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Sample records for cystinosis

  1. Nephropathic cystinosis: an international consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emma, F.; Nesterova, G.; Langman, C.; Labbe, A.; Cherqui, S.; Goodyer, P.; Janssen, M.C.; Greco, M.; Topaloglu, R.; Elenberg, E.; Dohil, R.; Trauner, D.; Antignac, C.; Cochat, P.; Kaskel, F.; Servais, A.; Wuhl, E.; Niaudet, P.; Hoff, W. van 't; Gahl, W.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2014-01-01

    Cystinosis is caused by mutations in the CTNS gene (17p13.2), which encodes for a lysosomal cystine/proton symporter termed cystinosin. It is the most common cause of inherited renal Fanconi syndrome in young children. Because of its rarity, the diagnosis and specific treatment of cystinosis are

  2. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

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    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  3. Structured Transition Protocol for Children with Cystinosis

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    Rupesh Raina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The transition from pediatric to adult medical services has a greater impact on the care of adolescents or young adults with chronic diseases such as cystinosis. This transition period is a time of psychosocial development and new responsibilities placing these patients at increased risk of non-adherence. This can lead to serious adverse effects such as graft loss and progression of the disease. Our transition protocol will provide patients, families, physicians, and all those involved a structured guide to transitioning cystinosis patients. This structured protocol depends on four areas of competency: Recognition, Insight, Self-reliance, and Establishment of healthy habits (RISE. This protocol has not been tested and therefore challenges not realized. With a focus on medical, social, and educational/vocational aspects, we aim to improve transition for cystinosis patients in all aspects of their lives.

  4. Bartter syndrome associated with nephropathic cystinosis.

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    Osman, Nader M; Sanosi, Ali Al

    2016-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is a rare inherited defect in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. It is characterized by low potassium levels (hypokalaemia), increased blood pH (alkalosis) and normal to low blood pressure. There are three types of Bartter syndrome: neonatal, the classic type and Gitelman syndrome. Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by accumulation of free cystine in lysosomes due to disorder of lysosomal transport that can lead to end stage renal failure within 10 years and multiorgan impairment. We report a 5 year 9 month old child with Bartter syndrome associated with nephropathic cystinosis, hypothyroidism and rickets. Hitherto, only a handful of similar cases have been reported in the literature.

  5. Efficacy of topical cysteamine in nephropathic cystinosis.

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    Al-Hemidan, Amal; Shoughy, Samir S; Kozak, Igor; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of topical cysteamine 0.55% eye drops in the treatment of corneal cystine crystal deposits in patients with nephropathic cystinosis. Thirty-two patients with nephropathic cystinosis were prospectively included in the study. Patients with corneal cystinosis were treated with topical cysteamine 0.55% eye drops. They were examined before treatment, on each monthly visit and after treatment at the last follow-up. Photophobia was classified as grade 0 (none) for no photophobia, grade 1 (mild) for photophobia in bright light, grade 2 (moderate) for photophobia in room light and grade 3 (severe) for photophobia in dim light. Corneal cystine crystals were graded as grade 0=none, grade 1=1-10 crystals/mm 2 , grade 2=11-50 crystals/mm 2 , grade 3=more than 50 crystals/mm 2 . The main outcome measure was evaluation of photophobia and resolution of corneal cystine crystals. There were 13 male and 19 female patients. The mean age was 8 years with an age range of 8 months to 19 years. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years with a range of 2-8 years. Improvement of photophobia was not clinically significant in symptomatic patients. Patients displayed statistically significant worsening of corneal cystine deposits during the follow-up period. This study has shown that topical 0.55% cysteamine eye drops may have limited effects in decreasing the corneal cystine deposits in patients with severe forms of nephropathic cystinosis. NCT02766855, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Cystinosis in adult and adolescent patients: Recommendations for the comprehensive care of cystinosis

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    Gema Ariceta

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: Guidelines for the comprehensive care of cystinosis provide a support tool for health professionals who look after these patients. They are based on the following main pillars: (a a multidisciplinary approach; (b appropriate disease monitoring and control of white blood cell (WBC cystine levels; (c the importance of adherence to cysteamine treatment; and (d the promotion of patient self-care by means of disease education programmes. All these recommendations will lead us, in a second phase, to create a coordinated model of transition from paediatric to adult care services which will cover the specific needs of cystinosis.

  7. Neurocognitive functioning in school-aged cystinosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besouw, M. T. P.; Hulstijn-Dirkmaat, G. M.; van der Rijken, R. E. A.; van Dael, C. M.; Vande Walle, J.; Lilien, M. R.; Levtchenko, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to intralysosomal cystine accumulation in various tissues. It causes renal Fanconi syndrome and end stage renal failure around the age of 10 years if not treated with cysteamine. Children with cystinosis seem to have a normal

  8. Neurocognitive functioning in school-aged cystinosis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besouw, M.T.; Hulstijn-Dirkmaat, G.M.; Rijken, R.E.A. van der; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Dael, C.M. van; Walle, J. van der; Lilien, M.R.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to intralysosomal cystine accumulation in various tissues. It causes renal Fanconi syndrome and end stage renal failure around the age of 10 years if not treated with cysteamine. Children with cystinosis seem to have a normal

  9. Infantile cystinosis: From dialysis to renal transplantation

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    Manel Jellouli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in different organs and tissues. It is a multisystemic disease that can present with renal and extra-renal manifestations. In this report, we present the first case of transplanted nephropathic cystinosis in a Tunisian child. A 4-year-old Tunisian boy born to nonconsanguineous parents, was treated in our medical services in 1990 for cystinosis. Since the age of five months, he developed symptoms of severe weight loss, vomiting, dehydration, and polyuria. He manifested the Toni Debré Fanconi syndrome. Slit lamp examination of the anterior segment of both eyes revealed fine, shiny crystal-like deposits diffusely distributed in the corneal epithelium and the stroma. Our patient had renal failure. At the age of seven, he reached terminal chronic renal failure and was treated with peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis was started at the age of nine years. At the age of 13 years, he received a renal transplantation and was started on cysteamine 1999, five months after the renal transplantation. Currently, the patient is 28-year-old. The graft has survived 15 years after the transplantation. Renal functions were stable with a serum creatinine of 123 μmol/L at last follow-up.

  10. [Cystinosis : Diagnosis, cystine-depleting therapy, and transition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufeld, Jessica; Weber, Lutz T; Kurschat, Christine; Canaan-Kuehl, Sima; Brand, Eva; Oh, Jun; Pape, Lars

    2018-04-18

    This article presents a case of cystinosis in a young man. Diagnosis of the disease and the problem of transition to adult care are described. Cystinosis is a rare lysosomal storage disease with first manifestation in early childhood presenting as renal Fanconi syndrome. Without treatment, the disease leads to severe health impairment. Due to the rarity of the disease, a correct diagnosis is often delayed. Without treatment, cystinosis often leads to end-stage renal failure, blindness, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, and rickets. Cystine-depleting therapy with cysteamine significantly improves mortality and quality of life.

  11. Cystinosis presenting with findings of Bartter syndrome.

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    Özkan, Behzat; Çayır, Atilla; Koşan, Celalettin; Alp, Handan

    2011-01-01

    A five-year-old boy was referred to our pediatric clinic for evaluation of failure to thrive, headache, intermittent high fever, restlessness, polyuria, and polydipsia. His weight and height measurements were under the 3rd percentile. Clinical findings consisted of frontal bossing, carious teeth, O-bain deformity of the lower extremities, and moderate dehydration. The presence of metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and high renin and aldosterone levels were suggestive of Bartter syndrome and a treatment regimen for Bartter syndrome was started. At follow-up, the polyuria and hyponatremia were found to persist. A reassessment of the patient revealed findings consistent with proximal renal tubular acidosis such as metabolic acidosis with a high urinary pH, proteinuria, aminoaciduria with phosphaturia and hypercalciuria. Based on the presence of parental consanguinity as well as polyuria, proteinuria, low tubular reabsorption of phosphorus, generalized aminoaciduria, light yellow skin and hair color, the probable diagnosis of cystinosis was established and was confirmed by slit-lamp examination of the cornea showing cystine crystal deposition. Our case is a good example demonstrating that development of metabolic alkalosis does not exclude cystinosis and that all findings of the patient should be thoroughly evaluated. ©Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, Published by Galenos Publishing.

  12. Nephropathic Cystinosis Mimicking Bartter Syndrome: a Novel Mutation.

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    Bastug, Funda; Nalcacioglu, Hulya; Ozaltin, Fatih; Korkmaz, Emine; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine due to mutations in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The clinical phenotype of nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and development of end-stage renal disease during the first decade. Although metabolic acidosis is the classically prominent finding of the disease, a few cases may present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis mimicking Bartter syndrome. Bartter-like presentation may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of specific treatment for cystinosis. We report a case of a 6-year-old girl initially presenting with the features of Bartter syndrome that was diagnosed 2 years later with nephropathic cystinosis and a novel CTNS mutation.

  13. Growth hormone producing prolactinoma in juvenile cystinosis: a simple coincidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besouw, M.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Noordam, C.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile cystinosis was diagnosed in a patient who presented with severe headache attacks and photophobia. Treatment with oral cysteamine and topical cysteamine eye drops was started. One-and-a-half years later, he developed unilateral gynecomastia and elevated prolactin and growth hormone levels. A

  14. Genetic basis of cystinosis in Turkish patients: a single-center experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topaloglu, R.; Vilboux, T.; Coskun, T.; Ozaltin, F.; Tinloy, B.; Gunay-Aygun, M.; Bakkaloglu, A.; Besbas, N.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Kleta, R.; Gahl, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the molecular findings for the CTNS gene in 12 Turkish cystinosis patients aged 7-29 years. All presented initially with severe failure to thrive, polyuria, and polydipsia. Cystinosis was diagnosed at age 1 month to 9 years. Seven patients reached end-stage renal failure at ages ranging

  15. Successful Management of a Neglected Case of Nephropathic Cystinosis

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    Mohamed A. El-Naggari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cystinosis is a rare metabolic disorder characterised by lysosomal cystine accumulation leading to multi-organ damage; clinically, the kidneys are the first organ affected. Respiratory insufficiency caused by overall respiratory muscle myopathy is a life-threatening complication. Treatment with cysteamine should be initiated rapidly and continued lifelong to prolong renal function and protect the extra-renal organs. We report the case of a four-year-old Omani girl, diagnosed with infantile nephropathic cystinosis at 21 months. Cysteamine was prescribed but with no compliance to medications. She presented to the Child Health Department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, two years later with severe failure to thrive, electrolyte disturbance and respiratory failure. The hypoventilation and early respiratory dysfunction, due to intercostal and diaphragm myopathy, was treated by non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation. The patient was discharged after four months of intensive rehabilitation with no ventilator support. No standard treatment options have yet been established for respiratory dysfunction in cystinosis.

  16. Neurocognitive functions and behavioral profiles in children with nephropathic cystinosis

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    Reham Aly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with nephropathic cystinosis (NCTN have evidence of defective intellec-tual functions and behavioral disorders. This prospective study was performed to detect the cognitive dysfunctions in patients with this rare hereditary lysosomal storage disease, define their behavioral phenotypes, and study the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Thirteen patients with confirmed diagnosis of cystinosis (mean age ± SD 5.9 ± 3.0, range 1.5 - 12 years were subjected to the Stanford Binet test, Porteus Maze test, Child Behavior Checklist, and MRI brain. Thirteen age- and sex-matched children served as the control subjects (mean age ± SD 5.9 ± 2.9, range 1.7 - 12 years. The intelligence quotient (IQ was significantly lower in patients with cystinosis (P <0.001, with a significant defect in verbal (language, memory, and compre-hension and non-verbal abilities (visual perception and visiospatial and motor performance. A discrepancy between both abilities was detected - the non-verbal ability being lower; however, it did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, analysis revealed the visiospatial ability to be significantly lower compared to the visual perception. In comparison to healthy controls, children with NCTN had evidence of increased incidence of behavioral problems, mainly social (P = 0.023. An MRI of the brain revealed varying degrees of atrophic changes in seven patients. Patients with NCTN need a wider scope of attention and care, encompassing not only the metabolic multisystem derangement, but also the neuropsychological impairment in the context of multidisciplinary management. This approach is crucial in formulating comprehensive plans for social and educational rehabilitation.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine in nephropathic cystinosis patients

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    Bouazza Naïm

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in an impaired transport of cystine trough the lysosomal membrane causing an accumulation of free cystine in lysosomes. The only specific treatment for nephropathic cystinosis is cysteamine bitartrate. This study was aimed to describe the relationship between cysteamine plasma concentrations and white blood cell cystine levels, and to simulate an optimized administration scheme to improve the management of patients with cystinosis. Methods Cysteamine and cystine concentrations were measured in 69 nephropathic cystinosis patients. A total of 250 cysteamine plasma concentrations and 243 intracellular cystine concentrations were used to perform a population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis. An optimized administration scheme was simulated in order to maintain cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein and to investigate the possibility of administrating the treatment less than 4 times a day (QID, recommended. The current dosing recommendations are 1.3 g/m2/day for less than 50 kg BW and 2 g/day thereafter; the maximum dose should not exceed 1.95 g/m2/day. Results Cysteamine concentrations were satisfactorily described by a one-compartment model. Parameter estimates were standardized for a mean standard bodyweight using an allometric model. WBC cystine levels were adequately described by an indirect response model where the first-order removal rate constant is stimulated by the cysteamine concentrations. Conclusions According to simulations, in order to increase the percentage of patient with cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein, the current dosages could be changed as follows: 80 mg/kg/day (QID from 10 to 17 kg, 70 mg/kg/day (QID from 17 to 25 kg, 60 mg/kg/day (QID from 25 to 40 kg and 50 mg/kg/day (QID from 40 to 70 kg (these dosages remain under the maximum recommended dose. However an 8-hourly daily treatment (TID

  18. Value of Renal Biopsy in Diagnosing Infantile Nephropathic Cystinosis Associated With Secondary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emily; Ho, Jacqueline; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Salgado, Cláudia M; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Cystinosis is the most common cause of inherited renal Fanconi syndrome in young children, and typically presents with laboratory findings of a proximal tubulopathy and corneal crystals by one year of age. We describe here renal biopsy findings in a 20-month-old patient with an atypical presentation of distal renal tubular acidosis, diabetes insipidus, and the absence of corneal crystals. Although renal biopsy is usually not necessary to establish the diagnosis of cystinosis, when the patient presents with atypical signs and symptoms, a renal biopsy may be extremely valuable. A 20-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive, polyuria, polydipsia, and rickets. He initially showed evidence of a renal tubular acidosis, mild renal insufficiency, and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. His initial ophthalmologic examination did not demonstrate corneal crystals. His subsequent workup revealed phosphaturia, suggesting a partial proximal tubulopathy. Concomitantly, a renal biopsy revealed prominent podocytes with an immature glomerular appearance, and electron microscopy analysis showed numerous intracellular crystals within tubular epithelial cells. Subsequent laboratory and genetic testing confirmed a diagnosis of infantile nephropathic cystinosis. This case highlights the variability in the clinical presentation of cystinosis, resulting in an uncommon clinical picture of a rare disease. Given that treatment is available to prolong renal function and minimize the extra-renal manifestations of this disorder, early diagnosis is essential. It is important to raise the index of suspicion of cystinosis by recognizing its subtle morphological changes in young patients, and that nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be secondary to this disorder.

  19. A case of corneal cystinosis in a patient with rickets and chronic renal failure

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    Jae Yon Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old man diagnosed with nephropathic cystinosis at the age of 4 years was found to have progressive bilateral corneal crystal deposition. He presented with severe photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Ocular cystinosis was diagnosed on observing the typical crystals. Optical coherence tomography showed multiple areas of stromal hyperreflectivity due to crystal deposits within the corneal stroma. Ex vivo transmission electron microscopy of the cornea showed pathognomonic crystal deposits in corneal stromal keratocytes. Using polymerase chain reaction sequencing of the entire coding region, we identified five gene mutations, including two unreported mutations.

  20. Cysteamine ophthalmic hydrogel for the treatment of ocular cystinosis

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    Anxo Fernández-Ferreiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ocular cystinosis is a rare disease characterised by the deposit of cystine crystals on the corneal surface, which hinder patients’ eyesight. Oral cysteamine is given as cysteamine; however, it does not reach the cornea due to the lack of corneal vascularization making necessary its administration by the topical ocular route. The aim of the present study is to determine the stability of an ophthalmic hydrogel of cysteamine, which can be potentially prepared at hospital pharmacy departments, under different preservation conditions during a follow-up of 30 days. Different physical and chemical parameters were evaluated: osmolality, pH and cysteamine concentration, which has been measured by a method of ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS. Descriptive assays were also performed, such as transparency measurement and microbiological assays in order to verify its sterility. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the cysteamine hydrogel is stable during 30 days, being recommendable its preservation in refrigerated conditions.

  1. [Cysteamine ophthalmic hydrogel for the treatment of ocular cystinosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; Luaces-Rodríguez, Andrea; Díaz-Tomé, Victoria; Gil-Martínez, María; Rodríguez Ares, María Teresa; Touriño Peralba, Rosario; Blanco-Méndez, José; González-Barcia, Miguel; Otero-Espinar, Francisco Javier; Lamas, María Jesús

    2017-11-01

    Ocular cystinosis is a rare disease characterised by the deposit of cystine crystals on the corneal surface, which hinder patients' eyesight. Oral cysteamine is given as cysteamine; however, it does not reach the cornea due to the lack of corneal vascularization making necessary its  administration by the topical ocular route. The aim of the present study is to  determine the stability of an ophthalmic hydrogel of cysteamine, which can be  potentially prepared at hospital pharmacy departments, under different preservation conditions during a follow-up of 30 days. Different physical  and chemical parameters were evaluated: osmolality, pH and  cysteamine concentration, which has been measured by a method of ultra  performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS).  Descriptive assays were also performed, such as transparency measurement and  microbiological assays in order to verify its sterility. The obtained results  allow us to conclude that the cysteamine hydrogel is stable during 30 days,  being recommendable its preservation in refrigerated conditions. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Report of a Brazilian multicenter study on nephropathic cystinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisbich, Maria Helena; Koch, Vera H

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian Multicenter Nephropathic Study Group, founded in 1999, is currently composed of 16 pediatric nephrology units, which are coordinated by the Pediatric Nephrology Unit of Instituto da Criança--HCFMUSP. This Study Group intends to better know our patients, their special characteristics and facilitates the treatment. To present an update on the demographics of the ongoing study participants with interest on renal function status, response to therapy, and extra-renal complications. Patient recruitment to the study is based on informed consent and has been supported by the Brazilian Society of Nephrology, by the creation of an electronic homepage and by the participation in medical meetings and publications in medical periodicals. Our study protocol involves the initial and follow-up questionnaire, the measurement of intraleukocyte cystine content, initiation and follow-up therapy with cysteamine, and clinical patient follow-up based on a protocol of subsidiary exams. We identified 102 patients (42 females) with nephropathic cystinosis in Brazil since 1999. Forty-six children are followed at the Instituto da Criança/SP, 15 at the Hospital Pequeno Príncipe/PR, 12 at the UNICAMP/SP, 10 at the Unidade de Transplante Renal - HCFMUSP/SP and 3 at the Santa Casa/SP; the remaining patients are followed at the Instituto da Criança and at their respective doctors' offices in different nephrology services in Brazil. Of these patients, 23/102 (22.5%) have normal renal function, 19/102 (18.6%) are in chronic renal failure with conservative treatment, 26/102 are on dialysis (18 on peritoneal dialysis and 8 on hemodialysis), and 34/102 received a renal transplant. The extra-renal involvement diagnosed was: hypothyroidism in 63 patients, diabetes mellitus in 8 patients, muscular involvement in 7 patients, a compromised central nervous system in 5 patients, hepatic complications in 5 patients, and deglutition dysfunction in 2 patients. During this period, 10

  3. Carnitine Profile and Effect of Suppletion in Children with Renal Fanconi Syndrome due to Cystinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Besouw, M.; Cornelissen, E.; Cassiman, D.; Kluijtmans, L.; van den Heuvel, L.; Levtchenko, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by intralysosomal cystine accumulation. Patients present with generalized proximal tubular dysfunction called renal Fanconi syndrome. Urinary carnitine loss results in plasma and muscle carnitine deficiency, but no clinical signs of carnitine deficiency have been described. Also, the optimal dose of carnitine supplementation is undefined. This study aimed to determine whether currently recommended carnitine doses result in adequ...

  4. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-01-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-[ 3 H]carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined

  5. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine bitartrate in paediatric nephropathic cystinosis patients.

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    Belldina, Eric B; Huang, Mei Y; Schneider, Jerry A; Brundage, Richard C; Tracy, Timothy S

    2003-11-01

    Cysteamine is used to reduce tissue cystine content in patients suffering from nephropathic cystinosis. The objectives of the current study were to investigate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine bitartrate in children and young adults with nephropathic cystinosis. Cysteamine bitartrate was administered to 11 cystinosis patients at their regular dose level in a single-dose, open-label, steady-state study. Blood samples were collected and analysed for plasma cysteamine and white blood cell cystine content and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters estimated by NONMEM analysis using a linked pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model. Cysteamine was rapidly cleared from the plasma (mean CL/F = 32.3 ml min(-1) kg(-1), range = 17.3-52.2), appeared to be extensively distributed (mean Vss/F = 15.1 l, range 2.7-32.3) and exhibited a mean Tmax of 1.4 h. White blood cell cystine content post-dosing was significantly decreased compared with pre- and post-dose values (average decrement approximately 47%). A counter-clockwise hysteresis was noted in all patients, suggestive of a lag time (mean Tlag = 0.44 h, range 0.22-0.92) between drug concentration and effect. The results of this study establish that cysteamine is rapidly cleared from the plasma but that an every 6 h dosing interval adequately maintains white blood cell cystine content below the target of 1 nmol cystine per mg protein.

  6. A patient with cystinosis presenting like bartter syndrome and review of literature.

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    Ertan, Pelin; Evrengul, Havva; Ozen, Serkan; Emre, Sinan

    2012-12-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder presenting with metabolic acidosis, Fanconi syndrome and renal failure. We present a 6-year-old girl with severe growth failure, hyponatremia and hypokalemia. Her parents were 4(th) degree relatives. Two relatives were diagnosed as end stage renal failure. She also had persistant hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Her renal function was normal at presentation. She was thought to have Bartter syndrome with supporting findings of elevated levels of renin and aldosterone with normal blood pressure, and hyperplasia of juxtaglomerular apparatus. Her metabolic alkalosis did not resolve despite supportive treatment. At 6(th) month of follow-up proteinuria, glucosuria and deterioration of renal function developed. Diagnosis of cystinosis was made with slit lamp examination and leukocyte cystine levels. At 12(th) month of follow-up her metabolic alkalosis has converted to metabolic acidosis. In children presenting with persistant metabolic alkalosis, with family history of renal failure, and parental consanguinity, cystinosis should always be kept in mind as this disease is an important cause of end stage renal failure which may have features mimmicking Bartter syndrome.

  7. Controversies and research agenda in nephropathic cystinosis: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langman, C.B.; Barshop, B.A.; Deschenes, G.; Emma, F.; Goodyer, P.; Lipkin, G.; Midgley, J.P.; Ottolenghi, C.; Servais, A.; Soliman, N.A.; Thoene, J.G.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive metabolic, lifelong disease characterized by lysosomal cystine accumulation throughout the body that commonly presents in infancy with a renal Fanconi syndrome and, if untreated, leads to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the later childhood years.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cystinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a condition characterized by accumulation of the amino acid cystine (a building block of proteins) within cells. ... adolescence, include muscle deterioration, blindness, inability to swallow, diabetes, thyroid and nervous system problems, and an inability ...

  9. A Phase 1 Pharmacokinetic Study of Cysteamine Bitartrate Delayed-Release Capsules Following Oral Administration with Orange Juice, Water, or Omeprazole in Cystinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Danielle; Holt, Robert J; Confer, Nils F; Checani, Gregg C; Obaidi, Mohammad; Xie, Yuli; Brannagan, Meg

    2018-02-01

    Cystinosis is a rare, metabolic, autosomal recessive, genetic lysosomal storage disorder characterized by an accumulation of cystine in various organs and tissues. Cysteamine bitartrate (CB) is a cystine-depleting aminothiol agent approved in the United States and Europe in immediate-release and delayed-release (DR) formulations for the treatment of nephropathic cystinosis in children and adults. It is recommended that CBDR be administered with fruit juice (except grapefruit juice) for maximum absorption. Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that inhibits gastric acid secretion and, theoretically, may cause the premature release of cysteamine by increasing intragastric pH, thereby affecting the PK of CBDR. This open-label, three-period, randomized study in healthy adult subjects was designed primarily to compare the pharmacokinetics of CBDR capsules after a single oral dose administered with orange juice, water, or multiple oral doses of omeprazole with water at steady state. A total of 32 subjects were randomly assigned to receive study agents in one of two treatment sequences. All subjects completed the study and baseline characteristics of the overall population and the two treatment sequence populations were similar. Peak mean plasma cysteamine concentrations following co-administration of CBDR capsules with orange juice (1892 ng/mL) were higher compared with co-administration with water (1663 ng/mL) or omeprazole 20 mg and water (1712 ng/mL). Mean time to peak plasma concentration was shorter with omeprazole co-administration (2.5 h) compared with orange juice (3.5 h) or water (3.0 h). Statistical comparisons between treatment groups indicated that exposure as assessed by AUC 0-t , AUC 0-∞ , and C max were all within the 80-125% bioequivalence ranges for all comparisons. All treatments were generally well tolerated. Overall, the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate DR capsules are not significantly impacted by co-administration with orange juice

  10. The Metabolic Basis of Cystinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-12

    glucose, amino acids and other organic acids appear. The present- ing symptoms of the disease— polyuria , polydipsia and recurrent unexplained fevers are... polyuria and polydypsia which results make children with the disease extremely susceptible to dehydration. This vulnerability to dehydration explains...on the relations between renal rickets (renal dwarfism) and renal diabetes . In: Stanbury J.Wyngaarden J.B., Frederickson D.S., eds. The Metabolic

  11. Quality of Life is Improved and Kidney Function Preserved in Patients with Nephropathic Cystinosis Treated for 2 Years with Delayed-Release Cysteamine Bitartrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langman, C.B.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Grimm, P.; Sarwal, M.; Niaudet, P.; Deschenes, G.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Morin, D.; Cochat, P.; Elenberg, E.; Hanna, C.; Gaillard, S.; Bagger, M.J.; Rioux, P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term effects of delayed-release cysteamine bitartrate (DR-CYS) based on our previous work that established the short-term noninferiority of DR-CYS every 12 hours compared with immediate-release cysteamine bitartrate every 6 hours. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a

  12. Bedre prognose af cystinose ved behandling med cysteamin og nyretransplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oczachowska-Kulik, Anna Ewa; Lund, Allan; Skovby, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare, autosomal recessive disease with cystine deposits in different tissues. First signs come from kidneys and eyes, but during progression of the disease other organs can also be affected. Previously, patients with cystinosis had a very poor prognosis, but it is now considerably...

  13. Visual and Verbal Learning in a Genetic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilkin, Amy M.; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2009-01-01

    Visual and verbal learning in a genetic metabolic disorder (cystinosis) were examined in the following three studies. The goal of Study I was to provide a normative database and establish the reliability and validity of a new test of visual learning and memory (Visual Learning and Memory Test; VLMT) that was modeled after a widely used test of…

  14. The origin of halitosis in cystinotic patients due to eysteamine treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besouw, Martine; Blom, Henk; Tangerman, Albert; de Graaf-Hess, Adriana; Levtchenko, Elena

    Introduction: Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of cystine. Cysteamine removes cystine from the lysosome and slows down the progression of the disease. One of its side effects is the induction of halitosis, which can interfere with

  15. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant γ-glutamyl cycle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a ...

  16. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for lysosomal cystine transporter cystinosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Ivanova

    Full Text Available Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles.

  17. Elevated oxidized glutathione in cystinotic proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Martijn J G; de Graaf-Hess, Adriana; Blom, Henk J; Dijkman, Henry B P M; Monnens, Leo A; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Levtchenko, Elena N

    2005-11-18

    Cystinosis, the most frequent cause of inborn Fanconi syndrome, is characterized by the lysosomal cystine accumulation, caused by mutations in the CTNS gene. To elucidate the pathogenesis of cystinosis, we cultured proximal tubular cells from urine of cystinotic patients (n = 9) and healthy controls (n = 9), followed by immortalization with human papilloma virus (HPV E6/E7). Obtained cell lines displayed basolateral polarization, alkaline phosphatase activity, and presence of aminopeptidase N (CD-13) and megalin, confirming their proximal tubular origin. Cystinotic cell lines exhibited elevated cystine levels (0.86 +/- 0.95 nmol/mg versus 0.09 +/- 0.01 nmol/mg protein in controls, p = 0.03). Oxidized glutathione was elevated in cystinotic cells (1.16 +/- 0.83 nmol/mg versus 0.29 +/- 0.18 nmol/mg protein, p = 0.04), while total glutathione, free cysteine, and ATP contents were normal in these cells. In conclusion, elevated oxidized glutathione in cystinotic proximal tubular epithelial cell lines suggests increased oxidative stress, which may contribute to tubular dysfunction in cystinosis.

  18. Clinical profile and outcome of renal tubular disorders in children: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Vijay Kiran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubular disorders form a significant proportion of pediatric kidney diseases and are an important differential diagnosis of failure to thrive (FTT in children. Data regarding their outcome is scarce from India. We evaluated the clinical profile of these children and studied the outcome in terms of their growth and renal failure. This is a retrospective longitudinal study of all children with renal tubular disorders attending a tertiary care pediatric nephrology center from 2005 to 2010. Growth and renal outcomes were assessed by Z scores and estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis and. The common disorders encountered were distal renal tubular acidosis (d-RTA (44%, Bartter-like (Bartter′s and Gitelman syndromes (22% followed by hereditary Fanconi syndrome (cystinosis and idiopathic Fanconi syndrome (13% and few cases of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, hypophosphatemic rickets and idiopathic hypercalciuria. Male: female ratio was 1.22. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 (range 0.13-11 years. Growth failure was the presenting feature in 86% of children followed by polyuria (60% and bone deformities (47%. In 60% of children with hereditary Fanconi syndrome, nephropathic cystinosis was diagnosed, all of whom progressed to stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD within 3.41 ± 1.42 years. With appropriate therapy, catch-up growth was noted in d-RTA and Bartter syndrome. Renal tubular disorders usually present with FTT. d-RTA is the most common etiology followed by Bartter-like syndrome. Renal function is preserved in all these disorders except for nephropathic cystinosis, who ultimately progressed to CKD. With appropriate and inexpensive therapy, these children do grow well.

  19. Treatment of Inherited Eye Defects by Systemic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Celine J; Kreymerman, Alexander; Ur, Sarah N; Frizzi, Katie E; Naphade, Swati; Lau, Athena; Tran, Tammy; Calcutt, Nigel A; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Cystinosis is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS gene), resulting in cystine crystal accumulation in tissues. In eyes, crystals accumulate in the cornea causing photophobia and eventually blindness. Hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) rescue the kidney in a mouse model of cystinosis. We investigated the potential for HSPC transplantation to treat corneal defects in cystinosis. We isolated HSPCs from transgenic DsRed mice and systemically transplanted irradiated Ctns-/- mice. A year posttransplantation, we investigated the fate and function of HSPCs by in vivo confocal and fluorescence microscopy (IVCM), quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR), mass spectrometry, histology, and by measuring the IOP. To determine the mechanism by which HSPCs may rescue disease cells, we transplanted Ctns-/- mice with Ctns-/- DsRed HSPCs virally transduced to express functional CTNS-eGFP fusion protein. We found that a single systemic transplantation of wild-type HSPCs prevented ocular pathology in the Ctns-/- mice. Engraftment-derived HSPCs were detected within the cornea, and also in the sclera, ciliary body, retina, choroid, and lens. Transplantation of HSPC led to substantial decreases in corneal cystine crystals, restoration of normal corneal thickness, and lowered IOP in mice with high levels of donor-derived cell engraftment. Finally, we found that HSPC-derived progeny differentiated into macrophages, which displayed tunneling nanotubes capable of transferring cystinosin-bearing lysosomes to diseased cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HSPCs can rescue hereditary corneal defects, and supports a new potential therapeutic strategy for treating ocular pathologies.

  20. Endocrine manifestations related to inherited metabolic diseases in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vantyghem Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM are recessive, genetically transmitted diseases and are classified into 3 main groups according to their mechanisms: cellular intoxication, energy deficiency, and defects of complex molecules. They can be associated with endocrine manifestations, which may be complications from a previously diagnosed IEM of childhood onset. More rarely, endocrinopathies can signal an IEM in adulthood, which should be suspected when an endocrine disorder is associated with multisystemic involvement (neurological, muscular, hepatic features, etc.. IEM can affect all glands, but diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism are the most frequent disorders. A single IEM can present with multiple endocrine dysfunctions, especially those involving energy deficiency (respiratory chain defects, and metal (hemochromatosis and storage disorders (cystinosis. Non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter and sometimes hypoparathyroidism should steer the diagnosis towards a respiratory chain defect. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequent in haemochromatosis (often associated with diabetes, whereas primary hypogonadism is reported in Alström disease and cystinosis (both associated with diabetes, the latter also with thyroid dysfunction and galactosemia. Hypogonadism is also frequent in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (with adrenal failure, congenital disorders of glycosylation, and Fabry and glycogen storage diseases (along with thyroid dysfunction in the first 3 and diabetes in the last. This is a new and growing field and is not yet very well recognized in adulthood despite its consequences on growth, bone metabolism and fertility. For this reason, physicians managing adult patients should be aware of these diagnoses.

  1. Crystalline Subtype of Pre-Descemetic Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Dolz-Marco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report corneal findings in a familial case of the crystalline subtype of pre- Descemetic corneal dystrophy. Case Report: A 19-year-old girl and her 44-year-old mother were found to have asymptomatic, bilateral, punctiform and multi-colored crystalline opacities across the whole posterior layer of the corneas. Endothelial specular microscopy revealed the presence of white round flecks located at different levels anterior to the endothelium. No systemic abnormalities or medications could be related to account for these findings. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the third familial report of this rare corneal disorder. Differential diagnosis may include Schnyder corneal dystrophy, cystinosis, Bietti΄s dystrophy and monoclonal gammopathy.

  2. Crystalline Subtype of Pre-Descemetic Corneal Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report corneal findings in a familial case of the crystalline subtype of pre-Descemetic corneal dystrophy. Case Report A 19-year-old girl and her 44-year-old mother were found to have asymptomatic, bilateral, punctiform and multi-colored crystalline opacities across the whole posterior layer of the corneas. Endothelial specular microscopy revealed the presence of white round flecks located at different levels anterior to the endothelium. No systemic abnormalities or medications could be related to account for these findings. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the third familial report of this rare corneal disorder. Differential diagnosis may include Schnyder corneal dystrophy, cystinosis, Bietti´s dystrophy and monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:25279130

  3. Regulation of steroid hormones and energy status with cysteamine and its effect on spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yandi; Zhao, Yong; Yu, Shuai; Feng, Yanni; Zhang, Hongfu; Kou, Xin; Chu, Meiqiang; Cui, Liantao; Li, Lan; Zhang, Pengfei; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that cysteamine is a potent chemical for treating many diseases including cystinosis and it has many adverse effects, the effect of cysteamine on spermatogenesis is as yet unknown. Therefore the objective of this investigation was to explore the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. Sheep were treated with vehicle control, 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg cysteamine for six months. After that, the semen samples were collected to determine the spermatozoa motility by computer-assisted sperm assay method. Blood samples were collected to detect the levels of hormones and the activity of enzymes. Spermatozoa and testis samples were collected to study the mechanism of cysteamine's actions. It was found that the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis were dose dependent. A low dose (10 mg/kg) cysteamine treatment increased ovine spermatozoa motility; however, a higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both spermatozoa concentration and motility. This decrease might be due to a reduction in steroid hormone production by the testis, a reduction in energy in the testis and spermatozoa, a disruption in the blood-testis barrier, or a breakdown in the vital signaling pathways involved in spermatogenesis. The inhibitory effects of cysteamine on sheep spermatogenesis may be used to model its effects on young male patients with cystinosis or other diseases that are treated with this drug. Further studies on spermatogenesis that focus on patients treated with cysteamine during the peripubertal stage are warranted. - Highlights: • Dose dependent effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis • A low dose (10 mg/kg) increased spermatozoa motility. • A higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both concentration and motility of spermatozoa. • Disruption in the blood-testis barrier caused reduction in concentration and motility.

  4. Regulation of steroid hormones and energy status with cysteamine and its effect on spermatogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yandi [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Yu, Shuai; Feng, Yanni [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhang, Hongfu [State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Institute of Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China); Kou, Xin [Shouguang Hongde Farmer Co., Weifang 262700 (China); Chu, Meiqiang; Cui, Liantao; Li, Lan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Zhang, Pengfei [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Shen, Wei [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China); Min, Lingjiang, E-mail: mlj020963@hotmail.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Germplasm Enhancement, Universities of Shandong, Qingdao 266109 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Although it is well known that cysteamine is a potent chemical for treating many diseases including cystinosis and it has many adverse effects, the effect of cysteamine on spermatogenesis is as yet unknown. Therefore the objective of this investigation was to explore the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. Sheep were treated with vehicle control, 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg cysteamine for six months. After that, the semen samples were collected to determine the spermatozoa motility by computer-assisted sperm assay method. Blood samples were collected to detect the levels of hormones and the activity of enzymes. Spermatozoa and testis samples were collected to study the mechanism of cysteamine's actions. It was found that the effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis were dose dependent. A low dose (10 mg/kg) cysteamine treatment increased ovine spermatozoa motility; however, a higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both spermatozoa concentration and motility. This decrease might be due to a reduction in steroid hormone production by the testis, a reduction in energy in the testis and spermatozoa, a disruption in the blood-testis barrier, or a breakdown in the vital signaling pathways involved in spermatogenesis. The inhibitory effects of cysteamine on sheep spermatogenesis may be used to model its effects on young male patients with cystinosis or other diseases that are treated with this drug. Further studies on spermatogenesis that focus on patients treated with cysteamine during the peripubertal stage are warranted. - Highlights: • Dose dependent effects of cysteamine on spermatogenesis • A low dose (10 mg/kg) increased spermatozoa motility. • A higher dose (20 mg/kg) decreased both concentration and motility of spermatozoa. • Disruption in the blood-testis barrier caused reduction in concentration and motility.

  5. Results of simultaneous and sequential pediatric liver and kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J; Bueno, J; Shapiro, R; Scantlebury, V; Mazariegos, G; Fung, J; Reyes, J

    2001-11-27

    The indications for simultaneous and sequential pediatric liver (LTx) and kidney (KTx) transplantation have not been well defined. We herein report the results of our experience with these procedures in children with end-stage liver disease and/or subsequent end-stage renal disease. Between 1984 and 1995, 12 LTx recipients received 15 kidney allografts. Eight simultaneous and seven sequential LTx/KTx were performed. There were six males and six females, with a mean age of 10.9 years (1.5-23.7). One of the eight simultaneous LTx/KTx was part of a multivisceral allograft. Five KTx were performed at varied intervals after successful LTx, one KTx was performed after a previous simultaneous LTx/KTx, and one KTx was performed after previous sequential LTx/KTx. Immunosuppression was with tacrolimus or cyclosporine and steroids. Indications for LTx were oxalosis (four), congenital hepatic fibrosis (two), cystinosis (one), polycystic liver disease (one), A-1-A deficiency (one), Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN)-related (one), cryptogenic cirrhosis (one), and hepatoblastoma (one). Indications for KTx were oxalosis (four), drug-induced (four), polycystic kidney disease (three), cystinosis (one), and glomerulonephritis (1). With a mean follow-up of 58 months (0.9-130), the overall patient survival rate was 58% (7/12). One-year and 5-year actuarial patient survival rates were 66% and 58%, respectively. Patient survival rates at 1 year after KTx according to United Network of Organ Sharing (liver) status were 100% for status 3, 50% for status 2, and 0% for status 1. The overall renal allograft survival rate was 47%. Actuarial renal allograft survival rates were 53% at 1 and 5 years. The overall hepatic allograft survival rate was equivalent to the overall patient survival rate (58%). Six of seven surviving patients have normal renal allograft function, and one patient has moderate chronic allograft nephropathy. All surviving patients have normal hepatic allograft function. Six

  6. Long term outcome of treatment of end stage renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, P; Tomlinson, L; Rigden, S P; Haycock, G B; Chantler, C

    1988-01-01

    The most common causes of end stage renal failure in 46 children (mean age 11 years, range 4-14) treated between January 1972 and June 1977 were: reflux nephropathy (n = 12), cystinosis (n = 7), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 6), and Schönlein-Henoch disease (n = 5). The quality of life, degree of renal function, and height attainment of the 31 survivors were assessed in June 1985, when their mean age was 22 years (range 14-27), using hospital records and a questionnaire designed to highlight social and psychological problems. Twenty six patients had a functioning transplanted kidney. Average growth during treatment for all survivors was normal, but most were disappointed with their 'final height'. Though five patients had some form of disabling bone disease, all 31 could walk and 27 could run. Sixteen (67%) were in full or part time employment and nine were living independently. A group of 32 patients with juvenile onset diabetes treated at this hospital for at least five years were also asked to complete the questionnaire and of these, 17 responded. On average, their data could usefully be compared with those of cases of end stage renal failure. More of the diabetics had jobs, but most sexually mature patients with renal disease were concerned about their physical appearance and had not achieved any stable long term sexual relationships. We suggest that a poor body image resulting in low self esteem may be responsible for the deficiency and believe that further study in this group is warranted.

  7. Radiological and clinical characterization of the lysosomal storage disorders: non-lipid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E I; Xing, M; Moreno-De-Luca, A; Harmouche, E; Terk, M R

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a large group of genetic metabolic disorders that result in the accumulation of abnormal material, such as mucopolysaccharides, glycoproteins, amino acids and lipids, within cells. Since many LSDs manifest during infancy or early childhood, with potentially devastating consequences if left untreated, timely identification is imperative to prevent irreversible damage and early death. In this review, the key imaging features of the non-lipid or extralipid LSDs are examined and correlated with salient clinical manifestations and genetic information. Disorders are stratified based on the type of excess material causing tissue or organ dysfunction, with descriptions of the mucopolysaccharidoses, mucolipidoses, alpha-mannosidosis, glycogen storage disorder II and cystinosis. In addition, similarities and differences in radiological findings between each of these LSDs are highlighted to facilitate further recognition. Given the rare and extensive nature of the LSDs, mastery of their multiple clinical and radiological traits may seem challenging. However, an understanding of the distinguishing imaging characteristics of LSDs and their clinical correlates may allow radiologists to play a key role in the early diagnosis of these progressive and potentially fatal disorders.

  8. Priority target conditions for algorithms for monitoring children's growth: Interdisciplinary consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Scherdel

    Full Text Available Growth monitoring of apparently healthy children aims at early detection of serious conditions through the use of both clinical expertise and algorithms that define abnormal growth. Optimization of growth monitoring requires standardization of the definition of abnormal growth, and the selection of the priority target conditions is a prerequisite of such standardization.To obtain a consensus about the priority target conditions for algorithms monitoring children's growth.We applied a formal consensus method with a modified version of the RAND/UCLA method, based on three phases (preparatory, literature review, and rating, with the participation of expert advisory groups from the relevant professional medical societies (ranging from primary care providers to hospital subspecialists as well as parent associations. We asked experts in the pilot (n = 11, reading (n = 8 and rating (n = 60 groups to complete the list of diagnostic classification of the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and then to select the conditions meeting the four predefined criteria of an ideal type of priority target condition.Strong agreement was obtained for the 8 conditions selected by the experts among the 133 possible: celiac disease, Crohn disease, craniopharyngioma, juvenile nephronophthisis, Turner syndrome, growth hormone deficiency with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome, infantile cystinosis, and hypothalamic-optochiasmatic astrocytoma (in decreasing order of agreement.This national consensus can be used to evaluate the algorithms currently suggested for growth monitoring. The method used for this national consensus could be re-used to obtain an international consensus.

  9. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Simpkins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling.

  10. Lysosomal cross-correction by hematopoietic stem cell-derived macrophages via tunneling nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naphade, Swati; Sharma, Jay; Chevronnay, Héloïse P. Gaide; Shook, Michael A.; Yeagy, Brian A.; Rocca, Celine J.; Ur, Sarah N.; Lau, Athena J.; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite controversies on the potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to promote tissue repair, we previously showed that HSC transplantation could correct cystinosis, a multi-systemic lysosomal storage disease, caused by a defective lysosomal membrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS). Addressing the cellular mechanisms, we here report vesicular cross-correction after HSC differentiation into macrophages. Upon co-culture with cystinotic fibroblasts, macrophages produced tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) allowing transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes into Ctns-deficient cells, which exploited the same route to retrogradely transfer cystine-loaded lysosomes to macrophages, providing a bidirectional correction mechanism. TNT formation was enhanced by contact with diseased cells. In vivo, HSCs grafted to cystinotic kidneys also generated nanotubular extensions resembling invadopodia that crossed the dense basement membranes and delivered cystinosin into diseased proximal tubular cells. This is the first report of correction of a genetic lysosomal defect by bidirectional vesicular exchange via TNTs and suggests broader potential for HSC transplantation for other disorders due to defective vesicular proteins. PMID:25186209

  11. Inhibition of peripubertal sheep mammary gland development by cysteamine through reducing progesterone and growth factor production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Feng, Yanni; Zhang, Hongfu; Kou, Xin; Li, Lan; Liu, Xinqi; Zhang, Pengfei; Cui, Liantao; Chu, Meiqiang; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang

    2017-02-01

    Cysteamine has been used for treating cystinosis for many years, and furthermore it has also been used as a therapeutic agent for different diseases including Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, malaria, cancer, and others. Although cysteamine has many potential applications, its use may also be problematic. The effects of low doses of cysteamine on the reproductive system, especially the mammary glands are currently unknown. In the current investigation, low dose (10 mg/kg BW/day) of cysteamine did not affect sheep body weight gain or organ index of the liver, spleen, or heart; it did, however, increase the levels of blood lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets. Most interestingly, it inhibited mammary gland development after 2 or 5 months of treatment by reducing the organ index and the number of mammary gland ducts. Plasma growth hormone and estradiol remained unchanged; however, plasma progesterone levels and the protein level of HSD3β1 in sheep ovaries were decreased by cysteamine. In addition to steroid hormones, growth factors produced in the mammary glands also play crucial roles in mammary gland development. Results showed that protein levels of HGF, GHR, and IGF1R were decreased after 5 months of cysteamine treatment. These findings together suggest that progesterone and local growth factors in mammary glands might be involved in cysteamine initiated inhibition of pubertal ovine mammary gland development. Furthermore, it may lead to a reduction in fertility. Therefore, cysteamine should be used with great caution until its actions have been further investigated and its limitations overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. UK Renal Registry 11th Annual Report (December 2008): Chapter 13 Demography of the UK paediatric renal replacement therapy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Malcolm A; Shaw, Joanne; Sinha, Manish; Adalat, Shazia; Hussain, Farida; Inward, Carol

    2009-01-01

    To describe the demographics of the paediatric RRT population in the UK and analyse changes in demographics with time. Extraction and analysis of data from the UK paediatric Renal Registry. The UK paediatric established renal failure (ERF) population in April 2008 was 875 patients. The prevalence under the age of 16 years was 55 per million age related population (pmp) and the incidence 7.92 pmp. The incidence and prevalence for South Asian and Other ethnic groups were 3 times that of the White and Black populations. Renal dysplasia was the most common cause of ERF accounting for 33% of prevalent cases. Diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance were more common in patients from ethnic minority groups. The spectrum of diseases seen has changed over a generation. Overall 5 year survival for children with ERF was 91.8%. Five year survival of infants starting dialysis was just 62%. Transplanted patients accounted for 74% of the current population. The proportion with grafts from living donors has steadily risen to 34%. Children from ethnic minority groups were less likely to have an allograft and living donation was less frequent in this population. For those on dialysis, 57% were receiving peritoneal dialysis. This was the main treatment modality for patients under 4 years of age. The paediatric ERF population continued to expand slowly. Incidence and prevalence rates were stable and similar to other developed nations. The high incidence in patients from ethnic minority groups will lead to a greater proportion of the population being from these groups in time. To maintain the high proportion of engrafted patients it will be necessary to encourage living donation in the ethnic minority population. The spectrum of diseases seen has already changed over a generation with the treatment of young children with diseases such as congenital nephrosis. The incidence of cystinosis causing ERF was reduced, probably reflecting better early treatment. Copyright 2009 S. Karger

  13. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  14. An Open-Label Investigation of the Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of Oral Cysteamine in Adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Graham; Steele, Sandra; Griffiths, Kairen; Devlin, Edward; Fraser-Pitt, Douglas; Cotton, Seonaidh; Norrie, John; Chrystyn, Henry; O'Neil, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Cysteamine is licensed for use in nephropathic cystinosis but preclinical data suggest a role in managing cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to determine whether oral cysteamine is absorbed in adult CF patients and enters the bronchial secretions. Tolerability outcomes were also explored. Patients ≥18 years of age, weighing >50 kg with stable CF lung disease were commenced on oral cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon(®)) 450 mg once daily, increased weekly to 450 mg four times daily. Serial plasma cysteamine concentrations were measured for 24 h after the first dose. Participants were reviewed every week for 6 weeks, except at 4 weeks. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were measured 8 h after dosing when reviewed at 1, 2 and 3 weeks and 6 h after dosing when reviewed at 5 weeks. Sputum cysteamine concentration was also quantified at the 5-week assessment. Seven of the ten participants reported adverse reactions typical of cysteamine, two participants discontinued intervention. Following the first 450-mg dose, mean (SD) maximum concentration (C max) was 2.86 (1.96) mg/l, the time corresponding to C max (T max) was 1.2 (0.7) h, the half-life (t ½) was 3.7 (1.7) h, clearance (CL/F) 89.9 (30.5) L/h and volume of distribution (V d/F) 427 (129) L. Cysteamine appeared to accumulate in sputum with a median (interquartile range) sputum:plasma cysteamine concentration ratio of 4.2 (0.98-8.84). Oral cysteamine is absorbed and enters the bronchial secretions in patients with CF. Although adverse reactions were common, the majority of patients continued with cysteamine. Further trials are required to establish the risk benefit ratio of cysteamine therapy in CF.

  15. V2R mutations and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    222300)(1), an autosomal recessive disorder. Other inherited disorders with complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium include Bartter syndrome (OMIM 601678)(1) and cystinosis (OMIM 219800)(1), while long-term lithium administration is the main cause of acquired NDI. Here, we use the gene symbols approved by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature) and provide OMIM entry numbers [OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man)(1); McKusick-Nathans Institute for Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) and National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine (Bethesda, MD), 2000; World Wide Web URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/]. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.