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Sample records for cytosolic calcium regulation

  1. Fluctuations in Cytosolic Calcium Regulate the Neuronal Malate-Aspartate NADH Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    that MAS is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and that this regulation is required to maintain a tight coupling between neuronal activity and mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. At cytosolic Ca(2+) fluctuations below the threshold of the mitochondrial calcium...

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium regulates the retrotranslocation of Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin to the cytosol.

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    Carlos A Labriola

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For most secretory pathway proteins, crossing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane is an irreversible process. However, in some cases this flow can be reversed. For instance, misfolded proteins retained in the ER are retrotranslocated to the cytosol to be degraded by the proteasome. This mechanism, known as ER associated degradation (ERAD, is exploited by several bacterial toxins to gain access to the cytosol. Interestingly, some ER resident proteins can also be detected in the cytosol or nucleus, calreticulin (CRT being the most studied. Here we show that in Trypanosoma cruzi a minor fraction of CRT localized to the cytosol. ER calcium depletion, but not increasing cytosolic calcium, triggered the retrotranslocation of CRT in a relatively short period of time. Cytosolic CRT was subsequently degraded by the proteasome. Interestingly, the single disulfide bridge of CRT is reduced when the protein is located in the cytosol. The effect exerted by ER calcium was strictly dependent on the C-terminal domain (CRT-C, since a CRT lacking it was totally retained in the ER, whereas the localization of an unrelated protein fused to CRT-C mirrored that of endogenous CRT. This finding expands the regulatory mechanisms of protein sorting and may represent a new crossroad between diverse physiological processes.

  3. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distelmaier, Felix; Valsecchi, Federica; Forkink, Marleen; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet; Swarts, Herman G; Rodenburg, Richard J T; Verwiel, Eugène T P; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2012-12-15

    Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) handling in healthy human skin fibroblasts. Trolox treatment reduced the levels of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein (CM-H(2)DCF) oxidizing ROS, lowered cellular lipid peroxidation, and induced a less oxidized mitochondrial thiol redox state. This was paralleled by increased glutathione- and mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial filamentation, increased expression of fully assembled mitochondrial complex I, elevated activity of citrate synthase and OXPHOS enzymes, and a higher cellular O(2) consumption. In contrast, Trolox did not alter hydroethidium oxidation, cytosolic thiol redox state, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels, or mitochondrial membrane potential. Whole genome expression profiling revealed that Trolox did not trigger significant changes in gene expression, suggesting that Trolox acts downstream of this process. Cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, induced by the hormone bradykinin, were of a higher amplitude and decayed faster in Trolox-treated cells. These effects were dose-dependently antagonized by hydrogen peroxide. Our findings suggest that Trolox-sensitive sROS are upstream regulators of mitochondrial mitofusin levels, morphology, and function in healthy human skin fibroblasts. This information not only facilitates the interpretation of antioxidant effects in cell models (of oxidative-stress), but also contributes to a better understanding of ROS-related human pathologies, including mitochondrial disorders.

  4. Despite differences in cytosolic calcium regulation, lidocaine toxicity is similar in adult and neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Lisa V; Eydlin, Olga; Piskoun, Boris; Kline, Richard P; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Rosenberg, Andrew D; Blanck, Thomas J J; Xu, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Neuraxial local anesthetics may have neurological complications thought to be due to neurotoxicity. A primary site of action of local anesthetics is the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron. Physiologic differences have been noted between young and adult DRG neurons; hence, the authors examined whether there were any differences in lidocaine-induced changes in calcium and lidocaine toxicity in neonatal and adult rat DRG neurons. DRG neurons were cultured from postnatal day 7 (P7) and adult rats. Lidocaine-induced changes in cytosolic calcium were examined with the calcium indicator Fluo-4. Cells were incubated with varying concentrations of lidocaine and examined for viability using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining. Live imaging of caspase-3/7 activation was performed after incubation with lidocaine. The mean KCl-induced calcium transient was greater in P7 neurons (P lidocaine significantly inhibited KCl-induced calcium responses in both ages (P lidocaine, KCl-induced calcium transients in both ages became more homogeneous but remained different between the groups. Interestingly, cell viability was decreased by lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Lidocaine treatment also activated caspase-3/7 in a dose- and time-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Despite physiological differences in P7 and adult DRG neurons, lidocaine cytotoxicity is similar in P7 and adult DRG neurons in vitro. Differences in lidocaine- and KCl-evoked calcium responses suggest the similarity in lidocaine cytotoxicity involves other actions in addition to lidocaine-evoked effects on cytosolic calcium responses.

  5. Despite Differences in Cytosolic Calcium Regulation, Lidocaine Toxicity Is Similar in Adult and Neonatal Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Lisa V.; Eydlin, Olga; Piskoun, Boris; Kline, Richard P; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Rosenberg, Andrew D; Blanck, Thomas JJ; Xu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuraxial local anesthetics may have neurological complications thought to be due to neurotoxicity. A primary site of action for local anesthetics is the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron. Physiologic differences have been noted between young and adult DRG neurons; hence, we examined whether there were differences in lidocaine-induced changes in calcium and lidocaine toxicity in neonatal and adult rat DRG neurons. Methods DRG neurons were cultured from postnatal day 7 (P7) and adult rats. Lidocaine-induced changes in cytosolic calcium were examined with the calcium indicator Fluo-4. Cells were incubated with varying concentrations of lidocaine and examined for viability using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining. Live imaging of caspase-3/7 activation was performed after incubation with lidocaine. Results The mean KCl-induced calcium transient was greater in P7 neurons (p lidocaine significantly inhibited KCl-induced calcium responses in both ages (p lidocaine, KCl-induced calcium transients in both ages became more homogeneous but remained different between the groups. Interestingly cell viability was decreased by lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Lidocaine treatment also activated caspase-3/7 in a dose- and time-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Conclusions Despite physiological differences in P7 and adult DRG neurons, lidocaine cytotoxicity is similar in P7 and adult DRG neurons in vitro. Differences in lidocaine- and KCl-evoked calcium responses suggest the similarity in lidocaine cytotoxicity involves other actions in addition to lidocaine-evoked effects on cytosolic calcium responses. PMID:23851347

  6. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Forkink, M.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Swarts, H.G.P.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic

  7. Calmodulin regulates a TRP channel (ADF1) and phospholipase C (PLC) to mediate elevation of cytosolic calcium during acidic stress that induces deflagellation in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Gao, Kang; Zheng, Shuzhi; Zhu, Xin; Liang, Yinwen; Pan, Junmin

    2018-01-29

    Calcium has been implicated in the motility, assembly, disassembly, and deflagellation of the eukaryotic flagellum or cilium (exchangeable terms). Calmodulin (CaM) is known to be critical for flagellar motility; however, it is unknown whether and how CaM is involved in other flagella-related activities. We have studied CaM in Chlamydomonas, a widely used organism for ciliary studies. CaM is present in the cell body and the flagellum, with enrichment in the basal body region. Loss of CaM causes shortening of the nucleus basal body connector and impairs flagellar motility and assembly but not flagellar disassembly. Moreover, the cam mutant is defective in pH shock-induced deflagellation. The mutant deflagellates, however, upon mechanical shearing and treatment with mastoparan or detergent undergo permeabilization in the presence of calcium, indicating the cam mutant is defective in elevations of cytosolic calcium induced by pH shock, rather than by the deflagellation machinery. Indeed, the cam mutant fails to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Biochemical and genetic analysis showed that CaM does not directly activate PLC. Furthermore, CaM interacts with ADF1, a transient receptor channel that functions in acid-induced calcium entry. Thus, CaM is a critical regulator of flagellar activities especially those involved in modulating calcium homeostasis during acidic stress.-Wu, Q., Gao, K., Zheng, S., Zhu, X., Liang, Y., Pan, J. Calmodulin regulates a TRP channel (ADF1) and phospholipase C (PLC) to mediate elevation of cytosolic calcium during acidic stress that induces deflagellation in Chlamydomonas.

  8. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    nodulation have been cloned in model legumes. Among them, Medicago truncatula DMI1 (DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS1) is required for the generation of nucleus-associated calcium spikes in response to the rhizobial signaling molecule Nod factor. DMI1 encodes a membrane protein with striking similarities...... to the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum potassium channel (MthK). The cytosolic C terminus of DMI1 contains a RCK (regulator of the conductance of K+) domain that in MthK acts as a calcium-regulated gating ring controlling the activity of the channel. Here we show that a dmi1 mutant lacking the entire C terminus acts...... as a dominant-negative allele interfering with the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules and abolishing the induction of calcium spikes by the G-protein agonist Mastoparan. Using both the full-length DMI1 and this dominant-negative mutant protein we show that DMI1 increases the sensitivity of a sodium...

  9. Src Dependent Pancreatic Acinar Injury Can Be Initiated Independent of an Increase in Cytosolic Calcium.

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    Vivek Mishra

    Full Text Available Several deleterious intra-acinar phenomena are simultaneously triggered on initiating acute pancreatitis. These culminate in acinar injury or inflammatory mediator generation in vitro and parenchymal damage in vivo. Supraphysiologic caerulein is one such initiator which simultaneously activates numerous signaling pathways including non-receptor tyrosine kinases such as of the Src family. It also causes a sustained increase in cytosolic calcium- a player thought to be crucial in regulating deleterious phenomena. We have shown Src to be involved in caerulein induced actin remodeling, and caerulein induced changes in the Golgi and post-Golgi trafficking to be involved in trypsinogen activation, which initiates acinar cell injury. However, it remains unclear whether an increase in cytosolic calcium is necessary to initiate acinar injury or if injury can be initiated at basal cytosolic calcium levels by an alternate pathway. To study the interplay between tyrosine kinase signaling and calcium, we treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells with the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate. We studied the effect of the clinically used Src inhibitor Dasatinib (BMS-354825 on pervanadate or caerulein induced changes in Src activation, trypsinogen activation, cell injury, upstream cytosolic calcium, actin and Golgi morphology. Pervanadate, like supraphysiologic caerulein, induced Src activation, redistribution of the F-actin from its normal location in the sub-apical area to the basolateral areas, and caused antegrade fragmentation of the Golgi. These changes, like those induced by supraphysiologic caerulein, were associated with trypsinogen activation and acinar injury, all of which were prevented by Dasatinib. Interestingly, however, pervanadate did not cause an increase in cytosolic calcium, and the caerulein induced increase in cytosolic calcium was not affected by Dasatinib. These findings suggest that intra-acinar deleterious phenomena may be initiated

  10. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

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    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  11. Multiple cellular roles of Neurospora crassa plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 in regulation of cytosolic free calcium, carotenoid accumulation, stress responses, and acquisition of thermotolerance.

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    Barman, Ananya; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase C1 (PLC1), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger proteins regulate calcium signaling and homeostasis in eukaryotes. In this study, we investigate functions for phospholipase C1 (plc-1), sPLA2 (splA2) and a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger (cpe-1) in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants exhibited a growth defect on medium supplemented with the divalent ionophore A23187, suggesting that these genes might play a role in regulation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in N. crassa. The strains lacking plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 possessed higher carotenoid content than wild type at 8°C, 22°C, and 30°C, and showed increased ultraviolet (UV)-survival under conditions that induced carotenoid accumulation. Moreover, Δplc-1, ΔsplA2, and Δcpe-1 mutants showed reduced survival rate under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and induced thermotolerance after exposure to heat shock temperatures. Thus, this study revealed multiple cellular roles for plc-1, splA2, and cpe-1 genes in regulation of [Ca(2+)](c), carotenoid accumulation, survival under stress conditions, and acquisition of thermotolerance induced by heat shock.

  12. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in rat tissue cytosols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, A.J.; Nijssen, J.G.; Aarsman, A.J.; Bosch, H. van den

    1988-01-01

    Cytosols (105000 X g supernatant) from seven rat tissues were assayed for Ca²⁺-independent phospholipase A₂ activity with either 1-acyl-2-[1-¹⁴C]linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-acyl-2-[l-¹⁴C]linoleoyl-snglycero- 3-phosphoethanohunine or

  13. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

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    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  14. Excessive Signal Transduction of Gain-of-Function Variants of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Are Associated with Increased ER to Cytosol Calcium Gradient

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    Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function. PMID:24244430

  15. Changes in the level of cytosolic calcium, nitric oxide and nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variceal bleeding due to abnormal platelet function is a well-known complication of cirrhosis. Nitric oxide-related stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of platelet aggregation and concomitant changes in the level of platelet cytosolic calcium ...

  16. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosche, Bert, E-mail: bert.bosche@uk-essen.de [Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zülch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne (Germany); Schäfer, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schaefer@sanofi.com [Institute of Physiology, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany); Graf, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.graf@nf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zülch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne (Germany); Härtel, Frauke V., E-mail: frauke.haertel@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden (Germany); Schäfer, Ute, E-mail: ute.schaefer@medunigraz.at [Research Unit for Experimental Neurotraumatology, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Noll, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.noll@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden (Germany)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  17. Effect of Cyclosporin A and Angiotensin II on cytosolic calcium levels in primary human gingival fibroblasts

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    Ajitkumar Supraja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the effect of Cyclosporin A (CsA and angiotensin II (Ang II on cytosolic calcium levels in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. Materials and Methods: Healthy gingival samples from six volunteers were obtained, and primary HGFs were cultured. Cell viability and proliferation assay were performed to identify the ideal concentrations of CsA and Ang II. Cytosolic calcium levels in cultured gingival fibroblasts treated with CsA and Ang II were studied using colorimetric assay, confocal and fluorescence imaging. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS software and GraphPad Prism. Results: Higher levels of cytosolic levels were evident in cells treated with CsA and Ang II when compared to control group and was statistically significant (P < 0.05 in both colorimetric assay and confocal imaging. Fluorescent images of the cultured HGFs revealed the same. Conclusion: Thus calcium being a key player in major cellular functions, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  18. Paclitaxel induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through different calcium--regulating mechanisms depending on external calcium conditions.

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    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-02-17

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an "Enhanced Calcium Efflux" mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel's stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  19. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

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    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  20. Measuring Changes in Cytosolic Calcium Levels in HBV- and HBx-Expressing Cultured Primary Hepatocytes.

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    Casciano, Jessica C; Bouchard, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major worldwide health concern and is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (HBx) is the only regulatory protein encoded in the HBV genome; HBx stimulates HBV replication in vivo and in vitro. HBx also regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling, and altered Ca(2+) signaling is associated with the development of many diseases, including HCC. Importantly, many HBx functions, including HBx modulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription pathways, have been linked to changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling. Additionally, several stages of HBV replication, including capsid formation and activation of the HBV polymerase, are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Consequently, defining the molecular mechanism that underlies HBV and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels is important for understanding HBV pathogenesis and the role of HBx in HBV replication. Here, we describe a single-cell Ca(2+)-imaging protocol that we use to investigate HBV and HBx effects on the level of cytosolic Ca(2+). We specifically outline two methods that we use to evaluate HBV and HBx regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cultured primary hepatocytes. This protocol can also be adapted for use in liver cell lines.

  1. Protein kinase C modulates cytosolic free calcium by stimulating calcium pump activity in Jurkat T cells.

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    Balasubramanyam, M; Gardner, J P

    1995-12-01

    Although protein kinase C (PKC) activation has been shown to inhibit Ca2+ influx in T lymphocytes, the role of PKC on Ca2+ sequestration or extrusion processes has not been fully explored. We examined the effect of CD3 stimulation and PKC activators on cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+i) extrusion and 45Ca2+ efflux in human leukemic Jurkat T cells. Treatment of Fura-2 loaded cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or thymeleatoxin (THYM) resulted in a decrease in Ca2+i both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, whereas inactive phorbol esters had no effect. PKC activators added at the peak of a Ca2+i transient induced by anti-CD3 mAb, ionomycin or thapsigargin (TG) stimulated the rate and extent of return of Ca2+i to basal levels by 17-53%. PKC stimulation of the Ca2+i decline was not enhanced by the presence of Na+, indicating that PKC activators increase Ca2+ pump activity rather than a Na+/Ca2+ exchange mechanism. As CD3 receptor activation enhanced the Ca2+i decline in TG-treated cells, antigen-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC) signaling includes enhanced Ca2+ extrusion at the plasma membrane. The effect of PKC activators on parameters of Ca2+i extrusion were further explored. PMA significantly increased the rate of Ca2+ extrusion in TG-treated cells from 0.28 +/- 0.02 to 0.35 +/- 0.03 s-1 (mean +/- SEM) and stimulated the initial rate of 45Ca2+ efflux by 69% compared to inactive phorbol ester treated cells. The effects of PKC activation on the Ca2+i decline were eliminated by PKC inhibitors, PKC down regulation (24 h PMA pretreatment), ATP-depletion and conditions that inhibited the Ca2+ pump. In contrast, pretreatment of cells with okadaic acid enhanced the PMA-stimulated response. We suggest that Jurkat T cells contain a PKC-sensitive Ca2+ extrusion mechanism likely to be the Ca2+ pump. In lymphocytes, receptor/PLC-linked PKC activation modulates Ca2+i not only by inhibiting Ca2+ influx but also by stimulating plasma membrane Ca2+i

  2. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  3. Circadian waves of cytosolic calcium concentration and long-range network connections in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin Hee; Jeong, Byeongha; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2012-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master clock in mammals governing the daily physiological and behavioral rhythms. It is composed of thousands of clock cells with their own intrinsic periods varying over a wide range (20-28 h). Despite this heterogeneity, an intact SCN maintains a coherent 24 h periodic rhythm through some cell-to-cell coupling mechanisms. This study examined how the clock cells are connected to each other and how their phases are organized in space by monitoring the cytosolic free calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) of clock cells using the calcium-binding fluorescent protein, cameleon. Extensive analysis of 18 different organotypic slice cultures of the SCN showed that the SCN calcium dynamics is coordinated by phase-synchronizing networks of long-range neurites as well as by diffusively propagating phase waves. The networks appear quite extensive and far-reaching, and the clock cells connected by them exhibit heterogeneous responses in their amplitudes and periods of oscillation to tetrodotoxin treatments. Taken together, our study suggests that the network of long-range cellular connectivity has an important role for the SCN in achieving its phase and period coherence. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Doxorubicin Regulates Autophagy Signals via Accumulation of Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOXO is widely used to treat solid tumors. However, its clinical use is limited by side effects including serious cardiotoxicity due to cardiomyocyte damage. Resident cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs act as key regulators of homeostasis in myocardial cells. However, little is known about the function of hCPCs in DOXO-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, we found that DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is closely related to calcium-related autophagy signaling and was significantly attenuated by blocking mTOR signaling in human hCPCs. DOXO induced hCPC apoptosis with reduction of SMP30 (regucalcin and autophagosome marker LC3, as well as remarkable induction of the autophagy-related markers, Beclin-1, APG7, and P62/SQSTM1 and induction of calcium-related molecules, CaM (Calmodulin and CaMKII (Calmodulin kinase II. The results of an LC3 puncta assay further indicated that DOXO reduced autophagosome formation via accumulation of cytosolic Ca2+. Additionally, DOXO significantly induced mTOR expression in hCPCs, and inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin, a specific inhibitor, rescued DOXO-mediated autophagosome depletion in hCPCs with significant reduction of DOXO-mediated cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in hCPCs, and restored SMP30 and mTOR expression. Thus, DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity is linked to Ca2+-related autophagy signaling, and inhibition of mTOR signaling may provide a cardio-protective effect against DOXO-mediated hCPC toxicity.

  5. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-07-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain.

  6. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  7. Painful nerve injury decreases resting cytosolic calcium concentrations in sensory neurons of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Andreas; Lirk, Philipp; Stucky, Cheryl; Abram, Stephen E.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and poorly understood at the cellular level. Although cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca]c) critically regulates neuronal function, the effects of peripheral nerve injury on resting sensory neuronal [Ca]c are unknown. Resting [Ca]c was determined by microfluorometry in

  8. Phospholipase Cβ interacts with cytosolic partners to regulate cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlata, Suzanne; Singla, Ashima; Garwain, Osama

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is the main effector of the Gαq signaling pathway relaying different extracellular sensory information to generate intracellular calcium signals. Besides this classic function, we have found that PLCβ plays an important but unknown role in regulating PC12 cell differentiation by interacting with components in the RNA-induced silencing machinery. In trying to understand the role of PLCβ in PC12 cell differentiation, we find that over-expressing PLCβ reduces PC12 cell proliferation while down-regulating PLCβ increases the rate of cell proliferation. However, this behavior is not seen in other cancerous cell lines. To determine the underlying mechanism, we carried out mass spectrometry analysis of PLCβ complexes in PC12 cells. We find that in unsynchronized cells, PLCβ primarily binds cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)16 whose activity plays a key role in cell proliferation. In vitro studies show a direct association between the two proteins that result in loss in CDK16 activity. When cells are arrested in the G2/M phase, a large population of PLCβ is bound to Ago2 in a complex that contains C3PO and proteins commonly found in stress granules. Additionally, another population of PLCβ complexes with CDK18 and cyclin B1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) confirms cell cycle dependent associations between PLCβ and these other protein binding partners. Taken together, our studies suggest that PLCβ may play an active role in mediating interactions required to move through the cell cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. PMID:25623070

  10. RNA polymerase III regulates cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and intracellular microRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-03-20

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids bind to several components of the microRNA (miRNA) machinery-related proteins, including AGO2 and DDX17. Furthermore, we identified miRNAs that are specifically regulated by Pol III, providing a potential link between RNA:DNA hybrids and the miRNA machinery. One of the target genes, exportin-1, is shown to regulate cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids. Taken together, we reveal previously unknown mechanism by which Pol III regulates the presence of cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids and miRNA biogenesis in various human cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. DMPD: Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10080535 Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activ...on of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. PubmedID 10080535 Title Regulation ...of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. Authors Gij

  12. H2O2augments cytosolic calcium in nucleus tractus solitarii neurons via multiple voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Tim D; Dantzler, Heather A; Polo-Parada, Luis; Kline, David D

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a profound role in cardiorespiratory function under normal physiological conditions and disease states. ROS can influence neuronal activity by altering various ion channels and transporters. Within the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), a vital brainstem area for cardiorespiratory control, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induces sustained hyperexcitability following an initial depression of neuronal activity. The mechanism(s) associated with the delayed hyperexcitability are unknown. Here we evaluate the effect(s) of H 2 O 2 on cytosolic Ca 2+ (via fura-2 imaging) and voltage-dependent calcium currents in dissociated rat nTS neurons. H 2 O 2 perfusion (200 µM; 1 min) induced a delayed, slow, and moderate increase (~27%) in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). The H 2 O 2 -mediated increase in [Ca 2+ ] i prevailed during thapsigargin, excluding the endoplasmic reticulum as a Ca 2+ source. The effect, however, was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ or the addition of cadmium to the bath solution, suggesting voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels (VGCCs) as targets for H 2 O 2 modulation. Recording of the total voltage-dependent Ca 2+ current confirmed H 2 O 2 enhanced Ca 2+ entry. Blocking VGCC L, N, and P/Q subtypes decreased the number of cells and their calcium currents that respond to H 2 O 2 The number of responder cells to H 2 O 2 also decreased in the presence of dithiothreitol, suggesting the actions of H 2 O 2 were dependent on sulfhydryl oxidation. In summary, here, we have shown that H 2 O 2 increases [Ca 2+ ] i and its Ca 2+ currents, which is dependent on multiple VGCCs likely by oxidation of sulfhydryl groups. These processes presumably contribute to the previously observed delayed hyperexcitability of nTS neurons in in vitro brainstem slices. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Plasma Albumin Induces Cytosolic Calcium Oscilations and DNA Synthesis in Human Cultured Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Vega-Zelaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, a little is known about transition from normal to focal epileptic brain, although disruption in blood-brain barrier and albumin had recently involved. The main objective of this work is to characterize the response of cultured human astrocytes to plasma albumin, including induction of DNA synthesis. Cortical tissue was obtained from 9 patients operated from temporal lobe epilepsy. Astrocytes were cultured for 3-4 weeks and cytosolic calcium concentration (Ca2+c was measured. Bovine and human plasma albumin were used. We observed that low albumin concentration decreases Ca2+c, while higher concentration, induces increase in Ca2+c. It was shown that increase in Ca2+c was mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and released from internal stores. Increase in Ca2+c was reduced to 19% by blocking the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-βR receptor. Albumin induces DNA synthesis in a dose-response manner. Finally, induction of DNA synthesis can be partially blocked by heparin and block of TGF-β; however, the combination of both incompletely inhibits DNA synthesis. Therefore, results suggest that mechanisms other than Ca2+ signals and TGF-β receptor activation might induce DNA synthesis in a lesser degree. These results may be important to further understand the mechanisms involved in the transition from normal to focal epileptic brain.

  14. Changes in cytosolic pH and calcium of guard cells precede stomatal movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, H R; Gehring, C A; Parish, R W

    1992-03-01

    Stomatal opening is induced by indoleacetic acid (IAA), cytokinins, and fusicoccin (FC), whereas stomatal closure is induced by abscisic acid (ABA). To test the effect of these growth regulators on guard cell cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) and pH (pHcyt), epidermal strips were taken from the lower side of leaves of the orchid Paphiopedilum tonsum and were loaded with acetomethoxy-esterified forms of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 or the pH indicator 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)carboxyfluorescein. Basal [Ca2+]cyt ranged from 0.05 to 0.3 M and was 0.22 +/- 0.015 (n = 21). Increases in both [Ca2+]cyt and pHcyt were observed in guard cells after application of 10-100 M ABA to open stomata, and these preceded stomatal closure. The increase in [Ca2+]cyt ranged from 1.5- to 3-fold and was seen in 7 of 10 experiments. Guard cell alkalinization began within 2 min of ABA treatment and continued for the next 8 min. The increase ranged from 0.04 to 0.3 pH unit and was seen in 13 of 14 experiments. Guard cell [Ca2+]cyt increased, whereas pHcyt decreased after treatment of closed stomata with IAA, kinetin, or FC. In response to 50-100 M IAA, [Ca2+]cyt increased 1.5- to 2-fold in all cases, and pHcyt decreased 0.2-0.4 unit within 5 min in 7 experiments. Within 12 min, 10-100 M kinetin caused [Ca2+]cyt to increase in 28 of 34 experiments (1.3- to 2.5-fold) and pHcyt fell 0.1-0.4 unit in 15 of 17 treatments. The response to 10-50 M FC was similar in both time and magnitude. These results show that stomatal opening is accompanied by an increase in [Ca2+]cyt and cytosolic acidification in the guard cells, whereas stomatal closure is preceded by an increase in [Ca2+]cyt and cytosolic alkalinization in the guard cells. The order of these events is still uncertain, but changes in pHcyt are correlated with stomatal movement, and these changes may be an important factor in the regulation of guard cell movement.

  15. Cytosolic nucleic acid sensors and innate immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ori, Daisuke; Murase, Motoya; Kawai, Taro

    2017-03-04

    During viral and bacterial infections, pathogen-derived cytosolic nucleic acids are recognized by the intracellular RNA sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma-differentiated gene 5 and intracellular DNA sensors, including cyclic-di-GMP-AMP synthase, absent in melanoma 2, interferon (IFN)-gamma inducible protein 16, polymerase III, and so on. Binding of intracellular nucleic acids to these sensors activates downstream signaling cascades, resulting in the production of type I IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines to induce appropriate systematic immune responses. While these sensors also recognize endogenous nucleic acids and activate immune responses, they can discriminate between self- and non-self-nucleic acids. However, dysfunction of these sensors or failure of regulatory mechanisms causes aberrant activation of immune response and autoimmune disorders. In this review, we focus on how intracellular immune sensors recognize exogenous nucleic acids and activate the innate immune system, and furthermore, how autoimmune diseases result from dysfunction of these sensors.

  16. Enzymatic Regulation of Cytosolic Thymidine Kinase 1 and Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    . Apart from the complex de novo synthesis of dTTP through UDP reduction, dTTP is provided through salvage of thymidine catalyzed by the thymidine kinases, the cytosolic and cell cycle regulated TK1 and the mitochondrial and constitutively expressed TK2. The complex enzymatic regulation of TK1 and TK2...

  17. Extracellular and Intracellular Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bronner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An organism with an internal skeleton must accumulate calcium while maintaining body fluids at a well-regulated, constant calcium concentration. Neither calcium absorption nor excretion plays a significant regulatory role. Instead, isoionic calcium uptake and release by bone surfaces causes plasma calcium to be well regulated. Very rapid shape changes of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in response to hormonal signals, modulate the available bone surfaces so that plasma calcium can increase when more low-affinity bone calcium binding sites are made available and can decrease when more high-affinity binding sites are exposed. The intracellular free calcium concentration of body cells is also regulated, but because cells are bathed by fluids with vastly higher calcium concentration, their major regulatory mechanism is severe entry restriction. All cells have a calcium-sensing receptor that modulates cell function via its response to extracellular calcium. In duodenal cells, the apical calcium entry structure functions as both transporter and a vitamin D–responsive channel. The channel upregulates calcium entry, with intracellular transport mediated by the mobile, vitamin D–dependent buffer, calbindin D9K, which binds and transports more than 90% of the transcellular calcium flux. Fixed intracellular calcium binding sites can, like the body's skeleton, take up and release calcium that has entered the cell, but the principal regulatory tool of the cell is restricted entry.

  18. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Pan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  19. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

  20. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Phosphocitrate inhibits mitochondrial and cytosolic accumulation of calcium in kidney cells in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Tew, W P; Malis, C D; Howard, J. E.; Lehninger, A L

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic 3-phosphocitrate, an extremely potent inhibitor of calcium phosphate crystallization as determined in a nonbiological physical-chemical assay, has many similarities to a mitochondrial factor that inhibits crystallization of nondiffracting amorphous calcium phosphate. In order to determine whether phosphocitrate can prevent uptake and crystallization of calcium phosphate in mitochondria in vivo, it was administered intraperitoneally to animals given large daily doses of calcium gluco...

  2. Portraying the Effect of Calcium-Binding Proteins on Cytosolic Calcium Concentration Distribution Fractionally in Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Brajesh Kumar; Joshi, Hardik; Dave, Devanshi D

    2016-11-23

    Nerve cells like neurons and astrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) take part in the signaling process which means the transformation of the information from one cell to another via signals. The signaling process is affected by various external parameters like buffers calcium-binding proteins, voltage-gated calcium channel. In the present paper, the role of buffers in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration distribution is shown. The elicitation in calcium concentration is due to the presence of lower amount calcium-binding proteins which can be shown graphically. The mathematical model is designed by keeping in mind the physiological condition taking place in CNS of mammalian brain. The thing to be noted here is that the more elicitation in the calcium concentration distribution results in the cell death which finally give neurodegenerative disease to the mammalian brain. The present paper gives a glimpse of Parkinson's diseases in particular. Computational results are performed in Wolfram Mathematica 9.0 and simulated on core(TM) i5-3210M CPU @ 2.50 GHz processing speed and 4 GB memory. It is found that the different types of buffer like ethylene glycol-bis([Formula: see text]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid and calmodulin have noteworthy effect at different fractions of time.

  3. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Varenganayil, Muth M; Decho, Alan W; Waltimo, Tuomas; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  4. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  5. Light‐dependent regulation of ascorbate in tomato by a monodehydroascorbate reductase localized in peroxisomes and the cytosol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gest, Noé; Garchery, Cécile; Gautier, Hélène; Jiménez, Ana; Stevens, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    .... In plants, MDHAR belongs to a multigene family. Here, we report the presence of an MDHAR isoform in both the cytosol and peroxisomes and show that this enzyme negatively regulates ascorbate levels in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato...

  6. Palladacycle (BPC) antitumour activity against resistant and metastatic cell lines: the relationship with cytosolic calcium mobilisation and cathepsin B activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Alexandre; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Garcia, Daniel M; Silva, Luís S; Matsuo, Alisson L; Nascimento, Fábio D; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2014-05-22

    The search for new compounds that induce p53-independent apoptosis is the focus of many studies in cancer biology because these compounds could be more specific and would overcome chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antitumour activity of a Biphosphinic Palladacycle Complex (BPC) and extended preclinical studies to an in vivo model. Saos-2 cells, a p53-null human osteosarcoma drug-resistant cell line, were treated with BPC in the presence or absence of a cathepsin B inhibitor and a calcium chelator (CA074 and BAPTA-AM, respectively), and several parameters related to apoptosis were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed with mice that were intravenously inoculated with murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells and treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BPC (8 mg/kg/day) for ten consecutive days, when lung metastatic nodules were counted. In vitro data show that BPC induces cell death in Saos-2 cells mainly by apoptosis, which was accompanied by the effector caspase-3 activation. These events are most likely related to Bax translocation and increased cytosolic calcium mobilisation, mainly from intracellular compartments. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilisation (LMP) was also observed after 12 h of BPC exposure. Interestingly, BAPTA-AM and CA074 significantly decreased BPC cytotoxicity, suggesting that both calcium and cathepsin B are required for BPC antitumour activity. In vivo studies demonstrated that BPC protects mice against murine metastatic melanoma. In conclusion, BPC complex is an effective anticancer compound against metastatic murine melanoma. This complex is cytotoxic to the drug-resistant osteosarcoma Saos-2 human tumour cells by inducing apoptosis triggered by calcium signalling and a lysosomal-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardioprotection mechanism of mangiferin on doxorubicin-induced rats: Focus on intracellular calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustini, Femmi Dwinda; Arozal, Wawaimuli; Louisa, Melva; Siswanto, Soni; Soetikno, Vivian; Nafrialdi, Nafrialdi; Suyatna, Franciscus

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of doxorubicin (DOX) cardiotoxicity involves overproduction of free radicals that leads to intracellular calcium dysregulation and apoptosis. Mangiferin (MGR), a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone, has antioxidant and cardioprotective properties. However, its cardioprotection mechanism has yet to be revealed. This study determines whether the cardioprotective effect of MGR is caused by its effect on intracellular calcium regulation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced by DOX intraperitoneally with a total dose of 15 mg/kg bw. MGR was given orally at the doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg bw/d for seven consecutive weeks. The parameters examined were mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene (TNF-α), calcium regulatory gene (SERCA2a) and proapoptotic genes (caspase-9 and caspase-12), as well as cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium levels. Treatment with MGR at 60 mg/kg bw/d significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α by 44.55% and caspase-9 by 52.79%, as well as the cytosolic calcium level by 24.15% (p  0.05). Meanwhile, MGR 30 mg/kg bw/d gave insignificant results in all parameters. MGR protected against DOX-induced cardiac inflammation and apoptosis via down-regulation of proapoptotic and proinflammatory gene expressions, upregulation of SERCA2a gene expression, and normalization of cytosolic calcium level. Thus, the cardioprotective effect of MGR is at least in part due to the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  8. Fluid flow modulates vascular endothelial cytosolic calcium responses to adenine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, J; Luscinskas, F W; Gimbrone, M A; Dewey, C F

    1994-04-01

    To determine whether fluid flow influences the action of soluble vasoactive agonists on vascular endothelium. Confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were cultured on glass coverslips, prelabeled with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fura-2, and placed in a parallel-plate flow chamber designed to generate defined laminar fluid flow. Cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in individual BAEC was monitored during perfusion with medium containing adenine nucleotide under defined flow conditions. Continuous perfusion with ATP (0.3-3.0 microM) or ADP (0.1-1.0 microM) evoked repetitive oscillations in [Ca2+]i in individual BAEC. The frequency of the [Ca2+]i oscillations was dependent on both nucleotide concentration and levels of applied shear stress; at constant bulk concentration of nucleotide, the frequency increased with shear stress. Stopping flow in the continuous presence of agonists immediately extinguished the oscillatory response. Elimination of extracellular Ca2+ did not inhibit the [Ca2+]i oscillations. In the presence of nonhydrolyzable nucleotide analog, ATP gamma S or ADP beta S, application of flow resulted in similar shear-dependent [Ca2+]i oscillations, suggesting that flow modulation of the [Ca2+]i response was not simply due to depletion of ATP or ADP in the vicinity of BAEC monolayers as a result of hydrolysis of nucleotides by ectonucleotidases. These findings suggest that local hemodynamic conditions may modulate the action of vasoactive agents on the vascular endothelium in vivo.

  9. Agonist-selective effects of opioid receptor ligands on cytosolic calcium concentration in rat striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Hooper, Robert; Dun, Nae J; Undieh, Ashiwel S; Adler, Martin W; Benamar, Khalid; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-06-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid receptor ligand whose mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we assessed the effects of buprenorphine, β-endorphin, and morphine on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i), in rat striatal neurons. Buprenorphine (0.01-1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) in a dose-dependent manner in a subpopulation of rat striatal neurons. The effect of buprenorphine was largely reduced by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, but not by μ, κ, δ or NOP-selective antagonists. β-Endorphin (0.1 μM) increased [Ca(2+)](i) with a lower amplitude and slower time course than buprenorphine. Similar to buprenorphine, the effect of β-endorphin was markedly decreased by naloxone, but not by opioid-selective antagonists. Morphine (0.1-10 μM), did not affect [Ca(2+)](i) in striatal neurons. Our results suggest that buprenorphine and β-endorphin act on a distinct type/subtype of plasmalemmal opioid receptors or activate intracellular opioid-like receptor(s) in rat striatal neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Free cytosolic calcium and secretagogue-stimulated initial pancreatic exocrine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krims, P E; Pandol, S J

    1988-01-01

    In order to establish the role of secretagogue-induced changes in free cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in pancreatic enzyme secretion, we measured the effects of carbachol, cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-OP), bombesin, substance P, and bromo-A23187 on amylase release and [Ca2+]i in guinea pig pancreatic acini loaded with the Ca2+-selective fluorescent indicator, fura-2. Evaluation of time courses and dose-response curves indicated that carbachol, CCK-OP, bombesin, and substance P cause extracellular Ca2+-independent transient increases in [Ca2+]i and transient bursts in amylase release (initial secretion). The potencies for the secretagogues to increase [Ca2+]i and initial amylase release were similar. Bromo-A23187 also caused an extracellular Ca2+-independent transient increase in [Ca2+]i and amylase release. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, sequential additions of substance P followed by carbachol caused transient increases in [Ca2+]i correlating with transient bursts in amylase release. In contrast, in acini first treated with carbachol, the ability of substance P to increase [Ca2+]i and amylase release was blocked. Sustained secretion caused by the secretagogues was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ but occurred at basal [Ca2+]i. Increasing [Ca2+]i during the sustained phase of stimulation by increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration or with bromo-A23187 did not increase the rate of sustained secretion.

  11. Cytosolic calcium mediates RIP1/RIP3 complex-dependent necroptosis through JNK activation and mitochondrial ROS production in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Wu, Xiaxia; Gao, Hongwei; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Wenwen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Jinhua; Du, Guanhua; Chen, Xiuping

    2017-07-01

    Necroptosis is a form of programmed necrosis mediated by signaling complexes with receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 kinases as the main mediators. However, the underlying execution pathways of this phenomenon have yet to be elucidated in detail. In this study, a RIP1/RIP3 complex was formed in 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM)-treated HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. With this formation, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased, mitochondrial depolarization occurred, and ATP concentrations decreased. This process was identified as necroptosis. This finding was confirmed by experiments showing that MAM-induced cell death was attenuated by the pharmacological or genetic blockage of necroptosis signaling, including RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1s (Nec-1s) and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of RIP1 and RIP3, but was unaffected by caspase inhibitor z-vad-fmk or necrosis inhibitor 2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-3-pentylamino-maleimide (IM54). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis further revealed the ultrastructural features of MAM-induced necroptosis. MAM-induced RIP1/RIP3 complex triggered necroptosis through cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) accumulation and sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Both calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and JNK inhibitor SP600125 could attenuate necroptotic features, including mitochondrial ROS elevation, mitochondrial depolarization, and ATP depletion. 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which is a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, was found to effectively reverse both MAM induced mitochondrial ROS generation and cell death, indicating the complex II was the ROS-producing site. The essential role of mitochondrial ROS was confirmed by the protective effect of overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). MAM-induced necroptosis was independent of TNFα, p53, MLKL, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In summary, our study demonstrated that RIP1/RIP3 complex-triggered cytosolic calcium

  12. Fluid shear stress modulates cytosolic free calcium in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, J; Luscinskas, F W; Connolly, A; Dewey, C F; Gimbrone, M A

    1992-02-01

    Cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored in single and groups of fura-2-loaded bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) during exposure to laminar fluid shear stress. Application of a step increase in shear stress from 0.08 to 8 dyn/cm2 to confluent BAEC monolayers resulted in a transient increase in [Ca2+]i, which attained a peak value in 15-40 s, followed by a decline to baseline within 40-80 s. The magnitude of the [Ca2+]i responses increased with applied shear stress over the range of 0.2-4 dyn/cm2 and reached a maximum at greater than 4 dyn/cm2. Transient oscillations in [Ca2+]i with gradually diminishing amplitude were observed in individual cells subjected to continuous high shear stress. Elimination of extracellular Ca2+ with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, blockade of Ca2+ entry with lanthanum, depolarization of the cell membrane with high K+, and preconditioning of BAEC in steady laminar flow had little effect on the [Ca2+]i response. In the presence of ATP or ADP, application of shear stress caused repetitive oscillations in [Ca2+]i in single BAEC, whose frequency was dependent on both agonist concentration and the magnitude of applied shear stress. However, apyrase, an ATPase and ADPase, did not inhibit the shear-induced [Ca2+]i responses in standard medium (no added ATP or ADP), suggesting that the shear-induced [Ca2+]i response is not due to ATP released by endothelial cells.

  13. Bradykinin-evoked changes in cytosolic calcium and membrane currents in cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, M B; Sage, S O

    1989-12-01

    1. Cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were voltage clamped using a single microelectrode while cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was simultaneously measured using the fluorescent calcium indicator, Indo-1. 2. The resting current-voltage relationship was non-linear and exhibited marked inward rectification near the resting potential. In about 60% of cells examined, superfusion of saline resulted in a hyperpolarization and decrease in inward current. This result did not depend on the presence of agonist and is consistent with the presence of extracellular potassium accumulation in restricted spaces around the cell and the known dependence of the inward rectifier. In other cells there was no effect. 3. Resting [Ca2+]i was sensitive to membrane potential, decreasing continuously with membrane depolarization over the range -70 to +60 mV. This result is consistent with a simple pump-leak model and suggests that voltage-dependent calcium channels are not present in these cells. 4. Bradykinin (10 microM) increased [Ca2+]i after a delay of approximately 3 s. [Ca2+]i reached a peak after a further 3 s and declined over several minutes. 5. During the rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by application of bradykinin, there were no changes in the current-voltage relationship of the cell. These results question the role of a receptor-operated non-selective cation channel in mediating the increase in [Ca2+]i. This observation, coupled with the observed delay in the agonist-evoked response suggests that a second messenger system is involved in mediating the increase in [Ca2+]i. 6. Changes in the current-voltage relation started to occur about 30 s after the application of agonist. These changes could be explained by the activation of large-conductance potassium and non-selective cation channels with a reversal potential near 0 mV. The latter channels may mediate the plateau phase of the agonist-evoked response. 7. The results are discussed with respect to the

  14. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase regulates RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via AMPK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Jeong [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Gu, Dong Ryun [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Su Hyun [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun Ha [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seoung Hoon, E-mail: leesh2@wku.ac.kr [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Wonkwang Institute of Biomaterials and Implant, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-17

    Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (malate dehydrogenase 1, MDH1) plays pivotal roles in the malate/aspartate shuttle that might modulate metabolism between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we investigated the role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation and formation. MDH1 expression was induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) treatment. Knockdown of MDH1 by infection with retrovirus containing MDH1-specific shRNA (shMDH1) reduced mature osteoclast formation and bone resorption activity. Moreover, the expression of marker genes associated with osteoclast differentiation was downregulated by shMDH1 treatment, suggesting a role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation. In addition, intracellular ATP production was reduced following the activation of adenosine 5′ monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor and negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, in shMDH1-infected osteoclasts compared to control cells. In addition, the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a critical transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, was decreased with MDH1 knockdown during RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings provide strong evidence that MDH1 plays a critical role in osteoclast differentiation and function via modulation of the intracellular energy status, which might affect AMPK activity and NFATc1 expression.

  15. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A B

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we...

  16. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  17. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  18. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  19. New insights into the posttranslational regulation of human cytosolic thioredoxin by S-palmitoylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhiyu; Zhong, Liangwei, E-mail: liazho@ucas.ac.cn

    2015-05-15

    High level of palmitate is associated with metabolic disorders. We recently showed that enhanced level of S-palmitoylated cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx1) in mouse liver was new characteristic feature of insulin resistance. However, our understanding of the effect of S-palmitoylation on Trx1 is limited, and the tissue specificity of Trx1 S-palmitoylation is unclear. Here we show that S-palmitoylation also occurs at Cys73 of Trx1 in living endothelial cells, and the level of S-palmitoylated Trx1 undergoes regulation by insulin signaling. Trx1 prefers thiol-thioester exchange with palmitoyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA. S-palmitoylation alters conformation or secondary structure of Trx1, as well as decreases the ability of Trx1 to transfer electrons from thioredoxin reductase to S-nitrosylated protein–tyrosine phosphatase 1B and S-nitroso-glutathione. Our results demonstrate that S-palmitoylation is an important post-translational modification of human Trx1. - Highlights: • S-palmitoylation occurs at Cys73 of Trx1 in living endothelial cells. • Insulin signaling may regulate level of S-palmitoylated Trx1 in the cells. • S-palmitoylation plays significant effects on Trx1 structure and functions.

  20. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  1. RNA Polymerase III Regulates Cytosolic RNA:DNA Hybrids and Intracellular MicroRNA Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Christine Xing'er; Kobiyama, Kouji; Shen, Yu J.; LeBert, Nina; Ahmad, Shandar; Khatoo, Muznah; Aoshi, Taiki; Gasser, Stephan; Ishii, Ken J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids form in the nuclei and mitochondria of cells as transcription-induced R-loops or G-quadruplexes, but exist only in the cytosol of virus-infected cells. Little is known about the existence of RNA:DNA hybrids in the cytosol of virus-free cells, in particular cancer or transformed cells. Here, we show that cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are present in various human cell lines, including transformed cells. Inhibition of RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but not DNA polymerase, abrogated cy...

  2. Holocarboxylase Synthetase: A Moonlighting Transcriptional Coregulator of Gene Expression and a Cytosolic Regulator of Biotin Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Río, Alfonso; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-08-21

    The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes. Despite their evolutionary distance, these proteins share structural and sequence similarities, underscoring their importance across all life forms. However, beyond its role in metabolism, HCS participates in the regulation of biotin utilization and acts as a nuclear transcriptional coregulator of gene expression. In this review, we discuss the function of HCS and biotin in metabolism and human disease, a putative role for the enzyme in histone biotinylation, and its participation as a nuclear factor in chromatin dynamics. We suggest that HCS be classified as a moonlighting protein, with two biotin-dependent cytosolic metabolic roles and a distinct biotin-independent nuclear coregulatory function.

  3. SUMO-Modified FADD Recruits Cytosolic Drp1 and Caspase-10 to Mitochondria for Regulated Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Guk; Kim, Hyunjoo; Jeong, Eun Il; Lee, Ho-June; Park, Sungwoo; Lee, Song-Yi; Lee, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Seong Won; Chung, Chin Ha; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2017-01-15

    Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) plays a key role in extrinsic apoptosis. Here, we show that FADD is SUMOylated as an essential step during intrinsic necrosis. FADD was modified at multiple lysine residues (K120/125/149) by small ubiquitin-related modifier 2 (SUMO2) during necrosis caused by calcium ionophore A23187 and by ischemic damage. SUMOylated FADD bound to dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) in cells both in vitro and in ischemic tissue damage cores, thus promoting Drp1 recruitment by mitochondrial fission factor (Mff) to accomplish mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial-fragmentation-associated necrosis was blocked by FADD or Drp1 deficiency and SUMO-defective FADD expression. Interestingly, caspase-10, but not caspase-8, formed a ternary protein complex with SUMO-FADD/Drp1 on the mitochondria upon exposure to A23187 and potentiated Drp1 oligomerization for necrosis. Moreover, the caspase-10 L285F and A414V mutants, found in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, respectively, regulated this necrosis. Our study reveals an essential role of SUMOylated FADD in Drp1- and caspase-10-dependent necrosis, providing insights into the mechanism of regulated necrosis by calcium overload and ischemic injury. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Cytosolic free calcium dynamics as related to hyphal and colony growth in the filamentous fungal pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Mario; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-06-01

    Tip growth of pollen tubes and root hairs of plants is oscillatory and orchestrated by tip-focussed variations of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt). Hyphae of filamentous fungi are also tubular tip-growing cells, and components of the Ca(2+) signalling machinery, such as Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) sensors, are known to be important for fungal growth. In this study, we addressed the questions if tip-focussed [Ca(2+)]cyt transients govern hyphal and whole-colony growth in the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, and whether colony-wide [Ca(2+)]cyt dynamics rely on external Ca(2+) or internal Ca(2+) stores. Ratiometric fluorescence microscopy of individual hyphae expressing the Ca(2+) reporter Yellow Cameleon 3.6 revealed that Ca(2+) spikes in hyphal tips precede the re-initiation of growth after wounding. Tip-focussed [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes were also observed in undisturbed growing hyphae. They occurred not regularly and at a higher rate in hyphae growing at a medium-glass interface than in those growing on an agar surface. Hyphal tip growth was non-pulsatile, and growth speed was not correlated with the rate of spike occurrence. A possible relationship of [Ca(2+)]cyt spike generation and growth of whole colonies was assessed by using a codon-optimized version of the luminescent Ca(2+) reporter Aequorin. Depletion of extracellular free Ca(2+) abolished [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes nearly completely, but had only a modest effect on colony growth. In a pharmacological survey, some inhibitors targeting Ca(2+) influx or release from internal stores repressed growth strongly. However, although some of those inhibitors also affected [Ca(2+)]cyt spike generation, the effects on both parameters were not correlated. Collectively, the results indicate that tip growth of C. graminicola is non-pulsatile and not mechanistically linked to tip-focused or global [Ca(2+)]cyt spikes, which are likely a response to micro-environmental parameters, such as the physical properties of the

  5. WRKY62 transcription factor acts downstream of cytosolic NPR1 and negatively regulates jasmonate-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Duan, Mingrui; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2007-06-01

    Cytosolic NPR1 has been shown to be essential for the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated suppression of jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive gene expression. However, factors downstream of NPR1 in the cross-talk between SA and JA signaling are unclear. Here we show that Arabidopsis WRKY62, a member of WRKY group III transcription factors, was induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and SA treatment. The presence of basal SA is required for the MeJA-induced WRKY62 expression, and both chemicals exhibit a synergistic effect on WRKY62 induction. In addition, upon treatment with an extremely low concentration of SA, cytosolic NPR1 controls the MeJA-induced expression of WRKY62. TGA transcription factors, which up-regulate SA-induced expression of WRKY62, are dispensable for the induction of WRKY62 in JA signaling. Genetic dissection of both wrky62 mutants and WRKY62-overexpressing plants indicated that WRKY62 down-regulates JA-responsive LOX2 and VSP2 expression. Our results demonstrate that WRKY62 acts downstream of cytosolic NPR1 and negatively regulates JA-responsive gene expression, suggesting that WRKY62 may be involved in the SA-mediated suppression of JA signaling.

  6. Cytosolic calcium ions exert a major influence on the firing rate and maintenance of pacemaker activity in guinea-pig sinus node.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Anne Capel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The sino-atrial node (SAN provides the electrical stimulus to initiate every heart beat. Cellular processes underlying this activity have been debated extensively, especially with regards to the role of intracellular calcium. We have used whole-cell application of 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxyethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA, a rapid calcium chelator, to guinea pig isolated SAN myocytes to assess the effect of rapid reduction of intracellular calcium on SAN cell electrical activity. High-dose (10 mM BAPTA induced rapid and complete cessation of rhythmic action potential (AP firing (time to cessation 5.5±1.7 s. Over a range of concentrations, BAPTA induced slowing of action potential firing and disruption of rhythmic activity, which was dose-dependent in its time of onset. Exposure to BAPTA was associated with stereotyped action potential changes similar to those previously reported in the presence of ryanodine, namely depolarisation of the most negative diastolic potential, prolongation of action potentials and a reduction in action potential amplitude. These experiments are consistent with the view that cytosolic calcium is essential to the maintenance of rhythmic pacemaker activity.

  7. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca(2+) entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca(2+) currents after Ca(2+) release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed for the treatment of patients with pancreatitis

  8. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  9. LeftyA sensitive cytosolic pH regulation and glycolytic flux in Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells

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    Salker, Madhuri S.; Zhou, Yuetao; Singh, Yogesh [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Brosens, Jan [Division of Reproductive Health, Warwick Medical School, Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, University Hospital, Coventry CV2 2DX (United Kingdom); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-05-08

    Objective: LeftyA, a powerful regulator of stemness, embryonic differentiation, and reprogramming of cancer cells, counteracts cell proliferation and tumor growth. Key properties of tumor cells include enhanced glycolytic flux, which is highly sensitive to cytosolic pH and thus requires export of H{sup +} and lactate. H{sup +} extrusion is in part accomplished by Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers, such as NHE1. An effect of LeftyA on transport processes has, however, never been reported. The present study thus explored whether LeftyA modifies regulation of cytosolic pH (pHi) in Ishikawa cells, a well differentiated endometrial carcinoma cell model. Methods: NHE1 transcript levels were determined by qRT-PCR, NHE1 protein abundance quantified by Western blotting, pH{sub i} estimated utilizing (2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein [BCECF] fluorescence, Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity from Na{sup +} dependent realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and lactate concentration in the supernatant utilizing an enzymatic assay and subsequent colorimetry. Results: A 2 h treatment with LeftyA (8 ng/ml) significantly decreased NHE1 transcript levels (by 99.6%), NHE1 protein abundance (by 71%), Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity (by 55%), pHi (from 7.22 ± 0.02 to 7.05 ± 0.02), and lactate release (by 41%). Conclusions: LeftyA markedly down-regulates NHE1 expression, Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity, pHi, and lactate release in Ishikawa cells. Those effects presumably contribute to cellular reprogramming and growth inhibition. - Highlights: • LeftyA, an inhibitor of tumor growth, reduces Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-exchanger activity by 55%. • LeftyA decreases NHE1 transcripts by 99.6% and NHE1 protein by 71%. • LeftyA decreases cytosolic pH from 7.22 ± 0.02 to 7.05 ± 0.02. • Cytosolic acidification by Lefty A decreases glycolysis by 41%. • Cytosolic acidification by Lefty A compromises energy production of tumor cells.

  10. Cytosolic Pellino-1-Mediated K63-Linked Ubiquitination of IRF5 in M1 Macrophages Regulates Glucose Intolerance in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IRF5 is a signature transcription factor that induces M1 macrophage polarization. However, little is known regarding cytosolic proteins that induce IRF5 activation for M1 polarization. Here, we report the interaction between ubiquitin E3 ligase Pellino-1 and IRF5 in the cytoplasm, which increased nuclear translocation of IRF5 by K63-linked ubiquitination in human and mouse M1 macrophages. LPS and/or IFN-γ increased Pellino-1 expression, and M1 polarization was attenuated in Pellino-1-deficient macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Defective M1 polarization in Pellino-1-deficient macrophages improved glucose intolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, macrophages in adipose tissues from obese humans exhibited increased Pellino-1 expression and IRF5 nuclear translocation compared with nonobese subjects, and these changes are associated with insulin resistance index. This study demonstrates that cytosolic Pellino-1-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination of IRF5 in M1 macrophages regulates glucose intolerance in obesity, suggesting a cytosolic mediator function of Pellino-1 in TLR4/IFN-γ receptor-IRF5 axis during M1 polarization.

  11. The effects of intracellular pH changes on resting cytosolic calcium in voltage-clamped snail neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Debbie; Thomas, Roger C; Schwiening, Christof J

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of changing intracellular pH on intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in voltage-clamped neurones of the snail Helix aspersa. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using the fluorescent dye 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid (HPTS) and changed using weak acids and weak bases. Changes in [Ca2+]i were recorded using either fura-2 or calcium-sensitive microelectrodes. Acidification of the neurones with 5 mM or 20 mM propionate (∼0.2 or 0.3 pH units acidification, respectively) caused a small reduction in resting [Ca2+]i of 5 ± 2 nM (n = 4) and 7 ± 16 nM (n = 4), respectively. The removal of the 20 mM propionate after ∼40 min superfusion resulted in an alkalinization of ∼0.35 pH units and an accompanying rise in resting [Ca2+]i of 31 ± 9 nM (n = 4, P Helix neurones induced by superfusion with 3 mM concentrations of the weak bases trimethylamine (TMA), ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) and procaine were accompanied by significant (P < 0.05) increases in resting [Ca2+]i of 42 ± 4 nM (n = 26), 30 ± 7 nM (n = 5) and 36 ± 4 nM (n = 3), respectively. The effect of TMA (0.5-6 mM) on [Ca2+]i was dose dependent with an increase in [Ca2+]i during pHi increases of less than 0.1 pH units (0.5 mM TMA). Superfusion of neurones with zero calcium (1 mM EGTA) Ringer solution inhibited depolarization-induced calcium increases but not the calcium increase produced by the first exposure to TMA (3 mM). In the prolonged absence of extracellular calcium (∼50 min) TMA-induced calcium rises were decreased by 64 ± 10% compared to those seen in the presence of external calcium (P < 0.05). The calcium rise induced by TMA (3 mM) was reduced by 60 ± 5% following a 10 min period of superfusion with caffeine (10 mM) to deplete the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores of calcium (P < 0.05). Cyclopiazonic acid (10-30 μM CPA), an inhibitor of the ER calcium pump, inhibited the calcium rise produced by TMA (3 mM) and NH4Cl (3 mM) by 61 ± 4% compared

  12. Cytosol protein regulation in H295R steroidogenesis model induced by the zearalenone metabolites, α- and β-zearalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Øyvind L; Frizzell, Caroline; Verhaegen, Steven; Uhlig, Silvio; Connolly, Lisa; Ropstad, Erik; Sørlie, Morten

    2012-01-01

    α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZOL and β-ZOL, respectively) are metabolites of the mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN). All three individual mycotoxins have shown to be biological active i.e. being estrogenic and able to stimulate cellular proliferation albeit at different strengths. In this work, cytosol protein expression was determined by using stable-isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) upon exposure of α-ZOL and β-ZOL to the steroidogenesis cell model H295R. A total of 14 and 5 individual proteins were found to be significantly regulated by α-ZOL and β-ZOL, respectively. Interestingly, there were no common protein regulations by the metabolites or the parent mycotoxin ZEN. Furthermore, the regulated proteins were assigned to networks and groups of actions that also differed from one another suggesting that the three individual mycotoxins may have unique biological activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bmal1 is an essential regulator for circadian cytosolic Ca²⁺ rhythms in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2014-09-03

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays a pivotal role in the mammalian circadian clock system. Bmal1 is a clock gene that drives transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) for itself and other genes, and is expressed in nearly all SCN neurons. Despite strong evidence that Bmal1-null mutant mice display arrhythmic behavior under constant darkness, the function of Bmal1 in neuronal activity is unknown. Recently, periodic changes in the levels of intracellular signaling messengers, such as cytosolic Ca(2+) and cAMP, were suggested to regulate TTFLs. However, the opposite aspect of how clock gene TTFLs regulate cytosolic signaling remains unclear. To investigate intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics under Bmal1 perturbations, we cotransfected some SCN neurons with yellow cameleon together with wild-type or dominant-negative Bmal1 using a gene-gun applied for mouse organotypic cultures. Immunofluorescence staining for a tag protein linked to BMAL1 showed nuclear expression of wild-type BMAL1 and its degradation within 1 week after transfection in SCN neurons. However, dominant-negative BMAL1 did not translocate into the nucleus and the cytosolic signals persisted beyond 1 week. Consistently, circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons were inhibited for longer periods by dominant-negative Bmal1 overexpression. Furthermore, SCN neurons transfected with a Bmal1 shRNA lengthened, whereas those overexpressing wild-type Bmal1 shortened, the periods of Ca(2+) rhythms, with a significant reduction in their amplitude. BMAL1 expression was intact in the majority of neighboring neurons in organotypic cultures. Therefore, we conclude that proper intrinsic Bmal1 expression, but not passive signaling via cell-to-cell interactions, is the determinant of circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412029-10$15.00/0.

  14. Sources of variability in cytosolic calcium transients triggered by stimulation of homogeneous uro-epithelial cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Peter A; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2015-04-06

    Epithelial tissue structure is the emergent outcome of the interactions between large numbers of individual cells. Experimental cell biology offers an important tool to unravel these complex interactions, but current methods of analysis tend to be limited to mean field approaches or representation by selected subsets of cells. This may result in bias towards cells that respond in a particular way and/or neglect local, context-specific cell responses. Here, an automated algorithm was applied to examine in detail the individual calcium transients evoked in genetically homogeneous, but asynchronous populations of cultured non-immortalized normal human urothelial cells when subjected to either the global application of an external agonist or a localized scratch wound. The recorded calcium transients were classified automatically according to a set of defined metrics and distinct sub-populations of cells that responded in qualitatively different ways were observed. The nature of this variability in the homogeneous cell population was apportioned to two sources: intrinsic variation in individual cell responses and extrinsic variability due to context-specific factors of the environment, such as spatial heterogeneity. Statistically significant variation in the features of the calcium transients evoked by scratch wounding according to proximity to the wound edge was identified. The manifestation of distinct sub-populations of cells is considered central to the coordination of population-level response resulting in wound closure.

  15. VEGF-A isoform-specific regulation of calcium ion flux, transcriptional activation and endothelial cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A regulates many aspects of vascular physiology such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis and cell-cell interactions. Numerous isoforms of VEGF-A exist but their physiological significance is unclear. Here we evaluated two different VEGF-A isoforms and discovered differential regulation of cytosolic calcium ion flux, transcription factor localisation and endothelial cell response. Analysis of VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VEGFR2-dependent signal transduction revealed differential capabilities for isoform activation of multiple signal transduction pathways. VEGF-A165 treatment promoted increased phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, which was proportional to the subsequent rise in cytosolic calcium ions, in comparison to cells treated with VEGF-A121. A major consequence of this VEGF-A isoform-specific calcium ion flux in endothelial cells is differential dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc2. Using reverse genetics, we discovered that NFATc2 is functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration but not tubulogenesis. This work presents a new mechanism for understanding how VEGF-A isoforms program complex cellular outputs by converting signal transduction pathways into transcription factor redistribution to the nucleus, as well as defining a novel role for NFATc2 in regulating the endothelial cell response.

  16. Glutathione monoethyl ester and inhibition of the oxyhemoglobin-induced increase in cytosolic calcium in cultured smooth-muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, T; Takeyama, N; Tanaka, T

    1999-03-01

    The mechanism of arterial vasoconstriction caused by oxyhemoglobin production after subarachnoid hemorrhage was investigated. Using a fluorescent Ca++ indicator (fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester), the change in the cytosolic intracellular Ca++ concentration, [Ca++]i. was measured in cultured rat vascular smooth-muscle cells exposed to oxyhemoglobin and other substances. Oxyhemoglobin induced transient elevation of smooth-muscle cell [Ca++]i in either the presence or absence of ethyleneglycol-bis (beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid, indicating that Ca++ released by oxyhemoglobin was derived from [Ca++]i stores. In contrast, methemoglobin had no effect on the smooth-muscle cells. Exposure of the cells to reactive oxygen species generated by xanthine plus xanthine oxidase yielded the same results as with oxyhemoglobin, that is, transient elevation of smooth-muscle cell [Ca++]i. Procaine (a Ca++ channel blocker) failed to inhibit the oxyhemoglobin-induced elevation of [Ca++]i. Ryanodine (a Ca++ channel opener) plus oxyhemoglobin caused markedly greater elevation of [Ca++]i than ryanodine alone, whereas thapsigargin (an adenosine triphosphate [ATP]-dependent Ca++ pump inhibitor) plus oxyhemoglobin had no additional effect when compared with thapsigargin alone. The oxyhemoglobin-induced elevation of [Ca++]i could be blocked by an Fe++ chelator (ferene), but not by an Fe chelator (deferoxamine mesylate). Treatment with either dithiothreitol or glutathione monoethyl ester markedly inhibited the oxyhemoglobin-induced elevation of [Ca++]i. These results indicate that Fe++-catalyzed hydroxyl radicals generated from oxyhemoglobin-derived free radicals induce the elevation of [Ca++]i by inhibiting the ATP-dependent Ca++ pump rather than the Ca++ channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and that thiols may prevent Ca++ pump inactivation by inhibiting the oxidation of membrane sulfhydryl groups.

  17. Cytosolic calcium elevation induced by orexin/hypocretin in granule cell domain cells of the rat cochlear nucleus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Miura, Shinya; Yoshida, Takashi; Kim, Juhyon; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    Using rat brain slice preparations, we examined the effect of orexin on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the granule cell domain (GCD) cells of the cochlear nucleus that carry non-auditory information to the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Application of orexin concentration-dependently increased [Ca(2+)](i), and in two thirds of GCD cells these increases persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. There was no significant difference between the dose-response curve for orexin-A and that for orexin-B. Extracellular Ca(2+) removal abolished the [Ca(2+)](i) elevation induced by orexin-B, whereas depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores had no effect. The orexin-B-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) was not blocked by inhibitors of reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and nonselective cation channel, whereas it was blocked by lowering the extracellular Na(+) or by applying inhibitors of forward-mode NCX and voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The ORX-B-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was also blocked by inhibitors of adenylcyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), but not by inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine-specific and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. In electrophysiological experiments using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, half of GCD cells were depolarized by orexin-B, and the depolarization was abolished by a forward-mode NCX inhibitor. These results suggest that orexin increases [Ca(2+)](i) postsynaptically via orexin 2 receptors, and the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) is induced via the AC-PKA-forward-mode NCX-membrane depolarization-mediated activation of voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The results further support the hypothesis that the orexin system participates in integrating neural systems that are involved in arousal, sensory processing, energy homeostasis and autonomic function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of adiposity by dietary calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, M B; Shi, H; Greer, B; Dirienzo, D; Zemel, P C

    2000-06-01

    Recent data from this laboratory demonstrate that increasing adipocyte intracellular Ca(2+) results in a coordinated stimulation of lipogenesis and inhibition of lipolysis. We have also noted that increasing dietary calcium of obese patients for 1 year resulted in a 4.9 kg loss of body fat (Pinhibition of lipolysis (EC(50) approximately 50 pM; Pagouti gene specifically in adipocytes on a low (0.4%) Ca/high fat/high sucrose diet either unsupplemented or with 25 or 50% of the protein replaced by non-fat dry milk or supplemented to 1.2% Ca with CaCO(3) for 6 wk. Weight gain and fat pad mass were reduced by 26-39% by the three high calcium diets (Pinhibition of adipocyte fatty acid synthase expression and activity (Pobesity risk.

  19. Germ-Cell-Specific Inflammasome Component NLRP14 Negatively Regulates Cytosolic Nucleic Acid Sensing to Promote Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takayuki; Lee, Albert; Sitharam, Ramaswami; Kesner, Jordan; Rabadan, Raul; Shapira, Sagi D

    2017-04-18

    Cytosolic sensing of nucleic acids initiates tightly regulated programs to limit infection. Oocyte fertilization represents a scenario wherein inappropriate responses to exogenous yet non-pathogen-derived nucleic acids would have negative consequences. We hypothesized that germ cells express negative regulators of nucleic acid sensing (NAS) in steady state and applied an integrated data-mining and functional genomics approach to identify a rheostat of DNA and RNA sensing-the inflammasome component NLRP14. We demonstrated that NLRP14 interacted physically with the nucleic acid sensing pathway and targeted TBK1 (TANK binding kinase 1) for ubiquitination and degradation. We further mapped domains in NLRP14 and TBK1 that mediated the inhibitory function. Finally, we identified a human nonsense germline variant associated with male sterility that results in loss of NLRP14 function and hyper-responsiveness to nucleic acids. The discovery points to a mechanism of nucleic acid sensing regulation that may be of particular importance in fertilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan raises cytosolic calcium and prevents AQP2 trafficking and function: an in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Ranieri, Marianna; Geller, Ari; Tamma, Roberto; Zallone, Alberta; Valenti, Giovanna

    2017-09-01

    Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, is a new generation diuretic. Its clinical efficacy is in principle due to impaired vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption via aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Nevertheless, no direct in vitro evidence that tolvaptan prevents AQP2-mediated water transport, nor that this pathway is targeted in vivo in patients with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD) has been provided. The effects of tolvaptan on the vasopressin-cAMP/PKA signalling cascade were investigated in MDCK cells expressing endogenous V2R and in mouse kidney. In MDCK, tolvaptan prevented dDAVP-induced increase in ser256-AQP2 and osmotic water permeability. A similar effect on ser256-AQP2 was found in V1aR -/- mice, thus confirming the V2R selectively. Of note, calcium calibration in MDCK showed that tolvaptan per se caused calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum resulting in a significant increase in basal intracellular calcium. This effect was only observed in cells expressing the V2R, indicating that it requires the tolvaptan-V2R interaction. Consistent with this finding, tolvaptan partially reduced the increase in ser256-AQP2 and the water permeability in response to forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), suggesting that the increase in intracellular calcium is associated with an inhibition of the calcium-inhibitable AC type VI. Furthermore, tolvaptan treatment reduced AQP2 excretion in two SIAD patients and normalized plasma sodium concentration. These data represent the first detailed demonstration of the central role of AQP2 blockade in the aquaretic effect of tolvaptan and underscore a novel effect in raising intracellular calcium that can be of significant clinical relevance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Light-dependent regulation of ascorbate in tomato by a monodehydroascorbate reductase localized in peroxisomes and the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Noé; Garchery, Cécile; Gautier, Hélène; Jiménez, Ana; Stevens, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    Ascorbate is a powerful antioxidant in plants, and its levels are an important quality criteria in commercial species. Factors influencing these levels include environmental variations, particularly light, and the genetic control of its biosynthesis, recycling and degradation. One of the genes involved in the recycling pathway encodes a monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), an enzyme catalysing reduction of the oxidized radical of ascorbate, monodehydroascorbate, to ascorbate. In plants, MDHAR belongs to a multigene family. Here, we report the presence of an MDHAR isoform in both the cytosol and peroxisomes and show that this enzyme negatively regulates ascorbate levels in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Transgenic lines overexpressing MDHAR show a decrease in ascorbate levels in leaves, whereas lines where MDHAR is silenced show an increase in these levels in both fruits and leaves. Furthermore, the intensity of these differences is light dependent. The unexpected effect of this MDHAR on ascorbate levels cannot be explained by changes in the expression of Smirnoff-Wheeler pathway genes, or the activity of enzymes involved in degradation (ascorbate peroxidase) or recycling of ascorbate (dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase), suggesting a previously unidentified mechanism regulating ascorbate levels. © 2012 INRA Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynicka, Justin D; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cytosolic calcium, hydrogen peroxide and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: parabolic flight data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, N; Fengler, S; Hennig, A; Franz-Wachtel, M; Hampp, R; Neef, M

    2014-01-01

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular, short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and cytosolic Ca(2+) were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola [1 g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (20 s) and end of pull out (1.8 g)]. Cells exhibited an increase in both Ca(2+) and H2 O2 with the onset of microgravity, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating Ca(2+) -dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca(2+) - and ROS-related gene products. The same material was also used for analysis of phosphopeptides with 2-D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of ROS. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  7. Dystrophin/α1-syntrophin scaffold regulated PLC/PKC-dependent store-operated calcium entry in myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jessica; Harisseh, Rania; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    In skeletal muscles from patient suffering of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and from mdx mice, the absence of the cytoskeleton protein dystrophin has been shown to be essential for maintaining a normal calcium influx. We showed that a TRPC store-dependent cation influx is increased by loss of dystrophin or a scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, however the mechanisms of this calcium mishandling are incompletely understood. First of all, we confirmed that TRPC1 but also STIM1 and Orai1 are supporting the store-operated cation entry which is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient myotubes. Next, we demonstrated that inhibition of PLC or PKC in dystrophin-deficient myotubes restores elevated cation entry to normal levels similarly to enforced minidystrophin expression. In addition, silencing α1-syntrophin also increased cation influx in a PLC/PKC dependent pathway. We also showed that α1-syntrophin and PLCβ are part of a same protein complex reinforcing the idea of their inter-relation in calcium influx regulation. This elevated cation entry was decreased to normal levels by chelating intracellular free calcium with BAPTA-AM. Double treatments with BAPTA-AM and PLC or PKC inhibitors suggested that the elevation of cation influx by PLC/PKC pathway is dependent on cytosolic calcium. All these results demonstrate an involvement in dystrophin-deficient myotubes of a specific calcium/PKC/PLC pathway in elevation of store-operated cation influx supported by the STIM1/Orai1/TRPC1 proteins, which is normally regulated by the α1-syntrophin/dystrophin scaffold. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Arf and RhoA regulate both the cytosolic and the membrane-bound phospholipase D from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.; Provost, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that human placenta contains a cytosolic phospholipase D (PLD) activity. This activity had a pH optimum of 7.0 and was stimulated by PIP and inhibited by oleate. Furthermore, cytosolic PLD was stimulated by 30 µM GTP¿S (6-14-fold) and by the small G...... proteins 1 µM mArf3 (2-fold) and 0.37 nM RhoA (2-fold). This is the first report to show RhoA activation of a cytosolic PLD. The activation by mArf3 was maintained after partial purification on DEAE Sepharose of the enzyme. We have previously reported the existence of a membrane-bound PLD from human...... placenta, which is stimulated by PIP, but not by oleate. Here we show that oleic acid and a-linolenic acid both dose-dependently inhibited solubilized membrane PLD (65% inhibition at 4 mM), whereas stearic acid (4 mM) had no effect. Thus, the presence of double bonds in the fatty acid is important...

  10. E2F1 interactive with BRCA1 pathway induces HCC two different small molecule metabolism or cell cycle regulation via mitochondrion or CD4+T to cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingchun; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Ji, Zhili

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) are related to metabolism and cell cycle regulation. However, the corresponding mechanism is not clear in HCC. High BRCA1 direct pathway was constructed with 11 molecules from E2F1 feedback-interactive network in HCC by GRNInfer based on 39 Pearson mutual positive corelation CC ≥0.25 molecules with E2F1. Integration of GRNInfer with GO, KEGG, BioCarta, GNF_U133A, UNIGENE_EST, Disease, GenMAPP databases by DAVID and MAS 3.0, E2F1 feedback-interactive BRCA1 indirect mitochondrion to cytosol pathway was identified as upstream LAPTM4B activation, feedback UNG, downstream BCAT1-HIST1H2AD-TK1 reflecting protein, and DNA binding with enrichment of small molecule metabolism; The corresponding BRCA1 indirect membrane to cytosol pathway as upstream CCNB2-NUSAP1 activation, feedback TTK-HIST1H2BJ-CENPF, downstream MCM4-TK1 reflecting ATP, and microtubule binding with enrichment of CD4+T-related cell cycle regulation in HCC. Therefore, we propose that E2F1 interactive with BRCA1 pathway induces HCC two different small molecule metabolism or cell cycle regulation via mitochondrion or CD4+T to cytosol. Knowledge analysis demonstrates our E2F1 feedback-interactive BRCA1 pathway wide disease distribution and reflects a novel common one of tumor and cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Calcium-calmodulin kinase I cooperatively regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of CCTα by accessing a nuclear export signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassandian, Marianna; Chen, Bill B; Pulijala, Roopa; Kaercher, Leah; Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-07-01

    We identified a new calmodulin kinase I (CaMKI) substrate, cytidyltransferase (CCTα), a crucial enzyme required for maintenance of cell membranes. CCTα becomes activated with translocation from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane, resulting in increased membrane phospholipids. Calcium-activated CCTα nuclear import is mediated by binding of its C-terminus to 14-3-3 ζ, a regulator of nuclear trafficking. Here CaMK1 phosphorylates residues within this C-terminus that signals association of CCTα with 14-3-3 ζ to initiate calcium-induced nuclear entry. CaMKI docks within the CCTα membrane-binding domain (residues 290-299), a sequence that displays similarities to a canonical nuclear export signal (NES) that also binds CRM1/exportin 1. Expression of a CFP-CCTα mutant lacking residues 290-299 in cells results in cytosolically retained enzyme. CRM1/exportin 1 was required for CCTα nuclear export, and its overexpression in cells was partially sufficient to trigger CCTα nuclear export despite calcium stimulation. An isolated CFP-290-299 peptide remained in the nucleus in the presence of leptomycin B but was able to target to the cytoplasm with farnesol. Thus CaMKI vies with CRM1/exportin 1 for access to a NES, and assembly of a CaMKI-14-3-3 ζ-CCTα complex is a key effector mechanism that drives nuclear CCTα translocation.

  12. A differential redox regulation of the pathways metabolizing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate tunes the production of reducing power in the cytosol of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattoni, Claudia V; Guerrero, Sergio A; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2013-04-12

    Adaptation to aerobic life leads organisms to sense reactive oxygen species and use the signal for coordination of the entire metabolism. Glycolysis in plants is a particular network where specific steps, like oxidation of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate (Ga3P), are critical in order for it to function. The triose-phosphate can be converted into 3-phosphoglycerate through the phosphorylating Ga3P dehydrogenase (Ga3PDHase, EC 1.2.1.12) producing ATP and NADH, or via the non-phosphorylating enzyme (np-Ga3PDHase; EC 1.2.1.9) generating NADPH. In this work we found redox regulation to be a posttranslational mechanism allowing the fine-tuning of the triose-phosphate fate. Both enzymes were inactivated after oxidation by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Kinetic studies determined that Ga3PDHase is marked (63-fold) more sensitive to oxidants than np-Ga3PDHase. Thioredoxin-h reverted the oxidation of both enzymes (although with differences between them), suggesting a physiological redox regulation. The results support a metabolic scenario where the cytosolic triose-phosphate dehydrogenases are regulated under changeable redox conditions. This would allow coordinate production of NADPH or ATP through glycolysis, with oxidative signals triggering reducing power synthesis in the cytosol. The NADPH increment would favor antioxidant responses to cope with the oxidative situation, while the thioredoxin system would positively feedback NADPH production by maintaining np-Ga3PDHase at its reduced active state.

  13. A Differential Redox Regulation of the Pathways Metabolizing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Tunes the Production of Reducing Power in the Cytosol of Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto A. Iglesias

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to aerobic life leads organisms to sense reactive oxygen species and use the signal for coordination of the entire metabolism. Glycolysis in plants is a particular network where specific steps, like oxidation of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate (Ga3P, are critical in order for it to function. The triose-phosphate can be converted into 3-phosphoglycerate through the phosphorylating Ga3P dehydrogenase (Ga3PDHase, EC 1.2.1.12 producing ATP and NADH, or via the non-phosphorylating enzyme (np-Ga3PDHase; EC 1.2.1.9 generating NADPH. In this work we found redox regulation to be a posttranslational mechanism allowing the fine-tuning of the triose-phosphate fate. Both enzymes were inactivated after oxidation by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Kinetic studies determined that Ga3PDHase is marked (63-fold more sensitive to oxidants than np-Ga3PDHase. Thioredoxin-h reverted the oxidation of both enzymes (although with differences between them, suggesting a physiological redox regulation. The results support a metabolic scenario where the cytosolic triose-phosphate dehydrogenases are regulated under changeable redox conditions. This would allow coordinate production of NADPH or ATP through glycolysis, with oxidative signals triggering reducing power synthesis in the cytosol. The NADPH increment would favor antioxidant responses to cope with the oxidative situation, while the thioredoxin system would positively feedback NADPH production by maintaining np-Ga3PDHase at its reduced active state.

  14. Forkhead box protein O3 transcription factor negatively regulates autophagy in human cancer cells by inhibiting forkhead box protein O1 expression and cytosolic accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Long Zhu

    Full Text Available FoxO proteins are important regulators in cellular metabolism and are recognized to be nodes in multiple signaling pathways, most notably those involving PI3K/AKT and mTOR. FoxO proteins primarily function as transcription factors, but recent study suggests that cytosolic FoxO1 participates in the regulation of autophagy. In the current study, we find that cytosolic FoxO1 indeed stimulates cellular autophagy in multiple cancer cell lines, and that it regulates not only basal autophagy but also that induced by rapamycin and that in response to nutrient deprivation. These findings illustrate the importance of FoxO1 in cell metabolism regulation independent of its transcription factor function. In contrast to FoxO1, we find the closely related FoxO3a is a negative regulator of autophagy in multiple cancer cell lines, a previously unrecognized function for this protein, different from its function in benign fibroblast and muscle cells. The induction of autophagy by the knockdown of FoxO3a was found not to be mediated through the suppression of mTORC1 signaling; rather, the regulatory role of FoxO3a on autophagy was determined to be through its ability to transcriptionally suppress FoxO1. This complicated interplay of FoxO1 and FoxO3a suggests a complex checks- and balances-relationship between FoxO3a and FoxO1 in regulating autophagy and cell metabolism.

  15. Flightless-I, a gelsolin family member and transcriptional regulator, preferentially binds directly to activated cytosolic CaMK-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Matthew E; Easley, Charles A; McLeod, Jamie J; Myers, Alexandra L; Tombes, Robert M

    2008-07-23

    In order to evaluate links between Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase type II (CaMK-II) and cell cycle progression, CaMK-II binding partners were sought in proliferating cells by epitope-tag tandem mass spectrometry. One protein identified was the gelsolin family member, flightless-I (Fli-I). Fli-I is not a CaMK-II substrate, but binds directly and preferentially to constitutively active (T287D) CaMK-II over inactive CaMK-II. Fli-I gradually enters the nucleus upon CaMK-II inhibition and is retained in the cytosol by T287D CaMK-II. CaMK-II inhibition and Fli-I overexpression suppress transcription of beta-catenin dependent transcriptional reporters, whereas Fli-I suppression enhances their transcription. These findings support a novel mechanism whereby cytosolic CaMK-II influences beta-catenin dependent gene expression through Fli-I.

  16. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  17. Regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels by proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn, ABELE; Jian, YANG

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are multi-subunit membrane proteins present in a variety of tissues and control many essential physiological processes. Due to their vital importance, VGCCs are regulated by a myriad of proteins and signaling pathways. Here we review the literature on the regulation of VGCCs by proteolysis of the pore-forming α1 subunit, Cavα1. This form of regulation modulates channel function and degradation and affects cellular gene expression and excitability. L-type Ca2+ channels are proteolyzed in two ways, depending on tissue localization. In the heart and skeletal muscle, the distal C-terminus of Cavα1 is cleaved and acts as an autoinhibitor when it reassociates with the proximal C-terminus. Relief of this autoinhibition underlies the β-adrenergic stimulation-induced enhancement of cardiac and skeletal muscle calcium currents, part of the “fight or flight” response. Proteolysis of the distal C-terminus of L-type channels also occurs in the brain and is probably catalyzed by a calpain-like protease. In some brain regions, the entire C-terminus of L-type Ca2+ channels can be cleaved by an unknown protease and translocates to the nucleus acting as a transcription factor. The distal C-terminus of P/Q-channel Cavα1 is also proteolyzed and translocates to the nucleus. Truncated forms of the PQ-channel Cavα1 are produced by many disease-causing mutations and interfere with the function of full-length channels. Truncated forms of N-type channel Cavα1, generated by mutagenesis, affect the expression of full-length channels. New forms of proteolysis of VGCC subunits remain to be discovered and may represent a fruitful area of VGCC research. PMID:23090491

  18. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  19. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  1. Propofol Affects Neurodegeneration and Neurogenesis by Regulation of Autophagy via Effects on Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Yun; Xu, Zhendong; Li, Wenxian; Fu, Zhijian; Wang, Yuezhi; King, Alexander; Wei, Huafeng

    2017-09-01

    In human cortical neural progenitor cells, we investigated the effects of propofol on calcium homeostasis in both the ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate calcium release channels. We also studied propofol-mediated effects on autophagy, cell survival, and neuro- and gliogenesis. The dose-response relationship between propofol concentration and duration was studied in neural progenitor cells. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase release assays. The effects of propofol on cytosolic calcium concentration were evaluated using Fura-2, and autophagy activity was determined by LC3II expression levels with Western blot. Proliferation and differentiation were evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and immunostaining with neuronal and glial markers. Propofol dose- and time-dependently induced cell damage and elevated LC3II expression, most robustly at 200 µM for 24 h (67 ± 11% of control, n = 12 to 19) and 6 h (2.4 ± 0.5 compared with 0.6 ± 0.1 of control, n = 7), respectively. Treatment with 200 μM propofol also increased cytosolic calcium concentration (346 ± 71% of control, n = 22 to 34). Propofol at 10 µM stimulated neural progenitor cell proliferation and promoted neuronal cell fate, whereas propofol at 200 µM impaired neuronal proliferation and promoted glial cell fate (n = 12 to 20). Cotreatment with ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists and inhibitors, cytosolic Ca chelators, or autophagy inhibitors mostly mitigated the propofol-mediated effects on survival, proliferation, and differentiation. These results suggest that propofol-mediated cell survival or neurogenesis is closely associated with propofol's effects on autophagy by activation of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors.

  2. The AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK Activator A-769662 Causes Arterial Relaxation by Reducing Cytosolic Free Calcium Independently of an Increase in AMPK Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although recent studies reveal that activation of the metabolic and Ca2+ sensor AMPK strongly inhibits smooth muscle contraction, there is a paucity of information about the potential linkage between pharmacological AMPK activation and vascular smooth muscle (VSM contraction regulation. Our aim was to test the general hypothesis that the allosteric AMPK activator A-769662 causes VSM relaxation via inhibition of contractile protein activation, and to specifically determine which activation mechanism(s is(are affected. The ability of A-769662 to cause endothelium-independent relaxation of contractions induced by several contractile stimuli was examined in large and small musculocutaneous and visceral rabbit arteries. For comparison, the structurally dissimilar AMPK activators MET, SIM, and BBR were assessed. A-769662 displayed artery- and agonist-dependent differential inhibitory activities that depended on artery size and location. A-769662 did not increase AMPK-pT172 levels, but did increase phosphorylation of the downstream AMPK substrate, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC. A-769662 did not inhibit basal phosphorylation levels of several contractile protein regulatory proteins, and did not alter the activation state of rhoA. A-769662 did not inhibit Ca2+- and GTPγS-induced contractions in β-escin-permeabilized muscle, suggesting that A-769662 must act by inhibiting Ca2+ signaling. In intact artery, A-769662 immediately reduced basal intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i, inhibited a stimulus-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, and inhibited a cyclopiazonic acid (CPA-induced contraction. MET increased AMPK-pT172, and caused neither inhibition of contraction nor inhibition of [Ca2+]i. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the differential inhibition of stimulus-induced arterial contractions by A-769662 was due to selective inhibition of a Ca2+ mobilization pathway, possibly involving CPA-dependent Ca2+ entry via an AMPK-independent pathway. That

  3. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optogenetic monitoring identifies phosphatidylthreonine-regulated calcium homeostasis in Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunakar Kuchipudi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite, which inflicts acute as well as chronic infections in a wide range of warm-blooded vertebrates. Our recent work has demonstrated the natural occurrence and autonomous synthesis of an exclusive lipid phosphatidylthreonine in T. gondii. Targeted gene disruption of phosphatidylthreonine synthase impairs the parasite virulence due to unforeseen attenuation of the consecutive events of motility, egress and invasion. However, the underlying basis of such an intriguing phenotype in the parasite mutant remains unknown. Using an optogenetic sensor (gene-encoded calcium indicator, GCaMP6s, we show that loss of phosphatidylthreonine depletes calcium stores in intracellular tachyzoites, which leads to dysregulation of calcium release into the cytosol during the egress phase of the mutant. Consistently, the parasite motility and egress phenotypes in the mutant can be entirely restored by ionophore-induced mobilization of calcium. Collectively, our results suggest a novel regulatory function of phosphatidylthreonine in calcium signaling of a prevalent parasitic protist. Moreover, our application of an optogenetic sensor to monitor subcellular calcium in a model intracellular pathogen exemplifies its wider utility to other entwined systems.

  5. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  6. Intracellular calcium modulates basolateral K(+)-permeability in frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Rytved, K A; Nielsen, R

    1994-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) has been suggested as a key modulator in the regulation of active sodium transport across electrically "tight" (high resistance) epithelia. In this study we investigated the effects of calcium on cellular electrophysiological parameters in a classical model tissue, the......, the frog skin. [Ca2+]i was measured with fura-2 in an epifluorescence microscope setup. An inhibition of basolateral potassium permeability was observed when cytosolic calcium was increased. This inhibition was reversible upon removal of calcium from the serosal solution....

  7. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  8. Differential effects of thapsigargin analogues on apoptosis of prostate cancer cells: complex regulation by intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Charlotte; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Sehgal, Pankaj; Olesen, Claus; Junker, Steffen; Christensen, Søren B; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Møller, Jesper V

    2013-11-01

    The inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) by thapsigargin (Tg) and Tg-type analogues is considered to trigger cell death by activation of apoptotic pathways. Some of these analogues may be useful as antineoplastic agents after appropriate targeting as peptide conjugated prodrugs to cancer cells. With this in mind, this study evaluates the effect on LNCaP androgen-sensitive cancer cells of thapsigargin substituted with 12-aminododecanoyl linkers and Leu (Leu-8ADT), aspartate (Asp-8ADT) or Boc-8ADT. Our results show that both Leu-8ADT and Asp-8ADT result in rapid ER calcium depletion and an influx of calcium across the plasma membrane by activation of store-operated calcium entry. By contrast, ER Ca(2+) depletion by Boc-8ADT is a very slow process that does not perceptibly increase cytosolic Ca(2+) and activate store-operated calcium entry, because the inhibition of SERCA with this compound is very slow. Nevertheless, we find that Boc-8ADT is a more efficient inducer of apoptosis than both Tg and Leu-8ADT. Compared with Tg and the other analogues, apoptosis induced by Asp-8ADT is very modest, although this compound also activates store-operated calcium entry and at high concentrations (1 μm) causes severe morphological changes, reflecting decreased cell viability. We conclude that many factors need to be considered for optimization of these compounds in antineoplastic drug design. Among these ER stress induced by Ca(2+) endoplasmic reticulum mobilization seems particularly important, whereas the early cytosolic increase of Ca(2+) concentration preceding the executive phase of apoptosis appears to be of no, or little, consequence for a subsequent apoptotic effect. © 2013 FEBS.

  9. PTHrP regulation and calcium balance in sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) under calcium constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Bevelander, G.S.; Hang, X.; Lu, W.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, T.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile gilthead sea bream were exposed to diluted seawater (2.5 per thousand salinity; DSW) for 3 h or, in a second experiment, acclimated to DSW and fed a control or calcium-deficient diet for 30 days. Branchial Ca(2+) influx, drinking rate and plasma calcium levels were assessed. Sea bream

  10. Regulation of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The objectives of the current study were to: (i) present an integrated model for the restoration of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils based on current knowledge and recent research; and (ii) identify potential targets for the modulation of calcium fluxes in activated neutrophils based on this model ...

  11. Localization and function of cytosolic phospholipase A2α at the Golgi

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, Christina C.; Gangelhoff, Todd A.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α, Group IVA phospholipase A2) is a central mediator of arachidonate release from cellular phospholipids for the biosynthesis of eicosanoids. cPLA2α translocates to intracellular membranes including the Golgi in response to a rise in intracellular calcium level. The enzyme’s calcium-dependent phospholipid-binding C2 domain provides the targeting specificity for cPLA2α translocation to the Golgi. However, other features of cPLA2α regulation are incompletely un...

  12. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR GENE: REGULATION OF EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Noel Hendy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes – promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation – as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2 have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the tumor suppressor activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2 – the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR––the calciostat––is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  13. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  14. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  15. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  16. Stability analysis on a set of calcium-regulated viscoelastic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, L. E. H.; Goodwin, B. C.

    1986-08-01

    In recent years some progress has been made in modelling pattern formation and morphogenesis in biological systems in terms of calcium ion regulation of the viscoelastic properties of the cellular cortex. In this paper, linear stability analysis is used on a set of calcium-regulated viscoelastic equations derived by Goodwin and Trainor [5] for the 3-dimensional medium appropriate to regeneration phenomena in the single celled alga Acetabularia mediterranea. The nature of the instabilities is discussed and it is shown how complex patterns arise naturally from the cross-terms linking viscoelastic strain to calcium concentration and concentration gradients.

  17. Regulation of calcium signalling by docosahexaenoic acid in human T-cells. Implication of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, A; Khan, N A

    2000-02-01

    We elucidated the role of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the increases in free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca(2+)]i, in human (Jurkat) T-cell lines. DHA evoked an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner in these cells. Anti-CD3 antibody, known to stimulate increases in Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the production of inositol trisphosphate, also evoked increases in [Ca(2+)]i in Jurkat T-cells. We also used thapsigargin which inhibits Ca(2+)-ATPase of the ER and, therefore, increases Ca(2+) in the cytosol. Interestingly, addition of DHA during the thapsigargin-induced peak response exerted an additive effect on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in human T-cells, indicating that the mechanisms of action of these two agents are different. However, the DHA-induced calcium response was not observed when this agent was added during the anti-CD3-induced calcium peak, though its addition resulted in a prolonged and sustained calcium response as a function of time, suggesting that DHA recruits calcium, in part, from the ER pool and the prolonged response may be due to Ca(2+) influx. In the medium containing 0% Ca(2+), the DHA-evoked response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i was significantly curtailed as compared to that in 100% Ca(2+) medium, supporting the notion that the response of the DHA is also due, in part, to the opening of calcium channels. Furthermore, preincubation of cells with tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels also significantly curtailed the DHA-induced sustained response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces an increase in [Ca(2+)]i via the ER pool and the opening of CRAC channels in human T-cells.

  18. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Pan; Andrew Avila; Lauren Gollahon

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and...

  19. Nuclear calcium signalling in the regulation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bading, Hilmar

    2013-09-01

    Synaptic activity initiates biochemical processes that have various outcomes, including the formation of memories, increases in neuronal survival and the development of chronic pain and addiction. Virtually all activity-induced, long-lasting adaptations of brain functions require a dialogue between synapses and the nucleus that results in changes in gene expression. Calcium signals that are induced by synaptic activity and propagate into the nucleus are a major route for synapse-to-nucleus communication. Recent findings indicate that diverse forms of neuroadaptation require calcium transients in the nucleus to switch on the necessary genomic programme. Deficits in nuclear calcium signalling as a result of a reduction in synaptic activity or increased extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signalling may underlie the aetiologies of various diseases, including neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction.

  20. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  1. The effects of calcium regulation of endosperm reserve protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of steep liquor calcium ion on sorghum endosperm reserve protein mobilization were evaluated using two improved Nigeria sorghum cultivars (ICSV 400 and KSV 8). The key protein modification factors evaluated were free amino nitrogen (FAN), total non protein nitrogen (TNPN) and soluble protein of cold water ...

  2. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis: concerted interplay of new regulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.R.; Alexander, R.T.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (P(i)) are essential to many vital physiological processes. Consequently the maintenance of Ca(2+) and P(i) homeostasis is essential to a healthy existence. This occurs through the concerted action of intestinal, renal, and skeletal regulatory mechanisms. Ca(2+) and

  3. Sixteen cytosolic glutamine synthetase genes identified in the Brassica napus L. genome are differentially regulated depending on nitrogen regimes and leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsel, Mathilde; Moison, Michaël; Clouet, Vanessa; Thomas, Justine; Leprince, Françoise; Canoy, Anne-Sophie; Just, Jérémy; Chalhoub, Boulos; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2014-07-01

    A total of 16 BnaGLN1 genes coding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoforms (EC 6.3.1.2.) were found in the Brassica napus genome. The total number of BnaGLN1 genes, their phylogenetic relationships, and genetic locations are in agreement with the evolutionary history of Brassica species. Two BnaGLN1.1, two BnaGLN1.2, six BnaGLN1.3, four BnaGLN1.4, and two BnaGLN1.5 genes were found and named according to the standardized nomenclature for the Brassica genus. Gene expression showed conserved responses to nitrogen availability and leaf senescence among the Brassiceae tribe. The BnaGLN1.1 and BnaGLN1.4 families are overexpressed during leaf senescence and in response to nitrogen limitation. The BnaGLN1.2 family is up-regulated under high nitrogen regimes. The members of the BnaGLN1.3 family are not affected by nitrogen availability and are more expressed in stems than in leaves. Expression of the two BnaGLN1.5 genes is almost undetectable in vegetative tissues. Regulations arising from plant interactions with their environment (such as nitrogen resources), final architecture, and therefore sink-source relations in planta, seem to be globally conserved between Arabidopsis and B. napus. Similarities of the coding sequence (CDS) and protein sequences, expression profiles, response to nitrogen availability, and ageing suggest that the roles of the different GLN1 families have been conserved among the Brassiceae tribe. These findings are encouraging the transfer of knowledge from the Arabidopsis model plant to the B. napus crop plant. They are of special interest when considering the role of glutamine synthetase in crop yield and grain quality in maize and wheat. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriol...... publication, 10 November 2010; doi:10.1038/ki.2010.429....

  5. Synaptic calcium regulation in hair cells of the chicken basilar papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gi Jung; Moskowitz, Howard S; Lehar, Mohammed; Hiel, Hakim; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2014-12-10

    Cholinergic inhibition of hair cells occurs by activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. A near-membrane postsynaptic cistern has been proposed to serve as a store from which calcium is released to supplement influx through the ionotropic ACh receptor. However, the time and voltage dependence of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked potassium currents reveal a more complex relationship between calcium entry and release from stores. The present work uses voltage steps to regulate calcium influx during the application of ACh to hair cells in the chicken basilar papilla. When calcium influx was terminated at positive membrane potential, the ACh-evoked potassium current decayed exponentially over ∼100 ms. However, at negative membrane potentials, this current exhibited a secondary rise in amplitude that could be eliminated by dihydropyridine block of the voltage-gated calcium channels of the hair cell. Calcium entering through voltage-gated channels may transit through the postsynaptic cistern, since ryanodine and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase blockers altered the time course and magnitude of this secondary, voltage-dependent contribution to ACh-evoked potassium current. Serial section electron microscopy showed that efferent and afferent synaptic structures are juxtaposed, supporting the possibility that voltage-gated influx at afferent ribbon synapses influences calcium homeostasis during long-lasting cholinergic inhibition. In contrast, spontaneous postsynaptic currents ("minis") resulting from stochastic efferent release of ACh were made briefer by ryanodine, supporting the hypothesis that the synaptic cistern serves primarily as a calcium barrier and sink during low-level synaptic activity. Hypolemmal cisterns such as that at the efferent synapse of the hair cell can play a dynamic role in segregating near-membrane calcium for short-term and long-term signaling. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416688-10$15.00/0.

  6. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion.

  7. Intracellular Ca2+ Regulation in Calcium Sensitive Phenotype of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERMANSYAH

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular cytosolic Ca2+ concentration accumulation plays an essential information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae i.e. to explain cellular mechanism of Ca2+ sensitive phenotype. Disruption both S. cerevisiae PPase PTP2 and MSG5 genes showed an inhibited growth in the presence of Ca2+. On the other hand, by using Luminocounter with apoaequorin system, a method based upon luminescent photoprotein aequorin, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was accumulated as a consequence of calcium sensitive phenotype of S. cerevisiae. This fact indicated that PPase ptp2Δ and msg5Δ were involved in intracellular Ca2+ transport in addition their already known pathways i.e Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase cell wall integrity pathway, high osmolarity glycerol (HOG pathway, and pheromone response FUS3 pathway.

  8. AtDSEL, an Arabidopsis cytosolic DAD1-like acylhydrolase, is involved in negative regulation of storage oil mobilization during seedling establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Yu; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2011-09-15

    Mobilization of seed storage reserves is essential for seed germination and seedling establishment. Here, we report that AtDSEL, an Arabidopsis thalianaDAD1-like Seedling Establishment-related Lipase, is involved in the mobilization of storage oils for early seedling establishment. AtDSEL is a cytosolic member of the DAD1-like acylhydrolase family encoded by At4g18550. Bacterially expressed AtDSEL preferentially hydrolyzed 1,3-diacylglycerol and 1-monoacylglycerol, suggesting that AtDSEL is an sn-1-specific lipase. AtDSEL-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:AtDSEL) were defective in post-germinative seedling growth in medium without an exogenous carbon source. This phenotype was rescued by the addition of sucrose to the growth medium. In contrast, loss-of-function mutant plants (atdsel-1 and atdsel-2) had a mildly fast-growing phenotype regardless of the presence of an exogenous carbon source. Electron microscopy revealed that 5-day-old 35S:AtDSEL cotyledons retained numerous peroxisomes and oil bodies, which were exhausted in wild-type and mutant cotyledons. The impaired seedling establishment of 35S:AtDSEL was not rescued by the addition of an exogenous fatty acid source, and 35S:AtDSEL seedling growth was insensitive to 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid, indicating that β-oxidation was blocked in AtDSEL-overexpressers. These results suggest that AtDSEL is involved in the negative regulation of seedling establishment by inhibiting the breakdown of storage oils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Polyamine regulates tolerance to water stress in leaves of white clover associated with antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes via involvement in calcium messenger system and hydrogen peroxide signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous polyamine (PA may play a critical role in tolerance to water stress in plants acting as a signaling molecule activator. Water stress caused increases in endogenous PA content in leaves, including putrescine (Put, spermidine (Spd, and spermine (Spm. Exogenous application of Spd could induce the instantaneous H2O2 burst and accumulation of cytosolic free Ca2+, and activate NADPH oxidase and CDPK gene expression in cells. To a great extent, PA biosynthetic inhibitor reduced the water stress-induced H2O2 accumulation, free cytosolic Ca2+ release, antioxidant enzyme activities and genes expression leading to aggravate water stress-induced oxidative damage, while these suppressing effects were alleviated by the addition of exogenous Spd, indicating PA was involved in water stress-induced H2O2 and cytosolic free Ca2+ production as well as stress tolerance. Dehydrin genes (Y2SK, Y2K, and SK2 were showed to be highly responsive to exogenous Spd. PA-induced antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes expression could be blocked by the scavenger of H2O2 and the inhibitors of H2O2 generation or Ca2+ channels blockers, a calmodulin antagonist, as well as the inhibitor of CDPK. These findings suggested that PA regulated tolerance to water stress in white clover associated with antioxidant defenses and dehydrins via involvement in the calcium messenger system and H2O2 signaling pathways. PA-induced H2O2 production required Ca2+ release, while PA-induced Ca2+ release was also essential for H2O2 production, suggesting an interaction between PA-induced H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling.

  10. Localization of the calcium-regulated citrate transport process in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Mao, Weibo; Schiro, Faith R; Coleman-Barnett, Joycelynn; Pajor, Ana M; Hamm, L Lee

    2014-06-01

    Urinary citrate is an important inhibitor of calcium-stone formation. Most of the citrate reabsorption in the proximal tubule is thought to occur via a dicarboxylate transporter NaDC1 located in the apical membrane. OK cells, an established opossum kidney proximal tubule cell line, transport citrate but the characteristics change with extracellular calcium such that low calcium solutions stimulate total citrate transport as well as increase the apparent affinity for transport. The present studies address several fundamental properties of this novel process: the polarity of the transport process, the location of the calcium-sensitivity and whether NaDC1 is present in OK cells. OK cells grown on permeable supports exhibited apical >basolateral citrate transport. Apical transport of both citrate and succinate was sensitive to extracellular calcium whereas basolateral transport was not. Apical calcium, rather than basolateral, was the predominant determinant of changes in transport. Also 2,3-dimethylsuccinate, previously identified as an inhibitor of basolateral dicarboxylate transport, inhibited apical citrate uptake. Although the calcium-sensitive transport process in OK cells is functionally not typical NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in OK cells by Western blot and PCR. By immunolocalization studies, NaDC1 was predominantly located in discrete apical membrane or subapical areas. However, by biotinylation, apical NaDC1 decreases in the apical membrane with lowering calcium. In sum, OK cells express a calcium-sensitive/regulated dicarboxylate process at the apical membrane which responds to variations in apical calcium. Despite the functional differences of this process compared to NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in these cells, but predominantly in subapical vesicles.

  11. Calcium oscillations in wounded fibroblast monolayers are spatially regulated through substrate mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembong, Josephine; Sabass, Benedikt; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-08-01

    The maintenance of tissue integrity is essential for the life of multicellular organisms. Healing of a skin wound is a paradigm for how various cell types localize and repair tissue perturbations in an orchestrated fashion. To investigate biophysical mechanisms associated with wound localization, we focus on a model system consisting of a fibroblast monolayer on an elastic substrate. We find that the creation of an edge in the monolayer causes cytosolic calcium oscillations throughout the monolayer. The oscillation frequency increases with cell density, which shows that wound-induced calcium oscillations occur collectively. Inhibition of myosin II reduces the number of oscillating cells, demonstrating a coupling between actomyosin activity and calcium response. The spatial distribution of oscillating cells depends on the stiffness of the substrate. For soft substrates with a Young’s modulus E ~ 360 Pa, oscillations occur on average within 0.2 mm distance from the wound edge. Increasing substrate stiffness leads to an average localization of oscillations away from the edge (up to ~0.6 mm). In addition, we use traction force microscopy to determine stresses between cells and substrate. We find that an increase of substrate rigidity leads to a higher traction magnitude. For E    ~8 kPa, traction magnitude is on average almost uniform beneath the monolayer. Thus, the spatial occurrence of calcium oscillations correlates with the cell-substrate traction. Overall, the experiments with fibroblasts demonstrate a collective, chemomechanical localization mechanism at the edge of a wound with a potential physiological role.

  12. Calcium channel regulator Mid1 links TORC2-mediated changes in mitochondrial respiration to autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that recycles cytoplasmic contents and is crucial for cell survival during stress. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates autophagy as part of two distinct protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. TORC1 negatively regulates autophagy according to nitrogen availability. In contrast, TORC2 functions as a positive regulator of autophagy during amino acid starvation, via its target kinase Ypk1, by repressing the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase cal...

  13. D1 receptors physically interact with N-type calcium channels to regulate channel distribution and dendritic calcium entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Alexandra E; Mulligan, Sean J; Altier, Christophe; Iftinca, Mircea C; Varela, Diego; Tai, Chao; Chen, Lina; Hameed, Shahid; Hamid, Jawed; Macvicar, Brian A; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2008-05-22

    Dopamine signaling through D1 receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a critical role in the maintenance of higher cognitive functions, such as working memory. At the cellular level, these functions are predicated to involve alterations in neuronal calcium levels. The dendrites of PFC neurons express D1 receptors and N-type calcium channels, yet little information exists regarding their coupling. Here, we show that D1 receptors potently inhibit N-type channels in dendrites of rat PFC neurons. Using coimmunoprecipitation, we demonstrate the existence of a D1 receptor-N-type channel signaling complex in this region, and we provide evidence for a direct receptor-channel interaction. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of this complex to receptor-channel colocalization in heterologous systems and in PFC neurons. Our data indicate that the N-type calcium channel is an important physiological target of D1 receptors and reveal a mechanism for D1 receptor-mediated regulation of cognitive function in the PFC.

  14. MARCKS Protein Is Phosphorylated and Regulates Calcium Mobilization during Human Acrosomal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Peña, Marcelo J.; Castillo Bennett, Jimena V.; Soler, Osvaldo M.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Michaut, Marcela A.

    2013-01-01

    Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED), indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis, probably by sequestering

  15. Effect of a plant growth regulator prohexadione-calcium on insect pests of apple and pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, G S; Hull, L A; Biddinger, D J

    2005-04-01

    The effect of prohexadione-calcium, a plant growth regulator that inhibits gibberellin metabolism, on Cacopsylla pyricoloa (Foerster) in pear trees, and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) and Aphis spireacola Patch, in apple trees was studied. C. pyricoloa and A. spireacola populations were significantly reduced in prohexadione-calcium-treated pear and apple, respectively. Insecticide control of both pests with imidacloprid was synergized in treatments with prohexadione-calcium. In apples treated with prohexadione-calcium, there was a significant reduction in the number of C. rosaceana shelters per tree and amount of fruit injury at harvest attributable to the C. rosaceana. There was an additive effect when tebufenozide was used to control C. rosaceana in trees treated with prohexadione-calcium. Prohexadione-calcium significantly reduced vegetative growth in both pears and apples. Synergistic and additive treatment effects of prohexadione-calcium and pesticides used in this study may be due to better penetration and coverage of pesticides due to reduced foliar growth or to changes in the nutritional quality of the host plants.

  16. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  17. Direct regulation of cytochrome c oxidase by calcium ions.

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    Tatiana Vygodina

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+ reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+ shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed previously to determine the kinetics and equilibrium characteristics of the binding. However, no effect of Ca(2+ on the functional characteristics of cytochrome oxidase was revealed earlier. Here we report that Ca(2+ inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity of isolated bovine heart enzyme by 50-60% with Ki of ∼1 µM, close to Kd of calcium binding with the oxidase determined spectrophotometrically. The inhibition is observed only at low, but physiologically relevant, turnover rates of the enzyme (∼10 s(-1 or less. No inhibitory effect of Ca(2+ is observed under conventional conditions of cytochrome c oxidase activity assays (turnover number >100 s(-1 at pH 8, which may explain why the effect was not noticed earlier. The inhibition is specific for Ca(2+ and is reversed by EGTA. Na(+ ions that compete with Ca(2+ for binding with the Cation Binding Site, do not affect significantly activity of the enzyme but counteract the inhibitory effect of Ca(2+. The Ca(2+-induced inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase is observed also with the uncoupled mitochondria from several rat tissues. At the same time, calcium ions do not inhibit activity of the homologous bacterial cytochrome oxidases. Possible mechanisms of the inhibition are discussed as well as potential physiological role of Ca(2+ binding with cytochrome oxidase. Ca(2+- binding at the Cation Binding Site is proposed to inhibit proton-transfer through the exit part of the proton conducting pathway H in the mammalian oxidases.

  18. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase Gln1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to GS1 activity and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao; de Bang, Thomas Christian; Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of th...

  19. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude...

  20. Tomato UDP-Glucose Sterol Glycosyltransferases: A Family of Developmental and Stress Regulated Genes that Encode Cytosolic and Membrane-Associated Forms of the Enzyme

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    Karla Ramirez-Estrada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sterol glycosyltransferases (SGTs catalyze the glycosylation of the free hydroxyl group at C-3 position of sterols to produce sterol glycosides. Glycosylated sterols and free sterols are primarily located in cell membranes where in combination with other membrane-bound lipids play a key role in modulating their properties and functioning. In contrast to most plant species, those of the genus Solanum contain very high levels of glycosylated sterols, which in the case of tomato may account for more than 85% of the total sterol content. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of the four members of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom SGT gene family. Expression of recombinant SlSGT proteins in E. coli cells and N. benthamiana leaves demonstrated the ability of the four enzymes to glycosylate different sterol species including cholesterol, brassicasterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol, which is consistent with the occurrence in their primary structure of the putative steroid-binding domain found in steroid UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and the UDP-sugar binding domain characteristic for a superfamily of nucleoside diphosphosugar glycosyltransferases. Subcellular localization studies based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and cell fractionation analyses revealed that the four tomato SGTs, like the Arabidopsis SGTs UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, localize into the cytosol and the PM, although there are clear differences in their relative distribution between these two cell fractions. The SlSGT genes have specialized but still largely overlapping expression patterns in different organs of tomato plants and throughout the different stages of fruit development and ripening. Moreover, they are differentially regulated in response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions. SlSGT4 expression increases markedly in response to osmotic, salt, and cold stress, as well as upon treatment with abscisic

  1. Calcium regulation of androgen receptor expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); J.E. Perry; J.K. Lindzey; D.J. Tindall; Y. Gong (Yuewen)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractElevation of intracellular calcium levels in the presence of normal androgen levels has been implicated in apoptotic prostate cell death. Since the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the prostate, it was of

  2. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmei Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1 is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca2+ uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b, the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1, and the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1 for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx.

  3. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-12-02

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion.

  4. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  5. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Juan F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest

  6. Regulation of the translocation of phosphatidate phosphohydrolase between the cytosol and the endoplasmic reticulum of rat liver. Effects of unsaturated fatty acids, spermine, nucleotides, albumin and chlorpromazine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hopewell, R; Martin-Sanz, P; Martin, A; Saxton, J; Brindley, D N

    1985-01-01

    The translocation of phosphatidate phosphohydrolase between the cytosol and the microsomal membranes was investigated by using a cell-free system from rat liver. Linoleate, alpha-linolenate, arachidonate and eicosapentenoate promoted the translocation to membranes with a similar potency to that of oleate. The phosphohydrolase that associated with the membranes in the presence of [14C]oleate or 1mM-spermine coincided on Percoll gradients with the peak of rotenone-insensitive NADH-cytochrome c ...

  7. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  8. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-27

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS.

  9. Ascorbic Acid Induces Necrosis in Human Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma via ROS, PKC, and Calcium Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Min-Woo; Cho, Heui-Seung; Kim, Sun-Hun; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    Ascorbic acid induces apoptosis, autophagy, and necrotic cell death in cancer cells. We investigated the mechanisms by which ascorbic acid induces death in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma Hep2 cells. Ascorbic acid markedly reduced cell viability and induced death without caspase activation and an increase in cytochrome c. Hep2 cells exposed to ascorbic acid exhibited membrane rupture and swelling, the morphological characteristics of necrotic cell death. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in Hep2 cells treated with ascorbic acid, and pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine blocked ascorbic acid-induced cell death. Ascorbic acid also stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) signaling, especially PKC α/β activation, and subsequently increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, ascorbic acid-induced necrotic cell death was inhibited by Ro-31-8425 (PKC inhibitor) and BAPTA-AM (cytosolic calcium-selective chelator). ROS scavenger NAC inhibited PKC activation induced by ascorbic acid and Ro-31-8425 suppressed the level of cytosolic calcium increased by ascorbic acid, indicating that ROS is represented as an upstream signal of PKC pathway and PKC activation leads to the release of calcium into the cytosol, which ultimately regulates the induction of necrosis in ascorbic acid-treated Hep2 cells. These data demonstrate that ascorbic acid induces necrotic cell death through ROS generation, PKC activation, and cytosolic calcium signaling in Hep2 cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 417-425, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  11. LRRK2 regulates voltage-gated calcium channel function.

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    Cade eBedford

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how

  12. The TRPM7 channel kinase regulates store-operated calcium entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faouzi, Malika; Kilch, Tatiana; Horgen, F David; Fleig, Andrea; Penner, Reinhold

    2017-05-15

    Pharmacological and molecular inhibition of transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) reduces store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Overexpression of TRPM7 in TRPM7-/- cells restores SOCE. TRPM7 is not a store-operated calcium channel. TRPM7 kinase rather than channel modulates SOCE. TRPM7 channel activity contributes to the maintenance of store Ca2+ levels at rest. The transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a protein that combines an ion channel with an intrinsic kinase domain, enabling it to modulate cellular functions either by conducting ions through the pore or by phosphorylating downstream proteins via its kinase domain. In the present study, we report store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) as a novel target of TRPM7 kinase activity. TRPM7-deficient chicken DT40 B lymphocytes exhibit a strongly impaired SOCE compared to wild-type cells as a result of reduced calcium release activated calcium currents, and independently of potassium channel regulation, membrane potential changes or changes in cell-cycle distribution. Pharmacological blockade of TRPM7 with NS8593 or waixenicin A in wild-type B lymphocytes results in a significant decrease in SOCE, confirming that TRPM7 activity is acutely linked to SOCE, without TRPM7 representing a store-operated channel itself. Using kinase-deficient mutants, we find that TRPM7 regulates SOCE through its kinase domain. Furthermore, Ca2+ influx through TRPM7 is essential for the maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ concentration in resting cells, and for the refilling of Ca2+ stores after a Ca2+ signalling event. We conclude that the channel kinase TRPM7 and SOCE are synergistic mechanisms regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  13. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  14. PDE7B is involved in nandrolone decanoate hydrolysis in liver cytosol and its transcription is up-regulated by androgens in HepG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eStrahm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most androgenic drugs are available as esters for a prolonged depot action. However the enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the esters have not been identified. There is one study indicating that PDE7B may be involved in the activation of testosterone enanthate. The aims are to identify the cellular compartments where the hydrolysis of testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate occurs, and to investigate the involvement of PDE7B in the activation. We also determined if testosterone and nandrolone affect the expression of the PDE7B gene. The hydrolysis studies were performed in isolated human liver cytosolic and microsomal preparations with and without specific PDE7B inhibitor. The gene expression was studied in human hepatoma cells (HepG2 exposed to testosterone and nandrolone. We show that PDE7B serves as a catalyst of the hydrolysis of testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate in liver cytosol. The gene expression of PDE7B was significantly induced 3- and 5- fold after 2 hours exposure to 1 µM testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate, respectively. These results show that PDE7B is involved in the activation of esterified nandrolone and testosterone and that the gene expression of PDE7B is induced by supra-physiological concentrations of androgenic drugs.

  15. Histone hyperacetylation and exon skipping: a calcium-mediated dynamic regulation in cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Cai, Lu; Lou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to cell type-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing, mechanisms controlling activity-dependent alternative splicing is under-studied and not well understood. In a recent study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of calcium-mediated mechanism that regulates alternative exon skipping in mouse cardiomyocytes. Our results reveal a strong link between histone hyperacetylation and skipping of cassette exons, and provide support to the kinetic coupling model of the epigenetic regulation of alternative splicing at the chromatin level. PMID:26325491

  16. Comparative Analysis of Spontaneous and Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Transients in Proliferating and Differentiating Human Midbrain-Derived Stem Cells

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    Torben Johansen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients and oscillations have been reported in various tissues of nonhuman and human origin but not in human midbrain-derived stem cells. Using confocal microfluorimetry, we studied spontaneous calcium transients and calcium-regulating mechanisms in a human ventral mesencephalic stem cell line undergoing proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Spontaneous calcium transients were detected in a large fraction of both proliferating (>50% and differentiating (>55% cells. We provide evidence for the existence of intracellular calcium stores that respond to muscarinic activation of the cells, having sensitivity for ryanodine and thapsigargin possibly reflecting IP3 receptor activity and the presence of ryanodine receptors and calcium ATPase pumps. The observed calcium transient activity potentially supports the existence of a sodium-calcium antiporter and the existence of calcium influx induced by depletion of calcium stores. We conclude that the cells have developed the most important mechanisms governing cytosolic calcium homeostasis. This is the first comparative report of spontaneous calcium transients in proliferating and differentiating human midbrain-derived stem cells that provides evidence for the mechanisms that are likely to be involved. We propose that the observed spontaneous calcium transients may contribute to mechanisms involved in cell proliferation, phenotypic differentiation, and general cell maturation.

  17. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Xi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lian, Xiaojie [College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Zhongwu [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Hong-Jiang [Wendeng Hospital of Traditional Chinese Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shandong 264400 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration.

  18. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

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    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  20. α-SNAP regulates dynamic, on-site assembly and calcium selectivity of Orai1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiyao; Miao, Yong; Dani, Adish; Vig, Monika

    2016-08-15

    Orai1 forms a highly calcium-selective pore of the calcium release activated channel, and α-SNAP is necessary for its function. Here we show that α-SNAP regulates on-site assembly of Orai1 dimers into calcium-selective multimers. We find that Orai1 is a dimer in resting primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts but displays variable stoichiometry in the plasma membrane of store-depleted cells. Remarkably, α-SNAP depletion induces formation of higher-order Orai1 oligomers, which permeate significant levels of sodium via Orai1 channels. Sodium permeation in α-SNAP-deficient cells cannot be corrected by tethering multiple Stim1 domains to Orai1 C-terminal tail, demonstrating that α-SNAP regulates functional assembly and calcium selectivity of Orai1 multimers independently of Stim1 levels. Fluorescence nanoscopy reveals sustained coassociation of α-SNAP with Stim1 and Orai1, and α-SNAP-depleted cells show faster and less constrained mobility of Orai1 within ER-PM junctions, suggesting Orai1 and Stim1 coentrapment without stable contacts. Furthermore, α-SNAP depletion significantly reduces fluorescence resonance energy transfer between Stim1 and Orai1 N-terminus but not C-terminus. Taken together, these data reveal a unique role of α-SNAP in the on-site functional assembly of Orai1 subunits and suggest that this process may, in part, involve enabling crucial low-affinity interactions between Orai1 N-terminus and Stim1. © 2016 Li, Miao, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

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    Ziying Han

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses, are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1 and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms.

  2. Impairment of mitochondrial calcium handling in a mtSOD1 cell culture model of motoneuron disease

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    Zippelius Annette

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons (MN in the brain stem and spinal cord. Intracellular disruptions of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium have been associated with selective MN degeneration, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The present evidence supports a hypothesis that mitochondria are a target of mutant SOD1-mediated toxicity in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS and intracellular alterations of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium might aggravate the course of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we used a fluorescence charged cool device (CCD imaging system to separate and simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations in individual cells in an established cellular model of ALS. Results To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of SOD1G93A associated motor neuron disease, we simultaneously monitored cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations in individual cells. Voltage – dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevations and mitochondria – controlled calcium release mechanisms were monitored after loading cells with fluorescent dyes fura-2 and rhod-2. Interestingly, comparable voltage-dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in WT (SH-SY5YWT and G93A (SH-SY5YG93A expressing cells were observed. In contrast, mitochondrial intracellular Ca2+ release responses evoked by bath application of the mitochondrial toxin FCCP were significantly smaller in G93A expressing cells, suggesting impaired calcium stores. Pharmacological experiments further supported the concept that the presence of G93A severely disrupts mitochondrial Ca2+ regulation. Conclusion In this study, by fluorescence measurement of cytosolic calcium and using simultaneous [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]mito measurements, we are able to separate and simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium concentrations

  3. Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear calcium signals regulate angiogenesis and cell motility in triple negative breast cancer.

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    Erika Guimarães

    Full Text Available Increases in nuclear calcium concentration generate specific biological outcomes that differ from those resulting from increased cytoplasmic calcium. Nuclear calcium effects on tumor cell proliferation are widely appreciated; nevertheless, its involvement in other steps of tumor progression is not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether nuclear calcium is essential in other additional stages of tumor progression, including key steps associated with the formation of the primary tumor or with the metastatic cascade. We found that nuclear calcium buffering impaired 4T1 triple negative breast cancer growth not just by decreasing tumor cell proliferation, but also by enhancing tumor necrosis. Moreover, nuclear calcium regulates tumor angiogenesis through a mechanism that involves the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10-IP10. In addition, nuclear calcium buffering regulates breast tumor cell motility, culminating in less cell invasion, likely due to enhanced vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Together, our results show that nuclear calcium is essential for triple breast cancer angiogenesis and cell migration and can be considered as a promising strategic target for triple negative breast cancer therapy.

  4. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signalling and learning

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    John Michael Gillespie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM associated serine kinase is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signalling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signalling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signalling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signalling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG potassium (K+ channel localisation to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signalling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signalling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odour evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centres of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation.

  5. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signaling, and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, John M.; Hodge, James J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) associated serine kinase) is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signaling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null) or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D) produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signaling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signaling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signaling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG) potassium (K+) channel localization to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signaling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signaling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odor evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centers of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation. PMID:24062638

  6. Peripheral calcium-permeable AMPA receptors regulate chronic inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Vijayan; Wang, Rui; Ulzhöfer, Bettina; Luo, Ceng; Bardoni, Rita; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Agarwal, Nitin; Tegeder, Irmgard; Hildebrandt, Ullrich; Nagy, Gergely G; Todd, Andrew J; Ghirri, Alessia; Häussler, Annette; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; MacDermott, Amy B; Lewin, Gary R; Kuner, Rohini

    2011-04-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type (AMPA-type) glutamate receptors (AMPARs) play an important role in plasticity at central synapses. Although there is anatomical evidence for AMPAR expression in the peripheral nervous system, the functional role of such receptors in vivo is not clear. To address this issue, we generated mice specifically lacking either of the key AMPAR subunits, GluA1 or GluA2, in peripheral, pain-sensing neurons (nociceptors), while preserving expression of these subunits in the central nervous system. Nociceptor-specific deletion of GluA1 led to disruption of calcium permeability and reduced capsaicin-evoked activation of nociceptors. Deletion of GluA1, but not GluA2, led to reduced mechanical hypersensitivity and sensitization in models of chronic inflammatory pain and arthritis. Further analysis revealed that GluA1-containing AMPARs regulated the responses of nociceptors to painful stimuli in inflamed tissues and controlled the excitatory drive from the periphery into the spinal cord. Consequently, peripherally applied AMPAR antagonists alleviated inflammatory pain by specifically blocking calcium-permeable AMPARs, without affecting physiological pain or eliciting central side effects. These findings indicate an important pathophysiological role for calcium-permeable AMPARs in nociceptors and may have therapeutic implications for the treatment chronic inflammatory pain states.

  7. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  8. Dietary calcium regulates ROS production in aP2-agouti transgenic mice on high-fat/high-sucrose diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X; Zemel, M B

    2006-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 promotes adipocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We have now evaluated whether decreasing 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 levels by increasing dietary calcium will decrease oxidative stress in vivo. We fed low-calcium (0.4% Ca) and high-calcium (1.2% Ca from CaCO3) obesity-promoting (high sucrose/high fat) diets to aP2-agouti transgenic mice and assessed regulation of ROS production in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Mice on the high-calcium diet gained 50% of the body weight (P=0.04) and fat (Pcalcium diet (0.4% Ca). The high-calcium diet significantly reduced adipose intracellular ROS production by 64 and 18% (Pphosphate oxidase expression by 49% (P=0.012) and 63% (P=0.05) in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. Adipocyte intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels were suppressed in mice on the high-calcium diet by 73-80% (Pcalcium diet also induced 367 and 191% increases in adipose mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) expression (Pcalcium diet also suppressed 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) expression in visceral adipose tissue by 39% (P=0.034). 11beta-HSD expression was markedly higher in visceral vs subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice on the low-calcium diet (P=0.034), whereas no difference was observed between the fat depots in mice on the high-calcium diet. These data support a potential role for dietary calcium in the regulation of obesity-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Physiological studies in heterozygous calcium sensing receptor (CaSR gene-ablated mice confirm that the CaSR regulates calcitonin release in vivo

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    Kovacs Christopher S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR regulates serum calcium by suppressing secretion of parathyroid hormone; it also regulates renal tubular calcium excretion. Inactivating mutations of CaSR raise serum calcium and reduce urine calcium excretion. Thyroid C-cells (which make calcitonin express CaSR and may, therefore, be regulated by it. Since calcium stimulates release of calcitonin, the higher blood calcium caused by inactivation of CaSR should increase serum calcitonin, unless CaSR mutations alter the responsiveness of calcitonin to calcium. To demonstrate regulatory effects of CaSR on calcitonin release, we studied calcitonin responsiveness to calcium in normal and CaSR heterozygous-ablated (Casr+/- mice. Casr+/- mice have hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria, and live normal life spans. Each mouse received either 500 μl of normal saline or one of two doses of elemental calcium (500 μmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg by intraperitoneal injection. Ionized calcium was measured at baseline and 10 minutes, and serum calcitonin was measured on the 10 minute sample. Results At baseline, Casr+/- mice had a higher blood calcium, and in response to the two doses of elemental calcium, had greater increments and peak levels of ionized calcium than their wild type littermates. Despite significantly higher ionized calcium levels, the calcitonin levels of Casr+/- mice were consistently lower than wild type at any ionized calcium level, indicating that the dose-response curve of calcitonin to increases in ionized calcium had been significantly blunted or shifted to the right in Casr+/- mice. Conclusions These results confirm that the CaSR is a physiological regulator of calcitonin; therefore, in response to increases in ionized calcium, the CaSR inhibits parathyroid hormone secretion and stimulates calcitonin secretion.

  10. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  11. Regulation of sulfur nutrition in wild-type and transgenic poplar over-expressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol as affected by atmospheric H2S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herschbach, C; van der Zalm, E; Schneider, A; Jouanin, L; De Kok, LJ; Rennenberg, H

    This study with poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) cuttings was aimed to test the hypothesis that sulfate uptake is regulated by demand-driven control and that this regulation is mediated by phloem-transported glutathione as a shoot-to-root signal. Therefore, sulfur nutrition was investigated

  12. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

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    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  13. Calcium regulates independently ciliary beat and cell contraction in Paramecium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is a well-known signal regulator for various physiological activities. In many cases, Ca(2+) simultaneously regulates individual functions in single cells. How can Ca(2+) regulate these functions independently? In Paramecium cells, the contractile cytoskeletal network and cilia are located close to each other near the cell surface. Cell body contraction, ciliary reversal, and rises in ciliary beat frequency are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, they are not always triggered simultaneously. We injected caged calcium into Paramecium caudatum cells and continuously applied weak ultraviolet light to the cells to slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The cell bodies began to contract just after the start of ultraviolet light application, and the degree of contraction increased gradually thereafter. On the other hand, cilia began to reverse 1.4s after the start of ultraviolet application and reversed completely within 100ms. Ciliary beat frequency in the reverse direction was significantly higher than in the normal direction. These results indicate that cell body contraction is regulated by Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner in living P. caudatum. On the other hand, ciliary reversal and rise in ciliary beat frequency are triggered by Ca(2+) in an all-or-none manner.

  14. Hypotonic stress-induced calcium signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves TRP-like transporters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, M; Groppi, S; Belotti, F; Ambrosini, R; Filippi, G; Martegani, E; Tisi, R

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to hypotonic stress (HTS) by a cytosolic calcium rise, either generated by an influx of calcium from extracellular medium, when calcium is available, or by a release from intracellular stores in scarcity of extracellular calcium. Calcium release from intracellular compartments is peculiarly inhibited by external calcium in a calcineurin-independent and Cch1-, but not Mid1-, driven manner. HTS-induced calcium release is also negatively regulated by the ER protein Cls2 and involves a poorly characterized protein, FLC2/YAL053W gene product, previously proposed to be required for FAD transport in the ER, albeit, due to its molecular features, it was also previously classified as an ion transporter. A computational analysis revealed that this gene and its three homologs in S. cerevisiae, together with previously identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe pkd2 and Neurospora crassa calcium-related spray protein, belong to a fungal branch of TRP-like ion transporters related to human mucolipin and polycystin 2 calcium transporters. Moreover, disruption of FLC2 gene confers severe sensitivity to Calcofluor white and hyper-activation of the cell wall integrity MAPK cascade, suggesting a role in cell wall maintenance as previously suggested for the fission yeast homolog. Perturbation in cytosolic resting calcium concentration and hyper-activation of calcineurin in exponentially growing cells suggest a role for this transporter in calcium homeostasis in yeast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

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    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  16. Expression of the calcium-binding proteins MRP8 and MRP14 in monocytes is regulated by a calcium-induced suppressor mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    ROTH, J.; Goebeler, M; Wrocklage, V; van den Bos, C; Sorg, C.

    1994-01-01

    MRP8 and MRP14 are two calcium-binding proteins of the S-100 family the expression of which is restricted to distinct stages of monocytic differentiation. Heteromeric MRP8/MRP14 complexes have been shown to represent their biologically active forms. However, it is not as yet clear whether biochemical modification of complexes, or regulation on the transcriptional level, are responsible for the control of MRP8/MRP14 expression. Employing Western-blot analysis and metabolic labelling we have de...

  17. Transcriptional expression analysis of genes involved in regulation of calcium translocation and storage in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gartn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Neelofar; Taj, Gohar; Arora, Sandeep; Kumar, Anil

    2014-10-25

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) variably accumulates calcium in different tissues, due to differential expression of genes involved in uptake, translocation and accumulation of calcium. Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (CAX1), two pore channel (TPC1), CaM-stimulated type IIB Ca(2+) ATPase and two CaM dependent protein kinase (CaMK1 and 2) homologs were studied in finger millet. Two genotypes GP-45 and GP-1 (high and low calcium accumulating, respectively) were used to understand the role of these genes in differential calcium accumulation. For most of the genes higher expression was found in the high calcium accumulating genotype. CAX1 was strongly expressed in the late stages of spike development and could be responsible for accumulating high concentrations of calcium in seeds. TPC1 and Ca(2+) ATPase homologs recorded strong expression in the root, stem and developing spike and signify their role in calcium uptake and translocation, respectively. Calmodulin showed strong expression and a similar expression pattern to the type IIB ATPase in the developing spike only and indicating developing spike or even seed specific isoform of CaM affecting the activity of downstream target of calcium transportation. Interestingly, CaMK1 and CaMK2 had expression patterns similar to ATPase and TPC1 in various tissues raising a possibility of their respective regulation via CaM kinase. Expression pattern of 14-3-3 gene was observed to be similar to CAX1 gene in leaf and developing spike inferring a surprising possibility of CAX1 regulation through 14-3-3 protein. Our results provide a molecular insight for explaining the mechanism of calcium accumulation in finger millet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of presynaptic calcium-activated potassium currents to transmitter release regulation in cultured Xenopus nerve-muscle synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, J M; Yazejian, B; DiGregorio, D A; Vergara, J L; Grinnell, A D; Meriney, S D

    2001-01-01

    Using Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures, we have examined the contribution of calcium-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channels to the regulation of transmitter release evoked by single action potentials. The presynaptic varicosities that form on muscle cells in these cultures were studied directly using patch-clamp recording techniques. In these developing synapses, blockade of K(Ca) channels with iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin decreased transmitter release by an average of 35%. This effect would be expected to be caused by changes in the late phases of action potential repolarization. We hypothesize that these changes are due to a reduction in the driving force for calcium that is normally enhanced by the local hyperpolarization at the active zone caused by potassium current through the K(Ca) channels that co-localize with calcium channels. In support of this hypothesis, we have shown that when action potential waveforms were used as voltage-clamp commands to elicit calcium current in varicosities, peak calcium current was reduced only when these waveforms were broadened beginning when action potential repolarization was 20% complete. In contrast to peak calcium current, total calcium influx was consistently increased following action potential broadening. A model, based on previously reported properties of ion channels, faithfully reproduced predicted effects on action potential repolarization and calcium currents. From these data, we suggest that the large-conductance K(Ca) channels expressed at presynaptic varicosities regulate transmitter release magnitude during single action potentials by altering the rate of action potential repolarization, and thus the magnitude of peak calcium current.

  19. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  20. A forward genetic screen reveals that calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 regulates egress in Toxoplasma.

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    Erin Garrison

    Full Text Available Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle.

  1. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  2. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca2+ influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu......+-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient......Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca2+ outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Acting as Ca2+/H+ counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four...

  3. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  4. Calcium regulation in long-term changes of neuronal excitability in the hippocampal formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mody, I.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) was examined during long-term changes of neuronal excitability in the mammalian CNS. The preparations under investigation included the kindling model of epilepsy, a genetic form of epilepsy and long-term potentiation (LTP) of neuronal activity. The study also includes a discussion of the possible roles of a neuron-specific calcium-binding protein (CaBP). The findings are summarized as follows: (1) CaBP was found to have an unequal distribution in various cortical areas of the rat with higher levels in ventral structures. (2) The decline in CaBP was correlated to the number of evoked afterdischarges (AD's) during kindling-induced epilepsy. (3) Marked changes in CaBP levels were also found in the brains of the epileptic strain of mice (El). The induction of seizures further decreased the levels of CaBP in the El mice, indicating a possible genetic impairment of neuronal Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis in the El strain. (4) The levels of total hippocampal Ca/sup 2 +/ and Zn/sup 2 +/ were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in control and commissural-kindled animals. (5) To measure Ca/sup 2 +/-homeostasis, the kinetic analysis of /sup 45/Ca uptake curves was undertaken in the in vitro hippocampus. (6) The kinetic analysis of /sup 45/Ca uptake curves revealed that Ca/sup 2 +/-regulation of the hippocampus is impaired following amygdala- and commissural kindling. (7). A novel form of long-term potentiation (LTP) of neuronal activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is described. The findings raise the possibility that the Ca/sup 2 +/ necessary for induction of LTP may be derived from an intraneuronal storage site.

  5. The 3' untranslated region of the two cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS(1)) genes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) regulates transcript stability in response to glutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bindu; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-10-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to produce glutamine. The GS enzyme is located either in the chloroplast (GS(2)) or in the cytoplasm (GS(1)). GS(1) is encoded by a small gene family and the members exhibit differential expression pattern mostly attributed to transcriptional regulation. Based on our recent finding that a soybean GS(1) gene, Gmglnβ ( 1 ) is subject to its 3'UTR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation as a transgene in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) we have raised the question of whether the 3'UTR-mediated transcript destabilization is a more universal phenomenon. Gene constructs consisting of the CaMV35S promoter driving the reporter gene, GUS, followed by the 3'UTRs of the two alfalfa GS(1) genes, MsGSa and MsGSb, were introduced into alfalfa and tobacco. The analysis of these transformants suggests that while both the 3'UTRs promote transcript turnover, the MsGSb 3'UTR is more effective than the MsGSa 3'UTR. However, both the 3'UTRs along with Gmglnβ ( 1 ) 3'UTR respond to nitrate as a trigger in transcript turnover. More detailed analysis points to glutamine rather than nitrate as the mediator of transcript turnover. Our data suggests that the 3'UTR-mediated regulation of GS(1) genes at the level of transcript turnover is probably universal and is used for fine-tuning the expression in keeping with the availability of the substrates.

  6. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  7. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena; Kowalski, Antoni; Stepinski, Dariusz; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca(2+) outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Acting as Ca(2+)/H(+) counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca(2+) overload evoked by 59 mM KCl. We observed that manipulation in PMCA expression elevated pHmito and pHcyto but only in PMCA2-downregulated cells higher mitochondrial pH gradient (ΔpH) was found in steady-state conditions. Our data also demonstrated that PMCA2 or PMCA3 knock-down delayed Ca(2+) clearance and partially attenuated cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu. In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca(2+) overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca(2+)-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient.

  8. A Compartmental Comparison of Major Lipid Species in a Coral-Symbiodinium Endosymbiosis: Evidence that the Coral Host Regulates Lipogenesis of Its Cytosolic Lipid Bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Kai Chen

    Full Text Available The lipid body (LB formation in the host coral gastrodermal cell cytoplasm is a hallmark of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis, and such lipid-based entities are not found in endosymbiont-free cnidarian cells. Therefore, the elucidation of lipogenesis regulation in LBs and how it is related to the lipid metabolism of the host and endosymbiont could provide direct insight to understand the symbiosis mechanism. Herein, the lipid composition of host cells of the stony coral Euphyllia glabrescens, as well as that of their cytoplasmic LBs and in hospite Symbiodinium populations, was examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and six major lipid species were identified: wax esters, sterol esters, triacylglycerols, cholesterols, free fatty acids, and phospholipids. Their concentrations differed significantly between host coral cells, LBs, and Symbiodinium, suggesting compartmental regulation. WE were only present in the host coral and were particularly highly concentrated in LBs. Amongst the four species of WE, the monoene R = C18:1/R = C16 was found to be LB-specific and was not present in the host gastrodermal cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, the acyl pool profiles of the individual LB lipid species were more similar, but not equal to, those of the host gastrodermal cells in which they were located, indicating partially autonomous lipid metabolism in these LBs. Nevertheless, given the overall similarity in the host gastrodermal cell and LB lipid profiles, these data suggest that a significant portion of the LB lipids may be of host coral origin. Finally, lipid profiles of the in hospite Symbiodinium populations were significantly distinct from those of the cultured Symbiodinium, potentially suggesting a host regulation effect that may be fundamental to lipid metabolism in endosymbiotic associations involving clade C Symbiodinium.

  9. A Compartmental Comparison of Major Lipid Species in a Coral-Symbiodinium Endosymbiosis: Evidence that the Coral Host Regulates Lipogenesis of Its Cytosolic Lipid Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Kai; Song, Shin-Ni; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Mayfield, Anderson B; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Chen, Wan-Nan U; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2015-01-01

    The lipid body (LB) formation in the host coral gastrodermal cell cytoplasm is a hallmark of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis, and such lipid-based entities are not found in endosymbiont-free cnidarian cells. Therefore, the elucidation of lipogenesis regulation in LBs and how it is related to the lipid metabolism of the host and endosymbiont could provide direct insight to understand the symbiosis mechanism. Herein, the lipid composition of host cells of the stony coral Euphyllia glabrescens, as well as that of their cytoplasmic LBs and in hospite Symbiodinium populations, was examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and six major lipid species were identified: wax esters, sterol esters, triacylglycerols, cholesterols, free fatty acids, and phospholipids. Their concentrations differed significantly between host coral cells, LBs, and Symbiodinium, suggesting compartmental regulation. WE were only present in the host coral and were particularly highly concentrated in LBs. Amongst the four species of WE, the monoene R = C18:1/R = C16 was found to be LB-specific and was not present in the host gastrodermal cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, the acyl pool profiles of the individual LB lipid species were more similar, but not equal to, those of the host gastrodermal cells in which they were located, indicating partially autonomous lipid metabolism in these LBs. Nevertheless, given the overall similarity in the host gastrodermal cell and LB lipid profiles, these data suggest that a significant portion of the LB lipids may be of host coral origin. Finally, lipid profiles of the in hospite Symbiodinium populations were significantly distinct from those of the cultured Symbiodinium, potentially suggesting a host regulation effect that may be fundamental to lipid metabolism in endosymbiotic associations involving clade C Symbiodinium.

  10. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of sulphate assimilation by glutathione in poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) of wild type and overexpressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Tanja; Hönicke, Petra; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2004-04-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major low molecular weight thiol in plants with different functions in stress defence and the transport and storage of sulphur. Its synthesis is dependent on the supply of its constituent amino acids cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. GSH is a feedback inhibitor of the sulphate assimilation pathway, the primary source of cysteine synthesis. Sulphate assimilation has been analysed in transgenic poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) overexpressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the key enzyme of GSH synthesis, and the results compared with the effects of exogenously added GSH. Although foliar GSH levels were 3-4-fold increased in the transgenic plants, the activities of enzymes of sulphate assimilation, namely ATP sulphurylase, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase (APR), sulphite reductase, serine acetyltransferase, and O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase were not affected in three transgenic lines compared with the wild type. Also the mRNA levels of these enzymes were not altered by the increased GSH levels. By contrast, an increase in GSH content due to exogenously supplied GSH resulted in a strong reduction in APR activity and mRNA accumulation. This feedback regulation was reverted by simultaneous addition of O-acetylserine (OAS). However, OAS measurements revealed that OAS cannot be the only signal responsible for the lack of feedback regulation of APR by GSH in the transgenic poplars.

  12. Reciprocal Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Calcium Signaling in Astrocyte Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that inhibition of neuronal activity, glutamate uptake, or reversed-Na+/Ca2+-exchange with TTX, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769, respectively, increases mitochondrial mobility in astrocytic processes. In the present study, we examined the interrelationships between mitochondrial mobility and Ca2+ signaling in astrocyte processes in organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus. All of the treatments that increase mitochondrial mobility decreased basal Ca2+. As recently reported, we observed spontaneous Ca2+ spikes with half-lives of ∼1 s that spread ∼6 μm and are almost abolished by a TRPA1 channel antagonist. Virtually all of these Ca2+ spikes overlap mitochondria (98%), and 62% of mitochondria are overlapped by these spikes. Although tetrodotoxin, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769 increased Ca2+ signaling, the specific effects on peak, decay time, and/or frequency were different. To more specifically manipulate mitochondrial mobility, we explored the effects of Miro motor adaptor proteins. We show that Miro1 and Miro2 are both expressed in astrocytes and that exogenous expression of Ca2+-insensitive Miro mutants (KK) nearly doubles the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Expression of Miro1KK had a modest effect on the frequency of these Ca2+ spikes but nearly doubled the decay half-life. The mitochondrial proton ionophore, FCCP, caused a large, prolonged increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by an increase in the decay time and the spread of the spontaneous Ca2+ spikes. Photo-ablation of mitochondria in individual astrocyte processes has similar effects on Ca2+. Together, these studies show that Ca2+ regulates mitochondrial mobility, and mitochondria in turn regulate Ca2+ signals in astrocyte processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In neurons, the movement and positioning of mitochondria at sites of elevated activity are important for matching local energy and Ca2+ buffering capacity. Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondria are immobilized in astrocytes in response

  13. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  14. Cytosol-Localized Heat Shock Factor-Binding Protein, AtHSBP, Functions as a Negative Regulator of Heat Shock Response by Translocation to the Nucleus and Is Required for Seed Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Feng; Lai, Hui-Chuan; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) is a universal mechanism in all organisms. It is under tight regulation by heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) after heat shock (HS) to prevent stress damage. On the attenuation of HSR, HSP70 and HSF Binding Protein1 (HSBP1) interact with HSF1 and thus dissociate trimeric HSF1 into an inert monomeric form in humans. However, little is known about the effect of HSBP with thermal stress in plants. This report describes our investigation of the role of AtHSBP in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by genetic and molecular approaches. AtHSBP was heat inducible and ubiquitously expressed in all tissues; AtHSBP was also crucial for seed development, as demonstrated by AtHSBP-knockout lines showing seed abortion. Thermotolerance results showed that AtHSBP participates in acquired thermotolerance but not basal thermotolerance and is a negative regulator of HSR. Subcellular localization revealed that the cytosol-localized AtHSBP translocated to the nucleus in response to HS. Protoplast two-hybrid assay results confirmed that AtHSBP interacts with itself and with the HSFs, AtHSFA1a, AtHSFA1b, and AtHSFA2. AtHSBP also negatively affected AtHSFA1b DNA-binding capacity in vitro. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western-blot analysis demonstrated that altered levels of AtHSBP lead to differential HSP expression, mainly during the recovery from HS. These studies provide a new insight into HSBP in plants and reveal that AtHSBP is a negative regulator of HSR and required for seed development. PMID:20388662

  15. Cytosol-localized heat shock factor-binding protein, AtHSBP, functions as a negative regulator of heat shock response by translocation to the nucleus and is required for seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Feng; Lai, Hui-Chuan; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2010-06-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) is a universal mechanism in all organisms. It is under tight regulation by heat shock factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) after heat shock (HS) to prevent stress damage. On the attenuation of HSR, HSP70 and HSF Binding Protein1 (HSBP1) interact with HSF1 and thus dissociate trimeric HSF1 into an inert monomeric form in humans. However, little is known about the effect of HSBP with thermal stress in plants. This report describes our investigation of the role of AtHSBP in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by genetic and molecular approaches. AtHSBP was heat inducible and ubiquitously expressed in all tissues; AtHSBP was also crucial for seed development, as demonstrated by AtHSBP-knockout lines showing seed abortion. Thermotolerance results showed that AtHSBP participates in acquired thermotolerance but not basal thermotolerance and is a negative regulator of HSR. Subcellular localization revealed that the cytosol-localized AtHSBP translocated to the nucleus in response to HS. Protoplast two-hybrid assay results confirmed that AtHSBP interacts with itself and with the HSFs, AtHSFA1a, AtHSFA1b, and AtHSFA2. AtHSBP also negatively affected AtHSFA1b DNA-binding capacity in vitro. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western-blot analysis demonstrated that altered levels of AtHSBP lead to differential HSP expression, mainly during the recovery from HS. These studies provide a new insight into HSBP in plants and reveal that AtHSBP is a negative regulator of HSR and required for seed development.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  17. The role of calcium in chloroplasts--an intriguing and unresolved puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Agostinho G; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2012-10-01

    More than 70 years of studies have indicated that chloroplasts contain a significant amount of calcium, are a potential storage compartment for this ion, and might themselves be prone to calcium regulation. Many of these studies have been performed on the photosynthetic light reaction as well as CO(2) fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, and they showed that calcium is required in several steps of these processes. Further studies have indicated that calcium is involved in other chloroplast functions that are not directly related to photosynthesis and that there is a calcium-dependent regulation similar to cytoplasmic calcium signal transduction. Nevertheless, the precise role that calcium has as a functional and regulatory component of chloroplast processes remains enigmatic. Calcium concentrations in different chloroplast subcompartments have been measured, but the extent and direction of intra-plastidal calcium fluxes or calcium transport into and from the cytosol are not yet very well understood. In this review we want to give an overview over the current knowledge on the relationship between chloroplasts and calcium and discuss questions that need to be addressed in future research.

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity regulates the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Ahrens, Molly J; Wu, Amy; Liu, Jennifer; Dudley, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    For tissues that develop throughout embryogenesis and into postnatal life, the generation of differentiated cells to promote tissue growth is at odds with the requirement to maintain the stem cell/progenitor cell population to preserve future growth potential. In the growth plate cartilage, this balance is achieved in part by establishing a proliferative phase that amplifies the number of progenitor cells prior to terminal differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we show that endogenous calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamkII, also known as Camk2) activity is upregulated prior to hypertrophy and that loss of CamkII function substantially blocks the transition from proliferation to hypertrophy. Wnt signaling and Pthrp-induced phosphatase activity negatively regulate CamkII activity. Release of this repression results in activation of multiple effector pathways, including Runx2- and β-catenin-dependent pathways. We present an integrated model for the regulation of proliferation potential by CamkII activity that has important implications for studies of growth control and adult progenitor/stem cell populations.

  19. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  20. Hippuric acid as a significant regulator of supersaturation in calcium oxalate lithiasis: the physiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, Stoyanka S; Gutzow, Ivan S

    2013-01-01

    At present, the clinical significance of existing physicochemical and biological evidence and especially the results we have obtained from our previous in vitro experiments have been analyzed, and we have come to the conclusion that hippuric acid (C6H5CONHCH2COOH) is a very active solvent of Calcium Oxalate (CaOX) in physiological solutions. Two types of experiments have been discussed: clinical laboratory analysis on the urine excretion of hippuric acid (HA) in patients with CaOX lithiasis and detailed measurements of the kinetics of the dissolution of CaOX calculi in artificial urine, containing various concentrations of HA. It turns out that the most probable value of the HA concentration in the control group is approximately ten times higher than the corresponding value in the group of the stone-formers. Our in vitro analytical measurements demonstrate even a possibility to dissolve CaOX stones in human urine, in which increased concentration of HA have been established. A conclusion can be that drowning out HA is a significant regulator of CaOX supersaturation and thus a regulation of CaOX stone formation in human urine. Discussions have arisen to use increased concentration of HA in urine both as a solubilizator of CaOX stones in the urinary tract and on the purpose of a prolonged metaphylactic treatment.

  1. Hippuric Acid as a Significant Regulator of Supersaturation in Calcium Oxalate Lithiasis: The Physiological Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyanka S. Atanassova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the clinical significance of existing physicochemical and biological evidence and especially the results we have obtained from our previous in vitro experiments have been analyzed, and we have come to the conclusion that hippuric acid (C6H5CONHCH2COOH is a very active solvent of Calcium Oxalate (CaOX in physiological solutions. Two types of experiments have been discussed: clinical laboratory analysis on the urine excretion of hippuric acid (HA in patients with CaOX lithiasis and detailed measurements of the kinetics of the dissolution of CaOX calculi in artificial urine, containing various concentrations of HA. It turns out that the most probable value of the HA concentration in the control group is approximately ten times higher than the corresponding value in the group of the stone-formers. Our in vitro analytical measurements demonstrate even a possibility to dissolve CaOX stones in human urine, in which increased concentration of HA have been established. A conclusion can be that drowning out HA is a significant regulator of CaOX supersaturation and thus a regulation of CaOX stone formation in human urine. Discussions have arisen to use increased concentration of HA in urine both as a solubilizator of CaOX stones in the urinary tract and on the purpose of a prolonged metaphylactic treatment.

  2. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  3. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...

  4. Cytosolic delivery: Just passing through

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Macarena; Teixidó, Meritxell; Giralt, Ernest

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular protein delivery has been a major challenge in the field of cell biology for decades. Engineering such delivery is a key step in the development of protein- and antibody-based therapeutics. Now, two different approaches that enable the delivery of antibodies and antibody fragments into the cytosol have been developed.

  5. Regulation of NKG2D-ligand cell surface expression by intracellular calcium after HDAC-inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael Henrik; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt

    2013-01-01

    cell surface expression on melanoma cells and Jurkat T-cells. A NKG2D-dependent cytolytic assay and staining with a recombinant NKG2D-Fc fusion protein showed that calcium chelation impaired the functional ability of NKG2D-ligands induced by HDAC-inhibitor treatment. The HDAC-inhibitor induced cell......-cells. We further show that secretion and cell surface binding of the calcium-regulating protein galectin-1 is enhanced upon HDAC-inhibitor treatment of melanoma cells. However, binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycoproteins was not critical for constitutive or HDAC-inhibitor induced MICA/B and ULBP2...

  6. Interactions between calcium and phosphorus in the regulation of the production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, S.J.; Thomsen, A.R.B.; Pang, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    , however, increases in serum phosphorus by dietary manipulation were accompanied by severe hypocalcemia, which appeared to blunt stimulation of FGF23 release. Increases in dietary phosphorus in PTH-CaSR DKO mice markedly decreased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)D] despite no change in FGF23......, suggesting direct regulation of 1,25(OH)D synthesis by serum phosphorus. Calcium-mediated increases in serum FGF23 required a threshold level of serum phosphorus of about 5 mg/dl. Analogously, phosphorus-elicited increases in FGF23 were markedly blunted if serum calcium was less than 8 mg/dl. The best...

  7. Presenilins regulate synaptic plasticity and mitochondrial calcium homeostasis in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Lutz, David; Mossalam, Mohanad; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Frotscher, Michael; Shen, Jie

    2017-06-15

    Presenilins play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, in which the hippocampus is particularly vulnerable. Previous studies of Presenilin function in the synapse, however, focused exclusively on the hippocampal Schaffer collateral (SC) pathway. Whether Presenilins play similar or distinct roles in other hippocampal synapses is unknown. To investigate the role of Presenilins at mossy fiber (MF) synapses we performed field and whole-cell electrophysiological recordings and Ca 2+ imaging using acute hippocampal slices of postnatal forebrain-restricted Presenilin conditional double knockout (PS cDKO) and control mice at 2 months of age. We also performed quantitative electron microscopy (EM) analysis to determine whether mitochondrial content is affected at presynaptic MF boutons of PS cDKO mice. We further conducted behavioral analysis to assess spatial learning and memory of PS cDKO and control mice at 2 months in the Morris water maze. We found that long-term potentiation and short-term plasticity, such as paired-pulse and frequency facilitation, are impaired at MF synapses of PS cDKO mice. Moreover, post-tetanic potentiation (PTP), another form of short-term plasticity, is also impaired at MF synapses of PS cDKO mice. Furthermore, blockade of mitochondrial Ca 2+ efflux mimics and occludes the PTP deficits at MF synapses of PS cDKO mice, suggesting that mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis is impaired in the absence of PS. Quantitative EM analysis showed normal number and area of mitochondria at presynaptic MF boutons of PS cDKO mice, indicating unchanged mitochondrial content. Ca 2+ imaging of dentate gyrus granule neurons further revealed that cytosolic Ca 2+ increases induced by tetanic stimulation are reduced in PS cDKO granule neurons in acute hippocampal slices, and that inhibition of mitochondrial Ca 2+ release during high frequency stimulation mimics and occludes the Ca 2+ defects observed in PS cDKO neurons. Consistent with synaptic

  8. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Miragoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  9. Differential Effect of Renal Cortical and Medullary Interstitial Fluid Calcium on Blood Pressure Regulation in Salt-Sensitive Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Mildred A; Eley, Shaleka; Anderson, Lauren; Waters, Brittany; Royall, Brittany; Nichols, Sheena; Wells, Candace

    2015-08-01

    Hypercalciuria is a frequent characteristic of hypertension. In this report we extend our earlier studies investigating the role of renal interstitial fluid calcium (ISF(Ca))(2+) as a link between urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure in the Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive model. Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant (DR) rats were placed on control (0.45%) and high (8%) salt diets to determine if changes in renal cortical and medullary ISF(Ca)(2+)correlated with changes in urinary calcium excretion and blood pressure. We observed that renal ISFCa(2+) was predicted by urinary calcium excretion (P blood pressure (P blood pressure in DS rats (P blood pressure in the DR rats under the conditions of this study. We interpret these findings to suggest that decreased renal cortical ISF(Ca)(2+) plays a role in the increase in blood pressure following a high salt diet in salt hypertension perhaps by mediating renal vasoconstriction; the role of medullary calcium remains to be fully understood. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism of the altered renal ISF(Ca)(2+) and its role in blood pressure regulation. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CO2/HCO3(-)- and calcium-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase as a physiological ATP sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H; Chen, Yanqiu; Straub, Susanne G; Hess, Kenneth C; Diaz, Ana; Lee, Dana; Tso, Patrick; Holz, George G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. In mammalian cells, cAMP can be generated from hormone- and G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases or via the widely expressed and structurally and biochemically distinct enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). sAC activity is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate ions, and in cells, sAC functions as a physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensor. sAC activity is also stimulated by calcium, and its affinity for its substrate ATP suggests that it may be sensitive to physiologically relevant fluctuations in intracellular ATP. We demonstrate here that sAC can function as a cellular ATP sensor. In cells, sAC-generated cAMP reflects alterations in intracellular ATP that do not affect transmembrane AC-generated cAMP. In β cells of the pancreas, glucose metabolism generates ATP, which corresponds to an increase in cAMP, and we show here that sAC is responsible for an ATP-dependent cAMP increase. Glucose metabolism also elicits insulin secretion, and we further show that sAC is necessary for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Extracellular NAD+ regulates intracellular calcium levels and induces activation of human granulocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    β-NAD+e (extracellular β-NAD+), present at nanomolar levels in human plasma, has been implicated in the regulation of [Ca2+]i (the intracellular calcium concentration) in various cell types, including blood cells, by means of different mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that micromolar NAD+e (both the α and the β extracellular NAD+ forms) induces a sustained [Ca2+]i increase in human granulocytes by triggering the following cascade of causally related events: (i) activation of adenylate cyclase and overproduction of cAMP; (ii) activation of protein kinase A; (iii) stimulation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity and consequent overproduction of cADP-ribose, a universal Ca2+ mobilizer; and (iv) influx of extracellular Ca2+. The NAD+e-triggered [Ca2+]i elevation translates into granulocyte activation, i.e. superoxide and nitric oxide generation, and enhanced chemotaxis in response to 0.1–10 μM NAD+e. Thus extracellular β-NAD+e behaves as a novel pro-inflammatory cytokine, stimulating human granulocytes and potentially recruiting them at sites of inflammation. PMID:16225456

  13. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuren Zhou

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Protein kinase D regulates the human cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel through serine 1884.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Yusuke; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Maturana, Andrés D

    2011-12-15

    Protein kinase D (PKD) regulates the activity of the L-type calcium channel in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, the functional target residues of PKD on the L-type calcium channel remain to be identified. Our aim was to identify the functional phosphorylation sites of PKD on the human L-type calcium channel. The pore subunit of the human CaV1.2 (hCaV1.2) was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. Both the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKD and the mutation of serine 1884 but not serine 1930, putative targets of PKD, strongly reduced L-type calcium currents and single channel activity without affecting the channel's expression at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that serine 1884 is essential for the regulation of hCaV1.2 by PKD. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MICU2, a paralog of MICU1, resides within the mitochondrial uniporter complex to regulate calcium handling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Plovanich

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial calcium uptake is present in nearly all vertebrate tissues and is believed to be critical in shaping calcium signaling, regulating ATP synthesis and controlling cell death. Calcium uptake occurs through a channel called the uniporter that resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, we used comparative genomics to identify MICU1 and MCU as the key regulatory and putative pore-forming subunits of this channel, respectively. Using bioinformatics, we now report that the human genome encodes two additional paralogs of MICU1, which we call MICU2 and MICU3, each of which likely arose by gene duplication and exhibits distinct patterns of organ expression. We demonstrate that MICU1 and MICU2 are expressed in HeLa and HEK293T cells, and provide multiple lines of biochemical evidence that MCU, MICU1 and MICU2 reside within a complex and cross-stabilize each other's protein expression in a cell-type dependent manner. Using in vivo RNAi technology to silence MICU1, MICU2 or both proteins in mouse liver, we observe an additive impairment in calcium handling without adversely impacting mitochondrial respiration or membrane potential. The results identify MICU2 as a new component of the uniporter complex that may contribute to the tissue-specific regulation of this channel.

  16. Hepatitis B virus modulates store-operated calcium entry to enhance viral replication in primary hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C Casciano

    Full Text Available Many viruses modulate calcium (Ca2+ signaling to create a cellular environment that is more permissive to viral replication, but for most viruses that regulate Ca2+ signaling, the mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. The hepatitis B virus (HBV HBx protein modulates cytosolic Ca2+ levels to stimulate HBV replication in some liver cell lines. A chronic HBV infection is associated with life-threatening liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ levels could have an important role in HBV pathogenesis. Whether HBx affects cytosolic Ca2+ in a normal hepatocyte, the natural site of an HBV infection, has not been addressed. Here, we report that HBx alters cytosolic Ca2+ signaling in cultured primary hepatocytes. We used single cell Ca2+ imaging of cultured primary rat hepatocytes to demonstrate that HBx elevates the cytosolic Ca2+ level in hepatocytes following an IP3-linked Ca2+ response; HBx effects were similar when expressed alone or in the context of replicating HBV. HBx elevation of the cytosolic Ca2+ level required extracellular Ca2+ influx and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC entry and stimulated HBV replication in hepatocytes. We used both targeted RT-qPCR and transcriptome-wide RNAseq analyses to compare levels of SOC channel components and other Ca2+ signaling regulators in HBV-expressing and control hepatocytes and show that the transcript levels of these various proteins are not affected by HBV. We also show that HBx regulation of SOC-regulated Ca2+ accumulation is likely the consequence of HBV modulation of a SOC channel regulatory mechanism. In support of this, we link HBx enhancement of SOC-regulated Ca2+ accumulation to Ca2+ uptake by mitochondria and demonstrate that HBx stimulates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in primary hepatocytes. The results of our study may provide insights into viral mechanisms that affect Ca2+ signaling to regulate viral replication and virus

  17. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  18. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

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    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  19. Calcium-containing scaffolds induce bone regeneration by regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Aquino-Martínez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoinduction and subsequent bone formation rely on efficient mesenchymal stem cell (MSC recruitment. It is also known that migration is induced by gradients of growth factors and cytokines. Degradation of Ca2+-containing biomaterials mimics the bone remodeling compartment producing a localized calcium-rich osteoinductive microenvironment. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of calcium sulfate (CaSO4 on MSC migration. In addition, to evaluate the influence of CaSO4 on MSC differentiation and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods A circular calvarial bone defect (5 mm diameter was created in the parietal bone of 35 Balb-C mice. We prepared and implanted a cell-free agarose/gelatin scaffold alone or in combination with different CaSO4 concentrations into the bone defects. After 7 weeks, we determined the new bone regenerated by micro-CT and histological analysis. In vitro, we evaluated the CaSO4 effects on MSC migration by both wound healing and agarose spot assays. Osteoblastic gene expression after BMP-2 and CaSO4 treatment was also evaluated by qPCR. Results CaSO4 increased MSC migration and bone formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Micro-CT analysis showed that the addition of CaSO4 significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to the scaffold alone. The histological evaluation confirmed an increased number of endogenous cells recruited into the cell-free CaSO4-containing scaffolds. Furthermore, MSC migration in vitro and active AKT levels were attenuated when CaSO4 and BMP-2 were in combination. Addition of LY294002 and Wortmannin abrogated the CaSO4 effects on MSC migration. Conclusions Specific CaSO4 concentrations induce bone regeneration of calvarial defects in part by acting on the host’s undifferentiated MSCs and promoting their migration. Progenitor cell recruitment is followed by a gradual increment in osteoblast gene expression. Moreover, CaSO4 regulates BMP-2-induced

  20. Calcium-containing scaffolds induce bone regeneration by regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Martínez, Rubén; Angelo, Alcira P; Pujol, Francesc Ventura

    2017-11-16

    Osteoinduction and subsequent bone formation rely on efficient mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) recruitment. It is also known that migration is induced by gradients of growth factors and cytokines. Degradation of Ca 2+ -containing biomaterials mimics the bone remodeling compartment producing a localized calcium-rich osteoinductive microenvironment. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of calcium sulfate (CaSO 4 ) on MSC migration. In addition, to evaluate the influence of CaSO 4 on MSC differentiation and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. A circular calvarial bone defect (5 mm diameter) was created in the parietal bone of 35 Balb-C mice. We prepared and implanted a cell-free agarose/gelatin scaffold alone or in combination with different CaSO 4 concentrations into the bone defects. After 7 weeks, we determined the new bone regenerated by micro-CT and histological analysis. In vitro, we evaluated the CaSO 4 effects on MSC migration by both wound healing and agarose spot assays. Osteoblastic gene expression after BMP-2 and CaSO 4 treatment was also evaluated by qPCR. CaSO 4 increased MSC migration and bone formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Micro-CT analysis showed that the addition of CaSO 4 significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to the scaffold alone. The histological evaluation confirmed an increased number of endogenous cells recruited into the cell-free CaSO 4 -containing scaffolds. Furthermore, MSC migration in vitro and active AKT levels were attenuated when CaSO 4 and BMP-2 were in combination. Addition of LY294002 and Wortmannin abrogated the CaSO 4 effects on MSC migration. Specific CaSO 4 concentrations induce bone regeneration of calvarial defects in part by acting on the host's undifferentiated MSCs and promoting their migration. Progenitor cell recruitment is followed by a gradual increment in osteoblast gene expression. Moreover, CaSO 4 regulates BMP-2-induced MSC migration by differentially activating the PI3

  1. Direct binding of the Kex2p cytosolic tail to the VHS domain of yeast Gga2p facilitates TGN to prevacuolar compartment transport and is regulated by phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Mithu; Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Fuller, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Human Golgi-localized, γ-ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor–binding proteins (Ggas) bind directly to acidic dileucine sorting motifs in the cytosolic tails (C-tails) of intracellular receptors. Despite evidence for a role in recruiting ubiquitinated cargo, it remains unclear whether yeast Ggas also function by binding peptide-sorting signals directly. Two-hybrid analysis shows that the Gga1p and Gga2p Vps27, Hrs, Stam (VHS) domains both bind a site in the Kex2p C-tail and that the Gga2p VHS domain binds a site in the Vps10p C-tail. Binding requires deletion of an apparently autoinhibitory sequence in the Gga2p hinge. Ser780 in the Kex2p C-tail is crucial for binding: an Ala substitution blocks but an Asp substitution permits binding. Biochemical assays using purified Gga2p VHS–GGA and TOM1 (GAT) and glutathione S-transferase–Kex2p C-tail fusions show that Gga2p binds directly to the Kex2p C-tail, with relative affinities Asp780 > Ser780 > Ala780. Affinity-purified antibody against a peptide containing phospho-Ser­780 recognizes wild-type Kex2p but not S780A Kex2p, showing that Ser780 is phosphorylated in vivo; phosphorylation of Ser780 is up-regulated by cell wall–damaging drugs. Finally, mutation of Ser780 alters trafficking of Kex2p both in vivo and in cell-free trans-Golgi network (TGN)–prevacuolar compartment (PVC) transport. Thus yeast Gga adaptors facilitate TGN–PVC transport by direct binding of noncanonical phosphoregulated Gga-binding sites in cargo molecules. PMID:23408788

  2. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Brennan

    Full Text Available Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E11.5-16.5 in mouse in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult. Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCC, inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, P/Q type (CaV2.1, N-type (CaV2.2, R-type (CaV2.3, and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3, demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  3. Sorcin Links Calcium Signaling to Vesicle Trafficking, Regulates Polo-Like Kinase 1 and Is Necessary for Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalioti, Vasiliki S.; Ilari, Andrea; O'Connell, David J.; Poser, Elena; Sandoval, Ignacio V.; Colotti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Sorcin, a protein overexpressed in many multi-drug resistant cancers, dynamically localizes to distinct subcellular sites in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts during cell-cycle progression. During interphase sorcin is in the nucleus, in the plasma membrane, in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae, and in ER-derived vesicles localized along the microtubules. These vesicles are positive to RyR, SERCA, calreticulin and Rab10. At the beginning of mitosis, sorcin-containing vesicles associate with the mitotic spindle, and during telophase are concentrated in the cleavage furrow and, subsequently, in the midbody. Sorcin regulates dimensions and calcium load of the ER vesicles by inhibiting RYR and activating SERCA. Analysis of sorcin interactome reveals calcium-dependent interactions with many proteins, including Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. Sorcin interacts physically with PLK1, is phosphorylated by PLK1 and induces PLK1 autophosphorylation, thereby regulating kinase activity. Knockdown of sorcin results in major defects in mitosis and cytokinesis, increase in the number of rounded polynucleated cells, blockage of cell progression in G2/M, apoptosis and cell death. Sorcin regulates calcium homeostasis and is necessary for the activation of mitosis and cytokinesis. PMID:24427308

  4. Calcium Binding and Disulfide Bonds Regulate the Stability of Secretagogin towards Thermal and Urea Denaturation.

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    Sanagavarapu, Kalyani; Weiffert, Tanja; Ní Mhurchú, Niamh; O'Connell, David; Linse, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin is a calcium-sensor protein with six EF-hands. It is widely expressed in neurons and neuro-endocrine cells of a broad range of vertebrates including mammals, fishes and amphibia. The protein plays a role in secretion and interacts with several vesicle-associated proteins. In this work, we have studied the contribution of calcium binding and disulfide-bond formation to the stability of the secretagogin structure towards thermal and urea denaturation. SDS-PAGE analysis of secretagogin in reducing and non-reducing conditions identified a tendency of the protein to form dimers in a redox-dependent manner. The denaturation of apo and Calcium-loaded secretagogin was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy under conditions favoring monomer or dimer or a 1:1 monomer: dimer ratio. This analysis reveals significantly higher stability towards urea denaturation of Calcium-loaded secretagogin compared to the apo protein. The secondary and tertiary structure of the Calcium-loaded form is not completely denatured in the presence of 10 M urea. Reduced and Calcium-loaded secretagogin is found to refold reversibly after heating to 95°C, while both oxidized and reduced apo secretagogin is irreversibly denatured at this temperature. Thus, calcium binding greatly stabilizes the structure of secretagogin towards chemical and heat denaturation.

  5. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

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    Yang Tianbao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fruit ripening is a complicated development process affected by a variety of external and internal cues. It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Results Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTAs are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wounding response in vegetative tissues. To study the possible roles of this gene family in fruit development and ripening, we cloned seven SR/CAMTAs, designated as SlSRs, from tomato, a model fruit-bearing crop. All seven genes encode polypeptides with a conserved DNA-binding domain and a calmodulin-binding site. Calmodulin specifically binds to the putative targeting site in a calcium-dependent manner. All SlSRs were highly yet differentially expressed during fruit development and ripening. Most notably, the expression of SlSR2 was scarcely detected at the mature green and breaker stages, two critical stages of fruit development and ripening; and SlSR3L and SlSR4 were expressed exclusively in fruit tissues. During the developmental span from 10 to 50 days post anthesis, the expression profiles of all seven SlSRs were dramatically altered in ripening mutant rin compared with wildtype fruit. By contrast, only minor alterations were noted for ripening mutant nor and Nr fruit. In addition, ethylene treatment of mature green wildtype fruit transiently stimulated expression of all SlSRs within one to two hours. Conclusions This study indicates that SlSR expression is influenced by both the Rin-mediated developmental network and ethylene signaling. The results suggest that calcium signaling is involved in the regulation of fruit development and ripening through calcium/calmodulin/SlSR interactions.

  6. Carboxylated molecules regulate magnesium content of amorphous calcium carbonates during calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongbo; Wallace, Adam F; De Yoreo, James J; Dove, Patricia M

    2009-12-22

    With the realization that many calcified skeletons form by processes involving a precursor phase of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), a new paradigm for mineralization is emerging. There is evidence the Mg content in biogenic ACC is regulated by carboxylated (acidic) proteins and other macromolecules, but the physical basis for such a process is unknown. We test the hypothesis that ACC compositions express a systematic relationship to the chemistry of carboxyl-rich biomolecules. A series of inorganic control experiments were conducted to establish the dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in ACC on solution composition. We then determined the influence of a suite of simple carboxylated organic acids on Mg content. Molecules with a strong affinity for binding Ca compared with Mg promote the formation of Mg-enriched ACC that is compositionally equivalent to high-magnesium calcites and dolomite. Measurements show Mg/Ca ratios are controlled by a predictable dependence upon the binding properties of the organic molecules. The trend appears rooted in the conformation and electrostatic potential topology of each molecule, but dynamic factors also may be involved. The dependence suggests a physical basis for reports that specific sequences of calcifying proteins are critical to modulating mineralization. Insights from this study may provide a plausible explanation for why some biogenic carbonates and carbonaceous cements often contain higher Mg signatures than those that are possible by classical crystal growth processes. The findings reiterate the controls of microenvironment on mineralization and suggest an origin of compositional offsets, or vital effects, long recognized by the paleoclimate community.

  7. Effects of Ginger and Its Constituents on Airway Smooth Muscle Relaxation and Calcium Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviski, Matthew E.; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent years, and is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Many patients report using alternative therapies to self-treat asthma symptoms as adjuncts to short-acting and long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). As many as 40% of patients with asthma use herbal therapies to manage asthma symptoms, often without proven efficacy or known mechanisms of action. Therefore, investigations of both the therapeutic and possible detrimental effects of isolated components of herbal treatments on the airway are important. We hypothesized that ginger and its active components induce bronchodilation by modulating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in airway smooth muscle (ASM). In isolated human ASM, ginger caused significant and rapid relaxation. Four purified constituents of ginger were subsequently tested for ASM relaxant properties in both guinea pig and human tracheas: [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol induced rapid relaxation of precontracted ASM (100–300 μM), whereas [10]-gingerol failed to induce relaxation. In human ASM cells, exposure to [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, but not [10]-gingerol (100 μM), blunted subsequent Ca2+ responses to bradykinin (10 μM) and S-(−)-Bay K 8644 (10 μM). In A/J mice, the nebulization of [8]-gingerol (100 μM), 15 minutes before methacholine challenge, significantly attenuated airway resistance, compared with vehicle. Taken together, these novel data show that ginger and its isolated active components, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, relax ASM, and [8]-gingerol attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, in part by altering [Ca2+]i regulation. These purified compounds may provide a therapeutic option alone or in combination with accepted therapeutics, including β2-agonists, in airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:23065130

  8. The β4subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel (Cacnb4) regulates the rate of cell proliferation in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Mohamad; Daghsni, Marwa; De Waard, Stephan; Gaborit, Nathalie; Fajloun, Ziad; Ronjat, Michel; Mori, Yasuo; Brusés, Juan L; De Waard, Michel

    2017-08-01

    The β subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (VGCC) are cytosolic proteins that interact with the VGCC pore -forming subunit and participate in the trafficking of the channel to the cell membrane and in ion influx regulation. β subunits also exert functions independently of their binding to VGCC by translocation to the cell nucleus including the control of gene expression. Mutations of the neuronal Cacnb4 (β 4 ) subunit are linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders including epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. It is believed that the pathogenic phenotype induced by these mutations is associated with channel-independent functions of the β 4 subunit. In this report, we investigated the role of β 4 subunit in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and examined whether these functions could be altered by a pathogenic mutation. To this end, stably transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO-K1) cells expressing either rat full-length β 4 or the rat C-terminally truncated epileptic mutant variant β 1-481 were generated. The subcellular localization of both proteins differed significantly. Full-length β 4 localizes almost exclusively in the cell nucleus and concentrates into the nucleolar compartment, while the C-terminal-truncated β 1-481 subunit was less concentrated within the nucleus and absent from the nucleoli. Cell proliferation was found to be reduced by the expression of β 4 , while it was unaffected by the epileptic mutant. Also, full-length β 4 interfered with cell cycle progression by presumably preventing cells from entering the S-phase via a mechanism that partially involves endogenous B56δ, a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that binds β 4 but not β 1-481 . Analysis of β 4 subcellular distribution during the cell cycle revealed that the protein is highly expressed in the nucleus at the G1/S transition phase and that it is translocated out of the nucleus during chromatin condensation and cell division. These results

  9. Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels (CaCCs) Regulate Action Potential and Synaptic Response in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wendy C.; Xiao, Shaohua; Huang, Fen; Harfe, Brian D.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Central neurons respond to synaptic inputs from other neurons by generating synaptic potentials. Once the summated synaptic potentials reach threshold for action potential firing, the signal propagates leading to transmitter release at the synapse. The calcium influx accompanying such signaling opens calcium-activated ion channels for feedback regulation. Here we report a novel mechanism for modulating hippocampal neuronal signaling that involves calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs). We present the first evidence that CaCCs reside in hippocampal neurons and are in close proximity of calcium channels and NMDA receptors to shorten action potential duration, dampen excitatory synaptic potentials, impede temporal summation, and raise the threshold for action potential generation by synaptic potential. Having recently identified TMEM16A and TMEM16B as CaCCs, we further show that TMEM16B but not TMEM16A is important for hippocampal CaCC, laying the groundwork for deciphering the dynamic CaCC modulation of neuronal signaling in neurons important for learning and memory. PMID:22500639

  10. Consequences of activating the calcium-permeable ion channel TRPV1 in breast cancer cells with regulated TRPV1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tina T L; Peters, Amelia A; Tan, Ping T; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2014-08-01

    Increased expression of specific calcium channels in some cancers and the role of calcium signaling in proliferation and invasion have led to studies assessing calcium channel inhibitors as potential therapies for some cancers. The use of channel activators to promote death of cancer cells has been suggested, but the risk of activators promoting cancer cell proliferation and the importance of the degree of channel over-expression is unclear. We developed an MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with inducible TRPV1 overexpression and assessed the role of TRPV1 levels on cell death mediated by the TRPV1 activator capsaicin and the potential for submaximal activation to promote proliferation. The TRPV1 level was a determinant of cell death induced by capsaicin. A concentration response curve with varying TRPV1 expression levels identified the minimum level of TRPV1 required for capsaicin induced cell death. At no level of TRPV1 over-expression or capsaicin concentration did TRPV1 activation enhance proliferation. Cell death induced by capsaicin was necrotic and associated with up-regulation of c-Fos and RIP3. These studies suggest that activators of specific calcium channels may be an effective way to induce necrosis and that this approach may not always be associated with enhancement of cancer cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-talk between ROS and calcium in regulation of nuclear activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice; Lamotte, Olivier; Bourque, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Calcium and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are acknowledged as crucial second messengers involved in the response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it is still not clear how these two compounds can play a role in different signaling pathways leading the plant to a variety of processes such as root development or defense against pathogens. Recently, it has been shown that the concept of calcium and ROS signatures, initially discovered in the cytoplasm, can also be extended to the nucleus of plant cells. In addition, it has been clearly proved that both ROS and calcium signals are intimately interconnected. How this cross-talk can finally modulate the translocation and/or the activity of nuclear proteins leading to the control of specific genes expression is the main focus of this review. We will especially focus on how calcium and ROS interact at the molecular level to modify their targets.

  12. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-05

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), the central regulator of plant root endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sylvia; Parniske, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The key molecular event during the development of arbuscular mycorrhiza and the root nodule symbiosis is the activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). Its regulation is complex and involves positive as well as negative regulation facilitated by autophosphorylation of two conserved sites. Deregulated versions of CCaMK are sufficient for mediating both organogenesis and infection processes. Epistasis tests demonstrated that a main function of signaling components upstream of calcium spiking is the activation of CCaMK. Despite CCaMK being a central signaling hub, specificity for both symbioses exists, resulting in differential transcriptional gene expression patterns. While the specificity upstream of CCaMK can be conceptualized by the specific perception of rhizobial and fungal lipo-chitooligosaccharides via cognate LysM receptors, the mechanisms conferring transcriptional specificity downstream of CCaMK are likely conferred by a variety of transcriptional regulators, mediating symbiosis appropriate gene regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of xanthine oxidoreductase protein expression by hydrogen peroxide and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, J Scott; Saxena, Archana; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G

    2005-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that endothelial xanthine oxidase (XO) levels are dependent on the NADPH oxidase. We postulated that H2O2 may modulate the irreversible conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to XO and sought to examine mechanisms involved. H2O2 (100 micromol/L) decreased bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) XDH protein expression, and metabolic labeling studies indicated that H2O2 stimulated conversion of XDH to XO. The decline in XDH was mimicked by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating compounds SIN-1 and Menadione, as well as by stimulating BAECs with angiotensin II (200 nmol/L). BAPTA-AM prevented the decline in XDH by H2O2, indicating that it was calcium-dependent. In keeping with calcium acting downstream of H2O2, the calcium ionophore A23187 (1 micromol/L) caused XDH-to-XO conversion, and this was not prevented by the antioxidants. In addition, XDH-to-XO conversion was blocked by 2-APB and NO donors and induced by thapsigargin and M-3M3FBS, implicating phospholipase C and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in this process. Endothelial XO and XDH expression are strongly dependent on H2O2 and calcium. Stimulation of XDH conversion to XO may represent a feed-forward mechanism whereby H2O2 can stimulate further production of ROS.

  15. The β1 Subunit Enhances Oxidative Regulation of Large-Conductance Calcium-activated K+ Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Lindsey Ciali; Chen, Jianguo; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may alter the functions of many proteins including the Slo1 large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa). Previous results demonstrated that in the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant chloramine-T (Ch-T), without the involvement of cysteine oxidation, increases the open probability and slows the deactivation of BKCa channels formed by human Slo1 (hSlo1) α subunits alone. Because native BKCa channel complexes may include the auxiliary subunit β1, we investigated whether β1 influences the oxidative regulation of hSlo1. Oxidation by Ch-T with β1 present shifted the half-activation voltage much further in the hyperpolarizing direction (−75 mV) as compared with that with α alone (−30 mV). This shift was eliminated in the presence of high [Ca2+]i, but the increase in open probability in the virtual absence of Ca2+ remained significant at physiologically relevant voltages. Furthermore, the slowing of channel deactivation after oxidation was even more dramatic in the presence of β1. Oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues within β1 was not involved in these potentiated effects because expression of mutant β1 subunits lacking cysteine or methionine residues produced results similar to those with wild-type β1. Unlike the results with α alone, oxidation by Ch-T caused a significant acceleration of channel activation only when β1 was present. The β1 M177 mutation disrupted normal channel activation and prevented the Ch-T–induced acceleration of activation. Overall, the functional effects of oxidation of the hSlo1 pore-forming α subunit are greatly amplified by the presence of β1, which leads to the additional increase in channel open probability and the slowing of deactivation. Furthermore, M177 within β1 is a critical structural determinant of channel activation and oxidative sensitivity. Together, the oxidized BKCa channel complex with β1 has a considerable chance of being open within the physiological voltage

  16. Structure of Human GIVD Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Reveals Insights into Substrate Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Klein, Michael G.; Snell, Gyorgy; Lane, Weston; Zou, Hua; Levin, Irena; Li, Ke; Sang, Bi-Ching (Takeda Cali)

    2016-07-01

    Cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2s) consist of a family of calcium-sensitive enzymes that function to generate lipid second messengers through hydrolysis of membrane-associated glycerophospholipids. The GIVD cPLA2 (cPLA2δ) is a potential drug target for developing a selective therapeutic agent for the treatment of psoriasis. Here, we present two X-ray structures of human cPLA2δ, capturing an apo state, and in complex with a substrate-like inhibitor. Comparison of the apo and inhibitor-bound structures reveals conformational changes in a flexible cap that allows the substrate to access the relatively buried active site, providing new insight into the mechanism for substrate recognition. The cPLA2δ structure reveals an unexpected second C2 domain that was previously unrecognized from sequence alignments, placing cPLA2δ into the class of membrane-associated proteins that contain a tandem pair of C2 domains. Furthermore, our structures elucidate novel inter-domain interactions and define three potential calcium-binding sites that are likely important for regulation and activation of enzymatic activity. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing cPLA2's function in signal transduction.

  17. Parasitoid wasp venom SERCA regulates Drosophila calcium levels and inhibits cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Nathan T; Goecks, Jeremy; Kacsoh, Balint Z; Mobley, James A; Bowersock, Gregory J; Taylor, James; Schlenke, Todd A

    2013-06-04

    Because parasite virulence factors target host immune responses, identification and functional characterization of these factors can provide insight into poorly understood host immune mechanisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model system for understanding humoral innate immunity, but Drosophila cellular innate immune responses remain incompletely characterized. Fruit flies are regularly infected by parasitoid wasps in nature and, following infection, flies mount a cellular immune response culminating in the cellular encapsulation of the wasp egg. The mechanistic basis of this response is largely unknown, but wasps use a mixture of virulence proteins derived from the venom gland to suppress cellular encapsulation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying wasp virulence and fly cellular immunity, we used a joint transcriptomic/proteomic approach to identify venom genes from Ganaspis sp.1 (G1), a previously uncharacterized Drosophila parasitoid species, and found that G1 venom contains a highly abundant sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump. Accordingly, we found that fly immune cells termed plasmatocytes normally undergo a cytoplasmic calcium burst following infection, and that this calcium burst is required for activation of the cellular immune response. We further found that the plasmatocyte calcium burst is suppressed by G1 venom in a SERCA-dependent manner, leading to the failure of plasmatocytes to become activated and migrate toward G1 eggs. Finally, by genetically manipulating plasmatocyte calcium levels, we were able to alter fly immune success against G1 and other parasitoid species. Our characterization of parasitoid wasp venom proteins led us to identify plasmatocyte cytoplasmic calcium bursts as an important aspect of fly cellular immunity.

  18. Toxoplasma DJ-1 Regulates Organelle Secretion by a Direct Interaction with Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Matthew A; Garland, Megan; Foe, Ian; Madzelan, Peter; Treeck, Moritz; van der Linden, Wouter A; Oresic Bender, Kristina; Weerapana, Eranthie; Wilson, Mark A; Boothroyd, John C; Reese, Michael L; Bogyo, Matthew

    2017-02-28

    Human DJ-1 is a highly conserved and yet functionally enigmatic protein associated with a heritable form of Parkinson's disease. It has been suggested to be a redox-dependent regulatory scaffold, binding to proteins to modulate their function. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the Toxoplasma orthologue Toxoplasma gondii DJ-1 (TgDJ-1) at 2.1-Å resolution and show that it directly associates with calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1). The TgDJ-1 structure identifies an orthologously conserved arginine dyad that acts as a phospho-gatekeeper motif to control complex formation. We determined that the binding of TgDJ-1 to CDPK1 is sensitive to oxidation and calcium, and that this interaction potentiates CDPK1 kinase activity. Finally, we show that genetic deletion of TgDJ-1 results in upregulation of CDPK1 expression and that disruption of the CDPK1/TgDJ-1 complex in vivo prevents normal exocytosis of parasite virulence-associated organelles called micronemes. Overall, our data suggest that TgDJ-1 functions as a noncanonical kinase-regulatory scaffold that integrates multiple intracellular signals to tune microneme exocytosis in T. gondii IMPORTANCE Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium are obligate intracellular parasites that require the protective environment of a host cell in order to replicate and survive within a host organism. These parasites secrete effector proteins from specialized apical organelles to select and invade a chosen host cell. The secretion of these organelles is a tightly regulated process coordinated by endogenous small molecules and calcium-dependent protein kinases. We previously identified the Toxoplasma orthologue of the highly conserved protein DJ-1 as a regulator of microneme secretion, but the molecular basis for this was not known. We have now identified the molecular mechanism for how TgDJ-1 regulates microneme secretion. TgDJ-1 interacts with the kinase responsible for the secretion of these

  19. Effect of intracellular pH on ferret pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell calcium homeostasis and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, I S; Hoidal, J R; Barry, W H

    1996-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Na+/H+ antiport in regulating cytosolic (intracellular) pH (pHi) in isolated and cultured ferret pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PSMC). We also studied the effects of modulating pHi on the cytosolic (intracellular) calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the PSMC and on the pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) of isolated ferret lungs. pHi was modulated by the NH4Cl washout method. To eliminate the contribution of Cl-/HCO3- exchangers, the PSMC and isolated lungs were perfused in HCO3- free buffer. Blocking the Na+/H+ antiporter decreased baseline pHi and prevented the recovery from NH4Cl washout-induced intracellular acidosis. Intracellular alkalinization caused an initial transient increase in both [Ca2+]i and Ppa that were dependent on extracellular Ca2+ entry. Maintaining cytosolic alkalinization caused another increase in Ppa that was not associated with an increase in [Ca2+]i. Intracellular acidosis also caused an increase in [Ca2+]i and Ppa. The cytosolic acidosis-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and Ppa were mediated by both extracellular Ca2+ influx and release of stored intracellular Ca2+. Cytosolic acidosis also appears to have a direct effect on the smooth muscle contractile elements. Both cytosolic alkalosis and acidosis increased vascular reactivity.

  20. Calcium and Vitamin D in the Regulation of Energy Balance: Where Do We Stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a pandemic of obesity and associated chronic diseases. Dietary calcium and vitamin D have many extra-skeletal roles in human health. In this review we have summarized the current understanding of their influence on human energy balance by examining the epidemiological, clinical, animal, cellular and molecular evidence. We opine that while calcium and vitamin D are functional nutrients in the battle against obesity, there is a need for prospective human trials to tilt the balance of evidence in favour of these nutrients.

  1. Multiple Mechanisms Drive Calcium Signal Dynamics around Laser-Induced Epithelial Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Erica K; Stevens, Aaron; Edrington, Westin; Zhao, Yunhua; Jayasinghe, Aroshan K; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hutson, M Shane

    2017-10-03

    Epithelial wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved process that requires coordination across a field of cells. Studies in many organisms have shown that cytosolic calcium levels rise within a field of cells around the wound and spread to neighboring cells, within seconds of wounding. Although calcium is a known potent second messenger and master regulator of wound-healing programs, it is unknown what initiates the rise of cytosolic calcium across the wound field. Here we use laser ablation, a commonly used technique for the precision removal of cells or subcellular components, as a tool to investigate mechanisms of calcium entry upon wounding. Despite its precise ablation capabilities, we find that this technique damages cells outside the primary wound via a laser-induced cavitation bubble, which forms and collapses within microseconds of ablation. This cavitation bubble damages the plasma membranes of cells it contacts, tens of microns away from the wound, allowing direct calcium entry from extracellular fluid into damaged cells. Approximately 45 s after this rapid influx of calcium, we observe a second influx of calcium that spreads to neighboring cells beyond the footprint of cavitation. The occurrence of this second, delayed calcium expansion event is predicted by wound size, indicating that a separate mechanism of calcium entry exists, corresponding to cell loss at the primary wound. Our research demonstrates that the damage profile of laser ablation is more similar to a crush injury than the precision removal of individual cells. The generation of membrane microtears upon ablation is consistent with studies in the field of optoporation, which investigate ablation-induced cellular permeability. We conclude that multiple types of damage, including microtears and cell loss, result in multiple mechanisms of calcium influx around epithelial wounds. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular imaging of in vivo calcium ion expression in area postrema of total sleep deprived rats: Implications for cardiovascular regulation by TOF-SIMS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Ling, Yong-Chien; Chen, Bo-Jung; Wu, Un-In; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Excessive calcium influx in chemosensitive neurons of area postrema (AP) is detrimental for sympathetic activation and participates in the disruption of cardiovascular activities. Since total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a stressful condition known to harm the cardiovascular function, the present study is aimed to determine whether the in vivo calcium expression in AP would significantly alter following TSD by the use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and calretinin (a specific calcium sensor protein in AP neurons) immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that in normal rats, the calcium intensity was estimated to be 0.5 × 10 5 at m/ z 40.08. However, following TSD, the intensity for calcium ions was greatly increased to 1.2 × 10 5. Molecular imaging revealed that after TSD, various strongly expressed calcium signals were distributed throughout AP with clear identified profiles instead of randomly scattered within this region in normal rats. Immunohistochemical staining corresponded well with ionic image in which a majority of calcium-enriched gathering co-localized with calretinin positive neurons. The functional significance of TSD-induced calcium augmentation was demonstrated by increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, clinical markers for cardiovascular dysfunction. Considering AP-mediated sympathetic activation is important for cardiovascular regulation, exaggerated calcium influx in AP would render this neurocircuitry more vulnerable to over-excitation, which might serve as the underlying mechanism for the development of TSD-relevant cardiovascular deficiency.

  3. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. cAMP-dependent protein kinase involves calcium tolerance through the regulation of Prz1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase Pka1 is known as a regulator of glycogenesis, meiosis, and stress responses in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We demonstrated that Pka1 is responsible for calcium tolerance. Loss of functional components of the PKA pathway such as Git3, Gpa2, Cyr1, and Pka1 yields a CaCl2-sensitive phenotype, while loss of Cgs1, a regulatory subunit of PKA, results in CaCl2 tolerance. Cytoplasmic distribution of Cgs1 and Pka1 is increased by the addition of CaCl2, suggesting that CaCl2 induces dissociation of Cgs1 and Pka1. The expression of Prz1, a transcriptional regulator in calcium homeostasis, is elevated in a pka1∆ strain and in a wild type strain under glucose-limited conditions. Accordingly, higher expression of Prz1 in the wild type strain results in a CaCl2-sensitive phenotype. These findings suggest that Pka1 is essential for tolerance to exogenous CaCl2, probably because the expression level of Prz1 needs to be properly regulated by Pka1.

  5. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  6. Regulation of nutrient uptake, water uptake and growth under calcium starvation and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the dynamics of growth, water and nutrient uptake, the effects of 1, 3 and 7 d of calcium starvation and the recovery capability during 7 d afterwards were investigated in vegetative tomato plants. Results showed that after only 1 d of Ca-starvation, leaf photosynthesis, leaf expansion

  7. Calcium Directly Regulates Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Headgroup Conformation and Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilkova, E.; Pleskot, Roman; Rissanen, S.; Sun, S.; Czogalla, A.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Róg, T.; Vattulainen, I.; Cremer, P. S.; Jungwirth, P.; Coskun, U.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 11 (2017), s. 4019-4024 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : membrane * calcium ions * PIP2 * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  8. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hours. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial...... macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS-treatment results in an up-regulation of HO-1(pos) /CD169(neg) cells in serosa and at AP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  9. ITH14001, a CGP37157-Nimodipine Hybrid Designed to Regulate Calcium Homeostasis and Oxidative Stress, Exerts Neuroprotection in Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Izaskun; Tenti, Giammarco; Michalska, Patrycja; Méndez-López, Iago; Luengo, Enrique; Satriani, Michele; Padín-Nogueira, Fernando; López, Manuela G; Ramos, M Teresa; García, Antonio G; Menéndez, J Carlos; León, Rafael

    2017-01-18

    During brain ischemia, oxygen and glucose deprivation induces calcium overload, extensive oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and, finally, massive neuronal loss. In the search of a neuroprotective compound to mitigate this neuronal loss, we have designed and synthesized a new multitarget hybrid (ITH14001) directed at the reduction of calcium overload by acting on two regulators of calcium homeostasis; the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (mNCX) and L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). This compound is a hybrid of CGP37157 (mNCX inhibitor) and nimodipine (L-type VDCCs blocker), and its pharmacological evaluation revealed a moderate ability to selectively inhibit both targets. These activities conferred concentration-dependent neuroprotection in two models of Ca(2+) overload, such as toxicity induced by high K(+) in the SH-SY5Y cell line (60% protection at 30 μM) and veratridine in hippocampal slices (26% protection at 10 μM). It also showed neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress, an activity related to its nitrogen radical scavenger effect and moderate induction of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Its Nrf2 induction capability was confirmed by the increase of the expression of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory enzyme heme-oxygenase I (3-fold increase). In addition, the multitarget profile of ITH14001 led to anti-inflammatory properties, shown by the reduction of nitrites production induced by lipopolysaccharide in glial cultures. Finally, it showed protective effect in two acute models of cerebral ischemia in hippocampal slices, excitotoxicity induced by glutamate (31% protection at 10 μM) and oxygen and glucose deprivation (76% protection at 10 μM), reducing oxidative stress and iNOS deleterious induction. In conclusion, our hybrid derivative showed improved neuroprotective properties when compared to its parent compounds CGP37157 and nimodipine.

  10. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  11. Activity-dependent calcium signaling and ERK-MAP kinases in neurons: a link to structural plasticity of the nucleus and gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, J Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression is important for the formation and maturation of neuronal networks, neuronal survival and for plastic modifications within mature networks. At the level of individual neurons, expression of new protein is required for dendritic branching, synapse formation and elimination. Experience-driven synaptic activity induces membrane depolarization, which in turn evokes intracellular calcium transients that are decoded according to their source and strength by intracellular calcium sensing proteins. In order to activate the gene transcription machinery of the cell, calcium signals have to be conveyed from the site of their generation in the cytoplasm to the cell nucleus. This can occur via a variety of mechanisms and with different kinetics depending on the source and amplitude of calcium influx. One mechanism involves the propagation of calcium itself, leading to nuclear calcium transients that subsequently activate transcription. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade represents a second central signaling module that transduces information from the site of calcium signal generation at the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Nuclear signaling of the MAPK cascades catalyzes the phosphorylation of transcription factors but also regulates gene transcription more globally at the level of chromatin remodeling as well as through its recently identified role in the modulation of nuclear shape. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2, activated by synaptically evoked calcium influx, can signal to the nucleus and regulate gene transcription. Moreover, we describe how MAPK-dependent structural plasticity of the nuclear envelope enhances nuclear calcium signaling and suggest possible implications for the regulation of gene transcription in the context of nuclear geometry. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of Spinal Substance P Release by Intrathecal Calcium Channel Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasusuki, Toshifumi; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated the role of different voltage sensitive calcium channels expressed at presynaptic afferent terminals in substance P release and on nociceptive behavior evoked by intraplantar formalin by examining the effects of intrathecally delivered N- (ziconotide), T- (mibefradil) and L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels blockers (diltiazem and verapamil). Methods Rats received intrathecal pretreatment with saline or doses of morphine, ziconotide, mibefradil, diltiazem or verapamil. The effect of these injections upon flinching evoked by intraplantar formalin (5%, 50μl) was quantified. To assess substance P release, the incidence of neurokinin 1 receptor internalization in the ipsilateral and contralateral lamina I was determined in immunofluorescent stained tissues. Results Intrathecal morphine (20μg), ziconotide (0.3, 0.6 and 1μg), mibefradil (100μg, but not 50μg), diltiazem (500μg, but not 300μg) and verapamil (200μg, but not 50 and 100μg) reduced paw flinching in phase 2 as compared to vehicle control (P Ziconotide (0.3, 0.6 and 1μg) and morphine (20μg) significantly inhibited neurokinin 1 receptor internalization (P < 0.05), but mibefradil, diltiazem and verapamil at the highest doses had no effect. Conclusion These results emphasize the role in vivo of N-, but not T- and L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels in mediating the stimulus evoked substance P release from small primary afferents and suggest that T- and L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels blockers exert antihyperalgesic effects by an action on other populations of afferents or mechanisms involving post synaptic excitability. PMID:21577088

  14. Calcium Directly Regulates Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Headgroup Conformation and Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilkova, E.; Pleskot, Roman; Rissanen, S.; Sun, S.; Czogalla, A.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Róg, T.; Vattulainen, I.; Cremer, P. S.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Coskun, U.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 11 (2017), s. 4019-4024 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : membrane * calcium ions * PIP2 * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jacs.6b11760

  15. Transport phenomena in intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2018-02-01

    The role of non-Gaussian noises on transport characteristic of Ca2+ in intracellular calcium oscillation system driven by non-Gaussian noises is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The statistical properties of velocity of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca2+ concentration are simulated. The results exhibit, as parameter p(which is used to control the degree of the departure from the non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian noise.)increases, calcium in cytosol shows positive, zero, and negative transport, but in calcium store always hold positive value. As non-Gaussian noises increase, calcium in cytosol appears negative and zero transport, and in calcium store appears positive transport. As correlation time of non-Gaussian noises varies, calcium in both cytosol and calcium store occur negative, zero, and positive transport.

  16. Calcium signaling through CaMKII regulates hepatic glucose production in fasting and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Lale; Wong, Catherine C.L.; Li, Gang; Xu, Tao; Pajvani, Utpal; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Wronska, Anetta; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Backs, Johannes; Singer, Harold A.; Yates, John R.; Accili, Domenico; Tabas, Ira

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatic glucose production (HGP) is crucial for glucose homeostasis, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that a calcium-sensing enzyme, CaMKII, is activated in a calcium- and IP3R-dependent manner by cAMP and glucagon in primary HCs and by glucagon and fasting in vivo. Genetic deficiency or inhibition of CaMKII blocks nuclear translocation of FoxO1 by affecting its phosphorylation, impairs fasting- and glucagon/cAMP-induced glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, and lowers blood glucose levels, while constitutively active CaMKII has the opposite effects. Importantly, the suppressive effect of CaMKII deficiency on glucose metabolism is abrogated by transduction with constitutively nuclear FoxO1, indicating that the effect of CaMKII deficiency requires nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. This same pathway is also involved in excessive HGP in the setting of obesity. These results reveal a calcium-mediated signaling pathway involved in FoxO1 nuclear localization and hepatic glucose homeostasis. PMID:22503562

  17. Glucose Regulates Cyclin D2 Expression in Quiescent and Replicating Pancreatic β-Cells Through Glycolysis and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpeter, Seth J.; Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Porat, Shay; Granot, Zvi; Shapiro, A. M. James; Magnuson, Mark A.; Eden, Amir; Grimsby, Joseph; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular triggers of pancreatic β-cell proliferation may facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for diabetes. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important role for cyclin D2 in β-cell proliferation and mass homeostasis, but its specific function in β-cell division and mechanism of regulation remain unclear. Here, we report that cyclin D2 is present at high levels in the nucleus of quiescent β-cells in vivo. The major regulator of cyclin D2 expression is glucose, acting via glycolysis and calcium channels in the β-cell to control cyclin D2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, cyclin D2 mRNA is down-regulated during S-G2-M phases of each β-cell division, via a mechanism that is also affected by glucose metabolism. Thus, glucose metabolism maintains high levels of nuclear cyclin D2 in quiescent β-cells and modulates the down-regulation of cyclin D2 in replicating β-cells. These data challenge the standard model for regulation of cyclin D2 during the cell division cycle and suggest cyclin D2 as a molecular link between glucose levels and β-cell replication. PMID:21521747

  18. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodvaël Fraysse

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2, a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content.

  19. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  20. Atlastin regulates store-operated calcium entry for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yan, Bing; Si, Hongjiang; Peng, Xu; Zhang, Shenyuan L; Hu, Junjie

    2017-02-27

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a class of dynamin-like GTPases known as atlastin (ATL). Depletion of or mutations in ATL cause an unbranched ER morphology and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by axon shortening in corticospinal motor neurons and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. How ER shaping is linked to neuronal defects is poorly understood. Here, we show that dominant-negative mutants of ATL1 in PC-12 cells inhibit nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of wild-type or mutant ATL1 or depletion of ATLs alters ER morphology and affects store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by decreasing STIM1 puncta formation near the plasma membrane upon calcium depletion of the ER. In addition, blockage of the STIM1-Orai pathway effectively abolishes neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells stimulated by NGF. These results suggest that SOCE plays an important role in neuronal regeneration, and mutations in ATL1 may cause HSP, partly by undermining SOCE.

  1. Regulation of CaV2 calcium channels by G protein coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Currie, Kevin P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (Ca2+ channels) are key mediators of depolarization induced calcium influx into excitable cells, and thereby play pivotal roles in a wide array of physiological responses. This review focuses on the inhibition of CaV2 (N- and P/Q-type) Ca2+-channels by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which exerts important autocrine/paracrine control over synaptic transmission and neuroendocrine secretion. Voltage-dependent inhibition is the most widespread mechanism, and involves direct binding of the G protein βγ dimer (Gβγ) to the α1 subunit of CaV2 channels. GPCRs can also recruit several other distinct mechanisms including phosphorylation, lipid signaling pathways, and channel trafficking that result in voltage-independent inhibition. Current knowledge of Gβγ-mediated inhibition is reviewed, including the molecular interactions involved, determinants of voltage-dependence, and crosstalk with other cell signaling pathways. A summary of recent developments in understanding the voltage-independent mechanisms prominent in sympathetic and sensory neurons is also included. PMID:23063655

  2. Acute and 3-month effects of calcium carbonate on the calcification propensity of serum and regulators of vascular calcification: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, S M; Gamble, G D; Pasch, A; O'Neill, W C; Stewart, A; Horne, A M; Reid, I R

    2016-03-01

    Calcium supplements have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but the mechanism is unknown. We investigated the effects of calcium supplements on the propensity of serum to calcify, based on the transition time of primary to secondary calciprotein particles (T50). Changes in serum calcium were related to changes in T50. Calcium supplements have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, it is unknown whether this is related to an increase in vascular calcification. We investigated the acute and 3-month effects of calcium supplements on the propensity of serum to calcify, based on the transition time of primary to secondary calciprotein particles (T50), and on three possible regulators of calcification: fetuin-A, pyrophosphate and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). We randomized 41 postmenopausal women to 1 g/day of calcium as carbonate, or to a placebo containing no calcium. Measurements were performed at baseline and then 4 and 8 h after their first dose, and after 3 months of supplementation. Fetuin-A, pyrophosphate and FGF23 were measured in the first 10 participants allocated to calcium carbonate and placebo who completed the study. T50 declined in both groups, the changes tending to be greater in the calcium group. Pyrophosphate declined from baseline in the placebo group at 4 h and was different from the calcium group at this time point (p = 0.04). There were no other significant between-groups differences. The changes in serum total calcium from baseline were significantly related to changes in T50 at 4 h (r = -0.32, p = 0.05) and 8 h (r = -0.39, p = 0.01), to fetuin-A at 3 months (r = 0.57, p = 0.01) and to pyrophosphate at 4 h (r = 0.61, p = 0.02). These correlative findings suggest that serum calcium concentrations modulate the propensity of serum to calcify (T50), and possibly produce counter-regulatory changes in pyrophosphate and fetuin-A. This provides a possible mechanism by which

  3. On the molecular basis and regulation of cellular capacitative calcium entry: Roles for Trp proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaumer, Lutz; Zhu, Xi; Jiang, Meisheng; Boulay, Guylain; Peyton, Michael; Vannier, Brigitte; Brown, Darren; Platano, Daniela; Sadeghi, Hamid; Stefani, Enrico; Birnbaumer, Mariel

    1996-01-01

    During the last 2 years, our laboratory has worked on the elucidation of the molecular basis of capacitative calcium entry (CCE) into cells. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that CCE channels are formed of subunits encoded in genes related to the Drosophila trp gene. The first step in this pursuit was to search for mammalian trp genes. We found not one but six mammalian genes and cloned several of their cDNAs, some in their full length. As assayed in mammalian cells, overexpression of some mammalian Trps increases CCE, while expression of partial trp cDNAs in antisense orientation can interfere with endogenous CCE. These findings provided a firm connection between CCE and mammalian Trps. This article reviews the known forms of CCE and highlights unanswered questions in our understanding of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and the physiological roles of CCE. PMID:8986787

  4. On the molecular basis and regulation of cellular capacitative calcium entry: roles for Trp proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaumer, L; Zhu, X; Jiang, M; Boulay, G; Peyton, M; Vannier, B; Brown, D; Platano, D; Sadeghi, H; Stefani, E; Birnbaumer, M

    1996-12-24

    During the last 2 years, our laboratory has worked on the elucidation of the molecular basis of capacitative calcium entry (CCE) into cells. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that CCE channels are formed of subunits encoded in genes related to the Drosophila trp gene. The first step in this pursuit was to search for mammalian trp genes. We found not one but six mammalian genes and cloned several of their cDNAs, some in their full length. As assayed in mammalian cells, overexpression of some mammalian Trps increases CCE, while expression of partial trp cDNAs in antisense orientation can interfere with endogenous CCE. These findings provided a firm connection between CCE and mammalian Trps. This article reviews the known forms of CCE and highlights unanswered questions in our understanding of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and the physiological roles of CCE.

  5. Effect of inherited abnormalities of calcium regulation on human neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Ricardo A; Books, Wendy; Dunne, Vanessa

    2003-09-01

    Synaptotagmins are abundant synaptic proteins that represent the best candidate for the calcium sensor at the nerve terminal. The pore-forming, voltage-sensing transmembrane alpha-1 subunit of the P/Q voltage-gated calcium channel (or Ca(v)2.1) encoded by the CACNA1A gene is another major component of the process of action potential-evoked exocytosis at the adult mammalian neuromuscular junction. Defects of these proteins, in nonhuman species, result in severe disruption of rapid synaptic transmission. This paper investigates the molecular bases of inherited presynaptic deficits of neuromuscular transmission in humans. Patients with congenital presynaptic failure, including two patients with episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2) due to CACNA1A mutations, were studied with muscle biopsy, microelectrode studies, electron microscopy, DNA amplification, and sequencing. All patients, including EA-2 patients, showed selective failure of the action potential-dependent release without reduction of the spontaneous release of neurotransmitter. In addition, patients with EA-2 showed partial blockade of neuromuscular transmission with the N-type blocker omega-conotoxin not seen in controls. The EM showed a varied degree of increased complexity of postsynaptic folds. Mutational analysis in candidate genes, including human synaptotagmin II, syntaxin 1A, synaptobrevin I, SNAP 25, CACNA1A, CACNB2, and Rab3A, was unrevealing. Although no mutations in candidate genes were found in patients with inborn presynaptic failure, functional and structural similarities between this group and patients with EA-2 due to CACNA1A mutations suggest a common pathogenic mechanism.

  6. [Regulation Mechanism of Ginkgo-Dipyridamolum for Calcium Homeostasis on Cardioprotective Effect During Ischemia Reperfusion Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Hai-hua; Zhou, Ping-ping; Jiang, Yu-xin

    2015-12-01

    To explore regulatory mechanism of Ginkgo-dipyridamolum (GD) for calcium homeostasis on cardioprotective effect during ischemia reperfusion injury in the isolated rat heart. 40 male SD-rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8): normal control group (NC), ischemia reperfusion group (IR), GD precondition group (GD + IR), Nicardipine and GD precondition group( Nic + GD + IR), and LaCl3 and GD precondition group (LaCl, + GD +IR). The hearts of rats were isolated after anesthesia and performed to profuse with Langendorff equipment. The heart functional indexes (HR, LVSP and ± dp/dt(max)) were detected at the five time points (stabilize point, ischemia 30 min, reperfusion 5 min, reperfusion 30 min, and reperfusion 60 min). The coronary effluents were also collected at the five time points. The activities of LDH and CK were measured, respectively, as well as the Ca2+ contents. After the experiments were finished,the myocardial mitochondria were isolated, homogenated and then the Ca2+ concentrations, the activities of IDH and α-OGDH were detected. The pathologic changes in myocardial tissues were also observed by histologic section. Compared with IR group, the heart functional indexes ( LVSP x HR and ± dp/dt(max)) of GD + IR group were improved at the five time points; the enzymes (LDH and CK) release, the Ca2+ concentrations, the activities of IDH and α-OGDH were reduced in mitochondrion. However, the protective effects above could be inhibited by Nic and LaCl3. Histologic sections showed that the myocardial tissue in IR group was damaged obviously, the damaged myocardial tissues were repaired in GD + IR, Nic + GD + IR and LaCl, + GD + IR) groups, especially in GD + IR group. Ginkgo-dipyridamolum can alleviate the myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, the mechanism is probobaly related to maintaining calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial energy metabolism function.

  7. Bruton's tyrosine kinase mediates the synergistic signalling between TLR9 and the B cell receptor by regulating calcium and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F Kenny

    Full Text Available B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation.

  8. Phytoplankton calcification as an effective mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M. N.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Kaźmierczak, J.; Gallo, F.; Mackinder, L.; Li, Y.; Nesterenko, P. N.; Trull, T. W.; Hallegraeff, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    Marine phytoplankton have developed the remarkable ability to tightly regulate the concentration of free calcium ions in the intracellular cytosol at a level of ~ 0.1 μmol L-1 in the presence of seawater Ca2+ concentrations of 10 mmol L-1. The low cytosolic calcium ion concentration is of utmost importance for proper cell signalling function. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the tight control of intracellular Ca2+ concentration are not completely understood, phytoplankton taxonomic groups appear to have evolved different strategies, which may affect their ability to cope with changes in seawater Ca2+ concentrations in their environment on geological timescales. For example, the Cretaceous (145 to 66 Ma), an era known for the high abundance of coccolithophores and the production of enormous calcium carbonate deposits, exhibited seawater calcium concentrations up to 4 times present-day levels. We show that calcifying coccolithophore species (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus braarudii) are able to maintain their relative fitness (in terms of growth rate and photosynthesis) at simulated Cretaceous seawater calcium concentrations, whereas these rates are severely reduced under these conditions in some non-calcareous phytoplankton species (Chaetoceros sp., Ceratoneis closterium and Heterosigma akashiwo). Most notably, this also applies to a non-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi which displays a calcium sensitivity similar to the non-calcareous species. We hypothesize that the process of calcification in coccolithophores provides an efficient mechanism to alleviate cellular calcium poisoning and thereby offered a potential key evolutionary advantage, responsible for the proliferation of coccolithophores during times of high seawater calcium concentrations. The exact function of calcification and the reason behind the highly ornate physical structures of coccoliths remain elusive.

  9. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor exon IV transcription through calcium responsive elements in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zheng

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been studied as an important model to elucidate the mechanisms underlying numerous aspects of neuroplasticity. It has been extensively emphasized that Ca(2+ influx through different routes may have significantly different effects on BDNF transcription. Here, we examined the regulatory property of the major calcium responsive elements (CaRE in BDNF promoter IV in cultured rat cortical neurons. BDNF promoter IV, as well as CaRE1 and CaRE3, was significantly activated by Ca(2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC or NMDA receptor (NMDAR. However, the L-VGCC- and NMDAR-mediated activation of CaRE was differentially regulated by different Ca(2+-stimulated protein kinases. Specifically, PKA, CaMKI, and CaMKIV activity were required for L-VGCC-, but not NMDAR-mediated CaRE1 activation. CaMKI activity was required for NMDAR- but not L-VGCC-mediated CaRE3 activation. Surprisingly, the activation of CaRF, a previously identified transcription factor for CaRE1, was stimulated via L-VGCC but not NMDAR, and required MEK, PI3K and CaMKII activity. These results suggest a new working model that activity-dependent BDNF IV up-regulation may be coordinately mediated by CaRE1 and CaRE3 activity, which show different responses to Ca(2+-stimulated kinases. Our data also explain how the individual cis-element in BDNF promoter is distinctively coupled to different Ca(2+ routes.

  10. The transition from proliferation to differentiation in colorectal cancer is regulated by the calcium activated chloride channel A1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    Full Text Available Breaking the balance between proliferation and differentiation in animal cells can lead to cancer, but the mechanisms maintaining this balance remain largely undefined. The calcium activated chloride channel A1 (CLCA1 is a member of the calcium sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins and is expressed mainly in the colon, small intestine and appendix. We show that CLCA1 plays a functional role in differentiation and proliferation of Caco-2 cells and of intestinal tissue. Caco-2 cells spontaneously differentiate either in confluent culture or when treated with butyrate, a molecule present naturally in the diet. Here, we compared CLCA1 expressional levels between patients with and without colorectal cancer (CRC and determined the functional role of CLCA1 in differentiation and proliferation of Caco-2 cells. We showed that: 1 CLCA1 and CLCA4 expression were down-regulated significantly in CRC patients; 2 CLCA1 expression was up-regulated in Caco-2 cells induced to differentiate by confluent culture or by treatment with sodium butyrate (NaBT; 3 Knockdown of CLCA1 with siRNA significantly inhibited cell differentiation and promoted cell proliferation in Caco-2 confluent cultures, and 4 In Caco-2 3D culture, suppression of CLCA1 significantly increased cell proliferation and compromised NaBT-induced inhibition of proliferation. In conclusion, CLCA1 may contribute to promoting spontaneous differentiation and reducing proliferation of Caco-2 cells and may be a target of NaBT-induced inhibition of proliferation and therefore a potential diagnostic marker for CRC prognosis.

  11. The calcium-binding protein ALG-2 regulates protein secretion and trafficking via interactions with MISSL and MAP1B proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Terunao; Inoue, Kuniko; Arai, Yumika; Kuwata, Keiko; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi

    2017-10-13

    Mobilization of intracellular calcium is essential for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, apoptosis, and vesicular trafficking. Several lines of evidence have suggested that apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2, also known as PDCD6), a calcium-binding protein, acts as a calcium sensor linking calcium levels with efficient vesicular trafficking, especially at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport step. However, how ALG-2 regulates these processes remains largely unclear. Here, we report that MAPK1-interacting and spindle-stabilizing (MISS)-like (MISSL), a previously uncharacterized protein, interacts with ALG-2 in a calcium-dependent manner. Live-cell imaging revealed that upon a rise in intracellular calcium levels, GFP-tagged MISSL (GFP-MISSL) dynamically relocalizes in a punctate pattern and colocalizes with ALG-2. MISSL knockdown caused disorganization of the components of the ER exit site, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, and Golgi. Importantly, knockdown of either MISSL or ALG-2 attenuated the secretion of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), a model secreted cargo protein, with similar reductions in secretion by single- and double-protein knockdowns, suggesting that MISSL and ALG-2 act in the same pathway to regulate the secretion process. Furthermore, ALG-2 or MISSL knockdown delayed ER-to-Golgi transport of procollagen type I. We also found that ALG-2 and MISSL interact with microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and that MAP1B knockdown reverts the reduced secretion of SEAP caused by MISSL or ALG-2 depletion. These results suggest that a change in the intracellular calcium level plays a role in regulation of the secretory pathway via interaction of ALG-2 with MISSL and MAP1B. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  13. Calcium-sensing receptor is a physiologic multimodal chemosensor regulating gastric G-cell growth and gastrin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianying; Petersen, Clark D.; Coy, David H.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J.; Pollak, Martin R.; Wank, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is the major sensor and regulator of extracellular Ca2+, whose activity is allosterically regulated by amino acids and pH. Recently, CaR has been identified in the stomach and intestinal tract, where it has been proposed to function in a non-Ca2+ homeostatic capacity. Luminal nutrients, such as Ca2+ and amino acids, have been recognized for decades as potent stimulants for gastrin and acid secretion, although the molecular basis for their recognition remains unknown. The expression of CaR on gastrin-secreting G cells in the stomach and their shared activation by Ca2+, amino acids, and elevated pH suggest that CaR may function as the elusive physiologic sensor regulating gastrin and acid secretion. The genetic and pharmacologic studies presented here comparing CaR-null mice and wild-type littermates support this hypothesis. Gavage of Ca2+, peptone, phenylalanine, Hepes buffer (pH 7.4), and CaR-specific calcimimetic, cinacalcet, stimulated gastrin and acid secretion, whereas the calcilytic, NPS 2143, inhibited secretion only in the wild-type mouse. Consistent with known growth and developmental functions of CaR, G-cell number was progressively reduced between 30 and 90 d of age by more than 65% in CaR-null mice. These studies of nutrient-regulated G-cell gastrin secretion and growth provide definitive evidence that CaR functions as a physiologically relevant multimodal sensor. Medicinals targeting diseases of Ca2+ homeostasis should be reviewed for effects outside traditional Ca2+-regulating tissues in view of the broader distribution and function of CaR. PMID:20876097

  14. Selective regulation of clathrin-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and endocytosis by phospholipase C and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Bautista, Stephen; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bone, Leslie N; Dayam, Roya M; Abousawan, John; Botelho, Roberto J; Antonescu, Costin N

    2017-10-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a major regulator of cell-surface protein internalization. Clathrin and other proteins assemble into small invaginating structures at the plasma membrane termed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) that mediate vesicle formation. In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is regulated by its accumulation within CCPs. Given the diversity of proteins regulated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, how this process may distinctly regulate specific receptors is a key question. We examined the selective regulation of clathrin-dependent EGFR signaling and endocytosis. We find that perturbations of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), Ca 2+ , or protein kinase C (PKC) impair clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR, the formation of CCPs harboring EGFR, and EGFR signaling. Each of these manipulations was without effect on the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR). EGFR and TfR were recruited to largely distinct clathrin structures. In addition to control of initiation and assembly of CCPs, EGF stimulation also elicited a Ca 2+ - and PKC-dependent reduction in synaptojanin1 recruitment to clathrin structures, indicating broad control of CCP assembly by Ca 2+ signals. Hence EGFR elicits PLCγ1-calcium signals to facilitate formation of a subset of CCPs, thus modulating its own signaling and endocytosis. This provides evidence for the versatility of CCPs to control diverse cellular processes. © 2017 Delos Santos et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  16. Non-classical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by the vitamin D receptor: insights into calcium homeostasis, immune system regulation and cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Vassil; Salehi-Tabar, Reyhaneh; An, Beum-Soo; White, John H

    2014-10-01

    Hormonal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] signals through the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), a ligand-regulated transcription factor. Gene expression profiling studies have revealed that 1,25(OH)2D signaling through the VDR can lead to activation or repression of target gene transcription in roughly equal proportions. Classically, transcriptional regulation by the VDR, similar to other nuclear receptors, has been characterized by its capacity to recognize high affinity cognate vitamin D response elements (VDREs), located in the regulatory regions of target genes. Several biochemical studies revealed that the VDRE-bound receptor recruits a series of coregulatory proteins, leading to transactivation of adjacent target genes. However, genome-wide and other analyses of VDR binding have revealed that a subset of VDR binding sites does not contain VDREs, and that VDREs are not associated with transcriptionally repressed VDR target genes. Work over the last ∼20 years and in particular recent findings have revealed a diverse array of mechanisms by which VDR can form complexes with several other classes of transcriptional activators, leading to repression of gene transcription. Moreover, these efforts have led to several insights into the molecular basis for the physiological regulation of calcium homeostasis, immune system function and cancer chemoprevention by 1,25(OH)2D/VDR signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 31P NMR study of intracellular pH during the calcium paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Kirkels, J.H.; Echteld, C.J.A. van; Borst, C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Reperfusion of an isolated mammalian heart with a calcium-containing solution after a brief calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage: the calcium paradox. It has been suggested that acidification of the cytosol, as a result of hydrolysis of ATP and accumulation of calcium by

  18. TRPV4 and AQP4 Channels Synergistically Regulate Cell Volume and Calcium Homeostasis in Retinal Müller Glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Andrew O; Ryskamp, Daniel A; Phuong, Tam T T; Verkman, Alan S; Yarishkin, Oleg; MacAulay, Nanna; Križaj, David

    2015-09-30

    that fine-tunes astroglial volume regulation by integrating osmosensing, calcium signaling, and water transport and, when overactivated, triggers pathological swelling. Significance statement: We characterize the physiological features of interactions between the astroglial swelling sensor transient receptor potential isoform 4 (TRPV4) and the aquaporin 4 (AQP4) water channel in retinal Müller cells. Our data reveal an elegant and complex set of mechanisms involving reciprocal interactions at the level of glial gene expression, calcium homeostasis, swelling, and volume regulation. Specifically, water influx through AQP4 drives calcium influx via TRPV4 in the glial end foot, which regulates expression of Aqp4 and Kir4.1 genes and facilitates the time course and amplitude of hypotonicity-induced swelling and regulatory volume decrease. We confirm the crucial facets of the signaling mechanism in heterologously expressing oocytes. These results identify the molecular mechanism that contributes to dynamic regulation of glial volume but also provide new insights into the pathophysiology of glial reactivity and edema formation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513526-13$15.00/0.

  19. Calcium homeostasis in digitonin-permeabilized bovine chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, L.S.

    1988-07-01

    The regulation of cytosolic calcium was studied in digitonin-permeabilized chromaffin cells. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by permeabilized cells was measured at various Ca2+ concentrations in the incubation solutions. In the absence of ATP, there was a small (10-15% of total uptake) but significant increase in accumulation of Ca2+ into both the vesicular and nonvesicular pools. In the presence of ATP, the permeabilized cells accumulated Ca2+ into carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP)-sensitive and -insensitive pools. The CCCP-sensitive pool--mainly mitochondria--was active when the calcium concentration was greater than 1 microM and was not saturated at 25 microM. The Ca2+ sequestered by the CCCP-insensitive pool could be inhibited by vanadate and released by inositol trisphosphate, a combination suggesting that this pool was the endoplasmic reticulum. The CCCP-insensitive pool had a high affinity for calcium, with an EC50 of approximately 1 microM. When the Ca2+ concentration was adjusted to the level in the cytoplasm of resting cells (0.1 microM), the presumed endoplasmic reticulum pool was responsible for approximately 90% of the ATP-stimulated calcium uptake. At a calcium level similar to the acetylcholine-stimulated level in intact cells (5-10 microM), most of the Ca2+ (greater than 95%) went into the CCCP-sensitive pool.

  20. Metabolomic and physico-chemical approach unravel dynamic regulation of calcium in sweet cherry fruit physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, Michail; Karagiannis, Evangelos; Tanou, Georgia; Karamanoli, Katerina; Lazaridou, Athina; Matsi, Theodora; Molassiotis, Athanassios

    2017-07-01

    Calcium (Ca 2 ) nutrition has a significant role in fruit physiology; however, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, fruit quality in response to CaCl 2 , applied via foliar sprays (Ca 2 ) or/and hydro-cooling water (Ca HC ), was characterized in 'Lapins' cherries at harvest, just after cold storage (20 days at 0 °C) as well as after cold storage followed by 2 days at 20 °C, herein defined as shelf-life period. Data indicated that pre- and post-harvest Ca 2+ applications increased total Ca 2+ and cell wall bound Ca 2+ , respectively. Treatment with Ca reduced cracking whereas Ca + Ca HC condition depressed stem browning. Both skin penetration and stem removal were affected by Ca 2+ feeding. Also, several color- and antioxidant-related parameters were induced by Ca 2+ treatments. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant alterations in primary metabolites among the Ca 2+ treatments, including sugars (eg., glucose, fructose), soluble alcohols (eg., arabitol, sorbitol), organic acids (eg.,malate, quinate) and amino acids (eg., glycine, beta-alanine). This work helps to improve our knowledge on the fruit's response to Ca 2+ nutrition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Agouti regulation of intracellular calcium: Role in the insulin resistance of viable yellow mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemel, M.B.; Kim, J.H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Woychik, R.P.; Michaud, E.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hadwell, S.H.; Patel, I.R.; Wilkison, W.O. [Research Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Several dominant mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse cause a syndrome of marked obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Although it is known that the agouti gene is expressed in an ectopic manner in these mutants, the precise mechanism by which the agouti gene product mediates these effects is unclear. Since intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is believed to play a role in mediating insulin action and dysregulation of Ca{sup 2+} flux is observed in diabetic animals and humans, we examined the status of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in mice carrying the dominant agouti allele, viable yellow (A{sup vy}). We show here that in mice carrying this mutation, the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is elevated in skeletal muscle, and the degree of elevation is closely correlated with the degree to which the mutant traits are expressed in individual animals. Moreover, we demonstrate that the agouti gene product is capable of inducing increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in cultured and freshly isolated skeletal muscle myocytes from wild-type mice. Based on these findings, we present a model in which we propose that the agouti polypeptide promotes insulin resistance in mutant animals through its ability to increase [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Shipston

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK channels are important determinants of their (pathophysiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs and acyl thioesterases. (APTs. S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signalling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease.

  3. Stimulus-dependent regulation of nuclear Ca2+ signaling in cardiomyocytes: a role of neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Shu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Nakamura, Tomoe Y

    2015-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) transients are elicited by electrical and receptor stimulations, leading to muscle contraction and gene expression, respectively. Although such elevations of Ca2+levels ([Ca2+]) also occur in the nucleus, the precise mechanism of nuclear [Ca2+] regulation during different kinds of stimuli, and its relationship with cytoplasmic [Ca2+] regulation are not fully understood. To address these issues, we used a new region-specific fluorescent protein-based Ca2+ indicator, GECO, together with the conventional probe Fluo-4 AM. We confirmed that nuclear Ca2+ transients were elicited by both electrical and receptor stimulations in neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. Kinetic analysis revealed that electrical stimulation-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transients are slower than cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients, and chelating cytoplasmic Ca2+ abolished nuclear Ca2+ transients, suggesting that nuclear Ca2+ are mainly derived from the cytoplasm during electrical stimulation. On the other hand, receptor stimulation such as with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) preferentially increased nuclear [Ca2+] compared to cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. Experiments using inhibitors revealed that electrical and receptor stimulation-elicited Ca2+ transients were mainly mediated by ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), respectively, suggesting different mechanisms for the two signals. Furthermore, IGF-1-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transient amplitude was significantly lower in myocytes lacking neuronal Ca2+ sensor-1 (NCS-1), a Ca2+ binding protein implicated in IP3R-mediated pathway in the heart. Moreover, IGF-1 strengthened the interaction between NCS-1 and IP3R. These results suggest a novel mechanism for receptor stimulation-induced nuclear [Ca2+] regulation mediated by IP3R and NCS-1 that may further fine-tune cardiac Ca2+ signal regulation.

  4. ZmCPK1, a calcium-independent kinase member of the Zea mays CDPK gene family, functions as a negative regulator in cold stress signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckwerth, Philipp; Ehlert, Britta; Romeis, Tina

    2015-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been shown to play important roles in plant environmental stress signal transduction. We report on the identification of ZmCPK1 as a member of the maize (Zea mays) CDPK gene family involved in the regulation of the maize cold stress response. Based upon in silico analysis of the Z. mays cv. B73 genome, we identified that the maize CDPK gene family consists of 39 members. Two CDPK members were selected whose gene expression was either increased (Zmcpk1) or decreased (Zmcpk25) in response to cold exposure. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that ZmCPK1 displays calcium-independent protein kinase activity. The C-terminal calcium-binding domain of ZmCPK1 was sufficient to mediate calcium independency of a previously calcium-dependent enzyme in chimeric ZmCPK25-CPK1 proteins. Furthermore, co-transfection of maize mesophyll protoplasts with active full-length ZmCPK1 suppressed the expression of a cold-induced marker gene, Zmerf3 (ZmCOI6.21). In accordance, heterologous overexpression of ZmCPK1 in Arabidopsis thaliana yielded plants with altered acclimation-induced frost tolerance. Our results identify ZmCPK1 as a negative regulator of cold stress signalling in maize. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Up-regulation of the parathyroid calcium-sensing receptor after burn injury in sheep: a potential contributory factor to postburn hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, E D; Chattopadhyay, N; Bai, M; Kifor, O; Harper, D; Traber, D L; Hawkins, H K; Brown, E M; Klein, G L

    2000-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that the hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism that follow severe burn injury are related to up-regulation of the parathyroid gland calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), which may reduce the set-point for suppression of circulating parathyroid hormone by blood calcium. A controlled but unblinded study. An investigational intensive care unit. Female range ewes. Sheep were subjected to a 40% total body surface area burn under anesthesia (n = 9) or sham burn receiving anesthesia and fluid resuscitation only (n = 8) and were killed 48 hrs postburn. Blood ionized calcium, magnesium, and creatinine, and urinary calcium, magnesium, and creatinine were monitored for 48 hrs. After the sheep were killed, parathyroids (burn group, n = 3; sham group, n = 4) and kidneys (n = 4, each group) were harvested, snap frozen in liquid nitrogen, and analyzed for CaR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) by Northern blot, and were analyzed for CaR cell-surface staining by immunocytochemistry with a polyclonal CaR-specific antiserum (parathyroids only). Bumed sheep were hypocalcemic and hypomagnesemic compared with sham-burned control sheep. CaR mRNA was increased by 50% (p sheep. These findings are consistent with up-regulation of the parathyroid CaR and a related decrease in set-point for calcium suppression of parathyroid hormone secretion that may contribute to the previously reported postburn hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia.

  6. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators. ©2016 Ngkelo et al.

  7. Molecular structure and regulation of the epithelial calcium channels TRPV5 and TRPV6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis is of utmost importance for the normal development and function of the body. Active transcellular Ca2+ transport involves a chain of Ca2+ transport proteins mediating apical Ca2+ influx, transport to the basolateral membrane and extrusion into the bloodstream. Regulation of the two

  8. Calcium and cytoskeleton signaling during cell volume regulation in isolated nematocytes of Aiptasia mutabilis (Cnidaria: Anthozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A; La Spada, G

    2007-05-01

    Cell volume regulation has not been completely clarified in Coelenterates. The present investigation focuses on cell volume regulation under anisosmotic conditions, both hyposmotic and hypertonic, and on the underlying signals in nematocytes isolated from the Coelenterate Aiptasia mutabilis living in sea water. Nematocytes, once isolated from acontia, that were submitted to either hyposmotic (35%) and hypertonic shock (45%) show RVD and RVI capabilities, respectively. In order to ascertain the role of Ca2+ in triggering such regulatory mechanisms and the possible involvement of cytoskeleton components, tests were performed by employing either Ca2+ free conditions, Gd3+ as Ca2+ channel blockers, TFP as calmodulin inhibitor, colchicine as microtubule inhibitor and cytochalasin B as microfilament polymerization inhibitor. Results show that isolated nematocytes of A. mutabilis can regulate their volume upon both hyposmotic and hypertonic challenge. Ca2+ both from external medium and from internal stores is needed to perform RVD mechanisms, whereas, intracellular Ca2+ seems to be mainly involved in RVI. Moreover cytoskeletal components may play an important role since a significant RVD and RVI inhibition was observed in treated cells. On the basis of our observations further studies are warranted to further verify the role of signals, including phosphatases and phosphorylases, in cell volume regulation of primitive eukaryotic cells.

  9. The calcium sensor synaptotagmin 1 is expressed and regulated in hippocampal postsynaptic spines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Suleman; Egbenya, Daniel Lawer; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2017-01-01

    vesicles and at the postsynaptic density. We further investigated whether postsynaptic synaptotagmin 1 is regulated during synaptic plasticity. In a rat model of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy, we found that presynaptic and postsynaptic concentrations of the protein are reduced compared to control animals...

  10. Calcium Sensing Receptor Regulating Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation Through Initiating Cystathionine-Gamma-Lyase/Hydrogen Sulfide Pathway in Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. However, how cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S, is regulated remains unknown. Whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous CSE/H2S pathway in diabetic rat has not been previously investigated. Methods and Results: The morphological and ultrastructure alterations were tested by transmission electron microscopy, changes in the H2S concentration and the relaxation of the mesenteric secondary artery loop of diabetic rats were determined by Multiskan spectrum microplate spectrophotometer and isometric force transducer. Additionally, the expression levels of CaSR, CSE and Cyclin D1 in the mesenteric arteries of rats were examined by western blotting. The intracellular calcium concentration, the expression of p-CaMK II (phospho-calmodulin kinases II, CSE activity, the concentration of endogenous H2S and the proliferation of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured by using confocal microscope, western blotting, microplate spectrophotometer, MTT and BrdU, respectively. The VSMC layer thickened, the H2S concentration dropped, the relaxation of the mesenteric secondary artery rings weakened, and the expression of CaSR and CSE decreased whereas the expression of Cyclin D1 increased in diabetic rats compared with the control group. The [Ca2+]i of VSMCs increased upon treatment with CaSR agonists (10 µM Calindol and 2.5 mM CaCl2, while it decreased upon administration of calhex231, U73122 and 2-APB. The expression of p-CaMK II and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonists in VSMCs. CSE activity and the endogenous H2S concentration decreased in response to high glucose, while it increased with treatment of CaSR agonists. The proliferation rate increased in response to high glucose, and CaSR agonists or NaHS significantly reversed the proliferation of VSMCs

  11. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK9 positively regulates drought stress tolerance and spikelet fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in tolerance to abiotic stresses and in plant seed development. However, the functions of only a few rice CDPKs have been clarified. At present, it is unclear whether CDPKs also play a role in regulating spikelet fertility. Results We cloned and characterized the rice CDPK gene, OsCPK9. OsCPK9 transcription was induced by abscisic acid (ABA), PEG6000, and NaCl treatments. The results of OsCPK9 overexpression (OsCPK9-OX) and OsCPK9 RNA interference (OsCPK9-RNAi) analyses revealed that OsCPK9 plays a positive role in drought stress tolerance and spikelet fertility. Physiological analyses revealed that OsCPK9 improves drought stress tolerance by enhancing stomatal closure and by improving the osmotic adjustment ability of the plant. It also improves pollen viability, thereby increasing spikelet fertility. In OsCPK9-OX plants, shoot and root elongation showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA, compared with that of wild-type. Overexpression and RNA interference of OsCPK9 affected the transcript levels of ABA- and stress-responsive genes. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that OsCPK9 is a positive regulator of abiotic stress tolerance, spikelet fertility, and ABA sensitivity. PMID:24884869

  13. Alix is involved in caspase 9 activation during calcium-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappazzon, Flavie; Torch, Sakina; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Petiot, Anne; Thibert, Chantal; Blot, Béatrice; Verna, Jean-Marc; Sadoul, Rémy

    2010-06-18

    The cytoplasmic protein Alix/AIP1 (ALG-2 interacting protein X) is involved in cell death through mechanisms which remain unclear but require its binding partner ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2). The latter was defined as a regulator of calcium-induced apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We show here that Alix is also a critical component of caspase 9 activation and apoptosis triggered by calcium. Indeed, expression of Alix dominant-negative mutants or downregulation of Alix afford significant protection against cytosolic calcium elevation following thapsigargin (Tg) treatment. The function of Alix in this paradigm requires its interaction with ALG-2. In addition, we demonstrate that caspase 9 activation is necessary for apoptosis induced by Tg and that this activation is impaired by knocking down Alix. Altogether, our findings identify, for the first time, Alix as a crucial mediator of Ca(2+) induced caspase 9 activation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of the mammalian membrane block to polyspermy: evidence for calcium-dependent and -independent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Allison J; Williams, Carmen J; Evans, Janice P

    2007-02-01

    One crucial result of egg activation is the establishment of blocks on the zona pellucida and the egg plasma membrane to prevent fertilization by additional sperm. The mechanism(s) by which a mammalian egg regulates the establishment of the membrane block to polyspermy is largely unknown. Since Ca(2+) signaling regulates several egg activation events, this study investigates how sperm-induced Ca(2+) transients affect the membrane block to polyspermy, building on our previous work (Biology of Reproduction 67:1342). We demonstrate that mouse eggs that experience only one sperm-induced Ca(2+) transient establish a membrane block that is less effective, than in eggs that experience normal sperm-induced Ca(2+) transients but that is more effective than in eggs with completely suppressed [Ca(2+)](cyt) increases. Sperm-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](cyt) regulate the timing of membrane block establishment, as this block is established more slowly in eggs that experience one or no sperm-induced Ca(2+) transients. Finally, our studies produce the intriguing discovery that there is also a Ca(2+)-independent event that is associated with fertilization in the pathway leading to membrane block establishment. Taken together, these data indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in facilitating membrane block establishment by regulating the timing with which this change in egg membrane function occurs, and also that the membrane block differs from other post-fertilization egg activation responses as Ca(2+) is not the only stimulus. The membrane block to polyspermy in mammalian eggs is likely to be the culmination of multiple post-fertilization events that together modify the egg membrane's receptivity to sperm.

  15. Developmental regulation of expression of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 subunits mRNAs of the voltage-dependent calcium channel in a differentiating myogenic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, G; Orlowski, J; Schwartz, A

    1989-07-03

    The voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) in skeletal muscle probably plays a key role in transducing membrane charge movement to the calcium release channel. We report here that the expression of VDCC alpha 1 and alpha 2 mRNAs is developmentally regulated in differentiating C2C12 myogenic cells. The alpha 1 mRNA is not detectable in the myoblast form of C2C12 cells while its expression is induced 20-fold in differentiated myotubes. In contrast, the alpha 2 mRNA is weakly expressed in myoblasts but is also induced upon myogenic differentiation.

  16. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, James; Bishop, Martin J; Wilder, Catherine D E; O'Shea, Christopher; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart. Conclusions : SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased I Ks .

  17. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Winter

    2018-01-01

    reuptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart.Conclusions: SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased IKs.

  18. Regulation of developing myelin sheath elongation by oligodendrocyte calcium transients in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Anna M; Ford, Marc C; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Wilson, Stephen W; Attwell, David

    2018-01-01

    How action potentials regulate myelination by oligodendrocytes is uncertain. We show that neuronal activity raises [Ca 2+ ] i in developing oligodendrocytes in vivo and that myelin sheath elongation is promoted by a high frequency of [Ca 2+ ] i transients and prevented by [Ca 2+ ] i buffering. Sheath elongation occurs ~1 h after [Ca 2+ ] i elevation. Sheath shortening is associated with a low frequency of [Ca 2+ ] i transients but with longer duration [Ca 2+ ] i bursts. Thus, [Ca 2+ ] i controls myelin sheath development.

  19. Vesicular calcium regulates coat retention, fusogenicity, and size of pre-Golgi intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Marvin; Nycz, Deborah C; Joglekar, Ashwini; Fertschai, Ismene; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F; Hay, Jesse C

    2010-03-15

    The significance and extent of Ca(2+) regulation of the biosynthetic secretory pathway have been difficult to establish, and our knowledge of regulatory relationships integrating Ca(2+) with vesicle coats and function is rudimentary. Here, we investigated potential roles and mechanisms of luminal Ca(2+) in the early secretory pathway. Specific depletion of luminal Ca(2+) in living normal rat kidney cells using cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) resulted in the extreme expansion of vesicular tubular cluster (VTC) elements. Consistent with this, a suppressive role for vesicle-associated Ca(2+) in COPII vesicle homotypic fusion was demonstrated in vitro using Ca(2+) chelators. The EF-hand-containing protein apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2), previously implicated in the stabilization of sec31 at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites, inhibited COPII vesicle fusion in a Ca(2+)-requiring manner, suggesting that ALG-2 may be a sensor for the effects of vesicular Ca(2+) on homotypic fusion. Immunoisolation established that Ca(2+) chelation inhibits and ALG-2 specifically favors residual retention of the COPII outer shell protein sec31 on pre-Golgi fusion intermediates. We conclude that vesicle-associated Ca(2+), acting through ALG-2, favors the retention of residual coat molecules that seem to suppress membrane fusion. We propose that in cells, these Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms temporally regulate COPII vesicle interactions, VTC biogenesis, cargo sorting, and VTC maturation.

  20. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  1. Model of intracellular calcium cycling in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Y; Watanabe, M A; Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Karma, A

    2003-12-01

    We present a mathematical model of calcium cycling that takes into account the spatially localized nature of release events that correspond to experimentally observed calcium sparks. This model naturally incorporates graded release by making the rate at which calcium sparks are recruited proportional to the whole cell L-type calcium current, with the total release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) being just the sum of local releases. The dynamics of calcium cycling is studied by pacing the model with a clamped action potential waveform. Experimentally observed calcium alternans are obtained at high pacing rates. The results show that the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon is a steep nonlinear dependence of the calcium released from the SR on the diastolic SR calcium concentration (SR load) and/or the diastolic calcium level in the cytosol, where the dependence on diastolic calcium is due to calcium-induced inactivation of the L-type calcium current. In addition, the results reveal that the calcium dynamics can become chaotic even though the voltage pacing is periodic. We reduce the equations of the model to a two-dimensional discrete map that relates the SR and cytosolic concentrations at one beat and the previous beat. From this map, we obtain a condition for the onset of calcium alternans in terms of the slopes of the release-versus-SR load and release-versus-diastolic-calcium curves. From an analysis of this map, we also obtain an understanding of the origin of chaotic dynamics.

  2. TRPV-5 Mediates a Receptor Activator of NF-κB (RANK) Ligand-induced Increase in Cytosolic Ca2+ in Human Osteoclasts and Down-regulates Bone Resorption*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, Estelle; Bisson, Martine; Payet, Marcel Daniel; Roux, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Most of the signaling effectors located downstream of receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) activation are calcium-sensitive. However, the early signaling events that lead to the mobilization of intracellular calcium in human osteoclasts are still poorly understood. The Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe Fura2 was used to detect changes in the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in a model of human osteoclasts. Stimulating these cells with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induced a rapid and significant increase in [Ca2+]i. Adding extracellular Ca2+ chelators, depleting intracellular stores, and the use of a phospholipase C inhibitor all indicated that the Ca2+ was of extracellular origin, suggesting the involvement of a Ca2+ channel. We showed that none of the classical Ca2+ channels (L-, T-, or R-type) were involved in the RANKL-induced Ca2+ spike. However, the effect of high doses of Gd3+ did suggest that TRP family channels were present in human osteoclasts. The TRPV-5 channel was expressed in osteoclasts and was mainly located in the cellular area in contact with the bone surface. Furthermore, the RNA inactivation of TRPV-5 channel completely inhibited the RANKL-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, which was accompanied in the long term by marked activation of bone resorption. Overall, our results show that RANKL induced a significant increase in [Ca2+]i of extracellular origin, probably as a result of the opening of TRPV-5 calcium channels on the surface of human osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that TRPV-5 contributes to maintaining the homeostasis of the human skeleton via a negative feedback loop in RANKL-induced bone resorption. PMID:20547482

  3. TRPV-5 mediates a receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand-induced increase in cytosolic Ca2+ in human osteoclasts and down-regulates bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, Estelle; Bisson, Martine; Payet, Marcel Daniel; Roux, Sophie

    2010-08-13

    Most of the signaling effectors located downstream of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) activation are calcium-sensitive. However, the early signaling events that lead to the mobilization of intracellular calcium in human osteoclasts are still poorly understood. The Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probe Fura2 was used to detect changes in the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a model of human osteoclasts. Stimulating these cells with receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) induced a rapid and significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Adding extracellular Ca(2+) chelators, depleting intracellular stores, and the use of a phospholipase C inhibitor all indicated that the Ca(2+) was of extracellular origin, suggesting the involvement of a Ca(2+) channel. We showed that none of the classical Ca(2+) channels (L-, T-, or R-type) were involved in the RANKL-induced Ca(2+) spike. However, the effect of high doses of Gd(3+) did suggest that TRP family channels were present in human osteoclasts. The TRPV-5 channel was expressed in osteoclasts and was mainly located in the cellular area in contact with the bone surface. Furthermore, the RNA inactivation of TRPV-5 channel completely inhibited the RANKL-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was accompanied in the long term by marked activation of bone resorption. Overall, our results show that RANKL induced a significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i) of extracellular origin, probably as a result of the opening of TRPV-5 calcium channels on the surface of human osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that TRPV-5 contributes to maintaining the homeostasis of the human skeleton via a negative feedback loop in RANKL-induced bone resorption.

  4. Analysis of Conditional Paralytic Mutants in Drosophila Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase Reveals Novel Mechanisms for Regulating Membrane Excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, S.; Consoulas, C.; Kuromi, H.; Basole, A.; Mukai, L.; Kidokoro, Y.; Krishnan, K. S.; Ramaswami, M.

    2005-01-01

    Individual contributions made by different calcium release and sequestration mechanisms to various aspects of excitable cell physiology are incompletely understood. SERCA, a sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, being the main agent for calcium uptake into the ER, plays a central role in this process. By isolation and extensive characterization of conditional mutations in the Drosophila SERCA gene, we describe novel roles of this key protein in neuromuscular physiology and enable a gene...

  5. ESCRT components regulate the expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 through the Rim101/Nrg1 pathway in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunying; Du, Jingcai; Xiong, Bing; Xu, Huihui; Jiang, Linghuo

    2013-10-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) complexes function to form multivesicular bodies for sorting of proteins destined for the yeast vacuole or the mammalian lysosome. ESCRT components are well conserved in eukaryotes, and their mutations cause neurodegenerative diseases and other cellular pathologies in humans. PMR1 is the orthologous gene of two human genes for calcium pumps secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase (SPCA1, ATP2C1) and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA, ATP2A2), which are mutated in Hailey-Hailey and Darier genetic diseases, respectively. Here we show that deletion mutation of ESCRT components Snf7, Snf8, Stp22, Vps20, Vps25, Vps28, or Vps36 activates the calcium/calcineurin signaling in yeast cells, but surprisingly leads to a nearly 50% reduction in expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 independent of calcium stress. These ESCRT mutants are known to have a defect in Rim101 activation. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101 or further deletion of NRG1 in these mutants partially suppresses their calcium hypersensitivity. Deletion of NRG1 also completely rescues the expression of PMR1 in these mutants to the level of the wild type. Promoter mutagenesis, gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrate that Nrg1 binds to two motifs in the PMR1 promoter. In addition, expression of PMR1 under the control of its promoters with mutated Nrg1-binding motifs suppresses the calcium hypersensitivity of these ESCRT mutants. Collectively, these data have uncovered a function of ESCRT components in regulating PMR1 expression through the Nrg1/Rim101 pathway. Our findings provide important clues for understanding human diseases related to calcium homeostasis.

  6. Structural Basis for Calcium and Phosphatidyl Serine Regulation of PLC δ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomasney, Jon W.; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Kobayashi, Minae; King, Klim

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane associated enzymes including those of the phospholipase C (PLC) superfamily are regulated by specific interactions with lipids. Previously we have shown that the C2 domain of PLC δ1 is required for phosphatidyl serine (PS) dependent enzyme activation, and that activation requires the presence of Ca2+. To identify the site of interaction and the role of Ca2+ in the activation mechanism, we mutagenized three highly conserved Ca2+ binding residues (Asp 653, Asp-706 and Asp-708) to Gly in the C2 domain of PLC δ1. The PS-dependent Ca2+ binding affinities of the mutant enzymes D653G, D706G and D708G were reduced by an order of magnitude and the maximal Ca2+ binding was reduced to half of that of the native enzyme. The Ca2+ dependent PS binding was also reduced in the mutant enzymes. Under basal conditions, the Ca2+ dependence and maximal hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) was not altered in the mutants. However, the Ca2+ dependent PS stimulation was severely defective. PS reduces the Km of the native enzyme almost 20 fold, but far less for the mutants. Replacing Asp-653, Asp-706 and Asp-708 simultaneously to glycine in the C2 domain of PLC δ1, leads to a complete and selective loss of the stimulation and binding by PS. These results show that D653, 706 and 708 are required for Ca2+ binding in the C2 domain and demonstrate a mechanism by which C2 domains can mediate regulation of enzyme activity by specific lipid ligands. PMID:22385159

  7. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  8. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  9. Fluorescence measurement of calcium transients in perfused rabbit heart using rhod 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nido, P J; Glynn, P; Buenaventura, P; Salama, G; Koretsky, A P

    1998-02-01

    Surface fluorescence spectroscopy of the beating heart to measure cytosolic calcium has been limited by the need to use ultraviolet excitation light for many of the commonly used calcium indicators. Ultraviolet light in the heart produces a high level of background fluorescence and is highly absorbed, limiting tissue penetration. Visible wave-length fluorescence dyes such as rhod 2 are available; however, the lack of spectral shift with calcium binding precludes the use of ratio techniques to account for changes in cytosolic dye concentration. We have developed a method for in vivo quantitation of cytosolic rhod 2 concentration that in conjunction with calcium-dependent fluorescence measurements permits estimation of cytosolic calcium levels in perfused rabbit hearts. Reflective absorbance of excitation light by rhod 2 loaded into myocardium was used as an index of dye concentration and the ratio of fluorescence intensity to absorbance as a measure of cytosolic calcium concentration. Endothelial cell loading of rhod 2 was found to be minimal (calcium was measured in vitro to be 500 nM, and this value increased to 710 nM in the presence of 0.5 mM myoglobin. On the basis of this value and in vivo fluorescence measurements, cytosolic calcium concentration in the rabbit heart was found to be 229 +/- 90 nM at end diastole and 930 +/- 130 nM at peak systole, with peak fluorescence preceding peak ventricular pressure by approximately 40 ms. This technique should facilitate detailed analysis of calcium transients from the whole heart.

  10. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation.

  11. GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates calcium influx during spike-timing dependent plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Balena

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity of hippocampal neurons alters the strength of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA-mediated inhibition through a Ca2+-dependent regulation of cation-chloride cotransporters. This long-term synaptic modulation is termed GABAergic spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP. In the present study, we examined whether the properties of the GABAergic synapses themselves modulate the required postsynaptic Ca2+ influx during GABAergic STDP induction. To do this we first identified GABAergic synapses between cultured hippocampal neurons based on their relatively long decay time constants and their reversal potentials which lay close to the resting membrane potential. GABAergic STDP was then induced by coincidentally (± 1 ms firing the pre- and postsynaptic neurons at 5 Hz for 30 seconds, while postsynaptic Ca2+ was imaged with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo4-AM. In all cases, the induction of GABAergic STDP increased postsynaptic Ca2+ above resting levels. We further found that the magnitude of this increase correlated with the amplitude and polarity of the GABAergic postsynaptic current (GPSC; hyperpolarizing GPSCs reduced the Ca2+ influx in comparison to both depolarizing GPSCs, and postsynaptic neurons spiked alone. This relationship was influenced by both the driving force for Cl- and GABAA conductance (which had positive correlations with the Ca2+ influx. The spike-timing order during STDP induction did not influence the correlation between GPSC amplitude and Ca2+ influx, which is likely accounted for by the symmetrical GABAergic STDP window.

  12. Calcium and reactive oxygen species in regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition and of programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Michela; Bernardi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in yeast shares many features with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of mammals. With many stimuli, increased cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and ROS generation are the triggering signals that lead to mitochondrial permeabilization and release of proapoptotic factors, which initiates yeast PCD. While in mammals the permeability transition pore (PTP), a high-conductance inner membrane channel activated by increased matrix Ca(2+) and oxidative stress, is recognized as part of this signaling cascade, whether a similar process occurs in yeast is still debated. The potential role of the PTP in yeast PCD has generally been overlooked because yeast mitochondria lack the Ca(2+) uniporter, which in mammals allows rapid equilibration of cytosolic Ca(2+) with the matrix. In this short review we discuss the nature of the yeast permeability transition and reevaluate its potential role in the effector phase of yeast PCD triggered by Ca(2+) and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium regulation by temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in human uveal melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, Stefan; Derckx, Raissa; Reinach, Peter S; Garreis, Fabian; Böhm, Arina; Schmelzer, Lisa; Skosyrski, Sergej; Ramesh, Niraja; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Polat, Onur Kerem; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Riechardt, Aline Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is both the most common and fatal intraocular cancer among adults worldwide. As with all types of neoplasia, changes in Ca(2+) channel regulation can contribute to the onset and progression of this pathological condition. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) are two different types of Ca(2+) permeation pathways that can be dysregulated during neoplasia. We determined in malignant human UM and healthy uvea and four different UM cell lines whether there is gene and functional expression of TRP subtypes and CB1 since they could serve as drug targets to either prevent or inhibit initiation and progression of UM. RT-PCR, Ca(2+) transients, immunohistochemistry and planar patch-clamp analysis probed for their gene expression and functional activity, respectively. In UM cells, TRPV1 and TRPM8 gene expression was identified. Capsaicin (CAP), menthol or icilin induced Ca(2+) transients as well as changes in ion current behavior characteristic of TRPV1 and TRPM8 expression. Such effects were blocked with either La(3+), capsazepine (CPZ) or BCTC. TRPA1 and CB1 are highly expressed in human uvea, but TRPA1 is not expressed in all UM cell lines. In UM cells, the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-2, induced Ca(2+) transients, which were suppressed by La(3+) and CPZ whereas CAP-induced Ca(2+) transients could also be suppressed by CB1 activation. Identification of functional TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1 and CB1 expression in these tissues may provide novel drug targets for treatment of this aggressive neoplastic disease. © 2013.

  14. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+ into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+ release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+ mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion.

  15. Calcium Signaling Regulates Ventricular Hypertrophy During Development Independent of Contraction or Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Ramachandran, Kapil V.; Bao, Michelle M.; Kirby, Margaret L.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Hutson, Mary R.

    2014-01-01

    In utero interventions aimed at restoring left ventricular hemodynamic forces in fetuses with prenatally diagnosed hypoplastic left heart syndrome failed to stimulate ventricular myocardial growth during gestation, suggesting chamber growth during development may not rely upon fluid forces. We therefore hypothesized that ventricular hypertrophy during development may depend upon fundamental Ca2+-dependent growth pathways that function independent of hemodynamic forces. To test this hypothesis, zebrafish embryos were treated with inhibitors or activators of Ca2+ signaling in the presence or absence of contraction during the period of chamber development. Abolishment of contractile function alone in the setting of preserved Ca2+ signaling did not impair ventricular hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx abolished contraction and led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy, whereas increasing L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx led to enhanced ventricular hypertrophy in either the presence or absence of contraction. Similarly, inhibition of the downstream Ca2+-sensitive phosphatase calcineurin, a known regulator of adult cardiac hypertrophy, led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy in the presence or absence of contraction, whereas hypertrophy was rescued in the absence of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and contraction by expression of a constitutively active calcineurin. These data suggest ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during chamber formation is dependent upon Ca2+ signaling pathways that are unaffected by heart function or hemodynamic forces. Disruption of Ca2+-dependent hypertrophy during heart development may therefore represent one mechanism for impaired chamber formation that is not related to impaired blood flow. PMID:25536179

  16. Effects of AMPK on high glucose stimulated apoptosis of endothelial cells via regulation of calcium influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting LU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of adenosine monophosphate (AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK on high glucose-stimulated endothelial cell apoptosis and its mechanism. Methods MS-1 endothelial cells were cultured in vitro, and they were treated with AMPK agonist, AMPK inhibitor, 2-APB (a blocker of store operated Ca2+ channel (SOCC and (or high glucose, and a control group without any intervention were set up. TUNEL assay was performed to determine apoptotic cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to assess the Ca2+ influx into cells, and Western-blotting was performed to determine the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 of the store operated Ca2+ channel (SOCC proteins. Results Apoptosis of endothelial cells was induced significantly, and the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 were upregulated in high glucose group compared with that in control group (P<0.05. The rate of apoptosis of high glucose-induced endothelial cell was found to be increased in AMPK inhibitor group and decreased in AMPK agonist group, and the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 were found to be down-regulated in AMPK agonist group as compared with that in high glucose group (P<0.05. Compared with the control group, high glucose stimulation significantly induced the Ca2+ influx to endothelial cells; compared with high glucose group, 2-APB significantly inhibited high glucose-induced Ca2+ influx to endothelial cells, and blocked the inducing effect of high-glucose on endothelial cell apoptosis. Compared with high glucose group, AMPK agonist significantly inhibited high glucose-induced cell Ca2+ influx. Conclusion By reducing the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1, AMPK may inhibit SOCC-mediated Ca2+ influx, and block the high glucose-stimulated endothelial cell apoptosis, thus play an important protective role in sustaining endothelial cell function. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.10.01

  17. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  18. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico, Alejandro M; Bukiya, Anna N; Singh, Aditya K

    2012-08-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca²⁺-gated K⁺ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca²⁺ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of a Plant Growth Regulator, Prohexadione Calcium (BX-112), on the Elongation of Rice Shoots Caused by Exogenouslyl Applied Gibberellins and Helminthosporol, Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, KAMIYA; Masatomo, Kobayashi; Shozo, FUJIOKA; Hisakazu, YAMANE; Ishizue, NAKAYAMA; Akira, Sakurai; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research:(Present)Frontier Research Program RIKEN; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, The University of Tokyo; Life Science Research Institute, Kumiai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    1991-01-01

    Prohexadione calcium (BX-112) is a novel plant growth regulator that inhibits the late stages of the biosynthesis of gibberellins in plants. Fourteen kinds of gibberellin, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were applied simultaneously with BX-112 to rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.), and their growth-promoting activities in terms of shoot elongation were examined. The growth-promoting activities of GA_1, GA_4, GA_, GA_, GA_, GA_, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were not inhibite...

  1. An assay for clogging the ciliary pore complex distinguishes mechanisms of cytosolic and membrane protein entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daisuke; Dishinger, John F; Kee, H Lynn; Pinskey, Justine M; Allen, Ben L; Verhey, Kristen J

    2014-10-06

    As a cellular organelle, the cilium contains a unique protein composition. Entry of both membrane and cytosolic components is tightly regulated by gating mechanisms at the cilium base; however, the mechanistic details of ciliary gating are largely unknown. We previously proposed that entry of cytosolic components is regulated by mechanisms similar to those of nuclear transport and is dependent on nucleoporins (NUPs), which comprise a ciliary pore complex (CPC). To investigate ciliary gating mechanisms, we developed a system to clog the pore by inhibiting NUP function via forced dimerization. We targeted NUP62, a component of the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), for forced dimerization by tagging it with the homodimerizing Fv domain. As proof of principle, we show that forced dimerization of NUP62-Fv attenuated (1) active transport of BSA into the nuclear compartment and (2) the kinesin-2 motor KIF17 into the ciliary compartment. Using the pore-clogging technique, we find that forced dimerization of NUP62 attenuated the gated entry of cytosolic proteins but did not affect entry of membrane proteins or diffusional entry of small cytosolic proteins. We propose a model in which active transport of cytosolic proteins into both nuclear and ciliary compartments requires functional NUPs of the central pore, whereas lateral entry of membrane proteins utilizes a different mechanism that is likely specific to each organelle's limiting membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  3. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  4. Enigma homolog 1 scaffolds protein kinase D1 to regulate the activity of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Wälchli, Sébastien; Iwata, Miki; Ryser, Stephan; Van Lint, Johannes; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2008-06-01

    In cardiomyocytes, protein kinase D1 (PKD1) plays a central role in the response to stress signals. From a yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) as a new binding partner of PKD1. Since in neurons, ENH1, associated with protein kinase Cepsilon, was shown to modulate the activity of N-type calcium channels, and the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel, alpha1C, possesses a potential phosphorylation site for PKD1, we studied here a possible role of ENH1 and PKD1 in the regulation of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel. PKD1-interacting proteins were searched by yeast two-hybrid screening. In vivo protein interactions in cardiomyocytes isolated from heart ventricles of newborn rats were tested by co-immunoprecipitation. Small interfering RNA and a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 were delivered into cardiomyocytes by use of an adenovirus. Calcium currents were measured by the patch-clamp technique. Both ENH1 and PKD1 interact with alpha1C in cardiomyocytes. This interaction is increased upon stimulation. Silencing of ENH1 prevented the binding of PKD1 to alpha1C. Moreover, a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 or the silencing of ENH1 inhibited the alpha-adrenergic-induced increase of L-type calcium currents. We found a new binding partner, ENH1, and a new target, alpha1C, for PKD1 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. We propose a model where ENH1 scaffolds PKD1 to alpha1C in order to form a signalling complex that regulates the activity of cardiac L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  5. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  6. Cantharidin Induces Apoptosis Through the Calcium/PKC-Regulated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chin-Chuan; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Kuan-I; Huang, Kou-Tong; Lu, Tien-Hui; Fang, Kai-Min; Wu, Chin-Ching; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Ho; Su, Yi-Chang; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. However, there is still no effective therapy for bladder cancer. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of cantharidin [a natural toxin produced (pure compound) from Chinese blister beetles (Mylabrisphalerata or Mylabriscichorii) and Spanish flies (Cantharis vesicatoria)] in human bladder cancer cell lines (including: T24 and RT4 cells). Treatment of human bladder cancer cells with cantharidin significantly decreased cell viability. The increase in the expressions of caspase-3 activity and cleaved form of caspase-9/-7/-3 were also increased in cantharidin-treated T24 cells. Furthermore, cantharidin increased the levels of phospho-eIF2α and Grp78 and decreased the protein expression of procaspase-12, which was accompanied by the increase in calpain activity in T24 cells. Cantharidin was capable of increasing the intracellular Ca (2+) and the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) in T24 cells. The addition of BAPTA/AM (a Ca (2+) chelator) and RO320432 (a selective cell-permeable PKC inhibitor) effectively reversed the increase in caspase-3 and calpain activity, the phosphorylation levels of PKC and eIF2α and Grp78 protein expression, and the decrease in procaspase-12 expression induced by cantharidin. Importantly, cantharidin significantly decreased the tumor volume (a dramatic 71% reduction after 21 days of treatment) in nude mice xenografted with T24 cells. Taken together, these results indicate cantharidin induced human bladder cancer cell apoptosis through a calcium/PKC-regulated ER stress pathway. These findings suggest that cantharidin may be a novel and potential anticancer agent targeting on bladder cancer cells.

  7. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Min, E-mail: chenminyx@gmail.com [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yunnan Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Kunming 650022 (China); Wang, Yanru [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu, Aijuan [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  10. Endurance Exercise Training Reduces Cardiac Sodium/Calcium Exchanger Expression in Animals Susceptible to Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eKukielka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity (NCX1, an important regulator of cardiomyocyte cystolic calcium may provoke arrhythmias. Exercise training can decrease NCX1 expression in animals with heart failure improving cytosolic calcium regulation, and could thereby reduce the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF. Methods: To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min. of exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 23 had VF (S, susceptible and 13 did not (R, resistant. The animals were randomly assigned to either 10-wk exercise training (progressively increasing treadmill running (S n = 9; R n = 8 or 10-wk sedentary (S n = 14; R n = 5 groups. At the end of the 10-wk period, the exercise + ischemia test provoked VF in sedentary but not trained susceptible dogs. On a subsequent day, cardiac tissue was harvested and NCX1 protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: In the sedentary group, NCX1 expression was significantly (ANOVA, P<0.05 higher in susceptible compared to resistant dogs. In contrast, NCX1 levels were similar in the exercise trained resistant and susceptible animals. Conclusion: These data suggest that exercise training can restore a more normal NCX1 level in dogs susceptible to ventricular fibrillation, improving cystolic calcium regulation and could thereby reduce the risk for sudden death following myocardial infarction.

  11. Conditionally immortalized human proximal tubular epithelial cells isolated from the urine of a healthy subject express functional calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Tamma, Grazia; Ranieri, Marianna; Svelto, Maria; Heuvel, Bert van den; Levtchenko, Elena N; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G protein-coupled receptor, which plays an essential role in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Here we show that conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cell line (ciPTEC) obtained by immortalizing and subcloning cells exfoliated in the urine of a healthy subject expresses functional endogenous CaSR. Immunolocalization studies of polarized ciPTEC revealed the apical localization of the receptor. By Western blotting of ciPTEC lysates, both monomeric and dimeric forms of CaSR at 130 and ∼250 kDa, respectively, were detected. Functional studies indicated that both external calcium and the positive CaSR allosteric modulator, NPS-R568, induced a significant increase in cytosolic calcium, proving a high sensitivity of the endogenous receptor to its agonists. Calcium depletion from the endoplasmic reticulum using cyclopiazonic acid abolished the increase in cytosolic calcium elicited by NPS-R568, confirming calcium exit from intracellular stores. Activation of CaSR by NPS-R significantly reduced the increase in cAMP elicited by forskolin (FK), a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, further confirming the functional expression of the receptor in this cell line. CaSR expressed in ciPTEC was found to interact with Gq as a downstream effector, which in turn can cause release of calcium from intracellular stores via phospholipase C activation. We conclude that human proximal tubular ciPTEC express functional CaSR and respond to its activation with a release of calcium from intracellular stores. These cell lines represent a valuable tool for research into the disorder associated with gain or loss of function of the CaSR by producing cell lines from patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotypic modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs via down-regulation the Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Liu, Baoqin; Kong, Dehui; Li, Si; Li, Chao; Wang, Huaqin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the onset and progression of proliferative vascular diseases. In adult tissue, VSMCs exist in a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype, which is defined by lack of the ability of proliferation and migration, while high expression of contractile marker proteins. After injury to the vessel, VSMC shifts from a contractile phenotype to a pathological synthetic phenotype, associated with increased proliferation, migration and matrix secretion. It has been demonstrated that PDGF-BB is a critical mediator of VSMCs phenotypic switch. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl l coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, exhibits various protective effects against VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin calcium on phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and the related intracellular signal transduction pathways. Treatment of VSMCs with atorvastatin calcium showed dose-dependent inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced proliferation. Atorvastatin calcium co-treatment inhibited the phenotype modulation and cytoskeleton rearrangements and improved the expression of contractile phenotype marker proteins such as α-SM actin, SM22α and calponin in comparison with PDGF-BB alone stimulated VSMCs. Although Akt phosphorylation was strongly elicited by PDGF-BB, Akt activation was attenuated when PDGF-BB was co-administrated with atorvastatin calcium. In conclusion, atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, indicating that Akt might play a vital role in the modulation of phenotype.

  13. S100 Proteins As an Important Regulator of Macrophage Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The S100 proteins, a family of calcium-binding cytosolic proteins, have a broad range of intracellular and extracellular functions through regulating calcium balance, cell apoptosis, migration, proliferation, differentiation, energy metabolism, and inflammation. The intracellular functions of S100 proteins involve interaction with intracellular receptors, membrane protein recruitment/transportation, transcriptional regulation and integrating with enzymes or nucleic acids, and DNA repair. The S100 proteins could also be released from the cytoplasm, induced by tissue/cell damage and cellular stress. The extracellular S100 proteins, serving as a danger signal, are crucial in regulating immune homeostasis, post-traumatic injury, and inflammation. Extracellular S100 proteins are also considered biomarkers for some specific diseases. In this review, we will discuss the multi-functional roles of S100 proteins, especially their potential roles associated with cell migration, differentiation, tissue repair, and inflammation.

  14. Structural characterization of coatomer in its cytosolic state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengliu Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies on coat protein I (COPI have contributed to a basic understanding of how coat proteins generate vesicles to initiate intracellular transport. The core component of the COPI complex is coatomer, which is a multimeric complex that needs to be recruited from the cytosol to membrane in order to function in membrane bending and cargo sorting. Previous structural studies on the clathrin adaptors have found that membrane recruitment induces a large conformational change in promoting their role in cargo sorting. Here, pursuing negative-stain electron microscopy coupled with single-particle analyses, and also performing CXMS (chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry for validation, we have reconstructed the structure of coatomer in its soluble form. When compared to the previously elucidated structure of coatomer in its membrane-bound form we do not observe a large conformational change. Thus, the result uncovers a key difference between how COPI versus clathrin coats are regulated by membrane recruitment.

  15. Calcium signatures and signaling events orchestrate plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peiguo; Jauregui, Edgard; Du, Liqun; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Poovaiah, B W

    2017-08-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) acts as an essential second messenger connecting the perception of microbe signals to the establishment of appropriate immune and symbiotic responses in plants. Accumulating evidence suggests that plants distinguish different microorganisms through plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors. The particular recognition events are encoded into Ca2+ signatures, which are sensed by diverse intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins. The Ca2+ signatures are eventually decoded to distinct downstream responses through transcriptional reprogramming of the defense or symbiosis-related genes. Recent observations further reveal that Ca2+-mediated signaling is also involved in negative regulation of plant immunity. This review is intended as an overview of Ca2+ signaling during immunity and symbiosis, including Ca2+ responses in the nucleus and cytosol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy improves health in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Min; Ostrovsky, Julian; Kwon, Young Joon; Polyak, Erzsebet; Licata, Joseph; Tsukikawa, Mai; Marty, Eric; Thomas, Jeffrey; Felix, Carolyn A; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Gasser, David L; Argon, Yair; Falk, Marni J

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease therapies directed at intra-mitochondrial pathology are largely ineffective. Recognizing that RC dysfunction invokes pronounced extra-mitochondrial transcriptional adaptations, particularly involving dysregulated translation, we hypothesized that translational dysregulation is itself contributing to the pathophysiology of RC disease. Here, we investigated the activities, and effects from direct inhibition, of a central translational regulator (mTORC1) and its downstream biological processes in diverse genetic and pharmacological models of RC disease. Our data identify novel mechanisms underlying the cellular pathogenesis of RC dysfunction, including the combined induction of proteotoxic stress, the ER stress response and autophagy. mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin partially ameliorated renal disease in B6.Pdss2(kd/kd) mice with complexes I-III/II-III deficiencies, improved viability and mitochondrial physiology in gas-1(fc21) nematodes with complex I deficiency, and rescued viability across a variety of RC-inhibited human cells. Even more effective was probucol, a PPAR-activating anti-lipid drug that we show also inhibits mTORC1. However, directly inhibiting mTORC1-regulated downstream activities yielded the most pronounced and sustained benefit. Partial inhibition of translation by cycloheximide, or of autophagy by lithium chloride, rescued viability, preserved cellular respiratory capacity and induced mitochondrial translation and biogenesis. Cycloheximide also ameliorated proteotoxic stress via a uniquely selective reduction of cytosolic protein translation. RNAseq-based transcriptome profiling of treatment effects in gas-1(fc21) mutants provide further evidence that these therapies effectively restored altered translation and autophagy pathways toward that of wild-type animals. Overall, partially inhibiting cytosolic translation and autophagy offer novel treatment strategies to improve health across the diverse array

  17. The rice cold-responsive calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 is regulated by alternative splicing and post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecília Almadanim, M; Gonçalves, Nuno M; Rosa, Margarida T G; Alexandre, Bruno M; Cordeiro, André M; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Saibo, Nelson J M; Soares, Cláudio M; Romão, Célia V; Margarida Oliveira, M; Abreu, Isabel A

    2017-10-31

    Plant calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are key proteins implicated in calcium-mediated signaling pathways of a wide range of biological events in the organism. The action of each particular CDPK is strictly regulated by many mechanisms in order to ensure an accurate signal translation and the activation of the adequate response processes. In this work, we investigated the regulation of a CDPK involved in rice cold stress response, OsCPK17, to better understand its mode of action. We identified two new alternative splicing (AS) mRNA forms of OsCPK17 encoding truncated versions of the protein, missing the CDPK activation domain. We analyzed the expression patterns of all AS variants in rice tissues and examined their subcellular localization in onion epidermal cells. The results indicate that the AS of OsCPK17 putatively originates truncated forms of the protein with distinct functions, and different subcellular and tissue distributions. Additionally, we addressed the regulation of OsCPK17 by post-translational modifications in several in vitro experiments. Our analysis indicated that OsCPK17 activity depends on its structural rearrangement induced by calcium binding, and that the protein can be autophosphorylated. The identified phosphorylation sites mostly populate the OsCPK17 N-terminal domain. Exceptions are phosphosites T107 and S136 in the kinase domain and S558 in the C-terminal domain. These phosphosites seem conserved in CDPKs and may reflect a common regulatory mechanism for this protein family. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A Ca2+/calmodulin-binding peroxidase from Euphorbia latex: novel aspects of calcium-hydrogen peroxide cross-talk in the regulation of plant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Anna; Medda, Rosaria; Longu, Silvia; Floris, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Padiglia, Alessandra

    2005-11-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor found in all eukaryotes, where it participates in the regulation of diverse calcium-dependent physiological processes. In response to fluctuations of the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+), CaM binds to a set of unrelated target proteins and modulates their activity. In plants, a growing number of CaM-binding proteins have been identified that apparently do not have a counterpart in animals. Some of these plant-specific Ca(2+)/CaM-activated proteins are known to tune the interaction between calcium and H(2)O(2) in orchestrating plant defenses against biotic and abiotic stresses. We previously characterized a calcium-dependent peroxidase isolated from the latex of the Mediterranean shrub Euphorbia characias (ELP) [Medda et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 8909-8918]. Here we report the cDNA nucleotide sequence of Euphorbia latex peroxidase, showing that the derived protein has two distinct amino acid sequences recognized as CaM-binding sites. The cDNA encoding for an E. characias CaM was also found and sequenced, and its protein product was detected in the latex. Results obtained from different CaM-binding assays and the determination of steady-state parameters showed unequivocally that ELP is a CaM-binding protein activated by the Ca(2+)/CaM system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a peroxidase regulated by this classic signal transduction mechanism. These findings suggest that peroxidase might be another node in the Ca(2+)/H(2)O(2)-mediated plant defense system, having both positive and negative effects in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis.

  19. A stress-induced calcium-dependent protein kinase from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum phosphorylates a two-component pseudo-response regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patharkar, O R; Cushman, J C

    2000-12-01

    McCDPK1 is a salinity- and drought-induced calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) isolated from the common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. A yeast two-hybrid experiment was performed, using full-length McCDPK1 and truncated forms of McCDPK1 as baits, to identify interacting proteins. A catalytically impaired bait isolated a cDNA clone encoding a novel protein, CDPK substrate protein 1 (CSP1). CSP1 interacted with McCDPK1 in a substrate-like fashion in both yeast two-hybrid assays and wheat germ interaction assays. Furthermore, McCDPK1 was capable of phosphorylating CSP1 in vitro in a calcium-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the use of catalytically impaired and unregulated CDPKs with the yeast two-hybrid system can accelerate the discovery of CDPK substrates. The deduced CSP1 amino acid sequence indicated that it is a novel member of a class of pseudo-response regulator-like proteins that have a highly conserved helix-loop-helix DNA binding domain and a C-terminal activation domain. McCDPK1 and CSP1 co-localized to nuclei of NaCl-stressed ice plants. Csp1 transcript accumulation was not regulated by NaCl or dehydration stress. Our results strongly suggest that McCDPK1 may regulate the function of CSP1 by reversible phosphorylation.

  20. Heterodimerization of Arabidopsis calcium/proton exchangers contributes to regulation of guard cell dynamics and plant defense responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Arabidopsis thaliana" cation exchangers (CAX1 and CAX3) are closely related tonoplast-localized calcium/proton (Ca(2+)/H+) antiporters that contribute to cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. CAX1 and CAX3 were previously shown to interact in yeast; however, the function of this complex in plants has remain...

  1. Parathyroid hormone-related protein and calcium regulation in vitamin D-deficient sea bream (Sparus auratus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Hang, X.M.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, F.A.T.; Ross, H.A.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    Gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) were fed a vitamin D-deficient diet for 22 weeks. Growth rate, whole body mineral pools and calcium balance were determined. Plasma parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and calcitriol levels were assessed. Expression of mRNA for pthrp and pth1r was

  2. Poly(acrylic acid)-regulated Synthesis of Rod-Like Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Inducing the Osteogenic Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Yao, Chenxue; Cui, Zhengyang; Luo, Dandan; Lee, In-Seop; Yao, Juming; Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-05-06

    Calcium carbonate, especially with nanostructure, has been considered as a good candidate material for bone regeneration due to its excellent biodegradability and osteoconductivity. In this study, rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles (Rod-CC NPs) with desired water dispersibility were achieved with the regulation of poly (acrylic acid). Characterization results revealed that the Rod-CC NPs had an average length of 240 nm, a width of 90 nm with an average aspect ratio of 2.60 and a negative ζ-potential of -22.25 ± 0.35 mV. The degradation study illustrated the nanoparticles degraded 23% at pH 7.4 and 45% at pH 5.6 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution within three months. When cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells, the Rod-CC NPs exhibited a positive effect on the proliferation of osteoblast cells. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays together with the osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) expression observations demonstrated the nanoparticles could induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Our study developed well-dispersed rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles which have great potential to be used in bone regeneration.

  3. Poly(acrylic acid-regulated Synthesis of Rod-Like Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Inducing the Osteogenic Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate, especially with nanostructure, has been considered as a good candidate material for bone regeneration due to its excellent biodegradability and osteoconductivity. In this study, rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles (Rod-CC NPs with desired water dispersibility were achieved with the regulation of poly (acrylic acid. Characterization results revealed that the Rod-CC NPs had an average length of 240 nm, a width of 90 nm with an average aspect ratio of 2.60 and a negative ζ-potential of −22.25 ± 0.35 mV. The degradation study illustrated the nanoparticles degraded 23% at pH 7.4 and 45% at pH 5.6 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution within three months. When cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells, the Rod-CC NPs exhibited a positive effect on the proliferation of osteoblast cells. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity assays together with the osteocalcin (OCN and bone sialoprotein (BSP expression observations demonstrated the nanoparticles could induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Our study developed well-dispersed rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles which have great potential to be used in bone regeneration.

  4. Identification of mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms that alter mitochondrial matrix pH and intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-a Kazuno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is highly polymorphic, and its variations in humans may contribute to individual differences in function as well as susceptibility to various diseases such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, bipolar disorder, and cancer. However, it is unclear whether and how mtDNA polymorphisms affect intracellular function, such as calcium signaling or pH regulation. Here we searched for mtDNA polymorphisms that have intracellular functional significance using transmitochondrial hybrid cells (cybrids carrying ratiometric Pericam (RP, a fluorescent calcium indicator, targeted to the mitochondria and nucleus. By analyzing the entire mtDNA sequence in 35 cybrid lines, we found that two closely linked nonsynonymous polymorphisms, 8701A and 10398A, increased the basal fluorescence ratio of mitochondria-targeted RP. Mitochondrial matrix pH was lower in the cybrids with 8701A/10398A than it was in those with 8701G/10398G, suggesting that the difference observed by RP was mainly caused by alterations in mitochondrial calcium levels. Cytosolic calcium response to histamine also tended to be higher in the cybrids with 8701A/10398A. It has previously been reported that 10398A is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, bipolar disorder, and cancer, whereas 10398G associates with longevity. Our findings suggest that these mtDNA polymorphisms may play a role in the pathophysiology of these complex diseases by affecting mitochondrial matrix pH and intracellular calcium dynamics.

  5. Calcium plays a key role in paraoxon-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-associated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Du, Yi; Ju, Furong; Ma, Shunxiang; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxon (POX) is one of the most toxic organophosphorus pesticides, but its toxic mechanisms associated with apoptosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate calcium-associated mechanisms in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells. EL4 cells were exposed to POX for 0-16 h. EGTA was used to chelate Ca(2+ ) in extracellular medium, and heparin and procaine were used to inhibit Ca(2+ )efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Z-ATAD-FMK was used to inhibit caspase-12 activity. The apoptotic rate assay, western blotting and immunocytochemistry (ICC) were used to reveal the mechanisms of POX-induced apoptosis. POX significantly increased the expression and activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, enhanced expression of calpain 1 and calpain 2, and induced the release of cyt c, but did not change the expression of Grp 78. Inhibiting caspase-12 activity alleviated POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1 and caspase-3, promoted POX-induced upregulation of calpain 2, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release, suggesting that there was a cross-talk between the ER-associated pathway and mitochondria-associated apoptotic signals. Attenuating intracellular calcium concentration with EGTA, heparin or procaine decreased POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1, calpain 2, caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release. After pretreatment with EGTA or procaine, POX significantly promoted expression of Grp 78. Calcium played a key role in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways. The cross-talk of ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways was accomplished through calcium signal.

  6. SERCA pump activity is physiologically regulated by presenilin and regulates amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kim N; Demuro, Angelo; Akbari, Yama; Hitt, Brian D; Smith, Ian F; Parker, Ian; LaFerla, Frank M

    2008-06-30

    In addition to disrupting the regulated intramembraneous proteolysis of key substrates, mutations in the presenilins also alter calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism linking presenilins and calcium regulation is unresolved. At rest, cytosolic Ca(2+) is maintained at low levels by pumping Ca(2+) into stores in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the sarco ER Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps. We show that SERCA activity is diminished in fibroblasts lacking both PS1 and PS2 genes, despite elevated SERCA2b steady-state levels, and we show that presenilins and SERCA physically interact. Enhancing presenilin levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes accelerates clearance of cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas higher levels of SERCA2b phenocopy PS1 overexpression, accelerating Ca(2+) clearance and exaggerating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated Ca(2+) liberation. The critical role that SERCA2b plays in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is underscored by our findings that modulating SERCA activity alters amyloid beta production. Our results point to a physiological role for the presenilins in Ca(2+) signaling via regulation of the SERCA pump.

  7. Localization and pharmacological characterization of voltage dependent calcium channels in cultured neocortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, D B; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Belhage, B

    2001-01-01

    The physiological significance and subcellular distribution of voltage dependent calcium channels was defined using calcium channel blockers to inhibit potassium induced rises in cytosolic calcium concentration in cultured mouse neocortical neurons. The cytosolic calcium concentration was measured...... channels were differentially distributed in somata, neurites and nerve terminals. omega-conotoxin MVIIC (omega-CgTx MVIIC) inhibited approximately 40% of the Ca(2+)-rise in both somata and neurites and 60% of the potassium induced [3H]GABA release, indicating that the Q-type channel is the quantitatively...... using the fluorescent calcium chelator fura-2. The types of calcium channels present at the synaptic terminal were determined by the inhibitory action of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced [3H]GABA release in the same cell preparation. L-, N-, P-, Q- and R-/T-type voltage dependent calcium...

  8. Cytosolic delivery of materials with endosome-disrupting colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Brett A.; Bayles, Andrea R.

    2016-03-15

    A facile procedure to deliver nanocrystals to the cytosol of live cells that is both rapid and general. The technique employs a unique cationic core-shell polymer colloid that directs nanocrystals to the cytosol of living cells within a few hours of incubation. The present methods and compositions enable a host of advanced applications arising from efficient cytosolic delivery of nanocrystal imaging probes: from single particle tracking experiments to monitoring protein-protein interactions in live cells for extended periods.

  9. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  10. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylation deficient female mice (T286A and 12 wild type littermates were used in the study. T286A strain was created by Giese et al. (1998. Mice were housed and tested in two IntelliCages from NewBehavior (www.newbehavior.com. IntelliCage is an automated learning system. After 95 days of alcohol drinking interrupted by tests for motivation, persistence in alcohol seeking and probability of relapse, mice were ascribed to ‘high’ or ‘low’ drinkers group according to their performance in the tests. Additional criterion was the amount of alcohol consumed during the whole experiment. Result of each test was evaluated separately. 1/3 of the mice that scored highest in each criterion were considered ‘positive’ for this trait. ‘Positive’ animals were given 1 point, negative 0 points. Mice that were positive in at least 2 criteria were ascribed to ‘high’ drinkers (‘+’ group. Remaining mice – to ‘low’ drinkers (‘–‘. This method of behavioral phenotyping, developed by Radwanska and Kaczmarek (2012, is inspired by DSM-IV. Since the results of this evaluation are discrete (i.e. by definition all the animals score between 0 to +4, we developed also a continuous method of addiction rating, which we call ‘addiction index’. The result of the second method is a sum of the standardized (z-score results of the above mentioned tests. We use it to examine the correlations between addiction-like behavior and spine parameters. Control group (12 WT, 8

  12. Do calcium buffers always slow down the propagation of calcium waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Calcium buffers are large proteins that act as binding sites for free cytosolic calcium. Since a large fraction of cytosolic calcium is bound to calcium buffers, calcium waves are widely observed under the condition that free cytosolic calcium is heavily buffered. In addition, all physiological buffered excitable systems contain multiple buffers with different affinities. It is thus important to understand the properties of waves in excitable systems with the inclusion of buffers. There is an ongoing controversy about whether or not the addition of calcium buffers into the system always slows down the propagation of calcium waves. To solve this controversy, we incorporate the buffering effect into the generic excitable system, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, to get the buffered FitzHugh-Nagumo model, and then to study the effect of the added buffer with large diffusivity on traveling waves of such a model in one spatial dimension. We can find a critical dissociation constant (K = K(a)) characterized by system excitability parameter a such that calcium buffers can be classified into two types: weak buffers (K ∈ (K(a), ∞)) and strong buffers (K ∈ (0, K(a))). We analytically show that the addition of weak buffers or strong buffers but with its total concentration b(0)(1) below some critical total concentration b(0,c)(1) into the system can generate a traveling wave of the resulting system which propagates faster than that of the origin system, provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large. Further, the magnitude of the wave speed of traveling waves of the resulting system is proportional to √D1 as D1 --> ∞. In contrast, the addition of strong buffers with the total concentration b(0)(1) > b(0,c)(1) into the system may not be able to support the formation of a biologically acceptable wave provided that the diffusivity D1 of the added buffers is sufficiently large.

  13. The calcium-modulated proteins, S100A1 and S100B, as potential regulators of the dynamics of type III intermediate filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbuglia

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+-modulated, dimeric proteins of the EF-hand (helix-loop-helix type, S100A1 and S100B, that have been shown to inhibit microtubule (MT protein assembly and to promote MT disassembly, interact with the type III intermediate filament (IF subunits, desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with a stoichiometry of 2 mol of IF subunit/mol of S100A1 or S100B dimer and an affinity of 0.5-1.0 µM in the presence of a few micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Binding of S100A1 and S100B results in inhibition of desmin and GFAP assemblies into IFs and stimulation of the disassembly of preformed desmin and GFAP IFs. S100A1 and S100B interact with a stretch of residues in the N-terminal (head domain of desmin and GFAP, thereby blocking the head-to-tail process of IF elongation. The C-terminal extension of S100A1 (and, likely, S100B represents a critical part of the site that recognizes desmin and GFAP. S100B is localized to IFs within cells, suggesting that it might have a role in remodeling IFs upon elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by avoiding excess IF assembly and/or promoting IF disassembly in vivo. S100A1, that is not localized to IFs, might also play a role in the regulation of IF dynamics by binding to and sequestering unassembled IF subunits. Together, these observations suggest that S100A1 and S100B may be regarded as Ca2+-dependent regulators of the state of assembly of two important elements of the cytoskeleton, IFs and MTs, and, potentially, of MT- and IF-based activities.

  14. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Regulation of autophagy by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) is a major integrator of the nutritional status at the crossroads of fat, sugar, and protein catabolism. Here we show that nutrient starvation causes rapid depletion of AcCoA. AcCoA depletion entailed the commensurate reduction in the overall acetylation of cytoplasmic p...

  16. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  17. Calcium Dynamics of Ex Vivo Long-Term Cultured CD8+ T Cells Are Regulated by Changes in Redox Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Rivet

    Full Text Available T cells reach a state of replicative senescence characterized by a decreased ability to proliferate and respond to foreign antigens. Calcium release associated with TCR engagement is widely used as a surrogate measure of T cell response. Using an ex vivo culture model that partially replicates features of organismal aging, we observe that while the amplitude of Ca2+ signaling does not change with time in culture, older T cells exhibit faster Ca2+ rise and a faster decay. Gene expression analysis of Ca2+ channels and pumps expressed in T cells by RT-qPCR identified overexpression of the plasma membrane CRAC channel subunit ORAI1 and PMCA in older T cells. To test whether overexpression of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel is sufficient to explain the kinetic information, we adapted a previously published computational model by Maurya and Subramaniam to include additional details on the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE process to recapitulate Ca2+ dynamics after T cell receptor stimulation. Simulations demonstrated that upregulation of ORAI1 and PMCA channels is not sufficient to explain the observed alterations in Ca2+ signaling. Instead, modeling analysis identified kinetic parameters associated with the IP3R and STIM1 channels as potential causes for alterations in Ca2+ dynamics associated with the long term ex vivo culturing protocol. Due to these proteins having known cysteine residues susceptible to oxidation, we subsequently investigated and observed transcriptional remodeling of metabolic enzymes, a shift to more oxidized redox couples, and post-translational thiol oxidation of STIM1. The model-directed findings from this study highlight changes in the cellular redox environment that may ultimately lead to altered T cell calcium dynamics during immunosenescence or organismal aging.

  18. Cloning and characterization of human liver cytosolic beta-glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, M; Van Veen, IC; Van Der Meulen-Muileman, IH; Gerritsen, WR; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    2001-01-01

    Cytosolic beta -glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) from mammalian liver is a member of the family 1 glycoside hydrolases and is known for its ability to hydrolyse a range of beta -D-glycosides. including beta -D-glucoside acid beta -D-galactoside. We therefore refer to this enzyme as cytosolic beta

  19. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Maltsev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s. Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  20. Interactions of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in monocyte adherence and TNFalpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, M R; Arbabi, S; Garcia, I; Maier, R V

    2000-03-01

    The circulating monocyte possesses a markedly different functional phenotype relative to the macrophage (Mphi). The adhesive interactions encountered by the monocyte, en route to the inflammatory focus, generate signals that culminate in the expression of a pro-inflammatory Mphi phenotype, marked by enhanced cytokine production. Previously, we demonstrated that calcium and calmodulin are essential for maximal Mphi activation and, in particular, TNFalpha production. These effects are likely to be mediated through signal transduction kinases that require the calcium/calmodulin complex. Here, we investigated the effect of adherence on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and IV activation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 cascade and on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production by human monocytes. Adherence activated ERK 1/2 and led to an 8-fold potentiation in LPS-induced TNFalpha production over similarly stimulated non-adherent cells. Inhibition of CaMK II prior to adherence prevented ERK 1/2 activation and attenuated by up to 40%, the TNFalpha response to subsequent LPS stimulation. CaMK II inhibition after adherence, however, failed to modify cytokine release. Inhibition of CaMK IV, both after adherence and in non-adherent monocytes, significantly inhibited LPS-induced ERK 1/2 activation and abrogated TNFalpha production by up to 75%. These data suggest that the function of CaMK II in TNFalpha production by adherent monocytes occurs during adhesion, is mediated in part by activation of ERK 1/2, and appears to "prime" the monocyte for enhanced cytokine production. CaMK IV, through activation of ERK 1/2, appears to have a direct role in the LPS signal transduction for TNFalpha production.

  1. Abortive and propagating intracellular calcium waves: analysis from a hybrid model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Guisoni

    Full Text Available The functional properties of inositol(1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 receptors allow a variety of intracellular Ca(2+ phenomena. In this way, global phenomena, such as propagating and abortive Ca(2+ waves, as well as local events such as puffs, have been observed. Several experimental studies suggest that many features of global phenomena (e.g., frequency, amplitude, speed wave depend on the interplay of biophysical processes such as diffusion, buffering, efflux and influx rates, which in turn depend on parameters such as buffer concentration, Ca(2+ pump density, cytosolic IP3 level, and intercluster distance. Besides, it is known that cells are able to modify some of these parameters in order to regulate the Ca(2+ signaling. By using a hybrid model, we analyzed different features of the hierarchy of calcium events as a function of two relevant parameters for the calcium signaling, the intercluster distance and the pump strength or intensity. In the space spanned by these two parameters, we found two modes of calcium dynamics, one dominated by abortive calcium waves and the other by propagating waves. Smaller distances between the release sites promote propagating calcium waves, while the increase of the efflux rate makes the transition from propagating to abortive waves occur at lower values of intercluster distance. We determined the frontier between these two modes, in the parameter space defined by the intercluster distance and the pump strength. Furthermore, we found that the velocity of simulated calcium waves accomplishes Luther's law, and that an effective rate constant for autocatalytic calcium production decays linearly with both the intercluster distance and the pump strength.

  2. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  3. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter

    2015-01-01

    to be an essential component of both VRAC and VSOAC. Reduced VRAC and VSOAC activities are seen in drug resistant cancer cells. ANO1 is a calcium-activated chloride channel expressed on the plasma membrane of e.g. secretory epithelia. ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in a large number of carcinomas. The gene...... functions as well as their role in cancer and drug resistance......., encoding for ANO1, maps to a region on chromosome 11 (11q13) that is frequently amplified in cancer cells. Knockdown of ANO1 impairs cell proliferation and cell migration in several cancer cells. Below we summarize the basic biophysical properties of VRAC, VSOAC and ANO1 and their most important cellular...

  4. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  5. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative assessment of cytosolic Salmonella in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A Knodler

    Full Text Available Within mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium inhabits a membrane-bound vacuole known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV. We have recently shown that wild type S. Typhimurium also colonizes the cytosol of epithelial cells. Here we sought to quantify the contribution of cytosolic Salmonella to the total population over a time course of infection in different epithelial cell lines and under conditions of altered vacuolar escape. We found that the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, acts on vacuolar, but not cytosolic, Salmonella. After chloroquine treatment, vacuolar bacteria are not transcriptionally active or replicative and appear degraded. Using a chloroquine resistance assay, in addition to digitonin permeabilization, we found that S. Typhimurium lyses its nascent vacuole in numerous epithelial cell lines, albeit with different frequencies, and hyper-replication in the cytosol is also widespread. At later times post-infection, cytosolic bacteria account for half of the total population in some epithelial cell lines, namely HeLa and Caco-2 C2Bbe1. Both techniques accurately measured increased vacuole lysis in epithelial cells upon treatment with wortmannin. By chloroquine resistance assay, we also determined that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1, but not SPI-2, the virulence plasmid nor the flagellar apparatus, was required for vacuolar escape and cytosolic replication in epithelial cells. Together, digitonin permeabilization and the chloroquine resistance assay will be useful, complementary tools for deciphering the mechanisms of SCV lysis and Salmonella replication in the epithelial cell cytosol.

  7. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    /PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose......, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells....

  8. Interplay of Mg2+, ADP, and ATP in the cytosol and mitochondria: unravelling the role of Mg2+ in cell respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gout, Elisabeth; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Douce, Roland; Bligny, Richard

    2014-10-28

    In animal and plant cells, the ATP/ADP ratio and/or energy charge are generally considered key parameters regulating metabolism and respiration. The major alternative issue of whether the cytosolic and mitochondrial concentrations of ADP and ATP directly mediate cell respiration remains unclear, however. In addition, because only free nucleotides are exchanged by the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, whereas MgADP is the substrate of ATP synthase (EC 3.6.3.14), the cytosolic and mitochondrial Mg(2+) concentrations must be considered as well. Here we developed in vivo/in vitro techniques using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy to simultaneously measure these key components in subcellular compartments. We show that heterotrophic sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells incubated in various nutrient media contain low, stable cytosolic ADP and Mg(2+) concentrations, unlike ATP. ADP is mainly free in the cytosol, but complexed by Mg(2+) in the mitochondrial matrix, where [Mg(2+)] is tenfold higher. In contrast, owing to a much higher affinity for Mg(2+), ATP is mostly complexed by Mg(2+) in both compartments. Mg(2+) starvation used to alter cytosolic and mitochondrial [Mg(2+)] reversibly increases free nucleotide concentration in the cytosol and matrix, enhances ADP at the expense of ATP, decreases coupled respiration, and stops cell growth. We conclude that the cytosolic ADP concentration, and not ATP, ATP/ADP ratio, or energy charge, controls the respiration of plant cells. The Mg(2+) concentration, remarkably constant and low in the cytosol and tenfold higher in the matrix, mediates ADP/ATP exchange between the cytosol and matrix, [MgADP]-dependent mitochondrial ATP synthase activity, and cytosolic free ADP homeostasis.

  9. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Jun; Parsons, Harriet Tempé; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    of secondary metabolites, and accumulation of enzymes for defense and detoxification. This central role is highlighted by estimates indicating that the majority of eukaryotic proteins are cytosolic. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of numerous proteomic studies on its different subcellular...... compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted...

  10. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  11. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  12. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Finite element model to study calcium distribution in oocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parvaiz Ahmad Naik

    2015-03-20

    Mar 20, 2015 ... ing species studied to date from plants to humans.4,6 The fer- tilization ... mathematical model of simulation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscil- lations in ..... Membrane potential. А0:05 V. zCa. Valency of calcium. 2. VOocyte. Volume of oocyte cytosol. 5:48 В 10А11 l. F. Faraday's constant. 96487 C=mole. R.

  14. Plasma membrane calcium pump and sodium-calcium exchanger in maintenance and control of calcium concentrations in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juska, Alfonsas

    2010-01-29

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the activity of the mechanisms responsible for control of cytosolic calcium concentration in platelets by modeling the time-course of the concentration changing in response to discharge of the intracellular stores or store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The parameters estimated as a result of model fitting to experimental data are related to physiological or pathological state of the cells. It has been shown that: (a) the time-course is determined by the passive calcium fluxes and activities of the corresponding mechanisms; (b) the decline in the concentration (after its rise) develops due to activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) both in the case of discharge of the stores of platelets contained in calcium-free medium and in the case of SOCE; (c) impulsive extrusion of calcium in response to its sudden influx, presumably, is the main function of PMCA; (d) the function of sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) is to extrude calcium excess by permanent counteracting its influx. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glutathione redox potential in the mitochondrial intermembrane space is linked to the cytosol and impacts the Mia40 redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojer, Kerstin; Bien, Melanie; Gangel, Heike; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione is an important mediator and regulator of cellular redox processes. Detailed knowledge of local glutathione redox potential (EGSH) dynamics is critical to understand the network of redox processes and their influence on cellular function. Using dynamic oxidant recovery assays together with EGSH-specific fluorescent reporters, we investigate the glutathione pools of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space (IMS). We demonstrate that the glutathione pools of IMS and cytosol are dynamically interconnected via porins. In contrast, no appreciable communication was observed between the glutathione pools of the IMS and matrix. By modulating redox pathways in the cytosol and IMS, we find that the cytosolic glutathione reductase system is the major determinant of EGSH in the IMS, thus explaining a steady-state EGSH in the IMS which is similar to the cytosol. Moreover, we show that the local EGSH contributes to the partially reduced redox state of the IMS oxidoreductase Mia40 in vivo. Taken together, we provide a comprehensive mechanistic picture of the IMS redox milieu and define the redox influences on Mia40 in living cells. PMID:22705944

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent up-regulation of intracellular calcium concentration by environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human endothelial HMEC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayati, Abdullah; Le Ferrec, Eric; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Fardel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) constitute a major family of widely-distributed environmental toxic contaminants, known as potent ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). B(a)P has been recently shown to trigger an early and transient increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), involved in AhR-related up-regulation of target genes by B(a)P. This study was designed to determine whether AhR may play a role in [Ca(2+)](i) induction provoked by B(a)P. We demonstrated that, in addition to B(a)P, various PAHs, including pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene, known to not or only very poorly interact with AhR, similarly up-regulated [Ca(2+)](i) in human endothelial HMEC-1 cells. Moreover, α-naphthoflavone, a flavonoïd antagonist of AhR, was also able to induce [Ca(2+)](i). Knocking-down AhR expression in HMEC-1 cells through transfection of siRNAs, was finally demonstrated to not prevent B(a)P-mediated induction of [Ca(2+)](i), whereas it efficiently counteracted B(a)P-mediated induction of the referent AhR target gene cytochrome P-450 1B1. Taken together, these data demonstrate that environmental PAHs trigger [Ca(2+)](i) induction in an AhR-independent manner.

  17. Up-Regulation of Interleukin-9 and the Interleukin-9-Associated Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel hCLCA1 in Nasal Mucosa Following In Vivo Allergen Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauber Hans-Peter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-9 is a pleiotropic T helper 2-type cytokine that has been shown to be up-regulated in allergic airway disease, including asthma. IL-9 has been demonstrated to be a potent stimulus for the production and secretion of mucus from airway epithelial cells via induction of a calcium-activated chloride channel, hCLCA1. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-9 and hCLCA1 following allergen challenge in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal biopsies were obtained from allergic rhinitis patients out of allergen season both before (baseline and after local antigen challenge with either ragweed or diluent (control. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to assess IL-9 protein and hCLCA1 messenger ribonucleic acid. Eosinophils and T cells were detected using immunohistochemistry. IL-9 and hCLCA1 were very low at baseline, and expression was significantly up-regulated following ragweed challenge. Whereas the number of eosinophils increased after allergen challenge, T-cell counts did not change significantly. The results of this study demonstrate the relationship between specific allergen challenge and expression of both IL-9 and hCLCA1, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increased production of mucus from airway epithelial cells in allergic rhinitis.

  18. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  19. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pouly

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2, whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd, predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO, rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+.

  20. Permeant calcium ion feed-through regulation of single inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channel gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vais, Horia; Foskett, J. Kevin; Ullah, Ghanim; Pearson, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) Ca2+ release channel plays a central role in the generation and modulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals, and is intricately regulated by multiple mechanisms including cytoplasmic ligand (InsP3, free Ca2+, free ATP4−) binding, posttranslational modifications, and interactions with cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal proteins. However, regulation of InsP3R channel activity by free Ca2+ in the ER lumen ([Ca2+]ER) remains poorly understood because of limitations of Ca2+ flux measurements and imaging techniques. Here, we used nuclear patch-clamp experiments in excised luminal-side-out configuration with perfusion solution exchange to study the effects of [Ca2+]ER on homotetrameric rat type 3 InsP3R channel activity. In optimal [Ca2+]i and subsaturating [InsP3], jumps of [Ca2+]ER from 70 nM to 300 µM reduced channel activity significantly. This inhibition was abrogated by saturating InsP3 but restored when [Ca2+]ER was raised to 1.1 mM. In suboptimal [Ca2+]i, jumps of [Ca2+]ER (70 nM to 300 µM) enhanced channel activity. Thus, [Ca2+]ER effects on channel activity exhibited a biphasic dependence on [Ca2+]i. In addition, the effect of high [Ca2+]ER was attenuated when a voltage was applied to oppose Ca2+ flux through the channel. These observations can be accounted for by Ca2+ flux driven through the open InsP3R channel by [Ca2+]ER, raising local [Ca2+]i around the channel to regulate its activity through its cytoplasmic regulatory Ca2+-binding sites. Importantly, [Ca2+]ER regulation of InsP3R channel activity depended on cytoplasmic Ca2+-buffering conditions: it was more pronounced when [Ca2+]i was weakly buffered but completely abolished in strong Ca2+-buffering conditions. With strong cytoplasmic buffering and Ca2+ flux sufficiently reduced by applied voltage, both activation and inhibition of InsP3R channel gating by physiological levels of [Ca2+]ER were completely abolished

  1. Calcium signalling mediated through α7 and non-α7 nAChR stimulation is differentially regulated in bovine chromaffin cells to induce catecholamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, Laura; Egea, Javier; León, Rafael; Romero, Alejandro; Ruiz, Ana; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier; López, Manuela G

    2011-01-01

    Ca(2+) signalling and exocytosis mediated by nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes, especially the α7 nAChR, in bovine chromaffin cells are still matters of debate. We have used chromaffin cell cultures loaded with Fluo-4 or transfected with aequorins directed to the cytosol or mitochondria, several nAChR agonists (nicotine, 5-iodo-A-85380, PNU282987 and choline), and the α7 nAChR allosteric modulator PNU120596. Minimal [Ca(2+) ](c) transients, induced by low concentrations of selective α7 nAChR agonists and nicotine, were markedly increased by the α7 nAChR allosteric modulator PNU120596. These potentiated responses were completely blocked by the α7 nAChR antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α7-modulated-response). Conversely, high concentrations of the α7 nAChR agonists, nicotine or 5-iodo-A-85380 induced larger [Ca(2+) ](c) transients, that were blocked by mecamylamine but were unaffected by α-bungarotoxin (non-α7 response). [Ca(2+) ](c) increases mediated by α7 nAChR were related to Ca(2+) entry through non-L-type Ca(2+) channels, whereas non-α7 nAChR-mediated signals were related to L-type Ca(2+) channels; Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) -release contributed to both responses. Mitochondrial involvement in the control of [Ca(2+) ](c) transients, mediated by either receptor, was minimal. Catecholamine release coupled to α7 nAChRs was more efficient in terms of catecholamine released/[Ca(2+) ](c) . [Ca(2+) ](c) and catecholamine release mediated by α7 nAChRs required an allosteric modulator and low doses of the agonist. At higher agonist concentrations, the α7 nAChR response was lost and the non-α7 nAChRs were activated. Catecholamine release might therefore be regulated by different nAChR subtypes, depending on agonist concentrations and the presence of allosteric modulators of α7 nAChRs. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. TRPV4 calcium-permeable channel is a novel regulator of oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rishov; Merth, Michael; Sharma, Shweta; Alharbi, Mazen O; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Zhu, Xiaoping; Rahaman, Shaik O

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in United States, and atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory arterial disease, is the most dominant underlying pathology. Macrophages are thought to orchestrate atherosclerosis by generating lipid-laden foam cells and by secreting inflammatory mediators. Emerging data support a role for a mechanical factor, e.g., matrix stiffness, in regulation of macrophage function, vascular elasticity, and atherogenesis. However, the identity of the plasma membrane mechanosensor and the mechanisms by which pro-atherogenic signals are transduced/maintained are unknown. We have obtained evidence that TRPV4, an ion channel in the transient receptor potential vanilloid family and a known mechanosensor, is the likely mediator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-dependent macrophage foam cell formation, a critical process in atherogenesis. Specifically, we found that: i) genetic ablation of TRPV4 or pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 activity by a specific antagonist blocked oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, and ii) TRPV4 deficiency prevented pathophysiological range matrix stiffness or scratch-induced exacerbation of oxLDL-induced foam cell formation. Mechanistically, we found that: i) plasma membrane localization of TRPV4 was sensitized to the increasing level of matrix stiffness, ii) lack of foam cell formation in TRPV4 null cells was not due to lack of expression of CD36, a major receptor for oxLDL, and iii) TRPV4 channel activity regulated oxLDL uptake but not its binding on macrophages. Altogether, these findings identify a novel role for TRPV4 in regulating macrophage foam cell formation by modulating uptake of oxLDL. These findings suggest that therapeutic targeting of TRPV4 may provide a selective approach to the treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Activity-induced Ca2+ signaling in perisynaptic Schwann cells of the early postnatal mouse is mediated by P2Y1 receptors and regulates muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Hennig, Grant W; Renden, Robert B

    2018-01-01

    Perisynaptic glial cells respond to neural activity by increasing cytosolic calcium, but the significance of this pathway is unclear. Terminal/perisynaptic Schwann cells (TPSCs) are a perisynaptic glial cell at the neuromuscular junction that respond to nerve-derived substances such as acetylcholine and purines. Here, we provide genetic evidence that activity-induced calcium accumulation in neonatal TPSCs is mediated exclusively by one subtype of metabotropic purinergic receptor. In P2ry1 mutant mice lacking these responses, postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, function was altered in response to nerve stimulation. This impairment was correlated with a greater susceptibility to activity-induced muscle fatigue. Interestingly, fatigue in P2ry1 mutants was more greatly exacerbated by exposure to high potassium than in control mice. High potassium itself increased cytosolic levels of calcium in TPSCs, a response which was also reduced P2ry1 mutants. These results suggest that activity-induced calcium responses in TPSCs regulate postsynaptic function and muscle fatigue by regulating perisynaptic potassium. PMID:29384476

  4. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  5. The role of a cytosolic superoxide dismutase in barley-pathogen interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lightfoot, Damien

    2016-03-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide (O2-HO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are differentially produced during resistance responses to biotrophic pathogens and during susceptible responses to necrotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for the catalysis of the dismutation of O2-HO2 to H2O2, regulating the redox status of plant cells. Increased SOD activity has been correlated previously with resistance in barley to the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt, the causal agent of the net form of net blotch disease), but the role of individual isoforms of SOD has not been studied. A cytosolic CuZnSOD, HvCSD1, was isolated from barley and characterized as being expressed in tissue from different developmental stages. HvCSD1 was up-regulated during the interaction with Ptt and to a greater extent during the resistance response. Net blotch disease symptoms and fungal growth were not as pronounced in transgenic HvCSD1 knockdown lines in a susceptible background (cv. Golden Promise), when compared with wild-type plants, suggesting that cytosolic O2-HO2 contributes to the signalling required to induce a defence response to Ptt. There was no effect of HvCSD1 knockdown on infection by the hemi-biotrophic rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae or the biotrophic powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, but HvCSD1 also played a role in the regulation of lesion development by methyl viologen. Together, these results suggest that HvCSD1 could be important in the maintenance of the cytosolic redox status and in the differential regulation of responses to pathogens with different lifestyles.

  6. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  7. The presence of a protein activator of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C in cardiac cytosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, E.E.; Kriewaldt, S.D.; Powell, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-01-01

    To study polyphosphoinositide phospholipase (PL) C, isolated sarcolemmal membranes were preincubated with Mg({sup 32}P)-ATP to label phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). After washing, PLC activity was determined by measuring the release of {sup 32}P-labeled inositol diphosphate (IP{sub 2}) and/or inositol trisphospate (IP{sub 3}) from membrane PIP and PIP{sub 2} during incubation at 25{degree}C and pH 7.4. Increasing concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} (0-100 {mu}M) increased IP{sub 2} by 100% over the 0 Ca{sup 2+} control levels. Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC hydrolyzed both PIP and PIP{sub 2} with apparent D{sub A}'s of approximately 0.5 and 70 {mu}M. Addition of dialyzed cytosol further increased IP{sub 2} release by 250% without affecting the K{sub A}'s for Ca{sup 2+} activation. The cytosolic activator was partially purified by DEAE Sephacel chromatography was heat labile and sensitive to trypsin pretreatment identifying it as a protein. In contrast, 10 mM NaF increased the Ca{sup 2+} affinity for PLC 2-fold. These results show that cardiac sarcolemma possess a membrane bound Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC activity which is regulated by a cytosolic protein activator and a G protein. The cytosolic activator would potentially amplify the amount of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositides hydrolyzed by PLC in response to muscarinic receptor activation by acetylcholine. In addition, activation of PLC by NaF or other G protein activators could result from increasing the Ca{sup 2+} affinity of PLC to physiological intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels.

  8. TRPV4 and AQP4 Channels Synergistically Regulate Cell Volume and Calcium Homeostasis in Retinal Müller Glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Andrew O; Ryskamp, Daniel A; Phuong, Tam T T

    2015-01-01

    (-/-) mice exhibited suppressed transcription of genes encoding Trpv4, Aqp4, and the Kir4.1 subunit of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. Swelling and [Ca(2+)]i elevations evoked in Müller cells by hypotonic stimulation were antagonized by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047 (2-methyl-1......-{[(2,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfonyl]amino}-3-hydroxypropanoyl)-1-piperazinyl]carbonyl}-3-methylbutyl)-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide]. Glial cells lacking TRPV4 but not AQP4 showed deficits in hypotonic swelling and regulatory volume decrease. Functional synergy between TRPV4 and AQP4 during cell swelling was confirmed...... and facilitates the time course and amplitude of hypotonicity-induced swelling and regulatory volume decrease. We confirm the crucial facets of the signaling mechanism in heterologously expressing oocytes. These results identify the molecular mechanism that contributes to dynamic regulation of glial volume...

  9. Calcium signals regulated by NAADP and two-pore channels--their role in development, differentiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrington, John; Lear, Pamela; Hachem, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) signals regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be mobilized in response to extracellular stimuli via a range of signal transduction mechanisms, often involving recruitment of diffusible second messenger molecules. The Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers InsP 3 and cADPR release Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum via InsP 3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, while a third messenger, NAADP, releases Ca(2+) from acidic endosomes and lysosomes. Bidirectional communication between the ER and acidic organelles has functional relevance for endolysosomal function as well as for the generation of Ca(2+) signals. The two-pore channels (TPCs) are currently strong candidates for being key components of NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) channels. Ca(2+) signals have been shown to play important roles in embryonic development and cell differentiation; however, much remains to be established about the exact signalling mechanisms involved. Investigation of the role of NAADP and TPCs in development and differentiation is still at an early stage, but recent studies have suggested that they play important roles at key developmental stages in vivo and are important mediators of differentiation of neurons, skeletal muscle cells and osteoclasts in vitro. NAADP signals and TPCs have also been implicated in autophagy, an important process in differentiation. Moreover, potential links between TPC2 and cancer have been recently identified. Further studies will be required to identify the precise mechanisms of action of TPCs and their link with NAADP signalling, and to relate these to their roles in differentiation and other key developmental processes in the cell and organism.

  10. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  11. In vitro antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J; Farine, J C; Garay, R P; Hannaert, P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate, a vascular protective agent, was tested in vitro for its scavenging action against oxygen free radicals. Calcium dobesilate was as potent as rutin to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (IC50 = 1.1 vs 0.7 microM, respectively). It was also able to scavenge superoxide radicals, but with 23 times less potency than rutin (IC50 = 682 vs 30 microM, respectively). Calcium dobesilate significantly reduced platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced chemiluminescence in human PMN cells and lipid peroxidation by oxygen free radicals in human erythrocyte membranes, although these actions required calcium dobesilate concentrations > or = 50 microM. Finally, in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells, magnesium dobesilate reduced the increase in cytosolic free calcium induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibited phenazine methosulfate-induced cell potassium loss. In conclusion, calcium dobesilate was effective in scavenging hydroxyl radicals in vitro, at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Conversely, higher concentrations of the compound were required to scavenge superoxide radicals or to protect the cells against the deleterious effects of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Further studies in vivo are required to determine if these antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate can play a role in its vascular protective mechanisms.

  12. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyu; Chen, Yu; Li, Yanda; Ren, Xiaomeng

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL) on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II) signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs) were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS%) increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286) and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17) and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814). WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. PMID:28573136

  13. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS% increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2 were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286 and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17 and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814. WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway.

  14. Calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK31 interacts with arsenic transporter AtNIP1;1 and regulates arsenite uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijie Ji

    Full Text Available Although arsenite [As(III] is non-essential and toxic for plants, it is effectively absorbed through various transporters into the roots. Here we identified a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK31 response for As(III tolerance in Arabidopsis. We identified CPK31 as an interacting protein of a nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP1;1, an aquaporin involved in As(III uptake. Similarly to the nip1;1 mutants, the loss-of-function mutants of CPK31 improved the tolerance against As(III but not As(V, and accumulated less As(III in roots than that of the wild-type plants. The promoter-β-glucuronidase and quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis revealed that CPK31 displayed overlapping expression profiles with NIP1;1 in the roots, suggesting that they might function together in roots. Indeed, the cpk31 nip1;1 double mutants exhibited stronger As(III tolerance than cpk31 mutants, but similar to nip1;1 mutants, supporting the idea that CPK31 might serve as an upstream regulator of NIP1;1. Furthermore, transient CPK31 overexpression induced by dexamethasone caused the decrease in As(III tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. These findings reveal that CPK31 is a key factor in As(III response in plants.

  15. Bcl-2 regulation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and calcium signaling in normal and malignant lymphocytes: potential new target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Edward F; Lavik, Andrew R; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2014-10-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 is a versatile regulator of cell survival. Its interactions with its own pro-apoptotic family members are widely recognized for their role in promoting the survival of cancer cells. These interactions are thus being targeted for cancer treatment. Less widely recognized is the interaction of Bcl-2 with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), an InsP3-gated Ca(2+) channel located on the endoplasmic reticulum. The nature of this interaction, the mechanism by which it controls Ca(2+) release from the ER, its role in T-cell development and survival, and the possibility of targeting it as a novel cancer treatment strategy are summarized in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific association of growth-associated protein 43 with calcium release units in skeletal muscles of lower vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Caprara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43, is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes, and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species.

  17. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome: the metabolic heart of the cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eIto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The plant cytosol is the major intracellular fluid that acts as the medium for inter-organellar crosstalk and where a plethora of important biological reactions take place. These include its involvement in protein synthesis and degradation, stress response signaling, carbon metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and accumulation of enzymes for defense and detoxification. This central role is highlighted by estimates indicating that the majority of eukaryotic proteins are cytosolic. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of numerous proteomic studies on its different subcellular compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted proteomic characterizations of complexes is included. Despite this, few groups are currently applying advanced proteomic approaches to this important metabolic space. This review will highlight the current state of the Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome since its initial characterization a few years ago.

  18. Cytosolic proteostasis through importing of misfolded proteins into mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Linhao; Zhou, Chuankai; Jin, Erli; Kucharavy, Andrei; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhihui; Florens, Laurence; Li, Rong

    2017-03-16

    Loss of proteostasis underlies ageing and neurodegeneration characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although many neurodegenerative-disease-associated proteins can be found in mitochondria, it remains unclear how mitochondrial dysfunction and protein aggregation could be related. In dividing yeast cells, protein aggregates that form under stress or during ageing are preferentially retained by the mother cell, in part through tethering to mitochondria, while the disaggregase Hsp104 helps to dissociate aggregates and thereby enables refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins. Here we show that, in yeast, cytosolic proteins prone to aggregation are imported into mitochondria for degradation. Protein aggregates that form under heat shock contain both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins and interact with the mitochondrial import complex. Many aggregation-prone proteins enter the mitochondrial intermembrane space and matrix after heat shock, and some do so even without stress. Timely dissolution of cytosolic aggregates requires the mitochondrial import machinery and proteases. Blocking mitochondrial import but not proteasome activity causes a marked delay in the degradation of aggregated proteins. Defects in cytosolic Hsp70s leads to enhanced entry of misfolded proteins into mitochondria and elevated mitochondrial stress. We term this mitochondria-mediated proteostasis mechanism MAGIC (mitochondria as guardian in cytosol) and provide evidence that it may exist in human cells.

  19. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  20. A small conductance calcium-activated K+ channel in C. elegans, KCNL-2, plays a role in the regulation of the rate of egg-laying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavita K Chotoo

    Full Text Available In the nervous system of mice, small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK channels function to regulate neuronal excitability through the generation of a component of the medium afterhyperpolarization that follows action potentials. In humans, irregular action potential firing frequency underlies diseases such as ataxia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Due to the complexity of studying protein function in the mammalian nervous system, we sought to characterize an SK channel homologue, KCNL-2, in C. elegans, a genetically tractable system in which the lineage of individual neurons was mapped from their early developmental stages. Sequence analysis of the KCNL-2 protein reveals that the six transmembrane domains, the potassium-selective pore and the calmodulin binding domain are highly conserved with the mammalian homologues. We used widefield and confocal fluorescent imaging to show that a fusion construct of KCNL-2 with GFP in transgenic lines is expressed in the nervous system of C. elegans. We also show that a KCNL-2 null strain, kcnl-2(tm1885, demonstrates a mild egg-laying defective phenotype, a phenotype that is rescued in a KCNL-2-dependent manner. Conversely, we show that transgenic lines that overexpress KCNL-2 demonstrate a hyperactive egg-laying phenotype. In this study, we show that the vulva of transgenic hermaphrodites is highly innervated by neuronal processes and by the VC4 and VC5 neurons that express GFP-tagged KCNL-2. We propose that KCNL-2 functions in the nervous system of C. elegans to regulate the rate of egg-laying.

  1. Differential regulation of the fiber type-specific gene expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase isoforms induced by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morissette, Marc P; Susser, Shanel E; Stammers, Andrew N; O'Hara, Kimberley A; Gardiner, Phillip F; Sheppard, Patricia; Moffatt, Teri L; Duhamel, Todd A

    2014-09-01

    The regulatory role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α2 on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 1a and SERCA2a in different skeletal muscle fiber types has yet to be elucidated. Sedentary (Sed) or exercise-trained (Ex) wild-type (WT) and AMPKα2-kinase dead (KD) transgenic mice, which overexpress a mutated and inactivated AMPKα2 subunit, were utilized to characterize how genotype or exercise training influenced the regulation of SERCA isoforms in gastrocnemius. As expected, both Sed and Ex KD mice had >40% lower AMPK phosphorylation and 30% lower SERCA1a protein than WT mice (P SERCA2a protein was not different among KD and WT mice. Exercise increased SERCA1a and SERCA2a protein content among WT and KD mice, compared with their Sed counterparts. Maximal SERCA activity was lower in KD mice, compared with WT. Total phospholamban protein was higher in KD mice than in WT and lower in Ex compared with Sed mice. Exercise training increased phospholamban Ser(16) phosphorylation in WT mice. Laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR indicated that SERCA1a mRNA expression among type I fibers was not altered by genotype or exercise, but SERCA2a mRNA was increased 30-fold in WT+Ex, compared with WT+Sed. In contrast, the exercise-stimulated increase for SERCA2a mRNA was blunted in KD mice. Exercise upregulated SERCA1a and SERCA2a mRNA among type II fibers, but was not altered by genotype. Collectively, these data suggest that exercise differentially influences SERCA isoform expression in type I and type II fibers. Additionally, AMPKα2 influences the regulation of SERCA2a mRNA in type I skeletal muscle fibers following exercise training. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Involvement of TRPV2 and SOCE in calcium influx disorder in DMD primary human myotubes with a specific contribution of α1-syntrophin and PLC/PKC in SOCE regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harisseh, Rania; Chatelier, Aurélien; Magaud, Christophe; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Calcium homeostasis is critical for several vital functions in excitable and nonexcitable cells and has been shown to be impaired in many pathologies including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Various studies using murine models showed the implication of calcium entry in the dystrophic phenotype. However, alteration of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2)-dependant cation entry has not been investigated yet in human skeletal muscle cells. We pharmacologically characterized basal and store-operated cation entries in primary cultures of myotubes prepared from muscle of normal and DMD patients and found, for the first time, an increased SOCE in DMD myotubes. Moreover, this increase cannot be explained by an over expression of the well-known SOCE actors: TRPC1/4, Orai1, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) mRNA and proteins. Thus we investigated the modes of regulation of this cation entry. We firstly demonstrated the important role of the scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, which regulates SOCE in primary human myotubes through its PDZ domain. We also studied the implication of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in SOCE and showed that their inhibition restores normal levels of SOCE in DMD human myotubes. In addition, the involvement of TRPV2 in calcium deregulation in DMD human myotubes was explored. We showed an abnormal elevation of TRPV2-dependant cation entry in dystrophic primary human myotubes compared with normal ones. These findings show that calcium homeostasis mishandling in DMD myotubes depends on SOCE under the influence of Ca(2+)/PLC/PKC pathway and α1-syntrophin regulation as well as on TRPV2-dependant cation influx.

  3. Sympathetic regulation of vascular tone via noradrenaline and serotonin in the rat carotid body as revealed by intracellular calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takuya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-01-30

    Hypoxia-induced chemosensory activity in the carotid body (CB) may be enhanced by the sympathetic regulation of vascular tone in the CB. In the present study, we recorded cervical sympathetic nerve activity in rats exposed to hypoxia, and examined noradrenaline (NA)- and serotonin (5-HT)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) responses in smooth muscle cells and pericytes in isolated blood vessels from the CB. Multifiber electrical activity recorded from the cervical sympathetic trunk was increased during the inhalation of hypoxic gas. NA induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in smooth muscle cells in arteriole specimens, whereas 5-HT did not cause any [Ca(2+)]i responses. However, NA did not induce [Ca(2+)]i increases in pericytes in capillaries, whereas 5-HT did and this response was inhibited by the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin. In conclusion, cervical sympathetic nerves enhanced by hypoxia may reduce blood flow in the CB in order to increase chemosensitivity. Thus, hypoxic chemosensitivity in the CB may involve a positive feedback mechanism via sympathetic nerves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A bradykinin potentiating peptide from Egyptian cobra venom strongly affects rat atrium contractile force and cellular calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saadani, Muhammad A M; El-Sayed, Muhammad F

    2003-12-01

    Peptide fractions were isolated from venoms of the Egyptian snake Naja haje haje (cobra BPP) and the scorpions Buthus occitanus (BPP(B)) and Leirus quenquestriatus (BPP(L)). The pharmacological effects of these peptides were bioassayed and showed bradykinin potentiating activities. Amino acid analysis revealed that 14 amino acids contribute to the structure of BPP(B) and 16 for BPP(L), while cobra BPP was composed of 15 amino acids. Treatment of rat atrial preparations with 50 microg/ml of cobra BPP caused a significant reduction (Pcobra BPP in a way that restored the atrial force development. Na(+)-channel blockers did not change the force development at 5 mM Ca(2+). Experiments with (45)Ca revealed that Ca(2+) uptake of cobra BPP treated atria was 0.52+/-0.07 microM/g wet mass and the force at the end of the uptake period was 55.0+/-2.0%. The corresponding values for non-treated preparations were 0.56+/-0.04 microM/g and 92.0%+/-3.0%, respectively. Our results revealed that cobra BPP did not exhibit any effect on Ca(2+) uptake by rat atrial preparations, but strongly affected cellular Ca(2+) regulation.

  5. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  6. Agonist activation of cytosolic Ca2+ in subfornical organ cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Sharma, R. V.; Xu, Z.; Bhatty, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is sensitive to both ANG II and ACh, and local application of these agents produces dipsogenic responses and vasopressin release. The present study examined the effects of cholinergic drugs, ANG II, and increased extracellular osmolarity on dissociated, cultured cells of the SFO that were retrogradely labeled from the supraoptic nucleus. The effects were measured as changes in cytosolic calcium in fura 2-loaded cells by using a calcium imaging system. Both ACh and carbachol increased intracellular ionic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, in contrast to the effects of muscarinic receptor agonists on SFO neurons, manipulation of the extracellular osmolality produced no effects, and application of ANG II produced only moderate effects on [Ca2+]i in a few retrogradely labeled cells. The cholinergic effects on [Ca2+]i could be blocked with the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and with the more selective muscarinic receptor antagonists pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperdine methiodide (4-DAMP). In addition, the calcium in the extracellular fluid was required for the cholinergic-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that ACh acts to induce a functional cellular response in SFO neurons through action on a muscarinic receptor, probably of the M1 subtype and that the increase of [Ca2+]i, at least initially, requires the entry of extracellular Ca2+. Also, consistent with a functional role of M1 receptors in the SFO are the results of immunohistochemical preparations demonstrating M1 muscarinic receptor-like protein present within this forebrain circumventricular organ.

  7. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Pereyra, Andrea S. [Department of Histology, National University of La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Hereñú, Claudia [Department of Histology, National University of La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Delbono, Osvaldo, E-mail: odelbono@wakehealth.edu [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Neuroscience Program, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca{sub v}) β{sub 1a} subunit (Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} NH{sub 2}-terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}. • We mapped TnT3 and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation.

  8. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  9. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  10. Studies of the cytosolic thymidine kinase in human cells and comparison to the recombinantly expressed enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock Jensen, Helle

    Thymidine kinase (TK) is a key enzyme in the salvage pathway of the nucleoside metabolism catalyzing the first phosphorylation step in TTP synthesis. Human cytosolic TK (TKl) is highly cell cycle regulated. TKl is regulated on many different levels of expression and isoforms with altered enzymatic...... properties are found in cancer cells. Investigation of these factors offers possibilities to understand the molecular background for TKl expression including to clarify general regulation patterns. It also gives valuable information for constructing new nucleoside analogs for the therapy of cancer and virus...... infections. In the first part of the present investigation a sensitive test for quantitating TKl mRNA (competitive PCR) is developed and the results show that PHA stimulated lymphocytes reveal the same pattern concerning expression of TKl mRNA and TKl enzyme activity as serum-stimulated cells. This pattern...

  11. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  12. Targeted liposomes for cytosolic drug delivery to tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis, a Trojan horse strategy with antibody-targeted liposomes has been followed to obtain cytosolic delivery of biotherapeutics to tumor cells in vitro. This strategy involves targeting of immunoliposomes to specific receptors on tumor cells that result in receptor-mediated uptake of the

  13. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  14. Monitoring disulfide bond formation in the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Henrik; Tachibana, Christine; Winther, Jakob R.

    2004-01-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight thiol in the eukaryotic cytosol. The compartment-specific ratio and absolute concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively) are, however, not easily determined. Here, we present a glutathione-specific green flu...

  15. Short-term exposure to L-type calcium channel blocker, verapamil, alters the expression pattern of calcium-binding proteins in the brain of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palande, Nikhil V; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G

    2015-01-01

    The influx of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) is responsible for various physiological events including neurotransmitter release and synaptic modulation. The L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-type VDCCs) transport Ca(2+) across the membrane. Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) bind free cytosolic Ca(2+) and prevent excitotoxicity caused by sudden increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+). The present study was aimed to understand the regulation of expression of neuronal CaBPs, namely, calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) following blockade of L-type VDCCs in the CNS of Carassius auratus. Verapamil (VRP), a potent L-type VDCC blocker, selectively blocks Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane level. VRP present in the aquatic environment at a very low residual concentration has shown ecotoxicological effects on aquatic animals. Following acute exposure for 96h, median lethal concentration (LC50) for VRP was found to be 1.22mg/L for goldfish. At various doses of VRP, the behavioral alterations were observed in the form of respiratory difficulty and loss of body balance confirming the cardiovascular toxicity caused by VRP at higher doses. In addition to affecting the cardiovascular system, VRP also showed effects on the nervous system in the form of altered expression of PV. When compared with controls, the pattern of CR expression did not show any variations, while PV expression showed significant alterations in few neuronal populations such as the pretectal nucleus, inferior lobes, and the rostral corpus cerebellum. Our result suggests possible regulatory effect of calcium channel blockers on the expression of PV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. GsAPK, an ABA-activated and calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase from G. soja, mediates the regulation of plant tolerance to salinity and ABA stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Ji, Wei; Gao, Peng; Li, Yong; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Plant Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1) related protein kinase (SnRK), a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases, has been implicated as a crucial upstream regulator of ABA and osmotic signaling as in many other signaling cascades. In this paper, we have isolated a novel plant specific ABA activated calcium independent protein kinase (GsAPK) from a highly salt tolerant plant, Glycine soja (50109), which is a member of the SnRK2 family. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsAPK is localized in the plasma membrane. We found that autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation activity of GsAPK is only activated by ABA and the kinase activity also was observed when calcium was replaced by EGTA, suggesting its independence of calcium in enzyme activity. We also found that cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress alter GsAPK gene transcripts and heterogonous overexpression of GsAPK in Arabidopsis alters plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA stress. In summary, we demonstrated that GsAPK is a Glycine soja ABA activated calcium independent SnRK-type kinase presumably involved in ABA mediated stress signal transduction.

  17. GsAPK, an ABA-activated and calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase from G. soja, mediates the regulation of plant tolerance to salinity and ABA stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    Full Text Available Plant Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase (SnRK, a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases, has been implicated as a crucial upstream regulator of ABA and osmotic signaling as in many other signaling cascades. In this paper, we have isolated a novel plant specific ABA activated calcium independent protein kinase (GsAPK from a highly salt tolerant plant, Glycine soja (50109, which is a member of the SnRK2 family. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsAPK is localized in the plasma membrane. We found that autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation activity of GsAPK is only activated by ABA and the kinase activity also was observed when calcium was replaced by EGTA, suggesting its independence of calcium in enzyme activity. We also found that cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress alter GsAPK gene transcripts and heterogonous overexpression of GsAPK in Arabidopsis alters plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA stress. In summary, we demonstrated that GsAPK is a Glycine soja ABA activated calcium independent SnRK-type kinase presumably involved in ABA mediated stress signal transduction.

  18. Changes in the level of cytosolic calcium, nitric oxide and nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of .... grade C according to the Child–Pugh score, which is based on the levels of serum bilirubin, albumin, ... 35–55. Aetiology. Alcoholic. 33. -. Metabolic. 7. -. Grade (according to Child–Pugh class). A. 2.

  19. Role of tumour necrosis factor-a in the regulation of T-type calcium channel current in HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fang; Xue, Yu-Mei; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hui; Liu, Fang-Zhou; Chen, Shao-Xian; Kuang, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Wu, Shu-Lin; Deng, Chun-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation contributes to the initiation and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels are increased in patients with AF, the role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of AF remains unclear. Besides L-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,L ), T-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,T ) also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AF. This study was designed to use the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique and biochemical assays to explore if TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF through regulating IC a,T in atrial myocytes. It was found that compared with sinus rhythm (SR) controls, T-type calcium channel (TCC) subunit mRNA levels were decreased, while TNF-α expression levels were increased, in human atrial tissue from patients with AF. In murine atrial myocyte HL-1 cells, after culturing for 24 h, 12.5, 25 and 50 ng/mL TNF-α significantly reduced the protein expression levels of the TCC α1G subunit in a concentration-dependent manner. The peak current was reduced by the application of 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α in a concentration-dependent manner (from -15.08 ± 1.11 pA/pF in controls to -11.89 ± 0.83 pA/pF and -8.54 ± 1.55 pA/pF in 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α group respectively). TNF-α application also inhibited voltage-dependent inactivation of IC a,T, shifted the inactivation curve to the left. These results suggest that TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF, probably via decreasing IC a,T current density in atrium-derived myocytes through impaired channel function and down-regulation of channel protein expression. This pathway thus represents a potential pathogenic mechanism in AF. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Fractional Dynamics in Calcium Oscillation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoothana Suansook

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcium oscillations have many important roles to perform many specific functions ranging from fertilization to cell death. The oscillation mechanisms have been observed in many cell types including cardiac cells, oocytes, and hepatocytes. There are many mathematical models proposed to describe the oscillatory changes of cytosolic calcium concentration in cytosol. Many experiments were observed in various kinds of living cells. Most of the experimental data show simple periodic oscillations. In certain type of cell, there exists the complex periodic bursting behavior. In this paper, we have studied further the fractional chaotic behavior in calcium oscillations model based on experimental study of hepatocytes proposed by Kummer et al. Our aim is to explore fractional-order chaotic pattern in this oscillation model. Numerical calculation of bifurcation parameters is carried out using modified trapezoidal rule for fractional integral. Fractional-order phase space and time series at fractional order are present. Numerical results are characterizing the dynamical behavior at different fractional order. Chaotic behavior of the model can be analyzed from the bifurcation pattern.

  1. Targeting cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in neutrophil-dominated inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia eDe Chiara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available New therapeutic approaches that can accelerate neutrophil apoptosis under inflammatory conditions to enhance the resolution of inflammation are now under study. Neutrophils are deprived of proliferative capacity and have a tightly controlled lifespan to avoid their persistence at the site of injury. We have recently described that the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, a nuclear factor involved in DNA replication and repair of proliferating cells is a key regulator of neutrophil survival. In this review, we will try to put into perspective the physiologic relevance of PCNA in neutrophils. We will discuss key issues such as molecular structure, post-translational modifications, based on our knowledge of nuclear PCNA, assuming that similar principles governing its function are conserved between nuclear and cytosolic PCNA. The example of cystic fibrosis that features one of the most intense neutrophil-dominated pulmonary inflammation will be discussed. We believe that through an intimate comprehension of the cytosolic PCNA scaffold based on nuclear PCNA knowledge, novel pathways regulating neutrophil survival can be unraveled and innovative agents can be developed to dampen inflammation where it proves detrimental.

  2. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  3. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  4. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  5. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Cultivar Response to Prohexadione Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut digging efficiency can be reduced if row visibility is limited by excessive vegetation. The plant growth regulator prohexadione calcium retards vegetative growth and improves row visibility by inhibiting internode elongation. In some instances, prohexadione calcium also increases pod yield....

  6. Role of phospholipase A2 pathway in regulating activation of Bufo arenarum oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmat, M T; Bonilla, F; Hermosilla, P C; Zelarayán, L; Bühler, M I

    2013-08-01

    Transient increases in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) are essential for triggering egg activation events. Increased Ca(2+) results from its rapid release from intracellular stores, mainly mediated by one or both intracellular calcium channels: the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR). Several regulatory pathways that tailor the response of these channels to the specific cell type have been proposed. Among its many modulatory actions, calcium can serve as an activator of a cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA2), which releases arachidonic acid from phospholipids of the endoplasmic reticulum as well as from the nuclear envelope. Previous studies have suggested that arachidonic acid and/or its metabolites were able to modulate the activity of several ion channels. Based on these findings, we have studied the participation of the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) pathway in the process of Bufo arenarum oocyte activation and the interrelation between any of its metabolites and the ion channels involved in the calcium release from the intracellular reservoirs at fertilization. We found that addition of both melittin, a potent PLA(2) activator, and arachidonic acid, the main PLA(2) reaction metabolite, was able to induce activation events in a bell-shaped manner. Differential regulation of IP3Rs and RyRs by arachidonic acid and its products could explain melittin and arachidonic acid behaviour in Bufo arenarum egg activation. The concerted action of arachidonic acid and/or its metabolites could provide controlled mobilization of calcium from intracellular reservoirs and useful tools for understanding calcium homeostasis in eggs that express both types of receptors.

  7. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  8. Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Martens, Helle; Schulz, Alexander

    Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein.......Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein....

  9. A cytosolic juxtamembrane interface modulates plexin A3 oligomerization and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Barton

    Full Text Available Plexins (plxns are transmembrane (TM receptors involved in the guidance of vascular, lymphatic vessel, and neuron growth as well as cancer metastasis. Plxn signaling results in cytosolic GTPase-activating protein activity, and previous research implicates dimerization as important for activation of plxn signaling. Purified, soluble plxn extracellular and cytosolic domains exhibit only weak homomeric interactions, suggesting a role for the plxn TM and juxtamembrane regions in homooligomerization. In this study, we consider a heptad repeat in the Danio rerio PlxnA3 cytosolic juxtamembrane domain (JM for its ability to influence PlxnA3 homooligomerization in TM-domain containing constructs. Site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with the AraTM assay and bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET² suggest an interface involving a JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, regulates PlxnA3 homomeric interactions when examined in constructs containing an ectodomain, TM and JM domain. In the presence of a neuropilin-2a co-receptor and semaphorin 3F ligand, disruption to PlxnA3 homodimerization caused by an M1281F mutation is eliminated, suggesting destabilization of the PlxnA3 homodimer in the JM is not sufficient to disrupt co-receptor complex formation. In contrast, enhanced homodimerization of PlxnA3 caused by mutation M1281L remains even in the presence of ligand semaphorin 3F and co-receptor neuropilin-2a. Consistent with this pattern of PlxnA3 dimerization in the presence of ligand and co-receptor, destabilizing mutations to PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281F are able to rescue motor patterning defects in sidetracked zebrafish embryos, whereas mutations that enhance PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281L are not. Collectively, our results indicate the JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, forms a switchable interface that modulates both PlxnA3 homomeric interactions and signal transduction.

  10. Cytosolic HSP90 associates with and modulates the Arabidopsis RPM1 disease resistance protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, David A; Tornero, Pablo; Belkhadir, Youssef; Krishna, Priti; Takahashi, Akira; Shirasu, Ken; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2003-11-03

    The Arabidopsis protein RPM1 activates disease resistance in response to Pseudomonas syringae proteins targeted to the inside of the host cell via the bacterial type III delivery system. We demonstrate that specific mutations in the ATP-binding domain of a single Arabidopsis cytosolic HSP90 isoform compromise RPM1 function. These mutations do not affect the function of related disease resistance proteins. RPM1 associates with HSP90 in plant cells. The Arabidopsis proteins RAR1 and SGT1 are required for the action of many R proteins, and display some structural similarity to HSP90 co-chaperones. Each associates with HSP90 in plant cells. Our data suggest that (i) RPM1 is an HSP90 client protein; and (ii) RAR1 and SGT1 may function independently as HSP90 cofactors. Dynamic interactions among these proteins can regulate RPM1 stability and function, perhaps similarly to the formation and regulation of animal steroid receptor complexes.

  11. Testis-specific isoform of Na/K-ATPase (ATP1A4) regulates sperm function and fertility in dairy bulls through potential mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species, calcium and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, G D; Kroetsch, T; Kastelic, J P; Thundathil, J C

    2017-07-01

    Traditional bull breeding soundness evaluation (BBSE) eliminates bulls that are grossly abnormal; however, bulls classified as satisfactory potential breeders still vary in field fertility, implying submicroscopic differences in sperm characteristics. The testis-specific isoform of Na/K-ATPase (ATP1A4) is involved in regulation of sperm motility and capacitation in bulls through well-established enzyme activity and signaling functions. The objective was to determine ATP1A4 content, activity and their relationship to post-thaw sperm function and field fertility, using semen samples from low-fertility (LF) and high-fertility (HF) Holstein bulls (n = 20 each) with known FERTSOL rates (measure of field fertility, based on non-return rate). Frozen-thawed sperm from HF bulls had increased ATP1A4 content and activity compared to LF bulls. Furthermore, post-thaw sperm from HF bulls had increased tyrosine phosphorylation, ROS, F-actin content, and low intracellular calcium compared to LF bulls. Subsequent incubation of HF bull sperm with ouabain (a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) further augmented the post-thaw increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, ROS production, and F-actin content, whereas the increase in intracellular calcium was still low compared to LF bull sperm. ATP1A4 content and activity, ROS, F-actin and calcium were significantly correlated with fertility. In conclusion, we inferred that ATP1A4 content and activity differed among dairy bulls with satisfactory semen characteristics and that ATP1A4 may regulate sperm function through mechanisms involving ROS, F-actin and calcium in frozen-thawed sperm of HF and LF dairy bulls. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+ATP-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+ATP-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. l-Amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and PYY

  13. Calcium is the switch in the moonlighting dual function of the ligand-activated receptor kinase phytosulfokine receptor 1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, Victor

    2014-09-23

    Background: A number of receptor kinases contain guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic centres encapsulated in the cytosolic kinase domain. A prototypical example is the phytosulfokine receptor 1 (PSKR1) that is involved in regulating growth responses in plants. PSKR1 contains both kinase and GC activities however the underlying mechanisms regulating the dual functions have remained elusive. Findings: Here, we confirm the dual activity of the cytoplasmic domain of the PSKR1 receptor. We show that mutations within the guanylate cyclase centre modulate the GC activity while not affecting the kinase catalytic activity. Using physiologically relevant Ca2+ levels, we demonstrate that its GC activity is enhanced over two-fold by Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, increasing Ca2+ levels inhibits kinase activity up to 500-fold at 100 nM Ca2+. Conclusions: Changes in calcium at physiological levels can regulate the kinase and GC activities of PSKR1. We therefore propose a functional model of how calcium acts as a bimodal switch between kinase and GC activity in PSKR1 that could be relevant to other members of this novel class of ligand-activated receptor kinases.

  14. Electrical control of calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells using microsecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Hanna; Andre, Franck M; Mir, Lluis M

    2017-04-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine due to their ability to differentiate into many cellular types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes amongst many other cell types. These cells present spontaneous calcium oscillations implicating calcium channels and pumps of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. These oscillations regulate many basic functions in the cell such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the possibility to mimic or regulate these oscillations might be useful to regulate mesenchymal stem cells biological functions. One or several electric pulses of 100 μs were used to induce Ca 2+ spikes caused by the penetration of Ca 2+ from the extracellular medium, through the transiently electropermeabilized plasma membrane, in human adipose mesenchymal stem cells from several donors. Attached cells were preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and exposed to the electric pulse(s) under the fluorescence microscope. Viability was also checked. According to the pulse(s) electric field amplitude, it is possible to generate a supplementary calcium spike with properties close to those of calcium spontaneous oscillations, or, on the contrary, to inhibit the spontaneous calcium oscillations for a very long time compared to the pulse duration. Through that inhibition of the oscillations, Ca 2+ oscillations of desired amplitude and frequency could then be imposed on the cells using subsequent electric pulses. None of the pulses used here, even those with the highest amplitude, caused a loss of cell viability. An easy way to control Ca 2+ oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells, through their cancellation or the addition of supplementary Ca 2+ spikes, is reported here. Indeed, the direct link between the microsecond electric pulse(s) delivery and the occurrence/cancellation of cytosolic Ca 2+ spikes allowed us to mimic and regulate the Ca 2+ oscillations in these cells. Since microsecond electric pulse delivery

  15. Artificial Loading of ASC Specks with Cytosolic Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Can Sahillioğlu

    Full Text Available Inflammasome complexes form upon interaction of Nod Like Receptor (NLR proteins with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAPMS inside the cytosol. Stimulation of a subset of inflammasome receptors including NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 triggers formation of the micrometer-sized spherical supramolecular complex called the ASC speck. The ASC speck is thought to be the platform of inflammasome activity, but the reason why a supramolecular complex is preferred against oligomeric platforms remains elusive. We observed that a set of cytosolic proteins, including the model antigen ovalbumin, tend to co-aggregate on the ASC speck. We suggest that co-aggregation of antigenic proteins on the ASC speck during intracellular infection might be instrumental in antigen presentation.

  16. DMPD: Cytosolic DNA recognition for triggering innate immune responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280611 Cytosolic DNA recognition for triggering innate immune responses. Takaoka ...A, Taniguchi T. Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2008 Apr 29;60(7):847-57. Epub 2007 Dec 31. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cytosolic DNA reco...gnition for triggering innate immune responses. PubmedID 18280611 Title Cytosolic DNA reco

  17. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  18. A new view of the bacterial cytosol environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Cossins

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The cytosol is the major environment in all bacterial cells. The true physical and dynamical nature of the cytosol solution is not fully understood and here a modeling approach is applied. Using recent and detailed data on metabolite concentrations, we have created a molecular mechanical model of the prokaryotic cytosol environment of Escherichia coli, containing proteins, metabolites and monatomic ions. We use 200 ns molecular dynamics simulations to compute diffusion rates, the extent of contact between molecules and dielectric constants. Large metabolites spend ∼80% of their time in contact with other molecules while small metabolites vary with some only spending 20% of time in contact. Large non-covalently interacting metabolite structures mediated by hydrogen-bonds, ionic and π stacking interactions are common and often associate with proteins. Mg(2+ ions were prominent in NIMS and almost absent free in solution. Κ(+ is generally not involved in NIMSs and populates the solvent fairly uniformly, hence its important role as an osmolyte. In simulations containing ubiquitin, to represent a protein component, metabolite diffusion was reduced owing to long lasting protein-metabolite interactions. Hence, it is likely that with larger proteins metabolites would diffuse even more slowly. The dielectric constant of these simulations was found to differ from that of pure water only through a large contribution from ubiquitin as metabolite and monatomic ion effects cancel. These findings suggest regions of influence specific to particular proteins affecting metabolite diffusion and electrostatics. Also some proteins may have a higher propensity for associations with metabolites owing to their larger electrostatic fields. We hope that future studies may be able to accurately predict how binding interactions differ in the cytosol relative to dilute aqueous solution.

  19. Calcium metabolism & hypercalcemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, F; Motta, R; Cecchin, D; Ave, S; Camozzi, V; Basso, S M M; Luisetto, G

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is essential for many metabolic process, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. The metabolic pathways that contribute to maintain serum calcium levels are bone remodeling processes, intestinal absorption and secretion, and renal handling, but hypercalcemia occurs when at least 2 of these 3 metabolic pathways are altered. Calcium metabolism mainly depends on the activity of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Its secretion is strictly controlled by the ionized serum calcium levels through a negative feed-back, which is achieved by the activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) mainly expressed on the surface of the parathyroid cells. The PTH receptor in bone and kidney is now referred as PTHR1. The balance of PTH, calcitonin, and vitamin D has long been considered the main regulator of calcium metabolism, but the function of other actors, such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, and TPRV5 should be considered. Primary hyperparathyroidism and malignancy are the most common causes of hypercalcemia, accounting for more than 90% of cases. Uncontrolled hypercalcemia may cause renal impairment, both temporary (alteration of renal tubular function) and progressive (relapsing nephrolithiasis), leading to a progressive loss of renal function, as well as severe bone diseases, and heart damages. Advances in the understanding of all actors of calcium homeostasis will be crucial, having several practical consequences in the treatment and prevention of hypercalcemia. This would allow to move from a support therapy, sometimes ineffective, to a specific and addressed therapy, especially in patients with chronic hypercalcemic conditions unsuitable for surgery.

  20. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  1. Localization and pharmacological characterization of voltage dependent calcium channels in cultured neocortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, D B; Lund, T M; Belhage, B

    2001-01-01

    using the fluorescent calcium chelator fura-2. The types of calcium channels present at the synaptic terminal were determined by the inhibitory action of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced [3H]GABA release in the same cell preparation. L-, N-, P-, Q- and R-/T-type voltage dependent calcium...... channels were differentially distributed in somata, neurites and nerve terminals. omega-conotoxin MVIIC (omega-CgTx MVIIC) inhibited approximately 40% of the Ca(2+)-rise in both somata and neurites and 60% of the potassium induced [3H]GABA release, indicating that the Q-type channel is the quantitatively...... in cytosolic calcium concentration. The results of this investigation demonstrate that pharmacologically distinct types of voltage dependent calcium channels are differentially localized in cell bodies, neurites and nerve terminals of mouse cortical neurons but that the Q-type calcium channel appears...

  2. Gαi2- and Gαi3-specific regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Dizayee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two pertussis toxin sensitive G(i proteins, G(i2 and G(i3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous G(i isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of G(i proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC. METHODS: Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gα(i2 (Gα(i2 (-/- or Gα(i3 (Gα(i3 (-/-. mRNA levels of Gα(i/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gα(i and Ca(vα(1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. RESULTS: In cardiac tissue from Gα(i2 (-/- mice, Gα(i3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187 ± 21% and 567 ± 59%, respectively. In Gα(i3 (-/- mouse hearts, Gα(i2 mRNA (127 ± 5% and protein (131 ± 10% levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gα(i2 (-/- mice was lowered (-7.9 ± 0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05 compared to wild-type cells (-10.7 ± 0.5 pA/pF, n = 22, whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gα(i3 (-/- mice (-14.3 ± 0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05. Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gα(i2 (but not of Gα(i3 and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gα(i3 (-/-. The pore forming Ca(vα(1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Ca(vα(1 and Ca(vβ(2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gα(i2. CONCLUSION: Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform

  3. Identification and characterization of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Kimura, Ayako; Sakuyama, Harumi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Euglena gracilis has the ability to accumulate a storage polysaccharide, a β-1,3-glucan known as paramylon, under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, E. gracilis cells degrade paramylon and synthesize wax esters. Cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) appears to be a key enzyme in gluconeogenesis and position branch point of carbon partitioning between paramylon and wax ester biosynthesis. We herein identified and characterized cytosolic FBPase from E. gracilis. The Km and Vmax values of EgFBPaseIII were 16.5 ± 1.6 μM and 30.4 ± 7.2 μmol min(-1) mg protein(-1), respectively. The activity of EgFBPaseIII was not regulated by AMP or reversible redox modulation. No significant differences were observed in the production of paramylon in transiently suppressed EgFBPaseIII gene expression cells by RNAi (KD-EgFBPaseIII); nevertheless, FBPase activity was markedly decreased in KD-EgFBPaseIII cells. On the other hand, the growth of KD-EgFBPaseIII cells was slightly higher than that of control cells.

  4. Cloning and Expression of a Cytosolic HSP90 Gene in Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, a highly conserved molecular chaperone, plays essential roles in folding, keeping structural integrity, and regulating the subset of cytosolic proteins. We cloned the cDNA of Chlorella vulgaris HSP90 (named CvHSP90 by combining homology cloning with rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that CvHSP90 is a cytosolic member of the HSP90 family. Quantitative RT-PCR was applied to determine the expression level of messenger RNA (mRNA in CvHSP90 under different stress conditions. C. vulgaris was kept in different temperatures (5–45°C for 1 h. The mRNA expression level of CvHSP90 increased with temperature from 5 to 10°C, went further from 35 to 40°C, and reached the maximum at 40°C. On the other hand, for C. vulgaris kept at 35°C for different durations, the mRNA expression level of CvHSP90 increased gradually and reached the peak at 7 h and then declined progressively. In addition, the expression level of CvHSP90 at 40 or 45 in salinity (‰ was almost fourfold of that at 25 in salinity (‰ for 2 h. Therefore, CvHSP90 may be a potential biomarker to monitor environment changes.

  5. Expression and characterization of a cytosolic glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, Daniela; Cardi, Manuela; Landi, Simone; Cafasso, Donata; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    In plant cells, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH-EC 1.1.1.49) regulates the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), a metabolic route involved in the production of NADPH for various biosynthetic processes and stress response. In this study, we report the overexpression of a cytosolic G6PDH isoform from barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots in bacteria, and the biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant enzyme (HvCy-G6PDH). A full-length cDNA coding for a cytosolic isoform of G6PDH was isolated, and the sequence was cloned into pET3d vector; the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by anion exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic properties were calculated: the recombinant HvCy-G6PDH showed KMs and KINADPH comparable to those observed for the enzyme purified from barley roots; moreover, the analysis of NADPH inhibition suggested a competitive mechanism. Therefore, this enzyme could be utilised for the structural and regulatory characterization of this isoform in higher plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Euiyong [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Joo [Division of Longevity and Biofunctional Medicine, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kotdaji [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ju-Hong [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); So, Insuk, E-mail: insuk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex.

  7. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 regulates retinal pigment epithelium proliferation and may be important in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Kiilgaard, J F; Wang, J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2, group VIA (iPLA2-VIA) is involved in cell proliferation. This study aimed to evaluate the role of iPLA2-VIA in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell proliferation and in retinal diseases involving RPE proliferation. A human RPE cell line (ARPE-19) was used...

  8. Necroptosis Execution Is Mediated by Plasma Membrane Nanopores Independent of Calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uris Ros

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is a form of regulated necrosis that results in cell death and content release after plasma membrane permeabilization. However, little is known about the molecular events responsible for the disruption of the plasma membrane. Here, we find that early increase in cytosolic calcium in TNF-induced necroptosis is mediated by treatment with a Smac mimetic via the TNF/RIP1/TAK1 survival pathway. This does not require the activation of the necrosome and is dispensable for necroptosis. Necroptosis induced by the activation of TLR3/4 pathways does not trigger early calcium flux. We also demonstrate that necroptotic plasma membrane rupture is mediated by osmotic forces and membrane pores around 4 nm in diameter. This late permeabilization step represents a hallmark in necroptosis execution that is cell and treatment independent and requires the RIP1/RIP3/MLKL core. In support of this, treatment with osmoprotectants reduces cell damage in an in vivo necroptosis model of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  9. Genetic interactions between the Golgi Ca2+/H+ exchanger Gdt1 and the plasma membrane calcium channel Cch1/Mid1 in the regulation of calcium homeostasis, stress response and virulence in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Wang, Junjun; Cheng, Jianqing; Xu, Dayong; Jiang, Linghuo

    2015-11-01

    The Golgi-localized Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScGdt1 is a member of the cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily. We show here that Candida albicans CaGdt1 is the functional homolog of ScGdt1 in calcium sensitivity, and shows genetic interactions with CaCch1 or CaMid1 in response to ER stresses. In addition, similar to ScCCH1 and ScMID1, deletion of either CaCCH1 or CaMID1 leads to a growth sensitivity of cells to cold stress, which can be suppressed by deletion of CaGDT1. Furthermore, deletion of CaCCH1 leads to a severe delay in filamentation of C. albicans cells, and this defect is abolished by deletion of CaGDT1. In contrast, CaGDT1 does not show genetic interaction with CaMID1 in filamentation. Interestingly, C. albicans cells lacking both CaMID1 and CaGDT1 exhibit an intermediate virulence between C. albicans cells lacking CaCCH1 (non-virulent) and C. albicans cells lacking CaGDT1 (partially virulent), while C. albicans cells lacking both CaCCH1 and CaGDT1 are not virulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. Therefore, CaGdt1 genetically interacts with the plasma membrane calcium channel, CaCch1/CaMid1, in the response of C. albicans cells to cold and ER stresses and antifungal drug challenge as well as in filamentation and virulence. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Yeast and Mammals Utilize Similar Cytosolic Components to Drive Protein Transport through the Golgi Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, William G.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.; Clary, Douglas O.; Wattenberg, Binks W.; Glick, Benjamin S.; Rothman, James E.

    1986-03-01

    Vesicular transport between successive compartments of the mammalian Golgi apparatus has recently been reconstituted in a cell-free system. In addition to ATP, transport requires both membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins. Here we report that the cytosol fraction from yeast will efficiently substitute for mammalian cytosol. Mammalian cytosol contains several distinct transport factors, which we have distinguished on the basis of gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. Yeast cytosol appears to contain the same collection of transport factors. Resolved cytosol factors from yeast and mammals complement each other in a synergistic manner. These findings suggest that the molecular mechanisms of intracellular protein transport have been conserved throughout evolution. Moreover, this hybrid cell-free system will enable the application of yeast genetics to the identification and isolation of cytosolic proteins that sustain intracellular protein transport.

  11. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

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    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  12. [Regulatory mechanism of calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    It is often difficult for terrestrial animals to take enough calcium. To maintain serum or extracellular calcium levels is very important for muscle and nerve function. Two major regulators to increase the serum calcium levels are parathyroid hormone(PTH)and vitamin D. PTH binds to the G protein coupling receptor, PTH1R, and increases intracellular cAMP levels. Impirement in the PTH signalling causes many diseases such as pseudohypoparathyroidism and acrodysostosis with hormone resistance. Vitamin D is activated to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D]by two steps of hydroxylation which occurs in the Liver and Kidney. Then, 1,25(OH)2D binds to vitamin D receptor(VDR), which works as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia are caused by various disorders including abnormal regulation of PTH and vitamin D production and their signal transduction.

  13. Involvement of ABA- and H2O2-dependent cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in maintaining redox homeostasis in soybean roots under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huahua; Yang, Lidan; Li, Yan; Hou, Junjie; Huang, Junjun; Liang, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in inducing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, EC 1.1.1.49) activity and the possible roles of G6PDH in regulating ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle were investigated in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots under drought stress. Drought caused a marked increase of the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities and triggered a rapid ABA and H2O2 accumulation in soybean roots. Exogenous ABA or H2O2 treatment elevated the total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, whereas suppressing ABA or H2O2 production inhibited the drought-induced increase in total and cytosolic G6PDH activities, suggesting that ABA and H2O2 are required for drought-induced increase of total G6PDH activity, namely cytosolic G6PDH activity. Furthermore, ABA induced H2O2 production by stimulating NADPH oxidase activity under drought stress. Moreover, drought significantly increased the contents of AsA and GSH and the activities of key enzymes in AsA-GSH cycle, while application of G6PDH inhibitor to seedlings significantly reduced the above effect induced by drought. Taken together, these results indicate that H2O2 acting as a downstream signaling molecule of ABA mediates drought-induced increase in cytosolic G6PDH activity, and that enhanced cytosolic G6PDH activity maintains cellular redox homeostasis by regulating AsA-GSH cycle in soybean roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Also known as Calcium Scan Test A coronary calcium scan is a CT scan of your heart that detects and measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries. Overview ...

  15. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

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    Kazuya Kusama

    Full Text Available Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP, but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC, nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells.

  16. Distinct molecular regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha isozyme controlled by its N-terminal region: functional role in calcium/calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-04-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further unc