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Sample records for cyprids semibalanus balanoides

  1. Long-term fluctuations in population of Semibalanus balanoides (L. (Crustacea in the estuarine zone of the Kola Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitina V. S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The intertidal population of the barnacles Semibalanus balanoides has been explored in the estuarine zone of the Tuloma River at the end of the Kola Bay for the first time. Barnacles S. balanoides are typical species for the littoral zone of the northern seas, they populate both the high and low salinity areas along the coast of the Barents Sea. The ecology and distribution of barnacle population in estuarine intertidal zones of the Barents Sea are not studied previously, and under the critical salinity conditions of any estuary, in particular. The investigation have been carried out on the littoral of the western (left shore of the southern tribe of the Kola Bay – the estuary section from the Tuloma bridge to the Cape Elovy. The studied site is a sandy-boulder beach with stony bars, its length is about 1 150 m, the area is about 126 500 m2. Counting the number of S. balanoides in clusters has been performed on site (without removal of the copepods from the population by the standard method for intertidal sampling. Simultaneously with the defining the number of barnacles for the period 2003–2014, the measurements of salinity and temperature of water and air have been made. The peculiarity of the estuarine barnacle population is their complete absence in the upper horizon of the littoral, and in the middle and the lower horizons they are found only within the channels of the littoral streams (3–20 specimens in the sample. For the first time the abundance and biomass of barnacles S. balanoides in this estuarine population has been determined, and the causes of their narrow-local distribution on the estuary littoral of the Tuloma River have been revealed. The main ecological factors determining the abundance and specific distribution of barnacles under the conditions of estuarine littoral have been established. The regular increase in the density of adult S. balanoides settlements along the gradient of water salinity from the Tuloma River to

  2. A comparative study of the anti-settlement properties of mytilid shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bers, A.V.; Hansson, L.J.; Head, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    of shells were exposed to cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides. Replicas with intact isotropic microtopographies and smooth controls were much less fouled than roughened anisotropic surfaces. This indicates that in both M. edulis and P. perna the periostracum possesses a generic anti...

  3. The relative magnitude of the effects of biological and physical settlement cues for cypris larvae of the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prendergast, G.S.; Zurn, C.M.; Bers, A.V.; Head, R.M.; Hansson, L.J.; Thomason, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Barnacle cypris larvae respond to many cues when selecting a settlement site. The settlement of over a million larvae on tiles of different textures, orientations and densities of incumbent settlers was measured on the rocky intertidal at Great Cumbrae, Scotland. Half of the tiles were replaced

  4. Antennular sensory organs in cyprids of balanomorphan cirripedes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielecki, Jan; Chan, Benny K K; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2009-01-01

    Cirripedes are one of the major groups of fouling organism in the marine environment. The cyprid can, before a permanent attachment, actively explore and walk on the substratum using its antennules in a bipedal fashion without leaving the surface. Studying the structure of the cyprid antennule...

  5. Confocal microscopy-based goniometry of barnacle cyprid permanent adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Nick; Gohad, Neeraj V; Petrone, Luigi; Orihuela, Beatriz; Liedberg, Bo; Ederth, Thomas; Mount, Andrew; Rittschof, Dan; Clare, Anthony S

    2013-06-01

    Biological adhesives are materials of particular interest in the fields of bio-inspired technology and antifouling research. The adhesive of adult barnacles has received much attention over the years; however, the permanent adhesive of the cyprid - the colonisation stage of barnacles - is a material about which very little is presently known. We applied confocal laser-scanning microscopy to the measurement of contact angles between the permanent adhesive of barnacle cyprid larvae and self-assembled monolayers of OH- and CH3-terminated thiols. Measurement of contact angles between actual bioadhesives and surfaces has never previously been achieved and the data may provide insight into the physicochemical properties and mechanism of action of these functional materials. The adhesive is a dual-phase system post-secretion, with the behaviour of the components governed separately by the surface chemistry. The findings imply that the cyprid permanent adhesion process is more complex than previously thought, necessitating broad re-evaluation of the system. Improved understanding will have significant implications for the production of barnacle-resistant coatings as well as development of bio-inspired glues for niche applications.

  6. Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleshlijski, S.; Sendra, G. H.; Aldred, N.; Clare, A. S.; Liedberg, B.; Grunze, M.; Ederth, T.; Rosenhahn, A.

    2016-01-01

    Barnacle larvae (cyprids) explore surfaces to identify suitable settlement sites. This process is selective, and cyprids respond to numerous surface cues. To better understand the settlement process, it is desirable to simultaneously monitor both the surface exploration behavior and any close interactions with the surface. Stereoscopic 3D tracking of the cyprids provides quantitative access to surface exploration and pre-settlement rituals. Imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reveals any interactions with the surfaces, such as surface inspection during bipedal walking and deposition of temporary adhesives. We report on a combination of both techniques to bring together information on swimming behavior in the vicinity of the interface and physical interactions of the cyprid with the surface. The technical requirements are described, and we applied the setup to cyprids of Balanus amphitrite. Initial data shows the applicability of the combined instrument to correlate exploration and touchdown events on surfaces with different chemical termination.

  7. Antennular specialization in cyprids of coral associated barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckner, I.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    We used video, light and scanning electron microscopy to study the cypris larvae in species of coral inhabiting barnacles (Pyrgomatidae) in search of adaptations to settlement on their highly unusual substratum. Species studied were Savignium crenatum, Trevathana jensi, Trevathana margaretae...... the nauplius eye, compound eyes, frontal ¿laments, lattice organs and cement glands known from other barnacles. Only T. sarae differed by having two unusually shaped setae terminally on the fourth segment. Video observations showed that the coral barnacle cyprids display the exploratory walking behaviour known...

  8. Morphometric and molecular identification of individual barnacle cyprids from wild plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hsi-Nien; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Chan, Benny K.K.

    2013-01-01

    species. Sequences from a total of 540 individual cypris larvae from Taiwanese waters formed 36 monophyletic clades (species) in a phylogenetic tree. Of these clades, 26 were identified to species, but 10 unknown monophyletic clades represented non-native species. Cyprids of the invasive barnacle...

  9. Response of cyprid specific genes to natural settlement cues in the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Honglei

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR was used to further our understanding of the molecular processes involved in the attachment and metamorphosis of larval barnacles. We report the effects of natural settlement cues (microbial biofilms and conspecific settlement-inducing factor) on the expression profiles of six barnacle cyprid specific (bcs) genes in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite Darwin. Genes bcs-1 to bcs-5 all showed marked decreases in their expression between initial cyprid attachment and the completion of metamorphosis, whereas bcs-6 showed significant up-regulation. Generally, settlement cues exerted no significant effect on the decreasing trend of bcs-1 to bcs-5 expression during attachment and metamorphosis. However, the expression of bcs-6 increased prior to cyprid attachment in response to both settlement cues. This elevated expression of bcs-6 gene indicates the importance and key regulatory role of this specific gene to larval attachment and metamorphosis in this barnacle species. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Proteome and Phosphoproteome Analyses during Cyprid Development of the Barnacle Balanus ( =Amphibalanus ) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-06-04

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) is a major marine biofouling invertebrate worldwide. It has a complex life cycle during which the larva (called a nauplius) molts six times before transforming into the cyprid stage. The cyprid stage in B. amphitrite is the critical stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In this study, proteome and phosphoproteome alterations during cyprid development/aging and upon treatment with the antifouling agent butenolide were examined with a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) multiplexed fluorescent staining approach. Optimized protein separation strategies, including solution-phase isoelectric fractionation and narrow-pH-range 2-DE, were used in a proteomic analysis. Our results show that the differential regulation of the target proteins is highly dynamic on the levels of both protein expression and posttranslational modification. Two groups of proteins, stress-associated and energy metabolism-related proteins, are differentially expressed during cyprid development. Comparison of the control and treatment groups suggests that butenolide exerts its effects by sustaining the expression levels of these proteins. Altogether, our data suggest that proteins involved in stress regulation and energy metabolism play crucial roles in regulating larval attachment and metamorphosis of B. amphitrite. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Antennulary sensory organs in cyprids of Octolasmis and Lepas (Crustacea: Thecostraca: Cirripedia: Thoracica): a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomsterberg, Mikkel; Høeg, Jens T; Jeffries, William B

    2004-01-01

    cyprids of the lepadid species but none of them were shared with the cyprids of Octolasmis; the list of unique lepadid characters includes: one additional, preaxial seta on the second segment; multiple similar (up to eight) postaxial setae (PS3) on the third segment, unlike all other thoracicans, where...... there is only a single PS3; the third segment consists almost entirely of the attachment disc, which is distended and surrounded by two parallel rows of radial setae; on the fourth segment the terminal seta E is diminutive. We found no traits in cyprids of Octolasmis that seem to be adaptations...

  12. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-10-05

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands.

  13. Role of conspecific cues and sugars in the settlement of cyprids of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    of Zoology Journal of Zoology 284 (2011) 206–214 cC132011 The Authors. Journal of Zoology cC132011 The Zoological Society of London206 Journal of Zoology. Print ISSN 0952-8369 by cyprids or secreted as water borne pheromone, role of other protein components... that we could have eliminated soft tissue within the lines of the shell plate. Supernatant of the crushed mixture was decanted, centri- fuged at 12000C2g for 5min and thereafter boiled for 10min in a boiling water bath. The extract was again centrifuged...

  14. Morphometric and molecular identification of individual barnacle cyprids from wild plankton: an approach to detecting fouling and invasive barnacle species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Nien; Høeg, Jens T; Chan, Benny K K

    2013-01-01

    The present study used DNA barcodes to identify individual cyprids to species. This enables accurate quantification of larvae of potential fouling species in the plankton. In addition, it explains the settlement patterns of barnacles and serves as an early warning system of unwanted immigrant species. Sequences from a total of 540 individual cypris larvae from Taiwanese waters formed 36 monophyletic clades (species) in a phylogenetic tree. Of these clades, 26 were identified to species, but 10 unknown monophyletic clades represented non-native species. Cyprids of the invasive barnacle, Megabalanus cocopoma, were identified. Multivariate analysis of antennular morphometric characters revealed three significant clusters in a nMDS plot, viz. a bell-shaped attachment organ (most species), a shoe-shaped attachment organ (some species), and a spear-shaped attachment organ (coral barnacles only). These differences in attachment organ structure indicate that antennular structures interact directly with the diverse substrata involved in cirripede settlement.

  15. Effects of poly-ether B on proteome and phosphoproteome expression in biofouling Balanus amphitrite cyprids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Swagatika; Chandramouli, Kondethimma H; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is ubiquitous in marine environments, and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is one of the most recalcitrant and aggressive biofoulers in tropical waters. Several natural antifoulants that were claimed to be non-toxic have been isolated in recent years, although the mechanism by which they inhibit fouling is yet to be investigated. Poly-ether B has shown promise in the non-toxic inhibition of larval barnacle attachment. Hence, in this study, multiplex two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied in conjunction with mass spectrometry to investigate the effects of poly-ether B on barnacle larvae at the molecular level. The cyprid proteome response to poly-ether B treatment was analyzed at the total proteome and phosphoproteome levels, with 65 protein and 19 phosphoprotein spots found to be up- or down-regulated. The proteins were found to be related to energy-metabolism, oxidative stress, and molecular chaperones, thus indicating that poly-ether B may interfere with the redox-regulatory mechanisms governing the settlement of barnacle larvae. The results of this study demonstrate the usefulness of the proteomic technique in revealing the working mechanisms of antifouling compounds. © 2012 Taylor & Francis

  16. Nitric oxide inhibits larval settlement in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids by repressing muscle locomotion and molting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2015-08-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule and plays a negative role in the metamorphosis of many biphasic organisms. Recently, the NO/NO (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) signaling pathway was reported to repress larval settlement in the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we analyzed changes in the proteome of A. amphitrite cyprids in response to different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 62.5, 250 and 1000 μM) using a label-free proteomics method. Compared with the control, the expression of 106 proteins differed in all three treatments. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 13 pathways based on KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. SNP treatment stimulated the expression of heat shock proteins and arginine kinase, which are functionally related to NO synthases, increased the expression levels of glutathione transferases for detoxification, and activated the iron-mediated fatty acid degradation pathway and the citrate cycle through ferritin. Moreover, NO repressed the level of myosins and cuticular proteins, which indicated that NO might inhibit larval settlement in A. amphitrite by modulating the process of muscle locomotion and molting.

  17. Effects of poly-ether B on proteome and phosphoproteome expression in biofouling Balanus amphitrite cyprids

    KAUST Repository

    Dash, Swagatika

    2012-04-01

    Biofouling is ubiquitous in marine environments, and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is one of the most recalcitrant and aggressive biofoulers in tropical waters. Several natural antifoulants that were claimed to be non-toxic have been isolated in recent years, although the mechanism by which they inhibit fouling is yet to be investigated. Poly-ether B has shown promise in the non-toxic inhibition of larval barnacle attachment. Hence, in this study, multiplex two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied in conjunction with mass spectrometry to investigate the effects of poly-ether B on barnacle larvae at the molecular level. The cyprid proteome response to poly-ether B treatment was analyzed at the total proteome and phosphoproteome levels, with 65 protein and 19 phosphoprotein spots found to be up- or down-regulated. The proteins were found to be related to energy-metabolism, oxidative stress, and molecular chaperones, thus indicating that poly-ether B may interfere with the redox-regulatory mechanisms governing the settlement of barnacle larvae. The results of this study demonstrate the usefulness of the proteomic technique in revealing the working mechanisms of antifouling compounds. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  18. Balanoid barnacles from the miocene of the Alaska Peninsula, and their relevance to the extant boreal barnacle fauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The barnacle fauna of the Miocene Bear Lake Formation of the Alaska Peninsula includes Chirona (Chirona) alaskana n. sp., and three species of Balanus Da Costa...

  19. Deeply hidden inside introduced biogenic structures - Pacific oyster reefs reduce detrimental barnacle overgrowth on native blue mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschbaum, Christian; Cornelius, Annika; Goedknegt, M. Anouk

    2016-11-01

    In sedimentary coastal ecosystems shells of epibenthic organisms such as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) provide the only major attachment surface for barnacle epibionts, which may cause detrimental effects on their mussel basibionts by e.g. reducing growth rate. In the European Wadden Sea, beds of native blue mussels have been invaded by Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas, which transformed these beds into mixed reefs of oysters with mussels. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution of M. edulis and their barnacle epibionts (Semibalanus balanoides) within the reef matrix. Mean mussel density near the bottom was about twice as high compared to the mussel density near the top of an oyster reef, whereas barnacles on mussels showed a reversed pattern. Barnacle dry weight per mussel was on average 14 times higher near the top than at the bottom. This pattern was confirmed by experimentally placing clean M. edulis at the top and on the bottom of oyster reefs at two sites in the Wadden Sea (island of Texel, The Netherlands; island of Sylt, Germany). After an experimental period of five weeks (April and May 2015, the main settlement period of S. balanoides), the number of barnacles per mussel was at both sites significantly higher on mussels near the top compared to near the bottom. We conclude that the oyster reef matrix offers a refuge for M. edulis: inside reefs they are not only better protected against predators but also against detrimental barnacle overgrowth. This study shows that alien species can cause beneficial effects for native organisms and should not be generally considered as a risk for the recipient marine ecosystems.

  20. Adult Prey Neutralizes Predator Nonconsumptive Limitation of Prey Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrich, Julius A; Scrosati, Ricardo A; Romoth, Katharina; Molis, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that predator chemical cues can limit prey demographic rates such as recruitment. For instance, barnacle pelagic larvae reduce settlement where predatory dogwhelk cues are detected, thereby limiting benthic recruitment. However, adult barnacles attract conspecific larvae through chemical and visual cues, aiding larvae to find suitable habitat for development. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of adult barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides) can neutralize dogwhelk (Nucella lapillus) nonconsumptive effects on barnacle recruitment. We did a field experiment in Atlantic Canada during the 2012 and 2013 barnacle recruitment seasons (May-June). We manipulated the presence of dogwhelks (without allowing them to physically contact barnacles) and adult barnacles in cages established in rocky intertidal habitats. At the end of both recruitment seasons, we measured barnacle recruit density on tiles kept inside the cages. Without adult barnacles, the nearby presence of dogwhelks limited barnacle recruitment by 51%. However, the presence of adult barnacles increased barnacle recruitment by 44% and neutralized dogwhelk nonconsumptive effects on barnacle recruitment, as recruit density was unaffected by dogwhelk presence. For species from several invertebrate phyla, benthic adult organisms attract conspecific pelagic larvae. Thus, adult prey might commonly constitute a key factor preventing negative predator nonconsumptive effects on prey recruitment.

  1. Adult Prey Neutralizes Predator Nonconsumptive Limitation of Prey Recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A Ellrich

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that predator chemical cues can limit prey demographic rates such as recruitment. For instance, barnacle pelagic larvae reduce settlement where predatory dogwhelk cues are detected, thereby limiting benthic recruitment. However, adult barnacles attract conspecific larvae through chemical and visual cues, aiding larvae to find suitable habitat for development. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of adult barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides can neutralize dogwhelk (Nucella lapillus nonconsumptive effects on barnacle recruitment. We did a field experiment in Atlantic Canada during the 2012 and 2013 barnacle recruitment seasons (May-June. We manipulated the presence of dogwhelks (without allowing them to physically contact barnacles and adult barnacles in cages established in rocky intertidal habitats. At the end of both recruitment seasons, we measured barnacle recruit density on tiles kept inside the cages. Without adult barnacles, the nearby presence of dogwhelks limited barnacle recruitment by 51%. However, the presence of adult barnacles increased barnacle recruitment by 44% and neutralized dogwhelk nonconsumptive effects on barnacle recruitment, as recruit density was unaffected by dogwhelk presence. For species from several invertebrate phyla, benthic adult organisms attract conspecific pelagic larvae. Thus, adult prey might commonly constitute a key factor preventing negative predator nonconsumptive effects on prey recruitment.

  2. Long-term effects of the water-accomodated fraction (WAF) of diesel oil on rocky shore populations maintained in experimental mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokn, T.L. [Norwegian Inst. for Water Research, Oslo (Norway); Moy, F.E. [Norwegian Inst. for Water Research, Oslo (Norway); Murray, S.N. [California State Univ., Fullerton, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Science

    1993-12-31

    The long-term effects of continuous doses (average hydrocarbon concentration =129.4 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 30.1 {mu}g L{sup -1}) of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of diesel oil on 15 rocky littoral populations were determined at three tidal levels in experimental mesocosms over two years. At each tidal level, most species exhibited similar abundance changes in both oil-contaminated and control (average background hydrocarbon concentration = 5.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}) mesocosms. Significant changes in species abundances attributable to oil (WAF) were demonstrated for only two of ten seaweeds and three of five invertebrates. Compared with the other mesocosms, significantly greater reductions in upper-level cover were recorded in the basin receiving the highest oil dosage for the seaweeds Phymatolithon lenormandii and Fucus evanescents together with lower recruitment of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides. The mussel Mytilus edulis was storngly affected by the oil treatments and essentially disappeared from both oil-contaminated mesocosms. Numbers of the starfish Asterias rubens also fell to zero at the lowest tidal level in the basin receiving the highest oil dosage. There were no demonstrable differences in the abundance patterns of the gastropod Littorina littorea, the crab Carcinus maenus, and a total of eight brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, F. vesiculosus, Laminaria digitata), red (Chondrus crispus), and green (Cladophora rupestris, Enteromorpha spp., Ulva lactuca) seaweeds in the oil-contaminated compared with the control mesocosms. (orig.)

  3. Exploration and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia ; Thoracica) cyprids: significance of sugars and adult extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    larvae, Balanus amphitrite Darwin. Biofouling. 16 (2-4), 159-170 Matsumura, K., Mori, S., Nagano, M., Fusetani, N., 1998a. Lentil lectin inhibits adult extract-induced settlement of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite. J. Exp. Zool. 280, 213- 219. Matsumura...

  4. Significance of biofilm proteins in modulating cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; KrishnaKumar, S.

    and lectin interaction. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 289, 1-13. Khandeparker L., Desai D., Shirayama Y. (2005) Larval development and post-settlement metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus Pilsbry and the serpulid...

  5. Video observation of surface exploration in cyprids of Balanus amphitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruzzo, Diego; Conlan, Sheelagh; Aldred, Nick

    2011-01-01

    flexed to either side of the antennule. This lateral displacement ensures that these two setae can touch large surface areas to either side of the appendage. The four subterminal setae on the fourth segment contact the surface both immediately before and after a step has been completed, and the constant...... than all other radial setae. All other setae on the second and third segment are only in contact after a step is completed. When the attachment disc touches the surface (=a step completed) the long and curved postaxial seta 2 (on the second segment) and postaxial seta 3 on the third segment are both...... touches the substratum and the area it can cover during surface exploration. On the fourth segment, the plumose terminal setae A and B are never in contact with the substratum, lack a terminal pore and it is argued that they sense hydrodynamic forces. The aesthetasc-like terminal seta D is likewise held...

  6. The invasion of the intertidal canopy-forming alga Fucus serratus L. to southwestern Iceland: Possible community effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Agnar

    2008-04-01

    The intertidal serrated wrack, Fucus serratus L. (Fucales: Phaeophyceae), has become an abundant canopy-forming alga along a ca. 100 km stretch of shore in southwestern Iceland in the last century. Its distribution has not changed noticeably since a survey in 1975/1976. Many experimental studies have shown that canopy-forming algae can have profound effects on the community structure. Although such experiments involving F. serratus are few it was decided to test predictions from these experiments on a geographical scale by comparing community compositions within the area where F. serratus is a dominant algae (since at least 1975/1976) with an adjacent area of similar size where F. serratus is absent (with a single exception without consequences). The work is based on measurements on some 372 stations in the F. serratus area, termed region A, and 227 stations from the F. serratus-free area, termed region B. Percentage cover of algae and sessile invertebrates was estimated on 2 m 2 on each station and animals collected from 800 cm 2 from each station. The vertical distribution of F. serratus was most similar to that of Fucus distichus and the two species often grew intermingled on the lower part of the shore. F. serratus appeared to have reduced the cover of F. distichus in the lowermost part of the shore, while having little or no effect on other canopy-forming species. The low abundance of Semibalanus balanoides in the F. serratus area (region A) is in line with experiments showing detrimental effect on this barnacle by whiplash of F. serratus. In general algal grazers were more abundant in region A, consistent with the greater attractiveness of F. serratus than other canopy-forming species to grazers, although this may be partly explained by the abundance of understorey algae in region A.

  7. Influence of bacterial exopolymers, conspecific adult extract and salinity on the cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, R.

    Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacteriaceae strains, isolated from the shell surface of B. amphitrite, were examined for their influence on metamorphosis, both individually and in combination with conspecific adult extract at 15, 25, 35 and 45 ppt...

  8. Influence of bacterial exopolymers and the adult extract of Balanus amphitrite and Cthamalus sp. on cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Mitbavkar, S.; Wagh, A.B.

    play a major role in the recruitment of larvae of fouling organisms, probably by providing inducing/inhibitory chemical cues. In this experiment, the influence of the extract of adult Balanus amphitrite and the expolymers of the bacteria colonising...

  9. Notes on the ultrastructure of the setae on the fourth antennulary segment of the Balanus amphitrite cyprid (Crustacea : Cirripedia : Thoracica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagersson, Niklas; Garm, Anders Lydik; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    This study presents electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) observations on the putative settlement receptors of the fourth antennulary segments. The TEM data from all nine setae are from the outer dendritic segment. Eight of them have morphological characteristics, indicating bimodal sensory properties w...

  10. Antifouling activities of marine sedentary invertebrates on some macrofoulers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wilsanand, V.; Wagh, A.B.; Bapuji, M.

    pfeifferae, Dercitopsis sp.] against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite and green mussel Perna viridis are reported here. All the extracts examined inhibited the settlement of cyprids of B. amphitrite. Toxicity revival studies indicate...

  11. When similar beginnings lead to different ends: Constraints and diversity i cirripede larval development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Møller, Ole Sten

    2006-01-01

    the larvae hatch as cyprids. The cypris larvae are very similar among the ingroups of the Cirripedia, but interesting variations occur in structures used for substrate location and attachment. The cyprid is specialized to both swim through the water and actively explore the substratum by walking...... on the antennules and using an array of sensory organs in search for a suitable site to attach. This unique morphology and behavior of the cyprid have enabled the Cirripedia to colonize widely different habitats ranging from hard rock to soft animal tissue. Yet, the cyprid can metamorphose into juveniles...

  12. The fish community of East Cape tidal pools and an assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish occurring in tidal pools in the lower balanoid zone near Port Elizabeth were examined by visual census and rotenone collections. Numerically, Clinidae constituted 28% of the community, Sparidae 23%, Gobiidae 17% and the Cheilodactylidae 12%, while eleven other families contributed to the remaining 20%. The 44 ...

  13. Studies on some cues regulating metamorphosis of the larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.

    compounds from adult conspecifics, microbes and their interaction. Efforts have been made to elucidate these settlement cues from these sources. The results indicated that the response of the cyprids towards bacteria and their products is regulated by both...

  14. Larval development and post-settlement metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus Pilsbry and the serpulid polychaete Pomatoleios kraussii Baird: Impact of a commonly used antifouling biocide, Irgarol 1051

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Shirayama, Y.

    , metamorphosis rates decreased Cyprids were prevented from metamorphosing completely by biofilms treated at the highest concentration of Irgarol 1051 Inhibition of metamorphosis was also observed in the case of competent polychaete larvae when exposed to Irgarol...

  15. Larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus albicostatus (Cirripedia: Thoracica); implications of temperature, food concentration and energetics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Shirayama, Y.

    concentration on the subsequent ageing and metamorphosis of cypris larva was also determined At lower food concentration and temperature, naupliar development duration was prolonged and the rate of metamorphosis of nauplius to cyprid was low The rearing food...

  16. Starvation threshold of Balanus amphitrite larvae in relation to temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.

    naupliar instars and the influence of the different environmental stresses that regulate it. From the antifouling assay perspective, it is also important to produce cyprids at energy level that mimic the stock in nature. In pursuit of this gobal...

  17. Larval development, sensory mechanisms and physiological adaptions in acorn barnacles with special reference to Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Baragi, L.V.; Gaonkar, C.

    ; Olivier et al., 2000; Khandeparker et al., 2002a, b, 2003, 2005, 2006). Microbial biofilms are generally observed to stimulate settlement of macrofouling organisms (Crisp, 1974). Monospecific bacterial films show varying effects on cyprid attachment...

  18. (-)-6 alpha hydroxy polyanthellian A - A novel antifouling diterpenoid from the Indian soft coral Cladiella krempfi (Hickson)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LimnaMol, V.P.; Raveendran, T.V.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Kunnath, R.J.; Rajamohanan, P.R.

    Bioassay-guided purification of methanol extract of the soft coral Cladiella krempfi (Octocorallia: Alcynocea) yielded a novel eunicellin-type diterpenoid, (-)-6 alpha-hydroxy polyanthellin A (1), active against the cyprids of the fouling barnacle...

  19. In vivo and in situ synchrotron radiation-based μ-XRF reveals elemental distributions during the early attachment phase of barnacle larvae and juvenile barnacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkbeil, Tobias; Mohamed, Tawheed; Simon, Rolf; Batchelor, David; Di Fino, Alessio; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Barnacles are able to establish stable surface contacts and adhere underwater. While the composition of adult barnacle cement has been intensively studied, far less is known about the composition of the cement of the settlement-stage cypris larva. The main challenge in studying the adhesives used by these larvae is the small quantity of material available for analysis, being on the order of nanograms. In this work, we applied, for the first time, synchrotron radiation-based μ-X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μ-XRF) for in vivo and in situ analysis of young barnacles and barnacle cyprids. To obtain biologically relevant information relating to the body tissues, adhesives, and shell of the organisms, an in situ sample environment was developed to allow direct microprobe investigation of hydrated specimens without pretreatment of the samples. In 8-day-old juvenile barnacles (Balanus improvisus), the junctions between the six plates forming the shell wall showed elevated concentrations of calcium, potassium, bromine, strontium, and manganese. Confocal measurements allowed elemental characterization of the adhesive interface of recently attached cyprids (Balanus amphitrite), and substantiated the accumulation of bromine both at the point of initial attachment as well as within the cyprid carapace. In situ measurements of the cyprid cement established the presence of bromine, chlorine, iodine, sulfur, copper, iron, zinc, selenium, and nickel for both species. The previously unrecognized presence of bromine, iron, and selenium in the cyprid permanent adhesive will hopefully inspire further biochemical investigations of the function of these substances.

  20. Larval vision contributes to gregarious settlement in barnacles: adult red fluorescence as a possible visual signal

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumura, K.

    2014-02-26

    Gregarious settlement, an essential behavior for many barnacle species that can only reproduce by mating with a nearby barnacle, has long been thought to rely on larval ability to recognize chemical signals from conspecifics during settlement. However, the cyprid, the settlement stage larva in barnacles, has one pair of compound eyes that appear only at the late nauplius VI and cyprid stages, but the function(s) of these eyes remains unknown. Here we show that cyprids of the intertidal barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite can locate adult barnacles even in the absence of chemical cues, and prefer to settle around them probably via larval sense of vision. We also show that the cyprids can discriminate color and preferred to settle on red surfaces. Moreover, we found that shells of adult B. amphitrite emit red auto-fluorescence and the adult extracts with the fluorescence as a visual signal attracted cyprid larvae to settle around it. We propose that the perception of specific visual signals can be involved in behavior of zooplankton including marine invertebrate larvae, and that barnacle auto-fluorescence may be a specific signal involved in gregarious larval settlement.

  1. Cypris Larvae in Polysaccus Mediterraneus and Mycetomorpha Vancouverensis: Their Importance in Analyzing the Phylogeny and Sexual Evolution of Parasitic Barnacles (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Rybakov, AV

    2007-01-01

    antennular segment. Cyprids of Mycetomorpha have, like most other Akentrogonida, either lost or specialized (terminal setae) these structures. Compared to the stereotyped life cycle found in the Kentrogonida, species of the Akentrogonida have a diversity of reproductive systems and advanced modes...... of metamorphosis, and this is reflected in specializations of their cyprids. The larval morphologies of P. mediterraneus and M. vancouverensis suggest that these two species have a sexual system and life cycle much closer to that seen in the Kentrogonida. Our results show that adult and larval morphologies...

  2. Factors regulating the production of different inducers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa with reference to larval metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    similar to that of the bacterial film and AE. The response of the cyprids to bacteria and its products seems to be regulated by both contact chemoreception and olfaction, depending on the properties of the settlement-inducing compounds. The need...

  3. siRNA transfection in larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, G.

    2015-06-25

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides an efficient and specific technique for functional genomic studies. Yet, no successful application of RNAi has been reported in barnacles. In this study, siRNA against p38 MAPK was synthesized and then transfected into A. amphitrite larvae at either the nauplius or cyprid stage, or at both stages. Effects of siRNA transfection on the p38 MAPK level were hardly detectable in the cyprids when they were transfected at the nauplius stage. In contrast, larvae that were transfected at the cyprid stage showed lower levels of p38 MAPK than the blank and reagent controls. However, significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) and reduced settlement rates were observed only in ‘double transfections’, in which larvae were exposed to siRNA solution at both the nauplius and cyprid stages. A relatively longer transfection time and more larval cells directly exposed to siRNA might explain the higher efficiency of double transfection experiments.

  4. Metamorphosis in the cirripede crustacean Balanus amphitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruzzo, Diego; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Stalked and acorn barnacles (Cirripedia Thoracica) have a complex life cycle that includes a free-swimming nauplius larva, a cypris larva and a permanently attached sessile juvenile and adult barnacle. The barnacle cyprid is among the most highly specialized of marine invertebrate larvae and its...

  5. Modulation of gregarious settlement of the stalked barnacle, Pollicipes pollicipes: a laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia C. Franco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although recruitment patterns of Pollicipes pollicipes (Crustacea: Scalpelliformes in the wild have been investigated, no studies have yet focused on the factors that affect settlement. In the present paper, settlement of P. pollicipes on conspecifics (gregarious settlement was investigated in the laboratory as a function of environmental conditions (hydrodynamics, temperature, light and salinity, larval age and batch. This study aimed to understand how these factors modulate settlement in the laboratory and elucidate how they might impact recruitment patterns in nature. Maximum attachment on adults was 30-35%, with a one-week metamorphosis rate of 70-80%. Batch differences affected both attachment and metamorphosis. Attachment rate was higher at natural salinity (30-40 psu, with lower salinity (20 psu decreasing metamorphosis rate. Cyprid attachment was stimulated by light conditions and circulating water. This might relate to a preference for positioning high in the water column in nature, but also to increased cyprid-surface contact in conditions of circulating water. Older cyprids (3 or 6 days showed higher attachment than un-aged larvae, though fewer 6-day-old larvae metamorphosed. Temperature did not affect attachment rate, but the metamorphosis rate decreased at 14°C (compared with 17 or 20°C, implying that differences in temperature during the breeding season can affect how quickly cyprids metamorphose to the juvenile. Cyprids survived for prolonged periods ( ≥ 20 days; 40% survival, likely due to efficient energy saving by intercalating long periods of inactivity with fast bursts of activity upon stimulation.

  6. Isocyano compounds as non-toxic antifoulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogata, Y; Kitano, Y

    2006-01-01

    The marine sponge Acanthella cavernosa and nudibranchs of the family Phyllidiidae contain isocyanoterpenoids and their related compounds that show potent antifouling activity against cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, while their toxicity to cyprids is weak. To develop non-toxic antifoulants based on isocyanoterpenoids, especially 3-isocyanotheonellin, a total of 36 isocyano compounds have been synthesized. They were evaluated by both antifouling activity and toxicity toward B. amphitrite cyprids, which led some insight into the structure-activity relationships. Since linear alkyl isocyanides showed antifouling activity at nontoxic concentrations, a large amount of 1,1-dimethyl-10-undecyl isocyanide was synthesized, incorporated into paints, and tested for antifouling activity in the field with promising results. Therefore, isocyano compounds were considered as candidate non-toxic antifouling agents.

  7. Thielavins W–Z7, New Antifouling Thielavins from the Marine-Derived Fungus Thielavia sp. UST030930-004

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Zhuang

    2017-05-02

    Eleven new depsides-thielavins W-Z (1-4) and thielavins Z₁-Z₇ (5-11)-and also four known thielavins-A, H, J, and K (12-15)-were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of a marine-derived fungal strain Thielavia sp UST030930-004. All of these compounds were evaluated for antifouling activity against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The results showed that compounds 1-3 and 6-13 were active, with EC50 values ranging from 2.95 ± 0.59 to 69.19 ± 9.51 μM, respectively. The inhibitive effect of compounds 1-3 and 7 was reversible. This is the first description of the antifouling activity of thielavins against barnacle cyprids.

  8. The monophyletic origin of a remarkable sexual system in akentrogonid rhizocephalan parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Stenderup, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    parasites. The Rhizocephala Akentrogonida form a monophyletic group nested within a paraphyletic "Kentrogonida". C. paguri and S. hippolytes are sistergroups confirming the monophyly of the Clistosaccidae that was originally based on similarities in the cypris larvae. We find numerous LM and SEM level...... similarities between the two species, many of which appear to be correlated with their specialized sexual system, where male cyprids use an antennule to implant cells into the virgin female parasite. Some of these traits are also found in cyprids of the thompsoniid species. We conclude that the special cypris...... the Akentrogonida. This confirms the monophyly of the Chthamalophilidae and falsifies the theory that C. delagei should represent the most primitive extant rhizocephalan. Instead, chthamalophilid rhizocephalans represent some of the most highly advanced members of the parasitic barnacles....

  9. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis...... on the implantation of males and the histology of the female reproductive organs. In the virgin externae, male cyprids attach around a cuticular hood covering the mantle aperture, which is partially blocked by a plug of cuticle so only trichogon larvae, not cyprids, can access the mantle cavity. This resembles......, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted...

  10. External morphology of the two cypridiform ascothoracid-larva instars of Dendrogaster: The evolutionary significance of the two-step metamorphosis and comparison of lattice organs between larvae and adult males (Crustacea, Thecostraca, Ascothoracida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbasov, G.A.; Grygier, M.J.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2008-01-01

    We describe the external morphology of the two cypridiform larval instars (first and second ascothoracid-larvae, or -a-cyprids") of the ascothoracidan genus Dendrogaster. Ascothoracid-larvae of five species were studied with light and scanning electron microscopy, including both ascothoracid...... stage between the naupliar stages and the dispersive and fully functional second ascothoracid-larva that accomplishes settlement. The presence of two instars of ascothoracid-larvae (a-cyprids) in members of the order Dendrogastrida differs from the single cypridiform instar found in the Cirripedia...... that the lattice organs change significantly at the molt between these two instars. The lattice organs of second ascothoracid-larvae have no distinct keel and are situated in wide, shallow pits, whereas they have the ground pattern "crest-in-a-trough" morphology in adult males of two additional species examined...

  11. Toward an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barnacle larval settlement: A comparative transcriptomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2011-07-29

    Background: The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed biofouler and a model species in intertidal ecology and larval settlement studies. However, a lack of genomic information has hindered the comprehensive elucidation of the molecular mechanisms coordinating its larval settlement. The pyrosequencing-based transcriptomic approach is thought to be useful to identify key molecular changes during larval settlement. Methodology and Principal Findings: Using 454 pyrosequencing, we collected totally 630,845 reads including 215,308 from the larval stages and 415,537 from the adults; 23,451 contigs were generated while 77,785 remained as singletons. We annotated 31,720 of the 92,322 predicted open reading frames, which matched hits in the NCBI NR database, and identified 7,954 putative genes that were differentially expressed between the larval and adult stages. Of these, several genes were further characterized with quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, revealing some key findings: 1) vitellogenin was uniquely expressed in late nauplius stage, suggesting it may be an energy source for the subsequent non-feeding cyprid stage; 2) the locations of mannose receptors suggested they may be involved in the sensory system of cyprids; 3) 20 kDa-cement protein homologues were expressed in the cyprid cement gland and probably function during attachment; and 4) receptor tyrosine kinases were expressed higher in cyprid stage and may be involved in signal perception during larval settlement. Conclusions: Our results provide not only the basis of several new hypotheses about gene functions during larval settlement, but also the availability of this large transcriptome dataset in B. amphitrite for further exploration of larval settlement and developmental pathways in this important marine species. © 2011 Chen et al.

  12. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite in Response to the Antifouling Compound Meleagrin

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Zhuang

    2013-05-03

    Marine biofouling refers to the unwanted accumulation of fouling organisms, such as barnacles, on artificial surfaces, resulting in severe consequences for marine industries. Meleagrin is a potential nontoxic antifoulant that is isolated from the fungus Penicillium sp.; however, its mechanistic effect mode of action on larval settlement remains unknown. Here, we applied iTRAQ coupled with 2D LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis to investigate the effect of meleagrin on the proteomic expression profile of cyprid development and aging in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. Fifty proteins were differentially expressed in response to treatment with meleagrin, among which 26 proteins were associated with cyprid development/aging and 24 were specifically associated with the meleagrin treatment. The 66 proteins that were associated with aging only remained unaltered during exposure to meleagrin. Using KEGG analysis, those proteins were assigned to several groups, including metabolic pathways, ECM-receptor interactions, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the 24 proteins that were not related to the development/aging process, expression of the cyprid major protein (CMP), a vitellogenin-like protein, increased after the meleagrin treatment, which suggested that meleagrin might affect the endocrine system and prevent the larval molting cycle. With the exception of the chitin binding protein that mediates the molting process and ATPase-mediated energy processes, the majority of proteins with significant effects in previous studies in response to cyprid treatment with butenolide and polyether B remained unchanged in the present study, suggesting that meleagrin may exhibit a different mechanism. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Impact of Irgarol 1051 on the larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus amphitirite Darwin, diatom, Amphora coffeaformis and natural biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    . 1993; Neal and Yule 1994; Lau et al. 2003). Biofilms have varying effect (inhibitory/inductive/no effect) on the settlement of B. amphitrite cyprids (Olivier et al. 2000; Wieczorek et al. 1995). Biofilms provide specific chemical cues... Pollut Bull. 40(9):754-763. Okamura K, Watanabe T, Aoyama I, Hasobe M. 2002. Toxicity evaluation of new antifouling compounds using the suspension-cultured fish cells. Chemosphere. 46:945-951. Olivier F, Tremblay R, Bourget E, Rittschof D. 2000...

  14. The regulatory role of the NO/cGMP signal transduction cascade during larval attachment and metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is among the most dominant fouling species on intertidal rocky shores in tropical and subtropical areas and is thus a target organism in antifouling research. After being released from adults, the swimming nauplius undertakes six molting cycles and then transforms into a cyprid. Using paired antennules, a competent cyprid actively explores and selects a suitable substratum for attachment and metamorphosis (collectively known as settlement). This selection process involves the reception of exogenous signals and subsequent endogenous signal transduction. To investigate the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) during larval settlement of B. amphitrite, we examined the effects of an NO donor and an NO scavenger, two nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor on settling cyprids. We found that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibited larval settlement in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, both the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO and the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine hemisulfate (AGH) and S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMIS) significantly accelerated larval settlement. Suppression of the downstream guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity using a GC-selective inhibitor ODQ could also significantly accelerate larval settlement. Interestingly, the settlement inhibition effects of SNP could be attenuated by ODQ at all concentrations tested. In the developmental expression profiling of NOS and sGC, the lowest expression of both genes was detected in the cyprid stage, a crucial stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In summary, we concluded that NO regulates larval settlement via mediating downstream cGMP signaling.

  15. Quantitative proteomics study of larval settlement in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2014-02-13

    Barnacles are major sessile components of the intertidal areas worldwide, and also one of the most dominant fouling organisms in fouling communities. Larval settlement has a crucial ecological effect not only on the distribution of the barnacle population but also intertidal community structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stage remain largely unclear. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomic profiles of stage II nauplii, stage VI nauplii, cyprids, and juveniles of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite using label-free quantitative proteomics, followed by the measurement of the gene expression levels of candidate proteins. More than 700 proteins were identified at each stage; 80 were significantly up-regulated in cyprids and 95 in juveniles vs other stages. Specifically, proteins involved in energy and metabolism, the nervous system and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in cyprids, whereas proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and differentiation, and biomineralization were up-regulated in juveniles, consistent with changes associated with larval metamorphosis and tissue remodeling in juveniles. These findings provided molecular evidence for the morphological, physiological and biological changes that occur during the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stages in B. amphitrite. © 2014 Chen et al.

  16. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes and Pathways Involved in Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Megabalanus volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoyong; Zhang, Gen; Huang, Jiaomei; Lan, Yi; Sun, Jin; Zeng, Cong; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan; He, Lisheng

    2017-10-27

    Megabalanus barnacle is one of the model organisms for marine biofouling research. However, further elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying larval settlement has been hindered due to the lack of genomic information thus far. In the present study, cDNA libraries were constructed for cyprids, the key stage for larval settlement, and adults of Megabalanus volcano . After high-throughput sequencing and de novo assembly, 42,620 unigenes were obtained with a N50 value of 1532 bp. These unigenes were annotated by blasting against the NCBI non-redundant (nr), Swiss-Prot, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Finally, 19,522, 15,691, 14,459, and 10,914 unigenes were identified correspondingly. There were 22,158 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) identified between two stages. Compared with the cyprid stage, 8241 unigenes were down-regulated and 13,917 unigenes were up-regulated at the adult stage. The neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway (ko04080) was significantly enriched by KEGG enrichment analysis of the DEGs, suggesting that it possibly involved in larval settlement. Potential functions of three conserved allatostatin neuropeptide-receptor pairs and two light-sensitive opsin proteins were further characterized, indicating that they might regulate attachment and metamorphosis at cyprid stage. These results provided a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying larval settlement of barnacles.

  17. Nontoxic piperamides and their synthetic analogues as novel antifouling reagents

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Xiang-Zhong

    2014-03-25

    Bioassay-guided isolation of an acetone extract from a terrestrial plant Piper betle produced four known piperamides with potent antifouling (AF) activities, as evidenced by inhibition of settlement of barnacle cypris larvae. The AF activities of the four piperamides and 15 synthesized analogues were compared and their structure-activity relationships were probed. Among the compounds, piperoleine B and 1-[1-oxo-7-(3′,4′-methylenedioxyphenyl)-6E-heptenyl]-piperidine (MPHP) showed strong activity against settlement of cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, having EC50 values of 1.1 ± 0.3 and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg ml-1, respectively. No toxicity against zebra fish was observed following incubation with these two compounds. Besides being non-toxic, 91% of piperoleine B-treated cyprids and 84% of MPHP-treated cyprids at a concentration of 100 μM completed normal metamorphosis in recovery bioassays, indicating that the anti-settlement effect of these two compounds was reversible. Hydrolysis and photolysis experiments indicated that MPHP could be decomposed in the marine environment. It is concluded that piperamides are promising compounds for use in marine AF coatings. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Layer-by-layer click deposition of functional polymer coatings for combating marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen Jing; Pranantyo, Dicky; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2012-09-10

    "Click" chemistry-enabled layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of multilayer functional polymer coatings provides an alternative approach to combating biofouling. Fouling-resistant azido-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate-based polymer chains (azido-poly(PEGMA)) and antimicrobial alkynyl-functionalized 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride-based polymer chains (alkynyl-poly(META)) were click-assembled layer-by-layer via alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The polymer multilayer coatings are resistant to bacterial adhesion and are bactericidal to marine Gram-negative Pseudomonas sp. NCIMB 2021 bacteria. Settlement of barnacle ( Amphibalanus (= Balanus ) amphitrite ) cyprids is greatly reduced on the multilayer polymer-functionalized substrates. As the number of the polymer layers increases, efficacy against bacterial fouling and settlement of barnacle cyprids increases. The LBL-functionalized surfaces exhibit low toxicity toward the barnacle cyprids and are stable upon prolonged exposure to seawater. LBL click deposition is thus an effective and potentially environmentally benign way to prepare antifouling coatings.

  19. Evidence for the Involvement of p38 MAPK Activation in Barnacle Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    He, Li-Sheng

    2012-10-24

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  20. Antifouling Activity of Synthetic Alkylpyridinium Polymers Using the Barnacle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Piazza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge, Haliclona (Rhizoniera sarai, effectively inhibit barnacle larva settlement and natural marine biofilm formation through a non-toxic and reversible mechanism. Potential use of poly-APS-like compounds as antifouling agents led to the chemical synthesis of monomeric and oligomeric 3-alkylpyridinium analogues. However, these are less efficient in settlement assays and have greater toxicity than the natural polymers. Recently, a new chemical synthesis method enabled the production of poly-APS analogues with antibacterial, antifungal and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The present study examines the antifouling properties and toxicity of six of these synthetic poly-APS using the barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite as a model (cyprids and II stage nauplii larvae in settlement, acute and sub-acute toxicity assays. Two compounds, APS8 and APS12-3, show antifouling effects very similar to natural poly-APS, with an anti-settlement effective concentration that inhibits 50% of the cyprid population settlement (EC50 after 24 h of 0.32 mg/L and 0.89 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of APS8 is negligible, while APS12-3 is three-fold more toxic (24-h LC50: nauplii, 11.60 mg/L; cyprids, 61.13 mg/L than natural poly-APS. This toxicity of APS12-3 towards nauplii is, however, 60-fold and 1200-fold lower than that of the common co-biocides, Zn- and Cu-pyrithione, respectively. Additionally, exposure to APS12-3 for 24 and 48 h inhibits the naupliar swimming ability with respective IC50 of 4.83 and 1.86 mg/L.

  1. Evidence for the involvement of p38 MAPK activation in barnacle larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Sheng He

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  2. Influence of elevated temperature, pCO2, and nutrients on larva-biofilm interaction: Elucidation with acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragi, Lalita V.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2017-02-01

    Selection of optimal habitat by larvae of sessile organism is influenced by cues offered by the biofilm. Ocean warming and acidification are likely to enforce changes in the biofilm community and inturn influence the settlement process. Hence, we evaluated the influence of biofilm (multispecies and unialgal) and diet-mediated changes on the settlement of Balanus amphitrite cyprids (presettlement non-feeding larval stage) under different combinations of temperature (28, 30, 32 and 34 °C), pCO2 (400, 750 and 1500 μatm) and nutrient (unenriched and f/2 enriched). Nutrient enrichment enhanced the diatom and bacterial abundance at ambient temperature (30 °C) and pCO2 (400 μatm), which inturn increased larval settlement. Elevated pCO2 (750 and 1500 μatm) had no direct effect but a variable cascading effect on the settlement via biofilm-mediated changes was observed, depending on the type of biofilm. In contrast, elevated temperature (32 and 34 °C), either individually or in combination with elevated pCO2 had direct negative effect on settlement. However, biofilm-mediated changes compensated this negative effect. The larval settlement was also influenced by changes in the larval diet. Under elevated temperature and pCO2, cyprids raised with a feed (Chaetoceros calcitrans) from ambient temperature and pCO2 were of poor quality (lower RNA:DNA ratio, lower protein synthetic capacity) and yielded lower settlement. However, cyprids raised with a feed from elevated temperature and pCO2 were of better quality (higher RNA:DNA ratio, higher protein synthetic capacity) and yielded higher settlement. Overall, the observations from the present study provide insights into the significance of biotic interactions on the coastal biofouling communities under future climatic scenario and emphasise the need for future experiments on these aspects.

  3. Antifouling activity of synthetic alkylpyridinium polymers using the barnacle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Veronica; Dragić, Ivanka; Sepčić, Kristina; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca; Turk, Tom; Berne, Sabina

    2014-04-02

    Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge, Haliclona (Rhizoniera) sarai, effectively inhibit barnacle larva settlement and natural marine biofilm formation through a non-toxic and reversible mechanism. Potential use of poly-APS-like compounds as antifouling agents led to the chemical synthesis of monomeric and oligomeric 3-alkylpyridinium analogues. However, these are less efficient in settlement assays and have greater toxicity than the natural polymers. Recently, a new chemical synthesis method enabled the production of poly-APS analogues with antibacterial, antifungal and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The present study examines the antifouling properties and toxicity of six of these synthetic poly-APS using the barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) as a model (cyprids and II stage nauplii larvae) in settlement, acute and sub-acute toxicity assays. Two compounds, APS8 and APS12-3, show antifouling effects very similar to natural poly-APS, with an anti-settlement effective concentration that inhibits 50% of the cyprid population settlement (EC₅₀) after 24 h of 0.32 mg/L and 0.89 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of APS8 is negligible, while APS12-3 is three-fold more toxic (24-h LC₅₀: nauplii, 11.60 mg/L; cyprids, 61.13 mg/L) than natural poly-APS. This toxicity of APS12-3 towards nauplii is, however, 60-fold and 1200-fold lower than that of the common co-biocides, Zn- and Cu-pyrithione, respectively. Additionally, exposure to APS12-3 for 24 and 48 h inhibits the naupliar swimming ability with respective IC₅₀ of 4.83 and 1.86 mg/L.

  4. Antifouling effect of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata and different species of bacterial film on larval attachment of Balanus amphitrite (cirripedia, crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambaran Ganapiriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antifouling activity of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata (Dendy and five species of bacterial biofilm were studied. Larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cyprids and nauplii were used to monitor the settlement inhibition and the extent to which inhibition was due to toxicity. The crude extract and partially purified fractions of A.elongata showed significant inhibition over the settlement individually, and with the interaction of bacterial species. No bacterial film stimulated the barnacle settlement. The high but variable levels of antifouling activity in combination with less amount of toxicity showed the potential of these metabolites in environmentally-friendly antifouling preparations.

  5. Recruitment of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin in a tropical estuary: implications of environmental perturbation, reproduction and larval ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    remain immersed for a minimum of 16 to a maximum of 26 times (i.e. once in 2 to 1.7 days) in a month. Hence, the surface conditioning and time available for cyprids to explore the surface and settle could depend on substratum immersion duration. Qian... nauplii (D&I), Percentage of B. amphitrite with mature brood (E&J). The dashed lines in Fig.1 A,B,C,D & E indicate the 50% dissimilarity from the highest dissimilarity level. Fig. 2 (A-L) Cumulative abundance of live and dead B. amphitrite and cover...

  6. Transcriptome and Proteome Studies Reveal Candidate Attachment Genes during the Development of the Barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2016-09-21

    The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41%. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development. Proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004679.

  7. MKK3 Was Involved in Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite through Activating the Kinase Activity of p38MAPK

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2013-07-29

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) plays a key role in larval settlement of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To study the signaling pathway associated with p38MAPK during larval settlement, we sought to identify the upstream kinase of p38MAPK. Three MKKs (MKK3, MKK4 and MKK7) and three MAPKs (p38MAPK, ERK and JNK) in A. amphitrite were cloned and recombinantly expressed in E. coli. Through kinase assays, we found that MKK3, but not MKK4 or MKK7, phosphorylated p38MAPK. Furthermore, MKK3 activity was specific to p38MAPK, as it did not phosphorylate ERK or JNK. To further investigate the functional relationship between MKK3 and p38MAPK in vivo, we studied the localization of phospho-MKK3 (pMKK3) and MKK3 by immunostaining. Consistent with the patterns of p38MAPK and phospho-p38MAPK (pp38MAPK), pMKK3 and MKK3 mainly localized to the antennules of the cyprids. Western blot analysis revealed that pMKK3 levels, like pp38MAPK levels, were elevated at cyprid stage, compared to nauplii and juvenile stages. Moreover, pMKK3 levels increased after treatment with adult barnacle crude extracts, suggesting that MKK3 might mediate the stimulatory effects of adult barnacle extracts on the p38MAPK pathway. © 2013 Zhang et al.

  8. Transcriptome and proteome studies reveal candidate attachment genes during the development of the barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Al-Aqeel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI and cyprid from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1,387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development.

  9. The effect of butenolide on behavioral and morphological changes in two marine fouling species, the barnacle Balanus amphitrite and the bryozoan Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi Fan

    2011-05-23

    Butenolide [5-octylfuran-2(5H)-one] is a very promising antifouling compound. Here, the effects of butenolide on larval behavior and histology are compared in two major fouling organisms, viz. cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite and swimming larvae of Bugula neritina. Butenolide diminished the positive phototactic behavior of B. amphitrite (EC50=0.82 μg ml(-1)) and B. neritina (EC50=3 μg ml(-1)). Its effect on the attachment of cyprids of B. amphitrite was influenced by temperature, and butenolide increased attachment of larvae of B. neritina to the bottom of the experimental wells. At concentrations of 4 μg ml(-1) and 10 μg ml(-1), butenolide decreased attachment of B. amphitrite and B. neritina, respectively, but the effects were reversible within a certain treatment time. Morphologically, butenolide inhibited the swelling of secretory granules and altered the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the cement gland of B. amphitrite cyprids. In B. neritina swimming larvae, butenolide reduced the number of secretory granules in the pyriform-glandular complex.

  10. The control of marine biofouling on xerogel surfaces with nanometer-scale topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunari, Nikhil; Brewer, Lenora H; Bennett, Stephanie M; Sokolova, Anastasiya; Kraut, Nadine D; Finlay, John A; Meyer, Anne E; Walker, Gilbert C; Wendt, Dean E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Bright, Frank V; Detty, Michael R

    2011-02-01

    Mixtures of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (C18, 1-5 mole-%), n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) gave xerogel surfaces of varying topography. The 1:49:50 C18/C8/TEOS xerogel formed 100-400-nm-wide, 2-7-nm deep pores by AFM while coatings with ≥3% C18 were free of such features. Segregation of the coating into alkane-rich and alkane-deficient regions in the 1:49:50 C18/C8/TEOS xerogel was observed by IR microscopy. Immersion in ASW for 48 h gave no statistical difference in surface energy for the 1:49:50 C18/C8/TEOS xerogel and a significant increase for the 50:50 C8/TEOS xerogel. Settlement of barnacle cyprids and removal of juvenile barnacles, settlement of zoospores of the alga Ulva linza, and strength of attachment of 7-day sporelings were compared amongst the xerogel formulations. Settlement of barnacle cyprids was significantly lower in comparison to glass and polystyrene standards. The 1:49:50 and 3:47:50 C18/C8/TEOS xerogels were comparable to PDMSE with respect to removal of juvenile barnacles and sporeling biomass, respectively.

  11. Herbal plants as a promising source of natural antifoulants: evidence from barnacle settlement inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, D Q; Ke, C H; Lu, C Y; Li, S J

    2009-01-01

    A series comprising hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and aqueous extracts from six common Chinese herbs (Carpesium abrotanoides, Melia toosendan, Cnidium monnieri, Vitex negundo, Stemona sp. and Sophora flavescens) was investigated for antifouling (AF) activity against cypris (cyprids) larvae of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus. All extracts tested except the aqueous extract from Stemona sp. significantly inhibited the settlement of cyprids, the most potent being the ethyl acetate extract of S. flavescens (EC(50) value 2.08 microg ml(-1)), from which an AF compound, identified as 2'-methoxykurarinone, was isolated using bioassay-guided procedures. Furthermore, the AF activity of this compound was found to be highly reversible and greater than that of the three other natural products from S. flavescens, namely matrine, oxymatrine and oxysophocarpine. These compounds have been used commercially in China for their pharmaceutical activities, but their AF activities have not previously been evaluated. Analysis of structure-activity relationships suggested that the N-1 nitrogen atom in matrine plays a crucial role in AF activity. Overall, the present findings indicate that herbal plants are a valuable source of novel AF agents.

  12. Evaluation of the Activity of the Sponge Metabolites Avarol and Avarone and their Synthetic Derivatives Against Fouling Micro- and Macroorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Roussis

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The sesquiterpene hydroquinone avarol (1 was isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara, whereas the corresponding quinone, avarone (2, was obtained by oxidation of avarol, and the significantly more lipophilic compounds [3’-(p-chloro-phenylavarone (3, 3’,4’-ethylenedithioavarone (4, 4’-isopropylthioavarone (5, 4’-tert-butylthioavarone (6, 4’-propylthioavarone (7, 4’-octylthioavarone (8] were obtained by nucleophilic addition of thiols or p-chloroaniline to avarone. All these compounds were tested, at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 50 μg/mL, for their effect on the settlement of the cyprid stage of Balanus amphitrite, for toxicity to both nauplii and cyprids and for their growth inhibitory activity on marine bacteria (Cobetia marina, Marinobacterium stanieri, Vibrio fischeri and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis and marine fungi (Halosphaeriopsis mediosetigera, Asteromyces cruciatus, Lulworthia uniseptata and Monodictys pelagica.

  13. Relative tolerance of cirripede larval stages to acute thermal shock: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan; Nancharaiah; Venugopalan; Nair; Subramoniam

    2000-12-01

    (1) Meroplankters drawn into once-through cooling circuits of coastal power plants are subjected to transient thermal stress. The effect of such acute thermal shock on the development of barnacle larvae was studied in the laboratory.(2) The response of the barnacle larvae (naupliar and cyprid stages) to elevated temperature was dependent on exposure time and their stage of development.(3) Among the stages tested, N-6 larvae showed maximum tolerance. Exposure to 37 degrees C did not affect larval survival, but delayed development of N-2 larva to cypris by one day.(4) Exposure at 40 degrees C delayed, hastened or did not affect the development time of N-2 and N-4 larvae through cypris, depending on exposure time.(5) Ten mins exposure at 43 degrees C proved lethal to all larval stages with mortality ranging from 20 to 86%.(6) Development success of the surviving larvae, measured in terms of cypris yield, showed no significant difference from controls, at temperatures below 40 degrees C.(7) Settlement activity was significantly affected in only those cyprid larvae which were exposed to 43 degrees C for 10 min.(8) Results of the present study indicate that thermal stress experienced in the once-through cooling system does not have significant impact on survival and development of the barnacle larvae at temperatures of 37-40 degrees C.

  14. A System-Wide Approach to Identify the Mechanisms of Barnacle Attachment: Toward the Discovery of New Antifouling Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Biofouling is a significant economic problem, particularly for marine and offshore oil industries. The acorn barnacle (Amphibalanus (Balanus) amphitrite) is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. Environmental conditions, the physiology of the biofouling organism, the surrounding microbial community, and the properties of the substratum can all influence the attachment of biofouling organisms to substrates. My dissertation investigated the biological processes involved in B. amphitrite development and attachment in the unique environment of the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. I profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) and identified 65,784 expressed contigs and 1387 expressed proteins by quantitative proteomics. During the planktonic stage, genes related to osmotic stress, salt stress, the hyperosmotic response, and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated, hereas genes related to the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development were down-regulated. In the transition from the nauplius VI to cyprid stages, there was up-regulation of genes involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development, and eggshell formation, and down-regulation of genes in the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding responses of marine invertebrates. This system-wide integrated approach elucidated the development and attachment pathways important in B. amphitrite. Enzymes and metabolites in these pathways are potential molecular targets for the development of new antifouling compounds.

  15. Living on the Edge: Settlement Patterns by the Symbiotic Barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis on Small Cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juan M; Overstreet, Robin M; Raga, Juan A; Aznar, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The highly specialized coronulid barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis attaches exclusively on cetaceans worldwide, but little is known about the factors that drive the microhabitat patterns on its hosts. We investigate this issue based on data on occurrence, abundance, distribution, orientation, and size of X. globicipitis collected from 242 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) that were stranded along the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Barnacles exclusively infested the fins, particularly along the trailing edge. Occurrence, abundance, and density of X. globicipitis were significantly higher, and barnacles were significantly larger, on the caudal fin than on the flippers and dorsal fin. Barnacles were found more frequently and in greater numbers on the dorsal rather than ventral side of the caudal fin and on the central third of dorsal and ventral fluke surfaces. Nearly all examined individuals attached with their cirral fan oriented opposite to the fluke edge. We suggest that X. globicipitis may chemically recognize dolphins as a substratum, but fins, particularly the flukes, are passively selected because of creation of vortices that increase contact of cyprids with skin and early survival of these larvae at the corresponding sites. Cyprids could actively select the trailing edge and orient with the cirri facing the main direction of flow. Attachment on the dorsal side of the flukes is likely associated with asymmetrical oscillation of the caudal fin, and the main presence on the central segment of the flukes could be related to suitable water flow conditions generated by fluke performance for both settlement and nutrient filtration.

  16. Living on the Edge: Settlement Patterns by the Symbiotic Barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis on Small Cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Carrillo

    Full Text Available The highly specialized coronulid barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis attaches exclusively on cetaceans worldwide, but little is known about the factors that drive the microhabitat patterns on its hosts. We investigate this issue based on data on occurrence, abundance, distribution, orientation, and size of X. globicipitis collected from 242 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba that were stranded along the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Barnacles exclusively infested the fins, particularly along the trailing edge. Occurrence, abundance, and density of X. globicipitis were significantly higher, and barnacles were significantly larger, on the caudal fin than on the flippers and dorsal fin. Barnacles were found more frequently and in greater numbers on the dorsal rather than ventral side of the caudal fin and on the central third of dorsal and ventral fluke surfaces. Nearly all examined individuals attached with their cirral fan oriented opposite to the fluke edge. We suggest that X. globicipitis may chemically recognize dolphins as a substratum, but fins, particularly the flukes, are passively selected because of creation of vortices that increase contact of cyprids with skin and early survival of these larvae at the corresponding sites. Cyprids could actively select the trailing edge and orient with the cirri facing the main direction of flow. Attachment on the dorsal side of the flukes is likely associated with asymmetrical oscillation of the caudal fin, and the main presence on the central segment of the flukes could be related to suitable water flow conditions generated by fluke performance for both settlement and nutrient filtration.

  17. Molecular phylogeny, systematics and morphological evolution of the acorn barnacles (Thoracica: Sessilia: Balanomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens T; Simon-Blecher, Noa; Achituv, Yair; Jones, Diana; Crandall, Keith A

    2014-12-01

    The Balanomorpha are the largest group of barnacles and rank among the most diverse, commonly encountered and ecologically important marine crustaceans in the world. Paradoxically, despite their relevance and extensive study for over 150years, their evolutionary relationships are still unresolved. Classical morphological systematics was often based on non-cladistic approaches, while modern phylogenetic studies suffer from severe undersampling of taxa and characters (both molecular and morphological). Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of the familial relationships within the Balanomorpha. We estimate divergence times and examine morphological diversity based on five genes, 156 specimens, 10 fossil calibrations, and six key morphological characters. Two balanomorphan superfamilies, eight families and twelve genera were identified as polyphyletic. Chthamaloids, chionelasmatoid and pachylasmatoids split first from the pedunculated ancestors followed by a clade of tetraclitoids and coronuloids, and most of the balanoids. The Balanomorpha split from the Verrucidae (outgroup) in the Lower Cretaceous (139.6 Mya) with all the main lineages, except Pachylasmatoidea, having emerged by the Paleocene (60.9 Mya). Various degrees of convergence were observed in all the assessed morphological characters except the maxillipeds, which suggests that classical interpretations of balanomorphan morphological evolution need to be revised and reinterpreted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal stress and the biology of Actinia equina L. (Anthozoa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, R.J.

    1977-05-01

    Actinia equina L. is a cosmopolitan species subject to environmental conditions ranging from near Arctic to tropical. In South Africa it is found in the upper balanoid zone and tolerates extreme conditions of temperature and desiccation. Temperature measurements showed up to 11/sup 0/C rise in body temperature above ambient during exposure. Evaporation of coelenteron water from the body surface resulted in lower temperatures in the oral region. Exposure first caused increased muscular activity and high levels of oxygen consumption, well above those recorded for submerged animals at similar temperatures. This was followed by gradual reduction in activity and decline in oxygen consumption to constant level which was maintained for the rest of the period of exposure. A. equina when exposed to air showed greater tolerance of high temperatures than when submerged. Rate-temperature curves for A. equina collected during summer and winter showed metabolic constancy over the environmental temperature range with a lateral shift of the plateau to the right during the summer months. Comparison with similar curves for British animals showed evidence of acclimation to the different geographical zones in which A. equina is found. The sublittoral actinian Anemonia natalensis Calgr. showed no acclimation to temperature change.

  19. Larval development and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia; Thoracica): Significance of food concentration, temperature and nucleic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.

    concentration. Bars represent standard deviation. Ž 5 y1 concentrations at 208Cat2=10 cells ml DNA: Ys0.13 xq1.34 mg, rs0.79, pF0.001; RNA: Ys0.18 xq1.44 mg, rs0.59, pF0.001; and at 1=10 5 cells ml y1 DNA: Ys0.05 xq1.76 mg, rs0.57, pF0.01; RNA: Ys0.02 xq1.85 mg... , g and h represent larvae raised at 208Cat2=10 5 cells ml y1 . ()A.C. Anil et al.rJ. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol. 263 2001 125–141136 length ranging from 421 to 448 mm and total breadth from 211 to 230 mm. A regression analysis of the day of cyprid emergence...

  20. Oxygen-depleted surfaces: a new antifouling technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, J Fredrik; Haeffner, Mikael; Ericsson, Claes T; Jonsson, Per R

    2009-01-01

    A novel, non-toxic strategy to combat marine biofouling is presented. The technology is paint with additions of up to 43% of industrial protein. Through microbial degradation of the protein component, an oxygen-depleted layer rapidly forms in a 0.2 mm layer close to the paint surface. With the present paint formulations, a stable, O(2)-depleted layer can persist for 16 weeks. Barnacle larvae (cyprids) did not settle on panels where oxygen saturation was paint with protein reduced fouling by barnacles and bryozoans by 80% and close to 100%, respectively. The results suggest that this novel technology may be developed into a non-toxic alternative to copper-based antifouling paints, especially for pleasure boats in sensitive environments. There is clearly potential for further development of the paint formulation, and a full-scale test on a boat-hull suggested that service-life under realistic operations needs to be improved.

  1. Metamorphosis in balanomorphan, pedunculated, and parasitic barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju

    2012-01-01

    Cypris metamorphosis was followed using video microscopy in four species of cirripeds representing the suspension-feeding pedunculated and sessile Thoracica and the parasitic Rhizocephala. Cirripede metamorphosis involves one or more highly complex molts that mark the change from a free cypris...... and M. rosa, the juvenile must free itself from the cypris cuticle by an active process before it can extend the cirri for suspension feeding. In M. rosa, the juvenile performs intensely pulsating movements that result in shedding of the cypris carapace ~8¿h after settlement. Lepas sp. sheds the cypris...... cuticle ~2 days after settlement due to contractile movements of the peduncle. In Lepas anserifera, the juvenile actively breaks through the cypris carapace, which can thereafter remain for several days without impeding cirral feeding. Formation of the shell plates begins after 1-2 days under the cyprid...

  2. Sulfobetaine-based polymer brushes in marine environment: is there an effect of the polymerizable group on the antifouling performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Robert; Jańczewski, Dominik; Vasantha, Vivek Arjunan; Jana, Satyasankar; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; Parra-Velandia, Fernando Jose; Guo, Shifeng; Parthiban, Anbanandam; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-08-01

    Three different zwitterionic polymer brush coatings for marine biofouling control were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of sulfobetaine-based monomers including methacrylamide (SBMAm), vinylbenzene (SBVB) and vinylimidazolium (SBVI). None of these brush systems have been assessed regarding marine antifouling performance. Antifouling tests performed indicate that surfaces featuring these three brush systems substantially reduce the adhesion of the marine microalgae, Amphora coffeaeformis, and the settlement of cyprid larvae of the barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite, in a similar way, displaying comparable performance. Thus, it appears that the chemical structure of the polymerizable group has no substantial influence on marine antifouling performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Two 20kDa-Cement Protein (cp20k) Homologues in Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    He, Li-Sheng

    2013-05-22

    The barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite, is a common marine fouling organism. Understanding the mechanism of barnacle adhesion will be helpful in resolving the fouling problem. Barnacle cement is thought to play a key role in barnacle attachment. Although several adult barnacle cement proteins have been identified in Megabalanus rosa, little is known about their function in barnacle settlement. In this study, two homologous 20k-cement proteins (cp20k) in Amphibalanus amphitrite, named Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2, were characterized. The two homologues share primary sequence structure with proteins from other species including Megabalanus rosa and Fistulobalanus albicostatus. The conserved structure included repeated Cys domains and abundant charged amino acids, such as histidine. In this study we demonstrated that Bamcp20k-1 localized at the α secretory cells in the cyprid cement gland, while Bamcp20k-2 localized to the β secretory cells. The differential localizations suggest differential regulation for secretion from the secretory cells. Both Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 from cyprids dissolved in PBS. However, adult Bamcp20k-2, which was dominant in the basal shell of adult barnacles, was largely insoluble in PBS. Solubility increased in the presence of the reducing reagent Dithiothreitol (DTT), suggesting that the formation of disulfide bonds plays a role in Bamcp20k-2 function. In comparison, Bamcp20k-1, which was enriched in soft tissue, could not be easily detected in the shell and base by Western blot and easily dissolved in PBS. These differential solubilities and localizations indicate that Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 have distinct functions in barnacle cementing. © 2013 He et al.

  4. Larval Biology and Environmental Tolerances of the King Crab Parasite Briarosaccus regalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Leah Marie; Hardy, Sarah Mincks

    2017-02-01

    Rhizocephalan barnacles in the genus Briarosaccus parasitize and castrate king crab hosts, thereby preventing host reproduction and potentially altering host abundance. To better understand how environmental factors in Alaska may influence Briarosaccus prevalence, we studied the effects of temperature and salinity on the larvae of Briarosaccus regalis (previously Briarosaccus callosus). Nauplius larvae were reared at 7 temperatures (2 to 16 C) and 8 salinities (19 to 40) to determine larval survival and development rates. Maximum survival occurred from 4 to 12 C and at salinities between 25 and 34. In the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, ocean temperatures and salinities are often within these ranges; thus current conditions appear favorable for high B. regalis larval survival. In addition, temperature was negatively correlated with larval development time; thus warmer waters can reduce the time larvae are exposed to the dangers of the planktonic environment. Since only female B. regalis larvae can infect crabs, we investigated the sex ratios of B. regalis broods at different temperatures and how size and morphological traits can be used to sex cyprid larvae. Larval rearing temperature did not affect brood sex ratio (F0.947, P = 0.369), but sex ratio varied among broods (F221.9; P < 0.001). Male larvae (424.5 ± 24.3 μm [mean ± 1 SD]) were significantly larger than female larvae (387.6 ± 22.7 μm [mean ± 1 SD]; F1,221.4; P < 0.001), consistent with other rhizocephalan cyprids, but sizes overlapped between the sexes such that morphological traits were also necessary for determining sex. Overall, this study provides new information on the larval biology, larval morphology, and environmental tolerances of B. regalis , an important king crab parasite.

  5. Antifouling phenyl ethers and other compounds from the invertebrates and their symbiotic fungi collected from the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chao-Yi

    2016-10-26

    Marine organism-derived secondary metabolites are promising potential sources for discovering environmentally safe antifouling agents. In present study, 55 marine secondary metabolites and their synthesized derivatives were tested and evaluated for their antifouling activities and security. These compounds include 44 natural products isolated from marine invertebrates and their symbiotic microorganisms collected from the South China Sea and 11 structural modified products derived from the isolated compounds. The natural secondary metabolites, covering phenyl ether derivatives, terpenoids, 9, 11-secosteroids, anthraquinones, alkaloids, nucleoside derivatives and peptides, were isolated from two corals, one sponge and five symbiotic fungi. All of the isolated and synthesized compounds were tested for their antifouling activities against the cyprids of barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite Darwin. Noticeably, five phenyl ether derivatives (9, 11, 13–15) exhibited potent anti-larval settlement activity with the EC50 values lower than 3.05 μM and the LC50/EC50 ratios higher than 15. The study of structure–activity relationship (SAR) revealed that the introduction of acetoxy groups and bromine atoms to phenyl ether derivatives could significantly improve their antifouling activities. This is the first report on the SAR of phenyl ether derivatives on antifouling activity against barnacle B. amphitrite. The polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, 2, 4, 6, 2′, 4′, 6′-hexabromo-diorcinol (13), which displayed excellent antifouling activity, was considered as a promising candidate of environmentally friendly antifouling agents.

  6. Diet and feeding niches of juvenile Gadus morhua, Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Merlangius merlangus during the settlement transition in the northern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, D K; Gallego, A; Jaworski, A; Priede, I G; Jones, E G

    2011-07-01

    A study on the feeding ecology of juvenile cod Gadus morhua, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus and whiting Merlangius merlangus during the pelagic to demersal transition was carried out on fishes sampled throughout their settlement season at a local nursery ground in the north-western North Sea, off the Scottish east coast. A comprehensive quantitative taxonomic analysis of the diets, as described in the paper, showed the emergence of distinctive feeding niches, minimizing the potential for competition between species and size categories. The diet of the juveniles changed with fish size, water depth, time of year and distance offshore. Small G. morhua were present in the study area earlier in the season, settled further inshore and ate a higher proportion of pelagic prey (copepods) and as size increased they moved into deeper waters and targeted larger, more benthic prey. As M. aeglefinus grew larger and moved into deeper waters, a diet of largely copepods, amphipods, pelagic Ammodytes spp., cyprids and pelagic gastropods evolved to one dominated predominantly by fishes and benthic invertebrates. In the case of M. merlangus, widespread ages and sizes throughout the sampling season, a consequence of their more protracted spawning season, resulted in dietary changes which were more likely to be influenced by seasonal changes in the prey field, in addition to developmental (size) changes, than the diets of the other two species. © 2011 Marine Scotland. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Spontaneous multiscale phase separation within fluorinated xerogel coatings for fouling-release surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Anastasiya; Bailey, Joseph J; Waltz, Grant T; Brewer, Lenora H; Finlay, John A; Fornalik, Jill; Wendt, Dean E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Bright, Frank V; Detty, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Four-component xerogel films consisting of 1 mole-% n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (C18) and 50 mole-% tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in combination with 1-24 mole-% tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltriethoxysilane (TDF) and 25-48 mole-% n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8) and a 1:49:50 mole-% C18/TDF/TEOS were prepared. Settlement of barnacle cyprids and removal of juvenile barnacles, settlement of zoospores of the alga Ulva linza, and strength of attachment of 7-day sporelings (young plants) of Ulva were compared amongst the xerogel formulations. Several of the xerogel formulations were comparable to poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer with respect to removal of juvenile barnacles and removal of sporeling biomass. The 1:4:45:50 and 1:14:35:50 C18/TDF/C8/TEOS xerogels displayed some phase segregation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) pre- and post-immersion in water. Imaging reflectance infrared microscopy showed the formation of islands of alkane-rich and perfluoroalkane-rich regions in these same xerogels both pre- and post-immersion in water. Surface energies were unchanged upon immersion in water for 48 h amongst the TDF-containing xerogel coatings. AFM measurements demonstrated that surface roughness on the 1:4:45:50 and 1:14:35:50 C18/TDF/C8/TEOS xerogel coatings decreased upon immersion in water.

  8. Chlorine dioxide as an alternative antifouling biocide for cooling water systems: Toxicity to larval barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus (Utinomi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatnarayanan, Srinivas; Sriyutha Murthy, P; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2017-11-30

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is seen as an effective alternative to chlorine, which is widely used as an antifouling biocide. However, data on its efficacy against marine macrofoulants is scanty. In this study, acute toxicity of ClO2 to larval forms of the fouling barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus was investigated. ClO2 treatment at 0.1mg/L for 20min elicited 45-63% reduction in naupliar metamorphosis, 70% inhibition of cyprid settlement and 80% inhibition of metamorphosis to juveniles. Increase in concentration to 0.2mg/L did not result in any significant difference in the settlement inhibition or metamorphosis. Treatment with 0.2mg/L of ClO2 elicited substantial reduction in the settlement of barnacle larvae compared to control. The study indicates the possibility of using ClO2 as an alternative antifouling biocide in power plant cooling water systems. However, more work needs to be done on the environmental effects of such switchover, which we are currently undertaking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolated thallus-associated compounds from the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus mediate bacterial surface colonization in the field similar to that on the natural alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachnit, Tim; Wahl, Martin; Harder, Tilmann

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether surface-associated compounds isolated from the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus had the potential to mediate microbial and/or macrobial epibiosis similar to that on the natural alga. To selectively yield thallus-associated compounds and avoid contamination by intracellular algal compounds, cell lysis was monitored by surface microscopy of algal cells and chemical profiling of algal surface extracts by coupled gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. The optimized extraction resulted in polar and non-polar algal surface extracts. The non-polar surface extract was immobilized in hydrogel, the polar surface extract was homogeneously perfused through the gel to ensure a temporally constant delivery of polar extract components. During a 7 day field trial, bacterial biofilms were formed on control gels and gels featuring polar and/or non-polar extract components. PERMANOVA revealed that bacterial community profiles on controls and on gels featuring polar or non-polar extract were significantly different from the profile on F. vesiculosus, while the profile on the gels bearing both polar and non-polar extracts was not. Moreover, the polar surface extracts inhibited the settlement of barnacle cyprids. Considering the pronounced effects of bacterial biofilms on invertebrate larval settlement, these results suggest that algal surface chemistry affects macrofouling not only directly but also indirectly, via its control of biofilm formation and composition.

  10. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingjing, E-mail: jjwang1@hotmail.com; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from SS surfaces for marine antifouling. • All brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of biofouling. • The antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density of hydrogels. - Abstract: Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  11. Antifouling Activity of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Chinese Marine Organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong Xin

    2013-04-25

    Biofouling results in tremendous economic losses to maritime industries around the world. A recent global ban on the use of organotin compounds as antifouling agents has further raised demand for safe and effective antifouling compounds. In this study, 49 secondary metabolites, including diterpenoids, steroids, and polyketides, were isolated from soft corals, gorgonians, brown algae, and fungi collected along the coast of China, and their antifouling activity was tested against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite. Twenty of the compounds were found to inhibit larval settlement significantly at a concentration of 25 μg ml-1. Two briarane diterpenoids, juncin O (2) and juncenolide H (3), were the most promising non-toxic antilarval settlement candidates, with EC50 values less than 0.13 μg ml-1 and a safety ratio (LC50/EC50) higher than 400. A preliminary structure-activity relationships study indicated that both furanon and furan moieties are important for antifouling activity. Intriguingly, the presence of hydroxyls enhanced their antisettlement activity. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  12. ÉTUDE DU RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE DE L’ANCHOIS EUROPÉEN (ENGRAULIS ENCRASICOLUS EN ATLANTIQUE NORD-EST ET EN MÉDITERRANÉE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Jemaa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jemaa Sharif, Perrine Cuvilliers, Mahmoud Bacha, Gaby Khalaf et Rachid Amara. A study on the diet variation of European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus in the Atlantique and Mediterranean water. 2016. Lebanese Science Journal, 17(1: 77-92. This study evaluated diet variation of European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in productive and oligotrophic areas. The diet of the European anchovy was studied at 13 different sites along its geographic distribution range. In all sites, the diet was mainly based on copepods that represented 33 to 98% of the prey identified and were found in over 80% of the stomachs analyzed. The dominant copepod species and the various secondary preys such as ostracods, gastropods, and eggs varied among locations. Multivariate analyses (AFC, CAH, nMDS distinguished three groups according to sites: group 1 in the Northwestern Mediterranean, Atlantic, Channel/North Sea; group 2 in the Algero-Provençal Basin (Ghazaouet, Bénisaf and Bejaia; and group 3 in the Eastern Mediterranean (Lebanon and Turkey. The differences among groups were based on the presence of specific prey types, such as, zooplankton, cyprid larvae, barnacles in the first group, bivalves and amphipods in the second group, and ostracods, mysids, and euphausiids in the third group. These groupings reflected the dissimilarities of hydrographic characteristics and biological productivity between regions. Examination of the stomach contents highlights the significant presence of plastic (13-16% of the content in some sites, where the vast majority came from fishing gear filaments.

  13. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  14. Antifouling activity of bromotyrosine-derived sponge metabolites and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortlepp, Sofia; Sjögren, Martin; Dahlström, Mia; Weber, Horst; Ebel, Rainer; Edrada, RuAngelie; Thoms, Carsten; Schupp, Peter; Bohlin, Lars; Proksch, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Eighteen brominated sponge-derived metabolites and synthetic analogues were analyzed for antilarval settlement of Balanus improvisus. Only compounds exhibiting oxime substituents including bastadin-3 (4), -4 (1), -9 (2), and -16 (3), hemibastadin-1 (6), aplysamine-2 (5), and psammaplin A (10) turned out to inhibit larval settling at 1 to 10 microM. Analogues of hemibastadin-1 (6) were synthesized and tested for structure activity studies. Debromohemibastadin-1 (8) inhibited settling of B. improvisus, albeit at lower concentrations than hemibastadin-1 (6). Both 6 and 8 also induced cyprid mortality. 5,5'-dibromohemibastadin-1 (7) proved to be nontoxic, but settlement inhibition was observed at 10 microM. Tyrosinyltyramine (9), lacking the oxime function, was not antifouling active and was non-toxic at 100 microM. Hemibastadin-1 (6) and the synthetic products showed no general toxicity when tested against brine shrimp larvae. In contrast to the lipophilic psammaplin A (10), the hydrophilic sulfated psammaplin A derivative (11) showed no antifouling activity even though it contains an oxime group. We therefore hypothesize that the compound needs to cross membranes (probably by diffusion) and that the target for psammaplin A lies intracellularly.

  15. Effects of Toxic Leachate from Commercial Plastics on Larval Survival and Settlement of the Barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-Xiang; Getzinger, Gordon J; Ferguson, P Lee; Orihuela, Beatriz; Zhu, Mei; Rittschof, Daniel

    2016-01-19

    Plastic pollution represents a major and growing global problem. It is well-known that plastics are a source of chemical contaminants to the aquatic environment and provide novel habitats for marine organisms. The present study quantified the impacts of plastic leachates from the seven categories of recyclable plastics on larval survival and settlement of barnacle Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. Leachates from plastics significantly increased barnacle nauplii mortality at the highest tested concentrations (0.10 and 0.50 m(2)/L). Hydrophobicity (measured as surface energy) was positively correlated with mortality indicating that plastic surface chemistry may be an important factor in the effects of plastics on sessile organisms. Plastic leachates significantly inhibited barnacle cyprids settlement on glass at all tested concentrations. Settlement on plastic surfaces was significantly inhibited after 24 and 48 h, but settlement was not significantly inhibited compared to the controls for some plastics after 72-96 h. In 24 h exposure to seawater, we found larval toxicity and inhibition of settlement with all seven categories of recyclable commercial plastics. Chemical analysis revealed a complex mixture of substances released in plastic leachates. Leaching of toxic compounds from all plastics should be considered when assessing the risks of plastic pollution.

  16. The Mode of Action of Isocyanide in Three Aquatic Organisms, Balanus amphitrite, Bugula neritina and Danio rerio

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2012-09-18

    Isocyanide is a potential antifouling compound in marine environments. In this study, we investigated its mode of action in three aquatic organisms. Two of them, the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, are major marine fouling invertebrates, and the other organism is the non-target species zebrafish Danio rerio. In the swimming larvae of B. neritina, isocyanide did not affect the total attachment rate (≤50 µg ml^(−1)), but it did change the attachment site by increasing the percentage of attachment on the bottom of the container rather than on the wall or air-water inter-surface. Isocyanide binds several proteins in B. neritina as identified via SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS: 1) a 30 kD protein band containing two proteins similar to voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC), which control the direct coupling of the mitochondrial matrix to the energy maintenance of the cytosol and the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria of mammalian cells; and 2) an unknown 39 kD protein. In B. amphitrite cyprids, the isocyanide binding protein were 1) a protein similar to NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, which is the “entry enzyme” of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria; and 2) cytochrome P450. In Danio rerio embryos, isocyanide caused “wavy” notochords, hydrocephalus, pericardial edema, poor blood circulation, and defects in pigmentation and hematopoiesis, which phenocopied copper deficiency. This is the first report on isocyanide binding proteins in fouling organisms, as well as the first description of its phenotype and potential toxicology in zebrafish.

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Xing-Cheng

    2012-10-02

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  18. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Fan Chen

    Full Text Available Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM, encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite.

  19. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  20. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  1. Barnacle settlement and the adhesion of protein and diatom microfouling to xerogel films with varying surface energy and water wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, John A; Bennett, Stephanie M; Brewer, Lenora H; Sokolova, Anastasiya; Clay, Gemma; Gunari, Nikhil; Meyer, Anne E; Walker, Gilbert C; Wendt, Dean E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Detty, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Previous work has shown that organosilica-based xerogels have the potential to control biofouling. In this study, modifications of chemistry were investigated with respect to their resistance to marine slimes and to settlement of barnacle cyprids. Adhesion force measurements of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to xerogel surfaces prepared from aminopropylsilyl-, fluorocarbonsilyl-, and hydrocarbonsilyl-containing precursors, indicated that adhesion was significantly less on the xerogel surfaces in comparison to a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMSE) standard. The strength of adhesion of BSA on the xerogels was highest on surfaces with the highest and the lowest critical surface tensions, gamma(C) and surface energies, gamma(S), and duplicated the 'Baier curve'. The attachment to and removal of cells of the diatom Navicula perminuta from a similar series of xerogel surfaces were examined. Initial attachment of cells was comparable on all of the xerogel surfaces, but the percentage removal of attached cells by hydrodynamic shear stress increased with gamma(C) and increased wettability as measured by the static water contact angle, theta(Ws), of the xerogel surfaces. The percentage removal of cells of Navicula was linearly correlated with both properties (R(2) = 0.74 for percentage removal as a function of theta(Ws) and R(2) = 0.69 for percentage removal as a function of gamma(C)). Several of the aminopropylsilyl-containing xerogels showed significantly greater removal of Navicula compared to a PDMSE standard. Cypris larvae of the barnacle B. amphitrite showed preferred settlement on hydrophilic/higher energy surfaces. Settlement was linearly correlated with theta(Ws) (R(2) = 0.84) and gamma(C) (R(2) = 0.84). Hydrophilic xerogels should prove useful as coatings for boats in regions where fouling is dominated by microfouling (protein and diatom slimes).

  2. Post Earthquake Investigation Of The Mw7.8 Haida Gwaii, Canada, Rupture Area And Constraints On Earthquake Source Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, P. J.; Witter, R. C.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    The October 28, 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, earthquake was the second largest historical earthquake recorded in Canada. Earthquake seismology and GPS geodesy shows this was an underthrusting event, in agreement with prior studies that indicated oblique underthrusting of the Haida Gwaii by the Pacific plate. Coseismic deformation is poorly constrained by geodesy, with only six GPS sites and two tide gauge stations anywhere near the rupture area. In order to better constrain the coseismic deformation, we measured the upper limit of sessile intertidal organisms at 26 sites relative to sea level. We dominantly measured the positions of bladder weed (fucus distichus - 617 observations) and the common acorn barnacle (Balanus balanoides - 686 observations). Physical conditions control the upper limit of sessile intertidal organisms, so we tried to find the quietest water conditions, with steep, but not overhanging faces, where slosh from wave motion was minimized. We focused on the western side of the islands as rupture models indicated that the greatest displacement was there. However, we were also looking for calm water sites in bays located as close as possible to the often tumultuous Pacific Ocean. In addition, we made 322 measurements of sea level that will be used to develop a precise tidal model and to evaluate the position of the organisms with respect to a common sea level datum. We anticipate the resolution of the method will be about 20-30 cm. The sites were focused on the western side of the Haida Gwaii from Wells Bay on the south up to Otard Bay to the north, with 5 transects across strike. We also collected data at the town of Masset, which lies outside of the deformation zone of the earthquake. We observed dried and desiccated bands of fucus and barnacles at two sites on the western coast of southern Moresby Island (Gowgia Bay and Wells Bay). Gowgia Bay had the strongest evidence of uplift with fucus that was dried out and apparently dead. A

  3. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  4. Ostracod calcite records the 18O/16O ratio of the bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; McGregor, Helen V.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2017-10-01

    The δ18O of ostracod valves is widely used to infer water δ18O and temperature. However, ostracod δ18O appears sensitive to other environmental variables. In addition, there is species-dependent ostracod calcite 18O enrichment, relative to slowly precipitated inorganic calcite under the same conditions. Together these uncertainties complicate ostracod paleoclimate reconstructions. This study presents a new understanding of the causes of ostracod δ18O variations based on a global database of published ostracod δ18O values in lake, marine and coastal environments, and from culture experiments. The database includes associated field/experiment host water parameters including temperature (-1 to 32 °C), water δ18O (-13.2‰ to 4.3‰ VSMOW), pH (6.9-10.4), salinity (0-72 g/kg), calcite saturation states (0.6-26), and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration [DIC] (0.9-54.3 mmol/kg). The data show that: (1) the δ18O of marine and non-marine ostracods reflects the 18O/16O of the sum of host water CO32- and HCO3- ions. For example, at a given temperature, the δ18O of non-marine ostracods decreases by 4‰ to 6‰ as [CO32-]/[DIC] reaches 70%, depending on the ostracod species. In low [CO32-]/[DIC] settings (i.e. high HCO3-/CO32-), ostracod 18O/16O is close to the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions, which explains why on average ostracod δ18O is higher than the δ18O of inorganic calcite precipitated slowly under the same conditions. (2) Taxonomic offsets in ostracod δ18O vary with the host water [CO32-]/[DIC]. In environments where HCO3- ≫ CO32- (i.e. most freshwater lakes), the 18O/16O of Candonids is indistinguishable from the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions (difference of 0.10 ± 0.16‰) while the 18O/16O of Cyprids is lower than the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions by -0.77‰ to -0.32‰, Cytherids by -0.88 ± 0.29‰, and Limnocytherids by -1.12 ± 0.05‰. (3) The sensitivity of ostracod δ18O to [CO32-]/[DIC] also varies with taxonomy. For each percent increase in [CO32-]/[DIC