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Sample records for cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides

  1. CanVasc recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides - Executive summary.

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    McGeoch, Lucy; Twilt, Marinka; Famorca, Leilani; Bakowsky, Volodko; Barra, Lillian; Benseler, Susan; Cabral, David A; Carette, Simon; Cox, Gerald P; Dhindsa, Navjot; Dipchand, Christine; Fifi-Mah, Aurore; Goulet, Michele; Khalidi, Nader; Khraishi, Majed M; Liang, Patrick; Milman, Nataliya; Pineau, Christian A; Reich, Heather; Samadi, Nooshin; Shojania, Kam; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina; Towheed, Tanveer E; Trudeau, Judith; Walsh, Michael; Yacyshyn, Elaine; Pagnoux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) is composed of physicians from different medical specialties, including rheumatology and nephrology and researchers with expertise in vasculitis. One of its aims was to develop recommendations for the diagnosis and management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides in Canada. This executive summary features the 19 recommendations and 17 statements addressing general AAV diagnosis and management, developed by CanVasc group based on a synthesis of existing international guidelines, other published supporting evidence and expert consensus considering the Canadian healthcare context.

  2. CanVasc Recommendations for the Management of Antineutrophil Cytoplasm Antibody (ANCA-Associated Vasculitides – Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy McGeoch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc is composed of physicians from different medical specialties, including rheumatology and nephrology and researchers with expertise in vasculitis. One of its aims was to develop recommendations for the diagnosis and management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitides in Canada. This executive summary features the 19 recommendations and 17 statements addressing general AAV diagnosis and management, developed by CanVasc group based on a synthesis of existing international guidelines, other published supporting evidence and expert consensus considering the Canadian healthcare context.

  3. New advances in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, M.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are a group of autoimmune disorders including Wegener granulomatosis (WG), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and renal-limited vasculitis (RLV). This paper reviews updated information on the

  4. Treatment of renal ANCA-associated vasculitides

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    Olumide Olatubosun Rowaiye

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV are a group of small vessel vasculitides which commonly affect the kidneys, manifesting as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. In this review, we present different treatment methods (e.g. cyclophosphamide, rituximab, plasma exchange used for remission induction and maintenance in renal AAV. We also discuss treatment options in relapsing and refractory disease and for patients with end-stage renal disease due to AAV. In addition, we enumerate the various risk factors associated with relapsing and refractory disease, quality of life impairment and decreased renal and patient survival in AAV. Finally we present information on new, potentially applicable agents which can further help modify the disease course, thereby leading to increased patient survival.

  5. Plasma exchange and glucocorticoid dosing in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (PEXIVAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Michael; Merkel, Peter A; Peh, Chen Au

    2013-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are small vessel vasculitides collectively referred to as anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). AAV is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality due to uncontrolled disease...

  6. RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE WITH USING MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO B-LYMPHOCYTES (RITUXIMAB IN SYSTEMIC VASCULITIDES ASSOCIATED WITH NEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES (PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE RUSSIAN REGISTER NORMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Beketova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, Russia registered officially the indications for the use of monoclonal antibodies to B-lymphocytes (rituximab, RTM in systemic vasculitides associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA-SV. This communication presents the preliminary results of the Russian register of the RTM application in autoimmune diseases (NORMA that has included 50 patients with ANCA-SV treated in 14 cities of the Russian Federation. Twenty-five of 50 (50% patients received repeated courses of RTM. RTM has demonstrated a high efficacy and a good profile of treatment safety in patients with ANCA-SV in real-life national clinical practice. Among 25 patients who had been followed up for over 12 months, the remission was achieved in 92% of cases, a decrease in the ANCA-SV activity was observed in 8%. The efficacy of RTM increased when performing repeated courses, while it has been noted that the positive results can be obtained by prescribing a repeated course of RTM at a reduced dose (500–1000 mg. Prescription of the repeated courses was primarily required in patients with granulomatosis and polyangiitis affecting the lungs. Care should be taken when combining RTM treatment with cytostatics (primarily with cyclophosphamide because of the risk of secondary immunodeficiency and infectious adverse events (AE, which have been the most frequent serious AE (12% in patients with ANCA-SV.

  7. Pathogenetic and Clinical Aspects of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody-Associated Vasculitides

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    Peter Lamprecht

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA targeting proteinase 3 (PR3 and myeloperoxidase expressed by innate immune cells (neutrophils and monocytes are salient diagnostic and pathogenic features of small vessel vasculitis, comprising granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic GPA. Genetic studies suggest that ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV constitute separate diseases, which share common immunological and pathological features, but are otherwise heterogeneous. The successful therapeutic use of anti-CD20 antibodies emphasizes the prominent role of ANCA and possibly other autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of AAV. However, to elucidate causal effects in AAV, a better understanding of the complex interplay leading to the emergence of B lymphocytes that produce pathogenic ANCA remains a challenge. Different scenarios seem possible; e.g., the break of tolerance induced by a shift from non-pathogenic toward pathogenic autoantigen epitopes in inflamed tissue. This review gives a brief overview on current knowledge about genetic and epigenetic factors, barrier dysfunction and chronic non-resolving inflammation, necro-inflammatory auto-amplification of cellular death and inflammation, altered autoantigen presentation, alternative complement pathway activation, alterations within peripheral and inflamed tissue-residing T- and B-cell populations, ectopic lymphoid tissue neoformation, the characterization of PR3-specific T-cells, properties of ANCA, links between autoimmune disease and infection-triggered pathology, and animal models in AAV.

  8. Acute respiratory failure as primary manifestation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis

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    Evdokia Sourla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The systemic vasculitides are multifocal diseases characterized by the presence of blood vessel inflammation in multiple organ systems. Their clinical presentation is variable extending from self-limited illness to critical complications including diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. Alveolar hemorrhage is a lifethreatening manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis that can rapidly progress into acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We present the case of a 74-year-old patient admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with severe hypoxic respiratory failure and diffuse alveolar infiltrates in chest imaging that was later diagnosed as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis. The report highlights the importance of differentiate between alveolar hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome of other etiology because alveolar hemorrhage is reversible with prompt initiation of treatment.

  9. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody: positivity and clinical correlation.

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    Martínez Téllez, Goitybell; Torres Rives, Bárbara; Rangel Velázquez, Suchiquil; Sánchez Rodríguez, Vicky; Ramos Ríos, María Antonia; Fuentes Smith, Lisset Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    To determine positivity and clinical correlation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), taking into account the interference of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). A prospective study was conducted in the Laboratory of Immunology of the National Cuban Center of Medical Genetic during one year. Two hounded sixty-seven patients with indication for ANCA determination were included. ANCA and ANA determinations with different cut off points and assays were determined by indirect immunofluorescense. Anti proteinase 3 and antimyeloperoxidase antibodies were determined by ELISA. Most positivity for ANCA was seen in patients with ANCA associated, primary small-vessel vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of ANCA without positivity for proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase was higher in patients with ANA and little relation was observed between the perinuclear pattern confirmed in formalin and specificity by myeloperoxidase. Highest sensibility and specificity values for vasculitides diagnostic were achieved by ANCA determination using indirect immunofluorescense with a cut off 1/80 and confirming antigenic specificities with ELISA. ANCA can be present in a great number of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders in the population studied. This determination using indirect immunofluorescence and following by ELISA had a great value for vasculitis diagnosis. Anti mieloperoxidasa assay has a higher utility than the formalin assay when ANA is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term patient survival in ANCA-associated vasculitis

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    Flossmann, Oliver; Berden, Annelies; de Groot, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis are antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides with significant morbidity and mortality. The long-term survival of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis treated with current regimens is uncertain.......Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis are antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides with significant morbidity and mortality. The long-term survival of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis treated with current regimens is uncertain....

  11. Refractory disease in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies associated vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    Purpose of review Induction treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) is not always successful and nonresponding patients are considered refractory. Recent findings Refractory disease should be subdefined to the treatment that was received.

  12. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides and IgG4-related disease: A new overlap syndrome.

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    Danlos, François-Xavier; Rossi, Giovanni Maria; Blockmans, Daniel; Emmi, Giacomo; Kronbichler, Andreas; Durupt, Stéphane; Maynard, Claire; Luca, Luminita; Garrouste, Cyril; Lioger, Bertrand; Mourot-Cottet, Rachel; Dhote, Robin; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Hanslik, Thomas; Rouvier, Philippe; Ebbo, Mikael; Puéchal, Xavier; Nochy, Dominique; Carlotti, Agnès; Mouthon, Luc; Guillevin, Loïc; Vaglio, Augusto; Terrier, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    Atypical manifestations have been described in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV), such as pachymeningitis, orbital mass or chronic periaortitis. Because these manifestations have been associated to the spectrum of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), we hypothesized that both diseases could overlap. We conducted a European retrospective multicenter observational study including patients fulfilling ACR and Chapel Hill criteria for AAV and IgG4-RD Comprehensive Diagnostic Criteria. Eighteen patients were included (median age 55.5years, 13 men). AAV and IgG4-RD were diagnosed concomitantly in 13/18 (72%) patients; AAV preceded IgG4-RD in 3/18 (17%) while IgG4-RD preceded AAV in 2/18 (11%). AAV diagnoses included granulomatosis with polyangiitis in 14 (78%), microscopic polyangiitis in 3 (17%), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis in one case. IgG4-RD diagnosis included definite IgG4-RD in 5 (28%) cases, probable IgG4-RD in 5 (28%) and possible IgG4-RD in 8 (44%). IgG4-RD manifestations were chronic periaortitis in 9/18 (50%) patients, orbital mass and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 4 (22%) cases, prevertebral fibrosis in 3 (17%), pachymeningitis and autoimmune pancreatitis in 2 (11%) cases. Patients required median number of 2 (range 0-4) lines of immunosuppressants in combination with glucocorticoids. During the follow-up (median 49,8months, range 17,25-108months), AAV manifestations relapsed in 10/18 (56%) cases and IgG4-RD lesions in 5/18 (28%). When used, mainly for relapses, rituximab showed response in all cases. AAV and IgG4-RD may overlap. Clinicians should consider that atypical manifestations during AAV could be related to IgG4-RD rather than to refractory granulomatous or vasculitic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Animal models of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salama, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    To provide an update on the experimental models that have been developed recapitulating clinical antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis. The application of the models in the study of pathogenesis, and the therapeutic implications of this, are covered in the article by van Timmeren and Heeringa in this issue.

  14. Pediatric vasculitides: a generalists approach.

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    Khubchandani, Raju P; Viswanathan, V

    2010-10-01

    Vasculitis is defined as the presence of inflammation in a blood vessel that may occur as a primary process or secondary to an underlying disease. Primary vasculitides are rare in children. These are defined by both the size of vessels involved and the type of inflammatory response. Clinical features consist of multi-organ involvement on a background of constitutional features reflecting the size and location of the blood vessels involved. Whilst some vasculitides are best diagnosed clinically, many forms require sophisticated imaging and other investigations (auto antibodies) to reveal the correct diagnosis. Prompt recognition and treatment is crucial as many of the vasculitides cause significant morbidity or mortality. Treatment options range from symptomatic therapy, immunosuppresive agents, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or biologic agents and are determined by the type of vasculitis, the severity of the inflammation, and the organ systems affected. Early detection and aggressive treatment is crucial for the best outcomes in the most severe forms of childhood vasculitis.

  15. Genetic loci of Staphylococcus aureus associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, Corinna; de Goffau, Marcus C; van Timmeren, Mirjan M; Schulze, Mirja L; Jansen, Benita; Tavakol, Mehri; van Wamel, Willem J B; Stegeman, Coen A; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Arends, Jan P; Rossen, John W; Heeringa, Peter; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The proteinase 3 (PR3)-positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) has been associated with chronic nasal S. aureus carriage, which is a risk factor for disease relapse. The present study was aimed at comparing the

  16. Genetic loci of Staphylococcus aureus associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Glasner (Corinna); M.C. De Goffau (Marcus C.); M.M. Van Timmeren (Mirjan M.); Schulze, M.L. (Mirja L.); Jansen, B. (Benita); M. Tavakol (Mehri); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); C.A. Stegeman; C.G.M. Kallenberg (Cees G. M.); J.P.A. Arends (Jan); J.W. Rossen (John); P. Heeringa (Peter); J.M. Dijl (Jan Maarten)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe proteinase 3 (PR3)-positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) has been associated with chronic nasal S. aureus carriage, which is a risk factor for disease relapse. The present study was aimed at

  17. Plasma exchange in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis--a 25-year perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpirt, Wladimir M

    2015-01-01

    Demonstration of a pathogenic role for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) underlies the scientific rationale for plasma exchange (PLEX) in the treatment of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Most clinical evidence of efficacy concerns the use of PLEX for the recovery of renal function...

  18. Androgen deficiency in male patients diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis : A cause of fatigue and reduced health-related quality of life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, Janneke; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Buhl, Birgit M.; van Beek, Andre P.; Stegeman, Coen A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Low testosterone levels in men are associated with fatigue, limited physical performance and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, this relationship has never been assessed in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) -associated vasculitides (AAV).

  19. CUTANEOUS VASCULITIDES AND CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF SYSTEMIC VASCULITIDES

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    Vesna Jurčić

    2009-06-01

    plexes with complement activation. Typical representatives are Henoch-Schönlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus. Necrotizing arteriolitis and arteritis of small arteries are usually found in ANCA positive vasculitides. Medium-sized arteries can be involved in both ANCA positive vasculitides and polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusions This article presents the clinical picture, histopathologic characteristics, pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of some clinicopathologic entities of vasculitides, such as Henoch-Schönlein purpura, urticarial vasculitis, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, microscopic polyangiitis, Wegener\\'s granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome and polyarteritis nodosa.

  20. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies associated with infective endocarditis: Literature review].

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    Langlois, V; Marie, I

    2017-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated with infective endocarditis are a rare disorder. The condition can mimic primary systemic vasculitis (i.e. granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Thus, a wrong diagnosis of valvular involvement related to primary systemic vasculitis can be made in patients exhibiting ANCA associated with infective endocarditis. Because treatment of both conditions is different, this wrong diagnosis will lead to dramatic consequences in these latter patients. This review reports the state of knowledge and proposes an algorithm to follow when confronted to a possible case of ANCA associated with infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Central Diabetes Insipidus in Refractory Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis.

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    Ohashi, Keiji; Morishita, Michiko; Watanabe, Haruki; Sada, Ken-Ei; Katsuyama, Takayuki; Miyawaki, Yoshia; Katsuyama, Eri; Narazaki, Mariko; Tatebe, Noriko; Watanabe, Katsue; Kawabata, Tomoko; Wada, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We herein describe two cases of refractory antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) complicated with diabetes insipidus (DI) possibly related to hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP). One patient had microscopic polyangiitis and HP, which were refractory to cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and mizoribine. Remission was finally achieved with the use of etanercept, but DI occurred 5 years later. The other patient had granulomatosis with polyangiitis, which that was refractory to cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, MMF, and rituximab. DI subsequently developed, but was successfully treated with etanercept. Dura mater hypertrophy was macroscopically observed in the latter case.

  2. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

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    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High Prevalence of Autoantibodies to hLAMP-2 in Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kain, Renate; Tadema, Henko; McKinney, Eoin F.; Benharkou, Alexandra; Brandes, Ricarda; Peschel, Andrea; Hubert, Virginie; Feenstra, Tjerk; Sengoelge, Guerkan; Stegeman, Coen; Heeringa, Peter; Lyons, Paul A.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Kallenberg, Cees; Rees, Andrew J.

    The involvement of autoantibodies to human lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (hLAMP-2) in anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis is controversial because of the absence of confirmatory data subsequent to the initial reports of their high prevalence in this disease. We

  4. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: two case reports and review of literature

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    Spoerl David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are typically detected in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, but are also present in a number of chronic inflammatory non-vasculitic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Rare cases of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, a vasculitic disorder frequently associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been described in literature. Case presentation We report two middle-aged female patients with rheumatoid arthritis who developed anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and symptoms reminiscent of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Despite the lack of antibodies specific for proteinase 3 and the absence of a classical histology, we report a probable case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the first patient, and consider rheumatoid vasculitis in the second patient. Conclusion Taken together with previous reports, these cases highlight that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies have to be evaluated very carefully in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In this context, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence appear to have a low diagnostic value for granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Instead they may have prognostic value for assessing the course of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

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    B Lazarus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies.

  6. Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

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    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Shui-Yi; Li, Jian-Nan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Chen; Chen, Min; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-01

    In a substantial number of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis, both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are detected simultaneously. ANCA is presumed to be the initial event but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, aiming to reveal the mechanisms of the coexistence of the two kinds of autoantibodies. Thirty-one patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-four overlapping linear peptides were synthesized across the whole sequence of Goodpasture autoantigen. Serum antibodies against linear peptides were detected by ELISA and their associations with clinical features were further analyzed. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one (80.6%) sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis possessed antibodies against linear peptides on Goodpasture autoantigen. These antibodies could be detected in 50% of patients with normal renal function (Scr ≤ 133 μmol/L), 70% of patients with moderate renal dysfunction (133 μmol/L  600 μmol/L) (P = 0.032). The highest recognition frequencies were found for peptides P4 (51.6%), P14 (54.8%), and P24 (54.8%), which contained the sequences that constitute the conformational epitopes of E A (P4) and E B (P14) recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. The level of anti-P4 antibodies was positively correlated with the percentage of crescents in glomeruli (r = 0.764, P = 0.027). Patients with anti-P24 antibodies had a significantly higher prevalence of renal dysfunction on diagnosis (88.2 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.018). Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen could be detected in sera of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, which might mediate the production of antibodies towards the conformational epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen, namely, the anti-GBM antibodies.

  7. T1 and T2 mapping for evaluation of myocardial involvement in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides.

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    Greulich, Simon; Mayr, Agnes; Kitterer, Daniel; Latus, Joerg; Henes, Joerg; Steubing, Hannah; Kaesemann, Philipp; Patrascu, Alexandru; Greiser, Andreas; Groeninger, Stefan; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Sechtem, Udo; Mahrholdt, Heiko

    2017-01-06

    Myocardial involvement in AAV patients might be silent, presenting with no or nonspecific symptoms, normal ECG, and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction (LV-EF). Since up to 50% of deaths in these patients may be due to myocardial involvement, a reliable diagnostic tool is warranted. In contrast to LGE-CMR, which has its strengths in detecting focal inflammatory or fibrotic processes, recent mapping techniques are able to detect even subtle, diffuse inflammatory or fibrotic processes. Our study sought to investigate ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody) associated vasculitides (AAV) patients for myocardial involvement by a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and mapping sequences. Thirty seven AAV patients were prospectively enrolled and underwent CMR imaging. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls. Mean LV-EF was 64%; LGE prevalence of the AAV patients was 43%. AAV patients had higher median native T1 (988 vs. 952 ms, p T2 (53 vs. 49 ms, p T2 in AAV patients showed the highest prevalence of abnormally increased values beyond the 95% percentile of controls. AAV patients demonstrated increased T1, ECV, and T2 values, with native T1 and T2 showing the highest prevalence of values beyond the 95% percentile of normal. Since these findings seem to be independent of LGE, mapping techniques may provide complementary information to LGE-CMR in the assessment of myocardial involvement in patients with AAV.

  8. Urinary CD4+ Effector Memory T Cells Reflect Renal Disease Activity in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.

    Objective. Numbers of circulating CD4+ effector memory T cells are proportionally increased in patients with proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) whose disease is in remission and are decreased during active disease, which presumably reflects their migration

  9. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

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    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with renal involvement: Analysis of 89 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Yerovi, Estefanía; Delgado-Yagu E, María; Galeano, Cristina; Pampa-Saico, Saúl; Tenorio, Maria Teresa; Liaño, Fernando

    2017-01-06

    The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis with renal involvement are associated with high morbi-mortality. In this study we analyse if the prognosis of these diseases have improved in recent years, and which factors influence the outcomes. Retrospective single-centre observational study, which included all patients diagnosed with microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis with renal involvement in the last 25 years. Demographic, clinical and biochemical parameters of prognostic interest were recorded. The differences between four chronological periods were analysed, along with the determinants of a poor outcome (death or end-stage renal disease). Eighty-nine patients were included (mean age 64±15 years). Sixty-four patients (72%) had microscopic polyangiitis and 25 (28%) granulomatosis with polyangiitis. During the study period, 37 (42%) patients died. Through Cox regression analysis, the best determinants of mortality were the initial glomerular filtration rate (HR 0.911; P=.003), Charlson comorbidity index (HR 1.513; P<.0001) and tobacco smoking (HR 1.816; P=.003). 35% developed end-stage renal disease, and the best determinants (by competing-risk regression) were: initial glomerular filtration rate (sub-hazard ratio [SHR]: 0.791; P<.0001), proteinuria (SHR: 1.313; P<.0001), and smoking status (SHR: 1.848; P=.023). No differences were found in patients' mortality or renal survival between the different study periods. Prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies vasculitis with renal involvement treated with conventional immunosuppressive therapy remains unsatisfactory, and continues to have increased long-term complications and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Androgen deficiency in male patients diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis: a cause of fatigue and reduced health-related quality of life?

    OpenAIRE

    Tuin, Janneke; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F; Buhl, Birgit M; van Beek, André P; Stegeman, Coen A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Low testosterone levels in men are associated with fatigue, limited physical performance and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, this relationship has never been assessed in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) -associated vasculitides (AAV). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of androgen deficiency and to investigate the role of testosterone in fatigue, limited physical condition and reduced HRQOL in men with AAV. Meth...

  12. Pulmonary manifestations from systemic vasculitides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.; Both, M.; Schnabel, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides predominantly involve the small arterioles, capillaries and venules and include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and the Churg-Strauss syndrome. Takayasu's arteriitis is a large vessel disease and may affect the main pulmonary arteries causing stenoses and occlusions. Knowledge of the natural course of disease and of clinical manifestations of pulmonary disease is helpful for an understanding of imaging findings. For this reason this article gives an overview not only of radiologic findings in chest X-ray and high resolution CT of the lungs but as well of clinical aspects of pulmonary vasculitides. Next to determination of disease extension the determination of disease activity is in the foreground of diagnostic imaging in vasculitides. Within this context principals of immunosuppressive therapy will be recognized. (orig.)

  13. Anticorpos contra o citoplasma de neutrófilos Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies

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    Ari Stiel Radu

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A descoberta do marcador sorológico denominado anticorpo anticitoplasma de neutrófilos revolucionou o diagnóstico e o seguimento das vasculites pulmonares, especialmente da granulomatose de Wegener. Seu padrão pode ser citoplasmático e perinuclear. Sua titulação auxilia no diagnóstico e no seguimento das vasculites pulmonares.The discovery of the serological markers known as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies revolutionized the diagnosis and follow-up treatment of the various forms of pulmonary vasculitis, especially that of Wegener's granulomatosis. The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies pattern can be cytoplasmic or perinuclear. Determination of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies titers aids the diagnosis and follow-up treatment of pulmonary vasculitis.

  14. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Testing in a Large Cohort of Unselected Greek Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Tsiveriotis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To retrospectively evaluate ANCA testing in a cohort of unselected Greek in- and outpatients. Methods. In 10803 consecutive serum samples, ANCA were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and ELISA. ELISA in inpatients was performed only on IIF positive sera. Results. Low prevalence (6.0% of IIF positive samples was observed. Among these samples, 63.5% presented perinuclear (p-ANCA, 9.3% cytoplasmic (c-ANCA and 27.2% atypical (x-ANCA pattern. 16.1% of p-ANCA were antimyeloperoxidase (anti-MPO positive, whereas 68.3% of c-ANCA were antiproteinase-3 (anti-PR3 positive. Only 17 IIF negative outpatients' samples were ELISA positive. ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV, connective tissue disorders and gastrointestinal disorders represented 20.5%, 23.9%, and 21.2% of positive results, respectively. AAV patients exhibited higher rates of MPO/PR3 specificity compared to non-AAV (93.8% versus 8%. Conclusions. This first paper on Greek patients supports that screening for ANCA by IIF and confirming positive results by ELISA minimize laboratory charges without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  15. Proinflammatory genotype of interleukin-1 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is associated with ESRD in proteinase 3-ANCA vasculitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Stefan; Endisch, Georg; Hacker, Ulrich T; Song, Bong-Seok; Fricke, Harald

    2003-05-01

    Small-vessel vasculitides are associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Cytoplasmic ANCAs are targeted mainly against proteinase 3 (PR3), whereas myeloperoxidase (MPO) is the major antigen of perinuclear ANCAs. These relapsing vasculitides show heterogeneous clinical pictures, and disease severity may vary broadly from mild local organ manifestation to acute organ failure (eg, renal failure). We tested whether two cytokine polymorphisms in the interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) genes, known to determine cytokine secretion, are associated with clinical manifestations and outcome of ANCA-associated vasculitides. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses were performed to determine polymorphisms in the IL-1beta and IL-1ra genes in 79 patients with PR3-ANCA, 30 patients with MPO-ANCA vasculitis, and 196 healthy controls. The frequency of the so-called proinflammatory genotype, characterized by high secretion of IL-1beta and low secretion of its antagonist IL-1ra, was increased significantly in patients with PR3-ANCA with end-stage renal disease. Patients with a renal manifestation of PR3-ANCA vasculitis have an increased risk for developing end-stage renal disease when carrying the proinflammatory IL-1beta/IL-1ra genotype. Anti-inflammatory therapy specifically antagonizing the proinflammatory effect of IL-1beta may be a promising treatment for patients with Wegener's granulomatosis with renal manifestations.

  16. Evaluation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody seroconversion induced by minocycline, sulfasalazine, or penicillamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, HK; Slot, MC; Pan, GL; Weissbach, CA; Niles, JL; Merkel, PA

    Objective, Case reports have suggested that minocycline, sulfasalazine, and penicillamine are associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis, This study evaluated ANCA seroconversion due to these agents in serum samples prospectively collected in randomized,

  17. Propylthiouracil-Induced Vasculitis With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Grizzo Peres Martins, Ana Claudia; Gaviolli, Camila Fatima; Alavi, Afsaneh

    2015-06-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU)-associated vasculitis is a potentially life-threatening disease with a recent increase in the reported cases in the medical literature. This increase may suggest that some earlier cases have been unrecognized or assigned to an alternative nosology category. Although the skin can be the only organ affected by PTU-associated vasculitis, there are many reports with multiple-system involvement. Classically, the symptoms appear under a tetrad of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, and skin lesions. Cutaneous lesions in reported cases of PTU vasculitis have most commonly consisted of retiform acral, purpuric plaques, or nodules. We report a case of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis developed during treatment with PTU for Grave's disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Vasculitis syndromes : Peripheral neuropathy in AAV--when vasculitis hits a nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    Peripheral neuropathy can be a manifestation of small-vessel vasculitides such as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is, however, difficult in many cases. Early treatment focused on achieving remission of the underlying vasculitic process is

  19. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  20. Properdin-dependent activation and control of immune-homeostasis and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Flynn, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The complement system has been shown to have a role in various systemic autoimmune (AI) diseases which have a renal component. This includes systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), goodpastures syndrome and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitides. In particular the classical

  1. Azathioprine Intolerance in Japanese Patients with Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Michiko; Watanabe, Haruki; Yan, Minglu; Zeggar, Sonia; Hiramatsu, Sumie; Ohashi, Keiji; Miyawaki, Yoshia; Katsuyama, Eri; Katsuyama, Takayuki; Takano Narazaki, Mariko; Toyota Tatebe, Noriko; Sunahori Watanabe, Katsue; Kawabata, Tomoko; Sada, Ken-Ei; Wada, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety of azathioprine (AZA) in Japanese patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods We retrospectively enrolled 67 consecutive AAV patients who had initiated AZA treatment from January 2006 to August 2014 at Okayama University Hospital. We evaluated the development of severe adverse events (AEs), AZA discontinuation due to total AEs (severe AEs included) within 1 year, and AZA-associated risk factors. Results The patients' median age was 70 years old. Forty-nine women and 18 men participated at the initiation of the study. Fifty-eight (87%) patients experienced AEs, and 36 experienced severe AEs (21 hepatic and 11 cytopenic severe AEs). Thirty-one (46%) patients discontinued treatment because of AEs. Abnormal hepatic laboratory test results at the treatment initiation were more frequent in patients with hepatic severe AEs and were associated with treatment discontinuation. The leukocyte and neutrophil counts at the treatment initiation were lower in the patients who discontinued treatment because of cytopenic AEs than in those who continued treatment. Only two patients experienced flare-ups during treatment. Conclusion The AE-associated AZA discontinuation rate in Japanese AAV patients was relatively high. AZA use warrants caution in patients with abnormal hepatic laboratory test results or low leukocyte or neutrophil counts. PMID:28674351

  2. Occurrence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and associated vasculitis in patients with hyperthyroidism treated with antithyroid drugs : A long-term followup study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, MC; Links, TP; Stegeman, CA; Tervaert, JWC

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To test whether antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) are not only induced during treatment with antithyroid drugs, but can also become evident when medication has been ceased, possibly after years. Methods. Patients who visited our hospital for

  3. Estimating the incidence of connective tissue diseases and vasculitides in a defined population in Northern Savo area in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, P; Marjoniemi, O; Niinisalo, H; Kononoff, A; Arstila, L; Savolainen, E; Rutanen, J; Kaipiainen-Seppänen, O

    2016-07-01

    Objective of the study was to evaluate the annual incidence and distribution of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vasculitides during 2010. All units practicing rheumatology in the Northern Savo area, Finland, participated in the study by collecting data on newly diagnosed adult patients with autoimmune connective tissue disease or vasculitis over 1-year period. Seventy-two cases with autoimmune connective tissue disease were identified. The annual incidence rates were as follows: systemic lupus erythematosus 3.4/100,000 (95 % CI 1.4-7.0), idiopathic inflammatory myopathies 1.9 (0.5-5.0), systemic sclerosis 4.4 (2.0-8.3), mixed connective tissue disease 1.0 (0.1-3.5), Sjögren's syndrome 10.7 (6.7-16.1) and undifferentiated connective tissue disease 13.6 (9.0-19.6). The annual incidence rates among vasculitis category were as follows: antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis 1.5/100,000 (95 % CI 0.3-4.3), central nervous system vasculitis 0.5 (0-2.7) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura 1.5 (0.3-4.3). The annual incidence of giant cell arteritis in the age group of 50 years or older was 7.5/100,000 (95 % CI 3.2-14.8). The longest delay from symptom onset to diagnosis occurred in systemic sclerosis. The incidences of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vasculitides were comparable with those in published literature. The present study showed female predominance in all connective tissue diseases, excluding idiopathic inflammatory muscle diseases and mean age at onset of disease around 50 years of age. Despite improved diagnostic tools, diagnostic delay is long especially among patients with systemic sclerosis.

  4. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis associated with infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus infection: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamakawa, Taishi; Maeda, Matsuyoshi; Shimizu, Hideaki; Fujita, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    Although the aetiology of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis remains unclear, it is generally believed that environmental factors such as infections contribute to its development of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Prior Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is reported to be a trigger of systemic vasculitis. We herein report three cases of ANCA-associated vasculitis presenting with infectious mononucleosis due to primary EBV infection. The causal link between the two pathologies could not be proved, but primary EBV infection may play a role in the initiation or exacerbation of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Future studies are necessary to determine the interaction between these diseases conditions.

  5. Hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis presenting with a vasculitic syndrome, acute nephritis and a puzzling skin rash: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keasberry Justin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with many drugs and it is a relatively rare side effect of the antihypertensive drug hydralazine. The diagnosis and management of patients who have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis may be challenging because of its relative infrequency, variability of clinical expression and changing nomenclature. The spectrum of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is wide and can be fatal. This case documents a 62-year-old woman who presented with hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis with a puzzling cutaneous rash. Case presentation We report a rare case of hydralazine-induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a 62-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a vasculitic syndrome with a sore throat, mouth ulcers and otalgia after several months of constitutional symptoms. She then proceeded to develop a rash over her right lower limb. Clinically, the rash had features to suggest Sweet’s syndrome, but also had some appearances consistent with embolic phenomena and did not have the appearance of palpable purpure usually associated with cutaneous vasculitis. Differential diagnoses were hydralazine-associated Sweet’s syndrome, streptococcal-induced cutaneous eruption or an unrelated contact dermatitis. A midstream urine sample detected glomerular blood cells in the setting of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive renal vasculitis and Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia. A renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune, focally necrotizing glomerulonephritis with small crescents. Her skin biopsy revealed a heavy neutrophil infiltrate involving the full thickness of the dermis with no evidence of a leucocytoclastic vasculitis, but was non-specific. She was initially commenced on intravenous lincomycin for her bloodstream infection and subsequently

  6. Vasculitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies associated with propylthiouracil therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, K. M.; Gans, R. O.; Vervaat, T. J.; Zevenbergen, G.; Maingay, D.; Nikkels, R. E.; Donker, A. J.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Goldschmeding, R.

    1993-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare complication of propylthiouracil therapy. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been described in association with several vasculitic disorders. We report detection of ANCA against human neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and myeloperoxidase in serum from six

  7. Marfan syndrome with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated systemic vasculitis presenting as severe anaemia and haematuria after the Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijia, Li; Shuangxin, Liu; Wei, Shi; Yanhai, Cui

    2013-08-01

    One month previously, a 28-year old male underwent an emergency modified Bentall procedure because of Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection Stanford Class A. Computed tomography of the chest did not reveal severe graft stenosis of the anastomosis. To explore the cause of anaemia, renal dysfunction and macroscopic haematuria, the patient was tested for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV). Antimyeloperoxidase antibodies (MPO)-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies (PR3)-ANCA were strongly positive. Corticosteroid therapy was applied, followed by cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. In response to treatment, the MPO-ANCA and PR3-ANCA levels gradually decreased, proteinuria was alleviated and haemoglobin levels returned to normal after 6 months. This is the first report to highlight haemolytic anaemia and AASV with Marfan syndrome after surgery for aortic dissection.

  8. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Cytoplasmic Staining of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies

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    Omar I. Saadah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unusual for the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody with cytoplasmic pattern (cANCA to present in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD without vasculitis. The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence and characteristics of pediatrics IBD with cANCA. Methods. A retrospective review of pediatric IBD associated with cANCA serology in patients from King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, between September 2002 and February 2012. Results. Out of 131 patients with IBD screened for cANCAs, cANCA was positive in 7 (5.3% patients of whom 4 had ulcerative colitis and 3 had Crohn's disease. The median age was 8.8 years (2–14.8 years. Six (86% were males. Of the 7 patients, 5 (71% were Saudi Arabians and 2 were of Indian ethnicity. The most common symptoms were diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and rectal bleeding. None had family history or clinical features suggestive of vasculitis involving renal and respiratory systems. No difference in the disease location or severity was observed between cANCA positive and cANCA negative patients apart from male preponderance in cANCA positive patients. Conclusion. The occurrence of cANCA in pediatric IBD is rare. Apart from male preponderance, there were no peculiar characteristics for the cANCA positive patients.

  9. Urinary Biomarkers in Relapsing Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Jason G.; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Merkel, Peter A.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glomerulonephritis (GN) is common in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), but tools for early detection of renal involvement are imperfect. We investigated 4 urinary proteins as markers of active renal AAV: alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). Methods Patients with active renal AAV (n = 20), active nonrenal AAV (n = 16), and AAV in longterm remission (n = 14) were identified within a longitudinal cohort. Urinary biomarker concentrations (by ELISA) were normalized for urine creatinine. Marker levels during active AAV were compared to baseline remission levels (from 1–4 visits) for each patient. Areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC), sensitivities, specificities, and likelihood ratios (LR) comparing disease states were calculated. Results Baseline biomarker levels varied among patients. All 4 markers increased during renal flares (p < 0.05). MCP-1 discriminated best between active renal disease and remission: a 1.3-fold increase in MCP-1 had 94% sensitivity and 89% specificity for active renal disease (AUC = 0.93, positive LR 8.5, negative LR 0.07). Increased MCP-1 also characterized 50% of apparently nonrenal flares. Change in AGP, KIM-1, or NGAL showed more modest ability to distinguish active renal disease from remission (AUC 0.71–0.75). Hematuria was noted in 83% of active renal episodes, but also 43% of nonrenal flares and 25% of remission samples. Conclusion Either urinary MCP-1 is not specific for GN in AAV, or it identifies early GN not detected by standard assessment and thus has potential to improve care. A followup study with kidney biopsy as the gold standard is needed. PMID:23547217

  10. Churg–Strauss syndrome associated with antiphospholipid antibodies in a patient with recurrent myocardial and cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paroli M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Marino Paroli,1 Alessandro Polidoro,1 Simone Romano,1 Daniele Accapezzato21Department of Biotechnology and Medical-Surgical Sciences, 2Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: We report on a case of Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patient had a history of recurrent myocardial infarction and presented with acute ischemic cerebral disease. Eosinophilia with typical lung and skin lesions led us to diagnose the patient with CCS. We hypothesize that the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies significantly contributed to the ischemic events. We suggest that the search for antiphospholipid antibodies should be included in the laboratory work-up in CSS patients and patients affected by primary systemic vasculitides in general. Moreover, anticoagulant treatment appears to be warranted in all CSS patients and antiphospholipid antibodies to counteract this thrombosis-favoring association.Keywords: Churg–Strauss syndrome, antiphospholipid antibodies, ischemic disease

  11. Stress and Disease Onset in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

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    Christina V. Golemati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore the potential contribution of stress as a trigger for disease onset in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA associated vasculitis (AAV.Methods53 AAV and 85 rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients as well as 53 healthy controls (HC were thoroughly asked for the number and impact of stressful life events, coping strategies, and available social support 12 months prior to disease onset. Anxiety, depression, personality dimensions, insomnia, and fatigue were also determined.ResultsAAV patients reported higher scoring of the impact of stressful life events compared to the RA and HC group prior to disease onset (2.8 ± 3.1 vs 1.8 ± 2.1 vs 1.7 ± 2.3, p-values: 0.047 and 0.053, respectively. While the number of reported stressful events was found to be significantly higher in AAV vs RA patients but not HC, certain coping strategies and social support features were more commonly implemented by AAV patients compared to HC, but not RA patients. As far as personality and other psychosocial characteristics, AAV patients displayed significantly higher psychoticism traits compared to RA, with no other differences being detected between AAV patients and both RA and HC. After adjusting for potential cofounders, scoring of the impact of stressful life events >3 was independently associated with AAV development compared to both RA and HC [ORs (95% CI: 4.6 (1.6–13.4 and 4.4 (1.0–19.0, respectively].ConclusionThe perceived impact of stressful life events prior to disease onset emerged as a contributing factor for AAV development.

  12. Caveolin-1 single nucleotide polymorphism in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis.

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    Sourabh Chand

    Full Text Available Immunosuppression is cornerstone treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis (AAV but is later complicated by infection, cancer, cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Caveolin-1 is an essential structural protein for small cell membrane invaginations known as caveolae. Its functional role has been associated with these complications. For the first time, caveolin-1 (CAV1 gene variation is studied in AAV.CAV1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs4730751 was analysed in genomic DNA from 187 white patients with AAV from Birmingham, United Kingdom. The primary outcome measure was the composite endpoint of time to all-cause mortality or renal replacement therapy. Secondary endpoints included time to all-cause mortality, death from sepsis or vascular disease, cancer and renal replacement therapy. Validation of results was sought from 589 white AAV patients, from two European cohorts.The primary outcome occurred in 41.7% of Birmingham patients. In a multivariate model, non-CC genotype variation at the studied single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with increased risk from: the primary outcome measure [HR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.14-3.04; p=0.013], all-cause mortality [HR:1.83; 95% CI: 1.02-3.27; p=0.042], death from infection [HR:3.71; 95% CI: 1.28-10.77; p=0.016], death from vascular disease [HR:3.13; 95% CI: 1.07-9.10; p=0.037], and cancer [HR:5.55; 95% CI: 1.59-19.31; p=0.007]. In the validation cohort, the primary outcome rate was far lower (10.4%; no association between genotype and the studied endpoints was evident.The presence of a CC genotype in Birmingham is associated with protection from adverse outcomes of immunosuppression treated AAV. Lack of replication in the European cohort may have resulted from low clinical event rates. These findings are worthy of further study in larger cohorts.

  13. Pulse versus daily oral cyclophosphamide for induction of remission in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Kirsten; Harper, Lorraine; Jayne, David R W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current therapies for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis are limited by toxicity. OBJECTIVE: To compare pulse cyclophosphamide with daily oral cyclophosphamide for induction of remission. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial. Random assignments were...... outcome); change in renal function, adverse events, and cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide (secondary outcomes). RESULTS: Groups did not differ in time to remission (hazard ratio, 1.098 [95% CI, 0.78 to 1.55]; P = 0.59) or proportion of patients who achieved remission at 9 months (88.1% vs. 87...... regimen induced remission of ANCA-associated vasculitis as well as the daily oral regimen at a reduced cumulative cyclophosphamide dose and caused fewer cases of leukopenia. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: The European Union....

  14. Implications of Antiphospholipid and Antineutrophilic Cytoplasmic Antibodies in the Context of Postinfectious Glomerulonephritis

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    Daniel Leifer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA positivity has been documented in some patients with postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN and is associated with more severe disease, antiphospholipid antibodies (APA are not known to be a common occurrence. We describe a child with severe acute kidney injury who was noted to have prolonged positivity of both ANCA and APA; a renal biopsy showed noncrescentic immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis with subepithelial deposits compatible with PIGN. He recovered without maintenance immunosuppressive therapy and at last follow-up had normal renal function. We discuss the cooccurrence and implications of ANCA and APA in children with PIGN.

  15. Pulmonary manifestations from systemic vasculitides; Pulmonale Manifestationen bei systemischen Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, M [Vivantes Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Therapie; Both, M [UKSH, Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Schnabel, A [Sana-Rheumazentrum Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bad Wildbad (Germany). Klinik fuer Internistische Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie

    2007-06-15

    Pulmonary vasculitides predominantly involve the small arterioles, capillaries and venules and include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and the Churg-Strauss syndrome. Takayasu's arteriitis is a large vessel disease and may affect the main pulmonary arteries causing stenoses and occlusions. Knowledge of the natural course of disease and of clinical manifestations of pulmonary disease is helpful for an understanding of imaging findings. For this reason this article gives an overview not only of radiologic findings in chest X-ray and high resolution CT of the lungs but as well of clinical aspects of pulmonary vasculitides. Next to determination of disease extension the determination of disease activity is in the foreground of diagnostic imaging in vasculitides. Within this context principals of immunosuppressive therapy will be recognized. (orig.)

  16. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  17. Risk factors of atherosclerosis and clinical and morphological comparisons in systemic vasculitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Aleksandrovich Strizhakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence rates of angina, myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, and the frequency of endovascular interventions in patients with systemic vasculitides, and the incidence rate of atherosclerosis according to autopsy data. Subjects and methods. Three hundred and twenty-one patients with systemic vasculitides: Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 138, Takayasu's arteritis (n = 79, polyarteritis nodosum (n = 55, and Churg-Strauss syndrome (n = 49 were examined; 55 autopsies were analyzed in patients with the above diseases. Results. Fifty-one (15.6% of the 321 patients were diagnosed as having cardiovascular diseases (CVD: angina pectoris (7.1% and MI (3.1% and endovascular interventions (0.9%. The risk of cardiovascular events was found to be associated with traditional risk factors, such as male gender and age. Arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and increased serum creatinine were more frequently detected in the CVD group that showed no significant differences from the non-CVD group. According to autopsy results, atherosclerosis was identified in the patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (52%, Takayasu's arteritis (50%, polyarteritis nodosum (52.6%, and Churg-Strauss syndrome (57.1%. Conclusion. CVD and atherosclerosis are common in systemic vasculitides, which requires the traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis to be actively corrected.

  18. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  19. Infections and vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Konstantinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    To review recent evidence for infection rates in patients with systemic vasculitides, the role of specific infectious agents in the pathogenesis of vasculitis and recent breakthroughs in the treatment of virus-associated vasculitides. In well designed recent studies, infections were found to be common during the first 6-12 months in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to contribute significantly to increased mortality during this period. New therapeutic schemes with lower cyclophosphamide doses and shorter corticosteroid courses were associated with decreased infectious rates in elderly patients with AAV whereas a prednisone dose greater than 10 mg/day at the end of the first year were associated with increased infectious-related mortality in patients with GCA. Recently, a potential role for varicella zoster virus in GCA pathogenesis has been proposed but more data are needed in order to establish a causal relationship. Finally, preliminary data show excellent short-term efficacy and safety of the new, interferon-free, oral antiviral agents in the treatment of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Infections continue to be one of the main causes of mortality in patients with systemic vasculitides, emphasizing the need for safer immunosuppressive therapies and appropriate prophylaxis.

  20. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies stimulate release of neutrophil microparticles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hong, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) may contribute to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis are not well understood. In this study, both polyclonal ANCAs isolated from patients and chimeric proteinase 3-ANCA induced the release of neutrophil microparticles from primed neutrophils. These microparticles expressed a variety of markers, including the ANCA autoantigens proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. They bound endothelial cells via a CD18-mediated mechanism and induced an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, production of endothelial reactive oxygen species, and release of endothelial IL-6 and IL-8. Removal of the neutrophil microparticles by filtration or inhibition of reactive oxygen species production with antioxidants abolished microparticle-mediated endothelial activation. In addition, these microparticles promoted the generation of thrombin. In vivo, we detected more neutrophil microparticles in the plasma of children with ANCA-associated vasculitis compared with that in healthy controls or those with inactive vasculitis. Taken together, these results support a role for neutrophil microparticles in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis, potentially providing a target for future therapeutics.

  1. Circulating microRNA expression pattern separates patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis from healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoglund, C.; Carlsen, A.; Weiner, M.

    2015-01-01

    patients from healthy subjects as well as from renal transplant recipients. Loadings plots indicated similar contribution of the same miRNAs in both cohorts to the PCA. Renal engagement was important for miRNA expression but consistent correlations between estimated glomerular filtration rate and mi......Objective. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) has an unpredictable course and better biomarkers are needed. Micro-RNAs in body fluids are protected from degradation and might be used as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, here we explore the potential in AAV...... individual miRNAs were differently expressed compared to controls in both cohorts; miR-29a, -34a, -142-3p and -383 were up-regulated and miR-20a, -92a and -221 were down-regulated. Cluster analysis as well as principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that patterns of miRNA expression differentiate AAV...

  2. 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography can reliably rule-out infection and cancer in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis suspected of disease relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frary, Evan C; Hess, Søren; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by systemic inflammation in small- to medium-sized blood vessels. Although immunosuppressive therapy has greatly improved the prognosis for these patients, there are still...

  3. Present and future management of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis: how therapy changed the prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo L’Andolina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis is part of a multi-systemic idiopathic, small vessel pouci-immune vasculitis. Given the heterogeneous spectrum of the disease, and the need to update therapeutic protocols, the aim of this review was to evaluate clinical-diagnostic approaches. We examined statistical data available in the literature, in particular the 2010 review of St. Hamour et al. Management of Anca-associated Vasculitis, published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management. Acute immunosuppressive therapy and long-term maintenance, with the use of prednisolone, have significantly changed the prognosis of this disease, particularly compared with the 1970s before the introductions of steroids and cyclophosphamide. New drugs such as rituximab, monoclonal antibodies and other modulating immune system molecules are entering clinical use, and experience will confirm whether or not therapeutic guidelines are appropriate. The current diagnostic tools, ranging from laboratory and autoimmune tests, chest X-ray, broncho-alveolar lavage to capillaroscopy, allow prompt diagnosis and early treatment through a first phase of induction-remission, and a second phase of maintenance. There are, however, recurrent and refractory forms of the disease that require long-term immunosuppression and further research into this is merited. These issues have continued to drive the search for safer and more effective modulation of the immune system using targeted immunotherapy. However, the treatment limitations of incomplete efficacy, infection, and cumulative toxicity persist. Modifications to traditional treatment protocols by the use of azathioprine or methotrexate rather than cyclophosphamide, and the introduction of newer agents, such as rituximab, have meant that outcomes have been maintained while toxicity has been reduced.

  4. Detection of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; Csernok, Elena; Rasmussen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    of diagnosis) from 251 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), including granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and from 924 disease controls were tested for the presence of cytoplasmic pattern/perinuclear pattern and atypical ANCA (A-ANCA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF...

  5. CT features of vasculitides based on the 2012 international chapel hill consensus conference revised classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jee Hye; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Hae Young; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Kyung Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo; Yoo, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Vasculitis, characterized by inflammation of vessel walls, is comprised of heterogeneous clinicopathological entities, and thus poses a diagnostic challenge. The most widely used approach for classifying vasculitides is based on the International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature system. Based on the recently revised CHCC 2012, we propose computed tomography (CT) features of vasculitides and a differential diagnosis based on location and morphological characteristics. Finally, vasculitis mimics should be differentiated, because erroneous application of immunosuppressive drugs on vasculitis mimics may be ineffective, even deteriorating. This article presents the utility of CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vasculitides

  6. CT features of vasculitides based on the 2012 international chapel hill consensus conference revised classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jee Hye; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Hae Young; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Kyung Won [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Vasculitis, characterized by inflammation of vessel walls, is comprised of heterogeneous clinicopathological entities, and thus poses a diagnostic challenge. The most widely used approach for classifying vasculitides is based on the International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature system. Based on the recently revised CHCC 2012, we propose computed tomography (CT) features of vasculitides and a differential diagnosis based on location and morphological characteristics. Finally, vasculitis mimics should be differentiated, because erroneous application of immunosuppressive drugs on vasculitis mimics may be ineffective, even deteriorating. This article presents the utility of CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vasculitides.

  7. A case of propylthiouracil-induced antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis successfully treated with radioactive iodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA associated vasculitis is one of the rare complications of propylthiouracil treatment. Having a variable clinical spectrum, it may be presented with both skin limited vasculitis and life-threatening systemic vasculitis. In this study, we present a case that developed ANCA-positive vasculitis with skin and kidney involvement (hematuria and proteinuria six months after propylthiouracil treatment was initiated for toxic nodular goiter. Proteinuria recovered dramatically subsequent to radioactive iodine treatment following ceasing the drug.

  8. Top Differential Diagnosis Should Be Microscopic Polyangiitis in ANCA-Positive Patient with Diffuse Pulmonary Hemorrhage and Hemosiderosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Ward

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rat model of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA associated vasculitides reveals crescentic glomerulonephritis as seen in human renal biopsies and diffuse lung hemorrhage that is not well documented in human lung biopsies. A 64-year-old male, with shortness of breath and mild elevation of serum creatinine, was found to have a positive serum test for ANCA, but negative antiglomerular basement membrane antibody. A renal biopsy showed pauci-immune type of crescentic glomerulonephritis and focal arteritis. The prior lung wedge biopsy was retrospectively reviewed to show diffuse hemorrhage and hemosiderosis with focal giant cells. In addition, small arteries revealed subtle neutrophil aggregation, and margination along vascular endothelium, but no definitive vasculitis. The pathology of ANCA associated vasculitides results from activated neutrophils by ANCA and subsequent activation of the alternative complement cascade with endothelial injury, neutrophil aggregation and margination. Our findings, after the correlation between lung biopsy and renal biopsy, imply that the top differential diagnosis in the lung biopsy should be microscopic polyangiitis when diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis are present in this ANCA-positive patient.

  9. Interstital lung disease in ANCA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Henderson, Ashley G; Xiao, Hong; Hu, Peiqi; Nachman, Patrick H; Falk, Ronald J; Charles Jennette, J

    2017-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) vasculitides are immune-mediated disorders that primarily affect small blood vessels of the airway and kidneys. Lung involvement, one of the hallmarks of microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In recent years, several retrospective series and case reports have described the association of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and ANCA vasculitis, particularly those positive for ANCA specific for myeloperoxidase. In the majority of these patients pulmonary fibrosis occurs concurrently or predates the diagnosis of ANCA vasculitis. More importantly, these studies have shown that ILD has an adverse impact on the long-term prognosis of ANCA vasculitis. This review focuses on the main clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary fibrosis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Major histopathology features, prognosis and therapeutic options are summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Churg-strauss syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Andy

    2011-12-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is an uncommon disease of unknown cause described initially by Churg and Strauss in 1951. Even though it was initially thought to be a variant of polyarteritis nodosa, its pathological, clinical, and laboratory features show that it is related to the small vessel vasculitides, and it is now classified as an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. The presence of asthma, usually of adult onset, along with other allergic symptoms, peripheral and tissue eosinophilia, is specific to this disease. These features usually help clinicians distinguish it from other types of small vessel vasculitis and should alert clinicians about its presence. Two different clinical subtypes defined by the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies recently have been recognized. Recent advances in the treatment and pathophysiology of Churg-Strauss syndrome are reviewed in this article.

  11. Atualização do tratamento das vasculites associadas a anticorpo anticitoplasma de neutrófilos Treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz Santana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As vasculites antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA, anticorpo anticitoplasma de neutrófilos associadas (VAAs são caracterizadas por uma inflamação sistêmica das artérias de pequeno e médio calibre (especialmente no trato respiratório superior e inferior, e nos rins. As VAAs compreendem a granulomatose de Wegener (agora chamada de granulomatose com poliangeíte, poliangeíte microscópica, VAA limitada ao rim e a síndrome de Churg-Strauss. Neste artigo, discutiremos as fases de tratamento dessas vasculites, como fase de indução (com ciclofosfamida ou rituximab e fase de manutenção (com azatioprina, metotrexato ou rituximab. Além disso, discutiremos como manusear os casos refratários à ciclofosfamida.In its various forms, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV is characterized by a systemic inflammation of the small and medium-sized arteries (especially in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, as well as in the kidneys. The forms of AAV comprise Wegener's granulomatosis (now called granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, renal AAV, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. In this paper, we discuss the phases of AAV treatment, including the induction phase (with cyclophosphamide or rituximab and the maintenance phase (with azathioprine, methotrexate, or rituximab. We also discuss how to handle patients who are refractory to cyclophosphamide.

  12. Health related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Mahr, Alfred; Herlyn, Karen; Luqmani, Raashid; Merkel, Peter A.; Jayne, David R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) can present with a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. The relative effects of different manifestations on health related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown. Methods We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis of baseline Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores from four randomized controlled trials of patients with newly diagnosed AAV. We determined the associations between organ manifestations at trial entry and the SF-36 Physical Composite Score (PCS) and Mental Composite Score (MCS) using mixed effects models adjusted for demographic factors. Associations with each of the 8 domains of the SF-36 were further explored using multivariate multiple regression. Results SF-36 data was available from 346 patients. Older age (−0.11 points/year; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.21 to −0.012; p=0.029) and neurologic involvement (−5.84, p<0.001) at baseline were associated with lower Physical Composite Scores. Physical Function scores were the most affected and older age (−0.25 points per year, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.38 to −0.11; p<0.001) scores and neurologic involvement (−8.48 points, 95% CI −12.90 to −4.06; p<0.001) had the largest effects. The MCS was negatively affected only by chest involvement (p=0.027) but this effect was not exerted in any particular domain. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with newly diagnosed AAV are complex and incompletely explained by their organ system manifestations. PMID:21452254

  13. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of reviews This review focuses on recent advance in the diagnosis pathogenesis and treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis. Recent findings Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are closely associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and

  14. Radiology of the primary systemic vasculitides; Radiologie der primaeren systemischen Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, M.; Biederer, J.; Both, M.; Heller, M.L. [Universitaetsklinikum Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Schnabel, A. [Universitaetsklinik Luebeck (Germany). Poliklinik fuer Rheumatologie; Medizinische Krankenhausabteilung Rheumaklinik Bad Bramstedt GmbH (Germany); Sana Rheumazentrum Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany). Klinik fuer Internistische Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie; Reinhold-Keller, E.; Gross,W. [Universitaetsklinik Luebeck (Germany). Poliklinik fuer Rheumatologie; Medizinische Krankenhausabteilung Rheumaklinik Bad Bramstedt GmbH (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Determination of disease extension and disease activity are in the foreground of diagnostic imaging in vasculitides. There are several radiologic modalities available each having specific indications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readily depicts granulomas and mucosal inflammations in the paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity and orbits. Computed tomography detects osseous lesions of the skull. Due to its superb sensitivity MRI is an established screening modality for CNS vasculitides, although there are limitations with regard to specificity. In spite of its limited accuracy in most institutions angiography is still required for radiological confirmation of CNS vasculitis. Perfusion and diffusion MR-imaging may combine the advantages of ''conventional'' MRI and angiography. By now the method is not fully validated for vasculitides, however. Vascular disease in Takayasu's arteritis and in giant cell arteritis involving predominantly large and medium sized vessels is readily diagnosed by non invasive magnetic resonance angiography. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty has proven to be an effective and save therapeutic modality for the cure of vascular stenoses and occlusions. Plain film radiography in two planes is the established modality for pulmonary imaging. In pulmonary vasculitides a more thorough analysis of lung disease is provided by high resolution computed tomography. Diagnostic imaging does substantially assist in the interdisciplinary management of patients suffering from vasculitides. (orig.) [German] Die Bestimmung der Krankheitsausdehnung und die Festlegung der Krankheitsaktivitaet stehen im Vordergrund der bildgebenden Diagnostik von Vaskulitiden. Fuer die eigentliche Diagnosefindung ist die Radiologie von untergeordneter Bedeutung. Die verschiedenen radiologischen Methoden weisen jeweils spezifische Indikationen auf. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) hat sich als hilfreich fuer die Diagnostik von Granulomen und

  15. Cytoplasmic Estrogen Receptor in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Allison W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Young, Gregory S.; Sherman, Mark E.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Henry, N. Lynn; Ryden, Lisa; Kim, Chungyeul; Love, Richard R.; Schiff, Rachel; Rimm, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In addition to genomic signaling, it is accepted that ERα has non-nuclear signaling functions, which correlate with tamoxifen resistance in preclinical models. However, evidence for cytoplasmic ER localization in human breast tumors is less established. We sought to determine the presence and implications of non-nuclear ER in clinical specimens. Experimental Design A panel of ERα-specific antibodies (SP1, MC20, F10, 60c, 1D5) were validated by western blot and quantitative immunofluorescent (QIF) analysis of cell lines and patient controls. Then eight retrospective cohorts collected on tissue microarrays were assessed for cytoplasmic ER. Four cohorts were from Yale (YTMA 49, 107, 130, 128) and four others (NCI YTMA 99, South Swedish Breast Cancer Group SBII, NSABP B14, and a Vietnamese Cohort) from other sites around the world. Results Four of the antibodies specifically recognized ER by western and QIF, showed linear increases in amounts of ER in cell line series with progressively increasing ER, and the antibodies were reproducible on YTMA 49 with pearson’s correlations (r2 values)ranging from 0.87-0.94. One antibody with striking cytoplasmic staining (MC20) failed validation. We found evidence for specific cytoplasmic staining with the other 4 antibodies across eight cohorts. The average incidence was 1.5%, ranging from 0 to 3.2%. Conclusions Our data shows ERα present in the cytoplasm in a number of cases using multiple antibodies, while reinforcing the importance of antibody validation. In nearly 3,200 cases, cytoplasmic ER is present at very low incidence, suggesting its measurement is unlikely to be of routine clinical value. PMID:21980134

  16. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to the cytoplasmic tail of MUC16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gipson, Ilene K; Mandel, Ulla; Menon, Balaraj

    2017-01-01

    of the biological relevance of the C-terminal domain of MUC16 has been limited by lack of availability of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the native CT. Here, we report the development of a novel monoclonal antibody to the CT region of the molecule that recognizes native MUC16 and its enzymatically released CT...... for the disease and it is considered a promising target for immunotherapeutic intervention. Immunodetection of the mucin has to date been through antibodies that recognize its exceptionally large ectodomain. Similar to other membrane anchored mucins, MUC16 has a short cytoplasmic tail (CT), but studies...... region. The antibody is useful for immunoprecipitation of the released CT domain as demonstrated with the OVCAR3 ovarian cancer cell line and can be used for detailed cytolocalization in cells as well as in frozen sections of ocular surface and uterine epithelium....

  17. Analysis of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for antibodies to cytoplasmic antigen fractions of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, H.; Bromback, J.

    1981-01-01

    An indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in individual polystyrene microtiter cups has been adapted for measurement of antibody to various cytoplasmic and carbohydrate antigen fractions of Candida albicans. The assay was optimized for sensitivity, precision and linearization of serum dilution curves. The optimized procedure allows computerized measurement of anti-Candida antibodies and can be used for measurement of antibody over a wide concentration range. The procedure obviates variation due to changes in day-to-day counts as a result of isotope decay and end-point antibody dilutions. The assay has been used to demonstrate a Poisson-like distribution of antibody levels in the sera of persons showing no symptoms of candidiasis. The minimum antibody level detectable by the assay is about two orders of magnitude lower than the lowest level found in human serum and 4 orders of magnitude lower than the most sensitive test used hitherto, the hemagglutination test. (Auth.)

  18. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome as a differential diagnosis of hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Albuquerque Pessoa Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome, is a rare systemic disease situated between primary small vessel vasculitides associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs and hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES. Here, we present a case of EGPA in a 38-year-old male, with a previous diagnosis of asthma, who presented with fever, migratory lung infiltrates and systemic eosinophilia that was refractory to previous courses of antibiotics. This case highlights the importance of the primary care physician understanding the differential diagnosis of pulmonary eosinophilic syndromes.

  19. Cytoplasmic Kaiso is associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shun-Dong; Wang, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Zhang, Peng-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, En-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Kaiso has been identified as a new member of the POZ-zinc finger family of transcription factors that are implicated in development and cancer. Although controversy still exists, Kaiso is supposed to be involved in human cancer. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of cytoplasmic/nuclear Kaiso in human lung cancer. In this study, immunohistochemical studies were performed on 20 cases of normal lung tissues and 294 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including 50 cases of paired lymph node metastases and 88 cases with complete follow-up records. Three lung cancer cell lines showing primarily nuclear localization of Kaiso were selected to examine whether roles of Kaiso in cytoplasm and in nucleus are identical. Nuclear Kaiso was down-regulated by shRNA technology or addition a specific Kaiso antibody in these cell lines. The proliferative and invasive abilities were evaluated by MTT and Matrigel invasive assay, transcription of Kaiso's target gene matrilysin was detected by RT-PCR. Kaiso was primarily expressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer tissues. Overall positive cytoplasmic expression rate was 63.61% (187/294). The positive cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was higher in advanced TNM stages (III+IV) of NSCLC, compared to lower stages (I+II) (p = 0.019). A correlation between cytoplasmic Kaiso expression and lymph node metastasis was found (p = 0.003). In 50 paired cases, cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was 78.0% (41/50) in primary sites and 90.0% (45/50) in lymph node metastases (p = 0.001). The lung cancer-related 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients who were cytoplasmic Kaiso-positive (22.22%), compared to those with cytoplasmic Kaiso-negative tumors (64.00%) (p = 0.005). Nuclear Kaiso staining was seen in occasional cases with only a 5.10% (15/294) positive rate and was not associated with any clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Furthermore, after the down-regulation of the nuclear

  20. Evaluation of the FIDIS vasculitis multiplex immunoassay for diagnosis and follow-up of ANCA-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, J.; Vaessen, M.; Knapen, Y.; Csernok, E.; Stegeman, C. A.; Van Paassen, P.; Tervaert, J. W. Cohen; Gershwin, ME; Shoenfeld, Y

    2007-01-01

    We have evaluated a new-multiplex immunoassay (FIDIS Vasculitis) for simultaneous detection and quantification of anti-MPO, -PR3, and -glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies in diagnosis and follow-up of ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) and Goodpasture's disease. ANCA were determined in

  1. Use of a Granulocyte Immunofluorescence Assay Designed for Humans for Detection of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies in Dogs with Chronic Enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florey, J; Viall, A; Streu, S; DiMuro, V; Riddle, A; Kirk, J; Perazzotti, L; Affeldt, K; Wagner, R; Vaden, S; Harris, T; Allenspach, K

    2017-07-01

    Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) previously have been shown to be serum markers in dogs with chronic enteropathies, with dogs that have food-responsive disease (FRD) having higher frequencies of seropositivity than dogs with steroid-responsive disease (SRD). The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay used in previous publications is time-consuming to perform, with low interobserver agreement. We hypothesized that a commercially available granulocyte IIF assay designed for humans could be used to detect perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in dogs. Forty-four dogs with FRD, 20 dogs with SRD, 20 control dogs, and 38 soft-coated wheaten terrier (SCWT) or SCWT-cross dogs. A granulocyte assay designed for humans was used to detect pANCA, cANCA, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA), as well as antibodies against proteinase-3 protein (PR-3) and myeloperoxidase protein (MPO) in archived serum samples. Sensitivity of the granulocyte assay to predict FRD in dogs was 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.45, 0.75), and specificity was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.91, 1.00). A significant association was identified between positive pANCA or cANCA result and diagnosis of FRD (P < 0.0001). Agreement between the two assays to detect ANCA in the same serum samples from SCWT with protein-losing enteropathy/protein-losing nephropathy (PLE/PLN) was substantial (kappa, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.53, 1.00). Eight ANCA-positive cases were positive for MPO or PR-3 antibodies. The granulocyte immunofluorescence assay used in our pilot study was easy and quick to perform. Agreement with the previously published method was good. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. A laryngeal presentation of Churg-Strauss syndrome in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlAmmar, Ahmed Y; Yasin, Subhan S; AlMuhsen, Saleh Zaid; AlSaadi Muslim M; AlSohaibanic, Mohammad O

    2009-01-01

    A 10- year-old female, known to have bronchial asthma, presented with an unusual laryngeal lesion, eventually diagnosed as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS). She was referred to our hospital with history of recurrent stridor. On endoscopyhe, the larynx showed signs similar to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). CSS is a systemic disorder and is now defined as one of the ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) - associated vasculitides. CSS is a systemic disease that may involve unusual sites like the laryynx. Such an unusual presenatation of CSS should be kept in mind, especially in patients with history of asthma. (author)

  3. A laryngeal presentation of Churg-Strauss syndrome in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlAmmar, Ahmed Y; Yasin, Subhan S; AlMuhsen, Saleh Zaid [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, King Abdulaziz Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); M, AlSaadi Muslim [Dept. of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); AlSohaibanic, Mohammad O [Dept. of Pathology, King Abdulaziz Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-07-01

    A 10- year-old female, known to have bronchial asthma, presented with an unusual laryngeal lesion, eventually diagnosed as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS). She was referred to our hospital with history of recurrent stridor. On endoscopyhe, the larynx showed signs similar to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). CSS is a systemic disorder and is now defined as one of the ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) - associated vasculitides. CSS is a systemic disease that may involve unusual sites like the laryynx. Such an unusual presenatation of CSS should be kept in mind, especially in patients with history of asthma. (author)

  4. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation

  5. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKuwata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7900-fold, 1000-fold, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  6. Employment, work disability and quality of life in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides. The EXPOVAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarous, Lucas; Terrier, Benjamin; Laborde-Casterot, Hervé; Bérezné, Alice; Dunogué, Bertrand; Cohen, Pascal; Puéchal, Xavier; Mouthon, Luc; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Guillevin, Loic

    2017-01-01

    Improved therapeutic strategies for ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) have transformed acute and life-threatening diseases into chronic ones responsible for marked morbidity that could impact employment, work disability and quality of life (QoL). We aimed to analyse work, handicaps and QoL of AAV patients and identify their determinants. Patients with AAV were included in a cross-sectional study assessing employment, work disability and QoL. Specific and non-specific questionnaires, including SF-36, were sent to patients, and clinical-biological data that could affect QoL and their determinants were analysed. Questionnaires were completed by 189 patients. Among 94 working-age (employed; 23% of workers felt that their disease qualitatively limited the nature of their work, while 43% felt it limited the quantity of work they could do; 50% thought their disease had hindered their careers and 43% that it had led to a salary reduction. These results were comparable for the different vasculitides. QoL was significantly impaired for AAV patients compared to the general population (pemployment seemed to be preserved for the majority of the patients.

  7. [The significances of peripheral neutrophils CD(55) and myeloperoxidase expression in patients with myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X L; Zheng, M J; Shuai, Z W; Zhang, L; Zhang, M M; Chen, S Y

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD(55) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on neutrophils in patients with MPO-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis(MPO-AAV), and analyze the relationship between the expression and clinical manifestation. Methods: Forty untreated patients with active MPO-AAV (patient group) and 30 healthy volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. The CD(55) on neutrophils and both membrane and cytoplasmic MPO were detected by flow cytometry. Serum fragment-from the activated complement factor B(Ba) and MPO were measured by ELISA. The clinical activity of vasculitis was valued by Birmingham vasculitis activity score-version 3(BVAS-V3). The significance of laboratory data was evaluated by Spearman correlation test and multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: (1)The mean fluorescence intensity(MFI) of CD(55) expressed on neutrophils was significantly higher than that in control group[4 068.6±2 306.0 vs 2 999.5±1 504.9, P =0.033]. Similar results of serum MPO and Ba in patient group were found compared to controls [500.0(381.0, 612.7) IU/L vs 286.9(225.5, 329.1) IU/L, P <0.001; 35.2(25.2, 79.5) ng/L vs 18.0(15.0, 28.0) ng/L, P <0.001], respectively. However, MIF of cytoplasmic MPO in patients was significantly lower than that of control group(1 577.1±1 175.9 vs 3 105.3±2 323.0, P =0.003) . (2) In patient group, cytoplasmic intensity of MPO was negatively associated with the serum levels of MPO( r =-0.710, P <0.001) and Ba ( r =-0.589, P =0.001). Moreover, serum MPO was positively associated with serum Ba( r =0.691, P <0.001). Membrane intensity of CD(55) on neutrophils was positively correlated with patient age ( r =0.514, P =0.001), C reactive protein ( r =0.376, P =0.018), peripheral neutrophils count ( r =0.485, P =0.001) and BVAS-V3 ( r =0.484, P =0.002), whereas negative correlation between membrane CD(55) and disease duration was seen ( r =-0.403, P =0.01). (3) The result of multiple

  8. OMERACT Endorsement of Patient-reported Outcome Instruments in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Joanna C.; Tomasson, Gunnar; Milman, Nataliya; Ashdown, Sue; Boonen, Annelies; Casey, George C.; Cronholm, Peter F.; Cuthbertson, David; Dawson, Jill; Direskeneli, Haner; Easley, Ebony; Kermani, Tanaz A.; Farrar, John T.; Gebhart, Don; Lanier, Georgia; Luqmani, Raashid A.; Mahr, Alfred; McAlear, Carol A.; Peck, Jacqueline; Shea, Beverley; Shea, Judy A.; Sreih, Antoine G.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Objective The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitides (AAV) are multiorgan diseases. Patients with AAV report impairment in their health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and have different priorities regarding disease assessment compared with physicians. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Vasculitis Working Group previously received endorsement for a core set of domains in AAV. Two approaches to measure patient-reported outcomes (PRO) were presented at OMERACT 2016. Methods A novel 5-step tool was used to facilitate assessment of the instruments by delegates: the OMERACT Filter 2.0 Instrument Selection Algorithm, with a red-amber-green checklist of questions, including (1) good match with domain (face and content validity), (2) feasibility, (3) do numeric scores make sense (construct validity)?, (4) overall ratings of discrimination, and (5) can individual thresholds of meaning be defined? Delegates gave an overall endorsement. Three generic Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) instruments (fatigue, physical functioning, and pain interference) and a disease-specific PRO, the AAV-PRO (6 domains related to symptoms and HRQOL), were presented. Results OMERACT delegates endorsed the use of the PROMIS instruments for fatigue, physical functioning, and pain interference (87.6% overall endorsement) and the disease-specific AAV-PRO instrument (89.4% overall endorsement). Conclusion The OMERACT Vasculitis Working Group gained endorsement by OMERACT for use of the PROMIS and the AAV-PRO in clinical trials of vasculitis. These instruments are complementary to each other. The PROMIS and the AAV-PRO need further work to assess their utility in longitudinal settings, including their ability to discriminate between treatments of varying efficacy in the setting of a randomized controlled trial. PMID:28864650

  9. Clinical studies of the Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Hirofumi; Sada, Ken-Ei

    2013-10-01

    In Japan, the Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides, supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, has been promoting basic and clinical research on vasculitis since 1972. The present Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides comprises 4 subcommittees under the direction of a Principal Investigator: Basic and Pathological Research Subcommittee, Clinical Research Subcommittee of Small and Medium-sized Vessel Vasculitis, Clinical Research Subcommittee of Large-sized Vessel Vasculitis, and International Cooperation Research Subcommittee. Since 2008, 9 nationwide clinical studies for vasculitis have been conducted and 8 clinical and basic studies are in progress.

  10. Comparison of severity classification in Japanese patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a nationwide, prospective, inception cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Ken-Ei; Harigai, Masayoshi; Amano, Koichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Banno, Shogo; Sugihara, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Masaki; Usui, Joichi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Homma, Sakae; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Ishizu, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Okada, Yasunori; Arimura, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2016-09-01

    To compare disease severity classification systems for six-month outcome prediction in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Patients with newly diagnosed AAV from 53 tertiary institutions were enrolled. Six-month remission, overall survival, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD)-free survival were evaluated. According to the European Vasculitis Study Group (EUVAS)-defined disease severity, the 321 enrolled patients were classified as follows: 14, localized; 71, early systemic; 170, generalized; and 66, severe disease. According to the rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) clinical grading system, the patients were divided as follows: 60, grade I; 178, grade II; 66, grade III; and 12, grade IV. According to the Five-Factor Score (FFS) 2009, 103, 109, and 109 patients had ≤1, 2, and ≥3 points, respectively. No significant difference in remission rates was found in any severity classification. The overall and ESRD-free survival rates significantly differed between grades I/II, III, and IV, regardless of renal involvement. Severe disease was a good predictor of six-month overall and ESRD-free survival. The FFS 2009 was useful to predict six-month ESRD-free survival but not overall survival. The RPGN grading system was more useful to predict six-month overall and ESRD-free survival than the EUVAS-defined severity or FFS 2009.

  11. The effects of duration of glucocorticoid therapy on relapse rate in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Merkel, Peter A.; Mahr, Alfred; Jayne, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disease relapses are common for patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (AAV). The role of low-dose glucocorticoids (GC) in relapse prevention is controversial. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine if GC target doses influence relapses of AAV. Methods Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for observational studies and randomized controlled trials of treatment of AAV that included a predefined GC treatment plan. The association of GC target dose with the proportion of relapses in studies was assessed using meta-regression and multi-level generalized linear modeling. Results Thirteen studies (983 patients) were identified for inclusion. There were no studies directly comparing GC regimens. We classified 288 patients as having a non-zero GC target dose by study end and 695 patients as having a zero GC target dose by study end. The pooled proportion of patients with a relapse was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25 to 47%). GC regimen was the most significant variable explaining the variability between the proportions of patients with relapses. The proportion of patients with a relapse was 14% (95% CI 10 to 19%) in non-zero GC target dose and 43% (95% CI 33 to 52%) in zero GC target dose studies. Differences other than GC regimens exist between studies that complicate the comparability of trials and isolation of the variability in relapses due to GC target alone. Conclusions Studies with longer courses of GC in AAV are associated with fewer relapses. These results have implications for study design and outcome assessment in clinical trials of AAV. PMID:20235186

  12. Fibrosis pulmonar asociada a vasculitis con anticuerpos anticitoplasmáticos positivos Pulmonary fibrosis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fernández Casares

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Las complicaciones pulmonares más conocidas de las vasculitis con anticuerpos anticitoplasmáticos de los neutrófilos (ANCA positivos (VAA, son la hemorragia alveolar, los granulomas y la estenosis de la vía aérea. En los últimos años han aparecido algunos informes aislados que muestran la asociación con fibrosis pulmonar (FP, sugiriendo que ésta sería otra complicación de las VAA. En este trabajo informamos dos casos con dicha asociación describiendo sus características clínicas, tomográficas e inmunológicas. Dado que en la asociación de FP y VAA notificada en los últimos años, la FP puede ser su primera manifestación, podría ser necesaria la búsqueda de ANCA en pacientes con FP, como causa de la misma y por el posible desarrollo posterior de vasculitis.The most frequently observed pulmonary complications of vasculitis (AAV with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic positive antibodies (ANCA are alveolar hemorrhage, granulomas and airway stenosis. In recent years, some reports have been published that show the association of vasculitis with pulmonary fibrosis (PF, suggesting that it may be another complication of AAV. We report and describe here two cases with such association, and their clinical, tomographic and immunological characteristics. Given that in the association between PF and AAV, as reported in the last years, PF could be the first manifestation of AAV, the search for ANCA in patients with PF may be necessary, as a cause of it and for the possible subsequent development of vasculitis.

  13. Detection of beta-tubulin in the cytoplasm of the interphasic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Vargas-Mejía, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-Orea, María Alicia; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Cárdenas-Perea, María Elena; Guerrero-González, Tayde; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the microtubules (MT) of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites form an intranuclear mitotic spindle. However, electron microscopy studies and the employment of anti-beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) antibodies have not exhibited these cytoskeletal structures in the cytoplasm of these parasites. The purpose of this work was to detect β-tubulin in the cytoplasm of interphasic E. histolytica trophozoites. Activated or non-activated HMI-IMSS-strain E. histolytica trophozoites were used and cultured for 72 h at 37 °C in TYI-S-33 medium, and then these were incubated with the anti-β-tubulin antibody of E. histolytica. The anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with the intranuclear mitotic spindle of E. histolytica-activated trophozoites as control. In contrast, in non-activated interphasic parasites, anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with diverse puntiform structures in the cytoplasm and with ring-shaped structures localized in the cytoplasm, cellular membrane and endocytic stomas. In this work, for the first time, the presence of β-tubulin is shown in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica trophozoites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TRIM5α association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5α, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5α proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5α from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5α proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5α-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5α fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5α domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α

  15. Detection of Antibodies to Brucella Cytoplasmic Proteins in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurobrucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pablo C.; Araj, George F.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis usually relies on the detection of antibodies to Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by agglutination tests or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella spp. by ELISA and Western blotting in seven CSF samples from five patients with neurobrucellosis. While IgG to CP (titers of 200 to 12,800) and IgG to LPS (800 to 6,400) were found in the CSF of these patients, these antibodies were not detected in CSF samples from two patients who had systemic brucellosis without neurological involvement. The latter, however, had serum IgG and IgM to both LPS and CP. No reactivity to these antigens was found in CSF samples from 14 and 20 patients suffering from nonbrucellar meningitis and noninfectious diseases, respectively. These findings suggest that, in addition to its usefulness in the serological diagnosis of human systemic brucellosis, the ELISA with CP antigen can be used for the specific diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis. PMID:10473531

  16. Association of Anti-glycan Antibodies and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S; Boschetti, G; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Moreau, A; Del Tedesco, E; Bonneau, J; Presles, E; Mounsef, F; Clavel, L; Genin, C; Flourié, B; Phelip, J-M; Nancey, S; Roblin, X

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of anti-glycan antibodies alone or combined with anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae [ASCA] or perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic [pANCA] antibodies for diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], differentiation between Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC], disease stratification including IBD phenotype, and also for determination of the course of the disease, remain unclear. A large panel of serological anti-glycan carbohydrate antibodies, including anti-mannobioside IgG antibodies [AMCA], anti-chitobioside IgA [ACCA], anti-laminaribioside IgG antibodies [ALCA], anti-laminarin [anti-L] and anti-chitine [anti-C] were measured in the serum from a cohort of 195 patients with IBD] [107 CD and 88 UC]. The respective accuracy of isolated or combined markers for diagnosis, disease differentiation, stratification disease phenotype, and severity of the disease course, defined by a wide panel of criteria obtained from the past medical history, was assessed. The positivity of at least one anti-glycan antibody was detected in a significant higher proportion of CD and UC compared with healthy controls [p ACCA [> 51U/ml] and anti-laminarin [> 31U/ml] were significantly linked with a higher association with steroid dependency (odds ratio [OR] =2.0 [1.0-4.0], p = 0.03 and OR = 2.4 [1.1-5.2], p = 0.02, respectively]. We further defined the respective performance of anti-glycan antibodies to discriminate between patients with severe or not severe CD and UC course and determined the associated optimal cut-off values: severe CD course was significantly more likely in case of AMCA > 77U/ml [OR = 4.3; p = 0.002], ASCA > 63U/ml [OR = 3.5; p ACCA > 50U/ml [OR = 2.8; p 52U/ml [OR = 3.4; p = 0.04] and ACCA > 25U/ml [OR = 3.0; p < 0.04]. Anti-glycan antibodies are valuable serological markers, especially AMCA antibodies that may help clinicians to promptly classify patients into high risk for severe disease. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis

  17. Epigenetics and Vasculitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides represent a group of relatively rare systemic inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels. Despite recent progress in understanding the genetic basis and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in vasculitis, the etiology and pathogenesis of vasculitis remain incompletely understood. Epigenetic dysregulation plays an important role in immune-mediated diseases, and the contribution of epigenetic aberrancies in vasculitis is increasingly being recognized. Histone modifications in the PR3 and MPO gene loci might be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Similarly, other studies revealed important epigenetic contribution to other vasculitides, including Kawasaki disease and IgA vasculitis. More recently, genome-wide epigenomic studies have been performed in several vasculitides. A recent genome-wide DNA methylation study uncovered an important role for epigenetic remodeling of cytoskeleton-related genes in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and suggested that reversal of some of these DNA methylation changes associates with disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling characterized the inflammatory response in temporal artery tissue from patients with giant cell arteritis and showed increased activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling, prompting the suggestion that a specific calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor that is well tolerated and with the added beneficial anti-platelet activity, such as dipyridamole, might be of therapeutic potential in giant cell arteritis. While epigenetic studies in systemic vasculitis are still in their infancy, currently available data clearly indicate that investigating the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these diseases will help to better understand the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provide novel targets for the development of disease biomarkers and new therapies.

  18. Spotlight on rituximab in the treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moog P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Philipp Moog, Klaus Thuermel Abteilung für Nephrologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany Abstract: A 54-year-old patient presented to his general practitioner because of strong muscle pain in both thighs. Inflammatory parameters (CRP 16.3 mg/dL and white blood cells (15 g/L were elevated. The patient reported a weight loss of 10 kg in 4 weeks. There was no fever or any other specific symptoms. Urine dipstick examination and computed tomography of the chest were unremarkable. Because of increasing symptoms, the patient was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance tomography showed diffuse inflammatory changes of the muscles of both thighs. Neurological examination and electrophysiology revealed axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and ground-glass opacities of both lungs had occurred. Serum creatinine increased to 229 µmol/L within a few days, with proteinuria of 3.3 g/g creatinine. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis. Proteinase 3-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were markedly increased. Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score was 35. Within 2 days, serum creatinine further increased to 495 µmol/L. Plasma exchange, high-dose glucocorticosteroids, and hemodialysis were started. The patient received cyclophosphamide 1 g twice and rituximab 375 mg/m2 four times according to the RITUXVAS protocol. Despite ongoing therapy, hemodialysis could not be withdrawn and had to be continued over 3 weeks until diuresis normalized. Glucocorticosteroids were tapered to 20 mg after 2 months, and serum creatinine was 133 µmol/L. However, nephritic urinary sediment reappeared. Another dose of 1 g cyclophosphamide was given, and glucocorticosteroids were raised for another 4 weeks. After 6 months, the daily prednisolone dose was able to be tapered to 5 mg. Serum creatinine was 124 µmol/L, proteinuria further decreased to 382 mg/g creatinine, and the Birmingham

  19. Pediatric vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  20. Lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Sora; Kimura, Satoko; Soma, Yoshinao; Waki, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Nakazawa, Daigo; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro; Kawakami, Tamihiro

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) could be one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of vasculitides. We established a transgenic rat model, env-pX rats, with various vasculitides including cutaneous vasculitis. Human primary cutaneous vasculitis includes cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). We measured serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in morbid env-pX rats and injected anti-LAMP-2 antibody into premorbid env-pX rats. We further measured serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in patients with CPN and HSP. Cutaneous vasculitis was observed in ∼30% of 6-month-old morbid env-pX rats. In contrast, these findings were rare in premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old. We also examined 85 patients with CPN and 36 adult patients with HSP. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels were determined using ELISA. Premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old were given an i.v. injection of anti-LAMP-2 antibody at day 0 and day 7. At day 14, these rats underwent histopathological and direct immunofluorescence examination. Cell surface LAMP-2 expression of rat neutrophils was examined by flow cytometry. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels were significantly higher in morbid env-pX rats than in wild-type normal rats. In addition, the levels in the cutaneous vasculitis group of morbid env-pX rats were significantly higher than the no cutaneous vasculitis group. Intravenous anti-LAMP-2 antibody injection into premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old induced infiltration of neutrophils into cutaneous small vessels. Anti-LAMP-2 antibody-binding neutrophils were detected there. LAMP-2 expression on the cell surface of neutrophils in premorbid env-pX rats under PMA stimulation was higher compared with controls. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in CPN and HSP were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. These data support a positive relationship between anti-LAMP-2 antibody and cutaneous vasculitis.

  1. A case of proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA positive/IgG4-related lung disease

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    Hirokazu Touge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related lung disease (IgG4-RLD is a rare and chronic progressive autoimmune disease. We report a case of IgG4-related inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the lung that was seropositive for proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA. A 61-year-old male had a mass lesion in the right lower lung field in chest X-ray. Transbronchial lung biopsy resulted in a pathological diagnosis of IgG4-RLD. The condition was improved by hormonal therapy.

  2. Urinary levels of high mobility group box-1 are associated with disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis.

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    Tian-Tian Ma

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens.50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1.Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively. Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012, C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042, and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013. Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01.Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients.

  3. Epitope analysis of anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

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    Shen-Ju Gou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increasing evidences have suggested the pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA directing myeloperoxidase (MPO in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. The current study aimed to analyze the association between the linear epitopes of MPO-ANCA and clinicopathological features of patients with AAV. METHODS: Six recombinant linear fragments, covering the whole length amino acid sequence of a single chain of MPO, were produced from E.coli. Sera from 77 patients with AAV were collected at presentation. 13 out of the 77 patients had co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies. Ten patients also had sequential sera during follow up. The epitope specificities were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the recombinant fragments as solid phase ligands. RESULTS: Sera from 45 of the 77 (58.4% patients with AAV showed a positive reaction to one or more linear fragments of the MPO chain. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Scores and the sera creatinine were significantly higher in patients with positive binding to the light chain fragment than that in patients without the binding. The epitopes recognized by MPO-ANCA from patients with co-existence of serum anti-GBM antibodies were mainly located in the N-terminus of the heavy chain. In 5 out of the 6 patients, whose sera in relapse recognize linear fragments, the reactivity to linear fragments in relapse was similar to that of initial onset. CONCLUSION: The epitope specificities of MPO-ANCA were associated with disease activity and some clinicopathological features in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  4. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with antiphospholipid antibodies in a patient with retinal vasculitis.

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    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Gálvez-Carvajal, S; Medina-Tapia, A; Rueda, T; González-García, L; Szewc, M; Muñoz-Morales, A

    2016-11-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old woman with unilateral retinal vasculitis. Investigations showed asthma, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, peripheral blood eosinophilia, increased sedimentation rate, proteinuria, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were negative. Although her anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody (ANCA) status was negative, taking into account the other clinical and laboratory features, retinal vasculitis was thought to be an ocular manifestation of Churg-Strauss syndrome. Treatment was started with high-dose corticosteroids and anticoagulant therapy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression is associated with p-Akt1 and predicts poor prognosis in human breast carcinomas.

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    Jing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S-phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2, an oncogenic protein, is a key regulator in different cellular and molecular processes, through ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. Increased levels of Skp2 are observed in various types of cancer and associated with poor prognosis. However, in human breast carcinomas, the underlying mechanism and prognostic significance of cytoplasmic Skp2 is still undefined. METHODS: To investigate the role of cytoplasmic Skp2 expression in human breast carcinomas, we immnohistochemically assessed cytoplasmic Skp2, p-Akt1, and p27 expression in 251 patients with invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast. Association of cytoplasmic Skp2 expression with p-Akt1 and p27 was analyzed as well as correspondence with other clinicopathological parameters. Disease-free survival and overall survival were determined based on the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression models. RESULTS: Cytoplasmic of Skp2 was detected in 165 out of 251 (65.7% patients. Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression was associated with larger tumor size, more advanced histological grade, and positive HER2 expression. Increased cytoplasmic Skp2 expression correlated with p-Akt1 expression, with 54.2% (51/94 of low p-Akt1-expressing breast carcinomas, but 72.6% (114/157 of high p-Akt1-expressing breast carcinomas exhibiting cytoplasmic Skp2 expression. Elevated cytoplasmic Skp2 expression with low p-Akt1 expression was associated with poor disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS, and Cox regression models demonstrated that cytoplasmic Skp2 expression was an independent prognostic marker for invasive breast carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression is associated with aggressive prognostic factors, such as larger tumor size, and advanced histological grade of the breast cancers. Results demonstrate that combined cytoplasmic Skp2 and p-Akt1 expression may be prognostic for patients with invasive breast carcinomas, and cytoplasmic Skp2 may serve as a

  6. [VASCULITIDES IN CHILDHOOD: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY IN A PERIOD FROM 2002 TO 2012 AT THE DEPARTMENT OF PAEDIATRICS, UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL CENTRE ZAGREB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelusić, Marija; Kostić, Lucija; Frković, Marijan; Davidović, Masa; Malcić, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment, course and outcome of different types of vasculitis in children. All children aged up to 18 years that have been diagnosed with a vasculitis disorder from 2002. to 2012. at the Department of Paediatric, University Hospital Centre Zagreb according to EULAR/PRES/PRINTO criteria were included in the study. Vasculitis was diagnosed in 180 children, 101 girls and 79 boys, mean age 7.19 ± 3.7 years, with an average follow-up of 5.58 ± 3.28 years. Most of the children (155 or 86%) were diagnosed with Henoch-Shönlein purpura (HSP), polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) was diagnosed in 6 children (3.3%), isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in 5 (2.8%), Takayasu arteritis (TA) and Kawasaki disease in 2 (1.1%) respectively, hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in one patient (0.5%) and other types of vasculitis in 10 (5.5%) patients (vasculitides in systemic connective tissue disorders in 7 and unclassified vasculitides in 3 patients). All patients had elevated inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA) were positive only in one patient, suffering from microscopic polyangiitis. Treatment modality in most patients were NSAIDs, while children with kidney or gastrointestinal system affection were treated with glucocorticoids and/or immunosuppresive drugs. Biological therapy (anti-CD20, rituximab) was used in patients with most severe symptoms. One child (0.56%), suffering from microscopic polyangiitis, died due to kidney failure during the follow-up. Forty patients (22.6%) had one disease relapse, while 6 (3.4%) had two relapses. In conclusion, we found some differences in laboratory parameters (e.g. lower incidence of elevated antistreptolysin O titer in HSP) and epidemiological data (e.g. higher prevalence of PAN in female children) in comparison to data from available studies, while other clinical

  7. Cogan's syndrome is a new nosological entity in the current classification of systemic vasculitides: A clinical case and a review of literature

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    T. V. Beketova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of the typical variant of Cogan's syndrome (CS, a new nosological entity in the current classification of systemic vasculitides (SV, which belongs to a group of variable vasculitides. The literature review highlights in detail the problems of the diagnosis and treatment of this rare disease.CS is characterized by inflammatory eye involvement (interstitial keratitis, uveitis, and episcleritis and hearing problems (sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular disorders with the possible development of vasculitis at other sites, aortitis, and aortic or mitral lesions. A systemic lesion involving the ears and eyes necessitates to rule out granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's and to make a differential diagnosis with a wide range of diseases. The given data underline the need for the interdisciplinary collaboration of rheumatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, audiologists, oculists, and cardiologists in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this form of SV. 

  8. Efficiency of using rituximab in a patient with generalized granulomatosis with polyangiitis: A case report

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    Gulazyk Malikovna Koilubaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic vasculitides (SVs are characterized by inflammation of the blood vessels wall; the spectrum of their clinical manifestations depends on the type, extent, and location of affected vessels and the activity of systemic inflammation. The etiology of most primary SVs is unknown. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs are implicated in its pathogenesis. The presence of ANCAa in patients' serum and the correlation of their level with the severity of clinical manifestations served as a basis for identifying a subgroup of systemic necrotizing vasculitides associated with ANCA synthesis: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg – Strauss syndrome. GPA is characterized by systemic granulomatous necrotizing vasculitis involving the small vessels of the upper respiratory tract, lung, and kidney.The paper describes a case of difficult diagnosis and successful rituximab (RTM treatment of generalized GPA in a 45-year-old female patients. The disease occurred with local damage to the upper respiratory tract, granulomatous inflammation of the pulmonary vessels to form multiple infiltrates with lung tissue destruction elements and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Despite intensive immunosuppressive treatment, there was a rapid GPA progression with the further development of respiratory failure, which had been induced by stenotic laryngitis subglottica leading to tracheostoma. Damage to the organ of vision could lead to severe complications, including amaurosis. RMT was shown to be effective in treating generalized GPA with a poor prognosis.

  9. Intracellular distribution of TM4SF1 and internalization of TM4SF1-antibody complex in vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciuto, Tracey E.; Merley, Anne; Lin, Chi-Iou; Richardson, Douglas; Liu, Yu; Li, Dan; Dvorak, Ann M.; Dvorak, Harold F.; Jaminet, Shou-Ching S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane-4 L-six family member-1 (TM4SF1) is a small plasma membrane-associated glycoprotein that is highly and selectively expressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells, cultured endothelial cells, and, in vivo, on tumor-associated endothelium. Immunofluorescence microscopy also demonstrated TM4SF1 in cytoplasm and, tentatively, within nuclei. With monoclonal antibody 8G4, and the finer resolution afforded by immuno-nanogold transmission electron microscopy, we now demonstrate TM4SF1 in uncoated cytoplasmic vesicles, nuclear pores and nucleoplasm. Because of its prominent surface location on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelium, TM4SF1 has potential as a dual therapeutic target using an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) approach. For ADC to be successful, antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens must be internalized for delivery of associated toxins to intracellular targets. We now report that 8G4 is efficiently taken up into cultured endothelial cells by uncoated vesicles in a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent manner. It is then transported along microtubules through the cytoplasm and passes through nuclear pores into the nucleus. These findings validate TM4SF1 as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy with antibody-bound toxins that have the capacity to react with either cytoplasmic or nuclear targets in tumor cells or tumor-associated vascular endothelium. - Highlights: • Anti-TM4SF1 antibody 8G4 was efficiently taken up by cultured endothelial cells. • TM4SF1–8G4 internalization is dynamin-dependent but clathrin-independent. • TM4SF1–8G4 complexes internalize along microtubules to reach the perinuclear region. • Internalized TM4SF1–8G4 complexes pass through nuclear pores into the nucleus. • TM4SF1 is an attractive candidate for ADC cancer therapy

  10. Intracellular distribution of TM4SF1 and internalization of TM4SF1-antibody complex in vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciuto, Tracey E.; Merley, Anne; Lin, Chi-Iou [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Richardson, Douglas [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University (United States); Liu, Yu [Department of Pharmacology, Shanxi Medical University, Xinjiannanlu 56, Shanxi Province, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Dan; Dvorak, Ann M. [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Dvorak, Harold F., E-mail: hdvorak@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Jaminet, Shou-Ching S., E-mail: sjaminet@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Transmembrane-4 L-six family member-1 (TM4SF1) is a small plasma membrane-associated glycoprotein that is highly and selectively expressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells, cultured endothelial cells, and, in vivo, on tumor-associated endothelium. Immunofluorescence microscopy also demonstrated TM4SF1 in cytoplasm and, tentatively, within nuclei. With monoclonal antibody 8G4, and the finer resolution afforded by immuno-nanogold transmission electron microscopy, we now demonstrate TM4SF1 in uncoated cytoplasmic vesicles, nuclear pores and nucleoplasm. Because of its prominent surface location on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelium, TM4SF1 has potential as a dual therapeutic target using an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) approach. For ADC to be successful, antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens must be internalized for delivery of associated toxins to intracellular targets. We now report that 8G4 is efficiently taken up into cultured endothelial cells by uncoated vesicles in a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent manner. It is then transported along microtubules through the cytoplasm and passes through nuclear pores into the nucleus. These findings validate TM4SF1 as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy with antibody-bound toxins that have the capacity to react with either cytoplasmic or nuclear targets in tumor cells or tumor-associated vascular endothelium. - Highlights: • Anti-TM4SF1 antibody 8G4 was efficiently taken up by cultured endothelial cells. • TM4SF1–8G4 internalization is dynamin-dependent but clathrin-independent. • TM4SF1–8G4 complexes internalize along microtubules to reach the perinuclear region. • Internalized TM4SF1–8G4 complexes pass through nuclear pores into the nucleus. • TM4SF1 is an attractive candidate for ADC cancer therapy.

  11. Characterization of cytoplasmic male sterility of rice with Lead Rice cytoplasm in comparison with that with Chinsurah Boro II cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Etsuko; Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2009-02-01

    Rice with LD-type cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) possesses the cytoplasm of 'Lead Rice' and its fertility is recovered by a nuclear fertility restorer gene Rf1. Rf1 promotes processing of a CMS-associated mitochondrial RNA of atp6-orf79, which consists of atp6 and orf79, in BT-CMS with the cytoplasm of 'Chinsurah Boro II'. In this study, we found that LD-cytoplasm contained a sequence variant of orf79 downstream of atp6. Northern blot analysis showed that atp6-orf79 RNA of LD-cytoplasm was co-transcribed and was processed in the presence of Rf1 in the same manner as in BT-cytoplasm. Western blot analysis showed that the ORF79 peptide did not accumulate in an LD-CMS line, while ORF79 accumulated in a BT-CMS line and was diminished by Rf1. These results suggest that accumulation of ORF79 is not the cause of CMS in LD-cytoplasm and the mechanism of male-sterility induction/fertility restoration in LD-CMS is different from that in BT-CMS.

  12. Quantitation of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases : clinically useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Stegeman, C. A.; Bootsma, H.; Biji, M.; Limburg, P. C.

    2006-01-01

    Serial assessment of levels of autoantibodies has been proposed as being clinically useful in certain systemic autoimmune diseases. In particular, attention has been given to anti-dsDNA antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and ANCA in the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV). Much

  13. [Update Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosig, F; Hellmich, B

    2012-11-01

    The Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is the rarest subtype of the so-called anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) and has the lowest frequency of ANCA-positivity (around 30%). In addition to asthma and blood eosinophilia, CSS is characterized by end-organ damage, which can be caused by either vasculitis and/or tissue infiltration of eosinophilic granulocytes. The CSS shares many etiological and clinical features of other hypereosinophilic syndromes. Recently, a distinct genetic background could be demonstrated for both the ANCA-positive and ANCA-negative subtypes of CSS as compared to the other two forms of AAV. Among other cytokines, interleukin-5 (IL-5) could be identified as a key mediator of eosinophilia. Therefore, recent clinical trials in CSS aimed to target IL-5. Outside of clinical trials, treatment of CSS is adapted to disease stage and activity, as recommended for other types of AAV.

  14. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years.

  15. Effect of plasma exchange on in-hospital mortality in patients with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: A propensity-matched analysis using a nationwide administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uechi, Eishi; Okada, Masato; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2018-01-01

    Secondary pulmonary hemorrhage increases the risk of mortality in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV); plasma exchange therapy may improve outcomes in these patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the effect of plasma exchange therapy on short-term prognoses in patients with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to AAV. This study utilized the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, which is a nationwide inpatient database in Japan. We checked the abstract data and medical actions and identified the patients with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to AAV who required proactive treatment between 2009 and 2014. To compare the in-hospital mortality, we performed propensity score matching between the plasma exchange and non-plasma exchange groups at a ratio of 1:1. Of the 52,932 patients with AAV, 940 developed pulmonary hemorrhage as a complication. A total of 249 patients from 194 hospitals were eligible for the study. Propensity score matching at a ratio of 1:1 was performed, and 59 pairs were formed (plasma exchange group, n = 59; non-plasma exchange group, n = 59). A statistically significant difference was found in the all-cause in-hospital mortality between the plasma exchange and non-plasma exchange groups (35.6% vs. 54.2%; p = 0041; risk difference, -18.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), -35.4% to -0.67%). Thus, plasma exchange therapy was associated with improved in-hospital mortality in patients with pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to AAV.

  16. Classification and characteristics of Japanese patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in a nationwide, prospective, inception cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Ken-ei; Yamamura, Masahiro; Harigai, Masayoshi; Fujii, Takao; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Ito, Satoshi; Yamada, Hidehiro; Wada, Takashi; Hirahashi, Junichi; Arimura, Yoshihiro; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-04-23

    We investigated the clinical and serological features of patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) in Japan using data from a nationwide, prospective, inception cohort study. In total, 156 Japanese patients with newly diagnosed AAV were classified according to the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) algorithm with exploratory surrogate markers for AAV-related non-granulomatous pulmonary lesions, predefined as alveolar haemorrhage and interstitial lung disease (ILD), and their clinical and serological features were evaluated. Using the EMEA algorithm, we identified 14 patients (9.0%) with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), 33 (21.2%) with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 78 (50.0%) with microscopic polyangiitis and renal-limited vasculitis (MPA/RLV), and 31 (19.9%) with unclassifiable vasculitis. The average ages of patients with EGPA (male/female, 5/9), GPA (12/21), and MPA/RLV (35/43) and unclassifiable (9/22) were 58.0, 63.6, 71.1, and 70.6 years, respectively. Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase-3 ANCA positivity was 50.0% and 0% for EGPA, 54.6% and 45.5% for GPA, 97.4% and 2.6% for MPA/RLV, and 93.5% and 3.2% for unclassifiable, respectively. According to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), cutaneous (71.4%) and nervous system (92.9%) manifestations were prominent in EGPA and ear, nose, and throat manifestations (84.9%) and chest manifestations (66.7%) in GPA. Renal manifestations developed frequently in MPA/RLV (91.0%) and GPA (63.6%). The average serum creatinine levels were 0.71 mg/dL for EGPA, 1.51 mg/dL for GPA, 2.46 mg/dL for MPA/RLV, and 0.69 mg/dL for unclassifiable. The percentages of patients with ILD were 14.3% for EGPA, 9.0% for GPA, 47.4% for MPA/RLV, and 61.3% for unclassifiable. Patients with ILD (n = 61) had significantly lower BVAS (P = 0.019) with fewer ear, nose, and throat and cardiovascular manifestations than patients without ILD (n = 95). MPO

  17. Relationship among antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, blood urea nitrogen and complement in patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kimura, Satoko; Takeuchi, Sora; Soma, Yoshinao

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), also known as Churg-Strauss syndrome, is an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis characterized by a history of asthma, hypereosinophilia. The prevalence of ANCA in EGPA is less common than in other ANCA-associated vasculitis. Increasing evidence of complement activation in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis has been provided by studies in animal models. We examined EGPA patients with cutaneous manifestations as an initial sign and investigated the correlations among clinical, serological and histopathological findings. We focused on differences among ANCA, blood urea nitrogen and complement levels such as complement 3 (C3), C4 and total complement hemolytic activity (CH50). We retrospectively investigated the records of 22 patients (11 male and 11 female) with EGPA admitted to our hospital from 1997-2012. Ten of the 22 patients (46%) were positive for serum myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA. In contrast, all the patients were negative for serum proteinase 3 ANCA. There was a significantly positive correlation between serum CH50 and C4 levels in patients with EGPA. Serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels differed significantly between MPO-ANCA-positive and -negative patients. Serum CH50 levels were higher in MPO-ANCA-positive patients compared to negative patients. Serum BUN levels were higher in elevated CH50 patients compared to normal and low CH50-negative patients. We propose that positive findings for MPO-ANCA with CH50 high activity may be a risk factor for developing renal insufficiency. Assuming there are correlations between the presence of ANCA and complements, earlier diagnosis based on initial efficacious treatment for EGPA. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  18. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative crescentic paucimmune glomerulonephritis in a case of scleroderma with systemic lupus erythematosus overlap

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    Rohit Tewari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal Involvement in scleroderma is a known problem and the manifestations are well described. Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is also well known. However, in scleroderma and SLE overlap syndrome, the renal findings may vary being a combination of features of immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis as well as thrombotic microangiopathy. We report a case in which the renal manifestation in such a situation was of a focal necrotising pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with crescents, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative. To the best of our knowledge, such manifestations have not been described before. Renal dysfunction in a normotensive setting in such a case should direct one towards evaluation for other causes and should prompt a kidney biopsy. This would be valuable in delineating the pathological process in the kidney and would help in guiding therapy.

  19. Clinical features of usual interstitial pneumonia with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody in comparison with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Chiaki; Baba, Tomohisa; Hagiwara, Eri; Ito, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Norikazu; Kitamura, Hideya; Iwasawa, Tae; Okudela, Koji; Takemura, Tamiko; Ogura, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) is occasionally positive in patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). However, the differences from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF/UIP) have not been well documented. We aimed to clarify the clinical, radiological and pathological features of UIP associated with MPO-ANCA (ANCA/UIP). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 12 consecutive ANCA/UIP patients not manifesting microscopic polyangiitis and 108 IPF/UIP patients with no autoantibodies, both diagnosed by surgical lung biopsy. There was no significant difference in clinical background, laboratory results and pulmonary function tests between ANCA/UIP patients and IPF/UIP patients except for the percentage of bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils. HRCT showed subpleural reticulation in both groups. Increased attenuation around honeycombing and cysts was significantly observed in ANCA/UIP. Pathologically, ANCA/UIP had more prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, lymphoid follicles with germinal centres and cellular bronchiolitis. During the disease course, three of 12 patients (25%) developed microscopic polyangiitis. Immunosuppressive treatment tended to be more effective in ANCA/UIP patients, and the survival time in ANCA/UIP patients tended to be longer than those with IPF/UIP. ANCA/UIP may be distinguishable from IPF/UIP with a combination of HRCT findings of increased attenuation around honeycombing and cysts and some of the characteristic pathological findings. In contrast to IPF/UIP, immunosuppressive treatment could be a therapeutic option for ANCA/UIP. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Actin polymerisation at the cytoplasmic face of eukaryotic nuclei

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    David-Watine Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There exists abundant molecular and ultra-structural evidence to suggest that cytoplasmic actin can physically interact with the nuclear envelope (NE membrane system. However, this interaction has yet to be characterised in living interphase cells. Results Using a fluorescent conjugate of the actin binding drug cytochalasin D (CD-BODIPY we provide evidence that polymerising actin accumulates in vicinity to the NE. In addition, both transiently expressed fluorescent actin and cytoplasmic micro-injection of fluorescent actin resulted in accumulation of actin at the NE-membrane. Consistent with the idea that the cytoplasmic phase of NE-membranes can support this novel pool of perinuclear actin polymerisation we show that isolated, intact, differentiated primary hepatocyte nuclei support actin polymerisation in vitro. Further this phenomenon was inhibited by treatments hindering steric access to outer-nuclear-membrane proteins (e.g. wheat germ agglutinin, anti-nesprin and anti-nucleoporin antibodies. Conclusion We conclude that actin polymerisation occurs around interphase nuclei of living cells at the cytoplasmic phase of NE-membranes.

  1. Cytoplasmic BRMS1 expression in malignant melanoma is associated with increased disease-free survival

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    Slipicevic Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/aims Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 blocks metastasis in melanoma xenografts; however, its usefulness as a biomarker in human melanomas has not been widely studied. The goal was to measure BRMS1 expression in benign nevi, primary and metastatic melanomas and evaluate its impact on disease progression and prognosis. Methods Paraffin-embedded tissue from 155 primary melanomas, 69 metastases and 15 nevi was examined for BRMS1 expression using immunohistochemistry. siRNA mediated BRMS1 down-regulation was used to study impact on invasion and migration in melanoma cell lines. Results A significantly higher percentage of nevi (87%, compared to primary melanomas (20% and metastases (48%, expressed BRMS1 in the nucelus (p Waf1/Cip1 (p = 0.009. Cytoplasmic score index was inversely associated with nuclear p-Akt (p = 0.013 and positively associated with cytoplasmic p-ERK1/2 expression (p = 0.033. Nuclear BRMS1 expression in ≥ 10% of primary melanoma cells was associated with thicker tumors (p = 0.016 and decreased relapse-free period (p = 0.043. Nuclear BRMS1 was associated with expression of fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7; p = 0.011, a marker of invasion in melanomas. In line with this, repression of BRMS1 expression reduced the ability of melanoma cells to migrate and invade in vitro. Conclusion Our data suggest that BRMS1 is localized in cytoplasm and nucleus of melanocytic cells and that cellular localization determines its in vivo effect. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic BRMS1 restricts melanoma progression while nuclear BRMS1 possibly promotes melanoma cell invasion. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/19

  2. Anti-Myeloperoxidase Antibodies Associate with Future Proliferative Lupus Nephritis

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    S. W. Olson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The subclinical pathophysiology of proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN has not been fully elucidated. Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA is associated with PLN, but prediagnostic levels have not been reported. Methods. We performed a retrospective case-control Department of Defense Serum Repository (DoDSR study comparing MPO-ANCA levels in longitudinal prediagnostic serum samples for 23 biopsy confirmed proliferative lupus nephritis (PLN patients to DoDSR identified age, sex, race, and age of serum matched healthy and SLE without LN disease controls. We also compared the temporal relationship of MPO-ANCA to anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (dsDNAab. Results. A greater proportion of PLN patients had prediagnostic MPO-ANCA levels above ≥3 U/mL and ≥6 U/mL compared to SLE without LN (91% versus 43%, p<0.001; 57% versus 5%, p<0.001, resp.. In subgroup analysis, the MPO-ANCA threshold of ≥3 U/mL was significant at <1 year (88% versus 39%, p=0.007 and 1–4 years (87% versus 38%, p=0.009 prior to diagnosis. Statistically significant subclinical MPO-ANCA levels (≥3 U/mL occurred prior to statistically significant dsDNAab ≥ 3 IU/ml (89% versus 11%, p=0.003. Conclusions. Subclinical MPO-ANCA levels could distinguish future PLN from SLE without LN. MPO-ANCA manifests prior to clinical disease and subclinical dsDNAab to suggest that it may contribute directly to PLN pathogenicity.

  3. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding

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    Miyeon Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45th hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage.

  4. Concurrent IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis and IgG4 myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive crescentic glomerulonephritis: A case report.

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    Su, Tao; Yang, Li; Cui, Zhao; Wang, Su-Xia; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-05-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized systemic disease. The typical pathological finding in the kidney is abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration with characteristic storiform fibrosis in the interstitium. Antibodies of the IgG4 subclass have been linked to certain autoimmune diseases including antiproteinase 3 (PR3) anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) of the IgG4 subclass. Here, we report a rare case of kidney injury with concurrent typical IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis and IgG4 subclass of myeloperoxidase (MPO) ANCA-positive necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis. A 42-year-old Chinese man presented with repeated epigastric pain, sausage-shaped pancreas observed morphologically in computed tomography, effectiveness of prednisone therapy and was diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis. He subsequently developed acute kidney injury. The patient had an elevated serum IgG4, eosinophilia, and positive MPO-ANCA of IgG4-dominant subclass. Renal biopsy revealed necrotizing crescentic nephritis and typical IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis. The patient was treated with a combination of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, and a course of rituximab was later added to deplete peripheral B cells. The patient responded well and his renal function improved. This is the first case report of an IgG4-RD with concurrent IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis and IgG4 MPO-ANCA-associated necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis. It raises the difficulty in differentiation diagnosis of the two separate diseases that is worthy of further study.

  5. A pragmatic approach to vasculitis in the gastrointestinal tract.

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    Chetty, Runjan; Serra, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    Although vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is an uncommon occurrence, occasionally vasculitis can present as haemorrhagic infarction or ischaemia for which a length of bowel is removed. Invariably, the appropriate clinical history is not forthcoming, or vasculitis is not clinically suspected. The purpose of this overview is to provide the practising gastrointestinal (GI) pathologist with a framework to recognise and diagnose vasculitides within the GIT. The classification may be approached by aetiological agent or size of vessel involved; an international consensus group now favours the latter approach. The symptoms that systemic and/or localised vasculitis may cause in the GIT are protean and non-specific. As a result, pathologists examining resection specimens for unexplained haemorrhagic infarction or ischaemia should be aware that vasculitis may be a potential cause. Several well-known systemic vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis or Churg-Strauss syndrome and granulomatosis with polyangiitis or Wegener's granulomatosis can occur in the GIT. The latter three constitute the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitides. In addition, the so-called solitary organ vasculitis (SOV) can occur in the GIT as the harbinger of later onset systemic vasculitis, and be the cause of the GIT symptoms. In addition, SOV can occur incidentally and coexist with GIT disease such as gallstones or polyps, and there may be no manifestations of systemic vasculitis for years, or not at all. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Clinical study on antibody-associated limbic encephalitis

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    WANG Jia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE has attracted attentions of more and more clinicians. The associated antibodies mainly act on neuronal cell surface antigens, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptor, the γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2 and so on. The clinical manifestation is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. These severe and protracted disorders can affect children and young adults, occurring with or without tumor association. Routine detection of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and imaging tests show no specificity, but associated antibodies can be detected in serum and (or CSF. The patients respond well to tumor resection and immunotherapies, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, plasma exchange or combination of them, but may relapse. This article aims to study the clinical features and treatment of antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases.

  7. Detection of anti-lactoferrin antibodies and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in autoimmune hepatitis: a retrospective study.

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    Tan, Liming; Zhang, Yuhong; Peng, Weihua; Chen, Juanjuan; Li, Hua; Ming, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Anti-lactoferrin antibodies (ALA) and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (AMPA) are specific serological markers for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The project aimed to detect ALA and AMPA and explore their clinical significances in AIH patients. 59 AIH patients, 217 non AIH patients, and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. ALA and AMPA were detected by ELISA. Antineutropil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA) were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Antimitochondrial antibody M2 subtype (AMA-M2), anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody Type 1 (LKM1), anti-liver cytosol antibody Type 1 (LC1), and anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas antibodies (SLA/LP) were tested by immunoblot. The positivity for ALA was 18.6% in AIH group, only one patient in non-AIH group was positive for ALA; the positivity for AMPA was 59.3% in AIH group, with significant differences (P < 0.01) compared with other groups. The specificities for ALA and AMPA were 99.63% and 97.75%; the sensitivities were 18.64% and 59.32%; and the accuracy rates were 84.97% and 90.80%, respectively. A certain correlation was observed between ALA and SLA/LP, AMPA and ANCA, ASMA in AIH group. ALA and AMPA were associated with AIH, and had high clinical diagnostic value. Co-detection with other relative autoantibodies could play an important role in differential diagnosis of AIH.

  8. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

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    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  9. Complement-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA and MICA antigens are associated with antibody mediated rejection.

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    Cai, Junchao; Terasaki, Paul I; Zhu, Dong; Lachmann, Nils; Schönemann, Constanze; Everly, Matthew J; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    We have found antibodies against denatured HLA class I antigens in the serum of allograft recipients which were not significantly associated with graft failure. It is unknown whether transplant recipients also have denatured HLA class II and MICA antibodies. The effects of denatured HLA class I, class II, and MICA antibodies on long-term graft outcome were further investigated based on their ability to fix complement c1q. In this 4-year retrospective cohort study, post-transplant sera from 975 kidney transplant recipients were tested for antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens and these antibodies were further classified based on their ability to fix c1q. Thirty percent of patients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, or MICA antigens. Among them, 8.5% and 21.5% of all patients had c1q-fixing and non c1q-fixing antibodies respectively. There was no significant difference on graft survival between patients with or without antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA. However, when these antibodies were further classified according to their ability to fix c1q, patients with c1q-fixing antibodies had a significantly lower graft survival rate than patients without antibodies or patients with non c1q-fixing antibodies (p=0.008). In 169 patients who lost renal grafts, 44% of them had c1q-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens, which was significantly higher than that in patients with functioning renal transplants (25%, pantibodies were more significantly associated with graft failure caused by AMR (72.73%) or mixed AMR/CMR (61.9%) as compared to failure due to CMR (35.3%) or other causes (39.2%) (p=0.026). Transplant recipients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, and MICA antigens. However, only c1q-fixing antibodies were associated with graft failure which was related to antibody mediated rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Urinary matrix metalloproteinases reflect renal damage in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody-associated vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J.S.F.; Huitema, M.G.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Goor, H. van; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; Stegeman, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Renal expression of MMP-2, -9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1) correlates with histological disease activity in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). We studied whether urinary and plasma levels of MMP-2, -9, and TIMP-1 reflect renal expression of these

  11. Perspective on future therapy of vasculitis.

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    Boumpas, D T; Kritikos, H D; Daskalakis, N G

    2000-10-01

    This article summarizes recent advances in the management of various vasculitic syndromes and discusses potential new therapies based on a better understanding of their pathogenesis and natural history. Current efforts for optimization of testing for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and improvement of diagnostic criteria will certainly have a significant impact on future therapy. Biologic agents such as interferon-alpha are already in use in various vasculitides, whereas others, such as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, are in phase I clinical trials. Agents that selectively inhibit distinct steps in the pathogenesis of vasculitis are in preclinical or early clinical stages of development. Newer (mycophenolate mofetil, leflunamide) or older (methotrexate, azathioprine) immunosuppresive agents are finding new roles in the management of vasculitides. For patients with severe vasculitis, short-term use of cytotoxic agents, such as cyclophosphamide, alone or in combination with biologic agents, may expedite remission, which could then be better maintained with other, less toxic (and less expensive) immunosuppressive agents, such as methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and leflunamide. For patients with mild or moderately severe vasculitis, these latter agents alone may be adequate. New therapeutic studies in vasculitis should better address the impact of therapy on health-related quality of life and its long-term toxicity.

  12. Integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein-1 (ICAP-1) interacts with the ROCK-I kinase at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeken, Peter J. M.; Alvarez, Belén; van Rheenen, Jacco; Wijnands, Yvonne M.; Geerts, Dirk; Jalink, Kees; Roos, Ed

    2006-01-01

    The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein-1 (ICAP-1) binds via its C-terminal PTB (phosphotyrosine-binding) domain to the cytoplasmic tails of beta1 but not other integrins. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that ICAP-1 binds the ROCK-I kinase, an effector of the RhoA GTPase. By

  13. Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

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    Dou, Zhixun; Ghosh, Kanad; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Zhu, Jiajun; Sen, Payel; Wangensteen, Kirk J; Simithy, Johayra; Lan, Yemin; Lin, Yanping; Zhou, Zhuo; Capell, Brian C; Xu, Caiyue; Xu, Mingang; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Jiang, Tianying; Shoshkes-Carmel, Michal; Tanim, K M Ahasan Al; Barber, Glen N; Seykora, John T; Millar, Sarah E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2017-10-19

    Chromatin is traditionally viewed as a nuclear entity that regulates gene expression and silencing. However, we recently discovered the presence of cytoplasmic chromatin fragments that pinch off from intact nuclei of primary cells during senescence, a form of terminal cell-cycle arrest associated with pro-inflammatory responses. The functional significance of chromatin in the cytoplasm is unclear. Here we show that cytoplasmic chromatin activates the innate immunity cytosolic DNA-sensing cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase linked to stimulator of interferon genes) pathway, leading both to short-term inflammation to restrain activated oncogenes and to chronic inflammation that associates with tissue destruction and cancer. The cytoplasmic chromatin-cGAS-STING pathway promotes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in primary human cells and in mice. Mice deficient in STING show impaired immuno-surveillance of oncogenic RAS and reduced tissue inflammation upon ionizing radiation. Furthermore, this pathway is activated in cancer cells, and correlates with pro-inflammatory gene expression in human cancers. Overall, our findings indicate that genomic DNA serves as a reservoir to initiate a pro-inflammatory pathway in the cytoplasm in senescence and cancer. Targeting the cytoplasmic chromatin-mediated pathway may hold promise in treating inflammation-related disorders.

  14. The vasculitic neuropathies: an update.

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    Collins, Michael P

    2012-10-01

    Vasculitic neuropathy is a heterogeneous disorder that usually occurs in systemic diseases, but less commonly appears as nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN). This review is intended to highlight recent developments in the field of vasculitic neuropathies. A Peripheral Nerve Society guideline provides data-driven consensus recommendation on classification of vasculitic neuropathies and diagnosis/treatment of NSVN. NSVN is sometimes accompanied by subclinical inflammation of adjacent skin. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with sensory involvement can mimic NSVN. Systemic vasculitides with neuropathy include polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), rheumatoid vasculitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), and hepatitis C-related mixed cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (MCV). At autopsy, MPA affects limb nerves diffusely, with maximal damage in proximal/middle segments. CSS can be accompanied by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), but most patients with neuropathy lack ANCAs. Cryoglobulinemic neuropathies are usually caused by vasculitis, irrespective of phenotype. Two randomized trials revealed rituximab to be noninferior to cyclophosphamide for inducing remission in ANCA-associated vasculitis. Many reports also document efficacy of rituximab in MCV. Consensus guidelines on NSVN should be evaluated prospectively. MPA-associated vasculitic neuropathy results from vasculitic lesions distributed diffusely throughout peripheral extremity nerves. Rituximab is effective for ANCA-associated and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis with neuropathy.

  15. Androgen deficiency in male patients diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis: a cause of fatigue and reduced health-related quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuin, Janneke; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F; Buhl, Birgit M; van Beek, André P; Stegeman, Coen A

    2013-01-01

    Low testosterone levels in men are associated with fatigue, limited physical performance and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, this relationship has never been assessed in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) -associated vasculitides (AAV). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of androgen deficiency and to investigate the role of testosterone in fatigue, limited physical condition and reduced HRQOL in men with AAV. Male patients with AAV in remission were included in this study. Fatigue and HRQOL were assessed by the multi-dimensional fatigue inventory (MFI)-20 and RAND-36 questionnaires. Seventy male patients with a mean age of 59 years (SD 12) were included. Scores of almost all subscales of both questionnaires were significantly worse in patients compared to controls. Mean total testosterone and free testosterone levels were 13.8 nmol/L (SD 5.6) and 256 pmol/L (SD 102), respectively. Androgen deficiency (defined according to Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines) was present in 47% of patients. Scores in the subscales of general health perception, physical functioning and reduced activity were significantly worse in patients with androgen deficiency compared to patients with normal androgen levels. Testosterone and age were predictors for the RAND-36 physical component summary in multiple linear regression analysis. Testosterone, age, vasculitis damage index (VDI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were associated with the MFI-20 subscale of general fatigue. This study showed that androgen deficiency was present in a substantial number of patients with AAV. Testosterone was one of the predictors for physical functioning and fatigue. Testosterone may play a role in fatigue, reduced physical performance and HRQOL in male patients with AAV.

  16. [A case of mixed connective tissue disease positive for proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody in a patient with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus and chronic thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michitsuji, Tohru; Horai, Yoshiro; Sako, Ayaka; Asano, Taro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

      A female in her sixties with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPT1DM) and chronic thyroiditis was referred to our rheumatology department with swelling in her fingers. A prominent atherosclerotic lesion was revealed upon brain magnetic resonance imaging, and she was found to have mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) positive for proteinase 3 (PR3)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). This rare case of MCTD accompanying SPT1DM and PR3-ANCA suggested that a synergy between MCTD and PR3-ANCA triggers atherosclerosis.

  17. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Woo; Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5-2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028-9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary.

  18. Cellular Subcompartments through Cytoplasmic Streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieuchot, Laurent; Lai, Julian; Loh, Rachel Ann; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Stajich, Jason; Jedd, Gregory

    2015-08-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs in diverse cell types, where it generally serves a transport function. Here, we examine streaming in multicellular fungal hyphae and identify an additional function wherein regimented streaming forms distinct cytoplasmic subcompartments. In the hypha, cytoplasm flows directionally from cell to cell through septal pores. Using live-cell imaging and computer simulations, we identify a flow pattern that produces vortices (eddies) on the upstream side of the septum. Nuclei can be immobilized in these microfluidic eddies, where they form multinucleate aggregates and accumulate foci of the HDA-2 histone deacetylase-associated factor, SPA-19. Pores experiencing flow degenerate in the absence of SPA-19, suggesting that eddy-trapped nuclei function to reinforce the septum. Together, our data show that eddies comprise a subcellular niche favoring nuclear differentiation and that subcompartments can be self-organized as a consequence of regimented cytoplasmic streaming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Heterogeneity of Polyneuropathy Associated with Anti-MAG Antibodies

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    Laurent Magy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG antibodies is an immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. The pathophysiology of this condition is likely to involve anti-MAG antibody deposition on myelin sheaths of the peripheral nerves and it is supposed to be distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP, another immune-mediated demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this series, we have retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory findings from 60 patients with polyneuropathy, IgM gammopathy, and anti-MAG antibodies. We found that the clinical picture in these patients is highly variable suggesting a direct link between the monoclonal gammopathy and the neuropathy. Conversely, one-third of patients had a CIDP-like phenotype on electrodiagnostic testing and this was correlated with a low titer of anti-MAG antibodies and the absence of widening of myelin lamellae. Our data suggest that polyneuropathy associated with anti-MAG antibodies is less homogeneous than previously said and that the pathophysiology of the condition is likely to be heterogeneous as well with the self-antigen being MAG in most of the patients but possibly being another component of myelin in the others.

  20. Distinct HLA associations of LGI1 and CASPR2-antibody diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Sophie; Varley, James; Lee, Wanseon; Makuch, Mateusz; Elliott, Katherine; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Jacob, Saiju; Leite, M Isabel; Maddison, Paul; Chen, Mian; Geschwind, Michael D; Grant, Eleanor; Sen, Arjune; Waters, Patrick; McCormack, Mark; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Barnardo, Martin; Knight, Julian C; Irani, Sarosh R

    2018-05-18

    The recent biochemical distinction between antibodies against leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated-1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2) and intracellular epitopes of voltage-gated potassium-channels (VGKCs) demands aetiological explanations. Given established associations between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and adverse drug reactions, and our clinical observation of frequent adverse drugs reactions in patients with LGI1 antibodies, we compared HLA alleles between healthy controls (n = 5553) and 111 Caucasian patients with VGKC-complex autoantibodies. In patients with LGI1 antibodies (n = 68), HLA-DRB1*07:01 was strongly represented [odds ratio = 27.6 (95% confidence interval 12.9-72.2), P = 4.1 × 10-26]. In contrast, patients with CASPR2 antibodies (n = 31) showed over-representation of HLA-DRB1*11:01 [odds ratio = 9.4 (95% confidence interval 4.6-19.3), P = 5.7 × 10-6]. Other allelic associations for patients with LGI1 antibodies reflected linkage, and significant haplotypic associations included HLA-DRB1*07:01-DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:02, by comparison to DRB1*11:01-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*03:01 in CASPR2-antibody patients. Conditional analysis in LGI1-antibody patients resolved further independent class I and II associations. By comparison, patients with both LGI1 and CASPR2 antibodies (n = 3) carried yet another complement of HLA variants, and patients with intracellular VGKC antibodies (n = 9) lacked significant HLA associations. Within LGI1- or CASPR2-antibody patients, HLA associations did not correlate with clinical features. In silico predictions identified unique CASPR2- and LGI1-derived peptides potentially presented by the respective over-represented HLA molecules. These highly significant HLA associations dichotomize the underlying immunology in patients with LGI1 or CASPR2 antibodies, and inform T cell specificities and cellular interactions at disease initiation.

  1. An early cytoplasmic step of peptidoglycan synthesis is associated to MreB in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueff, Anne-Stéphanie; Chastanet, Arnaud; Domínguez-Escobar, Julia; Yao, Zhizhong; Yates, James; Prejean, Maria-Victoria; Delumeau, Olivier; Noirot, Philippe; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Filipe, Sergio R; Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    MreB proteins play a major role during morphogenesis of rod-shaped bacteria by organizing biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. In Bacillus subtilis, membrane-associated MreB polymers have been shown to be associated to elongation-specific complexes containing transmembrane morphogenetic factors and extracellular cell wall assembly proteins. We have now found that an early intracellular step of cell wall synthesis is also associated to MreB. We show that the previously uncharacterized protein YkuR (renamed DapI) is required for synthesis of meso-diaminopimelate (m-DAP), an essential constituent of the peptidoglycan precursor, and that it physically interacts with MreB. Highly inclined laminated optical sheet microscopy revealed that YkuR forms uniformly distributed foci that exhibit fast motion in the cytoplasm, and are not detected in cells lacking MreB. We propose a model in which soluble MreB organizes intracellular steps of peptidoglycan synthesis in the cytoplasm to feed the membrane-associated cell wall synthesizing machineries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study of Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ilyas Kamboh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA may lead to the development of primary or secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. Although the genetic basis of APA has been suggested, the identity of the underlying genes is largely unknown. In this study, we have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS in an effort to identify susceptibility loci/genes for three main APA: anticardiolipin antibodies (ACL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC, and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI. Methods. DNA samples were genotyped using the Affymetrix 6.0 array containing 906,600 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Association of SNPs with the antibody status (positive/negative was tested using logistic regression under the additive model. Results. We have identified a number of suggestive novel loci with Passociations of HLA genes and APOH with APA but these were not the top loci. Conclusions. We have identified a number of suggestive novel loci for APA that will stimulate follow-up studies in independent and larger samples to replicate our findings.

  3. Anti-prothrombin antibodies are associated with adverse pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozio, Luca; Curti, Antonella; Botta, Giovanni; Canuto, Emilie M; Salton, Loredana; Tavella, Anna Maria; Benedetto, Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) such as lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β(2) glycoprotein-1 antibodies are at high risk of late pregnancy complications, such as severe pre-eclampsia, placental insufficiency, and fetal loss. It has been observed that aPL consists of a heterogeneous group of antibodies targeting several phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, including also anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-protein S (anti-PS), and anti-protein C (anti-PC) antibodies. Their potential role in late pregnancy complications is not known. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between those autoantibodies and histories for adverse pregnancy outcome. Anti-PT, anti-PS, and anti-PC antibodies were evaluated in 163 patients with previous severe pre-eclampsia, fetal death, and/or placental abruption and in as many women with previous uneventful pregnancies, negative for aPL. The prevalence of anti-PT antibodies was higher in cases than in controls (OR, 95% CI: 10.92, 4.52-26.38). The highest prevalence was observed in subjects with fetal death. Anti-PT antibodies appear to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, irrespectively of aPL. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Cytoplasmic localization of alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) predicts poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Sameer; Rakha, Emad A; Alshareeda, Alaa; Mohibi, Shakur; Zhao, Xiangshan; Katafiasz, Bryan J; Wang, Jun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; Bele, Aditya; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew R; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2013-02-01

    Transcriptional activation by estrogen receptor (ER) is a key step to breast oncogenesis. Given previous findings that ADA3 is a critical component of HAT complexes that regulate ER function and evidence that overexpression of other ER coactivators such as SRC-3 is associated with clinical outcomes in breast cancer, the current study was designed to assess the potential significance of ADA3 expression/localization in human breast cancer patients. In this study, we analyzed ADA3 expression in breast cancer tissue specimens and assessed the correlation of ADA3 staining with cancer progression and patient outcome. Tissue microarrays prepared from large series of breast cancer patients with long-term follow-ups were stained with anti-ADA3 monoclonal antibody using immunohistochemistry. Samples were analyzed for ADA3 expression followed by correlation with various clinicopathological parameters and patients' outcomes. We report that breast cancer specimens show predominant nuclear, cytoplasmic, or mixed nuclear + cytoplasmic ADA3 staining patterns. Predominant nuclear ADA3 staining correlated with ER+ status. While predominant cytoplasmic ADA3 staining negatively correlated with ER+ status, but positively correlated with ErbB2, EGFR, and Ki67. Furthermore, a positive correlation of cytoplasmic ADA3 was observed with higher histological grade, mitotic counts, Nottingham Prognostic Index, and positive vascular invasion. Patients with nuclear ADA3 and ER positivity have better breast cancer specific survival and distant metastasis free survival. Significantly, cytoplasmic expression of ADA3 showed a strong positive association with reduced BCSS and DMFS in ErbB2+/EGFR+ patients. Although in multivariate analyses ADA3 expression was not an independent marker of survival, predominant nuclear ADA3 staining in breast cancer tissues correlates with ER+ expression and together serves as a marker of good prognosis, whereas predominant cytoplasmic ADA3 expression correlates with

  5. Emerging psychiatric syndromes associated with antivoltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, Harald; Lennox, Belinda R

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) were first recognised as having a potential pathogenic role in disorders of the central nervous system in 2001, with VGKC antibodies described in patients with limbic encephalitis, and the subsequent seminal paper describing the clinical phenotype and immunotherapy treatment responsiveness in 13 patients with VGKC antibodies and limbic encephalitis in 2004. These initial case descriptions were of a progressive neuropsychiatric syndrome with abnormalities of mood, sleep and cognition recognised alongside the neurological symptoms of seizures and autonomic instability. The clinical syndromes associated with VGKC complex (VGKCC) antibodies have broadened considerably over the last 15 years, with multiple cases of more restricted 'formes fruste' presentations associated with VGKCC antibodies being described. However, the relevance of antibodies in these cases has remained controversial. The understanding of the pathogenic nature of VGKC antibodies has further advanced since 2010 with the discovery that VGKC antibodies are not usually antibodies against the VGKC subunits themselves, but instead to proteins that are complexed with the potassium channel, in particular leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2). Antibodies against these proteins have been associated with particular, although overlapping, clinical phenotypes, each also including neuropsychiatric features. Our aim is to critically review the association between VGKCC, LGI1 and Caspr2 antibodies with isolated psychiatric presentations-with a focus on cognitive impairment, mood disorders and psychosis. We recommend that screening for VGKCC, LGI1 and Caspr2 antibodies be considered for those with neuropsychiatric presentations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Genetically distinct subsets within ANCA-associated vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, Paul A; Rayner, Tim F; Trivedi, Sapna

    2012-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single...

  7. Systemic vasculitis and the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Ibrahim; Hatemi, Gulen; Çelik, Aykut F

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal system can be involved in primary and secondary vasculitides. The recent data regarding the pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, management, and outcome of gastrointestinal involvement in different types of vasculitis are reviewed. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal vasculitis may be difficult and relies mostly on imaging, because biopsy samples are hard to obtain and superficial mucosal biopsies have a low yield. There are conflicting reports on the association of antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) type with the frequency of gastrointestinal involvement in ANCA-associated vasculitis. Pancreatitis is a rare but serious complication of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Terminal ileitis may be observed in immunoglobulin A vasculitis and can be hard to distinguish from Crohn's disease. High fecal calprotectin levels can indicate active gastrointestinal involvement in both immunoglobulin A vasculitis and Behçet's syndrome. Refractory gastrointestinal involvement in Behçet's syndrome can be treated with thalidomide and/or TNF-α antagonists. The outcome of mesenteric vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus can be improved with high-dose glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide or rituximab. Gastrointestinal system can be commonly involved in immunoglobulin A vasculitis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, polyarteritis nodosa, and Behçet's syndrome and can be an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Treatment depends on the type of vasculitis and is usually with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressives.

  8. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  9. Digital gangrene associated with anticentromere antibodies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Bindu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anticentromere antibodies have been associated with peripheral vascular occlusive disease, most frequently accompanied by sclerodactyly in the context of a connective tissue disorder. We report a case of digital gangrene with no other clinical associations except positive anticentromere antibodies. Case presentation Our patient, a 53-year-old Caucasian woman, non-smoker, presented with progressive pain and blackening of the distal right third finger over the preceding five weeks. No sclerodactyly was evident. She was anticentromere antibody positive at greater than 100 U/mL. Angiography revealed diffuse distal vasculopathy in both upper extremities. Other investigations were unremarkable. Conclusions It is rare for anticentromere antibody-associated digital necrosis to develop without concomitant sclerodactyly. However, this patient's case illustrates the need to consider an autoimmune contribution to the pathogenesis of digital ischemia even in the absence of a recognizable connective tissue disease.

  10. Microradioimmunoassay for antibodies to tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.C.C.; Berczi, I.; Froese, G.; Tsay, H.M.; Sehon, A.H.

    1975-01-01

    A versatile microradioimmunoassay for the detection of antibodies to tumor-associated and other tissue antigens was described. The method involved: the preparation of solid-phase antigen with cultured (already adhered) or noncultured cells (sedimented by centrifugation) fixed to Micro-Test plates with neutral buffered formaldehyde or absolute methanol; the incubation of the antigen with test or control sera; and the incubation of the antigen with radioiodinated antiglobulin antibody. The nonspecific background of radioactivity was reduced to an acceptable level by the fixed cells being precoated in the wells with 0.5 percent bovine serum albumin in phosphate-buffered saline which was also used for the dilution of sera and labeled antiglobulin antibody. Tumor cells in primary cultures gave a high background, as compared to long-term cultures, which was due to the presence of immunoglobulins (most likely tumor-specific antibody). The specific antibody response to a syngeneic mouse tumor was demonstrated by this technique. (auth)

  11. Retrieval of estradiol receptor in paraffin sections of resting porcine uteri by microwave treatment. Immunostaining patterns obtained with different primary antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierralta, W D; Thole, H H

    1996-05-01

    The unmasking of estradiol receptor in paraffin sections of Bouin's-fixed uterine tissue from ovariectomized gilts was attained with microwave treatment. Immunocytochemistry of the receptor was performed using a polyclonal or five monoclonal antibodies, two of which are commercially available, reacting with different domains of the protein and an amplified-peroxidase system for detection. With five of the antibodies, a predominance of nuclear staining was observed in cells of endometrial glands, while one monoclonal antibody (13H2), reacting with the receptor's domain E, showed a preference for the cytoplasmic receptor. In stroma, all antibodies detected more receptor in nuclei than in cytoplasm. In epithelium, the commercially available antibody H222, our monoclonals 13H2 and HT65, and the polyclonal antibody 402 demonstrated more receptor in cytoplasmic than in nuclear areas. In myometrium, the nuclei from longitudinal and ring muscles were definitely stained with the antibodies. We conclude that the accessibilities of the antibody epitopes of the receptor differ according to the functional uterine cell type.

  12. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  13. Polyfunctional HIV-Specific Antibody Responses Are Associated with Spontaneous HIV Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Ackerman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elite controllers (ECs represent a unique model of a functional cure for HIV-1 infection as these individuals develop HIV-specific immunity able to persistently suppress viremia. Because accumulating evidence suggests that HIV controllers generate antibodies with enhanced capacity to drive antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC that may contribute to viral containment, we profiled an array of extra-neutralizing antibody effector functions across HIV-infected populations with varying degrees of viral control to define the characteristics of antibodies associated with spontaneous control. While neither the overall magnitude of antibody titer nor individual effector functions were increased in ECs, a more functionally coordinated innate immune-recruiting response was observed. Specifically, ECs demonstrated polyfunctional humoral immune responses able to coordinately recruit ADCC, other NK functions, monocyte and neutrophil phagocytosis, and complement. This functionally coordinated response was associated with qualitatively superior IgG3/IgG1 responses, whereas HIV-specific IgG2/IgG4 responses, prevalent among viremic subjects, were associated with poorer overall antibody activity. Rather than linking viral control to any single activity, this study highlights the critical nature of functionally coordinated antibodies in HIV control and associates this polyfunctionality with preferential induction of potent antibody subclasses, supporting coordinated antibody activity as a goal in strategies directed at an HIV-1 functional cure.

  14. [Neurologic manifestations associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. Or what remains of neurolupus?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachulla, E; Leys, D; Deleume, J F; Pruvo, J P; Devulder, B

    1995-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody is associated with a clinical syndrome of vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and livedo reticularis, whether or not a clinical diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) coexists. Central nervous system involvement in SLE is multifactorial, thrombotic events, antineuronal antibodies, hypertension, infection, side effects of drugs etc. Antiphospholipid antibodies may play a role in focal neurological manifestations in SLE. In the absence of SLE, different neurological symptoms are well associated with antiphospholipid antibodies including stroke, seizures, dementia, migraine, ocular ischemia, chorea, transverse myelopathy, cerebral phlebitis. Other association are more controversal like Guillain Barré syndrome, motor neuron disease, communicating hydrocephalus. In all patients with antiphospholipid antibodies with neurological involvement, cerebral MRI may be performed with an echocardiographic study because a possible association with Libman and Sacks endocarditis, valve dysfunction or cardiac thrombus source of cerebral ischemia.

  15. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB- E. coli cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiv Anatoliy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody-fluorophore conjugates are invaluable reagents used in contemporary molecular cell biology for imaging, cell sorting and tracking intracellular events. However they suffer in some cases from batch to batch variation, partial loss of binding and susceptibility to photo-bleaching. In theory, these issues can all be addressed by using recombinant antibody fused directly to genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. However, single-chain fragment variable domains linked by long flexible linkers are themselves prone to disassociation and aggregation, and in some cases with isoelectric points incompatible with use in physiologically relevant milieu. Here we describe a general approach that permits fully functional intracellular production of a range of coloured fluorescent recombinant antibodies with optimally orientated VH/VL interfaces and isoelectric points compatible for use in physiological solutions at pH 7.4 with a binding site to fluorophore stoichiometry of 1:1. Results Here we report the design, assembly, intracellular bacterial production and purification of a panel of novel antibody fluorescent protein fusion constructs. The insertion of monomeric fluorescent protein derived from either Discosoma or Aequorea in-between the variable regions of anti-p185HER2-ECD antibody 4D5-8 resulted in optimal VH/VL interface interactions to create soluble coloured antibodies each with a single binding site, with isoelectric points of 6.5- 6. The fluorescent antibodies used in cell staining studies with SK-BR-3 cells retained the fluorophore properties and antibody specificity functions, whereas the conventional 4D5-8 single chain antibody with a (Gly4Ser3 linker precipitated at physiological pH 7.4. Conclusions This modular monomeric recombinant fluorescent antibody platform may be used to create a range of recombinant coloured antibody molecules for quantitative in situ, in vivo and ex vivo imaging, cell sorting and cell

  16. The Th1 and Th2 paradigm in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J S F; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2003-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, T cell contribution is indicated by T cell-dependent ANCA production combined with the presence of T cells in inflammatory infiltrates. However, the exact pathogenic role of T cells in ANCA-associated

  17. Coexistence of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies and myeloperoxidase-ANCAs in crescentic glomerulonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Slot, Marjan; van Paassen, Pieter; van Breda Vriesman, Peter; Heeringa, Peter; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen

    BACKGROUND: In a substantial proportion of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) are detected. In the present study, we questioned

  18. Pathogenesis of ANCA-Associated Vasculitis, an Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical observations, including a report of neonatal vasculitis occurring in a child born from a mother with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody directed to myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis, suggest a pathogenic role for ANCA. Such a role is supported by in vitro experimental data

  19. [Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel-Complex Antibodies Associated Encephalopathy and Related Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies are auto-antibodies, initially identified in acquired neuromyotonia (aNMT; Isaacs' syndrome), which cause muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. Subsequently, these antibodies were found in patients presenting with aNMT along with psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) patient with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Typical LE cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). The VGKC complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in the mild detergent digitonin. Recent studies indicated that the VGKC complex antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI1, Caspr2) that complex with VGKCs themselves. Patients with aNMT or MoS are most likely to have Caspr2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. We systematically identified and quantified autoantibodies in patient sera with VGKC-complex antibody associated encephalopathy and showed the relationship between individual antibodies and patient's symptoms. Furthermore, we revealed how autoantibodies disrupt the physiological functions of target proteins. LGI1 antibodies neutralize the interaction between LGI1 and ADAM22, reducing the synaptic AMPA receptors.

  20. Recurrent acute transverse myelopathy: association with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharao, Vijaya; Bartakke, Sandip; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Manisha S; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Udani, Vrajesh P

    2004-06-01

    A seven-year-old boy presented with a second episode of acute transverse myelopathy. The first episode had responded dramatically to methylprednisolone. The manifestations of the second episode did not respond to methylprednisolone or IVIG. He showed persistently raised levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in the serum. Primary conditions like collagen vascular diseases, malignancy, exposure to drugs and HIV infection, which are known to be associated with the raised titers of these antibodies were ruled out clinically and by investigations. Recurrent transverse myelopathy is a rare event in childhood and reports of its association with Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (APLAS) are scanty. The etiological role for these antibodies remains to be established. However, once the diagnosis is established, it may be prudent to treat the condition with agents and procedures to bring about a decrease in their titers. Long-term therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications of APLAS may also be instituted.

  1. Cytoplasmic Flow Enhances Organelle Dispersion in Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslover, Elena; Mogre, Saurabh; Chan, Caleb; Theriot, Julie

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is an active environment through which intracellular components move and mix. We explore, using theoretical modeling coupled with microrheological measurements, the efficiency of particle dispersion via different modes of transport within this active environment. In particular, we focus on the role of cytoplasmic flow over different scales in contributing to organelle transport within two different cell types. In motile neutrophil cells, we show that bulk fluid flow associated with rapid cell deformation enhances particle transport to and from the cell periphery. In narrow fungal hyphae, localized flows due to hydrodynamic entrainment are shown to contribute to optimally efficient organelle dispersion. Our results highlight the importance of non-traditional modes of transport associated with flow of the cytoplasmic fluid in the distribution of organelles throughout eukaryotic cells.

  2. Cytoplasmic Hu-Antigen R (HuR) Expression is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Surgically Resected Cholangiocarcinoma Treated with Adjuvant Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Naru; Uemura, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Naoya; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2018-05-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, translation, and nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of HuR in cholangiocarcinoma patients who received adjuvant gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (AGC) after surgical resection. Nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was investigated immunohistochemically in 131 patients with resected cholangiocarcinoma, including 91 patients administered AGC and 40 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The correlation between HuR expression and survival was evaluated by statistical analysis. High nuclear and cytoplasmic HuR expression was observed in 67 (51%) and 45 (34%) patients, respectively. Cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), while high cytoplasmic HuR expression was significantly associated with poor disease-free survival [DFS] (p = 0.03) and overall survival [OS] (p = 0.001) in the 91 patients who received AGC, but not in the 40 patients who did not receive AGC (DFS p = 0.17; OS p = 0.07). In the multivariate analysis of patients who received AGC, high cytoplasmic HuR expression was an independent predictor of poor DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.77; p = 0.04) and OS (HR 2.09; p = 0.02). Nuclear HuR expression did not affect the survival of enrolled patients. High cytoplasmic HuR expression was closely associated with the efficacy of AGC in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. The current findings warrant further investigations to optimize adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for resectable cholangiocarcinoma.

  3. Cytoplasmic streaming velocity as a plant size determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kimura, Atsushi; Yokota, Etsuo; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Nakano, Akihiko; Ito, Kohji

    2013-11-11

    Cytoplasmic streaming is active transport widely occurring in plant cells ranging from algae to angiosperms. Although it has been revealed that cytoplasmic streaming is generated by organelle-associated myosin XI moving along actin bundles, the fundamental function in plants remains unclear. We generated high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI by replacing the motor domains of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-2 with those of Chara corallina myosin XI and Homo sapiens myosin Vb, respectively. Surprisingly, the plant sizes of the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI-2 were larger and smaller, respectively, than that of the wild-type plant. This size change correlated with acceleration and deceleration, respectively, of cytoplasmic streaming. Our results strongly suggest that cytoplasmic streaming is a key determinant of plant size. Furthermore, because cytoplasmic streaming is a common system for intracellular transport in plants, our system could have applications in artificial size control in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of a novel myositis-associated antibody directed against cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Horrillo, Moisés; Martínez, Maria Angeles; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Grau-Junyent, Josep M; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel; Juarez, Candido

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a novel myositis-associated autoantibody (anti-cortactin antibody) and assess related clinical and immunological manifestations and its clinical significance. Adult patients with myositis (dermatomyositis, polymyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, and inclusion body myositis), as well as patients with other autoimmune diseases and non-inflammatory myopathies were analyzed for the presence of anti-cortactin antibody using in-house developed ELISA and immunoblotting techniques with a commercial source of purified cortactin. The cut-off for positive status was determined in a group of healthy volunteers. Antibody against cortactin was positive in 7/34 (20%) polymyositis patients, 9/117 (7.6%) dermatomyositis, 2/7 (26%) immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, and none of the 4 patients with inclusion body myositis. The antibody also tested positive in 3/101 patients with other autoimmune diseases (2 systemic sclerosis and 1 systemic lupus erythematosus), and in 1/29 patients with non-inflammatory myopathy. No relevant association with specific clinical features was found in patients with these antibodies. Anti-cortactin antibody was more frequently positive in patients with polymyositis and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy than in the remaining myositis patients, and was the only myositis autoantibody found in sera of 3 patients from these groups. Our data indicate that cortactin is a novel target antigen in patients with autoimmune diseases, especially patients with polymyositis or immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Anti-cortactin can be considered a new myositis-associated antibody. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Cavitating lung lesions in the course of ANCA-associated vasculitis: differential diagnostic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J; Raab, H P; Länger, F; Wigand, R; Mitrou, P; Jacobi, V

    1998-05-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome) show quite variable courses. Clinical features of the full blown generalized systemic vasculitis are usually found in the respiratory tract and the kidney. Pulmonary involvement of Wegener's granulomatosis shows commonly nodules and cavitations but also diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. We report the case of a 57 year-old man suffering from dyspnea, thoracal pain, arthralgia, purpura, scleritis and tinitus. Specimen of the kidney showed segmental glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial nephritis. Because of the presence of cANCA Wegener's disease was assumed. Pulmonary infiltrates developed under immunosuppressive treatment with cyclophosphamid. As differential diagnosis of the pulmonary infiltrates, we considered invasive pulmonary aspergillosis as well as infiltrates due to Wegener's granulomatosis. In spite of maximal therapeutic management of patient died of respiratory and cardiovascular failure. The findings at autopsy showed distinct invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and perifocal hemorrhage.

  6. Optimal therapy and prospects for new medicines in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnoux, Christian; Groh, Matthieu

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA; previously known as Churg-Strauss syndrome) is lower than that of other antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV's), and only a few randomized controlled trials have been conducted for this rare disease. However, recent international efforts have helped delineate the best treatment approach. At present, EGPA conventional therapy is by default similar to that of other AAVs. Limited, non-severe EGPA can initially be treated with glucocorticoids (GCs) alone. Patients with life-threatening manifestations and/or major organ involvement must receive a combination of GCs and an immunosuppressant, mainly cyclophosphamide. Remission can be achieved in >85% of patients with these first-line treatments, but vasculitis relapses occur in more than one-third of patients, and about 85% cannot stop GC treatment because of GC-dependent asthma and/or ENT manifestations. A few biologic agents, including rituximab or mepolizumab, are now under investigation after interesting preliminary results. Expert commentary: Treatment for EGPA still has several unmet needs. Several biologic agents are now under investigation in randomized controlled trials, but a few others should be considered soon. Their benefit should be demonstrated for devising more EGPA-tailored therapeutic strategies (ideally GC-free).

  7. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused β-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-β-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material

  8. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  9. Mechanisms of vasculitis : How pauci-immune is ANCA-associated renal vasculitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Paassen, P.; Tervaert, J. W. Cohen; Heeringa, P.

    2007-01-01

    Both the innate and the acquired immune system are involved in the pathophysiology of renal vasculitis. However, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated renal vasculitis is characterized by a 'pauci-immune' pattern of immunofluorescence during kidney biopsy, indicating the relative

  10. Netrin-1 receptor antibodies in thymoma-associated neuromyotonia with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Mancheño, Nuria; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chumillas, María J; Moris, Germán; Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sevilla, Teresa; Vílchez, Juan J; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bataller, Luis

    2017-03-28

    To identify cell-surface antibodies in patients with neuromyotonia and to describe the main clinical implications. Sera of 3 patients with thymoma-associated neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis were used to immunoprecipitate and characterize neuronal cell-surface antigens using reported techniques. The clinical significance of antibodies against precipitated proteins was assessed with sera of 98 patients (neuromyotonia 46, myasthenia gravis 52, thymoma 42; 33 of them with overlapping syndromes) and 219 controls (other neurologic diseases, cancer, and healthy volunteers). Immunoprecipitation studies identified 3 targets, including the Netrin-1 receptors DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinoma) and UNC5A (uncoordinated-5A) as well as Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). Cell-based assays with these antigens showed that among the indicated patients, 9 had antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (7 with additional Caspr2 antibodies) and 5 had isolated Caspr2 antibodies. Only one of the 219 controls had isolated Caspr2 antibodies with relapsing myelitis episodes. Among patients with neuromyotonia and/or myasthenia gravis, the presence of Netrin-1 receptor or Caspr2 antibodies predicted thymoma ( p myasthenia gravis, and neuromyotonia, often with Morvan syndrome ( p = 0.009). Expression of DCC, UNC5A, and Caspr2 proteins was demonstrated in paraffin-embedded thymoma samples (3) and normal thymus. Antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (DCC and UNC5a) and Caspr2 often coexist and associate with thymoma in patients with neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis. This study provides Class III evidence that antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors can identify patients with thymoma (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Family poverty is associated with cytomegalovirus antibody titers in U.S. children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Jennifer B; Palermo, Tia M; Aiello, Allison E

    2012-01-01

    Early life environmental and psychological influences are thought to play an important role in the development of the immune system. Antibody response to latent herpesviruses has been used as an indirect measure of cell-mediated immune function but has seldom been applied to younger age groups. We used data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to test for an association between family poverty and continuous antibody response to cytomegalovirus in U.S. children aged 6-16 (N = 2,226) using ordinary least squares regression. Poverty was significantly associated with increased antibody levels among seropositive individuals. The association between income and antibody levels exhibited a threshold effect, with additional income beyond the poverty line not associated with increased antibody titers. This relationship was more robust among older compared with younger children. Early life social factors such as family poverty could have detrimental impacts on the developing immune system, with potentially important consequences for later life health outcomes. Exposure to socioeconomic stressors for longer periods during childhood may further enhance alterations in immune response to cytomegalovirus.

  12. Cocaine-associated retiform purpura: a C5b-9-mediated microangiopathy syndrome associated with enhanced apoptosis and high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Cynthia M; Wang, Xuan

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine-associated retiform purpura is a recently described entity characterized by striking hemorrhagic necrosis involving areas of skin associated with administration of cocaine. Levamisole, an adulterant in cocaine, has been suggested as the main culprit pathogenetically. Four cases of cocaine-associated retiform purpura were encountered in the dermatopathology practice of C. M. Magro. The light microscopic findings were correlated with immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence studies. All 4 cases showed a very striking thrombotic diathesis associated with intravascular macrophage accumulation. Necrotizing vasculitis was noted in 1 case. Striking intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/CD54 expression in vessel wall along with endothelial expression of caspase 3 and extensive vascular C5b-9 deposition was observed in all biopsies examined. Cocaine-induced retiform purpura is a C5b-9-mediated microvascular injury associated with enhanced apoptosis and prominent vascular expression of ICAM-1, all of which have been shown in prior in vitro and in vivo murine models to be a direct effect of cocaine metabolic products. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody and antiphospholipid antibodies are likely the direct sequelae of the proapoptotic microenvironment. The inflammatory vasculitic lesion could reflect the downstream end point reflective of enhanced ICAM-1 expression and the development of antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody. Levamisole likely works synergistically with cocaine in the propagation of this syndromic complex.

  13. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in coeliac disease before and after gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Zauli, D; Muratori, P; Muratori, L; Grassi, A; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Veronesi, L; Gionchetti, P; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2005-04-01

    Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are markers of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis respectively. To determine the prevalence of anti-S. cerevisiae and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in a large series of coeliac disease patients before and after gluten free diet, and to correlate anti-S. cerevisiae-positivity with intestinal mucosal damage. One hundred and five consecutive coeliac disease patients and 141 controls (22 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease, 30 primary sclerosing cholangitis, 15 postenteritis syndrome, 50 blood donors) were tested for anti-S. cerevisiae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and for perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. In coeliac disease anti-S. cerevisiae (immunoglobulin G and/or immunoglobulin A) were slightly less frequent (59%) than in Crohn's disease (75%, P = 0.16) and significantly more frequent than in ulcerative colitis (27%), primary sclerosing cholangitis (30%), postenteritis syndrome (26%) and blood donors (4%) (P = 0.009, P = 0.0002, P = 0.025, P < 0.0001). No correlation was found between anti-S. cerevisiae and degree of mucosal damage. Perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies were detected only in one coeliac. After gluten free diet the disappearance of anti-S. cerevisiae-immunoglobulin A (93%) was more frequent than that of immunoglobulin G (17%, P = 0.0001); perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies disappeared in the only coeliac positive at diagnosis. More than half of untreated coeliacs are anti-S. cerevisiae-positive irrespective of the severity of mucosal damage. Differently from immunoglobulin A, anti-S. cerevisiae-immunoglobulin G persisted in more than 80% after gluten free diet. The high prevalence of anti-S. cerevisiae in coeliac disease suggests that they may be the effect of a non-specific immune response in course of chronic small bowel disease.

  14. Association of nad7a Gene with Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Pigeonpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sinha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS has been exploited in the commercial pigeonpea [ (L. Millsp.] hybrid breeding system; however, the molecular mechanism behind this system is unknown. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism involved in A CMS system derived from (Haines Maesen, 34 mitochondrial genes were analyzed for expression profiling and structural variation analysis between CMS line (ICRISAT Pigeonpea A line, ICPA 2039 and its cognate maintainer (ICPB 2039. Expression profiling of 34 mitochondrial genes revealed nine genes with significant fold differential gene expression at ≤ 0.01, including one gene, , with 1366-fold higher expression in CMS line as compared with the maintainer. Structural variation analysis of these mitochondrial genes identified length variation between ICPA 2039 and ICPB 2039 for (subunit of gene. Sanger sequencing of and genes in the CMS and the maintainer lines identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in upstream region of and a deletion of 10 bp in in the CMS line. Protein structure evaluation showed conformational changes in predicted protein structures for between ICPA 2039 and ICPB 2039 lines. All above analyses indicate association of gene with the CMS for A cytoplasm in pigeonpea. Additionally, one polymerase chain reaction (PCR based Indel marker ( has been developed and validated for testing genetic purity of A derived CMS lines to strengthen the commercial hybrid breeding program in pigeonpea.

  15. Genetically distinct subsets within ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Paul A

    2012-07-19

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener\\'s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis.

  16. Vasculitis mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Eamonn S; Langford, Carol A

    2008-01-01

    There are many disorders that may closely resemble the clinical, radiologic and/or pathologic features of the primary vasculitides. In this review, we focus on recently described and under-recognized syndromes that may mimic vasculitis. Hereditary causes of large-artery aneurysms such as Marfan's syndrome have long been recognized; recent years have seen a greater understanding of the genetics of Marfan's and other such disorders, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome type IV. Under-recognized mimics of medium-vessel vasculitis include segmental arterial mediolysis and Grange syndrome. A large number of entities can mimic small-vessel vasculitis. Recent descriptions of antibodies to human neutrophil elastase have provided insight into the occurrence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions. The differential diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis can be particularly difficult. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes represent an important class of entities that can readily mimic cerebral vasculitis but have a very different management approach and outcome. The diagnosis of vasculitis requires careful assessment of all available clinical, laboratory, radiologic and pathologic information, and consideration of many competing differential diagnoses. Awareness of noninflammatory mimics of vasculitis is essential to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful treatment with immunosuppressive agents.

  17. 'Leukodystrophy-like' phenotype in children with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Rossor, Thomas; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, Wk 'Kling'; Lux, Andrew; Wassmer, Evangeline; Lim, Ming; Barkhof, Frederik; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2018-04-01

    To review the demographics and clinical and paraclinical parameters of children with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-associated relapsing disease. In this UK-based, multicentre study, 31 children with MOG antibody-associated relapsing disease were studied retrospectively. Of the 31 children studied, 14 presented with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); they were younger (mean 4.1y) than the remainder (mean 8.5y) who presented with optic neuritis and/or transverse myelitis (p<0.001). Similarly, children who had an abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at onset (n=20) were younger than patients with normal MRI at onset (p=0.001) or at follow-up (p<0.001). 'Leukodystrophy-like' MRI patterns of confluent largely symmetrical lesions was seen during the course of the disease in 7 out of 14 children with a diagnosis of ADEM, and was only seen in children younger than 7 years of age. Their disability after a 3-year follow-up was mild to moderate, and most patients continued to relapse, despite disease-modifying treatments. MOG antibody should be tested in children presenting with relapsing neurological disorders associated with confluent, bilateral white matter changes, and distinct enhancement pattern. Children with MOG antibody-associated disease present with age-related differences in phenotypes, with a severe leukoencephalopathy phenotype in the very young and normal intracranial MRI in the older children. This finding suggests a susceptibility of the very young and myelinating brain to MOG antibody-mediated mechanisms of damage. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-associated demyelination manifest with an age-related phenotype. Children with MOG antibody and 'leukodystrophy-like' imaging patterns tend to have poor response to second-line immunotherapy. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  18. CIRCULATING MICROPARTICLES IN PATIENTS WITH ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES: CHARACTERIZATION AND ASSOCIATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Cockrell, Erin; Espinola, Ricardo; Hsi, Linda; Fulton, Stacey; Khan, Mohammad; Li, Liang; Fonseca, Fabio; Kundu, Suman; McCrae, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or recurrent fetal loss in the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. These antibodies cause activation of endothelial and other cell types leading to the release of microparticles with procoagulant and pro-inflammatory properties. The aims of this study were to characterize the levels of endothelial cell, monocyte, platelet derived, and tissue factor-bearing microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies, to determine the association of circulating microparticles with anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein antibodies, and to define the cellular origin of microparticles that express tissue factor. Microparticle content within citrated blood from 47 patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and 144 healthy controls was analyzed within 2 hours of venipuncture. Levels of Annexin-V, CD105 and CD144 (endothelial derived), CD41 (platelet derived) and tissue factor positive microparticles were significantly higher in patients than controls. Though levels of CD14 (monocyte-derived) microparticles in patient plasma were not significantly increased, increased levels of CD14 and tissue factor positive microparticles were observed in patients. Levels of microparticles that stained for CD105 and CD144 showed a positive correlation with IgG (R = 0.60, p=0.006) and IgM anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (R=0.58, p=0.006). The elevation of endothelial and platelet derived microparticles in patients with APS and their correlation with anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies suggests a chronic state of vascular cell activation in these individuals and an important role for β2-glycoprotein I in development of the pro-thrombotic state associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. PMID:25467081

  19. High Grade Glioma Mimicking Voltage Gated Potassium Channel Complex Associated Antibody Limbic Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilan Athauda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE. This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  20. High grade glioma mimicking voltage gated potassium channel complex associated antibody limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athauda, Dilan; Delamont, R S; Pablo-Fernandez, E De

    2014-01-01

    Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE). This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  1. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabiditis elegans embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex (“cortical flow”) is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region (“cytoplasmic flow”) is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos. PMID:21730185

  2. Cytoplasmic ATR Activation Promotes Vaccinia Virus Genome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Postigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate their genomes in the cytoplasm without host involvement. We find that vaccinia virus induces cytoplasmic activation of ATR early during infection, before genome uncoating, which is unexpected because ATR plays a fundamental nuclear role in maintaining host genome integrity. ATR, RPA, INTS7, and Chk1 are recruited to cytoplasmic DNA viral factories, suggesting canonical ATR pathway activation. Consistent with this, pharmacological and RNAi-mediated inhibition of canonical ATR signaling suppresses genome replication. RPA and the sliding clamp PCNA interact with the viral polymerase E9 and are required for DNA replication. Moreover, the ATR activator TOPBP1 promotes genome replication and associates with the viral replisome component H5. Our study suggests that, in contrast to long-held beliefs, vaccinia recruits conserved components of the eukaryote DNA replication and repair machinery to amplify its genome in the host cytoplasm.

  3. An effective intracellular delivery system of monoclonal antibody for treatment of tumors: erythrocyte membrane-coated self-associated antibody nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lipeng; Han, Lin; Ding, Xiaoling; Xu, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lu, Weiyue; Sun, Jihong; Yu, Lei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yiting

    2017-08-01

    Antibody-based drugs have attracted much attention for their targeting ability, high efficacy and low toxicity. But it is difficult for those intrabodies, a kind of antibody whose targets are intracellular biomarkers, to become effective drugs due to the lack of intracellular delivery strategy and their short circulation time in blood. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), an important biomarker for tumors, is expressed only in cytoplasm instead of on cell membrane. In this study, the anti-hTERT blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), as the model intrabody, was used to prepare nanoparticles (NPs), followed by the encapsulation of erythrocyte membrane (EM), to obtain the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs delivery system. The final NPs showed a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of about 197.3 nm. The in vitro cellular uptake by HeLa cells confirmed that compared with free anti-hTERT mAb, the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a significantly increased uptake by tumor cells. Besides, the pharmacokinetic study confirmed that the EM encapsulation can remarkably prolong the circulation time and increase the area under curve (AUC) of NPs in blood. The EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a remarkably decreased uptake by macrophages than uncoated NPs, which may be responsible for the prolonged circulation time and increased AUC. Furthermore, the frozen section of tumor tissue was performed and proved that the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs can be more effectively accumulated in tumor tissues than the free mAb and uncoated NPs. In summary, this study indicated that EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs are an effective delivery system for the long circulation and intracellular delivery of an intrabody, and make it possible for the intracellular biomarkers to become the potential targets of drugs.

  4. HuR cytoplasmic expression is associated with increased cyclin A expression and poor outcome with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Peir-In; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Hsu, Han-Ping; Chen, Li-Tzon; Lin, Ching-Yih; Tai, Chein; Lin, Chun-Mao; Li, Chien-Feng; Li, Wei-Ming; Wang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Ting-Feng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Alex C; Shen, Kun-Hung; Wei, Yu-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    HuR is an RNA-binding protein that post-transcriptionally modulates the expressions of various target genes implicated in carcinogenesis, such as CCNA2 encoding cyclin A. No prior study attempted to evaluate the significance of HuR expression in a large cohort with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUCs). In total, 340 cases of primary localized UTUC without previous or concordant bladder carcinoma were selected. All of these patients received ureterectomy or radical nephroureterectomy with curative intents. Pathological slides were reviewed, and clinical findings were collected. Immunostaining for HuR and cyclin A was performed and evaluated by using H-score. The results of cytoplasmic HuR and nuclear cyclin A expressions were correlated with disease-specific survival (DSS), metastasis-free survival (MeFS), urinary bladder recurrence-free survival (UBRFS), and various clinicopathological factors. HuR cytoplasmic expression was significantly related to the pT status, lymph node metastasis, a higher histological grade, the pattern of invasion, vascular and perineurial invasion, and cyclin A expression (p = 0.005). Importantly, HuR cytoplasmic expression was strongly associated with a worse DSS (p < 0.0001), MeFS (p < 0.0001), and UBRFS (p = 0.0370) in the univariate analysis, and the first two results remained independently predictive of adverse outcomes (p = 0.038, relative risk [RR] = 1.996 for DSS; p = 0.027, RR = 1.880 for MeFS). Cyclin A nuclear expression was associated with a poor DSS (p = 0.0035) and MeFS (p = 0.0015) in the univariate analysis but was not prognosticatory in the multivariate analyses. High-risk patients (pT3 or pT4 with/without nodal metastasis) with high HuR cytoplasmic expression had better DSS if adjuvant chemotherapy was performed (p = 0.015). HuR cytoplasmic expression was correlated with adverse phenotypes and cyclin A overexpression and also independently predictive of worse DSS and MeFS, suggesting its roles in

  5. Caspr2 antibody limbic encephalitis is associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis and thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hong; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chang, Bao-Luen; Hsieh, Hsiang-Yao; Chen, Wei-Hsun; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Fung, Hon-Chung; Wu, Tony

    2014-06-15

    Contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2) antibody is a neuronal surface antibody (NSAb) capable of causing disorders involving central and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). Thymoma can be found in patients with Caspr2 antibodies and is most frequently associated with PNS symptoms. Myasthenia gravis can be found in these patients, but Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has not been reported. A 76-year-old woman presented with sub-acute-onset changes in mental status. Further investigations revealed thymoma and HT. The presence of NSAb was tested by immunofluorescence on human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Treatment included corticosteroids, azathioprine, thyroxine, plasmapheresis, and thymectomy. Caspr2 antibody was positive in serum but absent in CSF. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse cortical atrophy, but did not change significantly after treatments. Brain positron emission tomography (PET) revealed diffuse hypometabolism over the cerebral cortex. The patient's mental status only partially improved. In Caspr2 antibody-associated syndromes, thymoma can occur in patients presenting only with LE, and HT can be an accompanying disease. Brain MRI and PET may not show specific lesions in limbic area. Patients with Caspr2 antibodies and thymoma may not have good prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Cutaneous and mucosal manifestations associated with cocaine use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrián; Chico, Ricardo; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio

    2016-06-17

    Complications due to cocaine are a public health problem. The typical cutaneous disease is leukocytoclastic vasculitis and/or thrombotic vasculopathy affecting mainly the ears. No intense systemic involvement is usually present, but there may be several cutaneous, mucosal and systemic manifestations. Other findings associated as arthralgia, neutropaenia or agranulocytosis, low titer positive antinuclear antibodies, antiphospholipid antibody positivity and neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against multiple antigens help the diagnosis. This disease requires a clinical suspicion with a clinical history, a complete physical examination and a broad differential diagnosis for an early and correct diagnosis. The course is usually self-limited. In most cases the only treatment is to discontinue the use of cocaine associated with symptomatic treatment, no proven benefit of systemic corticosteroids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Retromer associates with the cytoplasmic amino-terminus of polycystin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Frances C; Gallon, Matthew; Luo, Chong; Danson, Chris M; Zhou, Jing; Cullen, Peter J

    2018-05-03

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic human disease, with around 12.5 million people affected worldwide. ADPKD results from mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the atypical G-protein coupled receptor polycystin-1 (PC1) and the transient receptor potential channel polycystin-2 (PC2) respectively. Although altered intracellular trafficking of PC1 and PC2 appear as an underlying feature of ADPKD, the mechanisms which govern vesicular transport of the polycystins through the biosynthetic and endosomal membrane networks remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we describe an interaction between PC2 and retromer, a master controller for the sorting of integral membrane proteins through the endo-lysosomal network. We show that association of PC2 with retromer occurs via a region in the PC2 cytoplasmic amino-terminal domain, independently of the retromer-binding Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and scar homologue (WASH) complex. Based on observations that retromer preferentially interacts with a trafficking population of PC2, and that ciliary levels of PC1 are reduced upon mutation of key residues required for retromer-association in PC2, our data is consistent with the identification of PC2 as a retromer cargo protein. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-NH2-terminal of α-enolase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishitani, Toru; Matsunaga, Akiko; Ikawa, Masamichi; Hayashi, Kouji; Yamamura, Osamu; Hamano, Tadanori; Watanabe, Osamu; Tanaka, Keiko; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Yoneda, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several types of autoantibodies have been reported in autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE), such as antibodies against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex including leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1). We recently reported a patient with autoimmune LE and serum anti-NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) antibodies, a specific diagnostic marker for Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE), who was diagnosed with HE based on the presence of antithyroid antibodies and responsiveness to immunotherapy. This case suggests that LE patients with antibodies to both the thyroid and NAE could be diagnosed with HE and respond to immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicoimmunological features and efficacy of immunotherapy in LE associated with anti-NAE antibodies to determine whether the LE is a clinical subtype of HE. We examined serum anti-NAE antibodies in 78 LE patients with limbic abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging and suspected HE based on positivity for antithyroid antibodies. Nineteen of the 78 patients had anti-NAE antibodies; however, 5 were excluded because they were double positive for antibodies to the VGKC complex including LGI1. No antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2), γ-aminobutyric acid-B receptor (GABABR), or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) were detected in the 19 patients. Among the remaining 14 who were positive only for anti-NAE antibodies, the median age was 62.5 (20–83) years, 9 (64%) were women, and 8 (57%) showed acute onset, with less than 2 weeks between onset and admission. Consciousness disturbance (71%) and memory disturbance (64%) were frequently observed, followed by psychiatric symptoms (50%) and seizures (43%). The frequency of these symptoms significantly differed between the acute- and subacute-onset groups. Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid and electroencephalogram were commonly observed (92

  9. Mechanisms for cytoplasmic organization: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, L

    2000-01-01

    One of the basic characteristics of life is the intrinsic organization of cytoplasm, yet we know surprisingly little about the manner in which cytoplasmic macromolecules are arranged. It is clear that cytoplasm is not the homogeneous "soup" it was once envisioned to be, but a comprehensive model for cytoplasmic organization is not available in modern cell biology. The premise of this volume is that phase separation in cytoplasm may play a role in organization at the subcellular level. Other mechanisms for non-membrane-bounded intracellular organization have previously been proposed. Some of these will be reviewed in this chapter. Multiple mechanisms, involving phase separation, specific intracellular targeting, formation of macromolecular complexes, and channeling, all could well contribute to cytoplasmic organization. Temporal and spatial organization, as well as composition, are likely to be important in defining the characteristics of cytoplasm.

  10. Antibody to liver cytosol (anti-LC1) in patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E; Abuaf, N; Cavalli, F; Durand, V; Johanet, C; Homberg, J C

    1988-01-01

    A new autoantibody was detected by immunoprecipitation in the serum of 21 patients with chronic active hepatitis. The antibody reacted against a soluble cytosolic antigen in liver. The antibody was organ specific but not species specific and was therefore called anti-liver cytosol antibody Type 1 (anti-LC1). In seven of 21 cases, no other autoantibody was found; the remaining 14 cases had anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody Type 1 (anti-LKM1). With indirect immunofluorescence, a distinctive staining pattern was observed with the seven sera with anti-LC1 and without anti-LKM1. The antibody stained the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from four different animal species and spared the cellular layer around the central veins of mouse and rat liver that we have called juxtavenous hepatocytes. The immunofluorescence pattern disappeared after absorption of sera by a liver cytosol fraction. The 14 sera with both antibodies displayed anti-LC1 immunofluorescent pattern after absorption of anti-LKM1 by the liver microsomal fraction. The anti-LC1 was found in the serum only in patients with chronic active hepatitis of unknown cause. Anti-LC1 antibody was not found in sera from 100 patients with chronic active hepatitis associated with anti-actin antibody classic chronic active hepatitis Type 1, 100 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 157 patients with drug-induced hepatitis and a large number of patients with liver and nonliver diseases. This new antibody was considered a second marker of chronic active hepatitis associated with anti-LKM1 (anti-LKM1 chronic active hepatitis) or autoimmune chronic active hepatitis Type 2.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana BRI1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1) cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jian; Ma, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yuna; Zhao, Huadong; Hong, Dapeng; Yan, Liming; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of BRI1-associated kinase 1 from A. thaliana has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution. BRI1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1) is a member of the plant receptor-like kinase (RLK) superfamily. BAK1 has been shown to initiate brassinosteroid (BR) signalling and innate immune responses in plants by forming receptor complexes with both brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (BRI1) and flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). To gain a better understanding of the structural details and the mechanism of action of the BAK1 kinase domain, recombinant BAK1 cytoplasmic domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized at 291 K using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. A 2.6 Å resolution data set was collected from a single flash-cooled crystal at 100 K. This crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.3, b = 75.6, c = 71.9 Å, β = 93.1°. Assuming the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient was 2.6 Å 3 Da −1

  12. Association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Michel Alexandre Yazbek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus exposure appears to be an environmental trigger for rheumatoid arthritis that interacts with other risk factors. Relationships among anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status have been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from different populations. OBJECTIVE: To perform an association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In a case-control study, 140 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 143 healthy volunteers who were matched for age, sex, and ethnicity were recruited. Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and shared epitope alleles were identified by genotyping. Smoking information was collected from all subjects. A comparative analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status was performed in the patient group. Logistic regression analysis models were used to analyze the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies were not associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, shared epitope alleles, or smoking status. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity was significantly higher in smoking patients with shared epitope alleles (OR = 3.82. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis using stepwise selection, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were found to be independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 247.9. CONCLUSION: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies did not increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and were not associated with the rheumatoid arthritis risk factors studied. Smoking

  13. Prospective study of radioimmunoassay for antibodies against neutrophil cytoplasm in diagnosis of systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, C.O.S.; Winearls, C.G.; Jones, S.; Marshall, P.D.; Lockwood, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyarteritis are complicated by the lack of specific diagnostic tests. The diagnostic performance of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which detects the autoantibodies against neutrophil cytoplasm present in these disorders, was assessed in a prospective study of patients with suspected vasculitis and/or rapidly progressive nephritis. The assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 96% when carried out in combination with a specific inhibition stage and indirect immunofluorescence staining of alcohol-fixed normal neutrophils. (author)

  14. Anti-hLAMP2-antibodies and dual positivity for anti-GBM and MPO-ANCA in a patient with relapsing pulmonary-renal syndrome

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    Kistler Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary-renal syndrome associated with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibodies, also known as Goodpasture's syndrome, is a rare but acute and life-threatening condition. One third of patients presenting as anti-GBM antibody positive pulmonary-renal syndrome or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis are also tested positive for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA. Whilst anti-GBM disease is considered a non-relapsing condition, the long-term course of double-positive patients is less predictable. Case Presentation We report a patient with such dual positivity, who presented with pulmonary hemorrhage, crescentic glomerulonephritis and membranous nephropathy. Plasmapheresis in combination with immunosuppresive therapy led to a rapid remission but the disease relapsed after two years. The serum of the patient was tested positive for antibodies to human lysosomal membrane protein 2 (hLAMP2, a novel autoantigen in patients with active small-vessel vasculitis (SVV. The anti-hLAMP2 antibody levels correlated positively with clinical disease activity in this patient. Conclusion We hypothesize that this antibody may indicate a clinical course similar to ANCA-associated vasculitis in double-positive patients. However, this needs to be confirmed on comprehensive patient cohorts.

  15. A Case of Churg-Strauss Syndrome Associated with Antiphospholipid Antibodies

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    Ferenczi, Katalin; Chang, Timothy; Camouse, Melissa; Han, Rujing; Stern, Robert; Willis, Joseph; Cooper, Kevin D.; Gilliam, Anita C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized blood vessels, almost invariably affecting the lung and frequently associated with cutaneous involvement. Microvascular vaso-occlusion leading to digital gangrene is not a feature of CSS. OBSERVATIONS We report an unusual case of a patient with Churg Strauss Syndrome with antiphospholipid antibodies who developed severe digital gangrene in addition to cutaneous vasculitis. CONCLUSION The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies is not a feature usually seen in association with Churg-Strauss syndrome. While the full clinical spectrum of Churg Strauss Syndrome is still being defined, identification of additional features associated with this syndrome might help to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease and to have an impact on management and prognosis. PMID:17175066

  16. Infection of human and non-human cells by a highly fusogenic primary CD4-independent HIV-1 isolate with a truncated envelope cytoplasmic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Kunal; Yan Hui; Nelson, Julie A.E.; Zerhouni-Layachi, Bouchra

    2005-01-01

    Truncation of the envelope cytoplasmic tail has enabled FIV, SIV, and some laboratory HIV-1 strains to acquire broader cellular tropism and enhanced fusogenicity. Here we have characterized a primary CD4-independent HIV-1 isolate (92UG046-T8) with a truncated cytoplasmic tail that was able to infect and induce syncytia in primary lymphocytes from human, chimpanzee, and monkey, as well as CD4-negative cell lines from human and monkey. Increased syncytia were also noticeable with 293 cells expressing the cloned envelope from the 92UG046-T8 isolate suggesting envelope-mediated cellular fusion. Except pooled serum from HIV-1-infected individuals, monoclonal anti-envelope antibodies or antibodies/antagonists against CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 were not able to prevent infection by the 92UG046-T8 isolate. This is the first report showing a primary HIV-1 variant with truncated cytoplasmic tail which is highly fusogenic and can infect a broad range of cells from human and non-human origins. In vivo evolution of similar HIV-1 mutants may have important implications in AIDS pathogenesis

  17. Isotypes of Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Association with Rheumatoid Factors and Citrulline-Dependent Antibodies

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    Marie Wulff Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the humoral immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to compare it with the two major autoantibody types in RA, plasma samples from 77 RA patients, 28 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and 28 healthy controls (HCs were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Increased percentages of positives and concentrations of IgG/IgA/IgM antibodies against the latent EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 were observed in RA patients compared to SLE patients and HCs. Increased concentrations and percentages of positives of IgG/IgA/IgM against the early lytic EBV antigen diffuse (EAD were also found in RA patients compared to HCs but were highest in SLE patients. Furthermore, associations between the elevated EBNA-1 IgA and EBNA-1 IgM levels and the presence of IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors (RFs and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs, IgG and between elevated IgA concentrations against EAD and the presence of RFs and ACPAs in RA patients were found. Thus, RA patients had elevated antibodies of all isotypes characteristic of latent EBV infection (whereas SLE patients had elevated antibodies characteristic of lytic EBV infection. Notably, for IgM and IgA (but not IgG, these were associated with the presence of characteristic RA autoantibodies.

  18. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  19. Cancer in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis: A Registry-Based Cohort Study

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    Sanjeevan Sriskandarajah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Immunosuppressive therapy for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been associated with increased malignancy risk. Objectives. To quantify the cancer risk associated with contemporary cyclophosphamide-sparing protocols. Methods. Patients from the Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry between 1988 and 2012 who had biopsy-verified pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA serology were included. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs were calculated to compare the study cohort with the general population. Results. The study cohort included 419 patients. During 3010 person-years, cancer developed in 41 patients (9.79%; the expected number of cancer cases was 37.5 (8.95%. The cohort had SIRs as follows: 1.09, all cancer types (95% CI, 0.81 to 1.49; 0.96, all types except nonmelanoma skin cancer (95% CI, 0.69 to 1.34; 3.40, nonmelanoma skin cancer (95% CI, 1.62 to 7.14; 3.52, hematologic cancer (95% CI, 1.32 to 9.37; 2.12, posttransplant cancer (95% CI, 1.01 to 4.44; and 1.53, during the 1–5-year follow-up after diagnosis (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.32. Conclusions. Cancer risk did not increase significantly in this cohort with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. However, increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer, posttransplant cancer, and hematologic cancer indicates an association between immunosuppression and malignancy.

  20. Subcellular localization of estradiol receptor in MCF7 cells studied with nanogold-labelled antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, M M; Qualmann, B; Thole, H H; Sierralta, W D

    1998-01-01

    Ultrastructural localization studies of estradiol receptor in hormone-deprived and hormone-stimulated MCF7 cells were done using F(ab') fragments of three different antibodies (#402, 13H2, HT277) covalently linked to nanogold. These ultra-small, non-charged immunoreagents, combined with a size-enlargement by silver enhancement, localized estradiol receptor in both nuclear and cytoplasmic areas of non-stimulated target cells; stimulation with the steroid induced a predominantly nuclear labelling. In the cytoplasm of resting cells, tagging was often observed at or in the proximity of stress fibers. In the nucleus a large proportion of receptor was found inside the nucleolus, specially with the reagent derived from antibody 13H2. We postulate that different accessibilities of receptor epitopes account for the different labelling densities observed at cytoskeletal elements and the nucleoli.

  1. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16 INK4a , a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis

  2. Opsonising antibodies to P. falciparum merozoites associated with immunity to clinical malaria.

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    Danika L Hill

    Full Text Available Naturally acquired humoral immunity to the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum can protect against disease, although the precise mechanisms remain unclear. Although antibody levels can be measured by ELISA, few studies have investigated functional antibody assays in relation to clinical outcomes. In this study we applied a recently developed functional assay of antibody-mediated opsonisation of merozoites, to plasma samples from a longitudinal cohort study conducted in a malaria endemic region of Papua New Guinea (PNG. Phagocytic activity was quantified by flow cytometry using a standardized and high-throughput protocol, and was subsequently evaluated for association with protection from clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia. Opsonising antibody responses were found to: i increase with age, ii be enhanced by concurrent infection, and iii correlate with protection from clinical episodes and high-density parasitemia. Stronger protective associations were observed in individuals with no detectable parasitemia at baseline. This study presents the first evidence for merozoite phagocytosis as a correlate of acquired immunity and clinical protection against P. falciparum malaria.

  3. [Current Perspective on Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Complex Antibody Associated Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2018-04-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex auto-antibodies were initially identified in Isaacs' syndrome (IS), which is characterized by muscle cramps and neuromyotonia. These antibodies were subsequently identified in patients with Morvan's syndrome (MoS), which includes IS in conjunction with psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia. The antibodies have also been detected in a patient with limbic encephalopathy (LE) presenting with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Typical cases of LE have adult-onset, with frequent, brief dystonic seizures that predominantly affect the arms and ipsilateral face, and has recently been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Autoantibodies against the extracellular domains of VGKC complex proteins, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), and contactin-associated protein-2 (Caspr2), occur in patients with IS, MoS, and LE. However, routine testing has detected VGKC complex antibodies without LGI1 or Caspr2 reactivities (double-negative) in patients with other diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, double-negative VGKC complex antibodies are often directed against cytosolic epitopes of Kv1 subunits. Therefore, these antibodies should no longer be classified as neuronal-surface antibodies and lacking pathogenic potential. Novel information has been generated regarding autoantibody disruption of the physiological functions of target proteins. LGI1 antibodies neutralize the interaction between LGI1 and ADAM22, thereby reducing the synaptic AMPA receptors. It may be that the main action is on inhibitory neurons, explaining why the loss of AMPA receptors causes amnesia, neuronal excitability and seizures.

  4. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies and myeloperoxidase autoantibodies in clinical expression of Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Bridget; Bibby, Susan; Steele, Richard; Weatherall, Mark; Nelson, Harold; Beasley, Richard

    2013-02-01

    The clinical significance of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) in the phenotypic expression of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is uncertain. We sought to investigate the relationship between ANCA status and the clinical expression of CSS in a case series derived from the US Food and Drug Administration's adverse events database. All cases of CSS reported to the US Food and Drug Administration from 1997 to April 2003 were reviewed. Information about basic demographics, suspect medication use, clinical manifestations, histologic findings, ANCA staining patterns, and the presence of antibodies to myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) or proteinase 3 (anti-PR3) was recorded when available. There were 93 case reports of CSS with sufficient documentation, including ANCA status. There were 38 (40.9%) of 93 cases with positive ANCA results, of which 15 cases reported a positive ELISA, all of which were positive for anti-MPO. ANCA negativity was associated with an increased proportion of cardiac involvement (risk difference [RD], 38.2%; 95% CI, 25.3% to 51.0%), gastrointestinal involvement (RD, 25.5%; 95% CI, 13.9% to 37.0%), pulmonary infiltrates (odds ratio, 4.9; 95% CI, 1.5-16.2), and the outcome of a life-threatening event or death (RD, 30.9%; 95% CI, 18.7% to 43.1%) when compared with anti-MPO-positive cases. ANCA negativity was associated with a decreased proportion of peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.07-0.9). These findings support the hypothesis that the presence or absence of autoantibodies influences the clinical expression and severity of CSS. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytoplasmic Localization of HTLV-1 HBZ Protein: A Biomarker of HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratella, Marco; Forlani, Greta; Raval, Goutham U; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Gout, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Tosi, Giovanna; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1 is the causative agent of a severe form of adult T cell leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL), and of a chronic progressive neuromyelopathy designated HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Two important HTLV-1-encoded proteins, Tax-1 and HBZ, play crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of the oncogenic process. Less information is instead available on the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to HAM/TSP. More importantly, no single specific biomarker has been described that unambiguously define the status of HAM/TSP. Here we report for the first time the finding that HBZ, described until now as an exclusive nuclear protein both in chronically infected and in ATL cells, is instead exclusively localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients suffering of HAM/TSP. Interestingly, at the single cell level, HBZ and Tax-1 proteins are never found co-expressed in the same cell, suggesting the existence of mechanisms of expression uncoupling of these two important HTLV-1 viral products in HAM/TSP patients. Cells expressing cytoplasmic HBZ were almost exclusively found in the CD4+ T cell compartment that was not, at least in a representative HAM/TSP patient, expressing the CD25 marker. Less than 1 percent CD8+ T cells were fond positive for HBZ, while B cells and NK cells were found negative for HBZ in HAM/TSP patients. Our results identify the cytoplasmic localization of HBZ in HAM/TSP patient as a possible biomarker of this rather neglected tropical disease, and raise important hypotheses on the role of HBZ in the pathogenesis of the neuromyelopathy associated to HTLV-1 infection.

  6. Cytoplasmic Localization of HTLV-1 HBZ Protein: A Biomarker of HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP.

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    Marco Baratella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 is the causative agent of a severe form of adult T cell leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL, and of a chronic progressive neuromyelopathy designated HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Two important HTLV-1-encoded proteins, Tax-1 and HBZ, play crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of the oncogenic process. Less information is instead available on the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to HAM/TSP. More importantly, no single specific biomarker has been described that unambiguously define the status of HAM/TSP. Here we report for the first time the finding that HBZ, described until now as an exclusive nuclear protein both in chronically infected and in ATL cells, is instead exclusively localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from patients suffering of HAM/TSP. Interestingly, at the single cell level, HBZ and Tax-1 proteins are never found co-expressed in the same cell, suggesting the existence of mechanisms of expression uncoupling of these two important HTLV-1 viral products in HAM/TSP patients. Cells expressing cytoplasmic HBZ were almost exclusively found in the CD4+ T cell compartment that was not, at least in a representative HAM/TSP patient, expressing the CD25 marker. Less than 1 percent CD8+ T cells were fond positive for HBZ, while B cells and NK cells were found negative for HBZ in HAM/TSP patients. Our results identify the cytoplasmic localization of HBZ in HAM/TSP patient as a possible biomarker of this rather neglected tropical disease, and raise important hypotheses on the role of HBZ in the pathogenesis of the neuromyelopathy associated to HTLV-1 infection.

  7. Recent advances in childhood vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Seza; Acar-Ozen, Nazire Pinar

    2017-09-01

    The review aims to summarize the recent findings in vasculitis that may have an impact in our understanding or management of these diseases. We are learning more about monogenic diseases that closely mimic the pediatric vasculitides. Deficiency of adenosine deaminase 2 can present with a polyarteritis nodosa (PAN)-like picture and should be included in the differential of all pediatric cases of PAN with a family history or in cases with early stroke, or in cases resistant to conventional therapy. Mutations in tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 3 results in a disease that can present as Behçet disease called haploinsufficiency of A20. In fact, these patients would also fulfill the existing criteria for PAN and Behçet disease, respectively. Additional advances in Behçet disease pathogenesis come from a large genetic study of Turkish Behçet disease using data obtained from genotyping using the Immunochip. This confirmed the HLA-B-51 locus as the most significant association and identified new risk loci. Large Iranian and Japanese cohorts were used as replication cohorts. Best treatment of pediatric vasculitis remains a challenge as we continue to lack controlled studies. There are new reports in treatment on Henoch-Schönlein purpura/Immunoglobulin A vasculitis which is one of our most frequent childhood vasculitides. Small series of new treatments for central nervous system vasculitis and Takayasu disease will also be summarized. Diagnostic criteria have been reassessed in pediatric Behçet disease as well as adult and childhood forms of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-positive vasculitis. The new pathways defined in monogenic diseases may help us better understand the pathogenesis and may help us design more targeted therapy. Although pediatric cases are being increasingly recognized, the relative rarity of the diseases presents an obstacle for studies. Thus, we can reach conclusive results for their management through multicenter studies only.

  8. Hypothermia in VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S; Irani, S R; Rajabally, Y A; Grubneac, A; Walters, R J; Yazaki, M; Clover, L; Vincent, A

    2008-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab)-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) is a recently described syndrome that broadens the spectrum of immunotherapy-responsive central nervous system disorders. Limbic encephalitis is typically characterised by a sub-acute onset of disorientation, amnesia and seizures, but the clinical spectrum is not yet fully defined and the syndrome could be under-diagnosed. We here describe the clinical profile of four patients with VGKC-Ab-associated LE who had intermittent, episodic hypothermia. One of the patients also described a prodrome of severe neuropathic pain preceding the development of limbic symptoms. Both of these novel symptoms responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, with concurrent amelioration of amnesia/seizures.

  9. Association of maternal anti-HLA class II antibodies with protection from allergy in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Jeal, H; Harris, J M; Smith, J D; Rose, M L; Taylor, A N; Cullinan, P

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the birth order effect in allergy may be established during the prenatal period and that the protective effect may originate in the mother. HLA class II disparity between mother and foetus has been associated with significantly increased Th1 production. In this study, we investigated whether production of HLA antibodies 4 years after pregnancy with index child is associated with allergic outcomes in offspring at 8 years. Anti-HLA class I and II antibodies were measured in maternal serum (n = 284) and levels correlated to numbers of pregnancies and birth order, and allergic outcomes in offspring at 8 years of age. Maternal anti-HLA class I and II antibodies were significantly higher when birth order, and the number of pregnancies were larger. Anti-HLA class II, but not class I antibodies were associated with significantly less atopy and seasonal rhinitis in the offspring at age 8 years. Mothers with nonatopic (but not atopic) offspring had a significant increase in anti-HLA class I and II antibodies with birth order. This study suggests that the 'birth order' effect in children may be due to parity-related changes in the maternal immune response to foetal antigens. We have observed for the first time an association between maternal anti-HLA class II antibodies and protection from allergy in the offspring. Further work is required to determine immunologically how HLA disparity between mother and father can protect against allergy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Non-association between anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and ABO blood group system

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    ACF Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii infects humans through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, which elicits humoral immune response with specific antibodies. The expression of the ABO blood group glycoconjugates also occurs in this same system and may influence the human susceptibility of infection by T. gondii. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ABO blood group phenotypes and the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies. Data - including age, results of serology tests for T. gondii infection and ABO blood group phenotypes - were assembled from the medical records of 1,006 pregnant women attended in the Base Hospital of the Medical School of São José do Rio Preto, Brazil, between 2001 and 2004. The chi-square test was used to compare the results with the level of significance set at 5%. Of the studied cases, 64.1% (645/1006 and 35.9% (391/1006 presented respectively positive and negative serology tests for anti-T. gondii antibodies. The mean age of those who tested positive was higher than those with negative serology tests (p = 0.0004. The frequencies of ABO blood group phenotypes were similar in those with and without anti-T. gondii antibodies (p = 0.35. In conclusion, the ABO blood group system is not associated with the presence or absence of anti-T. gondii antibodies.

  11. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  12. Members of the HCMV US12 family of predicted heptaspanning membrane proteins have unique intracellular distributions, including association with the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E.

    2007-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family is a group of 10 predicted seven-transmembrane domain proteins that have some features in common with G-protein-coupled receptors. Little is known of their patterns of expression, localization, or functional interactions. Here, we studied the intracellular localization of three US12 family members, US14, US17, and US18, with respect to various intracellular markers and the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (AC). The three proteins have distinct patterns of expression, which include associations with the AC. US14 is often distributed in a uniform granular manner throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC in some cells. US17 is expressed in a segmented manner, with its N-terminal domain localizing to the periphery of what we show here to be the AC and the C-terminal domain localizing to nuclei and the cytoplasm [Das, S., Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Y., Wang, F. Z., Pellett, P.E., 2006. Infection-dependent nuclear localization of US17, a member of the US12 family of human cytomegalovirus-encoded seven-transmembrane proteins. J. Virol. 80, 1191-1203]. Here, we show that the C-terminal domain is present at the center of the AC, in close association with markers of early endosomes; the N-terminal staining corresponds to an area stained by markers for the Golgi and trans-Golgi. US18 is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC at later stages of infection; it is localized more to the periphery of the AC than are US14 and US17C, in association with markers of the trans-Golgi. Although not detected in virions, their structures and localization in various zones within the AC suggest possible roles for these proteins in the process of virion maturation and egress

  13. Estimation of antibodies specific for dextran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuuchi, L.; Morrison, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are described for the isolation and characterization of picogram quantities of anti-dextran antibodies. 14 C-dextrans produced by using the dextransucrases of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains B1355 and B512 were used in a radioimmunoassay. The specificity of this assay was verified by using cell cytoplasmic lysates from mouse plasmacytomas, J558 (anti-α 1 → 3 dextran) and W3129 (anti-α 1 → 6 dextran). Dextran produced by strain B1355 and insolubilized with epichlorohydrin was used as an immunoabsorbent

  14. Cytoplasmic influence of nucleolar development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sibdas

    1974-01-01

    The role of cytoplasmic factors on the development of nucleolus in nucleus has been investigated in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumour cells using tritiated thymidine/uridine for autoradiography. It is inferred from the observations that the cytoplasmic factors has some but not absolute control over the development of nucleolus. (M.G.B.)

  15. Cytoplasmic TRADD Confers a Worse Prognosis in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Chakraborty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1-associated death domain protein (TRADD is an important adaptor in TNFR1 signaling and has an essential role in nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB activation and survival signaling. Increased expression of TRADD is sufficient to activate NF-κB. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of NF-κB activation as a key pathogenic mechanism in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults.We examined the expression of TRADD by immunohistochemistry (IHC and find that TRADD is commonly expressed at high levels in GBM and is detected in both cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution. Cytoplasmic IHC TRADD scoring is significantly associated with worse progression-free survival (PFS both in univariate and multivariate analysis but is not associated with overall survival (n = 43 GBMs. PFS is a marker for responsiveness to treatment. We propose that TRADD-mediated NF-κB activation confers chemoresistance and thus a worse PFS in GBM. Consistent with the effect on PFS, silencing TRADD in glioma cells results in decreased NF-κB activity, decreased proliferation of cells, and increased sensitivity to temozolomide. TRADD expression is common in glioma-initiating cells. Importantly, silencing TRADD in GBM-initiating stem cell cultures results in decreased viability of stem cells, suggesting that TRADD may be required for maintenance of GBM stem cell populations. Thus, our study suggests that increased expression of cytoplasmic TRADD is both an important biomarker and a key driver of NF-κB activation in GBM and supports an oncogenic role for TRADD in GBM.

  16. In vivo evidence of TonB shuttling between the cytoplasmic and outer membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ray A; Letain, Tracy E; Postle, Kathleen

    2003-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are able to convert potential energy inherent in the proton gradient of the cytoplasmic membrane into active nutrient transport across the outer membrane. The transduction of energy is mediated by TonB protein. Previous studies suggest a model in which TonB makes sequential and cyclic contact with proteins in each membrane, a process called shuttling. A key feature of shuttling is that the amino-terminal signal anchor must quit its association with the cytoplasmic membrane, and TonB becomes associated solely with the outer membrane. However, the initial studies did not exclude the possibility that TonB was artifactually pulled from the cytoplasmic membrane by the fractionation process. To resolve this ambiguity, we devised a method to test whether the extreme TonB amino-terminus, located in the cytoplasm, ever became accessible to the cys-specific, cytoplasmic membrane-impermeant molecule, Oregon Green(R) 488 maleimide (OGM) in vivo. A full-length TonB and a truncated TonB were modified to carry a sole cysteine at position 3. Both full-length TonB and truncated TonB (consisting of the amino-terminal two-thirds) achieved identical conformations in the cytoplasmic membrane, as determined by their abilities to cross-link to the cytoplasmic membrane protein ExbB and their abilities to respond conformationally to the presence or absence of proton motive force. Full-length TonB could be amino-terminally labelled in vivo, suggesting that it was periplasmically exposed. In contrast, truncated TonB, which did not associate with the outer membrane, was not specifically labelled in vivo. The truncated TonB also acted as a control for leakage of OGM across the cytoplasmic membrane. Further, the extent of labelling for full-length TonB correlated roughly with the proportion of TonB found at the outer membrane. These findings suggest that TonB does indeed disengage from the cytoplasmic membrane during energy transduction and shuttle to the outer membrane.

  17. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs

  18. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijazhuang (China); Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); Wen, Jin-kun, E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  19. Tolerance induction to cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase by hepatic AAV gene transfer: implications for antigen presentation and immunotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley T Martino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic gene transfer, in particular using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, has been shown to induce immune tolerance to several protein antigens. This approach has been exploited in animal models of inherited protein deficiency for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. Adequate levels of transgene expression in hepatocytes induce a suppressive T cell response, thereby promoting immune tolerance. This study addresses the question of whether AAV gene transfer can induce tolerance to a cytoplasmic protein.AAV-2 vector-mediated hepatic gene transfer for expression of cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase (beta-gal was performed in immune competent mice, followed by a secondary beta-gal gene transfer with E1/E3-deleted adenoviral Ad-LacZ vector to provoke a severe immunotoxic response. Transgene expression from the AAV-2 vector in approximately 2% of hepatocytes almost completely protected from inflammatory T cell responses against beta-gal, eliminated antibody formation, and significantly reduced adenovirus-induced hepatotoxicity. Consequently, approximately 10% of hepatocytes continued to express beta-gal 45 days after secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer, a time point when control mice had lost all Ad-LacZ derived expression. Suppression of inflammatory T cell infiltration in the liver and liver damage was linked to specific transgene expression and was not seen for secondary gene transfer with Ad-GFP. A combination of adoptive transfer studies and flow cytometric analyses demonstrated induction of Treg that actively suppressed CD8(+ T cell responses to beta-gal and that was amplified in liver and spleen upon secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer.These data demonstrate that tolerance induction by hepatic AAV gene transfer does not require systemic delivery of the transgene product and that expression of a cytoplasmic neo-antigen in few hepatocytes can induce Treg and provide long-term suppression of inflammatory responses and immunotoxicity.

  20. Exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS): a clinical syndrome associated with insulin antibodies induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolei; Chen, Fengling

    2018-01-01

    Insulin has been used for diabetes therapy and has achieved significant therapeutic effect. In recent years, the use of purified and recombinant human insulin preparations has markedly reduced, but not completely suppressed, the incidence of insulin antibodies (IAs). IAs induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients is associated with clinical events, which is named exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS). The present review is based on our research and summarizes the characterization of IAs, the factors affecting IA development, the clinical significance of IAs and the treatments for EIAS. © 2018 The authors.

  1. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  2. Exploration, Development, and Validation of Patient-reported Outcomes in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–associated Vasculitis Using the OMERACT Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Joanna C.; Milman, Nataliya; Tomasson, Gunnar; Dawson, Jill; Cronholm, Peter F.; Kellom, Katherine; Shea, Judy; Ashdown, Susan; Boers, Maarten; Boonen, Annelies; Casey, George C.; Farrar, John T.; Gebhart, Don; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lanier, Georgia; McAlear, Carol A.; Peck, Jacqueline; Sreih, Antoine G.; Tugwell, Peter; Luqmani, Raashid A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of linked multisystem life- and organ-threatening diseases. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) vasculitis working group has been at the forefront of outcome development in the field and has achieved OMERACT endorsement of a core set of outcomes for AAV. Patients with AAV report as important some manifestations of disease not routinely collected through physician-completed outcome tools; and they rate common manifestations differently from investigators. The core set includes the domain of patient-reported outcomes (PRO). However, PRO currently used in clinical trials of AAV do not fully characterize patients’ perspectives on their burden of disease. The OMERACT vasculitis working group is addressing the unmet needs for PRO in AAV. Methods Current activities of the working group include (1) evaluating the feasibility and construct validity of instruments within the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) to record components of the disease experience among patients with AAV; (2) creating a disease-specific PRO measure for AAV; and (3) applying The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to examine the scope of outcome measures used in AAV. Results The working group has developed a comprehensive research strategy, organized an investigative team, included patient research partners, obtained peer-reviewed funding, and is using a considerable research infrastructure to complete these interrelated projects to develop evidence-based validated outcome instruments that meet the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, and feasibility. Conclusion The OMERACT vasculitis working group is on schedule to achieve its goals of developing validated PRO for use in clinical trials of AAV. (First Release September 1 2015; J Rheumatol 2015;42:2204–9; doi:10.3899/jrheum.141143) PMID:26329344

  3. Association of antithyroid peroxidase antibody with fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Blumen, Helena; Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate how autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) affects the clinical presentation of established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with particular reference to fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain (CWP). A cohort of 204 patients with RA for whom the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroid antibodies was documented was examined for the relationships between thyroid autoantibodies and fibromyalgia or CWP. We identified 29 % who tested positive for antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). The anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) was found in 24 %. Among the thyroid autoantibody-positive patients, 40 % had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or CWP versus 17 % for antibody negative patients. Logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex, diabetes and BMI) indicated that TPOAb-positive patients were more likely to have fibromyalgia or CWP, with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.641, 95 % confidence interval (CI) (2.110-10.207) P fibromyalgia, OR 4.458, 95 % CI (1.950-10.191), P fibromyalgia was not significant (P > .05). Additional logistic regression analyses (adjusted by age, sex and BMI) indicated a significant relationship between TPOAb and fibromyalgia or CWP in patients without diabetes and those without hypothyroidism (OR of 4.873, 95 % CI (1.877-12.653), P = .001 and OR of 4.615 95 % CI (1.810-11.770), P = .001, respectively). There may be a positive association between the ATD antibody TPOAb, and fibromyalgia syndrome and CWP in patients with established RA.

  4. Autoimmune encephalitis with anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 or anti-contactin-associated protein-like 2 antibodies (formerly called voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, Anna E M; van Sonderen, Agnes; Titulaer, Maarten J

    2017-06-01

    Twenty years since the discovery of voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-related autoimmunity; it is currently known that the antibodies are not directed at the VGKC itself but to two closely associated proteins, anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2). Antibodies to LGI1 and Caspr2 give well-described clinical phenotypes. Anti-LGI1 encephalitis patients mostly have limbic symptoms, and anti-Caspr2 patients have variable syndromes with both central and peripheral symptoms. A large group of patients with heterogeneous symptoms are VGKC positive but do not have antibodies against LGI1 or Caspr2. The clinical relevance of VGKC positivity in these 'double-negative' patients is questionable. This review focusses on these three essentially different subgroups. The clinical phenotypes of anti-LGI1 encephalitis and anti-Caspr2 encephalitis have been described in more detail including data on treatment and long-term follow-up. A specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association was found in nontumor anti-LGI1 encephalitis, but not clearly in those with tumors. There has been increasing interest in the VGKC patients without LGI1/Caspr2 antibodies questioning its relevance in clinical practice. Anti-LGI1 encephalitis and anti-Caspr2 encephalitis are separate clinical entities. Early recognition and treatment is necessary and rewarding. The term VGKC-complex antibodies, lumping patients with anti-LGI1, anti-Caspr2 antibodies or lacking both, should be considered obsolete.

  5. Atypical presentation of probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with anti-Zic4 antibody: Literature review of neuronal antibodies in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a prion disease characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia and myoclonus. Atypical phenotype masquerading as stroke, movement disorders or autoimmune encephalitis have been described. Here, I report a probable case of sCJD with an atypical presentation associated with anti-Zic4 antibody and review the literature of neuronal antibodies in CJD. A 70 year-old gentleman is admitted with a 2-month history of recurrent stroke-like symptoms associated with behavioral disturbances, gait ataxia and rapidly progressive dementia. His initial examination demonstrated akinetic mutism, diffuse rigidity, dysautononia, and Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Over the following weeks his condition progressed to profound coma. A comprehensive infectious, metabolic, inflammatory and autoimmune work-up yielded negative results. Empiric immunosuppressive therapy ensued. He expired three months after symptoms onset. Autopsy was not performed. After his demise, prion tests came back abnormal for elevated 14-3-3 protein, total tau and positive RTQuIC. Later on, anti-Zic4 antibodies were found in serum. This case underscores the importance of a high index of suspicion for CJD even in case of atypical features or the concurrence of neuronal antibodies. Further larger prospective studies on the prevalence of these neuronal antibodies in CJD and the contribution of these autoantibodies to disease pathophysiology are necessary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Native and recombinant proteins to analyze auto-antibodies to myeloperoxidase in pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, MM; Stegeman, CA; Oost-Kort, WW; Kallenberg, CGM; Moguilevsky, N; Limburg, PC; Tervaert, JWC

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA) directed against myeloperoxidase (MPO) in pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) is dependent on the assay(s) used, We investigated the frequency of MPO-ANCA as detected by different assays for MPO-ANCA in a large

  7. Association between serum antibodies to periodontal bacteria and rheumatoid factor in NHANES III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Charlene E.; Kopp, Jacob; Papapanou, Panos N.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Alterations in the microbiome, including the periodontal microbiome, may be a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most studies that have analyzed this association are relatively small, focus primarily on a single periodontal pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis), and are not population-based. We investigated the association between elevated serum IgG antibodies to 19 periodontal species and the prevalence of rheumatoid factor (RF) in a large nationally representative sample of adults. Methods The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey is a cross-sectional sample of the non-institutionalized US population (n=33,994). Our study population included all dentate participants ≥60 years, who did not have RA as defined by a modified version of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria, and had complete data for both serum IgG antibodies against periodontal bacteria and serum RF antibody titer (n=2461). Results Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% CI) summarizing the relationship between the 19 periodontal serum IgGs and RF seropositivity ranged from 0.53 (0.29, 0.97) to 1.27 (0.79, 2.06), and 17 of the 19 observed ORs were periodontal IgGs to be mostly unassociated with RF seropositivity in the nationally representative NHANES III. Elevated antibody levels to P. intermedia and C. ochracea were associated with lower odds of RF seropositivity. PMID:27110949

  8. Generation and Characterization of Novel Human IRAS Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoline receptors were first proposed by Bousquet et al., when they studied antihypertensive effect of clonidine. A strong candidate for I1R, known as imidazoline receptor antisera-selected protein (IRAS, has been cloned from human hippocampus. We reported that IRAS mediated agmatine-induced inhibition of opioid dependence in morphine-dependent cells. To elucidate the functional and structure properties of I1R, we developed the newly monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal hIRAS region including the PX domain (10–120aa through immunization of BALB/c mice with the NusA-IRAS fusion protein containing an IRAS N-terminal (10–120aa. Stable hybridoma cell lines were established and monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized full-length IRAS proteins in their native state by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies stained in a predominantly punctate cytoplasmic pattern when applied to IRAS-transfected HEK293 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assays and demonstrated excellent reactivity in flow immunocytometry. These monoclonal antibodies will provide powerful reagents for the further investigation of hIRAS protein functions.

  9. Using an improved phagocytosis assay to evaluate the effect of HIV on specific antibodies to pregnancy-associated malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataíde, Ricardo; Hasang, Wina; Wilson, Danny W; Beeson, James G; Mwapasa, Victor; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Meshnick, Steven R; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2010-05-25

    Pregnant women residing in malaria endemic areas are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria, particularly during their first pregnancy, resulting in low birth weight babies and maternal anaemia. This susceptibility is associated with placental sequestration of parasitised red blood cells expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens. Acquisition of antibodies against these variant surface antigens may protect women and their offspring. Functions of such antibodies may include prevention of placental sequestration or opsonisation of parasitised cells for phagocytic clearance. Here we report the development and optimisation of a new high-throughput flow cytometry-based phagocytosis assay using undifferentiated Thp-1 cells to quantitate the amount of opsonizing antibody in patient sera, and apply this assay to measure the impact of HIV on the levels of antibodies to a pregnancy malaria-associated parasite line in a cohort of Malawian primigravid women. The assay showed high reproducibility, with inter-experimental correlation of r(2) = 0.99. In primigravid women, concurrent malaria infection was associated with significantly increased antibodies, whereas HIV decreased the ability to acquire opsonising antibodies (Mann-Whitney ranksum: p = 0.013). This decrease was correlated with HIV-induced immunosuppression, with women with less than 350 x 10(6) CD4+ T- cells/L having less opsonising antibodies (coef: -11.95,P = 0.002). Levels of antibodies were not associated with protection from low birth weight or anaemia. This flow cytometry-based phagocytosis assay proved to be efficient and accurate for the measurement of Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis-inducing antibodies in large cohorts. HIV was found to affect mainly the acquisition of antibodies to pregnancy-specific malaria in primigravidae. Further studies of the relationship between opsonising antibodies to malaria in pregnancy and HIV are indicated.

  10. Association between antiphospholipid antibodies and recurrent fetal loss in women without autoimmune disease: a metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrny, Lucie; David, Michéle; Kahn, Susan R; Shrier, Ian; Rey, Evelyne

    2006-11-01

    To assess the strength of association between recurrent fetal loss (RFL) and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in women without autoimmune disease, and to examine whether magnitude of association varies according to type or titer of antibody and timing of fetal loss. We searched Medline and Current Contents for articles published between 1975 and 2003 with terms denoting early (less than 13 weeks) and late (less than 24 weeks) RFL associated with various aPL. Published case-control, cohort, and cross-sectional studies rated moderate or strong were included in our metaanalysis. Pooled odds ratios with 95% CI were generated using the random-effects models with Cochrane Review Manager software. Our analysis included 25 studies. Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) was associated with late RFL (OR 7.79, 95% CI 2.30-26.45); the association of LAC was stronger than that of any other aPL. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), when combining all titers, were associated with both early (OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.48-8.59) and late RFL (OR 3.57, 95% CI 2.26-5.65). Restricting analysis to include only women with moderate to high titers increased the strength of association (OR 4.68, 95% CI 2.96-7.40). It was not possible to extract data on isolated low IgG aCL positivity. IgM aCL were associated with late RFL (OR 5.61, 95% CI 1.26-25.03). There was no association found between early RFL and anti-Beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (OR 2.12, 95% CI 0.69-6.53). The magnitude of the association between aPL and RFL varies according to type of aPL. More data on the relationship between recurrent fetal loss and isolated IgM aCL as well as with low titer IgG aCL would be useful. The place of testing for anti-Beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies remains to be determined.

  11. Seasonal variation of maternally derived respiratory syncytial virus antibodies and association with infant hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Ravn, Henrik; Kristensen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    This study used 459 prospectively sampled cord blood samples to examine the association between maternally derived respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-neutralizing antibodies and the RSV hospitalization season in Denmark. We found a clear temporal association and suggest that RSV-neutralizing antib......This study used 459 prospectively sampled cord blood samples to examine the association between maternally derived respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-neutralizing antibodies and the RSV hospitalization season in Denmark. We found a clear temporal association and suggest that RSV......-neutralizing antibody level plays a role in the RSV seasonal pattern....

  12. Studies of cytotoxic antibodies against eye muscle antigens in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.-G.; Hiromatsu, Y.; Salvi, M.; Triller, H.; Bernard, N.; Wall, J.R.; Medeiros-Neto, G.; Iacona, A.; Lima, N.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the prevalence and significance of cytotoxic antibodies against human eye muscle cells, as detected in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (CMAC) in 51 Cr release assays, in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A high prevalence of positive ADCC tests was found in all groups of patients with ophthalmopathy tested. Tests were positive in 64% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy from an area of severe iodine deficiency (Sao Paulo) and in 64% of such patients from an iodine replete area (Montreal). In patients with so-called ''euthyroid ophthalmopathy'', i.e. eye disease associated with thyroiditis, ADCC tests were positive in 75 and 38% of patients from the two areas, respectively, while tests were positive in 40 and 22%, respectively, of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism without evident eye disease. In normal subjects, levels of 51 Cr release was always at background levels. In a group of patients from the high-iodine area, levels of antibodies in ADCC correlated positively with the intraocular pressure (mmHg) in primary position as a parameter of eye muscle dysfunction. In patients with ophthalmopathy, positive ADCC tests were assciated with antibodies to eye muscle membrane antigens of 55,65 and 95 kD as detected by immunoblotting, although the correlation was not close for any antigen. in contrast, CMAC tests were negative in all patients with ophthalmopathy. We also tested 9 mouse and 10 human monoclonal antibodies, reactive with orbital antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for cytotoxic activity, in ADCC and CMAC, against eye muscle and thyroid cells. All monoclonal antibodies were of the IgM class and negative in ADCC assays. When tested in CMAC against eye muscle cells, one of 9 mouse and 5 of 8 human monoclonal antibodies showed significant activity while tests were positive in one of 9 and one of 10 monoclonal antibodies

  13. Antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with lower body weight and autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntorp, Kerstin; Frid, Anders; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Sjöberg, Klas; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-08-17

    Esophageal dysmotility and gastroparesis are common secondary complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients with dysmotility express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. The aim of the present study was to scrutinize patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies, and to examine associations between antibodies and clinical findings. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus were included in the study after clinical examination and examination by esophageal manometry and gastric emptying scintigraphy. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies against GnRH using an ELISA, and values are expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per each patient served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 33% compared to 14% in controls (p = 0.027), with a higher antibody titer; 1.2 (0.6-5.0) and 0.2 (0.1-0.3) RU, respectively (p = 0.000). The expression of IgG antibodies was 15% in patients and none in controls (p = 0.000). Lower body mass index was associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.835, 95% CI = 0.699-0.998), and autonomic neuropathy with the presence IgG antibodies (OR = 9.000, 95% CI = 1.327-61.025). Esophageal dysmotility (69%) or gastroparesis (18%) were not associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.589, 95% CI = 0.143-2.424 and OR = 3.407, 95% CI = 0.633-18.350, respectively). Neither was esophageal dysmotility associated with IgG antibodies (OR = 2.500, 95% CI = 0.259-24.096). Antibodies against GnRH are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus compared with healthy controls. IgM antibodies are associated with lower body mass index and IgG antibodies are associated with autonomic neuropathy.

  14. A simple vector system to improve performance and utilisation of recombinant antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Karen J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolation of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody libraries is well established using technologies such as phage display. Phage display vectors are ideal for efficient display of antibody fragments on the surface of bacteriophage particles. However, they are often inefficient for expression of soluble antibody fragments, and sub-cloning of selected antibody populations into dedicated soluble antibody fragment expression vectors can enhance expression. Results We have developed a simple vector system for expression, dimerisation and detection of recombinant antibody fragments in the form of single chain Fvs (scFvs. Expression is driven by the T7 RNA polymerase promoter in conjunction with the inducible lysogen strain BL21 (DE3. The system is compatible with a simple auto-induction culture system for scFv production. As an alternative to periplasmic expression, expression directly in the cytoplasm of a mutant strain with a more oxidising cytoplasmic environment (Origami 2™ (DE3 was investigated and found to be inferior to periplasmic expression in BL21 (DE3 cells. The effect on yield and binding activity of fusing scFvs to the N terminus of maltose binding protein (a solubility enhancing partner, bacterial alkaline phosphatase (a naturally dimeric enzymatic reporter molecule, or the addition of a free C-terminal cysteine was determined. Fusion of scFvs to the N-terminus of maltose binding protein increased scFv yield but binding activity of the scFv was compromised. In contrast, fusion to the N-terminus of bacterial alkaline phosphatase led to an improved performance. Alkaline phosphatase provides a convenient tag allowing direct enzymatic detection of scFv fusions within crude extracts without the need for secondary reagents. Alkaline phosphatase also drives dimerisation of the scFv leading to an improvement in performance compared to monovalent constructs. This is illustrated by ELISA, western blot and

  15. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis in a young woman with APECED

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    Anna Kopczak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy–candidiasis–ectodermal dystrophy (APECED syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene. Immune deficiency, hypoparathyroidism and Addison’s disease due to autoimmune dysfunction are the major clinical signs of APECED. We report on a 21-year-old female APECED patient with two inactivating mutations in the AIRE gene. She presented with sudden onset of periodic nausea. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed by means of the ACTH stimulation test. Despite initiation of hormone replacement therapy with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone, nausea persisted and the patient developed cognitive deficits and a loss of interest which led to the diagnosis of depression. She was admitted to the psychiatric department for further diagnostic assessment. An EEG showed a focal epileptic pattern. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibodies, which had been negative eight years earlier, were now elevated in serum and in the cerebrospinal fluid. Oligoclonal bands were positive indicating an inflammatory process with intrathecal antibody production in the central nervous system (CNS. The periodic nausea was identified as dialeptic seizures, which clinically presented as gastrointestinal aura followed by episodes of reduced consciousness that occurred about 3–4 times per day. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE was diagnosed. Besides antiepileptic therapy, an immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids was initiated followed by azathioprine. The presence of nausea and vomiting in endocrine patients with autoimmune disorders is indicative of adrenal insufficiency. However, our case report shows that episodic nausea may be a symptom of epileptic seizures due to GAD antibodies-associated LE in patients with APECED.

  16. Uniparental Inheritance Promotes Adaptive Evolution in Cytoplasmic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Joshua R.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes carry numerous asexual cytoplasmic genomes (mitochondria and plastids). Lacking recombination, asexual genomes should theoretically suffer from impaired adaptive evolution. Yet, empirical evidence indicates that cytoplasmic genomes experience higher levels of adaptive evolution than predicted by theory. In this study, we use a computational model to show that the unique biology of cytoplasmic genomes—specifically their organization into host cells and their uniparental (maternal) inheritance—enable them to undergo effective adaptive evolution. Uniparental inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes decreases competition between different beneficial substitutions (clonal interference), promoting the accumulation of beneficial substitutions. Uniparental inheritance also facilitates selection against deleterious cytoplasmic substitutions, slowing Muller’s ratchet. In addition, uniparental inheritance generally reduces genetic hitchhiking of deleterious substitutions during selective sweeps. Overall, uniparental inheritance promotes adaptive evolution by increasing the level of beneficial substitutions relative to deleterious substitutions. When we assume that cytoplasmic genome inheritance is biparental, decreasing the number of genomes transmitted during gametogenesis (bottleneck) aids adaptive evolution. Nevertheless, adaptive evolution is always more efficient when inheritance is uniparental. Our findings explain empirical observations that cytoplasmic genomes—despite their asexual mode of reproduction—can readily undergo adaptive evolution. PMID:28025277

  17. Exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS: a clinical syndrome associated with insulin antibodies induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin has been used for diabetes therapy and has achieved significant therapeutic effect. In recent years, the use of purified and recombinant human insulin preparations has markedly reduced, but not completely suppressed, the incidence of insulin antibodies (IAs. IAs induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients is associated with clinical events, which is named exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS. The present review is based on our research and summarizes the characterization of IAs, the factors affecting IA development, the clinical significance of IAs and the treatments for EIAS.

  18. Treatment of VGKC complex antibody-associated limbic encephalitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radja, Guirindhra Koumar; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an autoimmune neuropsychiatric condition characterized by subacute cognitive symptoms, seizures, and affective changes. Although limbic encephalitis is usually caused by an immune reaction secondary to neoplasms, different types of potentially treatable non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (nPLE) have recently been described. In particular, published studies have reported variable responses to immunosuppressive therapy in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel (VGKC) complex antibody-associated nPLE. This systematic literature review found that the most significant improvements were reported by patients presenting with affective symptoms and consistent neuroradiological changes. In these patients, improved clinical outcomes correlated with the largest decreases in antibody titers.

  19. New-Onset Headache in Patients With Autoimmune Encephalitis Is Associated With anti-NMDA-Receptor Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schankin, Christoph J; Kästele, Fabian; Gerdes, Lisa Ann; Winkler, Tobias; Csanadi, Endy; Högen, Tobias; Pellkofer, Hannah; Paulus, Walter; Kümpfel, Tania; Straube, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We tested the hypotheses (i) that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with new-onset headache, and (ii) that the occurrence of headache is associated with the presence of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antibodies. Autoimmune encephalitis presents with cognitive dysfunction as well as neuro-psychiatric symptoms. Its pathophysiology might involve antibody-mediated dysfunction of the glutamatergic system as indicated by the presence of anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in some patients. In this cross-sectional study, patients with autoimmune encephalitis were assessed with a standardized interview for previous headache and headache associated with autoimmune encephalitis. Headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. Clinical and paraclinical findings were correlated with the occurrence of headache. Of 40 patients with autoimmune encephalitis, 19 did not have a history of headache. Of those, nine suffered from encephalitis-associated headache. Seven of these nine had anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in contrast to only two among the remaining 10 patients without new-onset headache (P = .023, odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 1.5; 127). In most patients headache occurred in attacks on more than 15 days/month, was severe, and of short duration (less than 4 hours). International Headache Society criteria for migraine were met in three patients. New-onset headache is a relevant symptom in patients with autoimmune encephalitis who have no history of previous headache, especially in the subgroup with anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies. This indicates a thorough investigation for secondary headaches including anti-NMDA-R antibodies for patients with new-onset headache and neuropsychiatric findings. Glutamatergic dysfunction might be important for the generation of head pain but may only occasionally be sufficient to trigger migraine-like attacks in nonmigraineurs. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  20. An atypical presentation of cardiac tamponade and periorbital swelling in a patient with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Alexandra C; Hymas, Joseph C; Emerson, Lyska L; Ryan, John J

    2017-09-24

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare, necrotizing systemic vasculitis associated with asthma and hypereosinophilia. Its cause and pathophysiology are still being elucidated. We report a case of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis in a 50-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with chest pain, dyspnea at rest, fever, and periorbital swelling. She was found to have significant hypereosinophilia and cardiac tamponade physiology. A biopsy confirmed extensive infiltration of both lungs and pericardium by eosinophils. She did not have any anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis diagnosis does not require the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis may present with different clinical phenotypes, perhaps suggesting two distinct disease etiologies and distinct pathophysiology.

  1. Early Outcomes in Children With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morishita, Kimberly A; Moorthy, Lakshmi N; Lubieniecka, Joanna M

    2017-01-01

    diagnosed before their eighteenth birthday as having granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss), or ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. The primary outcome measure was achievement of disease remission...

  2. Discrete nuclear structures in actively growing neuroblastoma cells are revealed by antibodies raised against phosphorylated neurofilament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raabe Timothy D

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear objects that have in common the property of being recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for phosphoprotein epitopes and cytoplasmic intermediate filaments (in particular, SMI-31 and RT-97 have been reported in glial and neuronal cells, in situ and in vitro. Since neurofilament and glial filaments are generally considered to be restricted to the cytoplasm, we were interested in exploring the identity of the structures labeled in the nucleus as well as the conditions under which they could be found there. Results Using confocal microscopy and western analysis techniques, we determined 1 the immunolabeled structures are truly within the nucleus; 2 the phosphoepitope labeled by SMI-31 and RT-97 is not specific to neurofilaments (NFs and it can be identified on other intermediate filament proteins (IFs in other cell types; and 3 there is a close relationship between DNA synthesis and the amount of nuclear staining by these antibodies thought to be specific for cytoplasmic proteins. Searches of protein data bases for putative phosphorylation motifs revealed that lamins, NF-H, and GFAP each contain a single tyrosine phosphorylation motif with nearly identical amino acid sequence. Conclusion We therefore suggest that this sequence may be the epitope recognized by SMI-31 and RT-97 mABs, and that the nuclear structures previously reported and shown here are likely phosphorylated lamin intermediate filaments, while the cytoplasmic labeling revealed by the same mABs indicates phosphorylated NFs in neurons or GFAP in glia.

  3. Association between Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies and wheezing in young children and the influence of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, E; Gnarpe, J; Wettergren, B; Janson, C; Wickman, M; Nordvall, L

    2006-12-01

    The proposed association between Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) infection and wheezing needs further clarification. Serum samples obtained from 1581 children aged 4 years in a population based cohort were tested for antibodies to Cpn and IgE antibodies to common allergens. Data on environmental factors and disease were collected prospectively from birth. The occurrence of IgG antibodies to Cpn at 4 years of age was associated with reported wheezing at different ages; however, these findings were most often not significant. In girls, the occurrence of anti-Cpn IgG was associated with wheezing at the ages of 1, 2, and 4 years (odds ratios (ORs) 3.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46 to 7.96), 2.13 (95% CI 1.02 to 4.44), and 2.01 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.54), respectively), and even higher ORs were observed for each age category when only high level antibody responses to Cpn were analysed. At the time of blood sampling the association between anti-Cpn IgG and wheezing was restricted to girls without atopic sensitisation (OR 2.39 (95% CI 1.25 to 4.57). No associations with wheezing were detected in boys, in whom IgE sensitisation was inversely associated with the presence of anti-Cpn IgG (OR 0.49 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.90)). This study suggests an association between evidence of earlier Cpn infection and a history of wheezing in young girls. Infection with Cpn may be an important risk factor for wheezing and possibly for non-atopic asthma, predominantly in girls.

  4. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

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    Toshiyuki Takahashi

    Full Text Available A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells.

  5. Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing and Re-Examination of a Cytoplasmic Male Sterility-Associated Gene in Boro-Taichung-Type Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome substitutions between subspecies can lead to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) through incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Boro-Taichung (BT)-type CMS rice was obtained by substituting the nuclear genome of Oryza sativa subsp. indica cultivar Chinsurah Boro II with that of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica cultivar Taichung 65. In BT-type CMS rice, the mitochondrial gene orf79 is associated with male sterility. A complete sequence of the Boro-type mitochondrial genome responsible for BT-type CMS has not been determined to date. Here, we used pyrosequencing to construct the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. The contiguous sequences were assembled into five circular DNA molecules, four of which could be connected into a single circle. The two resulting subgenomic circles were unable to form a reliable master circle, as recombination between them was scarcely detected. We also found an unequal abundance of DNA molecules for the two loci of atp6. These results indicate the presence of multi-partite DNA molecules in the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. Expression patterns were investigated for Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, which were not found in the mitochondria from the standard japonica cultivar Nipponbare. Restorer of fertility 1 (RF1)-dependent RNA processing has been observed in orf79-containing RNA but was not detected in other Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, supporting the conclusion that orf79 is a unique CMS-associated gene in Boro-type mitochondria.

  6. Uniparental Inheritance Promotes Adaptive Evolution in Cytoplasmic Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Joshua R; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotes carry numerous asexual cytoplasmic genomes (mitochondria and plastids). Lacking recombination, asexual genomes should theoretically suffer from impaired adaptive evolution. Yet, empirical evidence indicates that cytoplasmic genomes experience higher levels of adaptive evolution than predicted by theory. In this study, we use a computational model to show that the unique biology of cytoplasmic genomes-specifically their organization into host cells and their uniparental (maternal) inheritance-enable them to undergo effective adaptive evolution. Uniparental inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes decreases competition between different beneficial substitutions (clonal interference), promoting the accumulation of beneficial substitutions. Uniparental inheritance also facilitates selection against deleterious cytoplasmic substitutions, slowing Muller's ratchet. In addition, uniparental inheritance generally reduces genetic hitchhiking of deleterious substitutions during selective sweeps. Overall, uniparental inheritance promotes adaptive evolution by increasing the level of beneficial substitutions relative to deleterious substitutions. When we assume that cytoplasmic genome inheritance is biparental, decreasing the number of genomes transmitted during gametogenesis (bottleneck) aids adaptive evolution. Nevertheless, adaptive evolution is always more efficient when inheritance is uniparental. Our findings explain empirical observations that cytoplasmic genomes-despite their asexual mode of reproduction-can readily undergo adaptive evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Non-coding RNA may be associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in Silene vulgaris

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stone, James D.; Koloušková, Pavla; Sloan, D.B.; Štorchová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 7 (2017), s. 1599-1612 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09220S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cytoplasmic male sterility * Editing * Mitochondrion * Non-coding RNA * Silene vulgaris * Splicing * Transcriptome Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  8. Neurological disorders associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies: a Brazilian series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibodies are rare pleomorphic diseases of uncertain cause, of which stiff-person syndrome (SPS is the best-known. Here, we described nine consecutive cases of neurological disorders associated with anti-GAD, including nine patients with SPS and three cases with cerebellar ataxia. Additionally, four had hypothyroidism, three epilepsy, two diabetes mellitus and two axial myoclonus.

  9. Persistent fetal sinus bradycardia associated with maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Jaeggi, Edgar T.; Rammeloo, Lukas A.; Haak, Monique C.; Adama van Scheltema, Phebe N.; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Bartelings, Margot M.; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Blom, Nico A.

    2011-01-01

    To study the clinical course and outcome of fetal sinus bradycardia (SB) due to maternal antibody-induced sinus node dysfunction. We reviewed the maternal, prenatal, and postnatal findings of fetuses with SB associated with elevated maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Of the 6 cases

  10. Unconventional Cadherin Localization in Honey Bee Gonads Revealed Through Domain-Specific Apis mellifera E- and N-Cadherin Antibodies Indicates Alternative Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Hartfelder

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As key factors in intercellular adhesion processes, cadherins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes, including gametogenesis. In a previous study on cadherin localization in the gonads of honey bees, performed with heterologous pan-cadherin antibodies, we detected these proteins as (i associated with cell membranes, (ii as homogeneously distributed throughout the cytoplasm, and (iii as nuclear foci in both somatic and germline cells, raising the possibility of alternative functions. To further investigate such unusual intracellular cadherin localization we produced specific antibodies against the N- and C-terminal domains of honey bee N- and E-cadherin. A 160 kDa protein was recognized by the E-cadherin antibodies as well as one of approximately 300 kDa from those raised against N-cadherin. In gonad preparations, both proteins were detected as dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and as nuclear foci in both germline and somatic cells of queen and worker ovarioles, as well as in the testioles of drones. This leads us to infer that cadherins may indeed be involved in certain signaling pathways and/or transcriptional regulation during gametogenesis. In late oogenesis stages, immunolabeling for both proteins was observed at the cell cortex, in conformity with a role in cell adhesion. In testioles, E-cadherin was seen in co-localization with fusomes, indicating a possible role in cyst organization. Taken together, the distribution of N- and E-cadherins in honey bee gonads is suggestive of alternative roles for cadherins in gametogenesis of both sexes.

  11. Suspected limbic encephalitis and seizure in cats associated with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakozdy, A; Halasz, P; Klang, A; Bauer, J; Leschnik, M; Tichy, A; Thalhammer, J G; Lang, B; Vincent, A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment-resistant complex partial seizures (CPS) with orofacial involvement recently were reported in cats in association with hippocampal pathology. The features had some similarity to those described in humans with limbic encephalitis and voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate cats with CPS and orofacial involvement for the presence of VGKC-complex antibody. Client-owned cats with acute orofacial CPS and control cats were investigated. Prospective study. Serum was collected from 14 cats in the acute stage of the disease and compared with 19 controls. VGKC-complex antibodies were determined by routine immunoprecipitation and by binding to leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2), the 2 main targets of VGKC-complex antibodies in humans. Five of the 14 affected cats, but none of the 19 controls, had VGKC-complex antibody concentrations above the cut-off concentration (>100 pmol/L) based on control samples and similar to those found in humans. Antibodies in 4 cats were directed against LGI1, and none were directed against CASPR2. Follow-up sera were available for 5 cats in remission and all antibody concentrations were within the reference range. Our study suggests that an autoimmune limbic encephalitis exists in cats and that VGKC-complex/LGI1 antibodies may play a role in this disorder, as they are thought to in humans. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Association between HIV-1 coreceptor usage and resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Nico; Walter, Hauke; Lengauer, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies have revitalized hopes of developing a universal vaccine against HIV-1. Mainly responsible for new infections are variants only using CCR5 for cell entry, whereas CXCR4-using variants can become dominant in later infection stages. We performed a statistical analysis on two different previously published data sets. The first data set was a panel of 199 diverse HIV-1 isolates for which IC50 neutralization titers were determined for the broadly neutralizing antibodies VRC01, VRC-PG04, PG9, and PG16. The second data set contained env sequences of viral variants extracted from HIV-1-infected humanized mice treated with the antibody PGT128 and from untreated control mice. For the panel of 199 diverse HIV-1 isolates, we found a statistically significant association between viral resistance to PG9 and PG16 and CXCR4 coreceptor usage (P = 0.0011 and P = 0.0010, respectively). Our analysis of viral variants from HIV-1-infected humanized mice under treatment with the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT128 indicated that certain antibodies might drive a viral population toward developing CXCR4 coreceptor usage capability (P = 0.0011 for the comparison between PGT128 and control measurement). These analyses highlight the importance of accounting for a possible coreceptor usage bias pertaining to the effectiveness of an HIV vaccine and to passive antibody transfer as therapeutic approach.

  13. Intrathecal antibody production in two cases of yellow fever vaccine associated neurotropic disease in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Marczeski, Fanny Clara; Martinez, Valeria Paula; Nemirovsky, Corina; Padula, Paula Julieta

    2011-12-01

    During the period 2007-2008 several epizootics of Yellow fever with dead of monkeys occurred in southeastern Brasil, Paraguay, and northeastern Argentina. In 2008 after a Yellow fever outbreak an exhaustive prevention campaign took place in Argentina using 17D live attenuated Yellow fever vaccine. This vaccine is considered one of the safest live virus vaccines, although serious adverse reactions may occur after vaccination, and vaccine-associated neurotropic disease are reported rarely. The aim of this study was to confirm two serious adverse events associated to Yellow fever vaccine in Argentina, and to describe the analysis performed to assess the origin of specific IgM against Yellow fever virus (YFV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both cases coincided with the Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic disease case definition, being clinical diagnosis longitudinal myelitis (case 1) and meningoencephalitis (case 2). Specific YFV antibodies were detected in CSF and serum samples in both cases by IgM antibody-capture ELISA. No other cause of neurological disease was identified. In order to obtain a conclusive diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) infection the IgM antibody index (AI(IgM) ) was calculated. High AI(IgM) values were found in both cases indicating intrathecal production of antibodies and, therefore, CNS post-vaccinal YFV infection could be definitively associated to YFV vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of disease activity measures for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, PA; Cuthbertson, DD; Hellmich, B; Hoffman, GS; Jayne, DRW; Kallenberg, CGM; Krischer, JP; Luqmani, R; Mahr, AD; Matteson, EL; Specks, U; Stone, JH

    2011-01-01

    Aim Currently, several different instruments are used to measure disease activity and extent in clinical trials of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, leading to division among investigative groups and difficulty comparing study results. An exercise comparing six different vasculitis instruments was performed. Methods A total of 10 experienced vasculitis investigators from 5 countries scored 20 cases in the literature of Wegener granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis using 6 disease assessment tools: the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), The BVAS for Wegener granulomatosis (BVAS/WG), BVAS 2003, a Physician Global Assessment (PGA), the Disease Extent Index (DEI) and the Five Factor Score (FFS). Five cases were rescored by all raters. Results Reliability of the measures was extremely high (intraclass correlations for the six measures all=0.98). Within each instrument, there were no significant differences or outliers among the scores from the 10 investigators. Test/retest reliability was high for each measure: range=0.77 to 0.95. The scores of the five acute activity measures correlated extremely well with one another. Conclusions Currently available tools for measuring disease extent and activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis are highly correlated and reliable. These results provide investigators with confidence to compare different clinical trial data and helps form common ground as international research groups develop new, improved and universally accepted vasculitis disease assessment instruments. PMID:18664546

  16. Serum anti-glycan antibodies in paediatric-onset Crohn's disease: association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Wasilewska, Agata; Swiat, Agnieszka; Cmiel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with various microbial epitopes have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and are associated with a specific diagnosis and clinical presentation. To evaluate the profile of new anti-glycan antibodies, their potential association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy in paediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Blood samples from 134 paediatric IBD patients (109 CD, 25 ulcerative colitis (UC)) and 67 controls were blindly analysed for anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA), anti-chitobioside carbohydrate (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate (ALCA), and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate (AMCA) antibodies using commercially available assays. The serological response to glycans was correlated with clinical disease characteristics. At least one of the tested anti-glycan antibodies was present in 75% of CD patients. Despite the high frequency of reactivity to glycan epitopes, a limited overlap of serological markers was observed. In total, 49% of ASCA-negative patients presented with one of the following: ACCA, ALCA, or AMCA. The occurrence of one antibody from the anti-glycan panel was independently associated with complicated disease phenotype and ileocolonic disease location. A higher level of immune response as assessed by the quartile sum scores for ACCA, ALCA, and AMCA was linked with older age at diagnosis (10-17 years) and ileocolonic disease location. The ASCA had the greatest accuracy for diagnosis and differentiation of CD. Qualitative and quantitative serologicalal response to glycan epitopes was associated with distinct clinical presentation in paediatric CD patients. This raises the possibility for the use of these markers to differentiate subgroups of CD patients with more sever clinical presentation. The ASCA was the most accurate serological marker for CD; however, testing for the new anti-glycan antibodies may constitute an adjunctive tool in a specific group of patients to aid in the differentiation of CD with absent

  17. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  18. Frequent antibody production against RARalpha in both APL mice and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Marie; Andreu-Gallien, Juliette; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Bengoufa, Djaouida; Guillemot, Isabelle; Pokorna, Katerina; Robert, Carine; Larghero, Jerome; Rousselot, Philippe; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Dombret, Herve; Fenaux, Pierre; Pla, Marika; Charron, Dominique; Padua, Rose-Ann; Chomienne, Christine

    2006-09-15

    In an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)-transplantable mouse model, we previously reported the presence of antibodies recognizing PML-RARalpha and RARalpha in the sera of ATRA-treated mice. To evaluate this immune response, we determined the prevalence of anti-RARalpha antibodies in a cohort of 48 APL mice, treated by ATRA (n = 24) or by placebo pellets (n = 24), and in a preliminary subset of 9 patients with APL using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In APL mice, significantly higher antibody levels were observed at the latest time points (day 48 to 58 levels superior to day 15 to 18 or day 28 to 38 levels). Antibody levels were higher in ATRA-treated mice than in placebo-treated mice and were also predictive of better survival. In the patients with APL, anti-RARalpha antibodies were detected at diagnosis and after maintenance therapy, reminiscent of the ATRA-treated APL mice. Antinuclear or antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies were also detected. These data reveal for the first time that in patients with APL an immune response may be detected at diagnosis and enhanced after maintenance therapy.

  19. Paraneoplastic Encephalitis Associated with Anti-Ma2 Antibodies and Mesothelioma-Like Poorly Differentiated Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ebru Bekircan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with anti-Ma2 antibodies. Medical history and thorax computed tomog- raphy findings suggested malignant mesothelioma. Pleural biopsy results were compatible with high-grade neoplastic infiltration. Alt- hough the biopsy could not differentiate the type of neoplasm, mesothelioma was considered a strong possibility in this poorly dif- ferentiated lung carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with anti-Ma2 antibodies and mesothelioma

  20. Factors associated with Coxiella burnetii antibody positivity in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Suman; Agger, Jens Frederik Gramstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the level of Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) antibodies in individual milk samples and cow and herd level factors in Danish dairy cows. The study, designed as a prospective cross sectional study with follow up, included 24 herds identified...

  1. [Report on the 34th meeting of the German Clinical Immunology Workgroup, Frankfurt, 03.-04.11.2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aries, P M; Witte, T; Lamprecht, P

    2007-02-01

    The annual meeting of the Clinical Immunology Workgroup focused on autoimmune vasculitides. The role of innate immunity, T- and B-cells, and innovative therapies for autoimmune vasculitides was discussed. Further topics of the meeting were the role of endothelial microparticles, ghrelin and leptin, regulatory and effector-memory T-cells in ANCA-associated vasculitides, as well as the lethal midline granuloma, intracytoplasmic cytokine-profile in Behcet's disease, autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa with cranial manifestation, ILT6 as genetic marker in multiple sclerosis and Sjögren's syndrome, alpha-fodrin autoantibodies in multiple sclerosis, interferon-g autoantibodies in a patient with atypical mycobacteriosis, and autoreactive T-cells in murine lupus.

  2. Meta-analysis reveals an association of STAT4 polymorphisms with systemic autoimmune disorders and anti-dsDNA antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junfeng; Yin, Junping; Huang, Renliang; Petersen, Frank; Yu, Xinhua

    2013-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) has been recently identified as a susceptibility gene for multiple autoimmune diseases. Here we performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between STAT4 and several different autoimmune disorders to identify potential common inflammatory principles behind this association. Our meta-analysis revealed that the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism is associated with four autoimmune diseases with systemic pathology, including systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.48 - 1.56, Prs7574865 polymorphism is associated with the presence of autoantibodies with systemic reactivity (anti-ds-DNA antibodies) in SLE patients (OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.21 - 1.56, P = 1.12 × 10(-6)). However, no such specific association was seen in RA with regard to the presence of non-systemically reacting antibodies, including rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. Taken together, these results suggest that STAT4 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases which are characterized by a systemic pathology and anti-dsDNA antibody. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ca2+-dependent mobility of vesicles capturing anti-VGLUT1 antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenovec, Matjaz; Kreft, Marko; Grilc, Sonja; Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pangrsic, Tina; Zorec, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Several aspects of secretory vesicle cycle have been studied in the past, but vesicle trafficking in relation to the fusion site is less well understood. In particular, the mobility of recaptured vesicles that traffic back toward the central cytoplasm is still poorly defined. We exposed astrocytes to antibodies against the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), a marker of glutamatergic vesicles, to fluorescently label vesicles undergoing Ca 2+ -dependent exocytosis and examined their number, fluorescence intensity, and mobility by confocal microscopy. In nonstimulated cells, immunolabeling revealed discrete fluorescent puncta, indicating that VGLUT1 vesicles, which are approximately 50 nm in diameter, cycle slowly between the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. When the cytosolic Ca 2+ level was raised with ionomycin, the number and fluorescence intensity of the puncta increased, likely because the VGLUT1 epitopes were more accessible to the extracellularly applied antibodies following Ca 2+ -triggered exocytosis. In nonstimulated cells, the mobility of labeled vesicles was limited. In stimulated cells, many vesicles exhibited directional mobility that was abolished by cytoskeleton-disrupting agents, indicating dependence on intact cytoskeleton. Our findings show that postfusion vesicle mobility is regulated and may likely play a role in synaptic vesicle cycle, and also more generally in the genesis and removal of endocytic vesicles

  4. Anti-Chol-1 antigen, GQ1bα, antibodies are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Ariga

    Full Text Available The interaction of amyloid β-proteins (Aβ with membrane gangliosides has been reported to be an early event in Aβ fibril formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Neuronal degeneration in AD has been postulated to be associated with the presence of anti-ganglioside antibodies in patient sera. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC immunostaining, sera from 27 individuals (10 with AD, 6 with vascular dementia (VD, and 11 non-demented age-matched pathological controls were examined in order to detect anti-glycosphingolipid (GSL antibodies, including anti-cholinergic-specific antigen (Chol-1α; GQ1bα antibodies. All sera had natural antibodies against ganglio-N-tetraosyl gangliosides (brain-type gangliosides. However, sera of demented patients with AD and VD had significantly higher titers of anti-GSL antibodies than those in age-matched pathological controls. Although most serum antibodies, including anti- GM1, -GT1b, -GQ1b, -GQ1bα, were of the IgM type, the presence of the IgG type antibodies was also significantly elevated in the sera of demented patients with AD. Anti-GT1b antibodies of the IgG type were elevated in AD (90%, 9 of 10 cases and VD (100%, respectively. Most surprisingly, anti-GQ1bα antibodies (IgM were found in 90% (9/10 and 100% (6/6 in the sera of patients with AD and VD, respectively. Since GQ1bα is present in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, the presence of anti-GQ1bα antibodies may play an important role in disrupting cholinergic synaptic transmission and may participate in the pathogenesis of dementia. We conclude that elevated anti-GSL antibody titers may be useful as an aid for clinical diagnosis of those dementias.

  5. CIRCULATING ANTIBODIES TO ERYTHROPOIETIN ARE ASSOCIATED WITH LOWER EFFICACY OF RECOMBINANT EPOETIN TREATMENT IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Nazarov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological preparations (BP obtained by gene engineering possess a special characteristic called immunogenicity, i.e. propensity of biological drugs to induce an undesired immune response associated with arising anti-drug antibodies. These antibodies can change BP pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and therapeutical efficacy. A significant proportion of hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease treated by recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO have clinical features of resistance to such therapy. The aim of the study was to investigate whether anti-rEPO antibodies are associated with hemoglobin concentrations (Hb and red blood cells counts (RBC in hemodialysis patients, receiving long-term rEPO therapy. This research was performed at the Research Institute of Nephrology at the First St. Petersburg I.Pavlov State Medical University. Thirty-seven hemodialysis patients (pts with end-stage renal disease and anemia treated with different rEPO formulations were included into the study. The patients were further divided into two groups: those with diminished and normal clinical response to rEPO therapy (DCR, n = 21 vs NCR group, n = 16, respectively. To determine threshold levels of antibodies to rEPO-beta (Roche, Switzerland we tested blood serum samples of 35 healthy blood donors who never received rEPO in the past. Concentration of antibodies was measured by means of dot-blot method. The threshold antibody concentrations were defined by measurement of anti-rEPO concentrations in 2-fold stepwise dilutions (1:10 to 1:200 of blood sera from 35 healthy donors .The threshold value for rEPO-binding antibodies was 20.27 µg/ml (95 CI%±0.43. Antibodies to rEPO were found in 54 % of serum samples in the patients. Anti-rEPO antibodies concentrations correlated with mean values of hemoglobin and erythrocyte counts over a period of 12-months for the entire group of hemodialysis patients (r = -0.368, p = 0.025 and r = -0.336, p = 0.042 respectively

  6. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  7. The CARD8 p.C10X mutation associates with a low anti-glycans antibody response in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Francis; Sendid, Boualem; Broly, Franck; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Sarazin, Aurore; Standaert-Vitse, Annie; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Poulain, Daniel; Jouault, Thierry

    2013-03-18

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with elevated anti-glycans antibody response in 60% of CD patients, and 25% of healthy first-degree relatives (HFDRs), suggesting a genetic influence for this humoral response. In mice, anti-glucan antibody response depends on the NLRP3 inflammasome. Here, we explored the effect of mutated CARD8, a component of the inflammasome, on anti-glycans antibody response in human. The association between p.C10X mutation (rs2043211) of the CARD8 gene and the levels of anti-glycans antibody response was examined in 39 CD families. The family-based QTDT association test was used to test for the genetic association between CARD8 p.C10X mutation and anti-glycan antibodies in the pedigrees. The difference in antibody responses determined by ELISA was tested in a subgroup of CD probands (one per family) and in a subgroup of HFDRs using the Wilcoxon Kruskal Wallis non-parametric test. The QTDT familial transmission tests showed that the p.C10X mutation of CARD8 was significantly associated with lower levels of antibody to mannans and glucans but not chitin (p=0.024, p=0.0028 and p=0.577, for ASCA, ALCA and ACCA, respectively). These associations were independent of NOD2 and NOD1 genetic backgrounds. The p.C10X mutation significantly associated or displayed a trend toward lower ASCA and ALCA levels (p=0.038 and p=0.08, respectively) only in the subgroup of CD probands. Such associations were not significant for ACCA levels in both subgroups of CD probands and of HFDRs. Our results show that ASCA and ALCA but not ACCA levels are under the influence of CARD8 genotype. Alteration of CARD8, a component of inflammasome, is associated with lower levels of antibodies directed to mannans and glucans at least in CD patients.

  8. [The electron microscopic observation of the effect of monoclonal antibody on the form and structure of mutans streptococci OMZ176].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, L; Yue, S

    1996-01-01

    The effect of monoclonal antibody on the form and structure of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176 was studied. The result showed that a great number of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176 was agglutianated after treating with monoclonal antibody prepared by a cell wall protein antigen (molecular weight 220 kd) of Mutans Streptococci OMZ176. Bacterial cells were swollen obviously. The gap between cell wall and cytoplasmic was widened. The electronic density of cell plasm was greatly decreased.

  9. Molecular analysis of a new cytoplasmic male sterile genotype in sunflower

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassova, Mariana; Christov, Michail; Bohorova, Natasha; Petrov, Peter; Dudov, Kalin; Atanassov, Atanas; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jaques

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA from 1 fertile and 6 cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) sunflower genotypes was studied. The CMS genotypes had been obtained either by specific crosses between different Helianthus species or by mutagenesis. CMS-associated restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were found in

  10. ANCA-associated vasculitis and malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahr, Alfred; Heijl, Caroline; Le Guenno, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    of individual therapeutic agents is difficult to dissect, but cyclophosphamide has emerged as a major contributor to cancer development because of its direct carcinogenic properties. Awareness of cancer risk in AAV calls for increased implementation of measures to prevent or screen for cancer and development......In this review, we summarise the current understanding of the potential link between cancer and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's; GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). As is true for many autoimmune...... or inflammatory rheumatic diseases, AAV diagnosis and therapy are associated with an increased risk of de novo cancer development, likely as a result of impaired immunosurveillance, direct oncogenicity of immunosuppressive agents and perhaps malignant degeneration of tissues undergoing chronic immune stimulation...

  11. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  12. A Case of Simultaneous, Biopsy-Proven, Classic, ANCA-Positive Wegener's Granulomatosis and Anti-GBM Disease, but without Detectible Circulating Anti-GBM Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Gmurczyk, Aleksandra; Ahya, Shubhada N.; Goldschmidt, Robert; Kim, George; Ho, L. Tammy; Nash, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic, necrotizing, granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology. Approximately 75% of cases present as classic WG with both pulmonary and renal involvement, while the remaining 25% of patients present with a limited form with either predominantly upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms. Ninety percent of WG patients have circulating anti–neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), and approximately 10% have both circulating ANCA antibodies and concomitan...

  13. Cytoplasmic Streaming in the Drosophila Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Margot E

    2016-10-06

    Objects are commonly moved within the cell by either passive diffusion or active directed transport. A third possibility is advection, in which objects within the cytoplasm are moved with the flow of the cytoplasm. Bulk movement of the cytoplasm, or streaming, as required for advection, is more common in large cells than in small cells. For example, streaming is observed in elongated plant cells and the oocytes of several species. In the Drosophila oocyte, two stages of streaming are observed: relatively slow streaming during mid-oogenesis and streaming that is approximately ten times faster during late oogenesis. These flows are implicated in two processes: polarity establishment and mixing. In this review, I discuss the underlying mechanism of streaming, how slow and fast streaming are differentiated, and what we know about the physiological roles of the two types of streaming.

  14. Analysis of peroxidase-negative acute unclassifiable leukemias by monoclonal antibodies. 1. Acute myelogenous leukemia and acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, N; Tanaka, R; Kajihara, H; Kuramoto, A

    1988-11-01

    In this study, pretreatment peripheral and/or bone marrow blasts from 12 patients with acute unclassifiable leukemia (AUL) expressing the myeloid-related cell-surface antigen (CD 11) were isolated for further analysis. Despite a lack of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, 1 patient's blasts contained cytoplasmic Auer rods. The circulating blasts from another patient expressed MPO while maintaining the same surface phenotype during 20 months of clinical follow-up. In addition, the blasts from 3 cases demonstrated both myelomonocytic and monocyte-specific surface antigens, whereas the remaining 9 cases completely lacked any monocyte-specific antigen detectable by monoclonal antibodies, Mo2, My4 and Leu M3 (CD 14). The first case eventually was diagnosed as acute myelomonocytic leukemia and the second as acute myelogenous leukemia by means of immunophenotypic analysis using flow cytometry (FACS IV). In addition, the presence of MPO protein was identified in the cytoplasm of blast cells from 5 patients with AUL by means of a cytoplasmic immunofluorescence test using a monoclonal antibody (MA1). Our study indicates that non-T, non-B AUL expressing OKM1 (CD 11) antigens include acute leukemias which are unequivocally identifiable as being of either myeloid or myelomonocytic origin. However, further investigations, including immunophenotypic and cytoplasmic analysis, ultrastructural cytochemistry and gene analysis with molecular probes (tests applicable to normal myeloid cells), are necessary in order to determine the actual origin of blasts and to recognize the differentiation stages of the various types of leukemic cells from patients with undifferentiated forms of leukemia.

  15. The antimicrobial peptides lactoferricin B and magainin 2 cross over the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and reside in the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukland, H H; Ulvatne, H; Sandvik, K; Vorland, L H

    2001-11-23

    The localization of immunolabelled antimicrobial peptides was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were exposed to lactoferricin B (17-41), lactoferricin B (17-31) and D-lactoferricin B (17-31). E. coli was also exposed to cecropin P1 and magainin 2. The lactoferricins were found in the cytoplasm of both bacteria. In S. aureus the amount of cytoplasmic lactoferricin B (17-41) was time- and concentration-dependent, reaching a maximum within 30 min. Cecropin P1 was confined to the cell wall, while magainin 2 was found in the cytoplasm of E. coli. The finding of intracellularly localized magainin is not reported previously.

  16. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies are associated with Raynaud phenomenon and migraine in primary thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytek, M; Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) detectable in sera of some patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) have been shown to correlate with thrombosis. However, associations of aPS/PT antibodies with APS related disorders remain unclear. Aim To evaluate whether there are any associations between aPS/PT antibodies and Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and/or valvular lesions in primary thrombotic APS (PAPS). Methods We enrolled 67 consecutive patients (56 women) with thrombotic PAPS (VTE in 80.6%), aged 46.2 ± 13.5 years. The exclusion criteria were: acute coronary syndromes or stroke within preceding 6 months, cancer, severe comorbidities and pregnancy. The IgG and IgM aPS/PT antibodies were determined by ELISA with the cut-off of 30 units. We recorded Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions. Results Positive IgM or/and IgG aPS/PT antibodies were observed in 29 patients (43.3%), with a higher prevalence of IgM antibodies ( n = 27, 40.3%) compared with IgG isotype ( n = 12, 17.9%, p = 0.014). aPS/PT antibodies were observed most commonly in patients with triple aPL ( n = 12, 85.7%) compared with those with double ( n = 5, 35.7%) or single aPL antibodies (n = 12, 30.8%, p = 0.03), with no association with demographics, the ANA titre, the type of thrombotic events or medications. Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions were observed in 15% ( n = 10), 30% ( n = 20) and 18% ( n = 12) of the patients, respectively. Raynaud phenomenon and migraine, but not valvular lesions, were markedly more frequent in PAPS patients presenting with positive aPS/PT antibodies ( n = 10, 34.5% vs. n = 0, 0%; p = 0.0001). Conclusions In PAPS patients aPS/PT antibodies are related to the occurrence of both Raynaud phenomenon and migraine.

  17. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  18. Antibody-dependent NK cell activation is associated with late kidney allograft dysfunction and the complement-independent alloreactive potential of donor-specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Legris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs. The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years. Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83. In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration

  19. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-01-01

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus

  20. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  1. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-NH2-terminal of α-enolase antibodies: A clinical subtype of Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishitani, Toru; Matsunaga, Akiko; Ikawa, Masamichi; Hayashi, Kouji; Yamamura, Osamu; Hamano, Tadanori; Watanabe, Osamu; Tanaka, Keiko; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Yoneda, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Several types of autoantibodies have been reported in autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE), such as antibodies against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex including leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1). We recently reported a patient with autoimmune LE and serum anti-NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) antibodies, a specific diagnostic marker for Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE), who was diagnosed with HE based on the presence of antithyroid antibodies and responsiveness to immunotherapy. This case suggests that LE patients with antibodies to both the thyroid and NAE could be diagnosed with HE and respond to immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicoimmunological features and efficacy of immunotherapy in LE associated with anti-NAE antibodies to determine whether the LE is a clinical subtype of HE.We examined serum anti-NAE antibodies in 78 LE patients with limbic abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging and suspected HE based on positivity for antithyroid antibodies. Nineteen of the 78 patients had anti-NAE antibodies; however, 5 were excluded because they were double positive for antibodies to the VGKC complex including LGI1. No antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2), γ-aminobutyric acid-B receptor (GABABR), or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) were detected in the 19 patients. Among the remaining 14 who were positive only for anti-NAE antibodies, the median age was 62.5 (20-83) years, 9 (64%) were women, and 8 (57%) showed acute onset, with less than 2 weeks between onset and admission. Consciousness disturbance (71%) and memory disturbance (64%) were frequently observed, followed by psychiatric symptoms (50%) and seizures (43%). The frequency of these symptoms significantly differed between the acute- and subacute-onset groups. Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid and electroencephalogram were commonly observed (92% for both

  2. Detection of the argonaute protein Ago2 and microRNAs in the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC) using a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Keigo; Satoh, Minoru; Pauley, Kaleb M; Fritzler, Marvin J; Reeves, Westley H; Chan, Edward K L

    2006-12-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules responsible for post-transcriptional gene silencing by the degradation or translational inhibition of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). This process of gene silencing, known as RNA interference (RNAi), is mediated by highly conserved Argonaute (Ago) proteins which are the key components of the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC). In humans, Ago2 is responsible for the endonuclease cleavage of targeted mRNA and it interacts with the mRNA-binding protein GW182, which is a marker for cytoplasmic foci referred to as GW bodies (GWBs). We demonstrated that the anti-Ago2 monoclonal antibody 4F9 recognized GWBs in a cell cycle dependent manner and was capable of capturing miRNAs associated with Ago2. Since Ago2 protein is the effector protein of RNAi, anti-Ago2 monoclonal antibody may be useful in capturing functional miRNAs.

  3. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ting Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin antibodies (IA associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%, high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly.

  4. Cutting edge issues in the Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczeklik, Wojciech; Jakieła, Bogdan; Adamek, Dariusz; Musiał, Jacek

    2013-02-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare systemic small-vessel vasculitis that develops in the background of bronchial asthma, which is characterized by eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of various tissues. It belongs to the group of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides. The triggering factors and pathogenesis of CSS are still unknown. The possible role of eotaxin-3 and CCR4-related chemokines in selective recruitment of eosinophils to the target tissues in CSS has been recently suggested, but the role of eosinophilic inflammation in the development of vasculitic lesions is not completely understood. From the clinical view, two distinct phenotypes of the disease are slowly emerging depending on the ANCA-positivity status. Glucocorticoids are still the mainstay of treatment; however, data are accumulating regarding the beneficial role of novel immunosuppressants and biologic compounds, especially in patients with poorer prognosis.

  5. The Antitumor Effect of Single-domain Antibodies Directed Towards Membrane-associated Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Motz, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed towards catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused efficient reactivation of intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling specifically in human tumor cells. Single-domain antibodies targeted tumor cell-specific membrane-associated SOD and catalase, but not the corresponding intracellular enzymes. They were shown to be about 200-fold more effective than corresponding classical recombinant antigen-binding fragments and more than four log steps more efficient than monoclonal antibodies. Combined addition of single-domain antibodies against catalase and SOD caused a remarkable synergistic effect. Proof-of-concept experiments in immunocompromised mice using human tumor xenografts and single-domain antibodies directed towards SOD showed an inhibition of tumor growth. Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed to catalase and SOD also caused a very strong synergistic effect with the established chemotherapeutic agent taxol, indicating an overlap of signaling pathways. This effect might also be useful in order to avoid unwanted side-effects and to drastically lower the costs for taxol-based therapy. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical analysis of thyroglobulin antibody and thyroid peroxidase antibody and their association with vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, the abnormal presence of thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab has been reported in vitiligo patients, but presence of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab in patients of different ages and gender, and its association with vitiligo and thyroid autoimmunity has rarely been reported. The aim of our research was to determine whether vitiligo was associated with thyroid autoimmunity and figure out its relationship with age and gender. Materials and Methods: We analyzed TG-Ab, TPO-Ab in age and gender matched 87 vitiligo patients and 90 healthy controls, the patients of vitiligo who were positive for the presence of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab were followed up to confirm autoimmune thyroid disease subsequently. Results: Results showed that the frequencies of TG-Ab (23.0%, 20/87 positivity and TPO-AB (24.1%, 21/87 in vitiligo patients were significantly higher than that in healthy controls (P < 0.05. Moreover, The positivity for of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab was higher in 11-20-year age group and 21-40-year age group than that in age matched healthy controls. We found female patients with vitiligo had higher positive frequencies of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab than healthy female controls. (34.1% vs. 8.8% and 34.1% vs. 11.1%, P = 0.000 and P = 0.011. When 20 patients with TG-Ab and TPO-Ab positivity were followed up for three monthes, 14 of them (70% were diagnosed as having autoimmune thyroid disease compared with age-matched healthy controls (16.7%, χ 2 = 5.4, P = 0.02. Conclusion: TG-Ab and TPO-Ab are likely to be found in female teenagers with vitiligo, and are relevant with respect to subsequent development autoimmune thyroid disease.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Holder

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines.Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses.The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  8. Low Serum Vitamin D Is Associated with Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody in Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong Yeob; Kim, Kwang Joon; Kim, Daham; Hwang, Sena; Lee, Eun Jig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The association between autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) and vitamin D deficiency is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and anti-thyroid antibody levels. Materials and Methods 25(OH)D3, anti-thyroid antibodies, and thyroid function measured in 304 patients who visited the endocrinology clinic were analyzed. The patients were subgrouped into the AITDs or non-AITDs category according to the presence or absence of anti-t...

  9. The Composition and Organization of Cytoplasm in Prebiotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack T. Trevors

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the hypothesized composition and organization of cytoplasm in prebiotic cells from a theoretical perspective and also based upon what is currently known about bacterial cytoplasm. It is unknown if the first prebiotic, microscopic scale, cytoplasm was initially contained within a primitive, continuous, semipermeable membrane, or was an uncontained gel substance, that later became enclosed by a continuous membrane. Another possibility is that the first cytoplasm in prebiotic cells and a primitive membrane organized at the same time, permitting a rapid transition to the first cell(s capable of growth and division, thus assisting with the emergence of life on Earth less than a billion years after the formation of the Earth. It is hypothesized that the organization and composition of cytoplasm progressed initially from an unstructured, microscopic hydrogel to a more complex cytoplasm, that may have been in the volume magnitude of about 0.1–0.2 µm3 (possibly less if a nanocell prior to the first cell division.

  10. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in hybrid breeding in field crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohra, Abhishek; Jha, Uday C; Adhimoolam, Premkumar; Bisht, Deepak; Singh, Narendra P

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of CMS/Rf system enabled by modern omics tools and technologies considerably improves our ability to harness hybrid technology for enhancing the productivity of field crops. Harnessing hybrid vigor or heterosis is a promising approach to tackle the current challenge of sustaining enhanced yield gains of field crops. In the context, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) owing to its heritable nature to manifest non-functional male gametophyte remains a cost-effective system to promote efficient hybrid seed production. The phenomenon of CMS stems from a complex interplay between maternally-inherited (mitochondrion) and bi-parental (nucleus) genomic elements. In recent years, attempts aimed to comprehend the sterility-inducing factors (orfs) and corresponding fertility determinants (Rf) in plants have greatly increased our access to candidate genomic segments and the cloned genes. To this end, novel insights obtained by applying state-of-the-art omics platforms have substantially enriched our understanding of cytoplasmic-nuclear communication. Concomitantly, molecular tools including DNA markers have been implicated in crop hybrid breeding in order to greatly expedite the progress. Here, we review the status of diverse sterility-inducing cytoplasms and associated Rf factors reported across different field crops along with exploring opportunities for integrating modern omics tools with CMS-based hybrid breeding.

  12. Torque Teno Virus Load-Inverse Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemann, Martin; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Eskandary, Farsad; Kohlbeck, Philip; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, Susanne; Heilos, Andreas; Kozakowski, Nicolas; Görzer, Irene; Kikić, Željko; Herkner, Harald; Böhmig, Georg A; Bond, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) represents one of the cardinal causes of late allograft loss after kidney transplantation, and there is great need for noninvasive tools improving early diagnosis of this rejection type. One promising strategy might be the quantification of peripheral blood DNA levels of the highly prevalent and apathogenic Torque Teno virus (TTV), which might mirror the overall level of immunosuppression and thus help determine the risk of alloimmune response. To assess the association between TTV load in the peripheral blood and AMR, 715 kidney transplant recipients (median, 6.3 years posttransplantation) were subjected to a systematical cross-sectional AMR screening and, in parallel, TTV quantification. Eighty-six of these recipients had donor-specific antibodies and underwent protocol biopsy, AMR-positive patients (n = 46) showed only 25% of the TTV levels measured in patients without AMR (P = 0.003). In a generalized linear model, higher TTV levels were associated with a decreased risk for AMR after adjustment for potential confounders (risk ratio 0.94 per TTV log level; 95% confidence interval 0.90-0.99; P = 0.02). Future studies will have to clarify whether longitudinal assessment of TTV load might predict AMR risk and help guide the type and intensity of immunosuppression to prevent antibody-mediated graft injury.

  13. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, R. Krishnan; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P 27 KKRKAP 276 ) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting

  14. LAMP-1-chimeric DNA vaccines enhance the antibody response in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Barragán, Iang; Nozaki, Reiko; Hirono, Ikuo; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2017-08-01

    DNA vaccination is one method to protect farmed fish from viral and bacterial diseases. Chimeric antigens encoded by DNA vaccines have been shown to increase the resistance to viral diseases. Here, we sequenced the gene encoding lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, (JfLAMP-1) and assessed its use in a chimeric DNA vaccine fused with the major capsule protein (MCP) from red seabream iridovirus (RSIV). JfLAMP-1 cDNA has a length of 1248 bp encoding 415 aa, which contains transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. JfLAMP-1 is constitutively expressed in several tissues and its expression in spleen was upregulated following injection of formalin-killed cells (FKC) of Edwardsiella tarda. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that JfLAMP-1 is distributed in the small and large granules in the cytoplasm and groups close to the nucleus. The DNA encoding the luminal domain of JfLAMP-1 was replaced with the gene for the RSIV MCP, and the construct was cloned in an expression vector (pCIneo). Fish vaccinated with pCLAMP-MCP had significantly higher antibody levels than fish vaccinated with pCIneo vector harboring the MCP gene (p day 30 post-vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes , limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies.Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome,cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus.This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations.

  16. Young Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with the Development of Celiac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Children Living in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Harpreet; Newhook, Leigh A; Aaron, Hillary; Curtis, Joseph; Randell, Ed

    2015-10-14

    The objectives of this study were to establish the prevalence of positive antibodies to endomysium (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in children with type 1 diabetes living in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), and to examine clinical features associated with positive antibodies. Patients were recruited from the pediatric diabetes clinic. One hundred sixty-seven children with type 1 diabetes from the 280 children followed at the clinic were prospectively screened for celiac disease using EMA and tTG. The variables of Irish descent, age at onset of diabetes, duration of diabetes, sex, family history of celiac disease, hemoglobin A1C (A1C), ferritin, gastrointestinal symptoms, and body mass index were compiled for all patients. The group of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was compared to the group with negative antibodies. The prevalence of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was 16.8% (n = 28). One patient had also been previously diagnosed with symptomatic celiac disease. The two statistically significant variables with positive antibodies were an earlier age at onset of diabetes (Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test: mean difference 3.2 years, 95% CI 1.7-4.8 years, p celiac disease-associated antibodies in children living in NL with type 1 diabetes. Unlike other clinical features, an earlier age at onset of diabetes was predictive for positive antibodies. As the majority of children with positive antibodies did not have signs or symptoms of celiac disease, routine screening for celiac disease in type 1 diabetes is recommended.

  17. [Preparation and preliminary application of rabbit anti-human PON2 antibodies(paraoxonase-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Yang, Jin-Ju; Li, Shu-Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Gao, Jian-En; Sun, Qi-Hong

    2008-07-01

    To preparation and characterize the rabbit polyclonal antibodies against human PON2 (paraoxonase-2). A fragment of human PON2 gene which was of low homology with rabbits but of higher hydrophilicity and immunogenicity was selected for recombinant expression in prokaryotic expression system. The rabbits were immunized with the purified GST fusion protein 3 times. The specificity and sensitivity of the anti-human PON2 polyclonal antibodies were detected by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence. The GST-PON2 fusion protein was highly expressed in Ecoli with a molecular weight of 46 kDa. Western blot analysis proved the rabbit polyclonal antibodies could specifically recognize 39 kDa native PON2 protein expressed in several cells and tissues, such as HeLa cells, U937 cells, and human liver tissue. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that PON2 protein was located in the cytoplasm of SY5Y cells. The rabbit polyclonal antibodies against human PON2 can specifically recognize natural protein expressed in human cells and tissues, Which can be used for further study and clinical detection of human PON2.

  18. Epilepsy surgery in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy associated with neuronal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Mar; Bien, Christian G; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael; Marusic, Petr; Elisak, Martin; Pimentel, Jose; Wehner, Tim; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Uranga, Juan; Gómez-Ibáñez, Asier; Villanueva, Vicente; Gil, Francisco; Donaire, Antonio; Bargalló, Nuria; Rumià, Jordi; Roldán, Pedro; Setoain, Xavier; Pintor, Luis; Boget, Teresa; Bailles, Eva; Falip, Mercè; Aparicio, Javier; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of patients with drug resistant epilepsy and neuronal antibodies who underwent epilepsy surgery. Retrospective study, information collected with a questionnaire sent to epilepsy surgery centers. Thirteen patients identified, with antibodies to GAD (8), Ma2 (2), Hu (1), LGI1 (1) or CASPR2 (1). Mean age at seizure onset: 23 years. Five patients had an encephalitic phase. Three had testicular tumors and five had autoimmune diseases. All had drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (median: 20 seizures/month). MRI showed unilateral temporal lobe abnormalities (mainly hippocampal sclerosis) in 9 patients, bilateral abnormalities in 3, and was normal in 1. Surgical procedures included anteromesial temporal lobectomy (10 patients), selective amygdalohippocampectomy (1), temporal pole resection (1) and radiofrequency ablation of mesial structures (1). Perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates were seen in 7/12 patients. One year outcome available in all patients, at 3 years in 9. At last visit 5/13 patients (38.5%) (with Ma2, Hu, LGI1, and 2 GAD antibodies) were in Engel's classes I or II. Epilepsy surgery may be an option for patients with drug resistant seizures associated with neuronal antibodies. Outcome seems to be worse than that expected in other etiologies, even in the presence of unilateral HS. Intracranial EEG may be required in some patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cocaine/levamisole-associated autoimmune syndrome: a disease of neutrophil-mediated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Michael J; Jen, Kuang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Levamisole was previously used for its immunomodulatory properties to treat rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers. However, because of serious side-effects, it was taken off the market in the United States. Recently, levamisole has reemerged as a popular cocaine adulterant. Some individuals who consume levamisole-adulterated cocaine can develop a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome. In this review, the medical consequences of levamisole exposure and postulated mechanisms by which levamisole induces these adverse effects are discussed. Although agranulocytosis and cutaneous vasculitis are the major findings in patients who develop cocaine/levamisole-associated autoimmune syndrome (CLAAS), more recent experience indicates that other organ systems can be involved as well. Current studies point to neutrophil activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation with subsequent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated tissue injury as a possible mechanism of CLAAS. In the past decade, the detrimental effects of levamisole have reemerged because of its popularity as a cocaine adulterant. Although infrequent, some individuals develop a systemic autoimmune syndrome characterized by immune-mediated agranulocytosis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated vasculitis. Mechanistically, neutrophil antigens appear to be a major player in inducing CLAAS. Prompt cessation of levamisole exposure is key to treatment, although relapses are frequent because of the addictive effects of cocaine and the high prevalence of levamisole within the cocaine supply.

  20. Preconceptional antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, but not thyroid-stimulating hormone, are associated with decreased live birth rates in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seungdamrong, Aimee; Steiner, Anne Z; Gracia, Clarisa R; Legro, Richard S; Diamond, Michael P; Coutifaris, Christos; Schlaff, William D; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory M; Robinson, Randal D; Huang, Hao; Alvero, Ruben; Hansen, Karl R; Jin, Susan; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping; Santoro, Nanette

    2017-10-25

    To study whether preconceptual thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and antithyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are associated with poor reproductive outcomes in infertile women. Secondary analysis of data from two multicenter, randomized, controlled trials conducted by the Reproductive Medicine Network of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between preconceptual TSH levels and anti-TPO antibodies. Not applicable. Serum samples from 1,468 infertile women were utilized. None. Cumulative conception, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates were calculated. Conception, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates did not differ between patients with TSH ≥2.5 mIU/L vs. TSH < 2.5 mIU/L. Women with anti-TPO antibodies had similar conception rates (33.3% vs. 36.3%) but higher miscarriage rates (43.9% vs. 25.3%) and lower live birth rates (17.1% vs. 25.4%) than those without anti-TPO antibodies. Adjusted, multivariable logistic regression models confirmed elevated odds of miscarriage (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.12-4.22) and lower odds of live birth (oddr ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.96) in patients with anti-TPO antibodies. In infertile women, preconceptional TSH ≥2.5 mIU/L is not associated with adverse reproductive outcomes; however, anti-TPO antibodies are associated with increased risk of miscarriage and decreased probability of live birth. PPCOS II NCT00719186; AMIGOS NCT01044862. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The poly(rC)-binding protein αCP2 is a noncanonical factor in X. laevis cytoplasmic polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, Melanie R.; Sumaroka, Marina; Klein, Peter S.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of mRNA stability and translation is central to multiple developmental pathways. This control can be linked to cytoplasmic polyadenylation in certain settings. In maturing Xenopus oocytes, specific mRNAs are targeted for polyadenylation via recruitment of the Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element (CPE) binding protein (CPEB) to CPE(s) within the 3′ UTR. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation is also critical to early embryonic events, although corresponding determinants are less defined. Here, we demonstrate that the Xenopus ortholog of the poly(rC) binding protein αCP2 can recruit cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase activity to mRNAs in Xenopus post-fertilization embryos, and that this recruitment relies on cis sequences recognized by αCP2. We find that the hα-globin 3′ UTR, a validated mammalian αCP2 target, constitutes an effective target for cytoplasmic polyadenylation in Xenopus embryos, but not during Xenopus oocyte maturation. We further demonstrate that the cytoplasmic polyadenylation activity is dependent on the action of the C-rich αCP-binding site in conjunction with the adjacent AAUAAA. Consistent with its ability to target mRNA for poly(A) addition, we find that XαCP2 associates with core components of the Xenopus cytoplasmic polyadenylation complex, including the cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase XGLD2. Furthermore, we observe that the C-rich αCP-binding site can robustly enhance the activity of a weak canonical oocyte maturation CPE in early embryos, possibly via a direct interaction between XαCP2 and CPEB1. These studies establish XαCP2 as a novel cytoplasmic polyadenylation trans factor, indicate that C-rich sequences can function as noncanonical cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, and expand our understanding of the complexities underlying cytoplasmic polyadenylation in specific developmental settings. PMID:21444632

  2. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  3. Stabilization and Degradation Mechanisms of Cytoplasmic Ataxin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi F. Kohiyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-prone proteins in neurodegenerative disease disrupt cellular protein stabilization and degradation pathways. The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is caused by a coding polyglutamine expansion in the Ataxin-1 gene ( ATXN1 , which gives rise to the aggregation-prone mutant form of ATXN1 protein. Cerebellar Purkinje neurons, preferentially vulnerable in SCA1, produce ATXN1 protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Cytoplasmic stabilization of ATXN1 by phosphorylation and 14-3-3-mediated mechanisms ultimately drive translocation of the protein to the nucleus where aggregation may occur. However, experimental inhibition of phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding results in rapid degradation of ATXN1, thus preventing nuclear translocation and cellular toxicity. The exact mechanism of cytoplasmic ATXN1 degradation is currently unknown; further investigation of degradation may provide future therapeutic targets. This review examines the present understanding of cytoplasmic ATXN1 stabilization and potential degradation mechanisms during normal and pathogenic states.

  4. Bickerstaff's encephalitis and Miller Fisher syndrome associated with voltage-gated potassium channel and novel anti-neuronal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, E; Kürtüncü, M; Lang, B; Içöz, S; Akman-Demir, G; Eraksoy, M; Vincent, A

    2010-10-01

    GQ1b antibody (GQ1b-Ab) is detected in approximately two-thirds of sera of patients with Bickerstaffs encephalitis (BE). Whilst some of the remaining patients have antibodies to other gangliosides, many patients with BE are reported to be seronegative. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab) at high titer was detected during the diagnostic work-up of one patient with BE. Sera of an additional patient with BE and nine patients with Miller Fisher syndrome (MF) (all GQ1b-Ab positive) were investigated for VGKC-Ab and other anti-neuronal antibodies by radioimmunoprecipitation using 125I-dendrotoxin-VGKC and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Two patients with MF exhibited moderate titer VGKC-Abs. Regardless of positivity for VGKC or GQ1b antibodies, serum IgG of all patients with BE and MF reacted with the molecular layer and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in a distinctive pattern. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies might be involved in some cases of BE or MF. The common staining pattern despite different antibody results suggests that there might be other, as yet unidentified, antibodies associated with BE and MF.

  5. Cytoplasmic isoforms of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA recruit and antagonize the innate immune DNA sensor cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guigen; Chan, Baca; Samarina, Naira; Abere, Bizunesh; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Buch, Anna; Pich, Andreas; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Schulz, Thomas F

    2016-02-23

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is mainly localized and functions in the nucleus of latently infected cells, playing a pivotal role in the replication and maintenance of latent viral episomal DNA. In addition, N-terminally truncated cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA, resulting from internal translation initiation, have been reported, but their function is unknown. Using coimmunoprecipitation and MS, we found the cGMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), an innate immune DNA sensor, to be a cellular interaction partner of cytoplasmic LANA isoforms. By directly binding to cGAS, LANA, and particularly, a cytoplasmic isoform, inhibit the cGAS-STING-dependent phosphorylation of TBK1 and IRF3 and thereby antagonize the cGAS-mediated restriction of KSHV lytic replication. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic forms of LANA, whose expression increases during lytic replication, inhibit cGAS to promote the reactivation of the KSHV from latency. This observation points to a novel function of the cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA during lytic replication and extends the function of LANA from its role during latency to the lytic replication cycle.

  6. Stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules around the surviving nuclei during the third prezygotic division of Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Yuan, Jin-Qiang; Gao, Xin; Yang, Xian-Yu

    2012-12-01

    There are six micronuclear divisions during conjugation of Paramecium caudatum: three prezygotic and three postzygotic divisions. Four haploid nuclei are formed during the first two meiotic prezygotic divisions. Usually only one meiotic product is located in the paroral cone (PC) region at the completion of meiosis, which survives and divides mitotically to complete the third prezygotic division to yield a stationary and a migratory pronucleus. The remaining three located outside of the PC degenerate. The migratory pronuclei are then exchanged between two conjugants and fuse with the stationary pronuclei to form synkarya, which undergo three successive divisions (postzygotic divisions). However, little is known about the surviving mechanism of the PC nuclei. In the current study, stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) was indicated during the third prezygotic division by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-alpha tubulin antibodies surrounding the surviving nuclei, including the PC nuclei and the two types of prospective pronuclei. This suggested that cMTs were involved in the formation of a physical barrier, whose function may relate to sequestering and protecting the surviving nuclei from the major cytoplasm, where degeneration of extra-meiotic products occurs, another important nuclear event during the third prezygotic division.

  7. Correlation between the progressive cytoplasmic expression of a novel small heat shock protein (Hsp16.2) and malignancy in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozsgai, Eva; Gomori, Eva; Szigeti, Andras; Boronkai, Arpad; Gallyas, Ferenc Jr; Sumegi, Balazs; Bellyei, Szabolcs

    2007-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that protect proteins against stress-induced aggregation. They have also been found to have anti-apoptotic activity and to play a part in the development of tumors. Recently, we identified a new small heat shock protein, Hsp16.2 which displayed increased expression in neuroectodermal tumors. Our aim was to investigate the expression of Hsp16.2 in different types of brain tumors and to correlate its expression with the histological grade of the tumor. Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody to Hsp16.2 was carried out on formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded sections using the streptavidin-biotin method. 91 samples were examined and their histological grade was defined. According to the intensity of Hsp16.2 immunoreactivity, low (+), moderate (++), high (+++) or none (-) scores were given. Immunoblotting was carried out on 30 samples of brain tumors using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western-blotting. Low grade (grades 1–2) brain tumors displayed low cytoplasmic Hsp16.2 immunoreactivity, grade 3 tumors showed moderate cytoplasmic staining, while high grade (grade 4) tumors exhibited intensive cytoplasmic Hsp16.2 staining. Immunoblotting supported the above mentioned results. Normal brain tissue acted as a negative control for the experiment, since the cytoplasm did not stain for Hsp16.2. There was a positive correlation between the level of Hsp16.2 expression and the level of anaplasia in different malignant tissue samples. Hsp16.2 expression was directly correlated with the histological grade of brain tumors, therefore Hsp16.2 may have relevance as becoming a possible tumor marker

  8. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris: Heritabilities and associations with parasitological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus; Göring, Harald Heinz Herbert; Skallerup, Per; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-07-30

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens or egg excretion with specific antibody levels. We set out to investigate the association between worm load and T. suis and A. suum specific serum antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) against excretory-secretory products of adults and third stage larvae, respectively, measured at 0, 7 and 14 weeks p.i. in a trickle-infected F1-resource-population of crossbred pigs (n=195). Furthermore, we wanted to determine the heritability of these antibody isotypes during the course of infection. Most pigs remained infected with A. suum throughout the experiment while they expelled T. suis between 7 and 14 weeks post infection (p.i.). Parasite specific IgG1 and IgA were significantly (P<0.001) elevated after 7 and 14 weeks of infection, whereas parasite specific IgG2 levels only changed slightly at 14 weeks p.i.. However, the observed association between specific antibody isotype levels and faecal egg counts and macroscopic worm load was weak. The relative heritabilities of the different parasite specific isotypes were assessed and resulted in significant heritability estimates for parasite specific IgG1 and IgA. The highest heritabilities were found for A. suum specific IgG1 (h(2)=0.41 and 0.46 at 7 and 14 weeks p.i., respectively). Thus, the present study demonstrates that host genetic factors influence the IgG1 and IgA antibody isotype responses specific to two of the most common gastrointestinal nematodes of swine whereas specific antibody levels were poorly associated with egg excretion and the presence of macroscopic worms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  10. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against α-transforming growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human α-transforming growth factor (α-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting α-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native α-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of α-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of α-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor

  11. Efficient soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in fed-batch fermentations on chemically defined minimal media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąciarz, Anna; Khatri, Narendar Kumar; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Saaranen, Mirva J; Uchida, Yuko; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2017-06-15

    The production of recombinant proteins containing disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli is challenging. In most cases the protein of interest needs to be either targeted to the oxidizing periplasm or expressed in the cytoplasm in the form of inclusion bodies, then solubilized and re-folded in vitro. Both of these approaches have limitations. Previously we showed that soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli is possible at shake flask scale with a system, known as CyDisCo, which is based on co-expression of a protein of interest along with a sulfhydryl oxidase and a disulfide bond isomerase. With CyDisCo it is possible to produce disulfide bonded proteins in the presence of intact reducing pathways in the cytoplasm. Here we scaled up production of four disulfide bonded proteins to stirred tank bioreactors and achieved high cell densities and protein yields in glucose fed-batch fermentations, using an E. coli strain (BW25113) with the cytoplasmic reducing pathways intact. Even without process optimization production of purified human single chain IgA 1 antibody fragment reached 139 mg/L and hen avidin 71 mg/L, while purified yields of human growth hormone 1 and interleukin 6 were around 1 g/L. Preliminary results show that human growth hormone 1 was also efficiently produced in fermentations of W3110 strain and when glucose was replaced with glycerol as the carbon source. Our results show for the first time that efficient production of high yields of soluble disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli with the reducing pathways intact is feasible to scale-up to bioreactor cultivations on chemically defined minimal media.

  12. Distinct white matter integrity in glutamic acid decarboxylase and voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jan; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Malter, Michael P; Stoecker, Winfried; Probst, Christian; Weber, Bernd; Elger, Christian E

    2016-03-01

    Autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex are associated with distinct subtypes of limbic encephalitis regarding clinical presentation, response to therapy, and outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate white matter changes in these two limbic encephalitis subtypes by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Diffusion data were obtained in 14 patients with GAD antibodies and 16 patients with VGKC-complex antibodies and compared with age- and gender-matched control groups. Voxelwise statistical analysis was carried out using tract-based spatial statistics. The results were furthermore compared with those of 15 patients with unilateral histologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis and correlated with verbal and figural memory performance. We found widespread changes of fractional anisotropy and all diffusivity parameters in GAD-associated limbic encephalitis, whereas no changes were found in VGKC-complex-associated limbic encephalitis. The changes observed in the GAD group were even more extensive when compared against those of the hippocampal sclerosis group, although the disease duration was markedly shorter in patients with GAD antibodies. Correlation analysis revealed areas with a trend toward a negative correlation of diffusivity parameters with figural memory performance located mainly in the right temporal lobe in the GAD group as well. The present study provides further evidence that, depending on the associated antibody, limbic encephalitis features clearly distinct imaging characteristics by showing widespread white matter changes in GAD-associated limbic encephalitis and preserved white matter integrity in VGKC-complex-associated limbic encephalitis. Furthermore, our results contribute to a better understanding of the specific pathophysiologic properties in these two subforms of limbic encephalitis by revealing that patients with GAD antibodies show widespread affections of

  13. First cytoplasmic loop of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can function at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Tose, Koji; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classified into several families based on their amino acid sequences. In family 1, GPCRs such as rhodopsin and adrenergic receptor, the structure-function relationship has been extensively investigated to demonstrate that exposure of the third cytoplasmic loop is essential for selective G protein activation. In contrast, much less is known about other families. Here we prepared chimeric mutants between Gt-coupled rhodopsin and Gi/Go- and Gs-coupled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor of family 2 and tried to identify the loop region that functions at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin. We succeeded in expressing a mutant having the first cytoplasmic loop of GLP-1 receptor and found that this mutant activated Gi and Go efficiently but did not activate Gt. Moreover, the rhodopsin mutant having the first loop of Gs-coupled secretin receptor of family 2 decreased the Gi and Go activation efficiencies. Therefore, the first loop of GLP-1 receptor would share a similar role to the third loop of rhodopsin in G protein activation. This result strongly suggested that different families of GPCRs have maintained molecular architectures of their ancestral types to generate a common mechanism, namely exposure of the cytoplasmic loop, to activate peripheral G protein.

  14. Anti-Ma2-antibody-associated encephalitis: An atypical paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Targonska

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of conditions affecting cancer patients, where the signs and symptoms are not owing to the local effects of the tumour but instead owing to humoral or immunologic effects. We describe an unusual presentation of a paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome presenting with predominant involvement of the hypothalamus and deep grey nuclei secondary to an anterior mediastinal germinoma and associated with anti-Ma2 antibody.

  15. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  16. Peripheral neuropathies associated with antibodies directed to intracellular neural antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, J-C

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies directed to intracellular neural antigens have been mainly described in paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies and mostly includes anti-Hu and anti-CV2/CRMP5 antibodies. These antibodies occur with different patterns of neuropathy. With anti-Hu antibody, the most frequent manifestation is sensory neuronopathy with frequent autonomic involvement. With anti-CV2/CRMP5 the neuropathy is more frequently sensory and motor with an axonal or mixed demyelinating and axonal electrophysiological pattern. The clinical pattern of these neuropathies is in keeping with the cellular distribution of HuD and CRMP5 in the peripheral nervous system. Although present in high titer, these antibodies are probably not directly responsible for the neuropathy. Pathological and experimental studies indicate that cytotoxic T-cells are probably the main effectors of the immune response. These disorders contrast with those in which antibodies recognize a cell surface antigen and are probably responsible for the disease. The neuronal cell death and axonal degeneration which result from T-cell mediated immunity explains why treating these disorders remains challenging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies of cytotoxic antibodies against eye muscle antigens in patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.-G.; Hiromatsu, Y.; Salvi, M.; Triller, H.; Bernard, N.; Wall, J.R. (Thyroid Research Unit, The Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Medeiros-Neto, G.; Iacona, A.; Lima, N. (Thyroid Clinic, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the prevalence and significance of cytotoxic antibodies against human eye muscle cells, as detected in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (CMAC) in {sup 51}Cr release assays, in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A high prevalence of positive ADCC tests was found in all groups of patients with ophthalmopathy tested. Tests were positive in 64% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy from an area of severe iodine deficiency (Sao Paulo) and in 64% of such patients from an iodine replete area (Montreal). In patients with so-called ''euthyroid ophthalmopathy'', i.e. eye disease associated with thyroiditis, ADCC tests were positive in 75 and 38% of patients from the two areas, respectively, while tests were positive in 40 and 22%, respectively, of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism without evident eye disease. In normal subjects, levels of {sup 51}Cr release was always at background levels. In a group of patients from the high-iodine area, levels of antibodies in ADCC correlated positively with the intraocular pressure (mmHg) in primary position as a parameter of eye muscle dysfunction. In patients with ophthalmopathy, positive ADCC tests were assciated with antibodies to eye muscle membrane antigens of 55,65 and 95 kD as detected by immunoblotting, although the correlation was not close for any antigen. in contrast, CMAC tests were negative in all patients with ophthalmopathy. We also tested 9 mouse and 10 human monoclonal antibodies, reactive with orbital antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for cytotoxic activity, in ADCC and CMAC, against eye muscle and thyroid cells. All monoclonal antibodies were of the IgM class and negative in ADCC assays. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C; Schnabel, A; Csernok, E; De Groot, K; Reinhold-Keller, E; Gross, W L

    1995-07-01

    In this uncontrolled study 15 patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis, who were poor responders to conventional therapy, were treated with single or multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 30 g/day over 5 days. Clinical and serological evaluation was performed before and 4 weeks after IVIG. Six of the 15 patients experienced clinically significant benefit from IVIG. Improvement was confined to single organ manifestations (skin, ENT findings), no improvement was seen with conjunctivitis and scleritis, pericarditis or nephritis. No patient experienced complete remission after IVIG. Repeated courses of IVIG at 4-week intervals were no more effective than single courses. In six anti-proteinase 3 (PR3)-positive patients pretreatment sera were incubated with F(ab')2 fragments of the IVIG preparation in vitro to measure the inhibitory effect of IVIG on anti-PR3 activity. An inhibition of anti-PR3 activity by 25-70% was observed; this did not correlate with clinical effects. Approximately 40% of patients benefited from IVIG treatment, though complete remission of disease activity did not occur. Neither clinical characteristics nor the inhibitory effect of the IVIG preparation on serum anti-PR3 activity in vitro predicted clinical response to this treatment modality.

  19. Vasculitis associated with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, E; Gasparini, G; Papini, M; Burlando, M; Drago, F; Parodi, A

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis in connective tissue disease (CTD) is quite rare, it is reported in approximately 10% of patients with CTD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) shows the highest association rate. Vessels of any size may be involved, but mainly small vessels vasculitis is reported. At present the classification of these vasculitis is unsatisfactory. According to the 2012 revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference, vasculitides secondary to CTD are a well identified entity and are classified under the category of "vasculitis associated with systemic disease". However only lupus vasculitis and rheumatoid vasculitis are explicitly listed, while the remaining are generically included under the heading "others". Petechiae, purpura, gangrene and ulcers are the most frequent cutaneous manifestations that should investigated in order to rule out potentially dangerous systemic involvement, especially if cryoglobulinemic or necrotizing vasculitis are suspected. This review will focus on the cutaneous involvement in CTD associated vasculitis.

  20. Drug-associated cutaneous vasculitis: study of 239 patients from a single referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, José L; Pina, Trinitario; González-Vela, María C; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Armesto, Susana; González-López, Marcos A; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference on the Nomenclature of Vasculitides defined drug-associated immune complex vasculitis as a distinct entity included within the category of vasculitis associated with probable etiology. In the present study we assessed the clinical spectrum of patients with drug-associated cutaneous vasculitis (DACV). Case records were reviewed of patients with DACV treated at a tertiary referral hospital over a 36-year period. A diagnosis of DACV was considered if the drug was taken within a week before the onset of the disease. From a series of 773 unselected cutaneous vasculitis cases, 239 patients (30.9%; 133 men and 106 women; mean age 36 yrs) were diagnosed with DACV. Antibiotics (n=149; 62.3%), mainly β-lactams and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID; n=24; 10%) were the most common drugs. Besides skin lesions (100%), the most common clinical features were joint (51%) and gastrointestinal (38.1%) manifestations, nephropathy (34.7%), and fever (23.8%). The most remarkable laboratory data were increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (40.2%), presence of serum cryoglobulins (26%), leukocytosis (24.7%), positive antinuclear antibodies (21.1%), anemia (18.8%), and positive rheumatoid factor (17.5%). Despite drug discontinuation and bed rest, 108 patients (45.2%) required medical treatment, mainly corticosteroids (n=71) or immunosuppressive drugs (n=7). After a median followup of 5 months, relapses occurred in 18.4% of patients, and persistent microhematuria or renal insufficiency in 3.3% and 5%, respectively. DACV is generally associated with antibiotics and NSAID. In most cases it has a favorable prognosis, although a small percentage of patients may develop residual renal damage.

  1. Growth promotion of genetically modified hematopoietic progenitors using an antibody/c-Mpl chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Chen, Jianhong; Sogo, Takahiro; Teng, Jinying; Otsu, Makoto; Onodera, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2011-09-01

    Thrombopoietin is a potent cytokine that exerts proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) through its cognate receptor, c-Mpl. Therefore, mimicry of c-Mpl signaling by a receptor recognizing an artificial ligand would be attractive to attain specific expansion of genetically modified HSCs. Here we propose a system enabling selective expansion of genetically modified cells using an antibody/receptor chimera that can be activated by a specific antigen. We constructed an antibody/c-Mpl chimera, in which single-chain Fv (ScFv) of an anti-fluorescein antibody was tethered to the extracellular D2 domain of the erythropoietin receptor and transmembrane/cytoplasmic domains of c-Mpl. When the chimera was expressed in interleukin (IL)-3-dependent pro-B cell line Ba/F3, genetically modified cells were selectively expanded in the presence of fluorescein-conjugated BSA (BSA-FL) as a specific antigen. Furthermore, highly purified mouse HSCs transduced with the retrovirus carrying antibody/c-Mpl chimera gene proliferated in vitro in response to BSA-FL, and the cells retained in vivo long-term repopulating abilities. These results demonstrate that the antibody/c-Mpl chimera is capable of signal transduction that mimics wild-type c-Mpl signaling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human antibodies fix complement to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes and are associated with protection against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michelle J; Reiling, Linda; Feng, Gaoqian; Langer, Christine; Osier, Faith H; Aspeling-Jones, Harvey; Cheng, Yik Sheng; Stubbs, Janine; Tetteh, Kevin K A; Conway, David J; McCarthy, James S; Muller, Ivo; Marsh, Kevin; Anders, Robin F; Beeson, James G

    2015-03-17

    Antibodies play major roles in immunity to malaria; however, a limited understanding of mechanisms mediating protection is a major barrier to vaccine development. We have demonstrated that acquired human anti-malarial antibodies promote complement deposition on the merozoite to mediate inhibition of erythrocyte invasion through C1q fixation and activation of the classical complement pathway. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent (Ab-C') inhibition was the predominant invasion-inhibitory activity of human antibodies; most antibodies were non-inhibitory without complement. Inhibitory activity was mediated predominately via C1q fixation, and merozoite surface proteins 1 and 2 were identified as major targets. Complement fixation by antibodies was very strongly associated with protection from both clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia in a prospective longitudinal study of children. Ab-C' inhibitory activity could be induced by human immunization with a candidate merozoite surface-protein vaccine. Our findings demonstrate that human anti-malarial antibodies have evolved to function by fixing complement for potent invasion-inhibitory activity and protective immunity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A two-site immunoradiometric assay for human pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowles, E.A.; Pinto-Furtado, L.G.; Bolton, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive immunoradiometric assay has been developed for human pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) using a purified mouse monoclonal antibody as the tracer and a rabbit polyclonal antibody to this protein in the solid-phase antibody preparation. The assay showed no measurable cross-reaction (< 0.1%) against a range of purified human placental proteins, and a good correlation with a previously described radioimmunoassay procedure when tested on samples taken throughout normal human pregnancies. No PAPP-A-like immunological activity could be detected in sera from non-pregnant women, confirming the absence of this protein from the circulation outside pregnancy. (Auth.)

  4. A Candidate Gene Approach to ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Reveals Links to the C3 and CTLA-4 Genes but not to the IL1-Ra And Fcγ-RIIa Genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Ulf; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Pettersson, Åsa; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Truedsson, Lennart; Segelmark, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of the study is to search for associations between Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and polymorphisms in the genes of four key molecules possibly involved in different pathogenic pathways; complement C3, CTLA-4, Fcγ-RIIa and IL1-Ra. Patients and Methods: Patients with AAV (n=105) subgrouped as microscopic polyangiitis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) A...

  5. Pollen mitochondria in cytoplasmically male sterile tobacco zygotic and embryonic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symillides, Y.

    1985-09-01

    An attempt is being made to establish cytoplasmic organelles transmission during the process of fertilization, by using tobacco grain pollen labelled with leucine 14 C and tritiated thymidine. Through autoradiography the fate of pollen germination and its entry into the embryo sac has been studied. A few days after fertilization, labelled cytoplasmic organelles - mainly mitochondria - were detected in the embryo sac. However, labelling was not observed in cytoplasmic organelles by using tritiated thymidine. For more conclusive results labelled DNA incorporated in cytoplasmic organelles have to be traced during the embryo and endosperm development

  6. Sequencing and annotation of the chloroplast DNAs and identification of polymorphisms distinguishing normal male-fertile and male-sterile cytoplasms of onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kohn, Christopher; Kiełkowska, Agnieszka; Havey, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Male-sterile (S) cytoplasm of onion is an alien cytoplasm introgressed into onion in antiquity and is widely used for hybrid seed production. Owing to the biennial generation time of onion, classical crossing takes at least 4 years to classify cytoplasms as S or normal (N) male-fertile. Molecular markers in the organellar DNAs that distinguish N and S cytoplasms are useful to reduce the time required to classify onion cytoplasms. In this research, we completed next-generation sequencing of the chloroplast DNAs of N- and S-cytoplasmic onions; we assembled and annotated the genomes in addition to identifying polymorphisms that distinguish these cytoplasms. The sizes (153 538 and 153 355 base pairs) and GC contents (36.8%) were very similar for the chloroplast DNAs of N and S cytoplasms, respectively, as expected given their close phylogenetic relationship. The size difference was primarily due to small indels in intergenic regions and a deletion in the accD gene of N-cytoplasmic onion. The structures of the onion chloroplast DNAs were similar to those of most land plants with large and small single copy regions separated by inverted repeats. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms, two polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites, and one indel distributed across 20 chloroplast genes in the large and small single copy regions were selected and validated using diverse onion populations previously classified as N or S cytoplasmic using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Although cytoplasmic male sterility is likely associated with the mitochondrial DNA, maternal transmission of the mitochondrial and chloroplast DNAs allows for polymorphisms in either genome to be useful for classifying onion cytoplasms to aid the development of hybrid onion cultivars.

  7. Dehydration-induced redistribution of amphiphilic molecules between cytoplasm and lipids is associated with desiccation tolerance in seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitink, J.; Leprince, O.; Hoekstra, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study establishes a relationship between desiccation tolerance and the transfer of amphiphilic molecules from the cytoplasm into lipids during drying, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of amphiphilic spin probes introduced into imbibed radicles of pea (Pisum sativum) and

  8. Correlation between the progressive cytoplasmic expression of a novel small heat shock protein (Hsp16.2 and malignancy in brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallyas Ferenc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that protect proteins against stress-induced aggregation. They have also been found to have anti-apoptotic activity and to play a part in the development of tumors. Recently, we identified a new small heat shock protein, Hsp16.2 which displayed increased expression in neuroectodermal tumors. Our aim was to investigate the expression of Hsp16.2 in different types of brain tumors and to correlate its expression with the histological grade of the tumor. Methods Immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody to Hsp16.2 was carried out on formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded sections using the streptavidin-biotin method. 91 samples were examined and their histological grade was defined. According to the intensity of Hsp16.2 immunoreactivity, low (+, moderate (++, high (+++ or none (- scores were given. Immunoblotting was carried out on 30 samples of brain tumors using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western-blotting. Results Low grade (grades 1–2 brain tumors displayed low cytoplasmic Hsp16.2 immunoreactivity, grade 3 tumors showed moderate cytoplasmic staining, while high grade (grade 4 tumors exhibited intensive cytoplasmic Hsp16.2 staining. Immunoblotting supported the above mentioned results. Normal brain tissue acted as a negative control for the experiment, since the cytoplasm did not stain for Hsp16.2. There was a positive correlation between the level of Hsp16.2 expression and the level of anaplasia in different malignant tissue samples. Conclusion Hsp16.2 expression was directly correlated with the histological grade of brain tumors, therefore Hsp16.2 may have relevance as becoming a possible tumor marker.

  9. [Ma2 antibody and multiple mononeuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrignac, X; Castelnovo, G; Landrault, E; Fayolle, H; Pers, Y-M; Honnorat, J; Campello, C; Figarella-Branger, D; Labauge, P

    2008-01-01

    Anti-Ma2 antibodies belong to a family of onconeuronal antibodies that target proteins expressed in brain, testis and several tumors. Previously observed in patients presenting with limbic encephalitis, they seem to be associated with several other paraneoplastic syndromes. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting sensory and motor neuropathy associated with non-small-cell lung cancer who had Ma2-antibodies.

  10. Labelling of human resting lymphocytes by continuous infusion of (/sup 3/H)thymidine. 1. Characterization of cytoplasmic label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, P; Trepel, F; Maisel, K H; Past, W; Reisert, I; Begemann, H; Pilgrim, C [Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-01-01

    After continuous /sup 3/H-TdR infusion in vivo or incubation with /sup 3/H-TdR in vitro human blood lymphocytes were examined by light-microscopic and electron-microscopic autoradiography. Using relatively long autoradiographic exposure times (50-300 days) not only nuclear but also cytoplasmic labelling was visualized, the cytoplasmic label being present in up to 96% of the cells. The cytoplasmic label was predominantly associated with the mitochondria and was removed from the cells nearly completely by treatment with DNase but not with RNase or cold perchloric acid. It is concluded that this cytoplasmic label mainly represents /sup 3/H-TdR incorporated into mitochondrial DNA which is continuously renewed in an average turnover time of 14 days or less. This value is compatible with a turnover time of 11 days for mitochondrial DNA in mammalian cells reported in the literature.

  11. Marker-assisted identification of restorer gene(s) in iso-cytoplasmic restorer lines of WA cytoplasm in rice and assessment of their fertility restoration potential across environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Bhowmick, Prolay Kumar; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Malik, Manoj; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Seth, R; Nagarajan, M; Krishnan, S Gopala; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Iso-cytoplasmic restorers possess the same male sterile cytoplasm as the cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines, thereby minimizing the potential cyto-nuclear conflict in the hybrids. Restoration of fertility of the wild abortive CMS is governed by two major genes namely, Rf3 and Rf4 . Therefore, assessing the allelic status of these restorer genes in the iso-cytoplasmic restorers using molecular markers will not only help in estimating the efficiency of these genes either alone or in combination, in fertility restoration in the hybrids in different environments, but will also be useful in determining the efficacy of these markers. In the present study, the efficiency of molecular markers in identifying genotypes carrying restorer allele of the gene(s) Rf3 and Rf4, restoring male fertility of WA cytoplasm in rice was assessed in a set of 100 iso-cytoplasmic rice restorers using gene linked as well as candidate gene based markers. In order to validate the efficacy of markers in identifying the restorers, a sub-set of selected 25 iso-cytoplasmic rice restorers were crossed with four different cytoplasmic male sterile lines namely, IR 79156A, IR 58025A, Pusa 6A and RTN 12A, and the pollen and spikelet fertility of the F 1 s were evaluated at three different locations. Marker analysis showed that Rf4 was the predominant fertility restorer gene in the iso-cytoplasmic restorers and Rf3 had a synergistic effect on fertility restoration. The efficiency of gene based markers, DRCG-RF4-14 and DRRM-RF3-10 for Rf4 (87%) and Rf3 (84%) genes was higher than respective gene-linked SSR markers RM6100 (80%) and RM3873 (82%). It is concluded that the gene based markers can be effectively used in identifying fertility restorer lines obviating the need for making crosses and evaluating the F 1 s. Though gene based markers are more efficient, there is a need to identify functional polymorphisms which can provide 100% efficiency. Three iso-cytoplasmic restorers namely, PRR 300, PRR 363

  12. Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. McEwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21.

  13. Serum antinuclear antibody in adult Thais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapinjumrune, Chanwit; Prucktrakul, Chalakorn; Sooktonglarng, Trakarn; Thongprasom, Kobkan

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the presence of antinuclear antibody (ANA) in older Thais compared with middle-age and younger participants. Antinuclear antibody represents the first step in the diagnostic testing for lupus erythematosus (LE) and other autoimmune diseases. Due to the lack of reference ANA levels in older, middle-age and younger Thais healthy participants, this study will be useful for determining the proper diagnostic and treatment criteria. There were 28 older (60-76 years), 17 middle-age (41-59 years) and 13 younger (24-40 years) participants in this study. Immunofluorescence was performed to analyse the ANA staining pattern and titre levels in the participants' blood samples. The presence of serum ANA was found in 18 of 28 cases (64.3%), four of 17 (23.5%) and one of 13 cases (7.7%) of the older, middle-age and younger participants, respectively. The difference in the number of serum ANA-positive participants between the older, middle-age and younger groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the ANA positive in older participants presented more than one staining pattern. The speckled pattern was the most commonly detected ANA staining pattern in the older group, being found in 12 cases followed by cytoplasmic pattern (10 cases), homogeneous pattern (nine cases) and nucleolar pattern (five cases). In the middle-age group, the speckled pattern was found in four cases, whereas one younger participant presented a nucleolar pattern. Serum ANA positive was significantly higher in the older group compared with the middle-age and younger groups. There were variations of the serum ANA staining patterns in the older group. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Association of microRNAs with antibody response to mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in t...

  15. Generalized Platform for Antibody Detection using the Antibody Catalyzed Water Oxidation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, M. Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L.; Tague, Michele E.; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A.; Abru?a, H?ctor D.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody ...

  16. Induction of cytoplasmic male sterility by gamma-ray and chemical mutagens in sugar beets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Toshiro [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1982-03-01

    Male sterile plants appeared in the population of N cytoplasm sugar beet strains, H-19 and H-2002, when their dry seeds were exposed to 50 kR gamma-ray, and the male sterility was maintained up to the M/sub 4/ generation through the mother plants. Cytoplasmic inheritance was confirmed by the reciprocal crossings between plants with normal phenotype from gamma-strains (progeneis of the male mutants which transmitted male sterility through the mother plants) and H-19 or H-1001. The crossing experiments suggested that various kinds of cytoplasm were induced by gamma-ray irradiation, and that different nuclear genes were responsible for the respective cytoplasms. A specific relationship between the pollen restoring genes and the sterile cytoplasms was established, and was named ''one set of pollen restoring genes for one cytoplasm''. It is probable that the cytoplasmic mutation occurred in normal cytoplasm strains and the specific combination between the altered cytoplasm and the recessive nuclear gene produced male sterility. Ethyl methane sulphonate, ethidium bromide, acriflavine and streptomycin were also effective in inducing cytoplasmic mutation in sugar beets.

  17. Induction of cytoplasmic male sterility by gamma-ray and chemical mutagens in sugar beets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Toshiro

    1982-01-01

    Male sterile plants appeared in the population of N cytoplasm sugar beet strains, H-19 and H-2002, when their dry seeds were exposed to 50 kR gamma-ray, and the male sterility was maintained up to the M 4 generation through the mother plants. Cytoplasmic inheritance was confirmed by the reciprocal crossings between plants with normal phenotype from gamma-strains (progeneis of the male mutants which transmitted male sterility through the mother plants) and H-19 or H-1001. The crossing experiments suggested that various kinds of cytoplasm were induced by gamma-ray irradiation, and that different nuclear genes were responsible for the respective cytoplasms. A specific relationship between the pollen restoring genes and the sterile cytoplasms was established, and was named ''one set of pollen restoring genes for one cytoplasm''. It is probable that the cytoplasmic mutation occurred in normal cytoplasm strains and the specific combination between the altered cytoplasm and the recessive nuclear gene produced male sterility. Ethyl methane sulphonate, ethidium bromide, acriflavine and streptomycin were also effective in inducing cytoplasmic mutation in sugar beets. (Kaihara, S.)

  18. B cell and antibody repertoire development in rabbits: the requirement of gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mage, Rose G; Lanning, Dennis; Knight, Katherine L

    2006-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of rabbits has interested immunologists for decades, in part because of the ease with which large quantities of high affinity antibodies can be obtained in serum, and in part because of the presence of genetic variants, allotypes, within V(H), C(H) and C(L) regions. Studies of these allotypes led to the initial descriptions of allelic exclusion, and neonatal suppression of serum Ig production (allotype suppression), and were instrumental in demonstrating that V and C regions are encoded by separate genes and are usually expressed in cis. The immune system of rabbit continues to be of interest primarily because of the use of both gene conversion and somatic hypermutation to diversify rearranged heavy and light chain genes and the role that gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and intestinal flora play in developing the primary (preimmune) antibody repertoire.

  19. Consequences of cytoplasmic irradiation. Studies from microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hong, Mei; Chai, Yunfei; Hei, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing dogma for radiation biology is that genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation such as mutations and carcinogenesis are attributed mainly to direct damage to the nucleus. However, with the development of microbeam that can target precise positions inside the cells, accumulating evidences have shown that energy deposit by radiation in nuclear DNA is not required to trigger the damage, extra-nuclear or extra-cellular radiation could induce the similar biological effects as well. This review will summarize the biological responses after cytoplasm irradiated by microbeam, and the possible mechanisms involved in cytoplasmic irradiation. (author)

  20. Identification and characterization of vp7 gene in Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Min; Liang, Zi; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Liyuan; Kuang, Sulan; Cao, Guangli; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-09-05

    The genome of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) contains 10 double stranded RNA segments (S1-S10). The segment 7 (S7) encodes 50kDa protein which is considered as a structural protein. The expression pattern and function of p50 in the virus life cycle are still unclear. In this study, the viral structural protein 7 (VP7) polyclonal antibody was prepared with immunized mouse to explore the presence of small VP7 gene-encoded proteins in Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus. The expression pattern of vp7 gene was investigated by its overexpression in BmN cells. In addition to VP7, supplementary band was identified with western blotting technique. The virion, BmCPV infected cells and midguts were also examined using western blotting technique. 4, 2 and 5 bands were detected in the corresponding samples, respectively. The replication of BmCPV genome in the cultured cells and midgut of silkworm was decreased by reducing the expression level of vp7 gene using RNA interference. In immunoprecipitation experiments, using a polyclonal antiserum directed against the VP7, one additional shorter band in BmCPV infected midguts was detected, and then the band was analyzed with mass spectrum (MS), the MS results showed thatone candidate interacted protein (VP7 voltage-dependent anion-selective channel-like isoform, VDAC) was identified from silkworm. We concluded that the novel viral product was generated with a leaky scanning mechanism and the VDAC may be an interacted protein with VP7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Association Between Serum Antibodies to Periodontal Bacteria and Rheumatoid Factor in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Charlene E; Kopp, Jacob; Papapanou, Panos N; Molitor, Jerry A; Demmer, Ryan T

    2016-10-01

    Alterations in the microbiome, including the periodontal microbiome, may be a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most studies that have analyzed this association are relatively small, focus primarily on a single periodontal pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis), and are not population based. This study was undertaken to investigate the association between elevated serum levels of IgG antibodies to 19 periodontal species and the prevalence of rheumatoid factor (RF) in a large nationally representative sample of adults. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-III) is a cross-sectional sample of the noninstitutionalized US population (n = 33,994). Our study population included all dentate participants who were 60 years and older, did not have RA as defined by a modified version of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria, and had complete data for both serum IgG antibodies against periodontal bacteria and serum RF antibody titer (n = 2,461). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) summarizing the relationship between the 19 periodontal serum IgG antibodies and RF seropositivity ranged from 0.53 (95% CI 0.29-0.97) to 1.27 (95% CI 0.79-2.06), and 17 of the 19 observed ORs were periodontal bacteria are mostly unassociated with RF seropositivity in the nationally representative NHANES-III. Elevated levels of antibodies to P intermedia and C ochracea are associated with lower odds of RF seropositivity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Heparin-associated thrombocytopenia: antibody binding specificity to platelet antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, D M; Howe, S E

    1985-11-01

    Sera from four patients with heparin-associated thrombocytopenia (HAT) were evaluated by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect heparin-dependent serum platelet-bindable immunoglobulin (S-PBIg) and by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation to investigate the specificity of the antibody binding. All HAT sera showed mildly increased S-PBIg (mean, 7.8 fg per platelet; normal, less than 6.0 fg per platelet) to intact target platelets in the ELISA, which was markedly increased in the presence of heparin (mean, 20.9 fg per platelet). This increase was 20-fold greater than normal control sera, which showed a mean differential increase of only 0.5 fg per platelet. Immunoglobulin binding specificity to platelet antigens was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of platelet lysate with transfer of the platelet fractions onto nitrocellulose strips (Western blotting) and subsequent immunoassay using HAT and normal sera. In the presence of heparin, the four HAT patients demonstrated increased binding of immunoglobulin to platelet antigens of apparent molecular weights of 180, 124, and 82 kd. Radiolabeled heparin when incubated with HAT sera, normal sera, or albumin blanks bound to platelet proteins of the same apparent molecular weights. These observations are consistent with current hypotheses suggesting that HAT antibody is directed to heparin-platelet complexes or, alternatively, that heparin induces conformational change of antigenic sites on the platelet membrane.

  3. Cytoplasmic RAP1 mediates cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Lan, Xiaoying; Shi, Xianping; Zhao, Kai; Wang, Dongrui; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Faqian; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-05-18

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (e.g., cisplatin) are the first-line drugs to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but NSCLC develops resistance to the agent, limiting therapeutic efficacy. Despite many approaches to identifying the underlying mechanism for cisplatin resistance, there remains a lack of effective targets in the population that resist cisplatin treatment. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of cytoplasmic RAP1, a previously identified positive regulator of NF-κB signaling, in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. We found that the expression of cytoplasmic RAP1 was significantly higher in high-grade NSCLC tissues than in low-grade NSCLC; compared with a normal pulmonary epithelial cell line, the A549 NSCLC cells exhibited more cytoplasmic RAP1 expression as well as increased NF-κB activity; cisplatin treatment resulted in a further increase of cytoplasmic RAP1 in A549 cells; overexpression of RAP1 desensitized the A549 cells to cisplatin, and conversely, RAP1 depletion in the NSCLC cells reduced their proliferation and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin, indicating that RAP1 is required for cell growth and has a key mediating role in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. The RAP1-mediated cisplatin resistance was associated with the activation of NF-κB signaling and the upregulation of the antiapoptosis factor BCL-2. Intriguingly, in the small portion of RAP1-depleted cells that survived cisplatin treatment, no induction of NF-κB activity and BCL-2 expression was observed. Furthermore, in established cisplatin-resistant A549 cells, RAP1 depletion caused BCL2 depletion, caspase activation and dramatic lethality to the cells. Hence, our results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic RAP1-NF-κB-BCL2 axis represents a key pathway to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells, identifying RAP1 as a marker and a potential therapeutic target for cisplatin resistance of NSCLC.

  4. Association of antibody to E2 protein of human papillomavirus and p16INK4A with progression of HPV-infected cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Swangphon, Piyawut; Luanratanakorn, Sanguanchoke; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee; Tungsiriwattana, Thumwadee; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Burassakarn, Ati; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2018-05-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 and L1 proteins are expressed in cervical cells during the lytic stage of infection. Overexpression of p16 INK4A is a biomarker of HPV-associated cervical neoplasia. This study investigated antibodies to HPV16 E2, HPV16 L1, and p16 INK4A in sera from women with no squamous intraepithelial lesion (No-SIL) of the cervix, low-grade SIL, high-grade SIL, and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies in sera were determined by western blot. Among 116 samples, 69 (60%) were HPV DNA-positive. Percentages seropositive for anti-E2, -L1, and -p16 INK4A antibodies were 39.6, 22.4, and 23.3%, respectively. Anti-E2 antibody was significantly correlated with HPV DNA-positive cases. Eighty-seven women (75%) were regarded as infected with HPV, having at least one positive result from HPV DNA, L1, or E2 antibody. Antibody to p16 INK4A was associated with HPV infection (odds = 5.444, 95% CI 1.203-24.629, P = 0.028) and precancerous cervical lesions (odds = 5.132, 95% CI 1.604-16.415, P = 0.006). Interestingly, the concurrent detection of anti-E2 and -p16 INK4A antibodies was significantly associated with HPV infection (odds = 1.382, 95% CI 1.228-1.555, P = 0.044). These antibodies might be good candidate biomarkers for monitoring HPV-associated cervical lesion development to cancer.

  5. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-04-07

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting ..cap alpha..-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native ..cap alpha..-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of ..cap alpha..-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of ..cap alpha..-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor.

  6. Bronchial asthma is not associated with auto-antibodies to lipocortin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J R; Podgorski, M R; Godolphin, J L; Goulding, N J; Lee, T H

    1990-03-01

    Corticosteroids may mediate some of their anti-inflammatory action by the induction of lipocortin-1, which inhibits phospholipase A2 activity. Raised levels of antibodies to lipocortin have been found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and it has been postulated that these may contribute to steroid resistance. A proportion of asthmatic patients fail to respond to treatment with corticosteroids and one possible mechanism is that these patients have raised levels of anti-lipocortin antibodies. We have therefore measured IgG and IgM antibodies to lipocortin by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in eight corticosteroid-sensitive (CS) and 7 corticosteroid-resistant (CR) asthmatic subjects, and in eight normal controls. Comparison of asthmatic subjects with normal controls revealed no significant differences in either IgG or IgM antibodies to lipocortin. Comparison of CS asthmatic subjects with CR asthmatic subjects similarly revealed no significant differences in the concentration of either IgG or IgM antibodies to lipocortin. Levels of anti-lipocortin antibodies did not correlate with clinical response to treatment with 40 mg/day of prednisolone. Anti-lipocortin antibodies are unlikely to be involved in the inflammation seen in asthma, or in the relative insensitivity to corticosteroids seen in CR asthmatic subjects.

  7. Lack of gender-specific antibody recognition of products from domains of a var gene implicated in pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Zornig, Hanne D; Buhmann, Caecilie

    2003-01-01

    Gender-specific and parity-dependent acquired antibody recognition is characteristic of variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed by chondroitin sulfate A (CSA)-adherent Plasmodium falciparum involved in pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). However, antibody recognition of recombinant products...

  8. Association of Levels of Antibodies from Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Extracellular Proteins of Food and Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Hevia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract mucosa and is related to an abnormal immune response to commensal bacteria. Our aim of the present work has been to explore the levels of antibodies (IgG and IgA raised against extracellular proteins produced by LAB and its association with IBD. We analyzed, by Western-blot and ELISA, the presence of serum antibodies (IgA and IgG developed against extracellular protein fractions produced by different food bacteria from the genera Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. We used a sera collection consisting of healthy individuals (HC, n=50, Crohn's disease patients (CD, n=37, and ulcerative colitis patients (UC, n=15. Levels of IgA antibodies developed against a cell-wall hydrolase from Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus GG (CWH were significantly higher in the IBD group (P<0.002; n=52. The specificity of our measurements was confirmed by measuring IgA antibodies developed against the CWH peptide 365-VNTSNQTAAVSAS-377. IBD patients appeared to have different immune response to food bacteria. This paper sets the basis for developing systems for early detection of IBD, based on the association of high levels of antibodies developed against extracellular proteins from food and probiotic bacteria.

  9. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  11. Association of Circulating Transfer RNA fragments with antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Eduardo; Cai, Guohong; Kuehn, Larry A; Register, Karen B; McDaneld, Tara G; Neill, John D

    2018-03-13

    High throughput sequencing allows identification of small non-coding RNAs. Transfer RNA Fragments are a class of small non-coding RNAs, and have been identified as being involved in inhibition of gene expression. Given their role, it is possible they may be involved in mediating the infection-induced defense response in the host. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify 5' transfer RNA fragments (tRF5s) associated with a serum antibody response to M. bovis in beef cattle. The tRF5s encoding alanine, glutamic acid, glycine, lysine, proline, selenocysteine, threonine, and valine were associated (P < 0.05) with antibody response against M. bovis. tRF5s encoding alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, histidine, lysine, proline, selenocysteine, threonine, and valine were associated (P < 0.05) with season, which could be attributed to calf growth. There were interactions (P < 0.05) between antibody response to M. bovis and season for tRF5 encoding selenocysteine (anticodon UGA), proline (anticodon CGG), and glutamine (anticodon TTG). Selenocysteine is a rarely used amino acid that is incorporated into proteins by the opal stop codon (UGA), and its function is not well understood. Differential expression of tRF5s was identified between ELISA-positive and negative animals. Production of tRF5s may be associated with a host defense mechanism triggered by bacterial infection, or it may provide some advantage to a pathogen during infection of a host. Further studies are needed to establish if tRF5s could be used as a diagnostic marker of chronic exposure.

  12. Reversible Dementia: Two Nursing Home Patients With Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Antibody-Associated Limbic Encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reintjes, W.; Romijn, M.D.M.; den Hollander, D.; ter Bruggen, J.P.; van Marum, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable

  13. Raman microspectroscopy of nucleus and cytoplasm for human colon cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongbo; Du, Jingjing; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-11-15

    Subcellular Raman analysis is a promising clinic tool for cancer diagnosis, but constrained by the difficulty of deciphering subcellular spectra in actual human tissues. We report a label-free subcellular Raman analysis for use in cancer diagnosis that integrates subcellular signature spectra by subtracting cytoplasm from nucleus spectra (Nuc.-Cyt.) with a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model. Raman mapping with the classical least-squares (CLS) model allowed direct visualization of the distribution of the cytoplasm and nucleus. The PLS-DA model was employed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of five types of spectral datasets, including non-selective, nucleus, cytoplasm, ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (Nuc./Cyt.), and nucleus minus cytoplasm (Nuc.-Cyt.), resulting in diagnostic sensitivity of 88.3%, 84.0%, 98.4%, 84.5%, and 98.9%, respectively. Discriminating between normal and cancerous cells of actual human tissues through subcellular Raman markers is feasible, especially when using the nucleus-cytoplasm difference spectra. The subcellular Raman approach had good stability, and had excellent diagnostic performance for rectal as well as colon tissues. The insights gained from this study shed new light on the general applicability of subcellular Raman analysis in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin α, karyopherin β, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  15. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Chul, E-mail: scpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  16. Seroreactive marker for inflammatory bowel disease and associations with antibodies to dietary proteins in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Emily G; Gressitt, Kristin L; Yang, Shuojia; Stallings, Cassie R; Origoni, Andrea E; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Alaedini, Armin; Dickerson, Faith B; Yolken, Robert H

    2014-05-01

    Immune sensitivity to wheat glutens and bovine milk caseins may affect a subset of individuals with bipolar disorder. Digested byproducts of these foods are exorphins that have the potential to impact brain physiology through action at opioid receptors. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract might accelerate exposure of food antigens to systemic circulation and help explain elevated gluten and casein antibody levels in individuals with bipolar disorder. We measured a marker of GI inflammation, anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), in non-psychiatric controls (n = 207), in patients with bipolar disorder without a recent onset of psychosis (n = 226), and in patients with bipolar disorder with a recent onset of psychosis (n = 38). We compared ASCA levels to antibodies against gluten, casein, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), influenza A, influenza B, measles, and Toxoplasma gondii. Elevated ASCA conferred a 3.5-4.4-fold increased odds ratio of disease association (age-, race-, and gender-corrected multinomial logistic regressions, p ≤ 0.00001) that was independent of type of medication received. ASCA correlated with food antibodies in both bipolar disorder groups (R(2)  = 0.29-0.59, p ≤ 0.0005), and with measles and T. gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the recent onset psychosis bipolar disorder group (R(2)  = 0.31-0.36, p ≤ 0.004-0.01). Elevated seropositivity of a GI-related marker and its association with antibodies to food-derived proteins and self-reported GI symptoms suggest a GI comorbidity in at least a subgroup of individuals with bipolar disorder. Marker seroreactivity may also represent part of an overall heightened activated immune state inherent to this mood disorder. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with unusual positivity of anti-ATLA (adult T-cell leukemia-cell-associated antigen) antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, T; Okamura, H; Okamura, T; Gondo, H; Kudo, J; Shibuya, T; Harada, M; Niho, Y

    1990-03-01

    A 56-year-old female was admitted because of generalized lymphadenopathy. Based upon histological findings of biopsied lymph node, malignant lymphoma, diffuse large cell type was diagnosed. The surface marker analysis showed that malignant cells were positive for CD4 and CD2 but negative for CD8. Although anti-ATLA (adult T-cell leukemia associated antigen) antibody was negative with the use of a gelatin particle agglutination method (P.A.), other methods such as an indirect immunofluorescence assay (I.F.), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (E.I.A.) and a Western blotting assay revealed the positivity for anti-ATLA antibody. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L) was confirmed by the presence of monoclonal integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA in biopsied specimen. This case, showing a pattern of P.A. (-) and I.F. (+), is extremely unusual, because I.F. and P.A. show highly close correlation. Thus, it is important to employ different methods for screening of anti-ATLA antibodies in the diagnosis of ATL/L.

  18. Association of beta2-glycoprotein I IgG and IgM antibodies with thrombosis and thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Anne-Sofie Boertmann; Jacobsen, Søren; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2001-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) have been known for decades. Their relation to clinical manifestations, primarily thromboses and thrombocytopenia, was recognised in the 1980s. In this clinical study two cohorts of patients, a population-based (84 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE......)) and a hospital-based (87 patients with SLE and 53 with other connective tissue diseases) were investigated for APA and associated clinical manifestations. Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) of IgG and IgM classes were found in 13 and 38% of the population-based patients and in 29 and 58% of the hospital...

  19. [Limbic encephalitis with antibodies against intracellular antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiko; Kamei, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is often associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), breast cancer, testicular tumors, teratoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and thymoma. The common clinical manifestations of limbic encephalitis are subacute onset, cognitive dysfunction, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are considered to occur because of cytotoxic T cell responses and antibodies against target neuronal proteins that are usually expressed by an underlying tumor. The main intracellular antigens related to limbic encephalitis are Hu, Ma2, and less frequently CV2/CRMP5 and amphiphysin. The anti-Hu antibody, which is involved in cerebellar degeneration and extensive or multifocal encephalomyelitis such as limbic encephalitis is closely associated with a history of smoking and SCLC. The anti-Ma2 antibody is associated with encephalitis of the limbic system, hypothalamus and brain-stem. For this reason, some patients with limbic encephalitis have sleep disorders (including REM sleep abnormalities), severe hypokinesis and gaze palsy in addition to limbic dysfunction. In men aged less than 50 years, anti-Ma2 antibody encephalitis is almost always associated with testicular germ-cell tumors that are occasionally difficult to detect. In older men and women, the most common tumors are non-SCLC and breast cancer. Limbic encephalitis associated with cell-surface antigens (e.g., voltage-gated potassium channels, NMDA receptors) is mediated by antibodies and often improves after a reduction in the antibody titer and after tumor resection. Patients with antibodies against intracellular antigens, except for those with anti-Ma2 antibodies and testicular tumors, are less responsive. Early diagnosis and treatment with immunotherapy, tumor resection or both are important for improving or stabilizing the condition of limbic encephalitis.

  20. Characterization of Novel Cytoplasmic PARP in the Brain of Octopus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE LISA, EMILIA; DE MAIO, ANNA; MOROZ, LEONID L.; MOCCIA, FRANCESCO; MENNELLA, MARIA ROSARIA FARAONE; DI COSMO, ANNA

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigation has focused on the participation of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) reaction in the invertebrate central nervous system (CNS) during the process of long-term memory (LTM). In this paper, we characterize, localize, and assign a possible role to a cytoplasmic PARP in the brain of Octopus vulgaris. PARP activity was assayed in optic lobes, supraesophageal mass, and optic nerves. The highest levels of enzyme were found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Hyper-activation of the enzyme was detected in Octopus brain after visual discrimination training. Finally, cytoplasmic PARP was found to inhibit Octopus vulgaris actin polymerization. We propose that the cytoplasmic PARP plays a role in vivo to induce the cytoskeletonal reorganization that occurs during learning-induced neuronal plasticity. PMID:22815366

  1. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Significant rising antibody titres to influenza A are associated with an acute reduction in milk yield in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Timothy R; Brown, Ian H; Essen, Steve C; Young, Stuart C L

    2008-10-01

    Sporadic cases of an acute fall in milk production, "milk drop", were investigated in a Holstein Friesian dairy herd in Devon. The investigation was a case control study with two controls per case. Paired blood samples demonstrated that rising antibody titres to human influenza A/England/333/80 (H1N1) and human influenza A/Eng/427/88 (H3N2) were associated with an acute fall in milk production. Rising titres to bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVD), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3) were not associated with an acute fall in milk production. Cases with rises in antibody to influenza A had significantly higher respiratory scores and rectal temperatures than their controls. The mean loss of milk production for the cases with rises in antibody to influenza A compared to their controls was 159.9L. This study provides further evidence that influenza A persists in cattle and causes clinical disease.

  3. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    instances of curious sex ratios exemplify an important principle: the fitness ..... markable transition - the whole means of sex determination has changed. No longer ... to the cytoplasmic symbiont is self-evident; the symbionts simply increase the.

  4. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberse, R. C.; Stapel, S. O.; Schuurman, J.; Rispens, T.

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  5. A novel monoclonal antibody for detection of galectin-9 in tissue sections: application to human tissues infected by oncogenic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barjon Clément

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galectin-9 is a mammalian lectin which possesses immunosuppressive properties. Excessive production of galectin-9 has been reported in two types of human virus-associated diseases chronic hepatitis C and nasopharyngeal carcinoma associated to the Epstein-Barr virus. The objective of this study was to produce new monoclonal antibodies targeting galectin-9 in order to improve its detection in clinical samples, especially on tissue sections analysed by immunohistochemistry. Methods Hybridomas were produced through immunization of mice with the recombinant c-terminus part of galectin-9 (residues 191 to 355 of the long isoform and semi-solid fusion of spleen cells with Sp2/0 cells. Monoclonal antibodies were characterized using ELISA, epitope mapping, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results We selected seven hybridomas producing antibodies reacting with our recombinant c-terminus galectin-9 in ELISA. Five of them reacted with the epitope “TPAIPPMMYPHPA” (common to all isoforms, residues 210 to 222 of the long isoform and stained all three isoforms of galectin-9 analysed by western blot. One of them, 1G3,demonstrated very good sensitivity and specificity when used for immunohistochemistry. Using 1G3, we could confirm the intense and constant expression of galectin-9 by Epstein-Barr virus positive malignant cells from nasopharyngeal carcinomas. In most samples, specific staining was detected in both cytoplasm and nuclei. Galectin-9 was also detected in liver biopsies from patients infected by the human hepatitis C or B viruses with expression not only in inflammatory leucocytes and Kupffer cells, but also in hepatocytes. In contrast, galectin-9 was virtually absent in non-infected liver specimens. Conclusion The 1G3 monoclonal antibody will be a powerful tool to assess galectin-9 expression and distribution especially in diseases related to oncogenic viruses.

  6. [Anti-VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis/Morvan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Tamako; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-04-01

    Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (anti-VGKC-Ab) cause hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerve and central nervous system. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is the chief manifestation of Issacs syndrome and cramp-fasciculation syndrome. Morvan syndrome is characterized by neuromyotonia with autonomic and CNS involvement. Manifestations involving the CNS without peripheral involvement are characteristic of limbic encephalitis and epilepsy. The clinical features of anti-VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalitis are subacute onset of episodic memory impairment, disorientation and agitation. Hyponatremia is also noted in most patients. Cortico-steroid therapy, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin are effective in treating to not only the clinical symptoms but also hyponatremia. Unlike other anti-VGKC-Ab-associated neurological disorders, paraneoplastic cases are rare. Thus, anti-VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalopathy is considered to be an autoimmune, non-paraneoplastic, potentially treatable encephalitis. Morvan syndrome is characterized by widespread neurological symptoms involving the peripheral nervous system (neuromyotonia), autonomic system (hyperhidrosis, severe constipation, urinary incontinence, and cardiac arrhythmia) and the CNS (severe insomnia, hallucinations, impairment of short-term memory and epilepsy). Many patients have an underlying tumor, for example thymoma, lung cancer, testicular cancer and lymphoma; this indicates the paraneoplastic nature of the disease. Needle electro-myography reveals myokimic discharge. In nerve conduction study, stimulus-induced repetitive descharges are frequently demonstrated in involved muscles. Plasma exchange is an effective treatment approach, and tumor resection also improves symptoms. Both VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalitis and Morvan syndrome can be successfully treated. Therefore, when these diseases are suspected, it's important to measure the anti-VGKC-Ab level.

  7. Investigation on Cell Proliferation with a New Antibody against Thymidine Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naining Wang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytosolic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1 is one of the enzymes involved in DNA replication. Based on biochemical studies, TK1 is activated at late G1 of cell cycle, and its activity correlates with the cell proliferation. We have developed a polyclonal anti‐TK1 antibody against a synthetic peptide from the C‐terminus of human TK1. Using this antibody, here we demonstrate the exclusive location of TK1 in the cytoplasm of cells. Cell cycle dependent TK1 expression was studied by simultaneous fluorescence staining for TK1 and bromodeoxyuridine, by using elutriated cells, and by quantitation of the amount TK1 in relation to the cellular DNA content. TK1, which was strongly expressed in the cells in S+G2 period, raised at late G1 and decreased during mitosis. The amount of TK1 increased three folds from late G1 to G2. TK1 positive cells were demonstrated in areas of proliferation activity of various normal and malignant tissues. The new anti‐TK1 antibody works in archival specimens and is a specific marker of cell proliferation.

  8. High ASMA+ Fibroblasts and Low Cytoplasmic HMGB1+ Breast Cancer Cells Predict Poor Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornsupak, Kamolporn; Jamjuntra, Pranisa; Warnnissorn, Malee; O-Charoenrat, Pornchai; Sa-Nguanraksa, Doonyapat; Thuwajit, Peti; Eccles, Suzanne A; Thuwajit, Chanitra

    2017-10-01

    The influence of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been recognized in several cancers, although their roles in breast cancer are unclear. The present study aimed to determine the levels and prognostic significance of α-smooth muscle actin-positive (ASMA + ) CAFs, plus HMGB1 and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in cancer cells. A total of 127 breast samples, including 96 malignant and 31 benign, were examined for ASMA, HMGB1, and RAGE by immunohistochemistry. The χ 2 test and Fisher's exact test were used to test the association of each protein with clinicopathologic parameters. The Kaplan-Meier method or log-rank test and Cox regression were used for survival analysis. ASMA + fibroblast infiltration was significantly increased in the tumor stroma compared with that in benign breast tissue. The levels of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly greater in the breast cancer tissue than in the benign breast tissues. High ASMA expression correlated significantly with large tumor size, clinical stage III-IV, and angiolymphatic and perinodal invasion. In contrast, increased cytoplasmic HMGB1 correlated significantly with small tumor size, pT stage, early clinical stage, luminal subtype (but not triple-negative subtype), and estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression. The levels of ASMA (hazard ratio, 14.162; P = .010) and tumor cytoplasmic HMGB1 (hazard ratio, 0.221; P = .005) could serve as independent prognostic markers for metastatic relapse in breast cancer patients. The ASMA-high/HMGB1-low profile provided the most reliable prediction of metastatic relapse. We present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the potential clinical implications of the combined assessment of ASMA + fibroblasts and cytoplasmic HMGB1 in breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiolabelled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    A steadily growing number of tumor-associated antigens are used to raise antibodies used for the detection of human tumors by external imaging, a technique termed immunoscintigraphy. The majority of these clinical antibody studies are performed using Iodine-131, which is cheap, readily available and easily attached to protein. It has the disadvantage of having a high energy gamma emission (365 keV) which is poorly detected by modern cameras, so that increasing use is now being made of more appropriate labels with lower energies for imaging, such as Iodine-123, Indium-111 and Technetium-99m. A number of research centres in the United Kingdom are currently involved in the production of tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies, only a small number of which are finally selected for diagnostic use. These developments represent a major area of advancement in Nuclear Medicine and when used for imaging are capable of providing diagnostic information complimentary to other diagnostic techniques

  10. Circulating Anti-Elastin Antibody Levels and Arterial Disease Characteristics: Associations with Arterial Stiffness and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Kihyuk; Park, Sungha; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Lee, Sang-Hak

    2015-11-01

    Elastin is a major arterial structural protein, and elastin-derived peptides are related to arterial change. We previously reported on a novel assay developed using aortic elastin peptides; however, its clinical implications remain unclear. In this study, we assessed whether anti-elastin antibody titers reflect the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) or its characteristics. We included 174 CAD patients and 171 age- and sex-matched controls. Anti-elastin antibody titers were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Parameters of arterial stiffness, including the augmentation index (AI) and heart-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (hfPWV), were measured non-invasively. The clinical and angiographic characteristics of CAD patients were also evaluated. Associations between anti-elastin levels and vascular characteristics were examined by linear regression analysis. The median blood level of anti-elastin was significantly lower in the CAD group than in the controls [197 arbitrary unit (a.u.) vs. 63 a.u., pelastin were significantly lower in men and in subjects with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or high hfPWV. Nevertheless, anti-elastin levels were not dependent on atherothrombotic events or the angiographic severity of CAD. In a multivariate analysis, male sex (β=-0.38, pelastin levels. Lower levels of anti-elastin are related to CAD. The association between antibody titers and CAD is linked to arterial stiffness rather than the advancement of atherosclerosis.

  11. Epidemiology of ANCA associated vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Koldingsnes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available ANCA associated vasculitis (AAV comprises three syndromes with systemic vasculitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG, Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS and icroscopic polyangiitis (MPA, which all involve small and medium sized vessels and are associated with antibodies against cytoplasmatic antibodies in neutrophils (ANCA. Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN is included in this review as it also affects medium sized vessels, and has many clinical findings in common with the AAV.Since the recognition of ANCA, increasing data have become available on the epidemiology of these vasculitidis. WG constitutes half of the AAV and its prevalence has increased from 30/million in the late 1980’s in the USA to 160/million in this century in northern Europe. The prevalence for the whole group of primary systemic vasculitides is now 300/million in Sweden. The annual incidence of WG increased from 6.0/million to 14/million during the 1990’s in Tromsø, but it is unknown if this is a true increase or the result of an increased awareness of the diagnosis. For the whole group of AAV, the annual incidence in most more recent studies is relatively constant over time and by geographical location, ranging from 13 to 21/million. Nonetheless there are interesting differences in the prevalence of specific vasculitis between different geographical areas, as well as for sub specificities of ANCA.There seems to be a South-North gradient for WG and PR3-ANCA with high figures reported from northern Europe and southern New Zealand. In European studies WG is 90% PR3-ANCA positive. MPA which is predominantly MPO-ANCA associated are more frequent in the Mediterranean countries and also has an increasing gradient towards east-Asia, as almost all AAV in China and Japan are diagnosed as MPA, predominantly MPO-ANCA positive.There are also some ethnic and gender differences. WG is most prevalent among Caucasians in the USA and in people with European ancestors in Paris and in New Zealand, less

  12. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  14. Broadly reactive antibodies specific for Plasmodium falciparum MSP-119 are associated with the protection of naturally exposed children against infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dent Arlene E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 19 kDa C-terminal region of Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-1 is a known target of naturally acquired humoral immunity and a malaria vaccine candidate. MSP-119 has four predominant haplotypes resulting in amino acid changes labelled EKNG, QKNG, QTSR and ETSR. IgG antibodies directed against all four variants have been detected, but it is not known if these variant specific antibodies are associated with haplotype-specific protection from infection. Methods Blood samples from 201 healthy Kenyan adults and children who participated in a 12-week treatment time-to-infection study were evaluated. Venous blood drawn at baseline (week 0 was examined for functional and serologic antibodies to MSP-119 and MSP-142 variants. MSP-119 haplotypes were detected by a multiplex PCR assay at baseline and weekly throughout the study. Generalized linear models controlling for age, baseline MSP-119 haplotype and parasite density were used to determine the relationship between infecting P. falciparum MSP-119 haplotype and variant-specific antibodies. Results A total of 964 infections resulting in 1,533 MSP-119 haplotypes detected were examined. The most common haplotypes were EKNG and QKNG, followed by ETSR and QTSR. Children had higher parasite densities, greater complexity of infection (>1 haplotype, and more frequent changes in haplotypes over time compared to adults. Infecting MSP-119 haplotype at baseline (week 0 had no influence on haplotypes detected over the subsequent 11 weeks among children or adults. Children but not adults with MSP-119 and some MSP-142 variant antibodies detected by serology at baseline had delayed time-to-infection. There was no significant association of variant-specific serology or functional antibodies at baseline with infecting haplotype at baseline or during 11 weeks of follow up among children or adults. Conclusions Variant transcending IgG antibodies to MSP-119 are associated with protection

  15. Recurrence of ANCA-associated vasculitis in a patient with kidney trasplant

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    Pedro García Cosmes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Renal disease secondary to vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA can lead to chronic renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. In these patients, kidney transplantation offers excellent long-term rates of allograft and patient survival; consequently, they can be trasplanted when the clinical disease activity has remitted. However, the risk of disease relapses in the renal allograft remains, although at lower rates due to modern immunosuppressive regimes. We describe the case of a male patient with extracapillary glomerulonephritis type III C-ANCA (+ who developed a recurrence in the renal allograft 8 years after transplantation. Intensive immunosupression with plasmapheresis controlled the disease.

  16. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  17. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  18. Magnetite nanoparticles as reporters for microcarrier processing in cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reibetanz, Uta, E-mail: uta.reibetanz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM) Leipzig, Universitaet Leipzig, Philipp-Rosenthal-Strasse 55, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Institute for Medical Physics and Biophysics, Medical Faculty, Universitaet Leipzig, Haertelstrasse 16-18, 04107 Leipzig (Germany); Jankuhn, Steffen, E-mail: jankuhn@uni-leipzig.de [Division of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Geosciences, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Office for Environmental Protection and Occupational Safety, Universitaet Leipzig, Ritterstrasse 24, 04109 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    The development and therapeutic application of drug delivery systems based on colloidal microcarriers layer-by-layer coated with biopolyelectrolytes requires the investigation of their processing inside the cell for the successful and efficient transport and release of the active agents. The present study is focused on the time-dependent multilayer decomposition and the subsequent release of active agents to the cytoplasm. Magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) were used as reporter agents integrated into the protamine sulfate/dextran sulfate basis multilayer on colloidal SiO{sub 2} cores. This functionalization allows the monitoring of the multilayer decomposition due to the detection of the MNP release, visualized by means of proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) by elemental distribution of Si and Fe. The direct correlation between the microcarrier localization in endolysosomes and cytoplasm of HEK293T/17 cells via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the elemental distribution (PIXE) allows tracing the fate of the MNP-coated microcarriers in cytoplasm, and thus the processing of the multilayer. Microcarrier/cell co-incubation experiments of 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h show that a MNP release and a slight expansion into the cytoplasm occurs after a longer co-incubation of 72 h.

  19. Adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigen (ATLA) and anti-ATLA antibodies in patients with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K; Amagasaki, T; Yamada, Y; Ikeda, S; Momita, S; Toriya, K; Kamihira, S; Ichimaru, M

    1983-01-01

    Seven patients with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki district were examined for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigen (ATLA), a human retrovirus-associated antigen, and anti-ATLA antibodies. Anti-ATLA antibody reactivity with the ATLA-positive cultured cells from an ATL patient was demonstrated in four (57.1%) of seven patients. This suggests that infection by a human retrovirus may be closely associated with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki district. However, ATLA could not be induced in the cultured mononuclear cells taken from biopsied lymph nodes of the three patients examined. Hence, it is necessary to collect more direct evidence in the search for a viral etiology of Hodgkin's disease.

  20. A novel link between Sus1 and the cytoplasmic mRNA decay machinery suggests a broad role in mRNA metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llopis Ana

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is achieved by the coordinated action of multiple factors to ensure a perfect synchrony from chromatin epigenetic regulation through to mRNA export. Sus1 is a conserved mRNA export/transcription factor and is a key player in coupling transcription initiation, elongation and mRNA export. In the nucleus, Sus1 is associated to the transcriptional co-activator SAGA and to the NPC associated complex termed TREX2/THSC. Through these associations, Sus1 mediates the nuclear dynamics of different gene loci and facilitate the export of the new transcripts. Results In this study, we have investigated whether the yeast Sus1 protein is linked to factors involved in mRNA degradation pathways. We provide evidence for genetic interactions between SUS1 and genes coding for components of P-bodies such as PAT1, LSM1, LSM6 and DHH1. We demonstrate that SUS1 deletion is synthetic lethal with 5'→3' decay machinery components LSM1 and PAT1 and has a strong genetic interaction with LSM6 and DHH1. Interestingly, Sus1 overexpression led to an accumulation of Sus1 in cytoplasmic granules, which can co-localise with components of P-bodies and stress granules. In addition, we have identified novel physical interactions between Sus1 and factors associated to P-bodies/stress granules. Finally, absence of LSM1 and PAT1 slightly promotes the Sus1-TREX2 association. Conclusions In this study, we found genetic and biochemical association between Sus1 and components responsible for cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. Moreover, Sus1 accumulates in discrete cytoplasmic granules, which partially co-localise with P-bodies and stress granules under specific conditions. These interactions suggest a role for Sus1 in gene expression during cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism in addition to its nuclear function.

  1. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Amy W; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2014-11-13

    To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4(+) binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140(SR162), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcγRIIa, FcγRIIb and FcγRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcγRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection.

  2. Lack of antibodies to NMDAR or VGKC-complex in GAD and cardiolipin antibody-positive refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Peltola, Jukka; Hietaharju, Aki; Sabater, Lidia; Lang, Bethan

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years autoantibodies against neuronal proteins have been identified in several forms of autoimmune encephalitis and epilepsy. NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies are mainly associated with limbic encephalitis (LE) whereas glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and anticardiolipin (ACL) antibodies are more commonly detected in patients with chronic epilepsy. Clinical features vary between these antibodies suggesting the specificity of different neuronal antibodies in seizures. Serum samples of 14 GADA positive and 24 ACL positive patients with refractory epilepsy were analyzed for the presence of VGKC or NMDAR antibodies. No positive VGKC or NMDAR antibodies were found in these patients. The results confirm the different significance of these neuronal antibodies in seizure disorders. Different autoantibodies have different significance in seizures and probably have different pathophysiological mechanisms of actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Kothur

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination.To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS and -negative (NEG groups.We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8, transverse myelitis (TM = 2 n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9 demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls.The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19 as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01. In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies.Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets.

  4. Rhinovirus-induced VP1-specific Antibodies are Group-specific and Associated With Severity of Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Niespodziana

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation: Our results demonstrate that increases of antibodies towards the VP1 N-terminus are group-specific and associated with severity of respiratory symptoms and suggest that it may be possible to develop serological tests for identifying causative RV groups.

  5. Cytoplasmic p21 is a potential predictor for cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xi; Weng, Yanjie; Liao, Shujie; Han, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ronghua; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Shixuan; Xu, Gang; Meng, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Ma, Quanfu; Li, Xiao; Ji, Teng; Chen, Pingbo; Xu, Hongbin; Li, Kezhen; Fang, Yong; Weng, Danhui

    2011-01-01

    P21 (WAF1/Cip1) binds to cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and inhibits their activities. It was originally described as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation. However, many recent studies have shown that p21 promotes tumor progression when accumulated in the cell cytoplasm. So far, little is known about the correlation between cytoplasmic p21 and drug resistance. This study was aimed to investigate the role of p21 in the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer. RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence were used to detect p21 expression and location in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line C13* and its parental line OV2008. Regulation of cytoplasmic p21 was performed through transfection of p21 siRNA, Akt2 shRNA and Akt2 constitutively active vector in the two cell lines; their effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Tumor tissue sections of clinical samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. p21 predominantly localizes to the cytoplasm in C13* compared to OV2008. Persistent exposure to low dose cisplatin in OV2008 leads to p21 translocation from nuclear to cytoplasm, while it had not impact on p21 localization in C13*. Knockdown of cytoplasmic p21 by p21 siRNA transfection in C13* notably increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis through activation of caspase 3. Inhibition of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of Akt2 shRNA into C13* cells significantly increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, while induction of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of constitutively active Akt2 in OV2008 enhanced the resistance to cisplatin. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical ovarian tumor tissues demonstrated that cytoplasmic p21 was negatively correlated with the response to cisplatin based treatment. Cytoplasmic p21 is a novel biomarker of cisplatin resistance and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for ovarian tumors that are refractory to conventional treatment

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC ... the only things that can cause a transfusion reaction. The recipient's immune ... or to drugs that the donor may have taken. Rarely, antibodies in the plasma ...

  7. The frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in routine care and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Grunert, Veit Peter; Hetland, Merete L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure.......To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure....

  8. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Sinturel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3′-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3′-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3′-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3′-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5′-3′ cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression.

  9. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinturel, Flore; Navickas, Albertas; Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; Torchet, Claire; Benard, Lionel

    2015-09-22

    Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3'-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3'-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3'-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3'-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs) form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5'-3' cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurological Complications Associated With Anti-Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Justin C; Liao, Bing; Markovic, Svetomir N; Klein, Christopher J; Naddaf, Elie; Staff, Nathan P; Liewluck, Teerin; Hammack, Julie E; Sandroni, Paola; Finnes, Heidi; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2017-10-01

    Neurological complications are an increasingly recognized consequence of the use of anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibodies in the treatment of solid-organ tumors, with an estimated frequency of 4.2%. To date, the clinical spectrum and optimum treatment approach are not established. To investigate the frequency, clinical spectrum, and optimum treatment approach to neurological complications associated with anti-PD-1 therapy. This single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted from either September or December 2014 (the approval dates of the study drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration) to May 19, 2016. All patients receiving anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies were identified using the Mayo Cancer Pharmacy Database. Patients with development of neurological symptoms within 12 months of anti-PD-1 therapy were included. Patients with neurological complications directly attributable to metastatic disease or other concurrent cancer-related treatments were excluded. Clinical and pathological characteristics, time to development of neurological symptoms, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Among 347 patients treated with anti-PD1 monoclonal antibodies (pembrolizumab or nivolumab), 10 (2.9%) developed subacute onset of neurological complications. Seven patients were receiving pembrolizumab, and 3 patients were receiving nivolumab. The patients included 8 men and 2 women. Their median age was 71 years (age range, 31-78 years). Neurological complications occurred after a median of 5.5 (range, 1-20) cycles of anti-PD-1 inhibitors. Complications included myopathy (n = 2), varied neuropathies (n = 4), cerebellar ataxia (n = 1), autoimmune retinopathy (n = 1), bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (n = 1), and headache (n = 1). Peripheral neuropathies included axonal and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (n = 2), length-dependent neuropathies (n = 1), and asymmetric vasculitic neuropathy (n = 1). The time to maximum

  11. [Clinical and histopathological features of myositis associated with anti-mitochondrial antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are known to be characteristic markers of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). The association of PBC with myositis has been reported mainly as case reports, and comprehensive studies of the clinical and histopathological features of patients with myositis and AMAs or PBC have not been conducted thus far. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients with inflammatory myopathies in our laboratory and found 24 patients with AMA-positive myositis (11%) (seven patients with PBC and 17 patients without PBC). The analysis of clinical and histopathological features revealed that myositis associated with AMAs frequently include patients with a clinically chronic disease course, muscle atrophy, cardiopulmonary involvement and granulomatous inflammation, regardless of the presence or absence of PBC. We also reviewed and analyzed the clinical features of previously reported patients. The analysis of 75 patients, which have been described in previous case reports including the ones of meeting abstracts, also showed the similar results about clinical features of myositis associated with AMAs and supported our findings. Our study suggests that myositis associated with AMAs form a characteristic subgroup.

  12. Genetic variation among the male sterile cytoplasms induced by gamma irradiation in sugar beets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Toshiro; Takahashi, Man-emon

    1976-01-01

    In sugar beets, cytoplasmic male sterility was induced artificially by radiation treatment. In the present study, four kinds of male sterile strain made from the strain H-2002 with normal cytoplasms were used, and the mode of inheritance of the sterility maintained by these strains was confirmed. Also the hereditary mechanism of pollen fructification recovery was studied, and the newly induced heterotypic property of sterile cytoplasms was examined in comparison with naturally found sterile strains. In each of four produced strains, the male sterility was inherited down to M 4 lines stably through mother plants, and it was presumed that the sterility was caused by highly stable cytoplasmic mutation. In each strain, two pairs of nuclear genes took part in the recovery of pollen fructification, but the mode of action of two genes was different. As the result of mating for verification with O type strain to S cytoplasm strain, it seemed that at least the function as O type was not shown to three strains of γ-60, γ-114 and γ-165, and in the sterile cytoplasms of these three strains, the action of fructification recovery genes different from X and Z arose. It was presumed that the genes of X locus did not take effect in these induced cytoplasms. The possibility that at least four kinds of male sterile cytoplasms different from S were induced from normal cytoplasms by artificial mutation was proved indirectly. (Kako, I.)

  13. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  14. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  15. Estudio longitudinal de anticuerpos anticitoplasma de neutrófilos en pacientes con anemia drepanocítica Longitudinal study of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in patients with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Guerreiro Hernández

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio longitudinal para detectar anticuerpos anticitoplasma de neutrófilos (ANCA en 13 pacientes con anemia drepanocítica en crisis vasooclusiva y en estado basal, mediante un método de inmunofluorescencia indirecta. Del total de 34 muestras de suero obtenidas, 16 fueron en crisis vasooclusiva y en 12 de ellas, correspondientes a 10 pacientes, se demostró la presencia de p-ANCA. En el resto de las muestras en crisis vasooclusiva y en estado basal no se observó la presencia de p-ANCA o c-ANCA. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren la posible participación de los p-ANCA en el daño isquémico, así como la importancia de su medición en el diagnóstico de las crisis vasooclusivas (CVO en los pacientes con anemia drepanocítica (ADA longitudinal study was made to detect antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA in 13 patients with sickle cell anemia in vasocclusive crisis and basal state by using an indirect immunofluorescence method. Of 34 serum samples, 16 were in vasocclusive crisis and 12 of them corresponding to 10 patients revealed the presence of p-ANCA. Neither p-ANCA nor c-ANCA was observed in the rest of the samples taken in vasoclussive crisis and in basal state. The results achieved signaled a possible involvement of p-ANCA in ischemic damage as well as the importance of their measurement in the diagnosis of vasocclusive crisis in patients with sickle cell anemia

  16. Conference scene: progress with promising human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W

    2012-03-01

    Antibodies and antibody-based therapeutics have become big business, with annual sales over US$50 billion, accounting for >6% of worldwide pharmaceutical revenues. Ten molecules have blockbuster status (>US$1 billion), with six generating more than US$6 billion in sales. In excess of 300 products based on this rapidly maturing technology are in clinical trials. The generation and manufacture of human antibodies is now routine, although the cost of goods remains an issue. Optimizing combinations of antibodies with other therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy) is a major short-term goal, while target validation and product differentiation remain significant hurdles if growth is to continue. Some of the notable highlights of the recent 16th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas meeting in Cannes, France are described below. The conference was sponsored by the international journal Human Antibodies, in association with the Integrative Medical Sciences Association (IMSA). The Program Chairman was Professor Mark Glassy, IMSA, San Diego, CA, USA.

  17. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  18. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  19. An efficiently cleaved HIV-1 clade C Env selectively binds to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Boliar

    Full Text Available An ideal HIV-1 Env immunogen is expected to mimic the native trimeric conformation for inducing broadly neutralizing antibody responses. The native conformation is dependent on efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env. The clade B isolate, JRFL Env is efficiently cleaved when expressed on the cell surface. Here, for the first time, we report the identification of a native clade C Env, 4-2.J41 that is naturally and efficiently cleaved on the cell surface as confirmed by its biochemical and antigenic characteristics. In addition to binding to several conformation-dependent neutralizing antibodies, 4-2.J41 Env binds efficiently to the cleavage-dependent antibody PGT151; thus validating its native cleaved conformation. In contrast, 4-2.J41 Env occludes non-neutralizing epitopes. The cytoplasmic-tail of 4-2.J41 Env plays an important role in maintaining its conformation. Furthermore, codon optimization of 4-2.J41 Env sequence significantly increases its expression while retaining its native conformation. Since clade C of HIV-1 is the prevalent subtype, identification and characterization of this efficiently cleaved Env would provide a platform for rational immunogen design.

  20. Smooth muscle antibodies and cryoglobulinemia are associated with advanced liver fibrosis in Brazilian hepatitis C virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jesuino de Oliveira Andrade

    Full Text Available Cryoglobulinemia and non-organ-specific-autoantibody are biomarkers of autoimmunity of the chronic infection caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV. In this work, we report the association between the presence of smooth muscle antibodies (SMA and cryoglobulinemia and chronic liver disease in HCV carriers. Sixty-five untreated HCV patients, 38 women and 27 men were included in this study. Cryoglobulinemia was tested by cryoprecipitation, SMA by indirect fluorescent antibody test, and liver fibrosis and hepatocellular inflammation activity was investigated by histology of liver biopsy using the METAVIR score. The prevalence of SMA in the patients was 33.8% and cryoglobulinemia was demonstrated in 36.9% patients. Cryoglobulinemia and SMA seropositivity was associated with advanced fibrosis (p < 0.05. The presence of SMA and cryoglobulinemia was not associated with hepatocellular inflammation activity, age, carrier gender or HCV genotype. We concluded that liver biopsy should be recommended for HCV carriers that are seropositive for SMA or cryoglobulinemia.

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIFFERENT ALLOGAMIC ASSOCIATED TRAIT CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FIVE NEWLY DEVELOPED CYTOPLASMIC MALE STERILE (CMS LINES IN RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nematzadeh GHORBAN ALI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Five suitable maintainer varieties were identifi ed through testcrosses with IR58025A and the transfer of wild abortive cytoplasm was carried out by seven successive backcrosses. Five new CMS lines were developed by this approach in well adapted high yielding improved varietal background such as ‘Nemat’, ‘Neda’, ‘Dasht’, ‘Amol3’ and ‘Champa’. Agronomical characterization and allogamy-associated traits of the fi ve newly developed CMS lines were studied for their interrelationship. Anther length had a signifi cant positive correlation with the duration of glume opening (0.759 and high correlation of (0.698 with the angle between lemma and palea. The results indicated that ‘Nemat’ A, ‘Neda’ A, ‘Dasht’ A are more suitable as parents for hybrid seed production due to their favorable and superior fl oral characteristics in comparison to IR58025A.

  2. Single-Domain Antibodies and the Promise of Modular Targeting in Cancer Imaging and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Iezzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments have significantly changed the outcome of cancer in the clinic, effectively inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, triggering antibody-dependent immune effector cell activation and complement mediated cell death. Along with a continued expansion in number, diversity, and complexity of validated tumor targets there is an increasing focus on engineering recombinant antibody fragments for lead development. Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs, in particular those engineered from the variable heavy-chain fragment (VHH gene found in Camelidae heavy-chain antibodies (or IgG2 and IgG3, are the smallest fragments that retain the full antigen-binding capacity of the antibody with advantageous properties as drugs. For similar reasons, growing attention is being paid to the yet smaller variable heavy chain new antigen receptor (VNAR fragments found in Squalidae. sdAbs have been selected, mostly from immune VHH libraries, to inhibit or modulate enzyme activity, bind soluble factors, internalize cell membrane receptors, or block cytoplasmic targets. This succinct review is a compilation of recent data documenting the application of engineered, recombinant sdAb in the clinic as epitope recognition “modules” to build monomeric, dimeric and multimeric ligands that target, tag and stall solid tumor growth in vivo. Size, affinity, specificity, and the development profile of sdAbs drugs are seemingly consistent with desirable clinical efficacy and safety requirements. But the hepatotoxicity of the tetrameric anti-DR5-VHH drug in patients with pre-existing anti-drug antibodies halted the phase I clinical trial and called for a thorough pre-screening of the immune and poly-specific reactivities of the sdAb leads.

  3. Propilthiouracil-induced diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage: a case report with the clinical and radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Joung Sook; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Soo Jeon [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a drug that's used to manage hyperthyroidism and it can, on rare occasions, induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis that involved multiple organ systems and it can also cause extremely rare isolated or diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. We report here on a case of a patient who develop diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage after she had been taking PTU for five years. The patient is a 33-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis. Simple chest radiographs and the chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacity, consolidation and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed alveolar hemorrhage. The laboratory values showed increased perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody ({rho} - ANCA) and anti-peroxidase antibody titers.

  4. Multiplex serology of paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Maat (Peter); E. Brouwer (Eric); E. Hulsenboom (Esther); M.M. van Duijn (Martijn); M.W.J. Schreurs (Marco); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); P.A. Smitt (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractParaneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are devastating neurological disorders secondary to cancer, associated with onconeural autoantibodies. Such antibodies are directed against neuronal antigens aberrantly expressed by the tumor. The detection of onconeural antibodies in a patient

  5. Chagas' disease: IgG isotypes against cytoplasmic (CRA) and flagellar (FRA) recombinant repetitive antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verçosa, A F A; Lorena, V M B; Carvalho, C L; Melo, M F A D; Cavalcanti, M G A; Silva, E D; Ferreira, A G P; Pereira, V R A; Souza, W V; Gomes, Y M

    2007-01-01

    The wide range of clinical Chagas' disease manifestations, of which heart involvement is the most significant, because of its characteristics, frequency and consequences, and lack of treatment and cure, justify research in this area. Specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody subclasses have been associated with human Chagas' disease. Thus, in this study, the profile of IgG subclasses against cytoplasmic (CRA) and flagellar (FRA) recombinant repetitive T. cruzi-specific antigens was correlated with cardiac (CARD, n=33), cardiodigestive (CD, n=7), and indeterminate (IND, n=20) forms of Chagas' disease by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IgG subclasses were detected in almost all Chagas patients studied. Nevertheless, only specific IgG2 isotype FRA was found with a significant statistical difference in CARD patients when compared to IND patients. This result suggests the potential use of this isotype for prognostic purposes, for monitoring the progression of chronic Chagas' disease, and for predicting the risk of CARD damage. This is important information, as it could help physicians to evaluate and manage the treatment of their patients. However, a follow-up study is necessary to confirm our result. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes Microbes Can Distort the Sex Ratio of Populations. Stephen J Freeland Laurence D Hurst. General Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 68-78 ...

  7. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Ferguson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded

  8. Ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix protein is important for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao E Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxoviruses are known to replicate in the cytoplasm and bud from the plasma membrane. Matrix is the major structural protein in paramyxoviruses that mediates viral assembly and budding. Curiously, the matrix proteins of a few paramyxoviruses have been found in the nucleus, although the biological function associated with this nuclear localization remains obscure. We report here that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix (NiV-M protein and associated post-translational modification play a critical role in matrix-mediated virus budding. Nipah virus (NiV is a highly pathogenic emerging paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in humans, and is classified as a Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4 pathogen. During live NiV infection, NiV-M was first detected in the nucleus at early stages of infection before subsequent localization to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Mutations in the putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS and the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES found in NiV-M impaired its nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking and also abolished NiV-M budding. A highly conserved lysine residue in the NLS served dual functions: its positive charge was important for mediating nuclear import, and it was also a potential site for monoubiquitination which regulates nuclear export of the protein. Concordantly, overexpression of ubiquitin enhanced NiV-M budding whereas depletion of free ubiquitin in the cell (via proteasome inhibitors resulted in nuclear retention of NiV-M and blocked viral budding. Live Nipah virus budding was exquisitely sensitive to proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor for treating multiple myeloma, reduced viral titers with an IC(50 of 2.7 nM, which is 100-fold less than the peak plasma concentration that can be achieved in humans. This opens up the possibility of using an "off-the-shelf" therapeutic against acute NiV infection.

  9. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  10. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm.

  11. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  12. Post-transplant HLA class II antibodies and high soluble CD30 levels are independently associated with poor kidney graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, L L; Park, L P; Hughes, T L; Irish, A; Luxton, G; Witt, C S; Christiansen, F T

    2007-04-01

    HLA-specific antibodies (HSA) and soluble CD30 (sCD30) were measured in 208 renal transplant recipients with functioning grafts at least 1 year after transplantation (median 8.2 years) to investigate the predictive value of HSA and sCD30 on subsequent graft outcome. HSA (class I and class II) were detected by both ELISA LAT-M and Luminex LabScreen assays. Data on graft outcome was collected with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years after antibody and sCD30 measurement. Recipients with post-transplant HLA class II antibodies had particularly poor graft outcome with a hazard ratio (HR) of 7.8 (p transplant sCD30 level >or=100 U/mL was associated with increased risk of subsequent graft failure (HR 2.7, p = 0.03). sCD30 and HSA had an independent and additive association with graft outcome. Recipients with HLA class II antibody and high sCD30 had the highest risk of subsequent graft failure (HR 43.4, p sCD30 measured at least 1-year post-transplant provides valuable and predictive information regarding subsequent graft outcome.

  13. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication

  14. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  15. Wild Nicotiana Species as a Source of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Nicotianatabacum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikova V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of our experiments executed to obtain tobacco male sterile lines through interspecific hybridization are summarized. Ten wild species from the genus Nicotiana: N. excelsior (exc, N. amplexicaulis (amp, N. rustica (rus, Nicotianaglauca (gla, N. velutina (vel, N. benthamiana (ben, N. maritima (mar, N. paniculata (pan, N. longiflora (lon and N. africana (afr were used as cytoplasmic donors and N. tabacum, cv. HarmanliiskaBasma (HB as a donor of the nucleus. Genetic effects of cytoplasmic-nuclear interaction of the studied species are discussed. Our results suggested that cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS was expressed when the cytoplasms of the above mentioned wild Nicotiana species were combined with the nucleus of N. tabacum. The 10 sources of CMS obtained in tobacco were characterized by altered flower phenotypes. Flowers are classified into types according the stamen, pistil and corolla modification. All these CMS sources were backcrossed to Oriental tobaccos, cvs. Tekne, Nevrokop B-12, Kroumovgrad 90 and Djebel 576, to develop corresponding CMS lines. The investigated cytoplasms produced compete male sterility in all those cultivars. The CMS lines preserved flower types, specific for every “sterile” cytoplasm. The extent of male organ modifications varied from apparently normal (but pollenless stamens in CMS (pan, (afr, some plants of (vel (mar through different degrees of malformations (shriveled anther on shortened filaments (lon, pinnate-like anthers on filaments of normal length (amp, petal - (ben, pistil- or stigma-like structures (rus, (gla to lack of male reproductive organs in (exc and in some plants of (vel, (mar, (rus and (gla. Most of the above mentioned cytoplasms had normal female gametophyte and good seed productivity. Alterations of the pistils were observed in CMS (rus, (exc and (ben causing reduction of the seed set. Electrophoresis of seed proteins of the tobacco cultivars and their CMS lines also suggested that

  16. Thrombocytopenia associated with olanzapine: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited literature on olanzapine-associated thrombocytopenia. In this report, we present a case of a 32-year-old female, suffering from persistent delusional disorder who had thrombocytopenia (46,000/mm3 with the use of olanzapine 25 mg/day, 6 weeks after starting medication. Blood film did not reveal any evidence of any dysplastic cells, disturbance in the count of other cell lines, and autoimmune workup including antinuclear antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were found to be negative. Given no other etiology, olanzapine was gradually tapered, and platelet counts were monitored. Reduction in the dose of olanzapine led to an improvement in platelet counts which reached the normal range after complete stoppage of olanzapine. In view of continued psychotic symptoms, she was started on clozapine and which was gradually increased to 200 mg/day with biweekly monitoring of total platelet counts before each increment in the dose of clozapine. Thrombocytopenia did not recur with use of clozapine. With clozapine, her psychosis improved by nearly 60%. A review of literature revealed only eight case reports supporting the association of olanzapine and thrombocytopenia.

  17. PERMANGANATE FIXATION OF THE GOLGI COMPLEX AND OTHER CYTOPLASMIC STRUCTURES OF MAMMALIAN TESTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, Hilton H.; Zebrun, William

    1960-01-01

    Observations on the fine structure of KMnO4-fixed testes of small mammals (guinea pig, rat, and mouse) reveal certain morphological differences between the spermatogenic and Sertoli cells which have not been demonstrated in the same tissue fixed with OsO4. Aggregates of minute circular profiles, much smaller than the spherical Golgi vesicles, are described in close association with the Golgi complex of developing spermatids. Groups of dense flattened vesicles, individually surrounded by a membrane of different dimensions than that which bounds most of the other cell organelles, appear dispersed within the cytoplasm of some spermatogenic cells. Flattened vesicles of greater density than those belonging to the Golgi complex are reported confined to the inner Golgi zone of developing guinea pig spermatids between the Golgi cisternae and the head cap. The profiles of endoplasmic reticulum within spermatocytes appear shorter, wider, and more tortuous than those of Sertoli cells. Minute cytoplasmic particles approximately 300 A in diameter and of high electron opacity appear randomly disposed in some Sertoli cells. Groups of irregular-shaped ovoid bodies within the developing spermatids are described as resembling portions of cytoplasm from closely adjacent spermatids. Interpretation is presented regarding the fine structure of KMnO4-fixed testes in view of what has already been reported for mammalian testes fixed in OsO4. PMID:13771855

  18. Appearance of newly formed mRNA and rRNA as ribonucleoprotein-particles in the cytoplasmic subribosomal fraction of pea embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Noribumi; Takaiwa, Fumio; Fukuei, Keisuke; Sakamaki, Tadashi; Tanifuji, Shigeyuki

    1977-01-01

    Incorporation studies with 3 H-uridine or 3 H-adenosine showed that germinating pea embryos synthesize all types of poly A(+) RNA, rRNA and 4-5S RNA at the early stage of germination. After the pulse labeling for 30 min, only heterodisperse RNA and 4-5S RNA appeared in the cytoplasm as labeled RNA species. At this time the radioactivity was associated with cytoplasmic structures heavier than 80S and RNP particles of 68-70S, 52-55S, 36-38S and 20-22S which are presumed to be free mRNP particles in plants. When the pulse-labeled embryos were incubated for a further 60 min in an isotope-free medium, the labeled 17S and 25S rRNA emerged in the cytoplasm, together with labeled heterodisperse and 4-5S RNAs. More radioactivity accumulated in the regions of the polysome, 62-65S and 38-42S particles. The results of analysis of RNAs extracted from the whole cytoplasm, polysome or subribosomal fractions indicated that small subunits of newly formed ribosomes appear more rapidly in the cytoplasm than new large subunits, which accumulate for a while as free particles in the cytoplasm than are incorporated into polysomes. The actinomycin treatment which caused preferential inhibition of rRNA synthesis reduced the accumulation of free, newly formed ribosome subunits and partially permitted detection of the presumed mRNP particles in the subribosomal region even after the chase treatment. (auth.)

  19. Clinical presentation and outcome prediction of clinical, serological, and histopathological classification schemes in ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha M; Mejía-Vilet, Juan M; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Loyola-Rodríguez, Georgina; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Several classification schemes have been developed for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), with actual debate focusing on their clinical and prognostic performance. Sixty-two patients with renal biopsy-proven AAV from a single center in Mexico City diagnosed between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed and classified under clinical (granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA], microscopic polyangiitis [MPA], renal limited vasculitis [RLV]), serological (proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [PR3-ANCA], myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [MPO-ANCA], ANCA negative), and histopathological (focal, crescenteric, mixed-type, sclerosing) categories. Clinical presentation parameters were compared at baseline between classification groups, and the predictive value of different classification categories for disease and renal remission, relapse, renal, and patient survival was analyzed. Serological classification predicted relapse rate (PR3-ANCA hazard ratio for relapse 2.93, 1.20-7.17, p = 0.019). There were no differences in disease or renal remission, renal, or patient survival between clinical and serological categories. Histopathological classification predicted response to therapy, with a poorer renal remission rate for sclerosing group and those with less than 25 % normal glomeruli; in addition, it adequately delimited 24-month glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) evolution, but it did not predict renal nor patient survival. On multivariate models, renal replacement therapy (RRT) requirement (HR 8.07, CI 1.75-37.4, p = 0.008) and proteinuria (HR 1.49, CI 1.03-2.14, p = 0.034) at presentation predicted renal survival, while age (HR 1.10, CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.041) and infective events during the induction phase (HR 4.72, 1.01-22.1, p = 0.049) negatively influenced patient survival. At present, ANCA-based serological classification may predict AAV relapses, but neither clinical nor serological

  20. A sea urchin Na(+)K(+)2Cl(-) cotransporter is involved in the maintenance of calcification-relevant cytoplasmic cords in Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Wiebke C; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Findeisen, Ulrike; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Jackson, Daniel J; Himmerkus, Nina; Melzner, Frank; Bleich, Markus

    2015-09-01

    The cellular mechanisms of calcification in sea urchin larvae are still not well understood. Primary mesenchyme cells within the larval body cavity form a syncytium to secrete CaCO3 spicules from intracellular amorphous CaCO3 (ACC) stores. We studied the role of Na(+)K(+)2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) in intracellular ACC accumulation and larval spicule formation of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. First, we incubated growing larvae with three different loop diuretics (azosemide, bumetanide, and furosemide) and established concentration-response curves. All loop diuretics were able to inhibit calcification already at concentrations that specifically inhibit NKCC. Calcification was most effectively inhibited by azosemide (IC50=6.5 μM), while larval mortality and swimming ability were not negatively impacted by the treatment. The inhibition by bumetanide (IC50=26.4 μM) and furosemide (IC50=315.4 μM) resembled the pharmacological fingerprint of the mammalian NKCC1 isoform. We further examined the effect of azosemide on the maintenance of cytoplasmic cords and on the occurrence of calcification vesicles using fluorescent dyes (calcein, FM1-43). Fifty micromolars of azosemide inhibited the maintenance of cytoplasmic cords and resulted in increased calcein fluorescence within calcification vesicles. The expression of NKCC in S. droebachiensis was verified by PCR and Western blot with a specific NKCC antibody. In summary, the pharmacological profile of loop diuretics and their specific effects on calcification in sea urchin larvae suggest that they act by inhibition of NKCC via repression of cytoplasmic cord formation and maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock proteins in women with tubal factor infertility are associated with prior infection by C. trachomatis but not by C. pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, K; Osser, S; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    The antibody response to heat shock proteins 60 and 10 were studied in 163 patients with tubal factor infertility and in 163 age-matched pregnant women. The associations of these antibodies with specific antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and to Chlamydia pneumoniae as well as with antibodies...... proteins and to C. trachomatis but no independent influence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae. No interaction between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae suggesting a synergistic effect was found although the heat shock proteins from these two organisms are immunologically similar. Antibodies to the chlamydial...

  2. Herpesvirus Genome Recognition Induced Acetylation of Nuclear IFI16 Is Essential for Its Cytoplasmic Translocation, Inflammasome and IFN-β Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairaj Ahmed Ansari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The IL-1β and type I interferon-β (IFN-β molecules are important inflammatory cytokines elicited by the eukaryotic host as innate immune responses against invading pathogens and danger signals. Recently, a predominantly nuclear gamma-interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16 involved in transcriptional regulation has emerged as an innate DNA sensor which induced IL-1β and IFN-β production through inflammasome and STING activation, respectively. Herpesvirus (KSHV, EBV, and HSV-1 episomal dsDNA genome recognition by IFI16 leads to IFI16-ASC-procaspase-1 inflammasome association, cytoplasmic translocation and IL-1β production. Independent of ASC, HSV-1 genome recognition results in IFI16 interaction with STING in the cytoplasm to induce interferon-β production. However, the mechanisms of IFI16-inflammasome formation, cytoplasmic redistribution and STING activation are not known. Our studies here demonstrate that recognition of herpesvirus genomes in the nucleus by IFI16 leads into its interaction with histone acetyltransferase p300 and IFI16 acetylation resulting in IFI16-ASC interaction, inflammasome assembly, increased interaction with Ran-GTPase, cytoplasmic redistribution, caspase-1 activation, IL-1β production, and interaction with STING which results in IRF-3 phosphorylation, nuclear pIRF-3 localization and interferon-β production. ASC and STING knockdowns did not affect IFI16 acetylation indicating that this modification is upstream of inflammasome-assembly and STING-activation. Vaccinia virus replicating in the cytoplasm did not induce nuclear IFI16 acetylation and cytoplasmic translocation. IFI16 physically associates with KSHV and HSV-1 genomes as revealed by proximity ligation microscopy and chromatin-immunoprecipitation studies which is not hampered by the inhibition of acetylation, thus suggesting that acetylation of IFI16 is not required for its innate sensing of nuclear viral genomes. Collectively, these studies identify the

  3. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic

  4. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm) from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid female

  5. Crescentic glomerular nephritis associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendran, K; Senarathne, L D S U; Lanerolle, R D

    2017-07-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disorder where clinically significant renal involvement is relatively common. However, crescentic glomerular nephritis is a rarely described entity among the rheumatoid nephropathies. We report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis presenting with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative crescentic glomerular nephritis. A 54-year-old Sri Lankan woman who had recently been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis was being treated with methotrexate 10 mg weekly and infrequent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. She presented to our hospital with worsening generalized body swelling and oliguria of 1 month's duration. Her physical examination revealed that she had bilateral pitting leg edema and periorbital edema. She was not pale or icteric. She had evidence of mild synovitis of the small joints of the hand bilaterally with no deformities. No evidence of systemic vasculitis was seen. Her blood pressure was 170/100 mmHg, and her jugular venous pressure was elevated to 7 cm with an undisplaced cardiac apex. Her urine full report revealed 2+ proteinuria with active sediment (dysmorphic red blood cells [17%] and granular casts). Her 24-hour urinary protein excretion was 2 g. Her serum creatinine level was 388 μmol/L. Abdominal ultrasound revealed normal-sized kidneys with acute parenchymal changes and mild ascites. Her renal biopsy showed renal parenchyma containing 20 glomeruli showing diffuse proliferative glomerular nephritis, with 14 of 20 glomeruli showing cellular crescents, and the result of Congo red staining was negative. Her rheumatoid factor was positive with a high titer (120 IU/ml), but results for antinuclear antibody, double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (perinuclear and cytoplasmic) were negative. Antistreptolysin O titer rheumatoid arthritis, awareness of which would facilitate early appropriate investigations and treatment.

  6. ASSOCIATION OF TRYPANOSOME INFECTION WITH SPERM ANTIBODIES PRODUCTION IN RED SOKOTO (MARADI GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. FAYEMI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1021 randomly selected serum samples of adult male goats that had been screened for trypanosome infection were assayed for sperm antibodies using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The result of the trypanosome screening revealed that 586(57.39% goats were positive for trypanosome infection, while 435(42.61% were negative. The assay for sperm antibodies showed that 482(47.21% animals were positive, while 539(52.79% were negative. In the group that was positive for trypanosome infection, 364(62.12% animals were positive, whereas 222(37.88% were negative for sperm antibodies (P<0.001. The group that was negative for trypanosome infection, had a significantly lower number and proportion 118(27.13% of positive compared to 317(72.87% negative for sperm antibodies. Out of a total 482 goats that were positive for sperm antibodies, a significantly higher number, 364(75.52%, were positive than 118(24.48% that were negative for trypanosome infection (P<0.001. In the group that was found negative for sperm antibodies, a significantly lower proportion, 222(41.19%, was positive compared to 317(58.81% that were negative for trypanosome infection (P<0.001. Seropositivity to sperm antibodies was positively correlated to trypanosome infection (P<0.001. Further work on the pathogenesis of sperm antibody production in trypanosome infection is advocated.

  7. [Case of anti VGKC-complex antibody associated disorder presenting with severe pain and fasciculations predominant in unilateral upper extremity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenju; Watanabe, Osamu; Shibano, Ken; Ishiguro, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    A 21-year-old man complained of severe pain and muscle twitching localized in his right arm. Neurological examination showed muscle fasciculations in his right forearm but no myokymia or myotonia. Needle electromyography revealed fibrillation potentials in his biceps brachii muscle and extensor carpi radialis muscle at rest but no myokymic discharges. His serum anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibody level was significantly high (194.2pM; controls VGKC-complex antibody associated disorder.

  8. Use of peptide antibodies to probe for the mitoxantrone resistance-associated protein MXR/BCRP/ABCP/ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Jensen, Ulla; Hansen, Alastair

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have characterized the ABC half-transporter associated with mitoxantrone resistance in human cancer cell lines. Encoded by the ABCG2 gene, overexpression confers resistance to camptothecins, as well as to mitoxantrone. We developed four polyclonal antibodies against peptides corres...

  9. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell

  10. HLA antibodies and soluble CD30 are associated with poor renal graft outcome: updated results of a single-center cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Leanne L; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Park, Lawrence P; Hughes, Tiffany L; Irish, Ashley; Luxton, Grant; Witt, Campbell S; Christiansen, Frank T

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that HLA class II antibodies and a high soluble CD30 (sCD30) measured at least 1 year post-transplant predict subsequent graft failure. We have now updated the results of this same cohort of 208 patients 15 months later. HLA-specific antibodies (class I and class II) were detected by ELISA LAT-M and Luminex LabScreen assays. Data on graft outcome was collected with a median follow-up of 4.7 years. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, class II antibody was again associated with a poorer outcome, with an estimated 6-year graft survival of 67% and 71% when detected by ELISA and Luminex, respectively, compared with 92% for those without class II antibody (p soluble CD30 level of > or = 100 U/ml was also associated with a poorer estimated 6-year graft survival (p = 0.02). HLA antibodies and high sCD30 (> or = 100 U/ml) had an additive effect such that those with both high sCD30 and class II antibodies had a hazard ratio for subsequent graft failure of 18.1 (p = 0.0008) and 8.6 (p = 0.007) when detected by ELISA and Luminex, respectively. These data show that detection of HLA class II antibodies and serum sCD30 measured at least 1 year post-transplant continues to predict a subsequent outcome up to 6 years after the initial measurement; they also show that such measures provide important information that may allow for modification of ongoing therapy.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  12. Age at Development of Type 1 Diabetes– and Celiac Disease–Associated Antibodies and Clinical Disease in Genetically Susceptible Children Observed From Birth

    OpenAIRE

    Simell, Satu; Hoppu, Sanna; Simell, Tuu; Ståhlberg, Marja-Riitta; Viander, Markku; Routi, Taina; Simell, Ville; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the ages and sequence in which antibodies associated with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease appear and overt diseases develop in children with an HLA-conferred susceptibility to both diseases. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We observed 2,052 children carrying genetic risks for both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease from birth until the median age of 5.7 years and analyzed diabetes- and celiac disease–associated antibodies in serum samples collected at 3- to 12-month interv...

  13. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  14. Autologous monoclonal antibodies recognize tumour-associated antigens in X-irradiated C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artus, A; Guillemain, B; Legrand, E; Astier-Gin, T; Mamoun, R; Duplan, J -F

    1986-09-01

    X-irradiation of C57BL/6 mice induces thymic lymphosarcomas which sometimes contain retroviruses which upon injection into normal mice mimic the effect of the irradiation. We examined whether specific antigenicities, viral or cellular, were expressed by tumour cells that could be recognized by antibodies from the irradiated animals. We developed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) using splenocytes of the diseased animal. The reactivity of such MAbs towards thymoma cell lines established in vitro was investigated by means of an ELISA. At least 10 antibody specificities were detected on the 13 tumours investigated, allowing separation of the MAbs into three classes: (i) those recognizing the autologous tumour, heterologous tumours as well as normal thymic tissue, (ii) those specific for the autologous tumour, and (iii) those specific for one tumour, but not ones of autologous origin. The last two classes corresponded to specific tumour-associated antigens. Our panel of MAbs defined each tumour by the particular pattern of antigens harboured. It is striking that most of the antigens were present in the normal thymus and that only two tumours had additional antigenicities. Additionally, quantitative variations were observed in the levels of expression of these antigens.

  15. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin, E-mail: tanmja@gis.a-star.edu.sg; Parrish, Colin R., E-mail: crp3@cornell.edu

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  16. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes

  17. Evaluation of pre-existing antibody presence as a risk factor for posttreatment anti-drug antibody induction: analysis of human clinical study data for multiple biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li; Rup, Bonita

    2013-07-01

    Biotherapeutic-reactive antibodies in treatment-naïve subjects (i.e., pre-existing antibodies) have been commonly detected during clinical immunogenicity assessments; however information on pre-existing antibody prevalence, physiological effects, and impact on posttreatment anti-drug antibody (ADA) induction remains limited. In this analysis, pre-existing antibody prevalence and impact on posttreatment ADA induction were determined using ADA data from 12 biotherapeutics analyzed in 32 clinical studies. Approximately half (58%) of the biotherapeutics were associated with some level of pre-existing antibodies and 67% of those were associated with posttreatment ADA induction. Across all studies, 5.6% of study subjects demonstrated presence of pre-existing antibodies, among which, 17% of the individual subjects had posttreatment increases in their ADA titers while 16% had decreased titers and 67% had no change in titers. However, in studies conducted in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population, 14.8% of RA patients were associated with pre-existing antibodies and 30% of those had posttreatment titer increases. The results suggest that in most study subjects, pre-existing antibodies pose a low risk for posttreatment ADA induction. That said, the high risk of induction implicated for RA patients, primarily observed in treatments evaluating novel antibody-based constructs, indicates that further understanding of the contribution of product and disease-specific factors is needed. Cross-industry efforts to collect and analyze a larger data set would enhance understanding of the prevalence, nature, and physiological consequences of pre-existing antibodies, better inform the immunogenicity risk profiles of products associated with these antibodies and lead to better fit-for-purpose immunogenicity management and mitigation strategies.

  18. Anticardiolipin antibodies in proliferative diabetic retinopathy: An additional risk factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahin, Maha; ElDiasty, Amany M; Mabed, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    To report the prevalence of anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) having high-risk criteria (HRC). Diabetic patients having PDR with HRC and diabetics free of retinopathy were compared for the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies. Among the 34 patients, 6 (17.7%) of diabetics having PDR with HRC were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies. There was no significant association of aCL antibodies with sex or type of diabetes. Using Pearson's correlation test, no significant associations of aCL antibodies with duration of diabetes or age of patients were found. All patients who were positive for anticardiolipin antibodies had PDR with HRC. The difference was statistically significant. Presence of anticardiolipin antibodies may represent an additional risk factor for PDR. (author)

  19. Vasculites e eosinófilos em biópsia endomiocárdica, como preditores de rejeição em transplante cardíaco Vasculitis y eosinófilos en biopsia endomiocárdica, como predictores de rechazo en transplante cardíaco Vasculitides and eosinophils in emdomyocardial biopsies as rejection predictors in heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Cipullo

    2011-08-01

    precedieron rechazo agudo; y (2 Biopsias no predictoras: aquellas que no precedieron rechazo agudo. Comparamos la ocurrencia de los siguientes hallazgos histológicos: vasculitis, lesiones isquémicas, efecto Quilty y eosinófilos por análisis uni y multivariado entre los grupos. RESULTADOS: Después de análisis estadístico se verificó la presencia de vasculitis intensa y de eosinófilos como mayores predictores para rechazo agudo futuro, presentando respectivamente las siguientes razones de posibilidad: 10,60 (IC95%: 3,62 - 31,06. p BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of vasculitides, ischemic lesions, Quilty effect and the presence of eosinophils in endomyocardial biopsies of heart transplantation recipients with mild rejection has yet to be established. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether these histological findings observed in endomyocardial biopsies (eosinophils, vasculitides, Quilty effect and ischemic lesions are capable of predicting acute graft rejection. METHODS: A total of 1,012 consecutive endomyocardial biopsies were reevaluated; of these, 939 were classified as OR or 1R according to the Nomenclature of the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation of 2005 and divided in two groups: (1 Predictive biopsies: those that preceded acute rejection; and (2 Nonpredictive biopsies: those that did not precede acute rejection. We compared the occurrence of the following histological findings: vasculitides, ischemic lesions, Quilty effect and eosinophils between the groups by uni- and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed that the presence of severe vasculitides and eosinophils were the best predictors for future acute rejection, with the following odds ratios: 10.60 (95%CI: 3.62 - 31.06. p < 0.001 and 6.26 (95%CI: 3.16 - 12.43, p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Severe vasculitides and eosinophils in myocardial biopsies are the main predictive factors of acute graft rejection post-heart transplantation.

  20. Mouse-specific antibody responses to a monoclonal antibody during repeated immunoscintigraphy investigations: Comparison of antibody titres and imaging studies in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimm, M.V.; Gribben, S.J.; Markham, A.J.; Perkins, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    As a model for human mouse-specific antibody responses in patients undergoing immunoscintigraphy, we have investigated in rats the production of mouse-specific antibodies (MA) to the mouse monoclonal antibody 791T/36. At intervals of between 5 and 16 weeks the rats were given repeated cycles of intravenous (IV) injections of antibody with or without a simultaneous intradermal (ID) injection. The IV dose was 60 μg/kg, a dose similar to that used in many clinical immunoscintigraphy studies. The ID injection was 2 μg, which mimicks the skin test dose often given in clinical imaging protocols. The study was carried out with both 131 I-labelled antibody and with antibody labelled with 111 In by DTPA chelation. MA was measured with a passive haemagglutination assay using sheep red blood cells coated with the monoclonal antibody. Of rats given ID injections of unlabelled antibody at the same time as the IV imaging doses, 9/20 produced MA during 4 cycles of injections. In contrast, only 2/16 rats given only the IV dose produced MA. Both 131 I- and 111 In-labelled antibody appeared equally immunogenic with 5/18 and 6/18 overall responders, respectively. The production of MA was associated with a significant perturbation in the biodistribution of the IV dose of labelled antibody as seen by gamma-camera imaging of the rats given 111 In-labelled antibody. There was clearance of immune complexes to the liver, this organ accumulating up to 90% of the whole body count rate of radiolabel. MA titres of between 1/100 and 1/78000 caused equal perturbation of biodistribution, although below 1/100 the effect was more variable. (orig.)

  1. Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility is associated with decreased Hira expression in male Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolbachia are obligate endosymbiotic bacteria that infect numerous species of arthropods and nematodes. Wolbachia can induce several reproductive phenotypes in their insect hosts including feminization, male-killing, parthenogenesis and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI. CI is the most common phenotype and occurs when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females resulting in no or very low numbers of viable offspring. However, matings between males and females infected with the same strain of Wolbachia result in viable progeny. Despite substantial scientific effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying CI are currently unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression studies were undertaken in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans which display differential levels of CI using quantitative RT-PCR. We show that Hira expression is correlated with the induction of CI and occurs in a sex-specific manner. Hira expression is significantly lower in males which induce strong CI when compared to males inducing no CI or Wolbachia-uninfected males. A reduction in Hira expression is also observed in 1-day-old males that induce stronger CI compared to 5-day-old males that induce weak or no CI. In addition, Hira mutated D. melanogaster males mated to uninfected females result in significantly decreased hatch rates comparing with uninfected crosses. Interestingly, wMel-infected females may rescue the hatch rates. An obvious CI phenotype with chromatin bridges are observed in the early embryo resulting from Hira mutant fertilization, which strongly mimics the defects associated with CI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest Wolbachia-induced CI in Drosophila occurs due to a reduction in Hira expression in Wolbachia-infected males leading to detrimental effects on sperm fertility resulting in embryo lethality. These results may help determine the underlying mechanism of CI and provide further insight in to the important role

  2. Strong antitumor activities of IgG3 antibodies to a human melanoma-associated ganglioside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, I.; Brankovan, V.; Hellstroem, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal IgG3 antibodies, 2B2, IF4, and MG-21, recognize a G/sub D3/ ganglioside antigen that is expressed at the cell surface of most human melanomas. All three antibodies mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro when tested with human lymphocytes or effector cells in a 2-hr or 4-hr 51 Cr-release test, and one antibody, MG-21, also gives strong complement-dependent cytotoxicity with human serum. Antibody 2B2, which gives ADDC also in the presence of mouse lymphocytes, inhibited the outgrowth of a human melanoma in nude mice, but antibody IF4, which showed no ADCC with mouse lymphocyte effectors, did not

  3. Involvement of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) in HIV infection: inhibition by monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the alpha- and beta-chain of lymphocyte-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 infection in vitro. Infection of the T cell line MT4 and the monocytic cell line U937 by isolates HTLVIIIB and SSI-002, respectively was inhibited...

  4. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies of human neutrophilic leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, P.F.; Ackerman, S.J.; Nicholson-Weller, A.; Dvorak, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The morphology and function of cytoplasmic lipid bodies in human neutrophils were evaluated. By transmission electron microscopy, neutrophil lipid bodies were cytoplasmic inclusions, usually several microns in diameter, that occasionally coalesced to attain a diameter up to 7 microM. Neutrophil lipid bodies were not enveloped by membrane but were often surrounded by a more electron-dense shell at their periphery. Normal peripheral blood neutrophils contained an average of approximately one lipid body per cell. Lipid bodies appeared in greater numbers in neutrophils from inflammatory lesions. Perturbation of neutrophils during conventional methods of cell isolation and purification modestly increased lipid body numbers in neutrophils, whereas incubation of neutrophils with 1 microM oleic acid rapidly induced lipid body formation over 30 to 60 minutes. After granulocytes were incubated for 2 hours with 3H-fatty acids, including arachidonic, oleic, and palmitic acids, electron microscopic autoradiography demonstrated that lipid bodies represented the predominant intracellular sites of localization of each of the three 3H-fatty acids. There was lesser labeling noted in the perinuclear cisterna, but not in cell membranes. Virtually all of each of the three 3H-fatty acids incorporated by the neutrophils were esterified into chromatographically resolved classes of neutral lipids or phospholipids. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic lipid bodies are more prominent in neutrophils in vivo engaged in inflammatory responses and that these organelles in human neutrophils function as sites of deposition of esterified, incorporated fatty acids

  5. Cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression in breast cancer: induction by nitric oxide and correlation with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuoka, Hironao; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Nakahara, Masaaki; Kodama, Rieko; Sanke, Tokio; Nakamura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Lymph nodes constitute the first site of metastasis for most malignancies, and the extent of lymph node involvement is a major criterion for evaluating patient prognosis. The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) has been shown to play an important role in lymph node metastasis. Nitric oxide (NO) may also contribute to induction of metastatic ability in human cancers. CXCR4 expression was analyzed in primary human breast carcinoma with long-term follow-up. The relationship between nitrotyrosine levels (a biomarker for peroxynitrate formation from NO in vivo) and lymph node status, CXCR4 immunoreactivity, and other established clinico-pathological parameters, as well as prognosis, was analyzed. Nitrite/nitrate levels and CXCR4 expressions were assessed in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell lines after induction and/or inhibition of NO synthesis. CXCR4 staining was predominantly cytoplasmic; this was observed in 50%(56/113) of the tumors. Cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression was significantly correlated with nitrotyrosine levels and lymph node metastasis. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression was associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In multivariate analysis, cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression emerged as a significant independent predictor for overall and disease-free survival. Cytoplasmic expression of functional CXCR4 in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells was increased by treatment with the NO donor DETA NONOate. This increase was abolished by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS. Our data showed a role for NO in stimulating cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression in vitro. Formation of the biomarker nitrotyrosine was also correlated with CXCR4 expression and lymph node metastasis in vivo. In addition, cytoplasmic CXCR4 expression may serve as a significant prognostic factor for long-term survival in breast cancer

  6. Three Types of Striational Antibodies in Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeaki Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is caused by antibodies that react mainly with the acetylcholine receptor on the postsynaptic site of the neuromuscular junction. A wide range of clinical presentations and associated features allow MG to be classified into subtypes based on autoantibody status. Striational antibodies, which react with epitopes on the muscle proteins titin, ryanodine receptor (RyR, and Kv1.4, are frequently found in MG patients with late-onset and thymoma. Antititin and anti-RyR antibodies are determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblot. More recently, a method for the detection of anti-Kv1.4 autoantibodies has become available, involving 12–15% of all MG patients. The presence of striational antibodies is associated with more severe disease in all MG subgroups. Anti-Kv1.4 antibody is a useful marker for the potential development of lethal autoimmune myocarditis and response to calcineurin inhibitors. Detection of striational antibodies provides more specific and useful clinical information in MG patients.

  7. Cytoplasmic Dynein Regulation by Subunit Heterogeneity and Its Role in Apical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Andrew W.; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2001-01-01

    Despite the existence of multiple subunit isoforms for the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein, it has not yet been directly shown that dynein complexes with different compositions exhibit different properties. The 14-kD dynein light chain Tctex-1, but not its homologue RP3, binds directly to rhodopsin's cytoplasmic COOH-terminal tail, which encodes an apical targeting determinant in polarized epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We demonstrate that Tctex-1 and RP3 compete for binding to dynein intermediate chain and that overexpressed RP3 displaces endogenous Tctex-1 from dynein complexes in MDCK cells. Furthermore, replacement of Tctex-1 by RP3 selectively disrupts the translocation of rhodopsin to the MDCK apical surface. These results directly show that cytoplasmic dynein function can be regulated by its subunit composition and that cytoplasmic dynein is essential for at least one mode of apical transport in polarized epithelia. PMID:11425878

  8. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2013-01-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. PMID:23830997

  10. Co-association of methotrexate and SPIONs into anti-CD64 antibody-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for theranostic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Segundo, Marcela A; Neves, José das; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with severe consequences for the quality of life of sufferers. Regrettably, the inflammatory process involved remains unclear, and finding successful therapies as well as new means for its early diagnosis have proved to be daunting tasks. As macrophages are strongly associated with RA inflammation, effective diagnosis and therapy may encompass the ability to target these cells. In this work, a new approach for targeted therapy and imaging of RA was developed based on the use of multifunctional polymeric nanoparticles. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles were prepared using a single emulsion-evaporation method and comprisaed the co-association of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and methotrexate. The nanoparticles were further functionalized with an antibody against the macrophage-specific receptor, CD64, which is overexpressed at sites of RA. The devised nanoparticles were characterized for mean particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and morphology, as well as the association of SPIONs, methotrexate, and the anti-CD64 antibody. Lastly, the cytotoxicity of the developed nanoparticles was assessed in RAW 264.7 cells using standard MTT and LDH assays. The nanoparticles had a mean diameter in the range of 130-200 nm and zeta potential values ranging from -32 mV to -16 mV. Association with either methotrexate or SPIONs did not significantly affect the properties of the nanoparticles. Conjugation with the anti-CD64 antibody, in turn, caused a slight increase in size and surface charge. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the association of SPIONs within the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) matrix. Both anti-CD64 and methotrexate association were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and quantified yielding values as high as 36% and 79%, respectively. In vitro toxicity studies confirmed the methotrexate-loaded nanosystem to be more effective than the free drug

  11. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities.

  12. Cross-sectional study of serum antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona in cats tested for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Mary G; Murphy, Alice J; Vrable, Ruth A; Vanzo, Nicole E; Lewis, Stacy K; Sheline, Katherine D; Kaneene, John B; Mansfield, Linda S

    2002-08-15

    To determine apparent seroprevalence of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona in a population of domestic cats previously tested for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii. Cross-sectional study. Serum from 196 domestic cats. Banked serum samples submitted to the Michigan State University Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory for T. gondii diagnostic testing were tested for antibodies against S. neurona by use of an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test and a western blot test. Submission records were analyzed to determine descriptive statistics and test for associations between positive results of a test for S. neurona and other variables in the data set. 10 of 196 (5%) samples yielded positive results for antibodies against S. neurona by use of western blot analysis, whereas 27 samples yielded positive results by use of the IFA. No association was found between S. neurona western blot test results and T. gondii test results, age, sex, or the reason for T. gondii testing. The S. neurona IFA titer was positively and significantly associated with positive results of western blot analysis. Domestic cats are not likely to play a substantial role as intermediate hosts in the natural life cycle of S. neurona. Results indicate that natural infection of domestic cats may occur, and small animal practitioners should be aware of this fact when evaluating cats with neurologic disease. The S. neurona IFA test had lower specificity than western blot analysis.

  13. Anti-protein C antibodies are associated with resistance to endogenous protein C activation and a severe thrombotic phenotype in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchillage, D R J; Efthymiou, M; Mackie, I J; Lawrie, A S; Machin, S J; Cohen, H

    2014-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies may interfere with the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC) to induce acquired APC resistance (APCr). To investigate the frequency and characteristics of APCr by using recombinant human APC (rhAPC) and endogenous protein C activation in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). APCr was assessed in APS and non-APS venous thromboembolism (VTE) patients on warfarin and normal controls with rhAPC or Protac by thrombin generation. IgG anti-protein C and anti-protein S antibodies and avidity were assessed by ELISA. APS patients showed greater resistance to both rhAPC and Protac than non-APS patients and normal controls (median normalized endogenous thrombin potential inhibition): APS patients with rhAPC, 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 75.2-88.3%; non-APS patients with rhAPC, 97.7% (95% CI 93.6-101.8%; APS patients with Protac, 66.0% (95% CI 59.5-72.6%); and non-APS patients with Protac, 80.7 (95% CI 74.2-87.2%). APS patients also had a higher frequency and higher levels of anti-protein C antibodies, with 60% (15/25) high-avidity antibodies. High-avidity anti-protein C antibodies were associated with greater APCr and with a severe thrombotic phenotype (defined as the development of recurrent VTE while patients were receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or both venous and arterial thrombosis). Twelve of 15 (80%) patients with high-avidity anti-protein C antibodies were classified as APS category I. Thrombotic APS patients showed greater APCr to both rhAPC and activation of endogenous protein C by Protac. High-avidity anti-protein C antibodies, associated with greater APCr, may provide a marker for a severe thrombotic phenotype in APS. However, in patients with category I APS, it remains to be established whether anti-protein C or anti-β2 -glycoprotein I antibodies are responsible for APCr. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  14. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  15. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, You-Kyoung [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Woong [Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inhak, E-mail: miccih@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  16. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  17. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Kitano, Ken; Aoyama, Miki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The radixin FERM domain was shown to bind the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic peptide and crystals of the complex were obtained. ERM proteins play a role in the cross-linking found between plasma membranes and actin filaments. The N-terminal FERM domains of ERM proteins are responsible for membrane association through direct interaction with the cytoplasmic tails of integral membrane proteins. During cell migration and movement, membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) on plasma membranes sheds adhesion molecule CD44 in addition to degrading the extracellular matrix. Here, the interaction between the radixin FERM domain and the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail is reported and preliminary crystallographic characterization of crystals of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of MT1-MMP is presented. The crystals belong to space group P6 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.7, c = 128.3 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å

  18. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies as biomarkers to identify severe primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Ariela; Mattia, Elena; Tonello, Marta; Grava, Chiara; Pengo, Vittorio; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2017-05-01

    Anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies have begun to be considered potentional biomarkers for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This cohort study investigate the role of aPS/PT antibodies as a risk factor for severe APS by evaluating the association between those antibodies and clinical/laboratory profiles of APS. Plasma/serum samples from 197 APS patients, 100 healthy subjects and 106 patients with autoimmune diseases were collected. IgG/IgM aPS/PT antibodies were assayed using commercial ELISA kit. Prevalences of IgG and IgM aPS/PT (pantiphospholipid antibody patients than in double and single positivity ones (p<0.0001 for all). APS/PT antibodies were associated to severe thrombosis, severe pregnancy complications inducing prematurity, and vascular microangiopathy, all generally associated to high risk APS forms requiring strong therapy.

  19. Anti-troponin I antibodies in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, José Pedro L; Sampaio, Susana; Cerqueira, Ana; Kaya, Ziya; Oliveira, Nuno Pardal

    2015-02-01

    To characterize the prevalence and clinical correlates of anti-troponin I antibodies in renal transplant patients. A group of 48 consecutive renal transplant patients under immunosuppressive therapy were studied. Anti-troponin I antibodies were measured and clinical data were retrieved. An anti-troponin I antibody titer renal transplant patients, and are not associated with the presence of clinical heart disease, but are associated with lack of statin therapy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. A Case of Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis Associated with Thrombotic Microangiopathy and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akishi Momose

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first report of a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN associated with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM antibody. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for high fever and anuria. On the first hospital day, we initiated hemodialysis for renal dysfunction. Laboratory data revealed normocytic-normochromic anemia with schistocytes in the peripheral smear, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, decreased serum haptoglobin, and negative results for both direct and indirect Coombs tests. Based on these results, we diagnosed TMA. Assays conducted several days later indicated a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin motif 13 (ADAMTS13 activity of 31.6%, and ADAMTS13 inhibitors were negative. We started plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma and steroid pulse therapy. Anti-GBM antibody was found to be positive. Renal biopsy showed FGN. Blood pressure rose on the 46th hospital day, and mild convulsions developed. Based on magnetic resonance imaging of the head, the patient was diagnosed with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension persisted despite administration of multiple antihypertensive agents, and the patient experienced a sudden generalized seizure. Computed tomography of the head showed multiple cerebral hemorrhages. However, his blood pressure subsequently decreased and the platelet count increased. TMA remitted following 36 plasma exchange sessions, but renal function was not restored, and maintenance hemodialysis was continued. The patient was discharged on the 119th day of hospitalization. In conclusion, it was shown that TMA, FGN and anti-GBM antibody were closely related.

  1. VGKC antibodies in pediatric encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, J; Brenner, T; Gill, D; Brilot, F; Antony, J; Vincent, A; Lang, B; Dale, R C

    2011-04-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Ab) are associated with limbic encephalitis and neuromyotonia in adults. There have been no systematic investigations in children to date. We looked for antibodies that are associated with CNS syndromes in adults including antibodies to VGKCs, NMDARs, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and glycine receptor (GlyR) in the stored acute serum from 10 children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy and status epilepticus. We also looked for antibodies to leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (Lgi1) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), which are now known to be tightly complexed with VGKCs in vivo. Sixty-nine pediatric controls were used for comparison. An elevated VGKC Ab (>100 pM) was detected in 4/10 patients with encephalitis compared to only 1/69 controls (p VGKC Ab-positive patients with encephalitis was variable including good recovery (n = 1), cognitive impairment (n = 3), temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 2), and mesial temporal sclerosis (n = 1). No other antibodies were detected, including those to Lgi1 and Caspr2. Encephalitis associated with VGKC Ab occurs in children and presents with status epilepticus and focal epilepsy. These antibodies are not directed against Lgi1 or Caspr2.

  2. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  3. Water diffusion in cytoplasmic streaming in Elodea internodal cells under the effect of antimitotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, Vladimir N; Anisimov, Alexander V; Dautova, Nailya R

    2008-07-01

    The translational displacement of the cytoplasmic water in Elodea stem cells resulting from protein motor activity was measured using the NMR method. A 24-h treatment with vincristine results in a reduction of the translational displacement of the cytoplasmic water. With a constant cytoplasmic streaming velocity, the dynamics of the translational displacement of the cytoplasmic water under the effect of taxol are characterized by a continuous increase at a concentration of 0.05 mM, and reaching a plateau at a concentration of 0.5 mM.

  4. Genetic expression of induced rice sterility under alien-cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Naiyuan; Cai Zhijun; Liang Kangjing; Li Yu

    2005-01-01

    Rice restorer lines were treated with 60 Co γ-ray and 4 male sterile mutants obtained with the fertility of controlled by 4 non-allelic recessive genes, respectively. Sixty combinations were made by using male sterile plants/fertile plants as male parents, and 15 different cytoplasmic substitution lines of the same cell nucleus as female parents. The result showed that F 1 spikelets were normal and fertile, and different numbers of male sterile plants were segregated in F 2 . Complete fertility genotype was not found among interactions between induced male sterile genes and alien-cytoplasms. (authors)

  5. Correlation of antinuclear antibody immunofluorescence patterns with immune profile using line immunoassay in the Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wendy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunity status, individual response to disease and types of antibodies produced are well known to vary from person to person, place to place and probably from population to population. A broad spectrum of specific auto antibodies that have so far been associated with specific rheumatic diseases, as noted in Western literature, has been well taken as a reference standard all over the world. There is neither research work nor any data correlating the auto antibodies and their antinuclear antibody (ANA patterns with the immunoprofile in the Indian population to date. Aims: To understand a definite association between ANA patterns and specific antibodies in the serum in the Indian study population and to document similarities / differences with the West. Settings and Design: This prospective and retrospective double blind study was undertaken on the South Indian population referred for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence method and by immunoline methods. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of patients from a random South Indian population who sought medical help for rheumatic disease were subjected for ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF method and line immunoassay during the study period of 27 months. Serum samples were processed in dilution of 1:100 using HEp - 2010 / liver biochip (Monkey (EUROIMMUN AG. The serum samples which were further processed for line immunoassay were treated in 1:100 dilution on nylon strips coated with recombinant and purified antigens as discrete lines with plastic backing (EUROIMMUN AG coated with antigens nRNP / Sm, Sm, SSA, Ro-52, SSB, Scl-70, PM-Scl, PCNA, Jo-1, CENP-B, dsDNA, nucleosomes, histones, ribosomal protein-P, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA-M2 along with a control band. The analysis was done by comparing the intensity of the reaction with positive control line by image analysis. Results: The antinuclear antibody indirect immunofluorescence (ANA - IIF patterns obtained

  6. Antithyroid Antibodies Are Implicated in Epileptogenesis of Adult Patients With Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Fu, Ting-Ying; Chen, Nai-Ching; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Lu, Yan-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Antithyroid antibodies (Abs) are associated with epilepsy in steroid-responsive encephalopathy, but have been rarely studied in unselected epilepsy patients. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and associated factors of antithyroid Abs and other auto-Abs in adult patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy patients without autoimmune disorders were surveyed for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-?2 glycoprotein 1 antibody (a?2GP1), anticardiolipin IgG Ab, antimicrosomal antibody