WorldWideScience

Sample records for cyclotron rutherford backscattering

  1. Rutherford backscattering analysis of contaminants in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D. E.; Pfeffer, R. L.; Sadler, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to understand the sorption and desorption of organic contaminants in the polymer Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET. Samples were exposed to a range of organics to simulate contamination of PET that can take place in the post-consumer waste stream. From RBS analysis, concentration depth profiles were shown to vary from a monolayer regime surface layer to a saturation level, depending on the contaminant. Heat treatments were also applied to contaminated polymer to simulate thermal processing steps in the recycling of PET. Heating caused a dramatic decrease in contaminants and in some cases a complete removal of contamination was achieved to the limit of RBS detectability.

  2. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhang, Y.; Velisa, G.; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  3. Investigation of the solid-state reaction between nickel oxide and alumina by Rutherford backscattering (RBS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, G. de; Geus, John W.; Fluit, J.M.; Wit, J.H. de

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of NiO and Al2O3 to form NiAl2O4 was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering of 3 MeV He+-ions. The NiO was obtained by oxidation at 900°C of a nickel film vapour-deposited onto alumina substrates. The reaction of NiO and Al2O3 did not proceed markedly at 900°C. The reaction

  4. Interface defects in GaN/sapphire studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and channeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Sinha; P K Barhai

    2004-06-01

    GaN on sapphire was grown by MOCVD technique. Rutherford backscattering spectra together with channeling along [0 0 0 1] axis were recorded to study the defects at the interface. Detailed calculation shows that the defects at GaN/sapphire interface are due to dislocations which are distributed into the whole thickness of the film and are mainly aligned on the growth direction.

  5. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, Jason P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick’s second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  6. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick's second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  7. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry studies of 100 keV nitrogen ion implanted polypropylene polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mahak; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structure and composition in polypropylene (PP) polymer has been studied. Implantation was carried out using 100 keV N+ ions at different fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 with beam current density of ∼0.65 μA cm-2. Surface morphological changes in the pre- and post-implanted PP specimens have been studied using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and UV-Visible Spectroscopy. The spatial distribution of implantation induced modification in the form of carbonization and dehydrogenation in the near surface region of PP matrix, the projected range, retained dose of implanted nitrogen, the various elements present in the implanted layers and their differential cross-sections have been analyzed using RBS spectra. RUMP simulation yielded an increase in the concentration of carbon near the surface from 33 at.% (virgin) to 42 at.% at fluence of 1 × 1017 N+ cm-2. Further, optical absorption has been found to increase with a shift in the absorption edge from UV towards visible region with increasing fluence. UV-Vis absorption spectra also indicate a drastic decrease in optical energy gap from 4.12 eV (virgin) to 0.25 eV (1 × 1017 N+ cm-2) indicating towards the formation of carbonaceous network in the implanted region. All these changes observed using UV-Visible have been further correlated with the outcomes of the RBS characterization.

  8. Artificial neural networks for instantaneous analysis of real-time Rutherford backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeulemeester, J., E-mail: Jelle.Demeulemeester@fys.kuleuven.b [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Smeets, D. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1699 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Vieira, A. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Rua S. Tome, 4200 Porto (Portugal); Comrie, C.M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Temst, K.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    This paper reports on the advantage of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to analyze large sets of real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) data. Real-time RBS, i.e. collecting RBS spectra at periodic time intervals during a thermal treatment, probes the full response of a thin film to the annealing in situ. Although very valuable insights can be gained by this technique, the time-consuming analysis of the vast amount of RBS spectra acquired during real-time RBS measurements has so far prevented the widespread use of real-time RBS. Setting up an ANN is quite an intensive process as well, but once trained, these ANNs can handle the analysis of large data sets practically instantaneously. As such, the beneficial combination of real-time RBS and ANN analysis forms a perfect synergy. In this test case, a network was trained and applied to analyze the Ni silicide growth during annealing of a thin 80 nm Ni film on Si(1 0 0). The ANN performance was validated by comparing the ANN results with the conventional analysis performed on the same data set.

  9. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki, E-mail: t-nishi@hosei.ac.jp

    2016-03-15

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of {sup 16}O({sup 4}He, {sup 4}He){sup 16}O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  10. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry analysis of iron-containing Bi2Se3 topological insulator thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Diez, V.; Eddrief, M.; Vickridge, I.

    2016-03-01

    Fe-containing Bi2Se3 topological insulators (TI) thin films have been grown to investigate the intricate interplay between topological order and the incorporation of ferromagnetic atoms. Here we present the quantitative characterisation of the Bi2Se3 thin films with up to 16 at% Fe incorporated during the growth process on GaAs (1 1 1) substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. We report the elemental composition and depth profiles of the Bi2Se3:Fe films obtained using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and their formed crystalline phase obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Resistance of the TI to beam-induced damage was investigated by channelling RBS. Using the elemental composition from RBS and the thickness from XRD measurements the Fe-free film density was deduced. For Fe-containing samples, the diffraction reveals the formation of two distinct crystalline phases, as well as their intergrowth pattern, in which the basal planes of Bi2Se3 coexist with an additional Fe-Se phase. This intergrown composite, with chemical compatibility of the Fe-Se phase with the crystalline Bi2Se3 structure, preserves the intrinsic topological surface states of the TI component despite the inhomogeneous distribution of the constituent phases. RBS analysis gives the stoichiometry of the Bi2Se3, and Bi2Se3:Fe samples (estimated between 0 and 16 at% Fe) and gives insights into the composition of FeSex phases present.

  11. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki

    2016-03-01

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of 16O(4He, 4He)16O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  12. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  13. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  14. Kinetic study of wet oxidation of Si0.5Ge0.5 alloy by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of Si0. sGeo.5 alloy has been investigated at the temperatures of 800℃ and 900 ℃. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been employed to determine the composition and thickness of the oxide layers. Only Sio.5Geo. 5O2 layer formed during the oxidation at 800℃, whilst three layers, Si0.5Ge0.5O2, SiO2 and Ge, are existed after the oxidation at 900℃. Experimental results are interpreted by adding a germanium flux F4 in Deal-Grove oxidation model of Silicon.

  15. Rutherford backscattering and channelling studies of erbium implanted SIMOX refid="FN1">**SIMOX: separation by implanted oxygen. structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingping; Tang, Y. S.; Hemment, P. L. F.; Sealy, B. J.

    1990-04-01

    The behaviour of 250 keV 166Er + implanted into SIMOX structures has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering and channelling analysis. The implantation doses were 1.5 ×10 14 cm -2 and 1.5 × 10 15 cm -2. Both conventional furnace and rapid therm annealing were carried out in the temperature range 600°C-1100°C. Regrowth of the amorphized silicon and redistribution of the erbium were found to be strongly influenced by the status of the damaged layer. Different regrowth processes of the completely damaged silicon overlayer were suggested respectively for conventional furnace and rapid thermal annealing. It is found that the regrowth rate increases rapidly when the temperature is higher than 900° C in both cases. The redistribution of the erbium atoms was controlled by the regrowth boundary between the damaged and the recrystallized silicon.

  16. Lattice location of O18 in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-01

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O18 ions with fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O18 is analysed using the α-particles yield from O18(p,α)N15 nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along and axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O18 is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  17. Stoichiometry and local bond configuration of In2S3:Cl thin films by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Albert O.

    2016-10-01

    In2S3 thin films deposited using chemical methods always contain residual elements from the precursors, which modify their properties. As buffer layers in solar cells, the residual elements in the In2S3 layer affect the performance of these devices. The stoichiometry of In2S3 thin films deposited by spray ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) was studied as a function of the residual Cl from InCl3 precursor by varying the deposition parameters. The chemical formula was deduced from the elemental composition determined using Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Incomplete sulfurization of the precursor implies that residual Cl- remains bonded to the In3+ ions while some occupy interstitial and/or antisite positions in the In2S3 matrix. This results in thin films with different stoichiometry, described by the formula In4S6-xCl2x+2y. This changes the local bond configuration and geometry and underpins the influence of residual Cl on the physical properties of In2S3 thin films.

  18. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  19. Selective Rutherford backscattering techniques in the study of transition-metal implanted YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Cohen, D.D.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Using a metal-vapor vacuum arc ion source, several as-grown, large single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 17} zinc, nickel and iron ions. After implantation the crystal was subjected to two anneal cycles that has allowed to examine crystal structure, superconducting transitions and composition, through X-ray diffraction, rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and AC susceptibility measurements respectively. Although RBS discriminates strongly against light elements, such as oxygen, the use of resonant reaction {sup 16}O ({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.4 MeV was beneficial, as its cross section is nearly 23 times that of the rutherford cross section. 4 figs.

  20. Characterization of a compact filament-driven multicusp ion source for low energy time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangtip, S.; Junphong, P.; Ano, V.; Lekprasert, B.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Thongnopparat, N.; Vilaithong, T.

    2004-05-01

    Because of the limited pulse height energy resolution of a detector, conventional Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) requires an energy of the incident α particle to be in the MeV region. At Chiang Mai University we have researched the possibility of utilizing a 280 keV nanosecond pulse of helium ions for RBS applications. We have chosen a compact filament-driven multicusp ion source of 2.6 cm in diameter and 8 cm in length being investigated for the time-of-flight RBS applications. In this article, we present the general ion source performance using helium, nitrogen, and argon for generating the discharge plasma. The general ion source characteristics have been measured and analyzed. The measurements also include the extractable ion current and the ion beam emittance. We have performed beam extraction calculations with a computer simulation code KOBRA. Results of the measurements and calculations will be presented and discussed.

  1. Comparative Characterization of InGaN/GaN Multiple Quantum Wells by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Sheng-Qiang; WU Ming-Fang; YAO Shu-De; ZHANG Guo-Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The composition, elastic strain and structural defects of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are comparatively investigated by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering/channelling. The InGaN well layers are fully strained on GaN, i.e. the degree of relaxation is zero.The multilayered structure has a clear defined periodic thickness and abrupt interfaces. The In composition is deduced by XRD simulation. We show how the periodic structure, the In composition, the strain status and the crystalline quality of the InGaN/GaN MQWs can be determined and cross-checked by various techniques.

  2. Characterization of a ZnO Epilayer Grown on Sapphire by using Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling and X-Ray Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Bin-Feng

    2012-01-01

    A ZnO layer with rather good crystalline quality (Xmin =9.4%) is grown on a sapphire substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD).Rutherford backscattering (RBS)/channeling and high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize the elastic strain in the ZnO epilayer.The tetragonal distortion is positive and depth dependent.It is highest near the interface and decreases towards the sample surface.By combining the results of RBS and XRD,the average elastic strains in the parallel and the perpendicular directions can be calculated to be 0.50% and -0.17%,respectively.

  3. Sputtering of SiN films by 540 keV C{sub 60}{sup 2+} ions observed using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Morita, Y.; Kitayama, T.; Suzuki, M. [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Narumi, K.; Saitoh, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan); Tsujimoto, M.; Isoda, S. [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Fujii, Y. [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kimura, K., E-mail: kimura@kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride films deposited on Si(0 0 1) were irradiated with 540 keV C{sub 60} ions to fluences ranging from 2.5 × 10{sup 11} to 1 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The composition depth profiles of the irradiated samples were measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Both silicon and nitrogen in the film decrease rapidly with fluence. From the observed result the sputtering yields are obtained as 3900 ± 500 N atoms/ion and 1500 ± 1000 Si atoms/ion. Such large sputtering yield cannot be explained by either the elastic sputtering or the electronic sputtering, indicating that the synergy effect between the elastic sputtering and the electronic sputtering plays an important role.

  4. Dislocation and Elastic Strain in an InN Film Characterized by Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Feng-Feng; FA Tao; WANG Xin-Qiang; YAO Shu-De

    2012-01-01

    Dislocation information and strain-related tetragonal distortion as well as crystalline qualities of a 2-μm-thick InN film grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are characterized by Rutherford backscattering/channeling (RBS/C) and synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (SR-XRD).The minimum yield xmin=2.5% deduced from the RBS/C results indicates a fairly good crystalline quality.From the SR-XRD results,we obtain the values of the screw and edge densities to be ρscrew =7.0027 X 109 and ρedge =8.6115 × 109 cm-2,respectively.The tetragonal distortion of the sample is found to be -0.27 % by angular scans,which is close to the -0.28 % derived by SR-XRD.The value of |e(⊥)/e‖| =0.6742 implies that the InN layer is much stiffer along the a axis than that along the c axis,where e‖ is the parallel elastic strain,and e⊥ is the perpendicular elastic strain.Photoluminescence results reveal a main peak of 0.653eV with the linewidth of 60meV,additional shoulder band could be due to impurities and related defects.%Dislocation information and strain-related tetragonal distortion as well as crystalline qualities of a 2-μm-thick InN film grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are characterized by Rutherford backscattering/'channeling (RBS/C) and synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). The minimum yield Xmin=2.5% deduced from the RBS/C results indicates a fairly good crystalline quality. From the SR-XRD results, we obtain the values of the screw and edge densities to be pscrew = 7.0027 ×109 and pedge = 8.6115 ×109 cm-2, respectively. The tetragonal distortion of the sample is found to be-0.27% by angular scans, which is close to the -0.28 % derived by SR-XRD. The value of |e⊥/e|| | = 0.6742 implies that the InN layer is much stiffer along the a axis than that along the c axis, where e|| is the parallel elastic strain, and e⊥ is the perpendicular elastic strain. Photoluminescence results reveal a main peak of 0.653eV with the linewidth of 60me

  5. A remotely controlled, semi-automatic target system for Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analyses of polymeric membrane samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attayek, P.J. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7431 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575 (United States); Meyer, E.S.; Lin, L. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7431 (United States); Rich, G.C.; Clegg, T.B. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Coronell, O., E-mail: coronell@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7431 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    A new target system for Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis is described which enables remotely controlled, semi-automatic analysis of multiple organic polymer samples without exceeding damaging incident beam fluences. Control of fluence at a given beam current is achieved using two stepper motors to move a thin aluminum disk loaded with polymer samples both radially and azimuthally across the beam. Flexible beam spot locations and sample irradiation times are remotely controlled in two steps via two custom LabVIEW Trade-Mark-Sign programs. In the first step, a digital image of the target disk is converted into precise radial and azimuthal coordinates for each mounted polymer sample. In the second step, the motors implement the user-directed sample irradiation and fluence. Schematics of the target system hardware, a block diagram of interactions between the target system components, a description of routine procedures, and illustrative data taken with a 2 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} analysis beam are provided.

  6. Improvement of depth resolution and detection efficiency by control of secondary-electrons in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, Satoshi, E-mail: s-abo@stec.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Hamada, Yasuhisa [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Seidl, Albert [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Engineering Science and Industrial Design, Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, Breitscheidstraße 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Wakaya, Fujio; Takai, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    An improvement of a depth resolution and a detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is discussed on both simulation and experiment by control of secondary electron trajectories using sample bias voltage. The secondary electron, used for a start signal in single-event TOF-RBS, flies more directly to a secondary electron detector with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt than that without sample bias voltage in the simulation. The simulated collection efficiency of the secondary electrons also increases with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt. These simulation results indicate the possibility of a smaller depth resolution and a shorter measurement time in single-event TOF-RBS with positive sample bias voltage. The measurement time for the Pt-stripe sample using single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 65% shorter than that without sample bias voltage, resulting in a less sample damage by a probe beam. The depth resolution for the Pt stripes under the 50-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} cover-layer with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 4 nm smaller than that without sample bias voltage. Positive sample bias voltage improves the depth resolution and the detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS without an influence on the beam focusing.

  7. Rutherford's war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2016-02-01

    Seagulls, sea lions and the comic-book hero Professor Radium were all recruited to fight the threat of submarines during the First World War. But as John Campbell explains, it was Ernest Rutherford who led the way a century ago in using acoustics to deter these deadly craft.

  8. Rutherford Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    This experiment, carried out by Ernest Rutherford in 1910, revolutionised understanding of the structure of matter, showing that almost all the mass of an atom is concentrated in a very small, positively charged nucleus. Alpha particles emitted at bombard a thin gold foil. A detector records the number of alpha particles crossing the foil per second. The number is displayed on the counter and updated every minute. Alpha particles are helium nuclei, they consist of 2 protons and 2 neutrons. Rotate the central knob to change the angle between the foil and the detector. The number of alpha particles detected depends on the angle. Most of the alpha particles travel straight through the foil because the gold atoms are mainly empty space. However some hit the atomic nucleus and are deflected.

  9. Spectrometry of the Rutherford backscattering of ions and the Raman scattering of light in GaS single crystals irradiated with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibov, A. A.; Madatov, R. S., E-mail: msrahim@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan); Komarov, F. F.; Pilko, V. V. [Belarus State University, RTCCU of “Nanotechnology and Physical Electronics” (Belarus); Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Akhmedov, F. I.; Jakhangirov, M. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan)

    2015-05-15

    The methods of the Raman scattering of light and Rutherford backscattering are used to study the degree of structural disorder in layered GaS crystals before and after irradiation with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. It is shown that the distribution of the crystal’s components over depth is homogeneous; for doses as high as 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the stoichiometric composition of the compound’s components is retained. The experimental value of the critical dose for the beginning of amorphization amounts to about 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and is in accordance with the calculated value. The results obtained by the method of the Raman scattering of light confirm conservation of crystalline structure and the start of the amorphization process.

  10. Computerized Control and Operation of Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling for an in situ Ion Beam System and Its Application for Measurement of Si(001) and ZnO(001)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jun; J. C. LEE; LI Ming; WANG Ze-Song; LIU Chuan-Sheng; FU De-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A computer-automated Rutherford backscattering/channeling (RBS/C) system is developed to provide in situ ion beam analysis of the accelerator-TEM system in Wuhan University. The basic system components are a PC equipped with a multichannel analyzer data acquisition board, motion control hardware including the Panmure stepping motor controller and integrated circuit modules, and a Labview programmed operating system with associated electronics. Single crystalline Si(Ool) and ZnO(Ool) implanted with Mn ions were characterized with this computerized setup. The crystalline quality Xmin and channeling half angle of Si(001) were measured to be 4.65% and 0.52°, respectively, which are comparable to theoretical values 4.2% and 0.32°. The ion implantation induced damage depth profile derived from channeling and random spectrum is in reasonable agreement with the result calculated by the SRIM Monte-Carlo simulation code.

  11. Depth Dependence of Tetragonal Distortion of a ZnO/Mg_(0.1)Zn_(0.9)O/ZnO Heterostructure Studied by Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; DING Zhi-Bo; LI Lin; YAO Shu-De

    2009-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and channeling are used to characterize the structure of a ZnO/Mg_(0.1) Zn_(0.9)O/ZnO heterostructure grown on a sapphire (0001) substrate by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.The results show that the Mg_(0.1)Zn_(0.9) O layer has the same hexagonal wurtzite structure as the underlying ZnO layer, and the heterostructure has a good crystalline quality with xmin=5%, which is the ratio of the backscattering yields of aligned and random spectra in the near-surface region.Using the channeling angular scan around an off-normal axis in the {1010} plane of both ZnO and MgZnO layer, the tetragonal distortion eT, which is caused by the elastic strain in the epilayer, is determined.The depth dependence of eT is obtained by using this technique.It can clearly be seen that the elastic strain rapidly decreases with the increase in thickness of the ZnO film in the early growth stage and becomes slightly larger in the region of the Mg_(0.1)Zn_(0.9)O layer.

  12. 4He和12C离子Rutherford背散射的Geant4模拟%Geant4-Based Simulation of 4 He and 12C Ions Rutherford Backscattering on Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振超; 马玉刚; 杨海芳; 牛璐莹; 周庆; 赵广义; 宋明珠

    2013-01-01

    The Rutherford backscattering spectra (RBS) of 4 He and 12C normally incident on Au,Ag,Cu thin films at 270 keV and 500 keV were simulated via Geant4.Effects of different materials,thickness and energy of incident ions on RBS were discussed.The characters of 4He,12C RBS were analyzed.It was found that the mass resolution is much better for 12C RBS than that for 4He RBS.%利用Geant4程序模拟270,500 keV 4 He和12C离子垂直入射Au,Ag,Cu薄膜上的Rutherford背散射谱(RBS),并讨论材料、厚度和入射离子能量对背散射谱的影响.结果表明,能量较大的12C离子具有较好的质量分辨率.

  13. RUTHERFORD B.HAYES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    AFTER the scandals of Grant's administration the Republicans wanted an especially upright candidate; they found him in Rutherford B. Hayes, a devout, conscientious Ohioan whose Puritan ancestors had come from New England. In his third term as Governor of Ohio in 1876,

  14. Earnest Rutherford, the solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you did not make it to the Science & Society talk by John Campbell last week and are still wondering about the spelling of "Earnest", here is the solution: Two months after the birth of his fourth child on 30 August 1871 in Spring Grove, New Zealand, James Rutherford registered his son, who was recorded as "Earnest" in the Birth Register. Presumably the Registrar wrote the name down as it sounded and the father failed to notice the mistake when signing the Register.

  15. Ernest Rutherford: scientist supreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. [Physics Department, University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    1998-09-01

    One hundred years ago this month, Ernest Rutherford a talented young New Zealander who had just spent three years as a postgraduate student in Britain left for Canada, where he was to do the work that won him a Nobel prize. All three countries can justifiably claim this great scientist as their own. Ernest Rutherford is one of the most illustrious scientists that the world has ever seen. He achieved enduring international fame because of an incredibly productive life, during which he altered our view of nature on three separate occasions. Combining brilliantly conceived experiments with much hard work and special insight, he explained the perplexing problem of naturally occurring radioactivity, determined the structure of the atom, and was the world's first successful alchemist, changing nitrogen into oxygen. Rutherford received a Nobel prize for the first discovery, but the other two would have been equally worthy candidates, had they been discovered by someone else. Indeed, any one of his other secondary achievements many of which are now almost forgotten would have been enough to bring fame to a lesser scientist. For example, he invented an electrical method for detecting individual ionizing radiations, he dated the age of the Earth, and briefly held the world record for the distance over which wireless waves could be detected. He predicted the existence of neutrons, he oversaw the development of large-scale particle accelerators, and, during the First World War, he led the allied research into the detection of submarines. In this article the author describes the life and times of Ernest Rutherford. (UK)

  16. 27 CFR 9.133 - Rutherford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rutherford. 9.133 Section... Rutherford. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rutherford.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Rutherford viticultural area...

  17. A Rutherford Scattering Simulation with Microcomputer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Wright, Lavonia F.

    1989-01-01

    Lists a program for a simulation of Rutherford's gold foil experiment in BASIC for both Apple II and IBM compatible computers. Compares Rutherford's model of the atom with Thompson's plum pudding model of the atom. (MVL)

  18. The Spatial Distribution and Morphology of Supported Nanocatalysts using Rutherford-Scattered Electron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Pratibha; Midgley, Paul; Weyland, Matthew; Thomas, John; Boyes, Edward

    2003-03-01

    Back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging, combined with scanning transmission electron microscopic (STEM) high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, both using Rutherford-scattered electrons, are ideal in recording images of supported nanocatalysts. The incoherent scattering process ensures that images are ideal for electron tomography and the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) nanocatalyst distribution such as Pd on carbon.

  19. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance…

  20. Rutherford, Maestro of the Atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John (University of Canterbury, New Zealand)

    2003-12-10

    This talk will cover some of the lesser known aspects of Rutherford's work, including his early work in wireless signaling and his later encouragement of radio studies of the ionosphere, the development of what was later improved to be now called the Geiger-Muller tube, his acoustic work for submarine detection during the First World War, the development of particle accelerators and the race to splitting the atom, the first use of coincidence detectors, and why he received just one Nobel Prize.

  1. Rutherford's curriculum vitae, 1894-1907.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M

    1995-06-01

    A single page, handwritten document was discovered when the Macdonald Physics building of McGill University in Montreal was gutted in 1978. This proved to be the draft of Ernest Rutherford's curriculum vitae (C.V.) covering the years 1894-1907, probably written in the autumn of 1906 when Rutherford was preparing to leave McGill. The C.V. contains 21 headings in chronological order, referring to research and other activities of Rutherford and his coauthors (especially Soddy and Barnes), plus a further set of headings relating to the associated investigations of Rutherford's team, including Eve and Hahn. A transcript of the document is provided, although in several places, Rutherford's handwriting is difficult to interpret, and the significance of his abbreviations is not always clear. Each of the items in the C.V. is discussed briefly in this review, in the light both of Rutherford's personal career and of the contribution of his team to the development and understanding of radioactivity. This contribution included the cause and nature of radioactivity (with Soddy), energy aspects of radioactive decay (with Barnes), elucidation of the uranium-radium, thorium and actinium series (Godlewski and Hahn), the radioactivity of the earth and atmosphere (Eve), the nature of the gamma rays (Eve) and, perhaps most important of all, the nature and properties of the alpha particle (Rutherford himself). The latter investigations led directly to Rutherford's later work in Manchester, including the nuclear model of the atom and artificial disintegration of the nucleus.

  2. Cyclotrons: 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.A. (comp.)

    1978-01-01

    A compilation is presented of the experimental facilities of the world's cyclotrons including history and status, staff and operation, research staff, target facilities, magnet, acceleration system, vacuum system, characteristic beams, beam properties, and a plan view of the facility for each cyclotron. (GHT)

  3. Rutherford, Radioactivity, and the Atomic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Modern atomic and nuclear physics took its start in the early part of the twentieth century, to a large extent based upon experimental investigations of radioactive phenomena. Foremost among the pioneers of the new kind of physics was Ernest Rutherford, who made fundamental contributions to the structure of matter for more than three decades and, in addition, founded important research schools in Manchester and Cambridge. This paper reviews the most important aspects of Rutherford's scientific work in the period from about 1900 to 1920, and it also refers to some of his last experiments of the 1930s. The emphasis is on his theory of radioactive disintegration (1902), the discovery of the atomic nucleus (1911), and the first artificially produced element transformation (1919). Following the transmutation experiments, Rutherford developed elaborate models of the atomic nucleus, but these turned out to be unsuccessful. Other subjects could be included, but the three mentioned are undoubtedly those of the greates...

  4. Medical cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A P

    1976-01-01

    Cyclotrons as tools for therapy and for the production of radionuclides for use in nuclear medicine have been extensively reviewed in the literature. The current world status with respect to cyclotrons used primarily for research, development and application in nuclear medicine is reviewed here in the context of geographical distribution and type of use, presently available commercial types, machine characteristics and trends. Aspects of design requirements from a user perspective such as machine, beam and target characteristics are covered. Some special problems concerning many factors which can lead to effective production of the desired radionuclide or product are considered in light of machine characteristics. Consideration is also given to future directions for accelerators in nuclear medicine.

  5. Secret in the Margins: Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevgi; Hanuscin, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a lesson that uses the 5E Learning Cycle to help students not only understand the atomic model but also how Ernest Rutherford helped develop it. The lesson uses Rutherford's gold foil experiment to focus on three aspects of the nature of science: the empirical nature of science, the tentativeness of scientific…

  6. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Just over one hundred years ago, Ernest Rutherford presented an interpretation of alpha-particle scattering experiments, performed a couple of years earlier by Geiger and Marsden, to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. The work was summarised shortly afterwards in a paper in the Philosophical Magazine. He postulated that a dense speck of matter must exist at the centre of an atom (later to become known as the nucleus) if the details of the experiments, particularly the yield of alpha particles scattered through large angles, were to be explained. The nuclear hypothesis, combined with the experimental work by Moseley on X-rays and Bohr's theoretical ideas, both also initiated at the Victoria University of Manchester, established our view of atomic structure and gave birth to the field of nuclear physics. The Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics was held at The University of Manchester in August 2011 to celebrate this anniversary by addressing the wide range of contemporary topics that characterise modern nuclear physics. This set of proceedings covers areas including nuclear structure and astrophysics, hadron structure and spectroscopy, fundamental interactions studied within the nucleus and results of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank all those who presented their recent research results at the conference; the proceedings stand as a testament to the excitement and interest that still pervades the pursuit of this field of physics. We would also like to thank those who contributed in other ways to the conference. To colleagues at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry for putting together an exhibition to coincide with the conference that included the manuscript of the 1911 paper, letters, notebooks and equipment used by Rutherford. These items were kindly loaned by Cambridge and Manchester Universities. Winton Capital generously supported this exhibition. We would also like to thank Professor Mary Fowler

  7. CERN celebrates the ‘Rutherford centenary’

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    CERN marked the centenary of the discovery of the atomic nucleus, as published in Ernest Rutherford’s famous paper of 1911, with its Rutherford Centennial Colloquium, held on 15 November in the presence of John Adank, New Zealand’s ambassador to the World Trade Organization in Geneva. After an introduction by CERN’s director-general, Rolf Heuer, the speakers covered topics ranging from Rutherford’s early life in New Zealand, presented by his great grand-daughter Mary Fowler, through to his role as an inspiration to young scientists in his homeland, as seen by New Zealander Mark Kruse, who is now at Duke University and a member of the ATLAS collaboration. Fellow New Zealander, John Campbell, spoke about Rutherford’s road to discovery of the nuclear atom. Rutherford’s scientific legacy in nuclear physics was covered by Sean Freeman, appropriately from Manchester University, where the famous scattering experiment took place. Jerome Friedman delved deeper into matter with his talk detailing the scatt...

  8. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  9. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Rutherford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Rutherford County, TN. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  10. On the Rutherford-Santilli neutron model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burande, Chandrakant S. [Vilasrao Deshmukh College of Engineering and Technology, Mouda, India-441104, Email: csburande@gmail.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    In 1920 H. Rutherford conjectured that the first particle synthesized in stars is neutron from a proton and an electron after which all known matter is progressively synthesized. However, Pauli objected Rutherford’s version of neutron synthesis because inability to represent spin 1/2 of the neutron. Using this objection E. Fermi proposed emission of massless particle, called “neutrino”. However, Santilli has dismissed the neutrino hypothesis following certain ambiguities such as positive binding energy required in synthesis of neutron. He found that celebrated Schrödinger’s equation of quantum physics is not suitable for obtaining positive binding energy for bound state at the dimension of 10{sup −13}cm. In order to remove these shortcomings, Santilli has developed isomathematics and then hadronic mechanics, which allowed the time invariant representation of Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian interactions as needed for the neutron synthesis (see for example: References cited at [1]).Thus the anomalies pertaining to the binding energy, the spin and the magnetic moment got resolved. He successfully calculated missing positive binding energy via isonormalization of the mass for electron when totally immersed within the hyper-dense medium inside the proton. Considering Rutherford’s compression of the isoelectron within the proton in the singlet coupling, he also identified the spin 1/2 for neutron and calculated the magnetic moment of the neutron. In order to verify his logical concept, he repeated the Don Carlo Borghi experiment of synthesis of the neutron from proton and electrons and verified that the said setup indeed produces neutron-type particles called “neutroids” which latter is absorbed by the activated detector substances that produces known nuclear reactions. He dismissed the neutrino hypothesis and replaced it with a longitudinal impulse originating from the ether as a universal substratum, named, “etherino”. He pointed out that all the

  11. Traffic modifications on Routes Rutherford, Democrite and Fermi

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The GS Department would like to inform you that until the end of December, the construction of Building 245 will result in the following traffic modifications: Traffic on Route Rutherford will be partially restricted in front of the construction site, Traffic on Route Democrite will be one-way towards Route Rutherford. Also, please note that due to construction work in front of Building 377, Route Fermi will be closed from Wednesday, 10 June until Friday, 7 August. Thank you for your understanding.

  12. STUDY OF Ag DIFFUSION INTO Cu SINGLE CRYSTALS BY RUTHERFORD BACKSCATTERING SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Wang

    2003-01-01

    4. 0Me V 7 Li++ RBS was used for investigations of thermal diffusion of Ag in Cu single crystals. The annealing of samples was carried out in vacuum in the temperature range from 498K to 613K. The element depth concentration profiles transformed fiom RBS spectra indicate that the diffusion of Ag into Cu is a typical volume diffusion. The Arrhenius parameters corresponding to the diffusion were obtained.

  13. Determination of nitrogen content in thick TiN layers by proton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havranek, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Kvitek, J. (Nuclear Physics Inst., Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Rez (Czechoslovakia)); Musil, J.; Poulek, V. (Inst. of Physics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1990-06-01

    Non-Rutherford proton backscattering has been employed for the determination of the nitrogen content in TiN layers of a thickness of several micrometres deposited on a steel backing. The required proton scattering cross section has been measured using standards comprising thin TiN films on a light substrate. The scattering cross section of 2 MeV protons of nitrogen for {theta}{sub lab}=160deg was found to be 5.7 times the Rutherford value. Nitrogen detection limits in thick TiN samples are discussed. (orig.).

  14. Traffic modifications on Routes Rutherford, Democrite and Fermi

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The GS Department would like to inform you that, until the end of December, the construction of Building 245 will result in the following traffic modifications: Traffic on Route Rutherford will be partially restricted in front of the construction site, Traffic on Route Democrite will be one-way towards Route Rutherford. Also, please note that due to construction work in front of Building 377, Route Fermi will be closed from Wednesday, 10 June until Friday, 7 August. Thank you for your understanding.

  15. Alfven cyclotron instability and ion cyclotron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional solutions of compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) are studied in the cold plasma approximation. For finite inverse aspect ratio tokamak plasmas the two-dimensional eigenmode envelope is localized at the low magnetic field side with the radial and poloidal localization on the order of a/{radical}m and a/(fourth root of m), respectively, where m is the dominant poloidal mode number. Charged fusion product driven Alfven Cyclotron Instability (ACI) of the compressional Alfven eigenmodes provides the explanation for the ion cyclotron emission (ICE) spectrum observed in tokamak experiments. The ACI is excited by fast charged fusion products via Doppler shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonances. The ion cyclotron and electron Landau dampings and fast particle instability drive are calculated perturbatively for deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas. Near the plasma edge at the low field side the velocity distribution function of charged fusion products is localized in both pitch angle and velocity. The poloidal localization of the eigenmode enhances the ACI growth rates by a factor of {radical}m in comparison with the previous results without poloidal envelope. The thermal ion cyclotron damping determines that only modes with eigenfrequencies at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of the background ions can be easily excited and form an ICE spectrum similar to the experimental observations. Theoretical understanding is given for the results of TFTR DD and DT experiments with {upsilon}{sub {alpha}0}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 1 and JET experiments with {upsilon}{sub {alpha}0}/{upsilon}{sub A} > 1.

  16. Coupling currents in Rutherford cables under time varying conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, A.P.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    1993-01-01

    A network model is presented to simulate fully transposed Rutherford cables under time varying conditions. The intrinsic properties of the cable and the external applied conditions can be changed spatially. Several statistical distributions of the contact resistances are built in to investigate loca

  17. Experimenting from a Distance in the Case of Rutherford Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grober, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H. -J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and…

  18. Dark energy and the Rutherford-Soddy radiative decay law

    CERN Document Server

    Bento, M C

    2009-01-01

    It is argued that a putative evolution of the fundamental couplings of strong and weak interactions via coupling to dark energy through a generalized Bekenstein-type model may, for a linear model of variation, cause deviations on the statistical nuclear decay Rutherford-Soddy law unless bounds are imposed on the parameters of this variation.

  19. Ion Temperature-Measurements in Tokamak Plasmas by Rutherford Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanblokland, A. A. E.; Barbian, E. P.; Donne, A. J. H.; van der Grift, A. F.; Grimbergen, T. W. M.; Oyevaar, T.; Schüller, F. C.; Tammen, H. F.; Vanderven, H. W.; Vijverberg, T. F.; Dewinter, F. D. A.; Bertschinger, G.; Cosler, A.; Korten, M.

    1992-01-01

    A Rutherford scattering diagnostic has been applied at the TEXTOR tokamak to obtain spatially and temporally resolved information on the temperature of the bulk ions in the plasma. In the experimental setup, a helium atomic beam (30-keV, 12-mA equivalent current) passes vertically through the plasma

  20. High resolution backscattering studies of nanostructured magnetic and semiconducting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: afonseca@itn.pt; Franco, N. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Leitao, J.P. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sobolev, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Banhart, D.F. [Z. E. Elektronenmikroskopie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Presting, H. [Daimler-Chrysler Forschungszentrum, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Ulyanov, V.V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, A.I. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-15

    Low dimension structures raises inevitably new technological challenges in materials science. The new structures must fulfill stringent requirements in composition, crystalline quality and interface sharpness among others. We present and discuss the results of Si/Ge quantum structures and FePt/C multilayer structures deposited at different temperatures by ion beam sputtering. Evidence for the presence of FePt nanoparticles embedded in the C matrix and Ge islands in Ge/Si multilayers structures was found. Size and stoichiometry of the nanoparticles and the multilayer periodicity was obtained using Rutherford backscattering at grazing angles of incidence. The strain state of the single crystalline layers was determined by tilt axis channelling.

  1. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Henry [Texas A& M University; Yennello, Sherry [Texas A& M University; Tribble, Robert [Texas A& M University

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  2. Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic coil which forms the first section of the proton extraction channel in the improved synchro-cyclotron. The photograph shows the positioning gear and the current septum. An extraction efficiency above 50% is expected.

  3. The new cyclotrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawson, J D

    1966-01-01

    Article describing how valuable scientific work can still be carried out with the smaller energy cyclotrons such as those at the Radiochemical Centre, Amersham and the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell (2 pages).

  4. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  5. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  6. Alexander Cameron Rutherford: A Gentleman and a Scholar. Documents in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about Alexander Cameron Rutherford, a provincial politician. Includes a letter written by Rutherford in 1912 that provides insights into his responsibilities to the general public, information about Rutherford himself, the economic conditions of Alberta, Canada in 1912, and information about the individual to whom it was…

  7. Clinical characteristics of patients with Rutherford category IV, compared with V and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketsugu Tsuchiya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients categorized Rutherford category IV might have different characteristics compared with Rutherford category V and VI. Our study aims were to estimate the clinical differences between Rutherford category IV and Rutherford category V and VI, for those underwent endovascular therapy for isolated infrapopliteal disease, and also to find risk factors for endovascular therapy in Rutherford category IV. Methods: Based on the Japanese multi-center registry data, 1091 patients with 1332 limbs (Rutherford category IV: 226 patients with 315 limbs, Rutherford category V and VI: 865 patients with 1017 limbs were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Patients’ backgrounds and lesions’ characteristics had significant differences. Both freedom rate from major adverse limb event with perioperative death and amputation-free survival rate at 1 year were better in Rutherford category IV than Rutherford category V and VI (93.6% vs 78.3%, 87.7% vs 66.7% and those maintained to 3 years (p  3.0 mg/dL, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary artery disease in Rutherford category IV. Conclusion: From the present results, Rutherford category IV should be recognized to have quite different backgrounds and better outcome from Rutherford category V and VI.

  8. Science & Society: The search for the real Earnest Rutherford*

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Every physicist knows the name Rutherford who radically altered our understanding of nature on three separate occasions. Through brilliantly conceived experiments, and with special insight, he explained the perplexing problem of radioactivity as the spontaneous disintegration of atoms (they were not necessarily stable entities as had been assumed since the time of the ancient Greeks), he determined the structure of the atom and he was the world's first successful alchemist (he converted nitrogen into oxygen). This talk given by John Campbell, however, will cover some of the lesser known aspects of Rutherford's work, including his early wireless signalling, development of what was later improved to be now called the Geiger-Muller tube, his acoustic work for submarine detection during the First World War, the development of particle accelerators and the race to use them, the first use of a coincidence detector, and why he received just one Nobel Prize. Dr Campbell, a condensed matter physicist at the Universi...

  9. A continuum model for current distribution in Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmedov, A I; Breschi, M

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of eddy currents induced in flat Rutherford-type cables by external time dependent magnetic fields has been performed. The induced currents generate in turn a secondary magnetic field which has a longitudinal periodicity (periodic pattern). The dependence of the amplitude of the pattern on the history of the cable excitation has been investigated. The study has been carried out with two different models for the simulation of current distribution in Rutherford cables, namely a network model, based on a lumped parameters circuit and a "continuum" model, based on a distributed parameters circuit. We show the results of simulations of the current distribution in the inner cable of a short LHC dipole model in different powering conditions and compare them to experimental data. (12 refs).

  10. Design, processing, and properties of Bi 2212\\/Ag Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Collings, E W; Scanlan, R M; Dietderich, D R; Motowidlo, L R; Sokolowski, R S; Aoki, Y; Hasegawa, T

    1999-01-01

    In a program intended to explore the use of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) cables in high field synchrotron dipole magnets model Bi:2212/Ag Rutherford cables were designed bearing in mind the needs for mechanical integrity, relatively high tensile strength, and low coupling losses. To satisfy these needs a core-type cable design was selected and a readily available heat-resistant core material acquired. Cables were wound for critical current- and AC loss measurement. Both winding-induced (mechanical) and core-induced (chemical) critical current degradation was examined. Interstrand coupling loss was measured calorimetrically on model cable samples with bare- and oxide-coated cores. From the results it was predicted that the losses of full-scale Bi:2212/Ag-wound LHC-type Rutherford cables would fall close to the acceptability range for the windings of high-field accelerator dipoles. (10 refs).

  11. Inflation and Cyclotron Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Greensite, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that conditions on the flatness of the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field.

  12. Upgrading Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Final touches to the central region of SC2, the refurbished 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron, before the start of commissioning. Modifications included a new type of ion source at the centre. Protons were first accelerated in SC2 at full energy by October 1974. (See photo 7408042X)

  13. Electron-Cyclotron Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1994-01-01

    The essential elements of the theory of electron cyclotron waves are reviewed, The two main electro-magnetic modes of propagation are identified and their dispersion and absorption properties are discussed. The importance of the use of the relativistic resonance condition is stressed.

  14. Experimenting from a distance in the case of Rutherford scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H.-J.

    2010-07-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and can be operated by a computer via the Internet. We present results of measurements and supplementary didactical material. In addition, we make suggestions on how to use the RCL in class and we describe the added value of performing this experiment as an RCL.

  15. Strand critical current degradation in $Nb_{3}$ Sn Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Barzi, E; Higley, H C; Scanlan, R M; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fermilab is developing 11 Tesla superconducting accelerator magnets based on Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor. Multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn strands produced using the modified jelly roll, internal tin, and powder-in-tube technologies were used for the development and test of the prototype cable. To optimize the cable geometry with respect to the critical current, short samples of Rutherford cable with packing factors in the 85 to 95% range were fabricated and studied. In this paper, the results of measurements of critical current, n-value and RRR made on the round virgin strands and on the strands extracted from the cable samples are presented. (5 refs).

  16. Calculation of minimum quench energies in Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M N

    1996-01-01

    The Minimum Quench Energy MQE of a conductor may give some indication about the likelihood of training in magnets. We have used a numerical solution of the heat flow equation to calculate the MQE of a single superconducting wire and have found the results to be in good agreement with experiment. This model was then extended to an approximate representation of Rutherford cable by including current and heat transfer between strands. Reasonable agreement with experiment has been found, although in some cases it appears that the effective thermal contact between strands is greater than expected from electrical resistance measurements.

  17. The collected papers of Lord Rutherford of Nelson

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes which together contain the complete range of Lord Rutherford's scientific papers, incorporating in addition addresses, general lectures, letters to editors, accounts of his scientific work and personal recollections by friends and colleagues. The final volume, first published in 1965, covers his period as Cavendish Professor from 1919 to 1937. Following on the immense fertility of his years in Manchester - only overshadowed towards the end by the war - we now turn to his last years as a world figure at the Cavendish Laboratory, where he continued his work on

  18. The collected papers of Lord Rutherford of Nelson

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    1962-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes which together contain the complete range of Lord Rutherford's scientific papers, incorporating in addition addresses, general lectures, letters to editors, accounts of his scientific work and personal recollections by friends and colleagues. The final volume, first published in 1965, covers his period as Cavendish Professor from 1919 to 1937. Following on the immense fertility of his years in Manchester - only overshadowed towards the end by the war - we now turn to his last years as a world figure at the Cavendish Laboratory, where he continued his work on

  19. FEM Analysis of Nb-Sn Rutherford-type Cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Gallo, Giuseppe; Neri, Paolo; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    An important part of superconducting accelerator magnet work is the conductor. To produce magnetic fields larger than 10 T, brittle conductors are typically used. For instance, for Nb{sub 3}Sn the original round wire, in the form of a composite of Copper, Niobium and Tin, is assembled into a so-called Rutherford-type cable, which is used to wind the magnet. The magnet is then subjected to a high temperature heat treatment to produce the chemical reactions that make the material superconducting. At this stage the superconductor is brittle and its superconducting properties sensitive to strain. This work is based on the development of a 2D finite element model, which simulates the mechanical behavior of Rutherford-type cable before heat treatment. The model was applied to a number of different cable architectures. To validate a critical criterion adopted into the single Nb-Sn wire analysis, the results of the model were compared with those measured experimentally on cable cross sections.

  20. GLOBE backscatter - Climatologies and mission results. [Global Backscatter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) goals require intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at IR wavelengths. Airborne and ground-based lidars have been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. Descriptions of the calibration techniques and selected measurement results are presented.

  1. Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristina

    2009-11-01

    There is much interest in studying plasmas that generate hot electrons. The goal of this project is to develop a wide band electron cyclotron radiometer to measure the non-Maxwellian rapid rises in electron temperature. These rapid increases in temperature will then be correlated to instabilities in the plasma. This project explores a type of noncontact temperature measurement. We will attempt to show the feasibility of electron cyclotron emissions to measure the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment's electron plasma temperature. The radiometer has been designed to have 100dB of gain and a sensitivity of 24mV/dB given by its logarithmic amplifier. If successful, this radiometer will be used as a diagnostic tool in later projects such as the proposed experiment studying magnetic reconnection using solar flux loops.

  2. Cyclotron Line Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    We systematically analyzed the spectra of X-ray binary pulsars observed with GINGA (Mihara 1995). A new model NPEX (Negative and Positive power-laws EXponential) was introduced t o represent the pulsar continuum. Combining the NPEX continuum with the CYAB factor (cyclotron resonance scattering model), we successfully fit the whole-band spectra of all the pulsars. A possible physical meaning of the NPEX model is the Comptonized spectra. By using the smooth and concave NPEX model, the cyclotron structures were detected from 12 pulsars, about a half of the 23 sources, including new discoveries from LMC X-4 and GS 1843+00. The magnetic fields were scattered in the range of $3\\times10^{11}$ - $5\\times10^{12}$ G. The distribution was shown for the first time, which is remarkably similar to that of radio pulsars with a peak at $2 \\times 10^{12}$ G. The double harmonic cyclotron structures of 4U 0115+63 in 1990 changed to a sin gle structure in 1991. The resonance energy also increased by 40 % as the luminosity decre...

  3. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  4. Thin film depth profiling using simultaneous particle backscattering and nuclear resonance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, N. P.; Mateus, R.; Fonseca, M.; Reis, M. A.; Lorenz, K.; Vickridge, I.

    2010-06-01

    We report an important extension to the DataFurnace code for Ion Beam Analysis which allows users to simultaneously and self-consistently analyse Rutherford (RBS) or non-Rutherford (EBS) elastic backscattering together with particle-induced gamma-ray (PIGE) spectra. We show that the code works correctly with a well-known sample. Previously it has not been feasible to self-consistently treat PIGE and RBS/EBS data to extract the depth profiles. The PIGE data can be supplied to the code in the usual way as counts versus beam energy, but the differential cross-sections for the PIGE reaction are required. We also compared the results obtained by the new routine with high resolution narrow resonance profiling (NRP) simulations obtained with the stochastic model of energy loss.

  5. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  6. 77 FR 61653 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Smyrna-Rutherford County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Smyrna-Rutherford County Airport, Smyrna, TN AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... the release of land at the Smyrna-Rutherford County Airport, Smyrna, Tennessee. This property... review at the Smyrna--Rutherford County Airport, 278 Doug Warpoole Road, Smyrna, Tennessee 37167 and...

  7. Development of scaling rules for Rutherford type superconducting cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royet, J.M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1990-09-01

    During the R D phase of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) program, LBL was responsible for establishing the parameters for cables used in SSC dipole and quadrupole magnets. In addition, the design and fabrication of a new cable for use in the Low Beta Quadrupoles. As a result of the development work on these and other cables, we have arrived a set of scaling rules which provide guidelines for choosing the parameters for a wide range of superconducting cables. These parameters include strand size, strand number, keystone angle, percent compaction, cable pitch and compacted cable dimensions. In addition, we have defined the tolerance ranges for the key cable manufacturing parameters such as mandrel size and shape, stand tension, and Turkshead temperature control. In this paper, we present the results on cables ranging from 8 strands to 36 strands of 0.65mm wire and from 8 strands to 30 strands of 0.8mm wire. We use these results to demonstrate the application of the scaling rules for Rutherford-type cable.

  8. Napa River Restoration Project: Rutherford Reach Completion and Oakville to Oak Knoll Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Napa River Restoration Project: Rutherford Reach Completion/Oakville to Oak Knoll, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  9. Rutherford's Enlarged: A Content-Embedded Activity To Teach about Nature of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity that can be used to help middle and secondary school students develop more informed understandings of some important aspects of the nature of science in the context of teaching Rutherford's experiments and atomic structure. (Author/MM)

  10. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J. [eds.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  11. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  12. Spiral Inflector For Compact Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Karamysheva, G A

    2004-01-01

    Compact cyclotron for explosives detection by nuclear resonance absorption of γ-rays in nitrogen is under development [1] Cyclotron will be equipped with the external ion source. The injection system consists of a double-drift beam bunching system, a spiral inflector, beam diagnostics, focusing and adjustment elements [2]. The spiral inflector for ion bending from axial to median plane is used. Computer model of spiral inflector for the Customs cyclotron is developed. 3D electrostatic field calculations of the designed inflector are performed. Calculated electric field map and magnetic field map of the cyclotron [3] are used for beam dynamic simulations. Numeric simulations are carried out for 500 particles using code for calculation of particle dynamics by integration of differential equations in Cartesian coordinate system written in MATLAB. Direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method is used to take into account space-charge effects.

  13. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility (ICR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — his facility is charged with developing and exploiting the unique capabilities of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and leads the...

  14. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  15. Collective stimulated Brillouin backscatter

    CERN Document Server

    Lushnikov, Pavel M

    2007-01-01

    We develop the statistical theory of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) instability of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. Instability is collective because it does not depend on the dynamics of isolated speckles of laser intensity, but rather depends on averaged beam intensity. We identify convective and absolute instability regimes. Well above the incoherent threshold the coherent instability growth rate is recovered. The threshold of convective instability is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF) designs although current NIF bandwidth is not large enough to insure dominance of collective instability and suggests lower instability threshold due to speckle contribution. In contrast, we estimate that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be larg...

  16. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  17. Cyclotron resonant interactions in cosmic particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Terasawa, T; 10.1007/s11214-012-9878-0

    2012-01-01

    A review is given for cyclotron resonant interactions in space plasmas. After giving a simple formulation for the test particle approach, illustrative examples for resonant interactions are given. It is shown that for obliquely propagating whistler waves, not only fundamental cyclotron resonance, but also other resonances, such as transit-time resonance, anomalous cyclotron resonance, higher-harmonic cyclotron resonance, and even subharmonic resonance can come into play. A few recent topics of cyclotron resonant interactions, such as electron injection in shocks, cyclotron resonant heating of solar wind heavy ions, and relativistic modifications, are also reviewed.

  18. CSIR cyclotron modified for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Accelerator Centre (NAC) staff members will be making an important contribution to radiation therapy in South Africa when the Transvaal Department of Hospital Services starts treating certain types of cancer with fast neutrons, at the Pretoria Cyclotron on the CSIR campus. The fast neutrons will be utilized mainly to treat advanced cancers of the head and the neck. The project will develop along two lines. Firstly the Pretoria cyclotron must be modified and secondly satisfactory radiobiological data must be provided before patients may be treated. This radiobiological experiment heralds a new area for use of the cyclotron which has thus far been used mainly for basic nuclear research and the production of isotopes.

  19. Use of cyclotrons in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, S.M. E-mail: s.m.qaim@fz-juelich.de

    2004-11-01

    Cyclotrons are versatile ion-accelerating machines which find many applications in medicine. In this short review their use in hadron therapy is briefly discussed. Proton therapy is gaining significance because of its capability to treat deep-lying tumours. A strong area of application of cyclotrons involves the production of short-lived neutron deficient radiotracers for use in emission tomography, especially positron emission tomography. This fast and quantitative in vivo diagnostic technique is being increasingly used in neurology, cardiology and oncology. Besides routine patient care, considerable interdisciplinary work on development of new positron emitters is under way. A short account of those efforts is given. The use of cyclotrons in the production of radionuclides for internal radiotherapy is also briefly described.

  20. Rutherford cable made of single-core MgB2 wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, L.; Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Melišek, T.

    2013-12-01

    A flexible Rutherford cable stranded from twelve single-core MgB2 wires has been made. Individual MgB2/Ti/Cu/Monel strands of the cable were prepared by wire drawing down to an outer diameter of 300 μm. The strands were wound into the rectangular Rutherford-type cable with the aid of a back-twist cabling machine. The transposition length of the cable, shaped into the final overall dimensions of 0.54 mm × 2 mm, is 20 mm. In order to analyse the electrical and mechanical properties, short specimens of a heat-treated reference sample (as-drawn wire), wire strand extracted from the cable, as well as Rutherford cable specimens were prepared and measured. It was found that final cold forming of the cable by a rolling die increased the critical current density of individual strands by 65% in comparison to drawn ones. Consequently, the critical current of the Rutherford cable is considerably higher than the 12Ic of the reference sample. Bending stress applied to the Rutherford cable has shown that critical current degradation starts below a diameter of 35 mm, which suggests using the cable for the construction of small-scale windings and applications where low bending diameters are required.

  1. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seok; Chai, Jong Seo; Bak, Seong Ki; Park, Chan Won; Jo, Young Ho; Hong, Seong Seok; Lee, Min Yong; Jang Ho Ha

    2000-01-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-50 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-60{mu}A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23 days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed.

  2. Detection of Coaxial Backscattered Electrons in SEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We present a coaxial detection of the backscattered electrons in SEM. The lens-aperture has been used to filter in energy and focus the backscattered electrons. This particular geometry allows us to eliminate the iow energy backscattered electrons and collect the backscattered electrons, which are backscattered close to the incident beam orientation. The main advantage of this geometry is adapted to topographic contrast attenuation and atomic number contrast enhancement. Thus this new SEM is very suitable to analyze the material composition.

  3. Photonic Rutherford Scattering: A Classical and Quantum Mechanical Analogy in Ray- and Wave-Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Selmke, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Using Fermat's least optical path principle the family of ray-trajectories through a special but common type of a gradient refractive index lens, n(r)=n_0+\\Delta n R/r, is solved analytically. The solution, i.e. the ray-equation r(phi), is shown to be closely related to the famous Rutherford scattering and therefore termed photonic Rutherford scattering. It is shown that not only do these classical limits correspond, but also the wave-mechanical pictures coincide: The time-independent Schr\\"odingier equation and the inhomogeneous Helmholz equation permit the same mapping between massive particle scattering and diffracted optical scalar waves. Scattering of narrow wave-packets finally recovers the classical trajectories. The analysis suggests that photothermal single particle microscopy infact measures photonic Rutherford scattering in specific limits.

  4. Ion sources for cyclotron applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; McDonald, D.S.; Young, A.T.

    1992-07-01

    The use of a multicusp plasma generator as an ion source has many advantages. The development of both positive and negative ion beams based on the multicusp source geometry is presented. It is shown that these sources can be operated at steady state or cw mode. As a result they are very suitable for cyclotron operations.

  5. Status report on cyclotron operation

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, P; Ander, I; Lakatos, T; Fenyvesi, A; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Tarkanyi, F

    2003-01-01

    The operation of the cyclotron in 2002 was concentrated to 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4084 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 15 hours last year. In order to improve the circumstances of the irradiations, several following improvements were done. (R.P.)

  6. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density.

  7. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. Clark (Inventor); Whitaker, Ross (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  8. Physics for Teachers: Understanding Physics: David Cassidy, Gerald Holton, & James Rutherford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubisz, John L.

    2009-11-01

    Physics for Teachers: Understanding Physics, by David Cassidy, Gerald Holton, & James Rutherford and published by Springer Verlag, New York, NY 10010 (2002), pp. xxiii + 851 80.00 hardback. ISBN 0-387-98756-8. Student Guide & Instructor Guide are also available. The text and Instructor Guide are available online at http://www.dcassidybooks.com/up.html

  9. Turning Plastic into Gold: An Analogy to Demonstrate The Rutherford Gold Foil Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    The Rutherford-Geiger-Marsden gold foil experiment is demonstrated to give students a useful mental image of the concept or principle of chemistry. The experiment shows students that in a short time one unexpected result can change the way science looks at the world.

  10. Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center Library and Archives: Patron Use of Collections and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Myrna J.

    The Rutherford B. Hayes Library opened in 1916, when the building in Fremont, Ohio was dedicated as the first presidential library and museum. The library's original purpose was to preserve the 12,000 volume personal library of President Hayes along with archival material from his careers in law, the military, and politics. This was a radical idea…

  11. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  12. S.T.E.P. in Bay County. The Rutherford Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Environment Education.

    This document presents an explanation, illustration, and evaluation of a Students Toward Environmental Participation (S.T.E.P.) Project at Rutherford High School in Bay County, Florida. The main objective of this S.T.E.P. Project was to train high school students to teach environmental awareness activities to elementary students. This booklet…

  13. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  15. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    41 6.12 Geocoding ...47 7.6 Errors in Geocoding .............................................................................................................. 47...h = z - R cos6 (39a) and x = rt sin6. (39b) 6.12 Geocoding Acoustic backscatter imagery data are collected by recording the across-track signals

  16. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  17. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  18. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  19. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  20. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  1. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  2. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  3. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  4. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  5. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  6. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter E [Swath]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  8. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  9. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  10. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  12. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  14. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  15. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  17. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  18. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  19. Hanle effect in coherent backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Labeyrie, G; Müller, C A; Sigwarth, O; Delande, D; Kaiser, R

    2002-01-01

    We study the shape of the coherent backscattering (CBS) cone obtained when resonant light illuminates a thick cloud of laser-cooled rubidium atoms in presence of a homogenous magnetic field. We observe new magnetic field-dependent anisotropies in the CBS signal. We show that the observed behavior is due to the modification of the atomic radiation pattern by the magnetic field (Hanle effect in the excited state).

  20. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  1. submitter Optimization of Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford Cables Geometry for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fleiter, Jerome; Bonasia, Angelo; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2017-01-01

    The quadrupole and dipole magnets for the LHC High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade will be based on Nb3Sn Rutherford cables that operate at 1.9 K and experience magnetic fields of up to about 12 T. An important step in the design of these magnets is the development of the high aspect ratio Nb3Sn cables to achieve the nominal field with sufficient margin. The strong plastic deformation of unreacted $Nb_3Sn$ strands during the Rutherford cabling process may induce non negligible $I_c$ and RRR degradation. In this paper, the cabling degradation is investigated as a function of the cable geometry for both PIT and RRP conductors. Based on this analysis, new baseline geometries for both 11 T and QXF magnets of HL-LHC are proposed.

  2. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  3. Ion cyclotron waves at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    During the interaction of Titan's thick atmosphere with the ambient plasma, it was expected that ion cyclotron waves would be generated by the free energy of the highly anisotropic velocity distribution of the freshly ionized atmospheric particles created in the interaction. However, ion cyclotron waves are rarely observed near Titan, due to the long growth times of waves associated with the major ion species from Titan's ionosphere, such as CH4+ and N2+. In the over 100 Titan flybys obtained by Cassini to date, there are only two wave events, for just a few minutes during T63 flyby and for tens of minutes during T98 flyby. These waves occur near the gyrofrequencies of proton and singly ionized molecular hydrogen. They are left-handed, elliptically polarized, and propagate nearly parallel to the field lines. Hybrid simulations are performed to understand the wave growth under various conditions in the Titan environment. The simulations using the plasma and field conditions during T63 show that pickup protons with densities ranging from 0.01 cm-3 to 0.02 cm-3 and singly ionized molecular hydrogens with densities ranging from 0.015 cm-3 to 0.25 cm-3 can drive ion cyclotron waves with amplitudes of ~0.02 nT and of ~0.04 nT within appropriate growth times at Titan, respectively. Since the T98 waves were seen farther upstream than the T63 waves, it is possible that the instability was stronger and grew faster on T98 than T63.

  4. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  5. The Warsaw K=160 cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choinski, J.; Miszczak, J.; Sura, J.

    2001-12-01

    The overview of the Warsaw cyclotron facility is presented. The facility consists of K=160 cyclotron, 10 GHz ECR ion source, and several experimental stations. The cyclotron is of compact design with 2 straight dees. A yearly operation time is about 2900 hours on an average for the past few years. The cyclotron can deliver beams up to Ar with energy up to 10 MeV/amu to the experimental area. Experimental stations are: 1) The multidetector OSIRIS II, allows the study of exotic nuclei in the double magic 100Sn region. The experimental set-up consists of 8 HPGe detectors equipped with charged particle 4π multiplicity filter SiBall, 50 elements BGO γ-rays multiplicity filter, 4 sector polarimeter and electron conversion detector system. 2) CUDAC-Coulomb Universal Detector Scattering Chamber-an array of PIN-diodes in connection with HPGe detectors and the computer data analysis package GOSIA, maintained by the Laboratory allows investigation the Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) reactions. 3) IGISOL or Helium-jet transport system opened investigation of the reaction products by means of the online mass separator with ion-guide system. The system uses the Scandinavian-type mass separator built in INR Świerk, Poland. 4) Giant Dipole Resonance studies using experimental set-up JANOSIK developed for the detection of high-energy photons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. The set-up consists of a large NaI(Tl) detector (25 cm×29 cm) surrounded by shields: passive lead shield, active anticoincidence plastic shield and LiH shield to absorb neutrons, and a multiplicity filter of 32 small scintillator detectors (BaF2 and NaI(Tl)). 5) Laser spectroscopy stand now in test phase. The laser spectroscopy group at HIL has completed an equipment consisting of Argon ion Laser Innova 400-25W in all lines and coherent Ring Laser 669-21 as well as atomic beam apparatus.

  6. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  7. Developing the smallest possible medical cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a portable medical cyclotron operated in a conventional radioactive facility at a hospital. Imagine a nurse or technician switching it on and producing isotopes at the patient’s bedside. Sounds like science fiction? Think again.   CERN has teamed up with Spain’s national scientific research centre (CIEMAT) to develop an avant-garde cyclotron to be used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). “We plan to make a cyclotron that doesn't need an insulated building or ‘vault’: a cyclotron small enough to fit inside a hospital lift,” explains Jose Manuel Perez, who is leading the CIEMAT/CERN collaboration. “It will be the smallest possible medical cyclotron for single patient dose production and will dramatically reduce costs for hospitals.” While PET technology has transformed imaging techniques, many of its medical benefits have remained confined to highly specialised hospitals. “Studies have foun...

  8. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, His 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Why He Didn't Get a Second Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlskog, C

    2008-01-01

    "I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist." Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes. In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the "Theory of Everything"?

  9. Injection and extraction for cyclotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeven, W

    2006-01-01

    The main design goals for beam injection are explained and special problems related to a central region with internal ion source are considered. The principle of a PIG source is addressed. The issue of vertical focusing in the cyclotron centre is briefly discussed. Several examples of numerical simulations are given. Different ways of (axial) injection are briefly outlined. A proposal for a magnetostatic axial inflector is given. Different solutions for beam extraction are treated. These include the internal target, extraction by stripping, resonant extraction using a deflector and self-extraction. The different ways of creating a turn-separation are explained. The purpose of different types of extraction devices such as harmonic coils, deflectors and gradient corrector channels are outlined. Several illustrations are given in the form of photographs and drawings.

  10. Monte-Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons in Auger electron spectroscopy. Part 1: Backscattering factor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholomier, M.; Vicario, E.; Doghmane, N.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of backscattered electrons to Auger electrons yield was studied with a multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulation. The Auger backscattering factor has been calculated in the 5 keV-60 keV energy range. The dependence of the Auger backscattering factor on the primary energy and the beam incidence angle were determined. Spatial distributions of backscattered electrons and Auger electrons are presented for a point incident beam. Correlations between these distributions are briefly investigated.

  11. Cyclotron resonance absorption in ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena

    1991-04-01

    The mode conversion of ordinary polarized electromagnetic waves into electrostatic cyclotron waves in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. Near resonance the warm plasma dispersion relation is a function of the angle theta between the geomagnetic field and the density gradient and of the wave frequency omega, which lies between the electron cyclotron frequency and its doubling. The differential equations describing the electric field amplitudes near the plasma resonance are studied, including damping at the second gyroharmonic. The energy transmission coefficients and power absorbed by the cyclotron waves are calculated. The vertical penetration of the plasma wave amplitudes is estimated using a WKB analysis of the wave equation.

  12. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, J.R. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro de Astrofisica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito Libertador 441, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-11-15

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motions are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analyzed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys Rev D 85:024033, 2012), Olivares and Villanueva (Eur Phys J C 73:2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat Comp Appl Math 22:41-48, 2013; Serb Astron 190:41, 2015) for time-like geodesics. (orig.)

  13. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, J. R., E-mail: jose.villanuevalob@uv.cl [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile); Centro de Astrofísica de Valparaíso, Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile); Olivares, Marco, E-mail: marco.olivaresr@mail.udp.cl [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejército Libertador 441, Casilla 298–V, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-11-27

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons–Maeda–Garfinkle–Horowitz–Strominger black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motions are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analyzed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys Rev D 85:024033, 2012), Olivares and Villanueva (Eur Phys J C 73:2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat Comp Appl Math 22:41–48, 2013; Serb Astron 190:41, 2015) for time-like geodesics.

  14. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, J R

    2015-01-01

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motion are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analysed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys. Rev. D 85: 024033, 2012), Olivares & Villanueva (Eur. Phys. J. C 73: 2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat. Comp. Appl. Math. 22, 41 (2013); Serb. Astron. J. 190, 41 (2015)) for time-like geodesics.

  15. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma heating and non-inductive current drive by waves in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies are reviewed. Both theoretical aspects concerning wave properties, heating and current drive mechanisms, as well as the major experimental results are summarized.

  16. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  17. Shielding Design for a Medical Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Feng; SONG; Guo-fang; GUAN; Feng-ping; LV; Yin-long; ZHANG; Xing-zhi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A 10 MeV 100 μA medical cyclotron is constructed at CIAE which is used in the production of FDG. The energy of the cyclotron can reach 14 MeV by adjusting the magnetic field and RF system parameters, and the shielding design is in accordance with the 14 MeV beam energy. In this shielding design only neutron is considered, and the neutron source is produced by proton

  18. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  19. Small Signal Analysis of the Induced Resonance Electron Cyclotron Maser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-20

    Nazionale Energia Nucleare Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Centro di Frascati Chilton, Didcot C.P. 65 - 00044 Oxfordshire OX11 COX Frascati, Rome GREAT...Inst. di Fisica Sperimentale Kensington-Sydney Mostra d’Oltremare, Pad. 20 Australia 80125 Napoli, ITALY Dr. John D. Lawson Rutherford High Energy

  20. The use of electron Rutherford backscattering to characterize novel electronic materials as illustrated by a case study of sputter-deposited NbO{sub x} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M., E-mail: maarten.vos@anu.edu.au [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Liu, X. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Grande, P.L. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nandi, S.K. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Venkatachalam, D.K.; Elliman, R.G. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Electrons scattered over large angles at relatively high energies (40 keV) are used to study NbO{sub x} films. These films were deposited by reactive sputter deposition on a Si substrate using a Nb target and an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture. Energy spectra of electrons scattered from such samples exhibit elastic scattering peaks for each component due to the energy difference associated with scattering from different masses. The spectra provide in this way information about the film thickness as well as its stoichiometry. The stoichiometry and the deposition rate depends on the concentration of O{sub 2} in the mixture. For Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-like films the energy loss measurements also give an estimate of the band gap, but for Nb films with lower O concentration the band gap is not resolved. This work illustrates the possibility of characterizing modern transition metal oxide films in a fairly simple electron scattering experiment.

  1. Simulation of the cabling process for Rutherford cables: An advanced finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, J.; Garlasche, M.; Bordini, B.; Dallocchio, A.

    2016-12-01

    In all existing large particle accelerators (Tevatron, HERA, RHIC, LHC) the main superconducting magnets are based on Rutherford cables, which are characterized by having: strands fully transposed with respect to the magnetic field, a significant compaction that assures a large engineering critical current density and a geometry that allows efficient winding of the coils. The Nb3Sn magnets developed in the framework of the HL-LHC project for improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are also based on Rutherford cables. Due to the characteristics of Nb3Sn wires, the cabling process has become a crucial step in the magnet manufacturing. During cabling the wires experience large plastic deformations that strongly modify the geometrical dimensions of the sub-elements constituting the superconducting strand. These deformations are particularly severe on the cable edges and can result in a significant reduction of the cable critical current as well as of the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the stabilizing copper. In order to understand the main parameters that rule the cabling process and their impact on the cable performance, CERN has developed a 3D Finite Element (FE) model based on the LS-Dyna® software that simulates the whole cabling process. In the paper the model is presented together with a comparison between experimental and numerical results for a copper cable produced at CERN.

  2. Critical currents of Rutherford MgB2 cables compacted by two-axial rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, L.; Kováč, P.; Kulich, M.; Melišek, T.; Rindfleisch, M.; Yue, J.; Hušek, I.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of Rutherford cables made of two strand layers of commercial MgB2 wires manufactured by Hyper Tech Research, Inc. have been made. Flat rectangular cables consisting of 12 single-core MgB2/Nb/Cu10Ni, or 6-filaments MgB2/Nb/Cu strands, both of diameter 390 mewm, were assembled using a back-twist cabling machine with transposition length of 20 mm. In order to analyze impact of the cable compaction on critical currents, cables were two-axially rolled, each by a single step reduction of 3.5%-29.7% to thickness range of 0.775-0.62 mm. It was found that by increasing the packing factor (PF) of cable above 0.79, the critical current begins to increase. It is improved nearly two times up to the PF limit 0.89. Compaction over the PF limit introduced cable degradation and decrease of critical current. Bending tests applied to cables showed that critical current degradation starts below the bending diameter 120 mm for 6-filaments Cu sheath and 70 mm for single-core Cu10Ni sheath cable. Tensile tests showed similar irreversible strain values for the both types of cables. Rutherford cables assembled of single-core strands are promising for low field (2.7-4 T) applications where low bending diameters are required.

  3. Low coupling loss core-strengthened Bi 2212\\/Ag Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Collings, E W; Scanlan, R M; Dietderich, D R; Motowidlo, L R

    1999-01-01

    In a comprehensive "vertically integrated" program multifilamentary (MF) high temperature superconducting (HTSC) Bi:2212/Ag strand was fabricated using the powder-in-tube process and heat treated in oxygen by a modified standard $9 procedure. The reaction-heat-treatment (HT) was adjusted to maximize critical current (density), I/sub c/ (J /sub c/), as measured in various magnetic fields, B. A series of Rutherford cables was designed, each of which included a $9 metallic (Nichrome-80) core for strengthening and reduction of coupling loss. Prior to cable winding a series of tests examined the possibility of strand "poisoning" by the core during HT. Small model Rutherford cables were wound, $9 and after HT were prepared for I/sub c/(B) measurement and calorimetric measurement of AC loss and hence interstrand contact resistance I/sub c/(B). It was deduced that, if in direct contact with the strand during HT, the core $9 material can degrade the I/sub c/ of the cable; but steps can be taken to eliminate this probl...

  4. Aluminum strand coating for increasing the interstrand contact resistance in Rutherford type superconducting cables

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Verweij, A; Bonasia, A; Oberli, L; Taborelli, M; Richter, R

    2009-01-01

    The interstrand contact resistance (Rc) in Rutherford type cables for fast cycling superconducting magnets must be sufficiently high in order to limit eddy current losses. The required value for Rc depends on the cable and magnet geometries and on the foreseen cycling rate, but is typically of the order of one mW. Such values can be reached with a dedicated strand coating or with a resistive internal cable barrier. As a possible candidate Al strand coatings have been tested. For a Rutherford type inner conductor cable of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) made of Al coated strands Rc values higher than 500 Omega are achieved. The native Al2O3 oxide layer formed at ambient temperature in air is sufficient to reach this high contact resistance. A 6 h-200 °C oxidation heat treatment in air with 100% relative humidity further increases Rc to values above 600 μOmega . Due to the high thermal and mechanical stability of Al2O3 only a relatively moderate Rc drop of about 40 % is obtained during a 190 °C heat treatmen...

  5. Performance of a 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil with a 300 mm wide cold bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Awaji, Satoshi; Hanai, Satoshi; Ioka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tsubouchi, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    A large-bore 14-T CuNb/Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was developed for a 25 T cryogen-free superconducting magnet. The magnet consisted of a low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet of NbTi and Nb3Sn Rutherford coils, and a high-temperature superconducting magnet. The Nb3Sn Rutherford coil was fabricated by the react-and-wind method for the first time. The LTS magnet reached the designed operation current of 854 A without a training quench at a 1 h ramp rate. The central magnetic field generated by the LTS magnet was measured by a Hall sensor to be 14.0 T at 854 A in a 300 mm cold bore.

  6. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya st., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  7. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  8. Highly resolving Rutherford-scattering spectrometry for the study of ZrO{sub 2} layer growth in the beginning stage; Hochaufloesende Rutherford-Streuspektrometrie zur Untersuchung von ZrO{sub 2}-Schichtwachstum im Anfangsstadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieluf, Maik

    2010-06-15

    By means of High Resolution Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (HR-RBS) the diffusion behaviour and layer growth of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} and TiN in the initial regime were investigated. The analysis of concentration profiles in ultrathin layers and interfaces was the focus of this work, made possible by the excellent depth resolution of less than 0.3 nm near the surface. For the first time a two-dimensional position sensitive semiconductor detector was implemented and characterized in the setup of the HR-RBS for the improvement of the quality of the measurement results. Furthermore, a measurement procedure was put into operation that allowed the reduction of ion induced damage. Through the optimization of the experimental conditions and the development of a program package for the support of the analyst, an efficient measurement procedure could be routinely ensured. At the time of a binary collision between the incident ion and the target element with a small impact factor, the charge state changes frequently, especially due to the abruptly decreasing ion velocity of the projectile and the overlapping of the electron clouds. For HR-RBS with an energy-separating dipole magnet, the charge state distribution of the scattered ions must be known for the interpretation of the measured spectra. For the first time a significant dependence of the charge state distribution of the scattered C ions on the layer thickness as well as atomic number of the detected target elements, here from the fourth subgroup, was demonstrated. This new knowledge allowed systematic investigations of the ZrO{sub 2} layer growth in the initial regime. The ZrO{sub 2} layers were produced by means of the atomic layer deposition (ALD). Based on the evidence for agglomeration of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} a method was introduced, which takes local thickness variations into account during the simulation of the HR-RBS spectra. An accurate statement about the ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface was

  9. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging. PMID:27446752

  10. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  11. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  12. Current Redistribution around the Superconducting-to-normal Transition in Superconducting Nb-Ti Rutherford Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, G P; ten Kate, H H J

    2008-01-01

    Sufficient thermal-electromagnetic stability against external heat sources is an essential design criterion for superconducting Rutherford cables, especially if operated close to the critical current. Due to the complex phenomena contributing to stability such as helium cooling, inter-strand current and heat transfer, its level is difficult to quantify. In order to improve our understanding, many stability tests were performed on different cable samples, each incorporating several point-like heaters. The current redistribution around the heat front is measured after inducing a local normal zone in one strand of the cable. By using voltage taps, expansion of the normal zone is monitored in the initially quenched strand as well as in adjacent strands. An array of Hall probes positioned at the cable edge is used to scan the selffield generated by the cable by which it becomes possible to estimate the inter-strand current transfer. In this paper it is demonstrated that two different stability regimes can be disti...

  13. CUDI A Model for Calculation of Electrodynamic and Thermal Behaviour of Superconducting Rutherford Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, A

    2006-01-01

    CUDI is the extended Fortran code to calculate the electrodynamic and thermal behaviour of any type of Rutherford cable subject to global and/or local variations in field, transport current, and external heat release. The internal parameters of the cable can be freely varied along the length and across the width, such as contact resistances, critical current, cooling rates etc. In this way, all the typical non-uniformities occurring in a cable, e.g. broken filaments, strand welds, cable joints, and edge degradation can be simulated. Also the characteristics of the strands in the cable can be varied from strand to strand. Heat flows through the matrix, through the interstrand contacts, and to the helium are incorporated, as well as the self-field and self- and mutual inductances between the strands. The main features and structure of the program will be discussed.

  14. Progress of General Test Stand for Intensive Beam Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The general test stand for intensive beam cyclotron is one of the preliminary tasks of BRIF project at CIAE. The test stand, which actually is a small compact cyclotron with designed energy of 10 MeV,

  15. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  16. Cyclotron resonance absorption in ionospheric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA) Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    The mode conversion of ordinary polarized electromagnetic waves into electrostatic cyclotron waves in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. Near resonance the warm plasma dispersion relation is a function of the angle {theta} between the geomagnetic field and the density gradient and of the wave frequency {omega}, where {Omega} {le} {omega} {le} 2{Omega} and {Omega} is the electron cyclotron frequency. The differential equations describing the electric field amplitudes near the plasma resonance are studied, including damping at the second gyroharmonic. For certain values of {omega} and {theta} (e.g., {theta} < 45{degree}, {omega} {approximately} 2{Omega}) the wave equations reduce to the parabolic cylinder equation. The energy transmission coefficients and power absorbed by the cyclotron waves are calculated. The vertical penetration of the plasma wave amplitudes is iestimated using a WKB analysis of the wave equation.

  17. Spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, A. L.; Boss, E.; Cowles, T. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2007-05-01

    The spectral dependency of the particulate backscattering ratio is relevant in the fields of ocean color inversion, light field modeling, and inferring particle properties from optical measurements. Aside from theoretical predictions for spherical, homogeneous particles, we have very limited knowledge of the actual in situ spectral variability of the particulate backscattering ratio. This work presents results from five research cruises that were conducted over a three-year period. Water column profiles of physical and optical properties were conducted across diverse aquatic environments that offered a wide range of particle populations. The main objective of this research was to examine the behavior of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio in situ, both in terms of its absolute magnitude and its variability across visible wavelengths, using over nine thousand 1-meter binned data points for each of five wavelengths of the spectral particulate backscattering ratio. Our analysis reveals no spectral dependence of the particulate backscattering ratio within our measurement certainty, and a geometric mean value of 0.013 for this dataset. This is lower than the commonly used value of 0.0183 from Petzold’s integrated volume scattering data. Within the first optical depth of the water column, the mean particulate backscattering ratio was 0.010.

  18. Core-suppressed AC loss and strand-moderated contact resistance in a Nb3Sn Rutherford cable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumption, M.D.; Collings, E.W.; Scanlan, R.M.; Nijhuis, A.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements of AC loss and hence interstrand contact resistance (ICR), have been performed on two types of Rutherford cable wound with unplated Nb3Sn strand. One of the cable types was furnished with a thin core of AISI 316L stainless steel and the other was left uncored. The cables we

  19. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  20. Interstrand contact resistance and magnetization of Nb3Sn Rutherford cables with cores of different materials and widths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collings, E.W.; Sumption, M.D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Susner, M.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Nijhuis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Rutherford cables with cores of E-glass and S-glass woven tape and types AISI-316 and AISI-304 stainless steel (SS) ribbon were subjected to calorimetric AC loss measurement in transverse magnetic fields of amplitude 400 mT and frequencies of up to 90 mHz applied in the face-on (FO) and edge-on (EO)

  1. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterbeek, J.W.; Bürger, A.; Westerhof, E.;

    2008-01-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam...

  2. Imaging Cyclotron Orbits of Electrons in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Klales, Anna; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Heller, Eric; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M

    2016-03-09

    Electrons in graphene can travel for several microns without scattering at low temperatures, and their motion becomes ballistic, following classical trajectories. When a magnetic field B is applied perpendicular to the plane, electrons follow cyclotron orbits. Magnetic focusing occurs when electrons injected from one narrow contact focus onto a second contact located an integer number of cyclotron diameters away. By tuning the magnetic field B and electron density n in the graphene layer, we observe magnetic focusing peaks. We use a cooled scanning gate microscope to image cyclotron trajectories in graphene at 4.2 K. The tip creates a local change in density that casts a shadow by deflecting electrons flowing nearby; an image of flow can be obtained by measuring the transmission between contacts as the tip is raster scanned across the sample. On the first magnetic focusing peak, we image a cyclotron orbit that extends from one contact to the other. In addition, we study the geometry of orbits deflected into the second point contact by the tip.

  3. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  4. <600> MeV synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    One of the 14 pancakes of the new magnet coils for the 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron which were wound and coated with epoxy resin on the CERN site. These new coils will replace the present ones which have been in use for more than 14 years but are now showing signs of deteriorations.

  5. Stability of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Joachim; Bourget, Olivier; Meresse, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    We consider the magnetic AC Stark effect for the quantum dynamics of a single particle in the plane under the influence of an oscillating homogeneous electric and a constant perpendicular magnetic field. We prove that the electron cyclotron resonance is insensitive to impurity potentials.

  6. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  7. Development of the cyclotron radioisotope production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Sup; Chun, K.S.; Yang, S.D.; Lee, J.D.; Ahn, S.H.; Yun, Y.K.; Park, H.; Lee, J.S.; Chai, J.S.; Kim, U.S.; Hong, S.S.; Lee, M.Y.; Park, C.W.; Baik, S. K.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute the advance of nuclear medicine and to the improvement of human health through the development of various accelerator radionuclides and mass production with automization of production. The results obtained from this study are following: 1) In order to introduce 30 MeV high current cyclotron, the specification of cyclotron has been made, the building site was selected and we drew the draw-up of cyclotron. The cyclotron installation contract was postponed until the financial resources could be secured. 2) For a development high purity 1-123 producing system, a Xe-124 target system, a temperature measurement system of the inner part of the target and a target window were fabricated. A Xe-124 gas target recovery system and a full production system of 1-123 was drew up. 3) For a development of a therapeutic nuclide At-211, a target for the production of At-211 via {sup 209}Bi(alpha, 2n) reaction was fabricated. Produced At-211 was separated by distillation method. 4) For development of beta-emitting nuclides, Ti-45, C-11, F{sub 2}-18, beam irradiation system suitable for each target were fabricated. 5) For automatic production of Ga-67, automated module and PLC program was made 6) For the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, analytical method of thallium and copper by polarography was investigated and established.

  8. SC Cyclotron and RIB Facilities in Kolkata

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Bikash; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2005-01-01

    The superconducting cyclotron under construction at this Centre has bending limit (K-bend) of 520 and focusing limit (K-foc) of 160. It is being constructed, primarily, for nuclear physics experiments with heavy ion beams at intermediate energies. The 100-ton main magnet is currently in the commissioning phase with the main coil already at 4.2K temperature. Magnetic field measurements will be carried out over the next several months. All other systems of the cyclotron are in an advanced stage of fabrication or development. We plan to start assembly of the complete cyclotron around the end of 2005. In the phase-I of the project one beam line has been provided. Construction of three more beam lines and various experimental facilities for nuclear physics as well as irradiation experiments has also been funded and the work is well on its way. An ISOL type Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is being built with the existing K=130 room temperature cyclotron, VEC, as the primary beam source. In-beam RIB production a...

  9. The irradiation facility at the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Sytze; Ostendorf, Reint; Hofstee, Mariet; Kiewiet, Harry; Beijers, Hans

    2007-01-01

    The KVI is conducting radiobiology research using protons up to 190 MeV from the superconducting AGOR cyclotron in collaboration with the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) since 1998. Using the same set-up, we have started irradiations for radiation hardness studies of detectors and compone

  10. Electron cyclotron resonance heating on TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Schüller, F. C.; Barth, C. J.; Bongers, W. A.; Donne, A. J. H.; Dumortier, P.; van der Grift, A. F.; van Gorkom, J. C.; Kalupin, D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Mantica, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Merkulov, A.; Messiaen, A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Oyevaar, T.; Poelman, A. J.; Polman, R. W.; Prins, P. R.; Scholten, J.; Sterk, A. B.; Tito, C. J.; Udintsev, V.S.; Unterberg, B.; Vervier, M.; van Wassenhove, G.

    2003-01-01

    The 110 GHz and the new 140 GHz gyrotron systems for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ECCD on TEXTOR are described and results of ECRH experiments with the 110 GHz system are reported. Central ECRH on Ohmic plasmas shows the presence of an internal electron transport barrier near q =

  11. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  12. First principles fluid modelling of magnetic island stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Février, O.; Maget, P.; Lütjens, H.; Luciani, J. F.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Reich, M.; Beyer, P.; Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    Tearing modes are MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) instabilities that reduce the performance of fusion devices. They can however be controlled and suppressed using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) as demonstrated in various tokamaks. In this work, simulations of island stabilization by ECCD-driven current have been carried out using the toroidal nonlinear 3D full MHD code xtor-2f, in which a current source term modeling the ECCD has been implemented. The efficiency parameter, {η\\text{RF}} , has been computed and its variations with respect to source width and location were also computed. The influence of parameters such as current intensity, source width and position with respect to the island was evaluated and compared to the modified Rutherford equation. We retrieved a good agreement between the simulations and the analytical predictions concerning the variations of control efficiency with source width and position. We also show that the 3D nature of the current source term can lead to the onset of an island if the source term is precisely applied on a rational surface. We report the observation of a flip phenomenon in which the O- and X-points of the island rapidly switch their position in order for the island to take advantage of the current drive to grow.

  13. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  14. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  15. Heat Treatment Optimization of Rutherford Cable for a 15 T Nb3Sn Dipole Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, Emanuela [barzi@fnal.gov

    2016-12-22

    FNAL has been developing a 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator for a future Very High Energy pp Collider based on an optimized 60-mm aperture 4-layer “cos-theta” coil. To increase magnet efficiency, the coil was graded by using two cables with same 15 mm width and different thicknesses made of two different Restacked Rod Process (RRP®) wires. Due to the non-uniform field distribution in dipole coils the maximum field in the inner coil will reach 15-16 T, whereas the maximum field in the outer coil is 12-13 T. In preparation for the 15 T dipole coil reaction, heat treatment studies were performed on strands extracted from these cables with the goal of achieving the best coil performance in the corresponding magnetic fields. In particular, the effect of maximum temperature and time on the cable critical current was studied to take into account actual variations of these parameters during coil reaction. In parallel and in collaboration with OST, development was performed on optimizing Nb3Sn RRP® wire design and layout. Index Terms— Accelerator magnet, critical current density, Nb3Sn strand, Rutherford cable.

  16. submitter Geometrical Behavior of $Nb_{3}Sn$ Rutherford Cables During Heat Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, Maria; Ferracin, Paolo; Manil, Pierre; Perez, Juan Carlos; Rifflet, Jean-Michel; Rondeaux, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    In $Nb_{3}Sn$ accelerator magnets, non-superconducting precursor cables are wound into their final coil shape and then heat treated at a high temperature to form the A15 superconducting phase. The growth of cable strands during reaction and the differential thermal dilatation in the coil components lead to both stress in the cable and geometrical deformations of the winding, with possible consequences on magnet performances. An experimental campaign on different types of Rutherford cables has been carried out at CEA Saclay, in collaboration with CERN, in order to measure cable dimension changes in all directions, with respect to cable configuration and winding geometry. A 700-mm-long versatile test bench has been designed for several cable topologies up to 22 mm in width. This paper describes the tooling and presents the results of the experimental campaign led on the cables, made of powder-in-tube and restacked-rod-process strands, of FRESCA2, a 13-T dipole magnet

  17. Characterization of Nb3Sn Rutherford cables for the LHC 11-T Dipole Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Wuis, A J; Ballarino, A; Oberli, L; Ten Kate, H H J

    2013-01-01

    The so-called CERN-LHC DS upgrade relies on the use of 11 T dipole magnets. For these magnets 40 strands Nb3Sn type Rutherford cables based on 0.7 mm wires are being developed. Recently four samples of the cables were characterized in the CERN FRESCA cable test station. The critical current and the premature quench current due to magneto-thermal instability were measured at 1.9 K and 4.3 K in a background magnetic field between 0 and 9.6 T (the peak magnetic field on the conductor, including the self-field of the cable, ranges from ~ 2 T to ~ 12 T). Two cable samples were based on Powder-In-Tube (PIT) wire and two on Restacked-Rod-Process (RRP) wire. The PIT samples were identical and without a core in the cable while one of the RRP samples features a 25 μm thick stainless steel core. All cables samples tested have a width and a thickness of about 14.7 mm and 1.25 mm, respectively. Cables and sample holders were manufactured at CERN. In this paper we report and discuss the cable test results and compare them...

  18. Target studies for the neutrino factory at the Rutherford Appleton laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Drumm, P V; Bennett, R

    2001-01-01

    Target studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have concentrated on studies of a solid heavy metal target. The suggestion to use a radiatively cooled target which rotates in beam was made shortly after the first NuFact workshop as a means of dissipating large amounts of power at a high temperature, and as an alternative to the proposed water-cooled rotating band and liquid metal jet targets. This paper examines the proposed drive scheme for the target ring, which uses induced currents and magnetic forces to both levitate and drive the target. Estimates of the power required to levitate and drive the target ring and the forces exerted on the moving ring as it enters the target capture solenoid are given. One of the principle concerns in the operation of a solid target is the severe shock stress experienced due to the impact of an intense energetic proton beam in a short time compared to the transit time of sound in the material. Calculations of the stresses induced in the target ring and their evolution ...

  19. Experimental results of current distribution in Rutherford-type LHC cables

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, A P

    2000-01-01

    Current distribution among the wires of multi-strand superconducting cables is an important item for accelerator magnets. A non-uniform distribution could cause additional field distortions in the magnet bore and can as well be one of the reasons of premature quenching. Since two years electrical measurements on superconducting Rutherford-type cables are performed at CERN as part of the reception tests for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Cable samples of 2.4 m length are tested at currents up to 32 kA, temperatures around 1.9 and 4.3 K, and fields up to 10 T, applied perpendicularly as well as parallel to the broad face of the cable. Last year, an array of 24 Hall probes was installed in the test set-up in order to measure the self-field of the cable samples along one cable pitch. Each of the probes measures the local field generated by the current in the strands close by, and the results of the all probes reflect therefore the distribution of the strand currents. Experiments are done varying the applied fie...

  20. Matching an H{sup –} beam into a radio frequency quadrupole at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, C., E-mail: christoph.gabor@stfc.ac.uk; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Back, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    A major component of work being carried out to upgrade the ISIS spallation neutron source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) is the Front End Test Stand (FETS). FETS is aimed at improving the luminosity of the linac, and consists of a Penning ion source, Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), and Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT). It may serve as a first part of the accelerator chain providing a 60 mA, 3 MeV H{sup –} beam up to a 10% duty cycle. The current output of the source and the transmission of the LEBT are reasonable, but there are issues with the alignment to provide a centred beam matched into the acceptance of the RFQ. Improvements have been made to the post acceleration to address this problem. Measurements with a collimated beam have been performed to understand the behaviour of the solenoids and steerer magnets. Comparing these results with simulations proved that, besides possible mechanical imperfections of the ion source and post acceleration assembly, agreement can only be achieved if the magnetic fields are distorted.

  1. Interstrand and AC-loss measurements on Rutherford-type cables for accelerator magnet applications

    CERN Document Server

    Otmani, R; Tixador, P

    2001-01-01

    One of the main issues for particle accelerator magnets is the control of interstrand resistances. Too low resistances result in large coupling currents during ramping, which distort field quality, while too large resistances may prevent current redistribution among cable strands, resulting in degraded quench performance. In this paper, we review a series of interstrand resistance and AC-loss measurements performed on four Rutherford-type cables. The four cables have the same number of strands and similar outer dimensions, corresponding to LHC quadrupole cable specifications. The first cable is made from NbTi strands, coated with silver-tin alloy, the second one is made from bare Nb/sub 3/Sn strands, the third one is made also from bare Nb/sub 3/Sn strands but includes a 25- mu m-thick stainless steel core between the strand layers, and the last one is made from Nb/sub 3/Sn strands plated with chromium. To cross-check the two measurement types and assess their consistency, we compare the coupling-current time...

  2. Influence of strand surface condition on interstrand contact resistance and coupling loss in NbTi-wound Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Sumption, M D; Scanlan, R M; Nijhuis, A; ten Kate, H H J; Kim, S W; Wake, M; Shintomi, T

    1999-01-01

    Presented in this work are the results of directly measured and AC- loss-derived interstrand contact resistance (ICR) measurements performed magnetically or resistively on bare-Cu and coated-strand pairs, calorimetrically on $9 11-strand Rutherford cables wound with strands that had been coated with various metallic and insulating layers, and calorimetrically and magnetically on 28-strand Rutherford cables (LHC-type) wound with bare-Cu-, Ni-, and $9 stabrite-plated strands. Comparisons are made of the effects of various conditions of heat treatment, HT (time and temperature), and pressure (applied during HT and then either maintained or re-applied during measurement). The $9 resulting ICRs are compared and interpreted in terms of the oxide layer on the strand coating and its response to curing conditions. (66 refs).

  3. Heat transfer through Rutherford superconducting cable with novel pattern of polyimide electrical insulation in pressurized superfluid helium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorowski, Maciej; Polinski, Jaroslaw; Strychalski, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Future LHC accelerator luminosity upgrade will increase a beam losses heat deposition in the superconducting magnet coils. Main barrier of the heat evacuation from the coils made of Rutherford type cables is a cable electrical insulation. The insulation is made of polyimide tapes wrapped around the cable in a special configuration. Presently used insulation wrapping schemes constitute very good electrical insulation with relatively low heat transport ability. Therefore a new insulation wrapping schemes with enhanced helium permeability and adequate dielectric properties have been developed at CERN. An experimental comparative study of heat transfer perpendicular to the Rutherford type cable, for an old and new insulation wrapping schemes have been accomplished at Wroclaw University of Technology. The tests have been performed in pressurized superfluid helium conditions, and at 60 MPa of the sample applied external pressure simulating the Lorentz forces. This paper presents the measurements methodology and gives experimental results.

  4. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences.

  5. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. TFTR Michelson interferometer electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, F.J.; Boyd, D.A.; Cutler, R.C.; McCarthy, M.P.

    1985-05-01

    In July 1984, a Fourier transform spectrometer employing a fast-scanning Michelson interferometer began operating on TFTR. This diagnostic system can measure the electron cyclotron emission spectrum 72 times per s with a time resolution of 11 ms and a spectral resolution of 3.6 GHz. The initial operating spectral range is 75--540 GHz, which is adequate for measuring the first three cyclotron harmonics at present TFTR magnetic field levels. The range can be extended easily to 75--1080 GHz in order to accommodate increases in toroidal magnetic field or to study superthermal ECE. The measured spectra are absolutely calibrated using a liquid nitrogen cooled blackbody reference source. The second harmonic feature of each spectrum is used to calculate the absolute electron temperature profile.

  7. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ropponen, T; Suominen, P; Koponen, T K; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2008-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  8. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adelmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEδALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEδALUS—Hyper-K search for CP violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4° to 12° are presented.

  9. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  10. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  11. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  12. Backscatter nephelometer to calibrate scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladmir A. Kovalev; Wei Min Hao

    2008-01-01

    The general concept of an open-path backscatter nephelometer, its design, principles of calibration and the operational use are discussed. The research-grade instrument, which operates at the wavelength 355 nm, will be co-located with a scanning-lidar at measurement sites near wildfires, and used for the lidar calibration. Such a near-end calibration has significant...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  15. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  16. Preliminary backscatter results from the hydrosweep multibeam system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hagen, R.A.; Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    of Oceanography to convert the measured electrical energy into acoustic backscatter energy. This conversion includes corrections for the position, slope, and area of the scattering surface. In this paper we present backscatter data from several areas surveyed...

  17. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  20. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  1. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  2. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  3. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  4. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. BackscatterB [EM300]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Backscatter C [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter D [USGS]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  14. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  15. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  16. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  17. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. Backscatter D [7125]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  2. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  3. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  4. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Backscatter B [Swath]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Method for analysis of low energy backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowicz, V.; Kvitek, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Rez. Ustav Jaderne Fyziky); Pelikan, L. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslavika). Dept. of Microelectronics); Rybka, V.; Krejci, P. (Tesla, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-04-15

    An analytical formula is proposed describing the shape of the energy spectra of particles backscattered from samples implanted with heavy impurities. The method is suitable for quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra measured with low energy ions.

  8. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  9. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  10. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  15. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pigeon Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  17. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore Half Moon Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two...

  20. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  1. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  2. BackscatterA [SWATH]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  3. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter C [Swath]--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  8. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  9. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. Beam stripping extraction from the VINCY cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Đurović Jasna L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction system of a cyclotron guides an ion beam from a spiral acceleration orbit, through an extraction trajectory, into a high energy transport line. The two methods commonly used to direct an ion into the extraction path are deflection, by the electric field of an electrostatic deflector, and ion stripping, by a thin carbon foil. Compared to the electrostatic deflector system, the stripping extraction provides a fast and easy change of the extracted ion energy and is easier to manufacture operate, and maintain. However, the extraction trajectory and dynamics of an ion beam after stripping are highly dependant on the ion energy and specific charge. Thus, when a multipurpose machine such as the VINCY Cyclotron is concerned, it is far from easy to deliver a variety of ion beams into the same high energy transport line and at the same time preserve a reasonable compactness of the extraction system. The front side stripping extraction system of the VINCY Cyclotron provides high (~70 MeV and mid (~30 MeV energy protons, as well as a number of heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The back side stripping extraction system extracts low energy protons (~18 MeV and enables their simultaneous use with high energy protons at the front side of the machine.

  11. Ion Cyclotron Heating on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J. F.; Kafle, N.; Ray, H. B.; Showers, M. A.; Piotrowicz, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion cyclotron heating will be used on Proto-MPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment) to increase heat flux to the target, to produce varying ion energies without substrate biasing, and to vary the extent of the magnetic pre-sheath for the case of a tilted target. A 25 cm long, 9 cm diameter dual half-turn helical ion cyclotron antenna has been installed in the device located at the magnetic field maximum. It couples power to ions via single pass damping of the slow wave at the fundamental resonance, and operates with ω 0.8ωci at the antenna location. It is designed to operate at power levels up to 30 kW, with a later 200 kW upgrade planned. Near term experiments include measuring RF loading at low power as a function of frequency and antenna gap. The plasma is generated by a helicon plasma source that has achieved ne > 5 ×1019m-3 operating with deuterium, as measured downstream from the ion cyclotron antenna location. Measurements will be compared with 1-D and 2-D models of RF coupling. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Transparency of Magnetized Plasma at Cyclotron Frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Shvets; J.S. Wurtele

    2002-03-14

    Electromagnetic radiation is strongly absorbed by a magnetized plasma if the radiation frequency equals the cyclotron frequency of plasma electrons. It is demonstrated that absorption can be completely canceled in the presence of a magnetostatic field of an undulator or a second radiation beam, resulting in plasma transparency at the cyclotron frequency. This effect is reminiscent of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of the three-level atomic systems, except that it occurs in a completely classical plasma. Unlike the atomic systems, where all the excited levels required for EIT exist in each atom, this classical EIT requires the excitation of the nonlocal plasma oscillation. The complexity of the plasma system results in an index of refraction at the cyclotron frequency that differs from unity. Lagrangian description was used to elucidate the physics and enable numerical simulation of the plasma transparency and control of group and phase velocity. This control naturally leads to applications for electromagnetic pulse compression in the plasma and electron/ion acceleration.

  13. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, B.F

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. We will also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author)

  14. AAAS News: Questions of Science Literacy Addressed by Rutherford/AAAS; 1982 Exhibit; Energy and Health to Be Discussed in Berkeley; Short Courses at Pacific Division, Annual Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents the views of F. James Rutherford concerning the status of science education and his role as advisor on science education to the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (SK)

  15. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  16. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  18. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  19. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalyga, V. [Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanova st., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D. [Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanova st., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-08-15

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities.

  20. Surface quality studies of high T$_{c}$ superconductors of the Hg , Tl and Hg$_{x}$Tl$_{1-x}$-families RBS and resonant C and O backscattering studies

    CERN Document Server

    Vantomme, A; Correia, J G; Bryntse, I; Johansson, L G; Loureiro, S M; Le Floc'h, S; Toulemonde, T; Bordet, P; Bougerol-Chaillout, C

    2002-01-01

    The composition, crystallinity, uniformity, purity, and thermal stability of cuprate superconductors have been studied by Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry, and 3.045 MeV He$^{+}$ oxygen non-Rutherford resonant scattering. Further experiments have been performed with 1.75 MeV H$^{+}$carbon non-Rutherford resonant scattering. Three sets of samples were studied : HgBa$_{2}$CuO$_{(4+\\delta)}$ (Hg1201), Hg$_{x}$T1$_{1-x}$Ba$_{2}$Ca$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{(2n+\\delta)}$ (Hg,T1-1223) and T1$_{1.85}$Ba$_{2}$CuO$_{6}$/LaA10$_{3}$ (T1-2201), either in bulk or as an epitaxial thin film. It was observed that the superconductors exhibit a metal deficiency near the surface, which is largely compensated by excess oxygen. Moreover, the samples are significantly contaminated with carbon within the probing region of the H$^+$ beam. The thermal stability and surface degradation were studied in both oxidizing ambient and vacuum. As a general trend, the heavy metal deficiency — and consequently the compensating o...

  1. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  2. Radar Backscatter Study of Sea Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    in controlling the "state" of the ice ( temperatura and salinity) are shown in Figure 4.3-79. The salinity profile is a typical irregular c-shaped...the University of Kansas to provide well- controlled systematic studies to relate radar backscatter return to sea ice and to pin down some of the...34..,. : . - " ... ,. -.. .... .. .. ... ,,, ... ... _ ., ’.. . . , 72. Profiles of the parameters most important in controlling the "state" of the ice (temperature and salinity

  3. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  4. Benchmarking of codes for electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive under ITER conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prater, R.; Farina, D.; Gribov, Y.; Harvey, R. W.; Ram, A. K.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Poli, E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Volpe, F.; Westerhof, E.; Zvonkovo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal design and use of electron cyclotron heating requires that accurate and relatively quick computer codes be available for prediction of wave coupling, propagation, damping and current drive at realistic levels of EC power. To this end, a number of codes have been developed in laboratories wor

  5. Status of the Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melconian, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The Texas A&M University Re-accelerated EXotics (T-REX) project, an upgrade to the Cyclotron Institute, will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams of a unique energy range and the ability to provide primary beams to two experiments concurrently. The upgrade is nearing completion of its three major tasks: re-commissioning of the existing K150 cyclotron; construction of light- and heavy-ion guide transport systems; and charge-boosting the K150 RIB for re-acceleration using the K500 cyclotron. The light-ion guide transport system will utilize the high intensity (>= 10 μ A) proton beam from the K150 to produce rare ions via fusion-evapouration reactions or proton-induced fission fragments. These ions will be transported to an ECR charge breeder prior to injection in the K500. The heavy-ion guide will use deep inelastic, transfer and fragmentation reactions using the up to 25 MeV/u primary beams from the K150. The products will be separated by a superconducting solenoid and collected in a large gas-catcher, after which a multi-RFQ system will transport the RIB to any of: the charge-breeder and K500; the TAMU Penning Trap beamline; or an MR-TOF for beam analysis. The status of the T-REX upgrade and an overview of its capabilities will be presented Supported by DOE Grant Number DE-FG03-93ER40773 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant Number H-A-0098.

  6. Microwave Absorption in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-Hai; HU Xi-Wei; WU Qin-Chong; YU Guo-Yang

    2000-01-01

    The microwave power absorption in electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor was investigated with a twodimensional hybrid-code. Simulation results indicated that there are two typical power deposition profiles over the entire parameter region: (1) microwave power deposition peaks on the axis and decreases in radial direction,(2) microwave power deposition has its maximum at some radial position, i.e., a hollow distribution. The spatial distribution of electron temperature resembles always to the microwave power absorption profile. The dependence of plasma parameter on the gas pressure is discussed also.

  7. Relativistic Cyclotron Instability in Anisotropic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto E.; Araneda, Jaime A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

    2016-11-01

    A sufficiently large temperature anisotropy can sometimes drive various types of electromagnetic plasma micro-instabilities, which can play an important role in the dynamics of relativistic pair plasmas in space, astrophysics, and laboratory environments. Here, we provide a detailed description of the cyclotron instability of parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in relativistic pair plasmas on the basis of a relativistic anisotropic distribution function. Using plasma kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we study the influence of the relativistic temperature and the temperature anisotropy on the collective and noncollective modes of these plasmas. Growth rates and dispersion curves from the linear theory show a good agreement with simulations results.

  8. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  9. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  10. Complementary use of ion beam elastic backscattering and recoil detection analysis for the precise determination of the composition of thin films made of light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Climent-Font, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: acf@uam.es; Cervera, M.; Hernandez, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Laboratorio de Microelectronica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Piqueras, J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Laboratorio de Microelectronica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is a well known powerful technique to obtain depth profiles of the constituent elements in a thin film deposited on a substrate made of lighter elements. In its standard use the probing beam is typically 2 MeV He. Its capabilities to obtain precise composition profiles are severely diminished when the overlaying film is made of elements lighter than the substrate. In this situation the analysis of the energy of the recoiled element from the sample in the elastic scattering event, the ERDA technique may be advantageous. For the detection of light elements it is also possible to use beams at specific energies producing elastic resonances with these light elements to be analyzed, with a much higher scattering cross sections than the Rutherford values. This technique may be called non-RBS. In this work we report on the complementary use of ERDA with a 30 MeV Cl beam and non-RBS with 1756 keV H ions to characterize thin films made of boron, carbon and nitrogen (BCN) deposited on Si substrates.

  11. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  12. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, P.; Domier, C.W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Tobias, B.; Shen, Z.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H.; Classen, I.G.J.; van de Pol, M.J.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. Jaspers,

    2008-01-01

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T-e profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities

  13. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, P.; Domier, C.W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Tobias, B.; Shen, Z.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H.; Classen, I.G.J.; van de Pol, M.J.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. Jaspers,

    2008-01-01

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T-e profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities

  14. A new generation of medical cyclotrons for the 90`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-08-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for use in radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Existing and potential markets for these cyclotrons will be presented. They will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 150 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  15. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  16. An Ultrasonic Backscatter Instrument for Cancellous Bone Evaluation in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic backscatter technique has shown promise as a noninvasive cancellous bone assessment tool. A novel ultrasonic backscatter bone diagnostic (UBBD instrument and an in vivo application for neonatal bone evaluation are introduced in this study. The UBBD provides several advantages, including noninvasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, portability, and simplicity. In this study, the backscatter signal could be measured within 5 s using the UBBD. Ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on 467 neonates (268 males and 199 females at the left calcaneus. The backscatter signal was measured at a central frequency of 3.5 MHz. The delay (T1 and duration (T2 of the backscatter signal of interest (SOI were varied, and the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB, frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB, zero frequency intercept of apparent backscatter (FIAB, and spectral centroid shift (SCS were calculated. The results showed that the SOI selection had a direct influence on cancellous bone evaluation. The AIB and FIAB were positively correlated with the gestational age (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. Moderate positive correlations (|R| up to 0.45, P10 µs. The T2 mainly introduced fluctuations in the observed correlation coefficients. The moderate correlations observed with UBBD demonstrate the feasibility of using the backscatter signal to evaluate neonatal bone status. This study also proposes an explicit standard for in vivo SOI selection and neonatal cancellous bone assessment.

  17. Beam Phase Measurements in the AGOR Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, S; Van Asselt, W K

    2003-01-01

    Beamphase measurement to optimize the isochronism is an essential part of the diagnostics in multi-particle, multi-energy cyclotrons. In the AGOR cyclotron an array of 13 nondestructive beamphase pick-ups is installed. To reduce the large disturbances from the RF-system the measurements are traditionally performed at the 2nd harmonic of the RF-frequency. To further improve the sensitivity intensity modulation of the beam has been introduced. This creates side-bands in the Fourier spectrum, that are completely free of interference from the RF-system. These side-bands contain information on both the beamphase with respect to the accelerating voltage and the number of revolutions up to the radius of the measurement. A specific case is intensity modulation at the orbital frequency, where the side-bands contain only information on the beamphase. Measurements with the different methods will be presented, demonstrating that the intensity modulation strongly improves the sensitivity of the measurement. Useful beampha...

  18. Status of the NSCL Cyclotron Gas Stopper

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Brodeur, M; Morrissey, D J; Schwarz, S

    2016-01-01

    A gas-filled reverse cyclotron for the thermalisation of energetic beams is under construction at NSCL/MSU. Rare isotopes produced via projectile fragmentation after in-flight separation will be injected into the device and converted into low-energy beams through buffer gas interactions as they spiral towards the centre of the device. The extracted thermal beams will be used for low energy experiments such as precision mass measurements with traps or laser spectroscopy, and further transport for reacceleration. Detailed calculations have been performed to optimize the magnetic field design as well as the transport and stopping of ions inside the gas. An RF carpet will be used to transport the thermal ions to the axial extraction point. The calculations indicate that the cyclotron gas stopper will be much more efficient for the thermalisation of light and medium mass ions compared to linear gas cells. In this contribution we will discuss simulations of the overall performance and acceptance of machine, the bea...

  19. Cyclotron and linac production of Ac-225.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Graeme; Allen, Barry J

    2009-04-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. The reduction of radium by photonuclear transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) has been investigated. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 2.4 MBq (64 microCi) of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225 and can then be used for 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' (TAT) of cancer. This result, while consistent with theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use unless much larger quantities of radium are irradiated. The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. This paper investigates the possibility of producing of Ac-225 in commercial quantities, which could potentially reduce obsolete radioactive material and displace the need for expensive importation of Ac-225 from the USA and Russia in the years ahead. Scaled up production of Ac-225 could theoretically be achieved by the use of a high current cyclotron or linac. Production specifications are determined for a linac in terms of current, pulse length and frequency, as well as an examination of other factors such as radiation issues and radionuclei separation. Yields are compared with those calculated for the Australian National Cyclotron in Sydney.

  20. Resonant cyclotron scattering in magnetars' emission

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda; Turolla, Roberto; Lyutikov, Maxim; Gotz, Diego

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic application of a resonant cyclotron scattering (RCS) model to a comprehensive set of magnetars, including canonical and transient anomalous X-ray pulsars, and soft gamma repeaters. In this scenario, non-thermal magnetar spectra in the soft X-rays (i.e. below ~10keV) result from resonant cyclotron scattering of the thermal surface emission by hot magnetospheric plasma. We find that this model can successfully account for the X-ray emission of magnetars, while using the same number of free parameters than the commonly used empirical blackbody plus power-law model. We find that the entire class of sources is characterized by magnetospheric plasma with similar properties, in particular the optical depth is in a quite narrow range (tau_{res} ~1-2). This leads to an estimate of the magnetospheric electron densities at the resonance n_e ~ 1.5x10^{13} tau_{res} cm^{-3}, which is 3 orders of magnitudes greater than n_{GJ}, the Goldreich-Julian electron density for pulsar magnetospheres. The inf...

  1. Roles of Fast-Cyclotron and Alfven-Cyclotron Waves for the Multi-Ion Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Using linear Vlasov theory of plasma waves and quasi-linear theory of resonant wave-particle interaction, the dispersion relations and the electromagnetic field fluctuations of fast and Alfven waves are studied for a low-beta multi-ion plasma in the inner corona. Their probable roles in heating and accelerating the solar wind via Landau and cyclotron resonances are quantified. We assume that (1) low-frequency Alfven and fast waves have the same spectral shape and the same amplitude of power spectral density; (2) these waves eventually reach ion cyclotron frequencies due to a turbulence cascade; (3) kinetic wave-particle interaction powers the solar wind. The existence of alpha particles in a dominant proton/electron plasma can trigger linear mode conversion between oblique fast-whistler and hybrid alpha-proton cyclotron waves. The fast-cyclotron waves undergo both alpha and proton cyclotron resonances. The alpha cyclotron resonance in fast-cyclotron waves is much stronger than that in Alfven-cyclotron waves. ...

  2. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  3. Theory of the Quasi-Optical Electron Cyclotron Maser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-02

    D.C. 20545 Los Angeles, CA 90024 38 I . . .. .. . .. .". l ’@ .... . . . . .. .... Defense Technical Information Center Dr. Edvard A. Frieman (12 copies...Center Code 421 P. 0. Box 4349 Office of Naval Research Stanford, CA 94305 Arlington, VA 22217 Dr. Jesper Munch Dr. Charles Planner TRW Rutherford High

  4. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  5. Backscattering Differential Ghost Imaging in Turbid Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bina, M; Molteni, M; Gatti, A; Lugiato, L A; Ferri, F

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present experimental results concerning the retrieval of images of absorbing objects immersed in turbid media via differential ghost imaging (DGI) in a backscattering configuration. The method has been applied, for the first time to our knowledge, to the imaging of small thin black objects located at different depths inside a turbid solution of polystyrene nanospheres and its performances assessed via comparison with standard imaging techniques. A simple theoretical model capable of describing the basic optics of DGI in turbid media is proposed.

  6. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted...

  7. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  8. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra by electron moving in laser-magnetic resonance regime

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectra by an electron moving in the laser-magnetic resonance acceleration regime are computed numerically and analytically. The dependence of fundamental frequency on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter is examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized plane-wave laser field and constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra are exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role on the strength of emission. And the rich features of scattering spectra found may be applicable to the radiation source tunability.

  9. A preliminary area survey of neutron radiation levels associated with the NASA variable energy cyclotron horizontal neutron delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. K.; Leonard, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The 25 MeV deuteron beam from the NASA variable energy cyclotron incident on a thick beryllium target will deliver a tissue neutron dose rate of 2.14 rad micron A-min at a source to skin distance of 125 cm. A neutron survey of the existing hallways with various shielding configurations made during operating of the horizontal neutron delivery system indicates that minimal amounts of additional neutron shielding material are required to provide a low level radiation environment within a self-contained neutron therapy control station. Measurements also indicate that the primary neutron distribution delivered by a planned vertical delivery system will be minimally perturbed by neutrons backscattered from the floor.

  10. Helium-Charged Titanium Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition in an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Helium Plasma Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金钦华; 胡佩钢; 凌浩; 吴嘉达; 施立群; 周筑颖

    2003-01-01

    Titanium thin films incorporated with helium are produced by pulsed laser deposition in an electron cyclotron resonance helium plasma environment. Helium is distributed evenly in the film and a relatively high He/Ti atomic ratio (~ 20%) is obtained from the proton backscattering spectroscopy. This high concentration ofhelium leads to a surface blistering which is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Laser repetition rate has little influence on film characters. Substrate bias voltage is also changed for the helium incorporating mechanism study, and this is a helium ion implantation process during the film growth. Choosing suitable substrate bias voltage, one can avoid the damage produced by ion implantation, which is always present in general implantation case.

  11. Cyclotrons and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Go, R T

    1992-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) requires positron-emitting radionuclides that emit 511-keV photons detectable by PET imagers. Positron-emitting radionuclides are commonly produced in charged particle accelerators, eg, linear accelerators or cyclotrons. The most widely available radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging are carbon-11-, nitrogen-13-, and oxygen-15-labeled compounds, many of which, either in their normal state or incorporated in other compounds, serve as physiological tracers. Other useful PET radiopharmaceuticals include fluorine-18-, bromine-75-, gallium-68 (68Ga)-, rubidium-82 (82Rb)-, and copper-62 (62Cu)-labeled compounds. Many positron emitters have short half-lives and thus require on-site cyclotrons for application, and others (68Ga, 82Rb, and 62Cu) are available from radionuclides generators using relatively long-lived parent radionuclides. This review is divided into two sections: cyclotrons and PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. In the cyclotron section, the principle of operation of the cyclotron, types of cyclotrons, medical cyclotrons, and production of radionuclides are discussed. In the section on PET radiopharmaceuticals, the synthesis and clinical use of PET radiopharmaceuticals are described.

  12. Demonstration of zero optical backscattering from single nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Person, Steven; Lapin, Zachary; Saenz, Juan Jose; Wicks, Gary; Novotny, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    We present the first experimental demonstration of zero backscattering from nanoparticles at op- tical frequencies as originally discussed by Kerker et. al. [M. Kerker, D. Wang, and C. Giles, J. Opt. Soc. A 73, 765 (1983)]. GaAs pillars were fabricated on a fused silica substrate and the spectrum of the backscattered radiation was measured in the wavelength range 600-1000 nm. Suppression of backscattering occurred at ~725 nm, agreeing with calculations based on the discrete dipole approximation. Particles with zero backscattering provide new functionality for metamaterials and optical antennas.

  13. CRED Acoustic Backscatter Guam 2003, Imagery Extracted from Gridded Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter extracted from gridded bathymetry of the banktops and shelf environments of Guam, of the Mariana Islands Archipelago.

  14. Sea Floor Analyses Based On Multibeam Backscatter Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.

    Measurements of acoustic backscatter strength can be applied to analyse sea floor coverage on a spatial extent. They provide consistent coverage compared to analy- ses based on only a few surface samples. In particular the spatial validity of surface samples can be determined by analyses based on acoustic backscatter strength and sampling locations representative for the surrounding area can be determined. Dur- ing the cruise ANTXVII/4 of the German RV "Polarstern", a high precision swath bathymetry survey was performed along the European continental margin in the Por- cupine Seabight off southwest Ireland. Within the Porcupine Seabight a number of mound structures have been discovered earlier, most of them being carbonate mounds. The structure and genesis of these mounds are the main objective of recent investiga- tions. The cruise and the subsequent investigations are part of the EU project GEO- MOUND. They focus on the Belgica mound province. Besides the depth measure- ments, the acoustic intensities of the received echos have been recorded. Taking into account the transmitted and received sound level, acoustic beam patterns, and acous- tic attenuation in the water column, the backscatter strength of the ensonified area was calculated. This backscatter information is used to analyse the sea floor cover- age. Based on the data of the systematic survey the spatial variation of the backscatter strength was derived. Regions of equal backscatter characteristic can be combined and functions showing the dependency between backscatter strength and incidence angle of the acoustic wave can be determined. These functions help interpreting sea floor coverage. The mapping of the backscatter strength of the mound area indicates clear changes in backscatter strength. Small and shallow channels show a lower backscat- ter strength than their surroundings. That means the surface coverage of the channels is smooth with respect to the surroundings. One interpretation of this

  15. The aCORN backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. T.; Bateman, F.; Collett, B.; Darius, G.; DeAngelis, C.; Dewey, M. S.; Jones, G. L.; Komives, A.; Laptev, A.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Nico, J. S.; Noid, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stern, I.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2017-09-01

    Backscatter of electrons from a beta detector, with incomplete energy deposition, can lead to undesirable effects in many types of experiments. We present and discuss the design and operation of a backscatter-suppressed beta spectrometer that was developed as part of a program to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in neutron beta decay (aCORN). An array of backscatter veto detectors surrounds a plastic scintillator beta energy detector. The spectrometer contains an axial magnetic field gradient, so electrons are efficiently admitted but have a low probability for escaping back through the entrance after backscattering. The design, construction, calibration, and performance of the spectrometer are discussed.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, O. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Simulation of cyclotron resonant scattering features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarm Fritz-Walter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray binary systems consisting of a mass donating optical star and a highly magnetized neutron star, under the right circumstances, show quantum mechanical absorption features in the observed spectra called cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs. We have developed a simulation to model CRSFs using Monte Carlo methods. We calculate Green’s tables which can be used to imprint CRSFs to arbitrary X-ray continua. Our simulation keeps track of scattering parameters of individual photons, extends the number of variable parameters of previous works, and allows for more flexible geometries. Here we focus on the influence of bulk velocity of the accreted matter on the CRSF line shapes and positions.

  18. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on Aditya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Bora; Sunil Kumar; Raj Singh; S V Kulkarni; A Mukherjee; J P Singh; Raguraj Singh; S Dani; A Patel; Sai Kumar; V George; Y S S Srinivas; P Khilar; M Kushwah; P Shah; H M Jadav; Rajnish Kumar; S Gangopadhyay; H Machhar; B Kadia; K Parmar; A Bhardwaj; Suresh Adav; D Rathi; D S Bhattacharya

    2005-02-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system has been designed, fabricated indigenously and commissioned on Tokamak Aditya. The system has been commissioned to operate between 20·0 and 47·0 MHz at a maximum power of 200 kW continuous wave (CW). Duration of 500 ms is sufficient for operation on Aditya, however, the same system feeds the final stage of the 1·5 MW ICRH system being prepared for the steady-state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) for a duration of 1000 s. Radio frequency (RF) power (225 kW) has been generated and successfully tested on a dummy load for 100s at 30·0 MHz. Lower powers have been coupled to Aditya in a breakdown experiment. We describe the system in detail in this work.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Castejon, F.

    1992-07-01

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron- cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. The general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D- III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave, damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (Author) 13 refs.

  20. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  1. Backscatter coefficient estimation using tapers with gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchies, Adam C; Oelze, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    When using the backscatter coefficient (BSC) to estimate quantitative ultrasound parameters such as the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC), it is necessary to assume that the interrogated medium contains diffuse scatterers. Structures that invalidate this assumption can affect the estimated BSC parameters in terms of increased bias and variance and decrease performance when classifying disease. In this work, a method was developed to mitigate the effects of echoes from structures that invalidate the assumption of diffuse scattering, while preserving as much signal as possible for obtaining diffuse scatterer property estimates. Backscattered signal sections that contained nondiffuse signals were identified and a windowing technique was used to provide BSC estimates for diffuse echoes only. Experiments from physical phantoms were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed BSC estimation methods. Tradeoffs associated with effective mitigation of specular scatterers and bias and variance introduced into the estimates were quantified. Analysis of the results suggested that discrete prolate spheroidal (PR) tapers with gaps provided the best performance for minimizing BSC error. Specifically, the mean square error for BSC between measured and theoretical had an average value of approximately 1.0 and 0.2 when using a Hanning taper and PR taper respectively, with six gaps. The BSC error due to amplitude bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 1) tapers. The BSC error due to shape bias was smallest for PR (Nω = 4) tapers. These results suggest using different taper types for estimating ESD versus EAC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. ECR Ion Source for a High-Brightness Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    New technology is being developed for high-brightness, high-current cyclotrons with performance benefits for accelerator-driven subcritical fission power, medical isotope production, and proton beam cancer therapy. This paper describes the design for a 65 kV electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source that will provide high-brightness beam for injection into the cyclotron. The ion source is modeled closely upon the one that is used at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Modifications are being made to provide enhanced brightness and compatibility for higher-current operation.

  3. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  4. Semi-classical quantum theory for cyclotron radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈军锋; 邓劲松; 徐毅; 尤峻汉

    1997-01-01

    A semi-classical quantum theory of the cyclotron radiation of the nonrelativistic thermal electrons in a very strong magnetic field is presented.The basic formulae of the absorption coefficient of cyclotron resonance kv and the absorption (scattering) cross-section of cyclotron resonance σv have been derived under the quadrupole approximation.σv is an important quantity in the study of the "magnetic inverse-Compton scattering".It is shown that σv is greatly larger than the Thomson cross-sectron σT,which is important in discussing the magnetic inverse-Compton scattering of the relativistic electrons in a very strong magnetic field.

  5. Accelerators for hadrontherapy: From Lawrence cyclotrons to linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Braccini, S.; Crescenti, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Garlasché, M.; Garonna, A.; Magrin, G.; Mellace, C.; Pearce, P.; Pittà, G.; Puggioni, P.; Rosso, E.; Verdú Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.; Weiss, M.; Zennaro, R.

    2010-08-01

    Hadrontherapy with protons and carbon ions is a fast developing methodology in radiation oncology. The accelerators used and planned for this purpose are reviewed starting from the cyclotrons used in the thirties. As discussed in the first part of this paper, normal and superconducting cyclotrons are still employed, together with synchrotrons, for proton therapy while for carbon ion therapy synchrotrons have been till now the only option. The latest developments concern a superconducting cyclotron for carbon ion therapy, fast-cycling high frequency linacs and 'single room' proton therapy facilities. These issues are discussed in the second part of the paper by underlining the present challenges, in particular the treatment of moving organs.

  6. Radiation Monitoring System of 30 MeV Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Hur, Min-Goo; Jeong, Gyosung; Kim, Jongil

    2017-09-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation monitoring system was implemented at KAERI for a 30-MeV cyclotron. This system consists of several types of radiation measuring systems for ambient dose equivalent rate measurements of outside photon and neutron areas as well as inside the cyclotron, and monitors the alpha and beta particulates released from a stack, as well as the results of worker contamination at the portal of the cyclotron. In addition, an automatic alarm system is also mounted if there are alarms in the measuring systems.

  7. High-current cyclotron to drive an electronuclear assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G

    2002-01-01

    The proposal on creation of a high-current cyclotron complex for driving an electronuclear assembly reported at the 17th Meeting on Accelerators of Charged Particles is discussed. Some changes in the basic design parameters of the accelerator are considered in view of new results obtained in the recent works. It is shown that the cyclotron complex is now the most real and cheapest accelerator for production of proton beams with a power of up to 10 MW. Projects on design of a high-current cyclotron complex for driving an electronuclear subcritical assembly are presented.

  8. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  9. 卢瑟福公式中正负号问题的探讨%Discussion on Positive an d Negative Signs in Rutherford Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹海峰; 曾春花

    2014-01-01

    分析了某些理论力学教材在推导卢瑟福公式过程中,处理正负号问题不完善的地方,并给出了一种新的推导方式,从而达到对卢瑟福公式全面完整的认识。%By analyzing imperfections of some teaching materials in calculating Rutherford formula ,this paper gives a new derivation mode ,and provides a full and complete comprehension on Rutherford formula .

  10. Cyclotron mode frequency shifts in multi-species ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D.H.E.; Driscoll, C.F.

    2014-06-27

    In trapped plasmas, electric fields and collective effects shift the cyclotron mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequency for each species s. Here, these shifts are measured on a set of cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence in near rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. We observe that these frequency shifts are dependent on the plasma density, through the E×B rotation frequency f{sub E}, and on the “local” charge concentration δ{sub s} of species s, in close agreement with theory. - Highlights: • Cyclotron modes varying as sin(mθ) with m=0,1and2 are detected. • These mode frequencies shift by factors of the ExB rotation frequency. • These frequency shifts depend on the species charge fraction and radial distribution. • Centrifugal separation of species can greatly modify these frequency shifts.

  11. Variable-Energy Cyclotron for Proton Therapy Application

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Vorozhtsov, A S; Glazov, A A; Mytsyn, G V; Molokanov, A G; Onishchenko, L M

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to characteristics of the beams used for proton therapy are considered. The operation and proposed cyclotrons for proton therapy are briefly described. The technical decisions of creation of the cyclotron with energy variation in the range 70-230 MeV and with current up to 100 nA are estimated. Taking into account the fact, that the size and cost of the cyclotron are approximately determined by the maximum proton energy, it is realistically offered to limit the maximum proton energy to 190 MeV and to elaborate a cyclotron project with a warm winding of the magnet for acceleration of H^{-} ions. The energy of the extracted protons for each run is determined by a stripped target radius in the vacuum chamber of the accelerator, and the radiation dose field for the patient is created by the external devices using the developed techniques.

  12. Cryogenic system for VECC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, G; Bhattacharyya, T K; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    VEC Centre, Kolkata in India is at an advanced stage of commissioning a K500 superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting coil of the magnet for cyclotron is cooled by liquid helium. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the Dees of the radiofrequency system, maintain the vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The cryogenic system for magnet for cyclotron has been tested by cooling the coil and energizing the magnet. The cryogenic system for cryopanels has also been tested. Heater and temperature sensor were placed on the liquid helium cold head for cryopanel. The temperature of the cold head was observed to be below 20 K upto a heat load of 11.7 watt.

  13. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 [1] and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA [2]. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY [3] is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  14. Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D M; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thummler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2014-01-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta sp...

  15. Undergraduate Education with the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeth, Timothy W.

    The Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron is a research grade accelerator dedicated to undergraduate education. From its inception, it has been intended for instruction and has been designed to demonstrate classic beam physics phenomena and provides students hands on experience with accelerator technology. The cyclotron is easily reconfigured, allowing experiments to be designed and performed within one academic semester. Our cyclotron offers students the opportunity to operate an accelerator and directly observe many fundamental beam physics concepts, including axial and radial betatron motion, destructive resonances, weak and azimuthally varying field (AVF) focusing schemes, RF and DEE voltage effects, diagnostic techniques, and perform low energy nuclear reactions. This paper emphasizes the unique beam physics measurements and beam manipulations capable at the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron.

  16. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  17. The fundamental cyclotron line in 4U 1538-52

    CERN Document Server

    Rodes-Roca, J J; Bernabéu, J G

    2009-01-01

    We present pulse phase averaged spectra of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1538-52/QV Nor. Observations of this persistent accreting pulsar were made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We study the variability of cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF or simply cyclotron line) in the high energy spectra of this binary system. We show that the parameters of the CRSF are correlated. The first one is, as suggested by theory, between the width and the energy of the cyclotron line. The second one is between the relative width and the optical depth of the cyclotron line. We discuss these results with studies of other X-ray pulsars and their implications on the line variability.

  18. Design of 10 MeV cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Solhju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Design and construction of 10MeV cyclotron has been started at Amirkabir University of Technology since 2012. So far, the conceptual and detail engineering design phases have been finalized. The main purpose of this baby cyclotron is to generate proton beam for the production of PET radioisotopes. The cyclotron consists of magnet, cavity, ion source, RF and LLRF system, vacuum system, cooling system, power amplifiers and power supplies system. In this paper, a brief of design principles for all the parts of cyclotron and their final simulation results is presented. It should be noted that these simulations have been performed and optimized by the most accurate softwares such as TOSCA, ANSYS, HFSS, SolidWorks and CST. Also, the manufacturing feasibility of all the parts is performed and their dimensions and parameters are synchronized with manufacturing standards

  19. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-06-28

    Completion of magnet tests, followed by completion of installation of major cyclotron components, are reported. Intermediate level power tests of the rf system are also reported. Design and fabrication of the control system are reported to be under way. (LEW)

  20. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-17

    Progress is reported in the fabrication, installation, and testing of cyclotron components, including magnets and coils, rf components, vacuum and control equipment. Also reported are magnet and rf component measurements. (LEW)

  1. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-10-09

    Progress is reported in the design, installation of various components of the cyclotron, including coils, magnets, rf system, and vacuum system. Also reported are measurements on magnets and rf components. (LEW)

  2. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-06-30

    Progress is reported in the fabrication and testing of cyclotron components, including magnet system and rf system components. Work on vacuum components and instrumentation and control equipment is also reported. (LEW)

  3. Fusion Reactivity in the Case of Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞国扬; 常永斌; 沈林芳

    2003-01-01

    By applying the integral-variable-change technique,an explicit expression of deuterium-tritium fusion reactivity in the case of second harmonic ion cyclotron resonant heating on deuterium is obtained.

  4. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of light elements in thin films deposited on Si substrates using proton EBS (Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, F. J.; Alcaire, M.; Caballero-Hernández, J.; Garcia-Garcia, F. J.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Terriza, A.; Godinho, V.; García-López, J.; Barranco, A.; Fernández-Camacho, A.

    2014-08-01

    Quantification of light elements content in thin films is an important and difficult issue in many technological fields such as polymeric functional thin films, organic thin film devices, biomaterials, and doped semiconducting structures. Light elements are difficult to detect with techniques based on X-ray emission, such as energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX). Other techniques, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), can easily quantify the content of light elements within a surface but often these surface measurements are not representative of the lights elements global composition of the thin film. Standard Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), using alpha particles as probe projectiles, is not a good option to measure light elements deposited on heavier substrates composed of heavier elements like Si or glass. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) offers a good quantification method, but most of the nuclear reactions used are selective for the quantification of only one element, so several reactions and analysis are necessary to measure different elements. In this study, Elastic Backscattering Spectroscopy (EBS) using proton beams of 2.0 MeV simultaneously quantified different light elements (helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine) contained in thin films supported on silicon substrates. The capabilities of the proposed quantification method are illustrated with examples of the analysis for a series of thin film samples: amorphous silicon with helium bubbles, fluorinated silica, fluorinated diamond-like carbon and organic thin films. It is shown that this simple and versatile procedure allows the simultaneous quantification of light elements in thin films with thicknesses in the 200-500 nm range and contents lower than 10 at.%.

  6. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  7. First beam measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrie, Scott R., E-mail: scott.lawrie@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Department of Physics, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Faircloth, Daniel C.; Letchford, Alan P.; Perkins, Mike; Whitehead, Mark O.; Wood, Trevor [ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-08

    In order to facilitate the testing of advanced H{sup −} ion sources for the ISIS and Front End Test Stand (FETS) facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses (VESPA) has been constructed. This will perform the first detailed plasma measurements on the ISIS Penning-type H{sup −} ion source using emission spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the 30-year-old extraction optics are re-designed from the ground up in order to fully transport the beam. Using multiple beam and plasma diagnostics devices, the ultimate aim is improve H{sup −} production efficiency and subsequent transport for either long-term ISIS user operations or high power FETS requirements. The VESPA will also accommodate and test a new scaled-up Penning H{sup −} source design. This paper details the VESPA design, construction and commissioning, as well as initial beam and spectroscopy results.

  8. Coherent Backscattering of Ultra-cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jendrzejewski, Fred; Richard, Jérémie; Date, Aditya; Plisson, Thomas; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain; Josse, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We report on the direct observation of coherent backscattering (CBS) of ultra-cold atoms, in a quasi two dimensional configuration. Launching atoms with a well defined momentum in a laser speckle disordered potential, we follow the progressive build up of the momentum scattering pattern, consisting of a ring associated with multiple elastic scattering, and the CBS peak in the backward direction. Monitoring the depletion of the initial momentum component and the formation of the angular ring profile allow us to determine microscopic transport quantities. The time resolved evolution of the CBS peak is studied and is found a fair agreement with predictions, at long times as well as at short times. The observation of CBS can be considered a direct signature of coherence in quantum transport of particles in disordered media. It is responsible for the so called weak localization phenomenon, which is the precursor of Anderson localization.

  9. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  10. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  11. CHANGES OF BACKSCATTERING PARAMETERS DURING CHILLING INJURY IN BANANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORHASHILA HASHIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in backscattering parameters during the appearance of chilling injury in bananas was investigated. Bananas were stored at a chilling temperature for two days and the degrees of the chilling injuries that appeared were measured before, during and after storage using backscattering imaging and visual assessment. Laser lights at 660 nm and 785 nm wavelengths were shot consecutively onto the samples in a dark room and a camera was used to capture the backscattered lights that appeared on the samples. The captured images were analysed and the changes of intensity against pixel count were plotted into graphs. The plotted graph provides useful information of backscattering parameters such as inflection point (IP, slope after inflection point (SA, and full width at half maximum (FWHM and saturation radius (RSAT. Results of statistical analysis indicated that there were significant changes of these backscattering parameters as chilling injury developed.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering process in dislocation-containing SrTiO{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwik, P., E-mail: przemyslaw.jozwik@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Sathish, N. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); Nowicki, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Jagielski, J.; Turos, A. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Kovarik, L.; Arey, B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Studies of defects formation in crystals are of obvious importance in electronics, nuclear engineering and other disciplines where materials are exposed to different forms of irradiation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are the most convenient tool for this purpose, as they allow one to determine several features of lattice defects: their type, concentration and damage accumulation kinetic. On the other hand various irradiation conditions can be efficiently modeled by ion irradiation method without leading to the radioactivity of the sample. Combination of ion irradiation with channeling experiment and MC simulations appears thus as a most versatile method in studies of radiation damage in materials. The paper presents the results on such a study performed on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) single crystals irradiated with 320 keV Ar ions. The samples were analyzed also by using HRTEM as a complementary method which enables the measurement of geometrical parameters of crystal lattice deformation in the vicinity of dislocations. Once the parameters and their variations within the distance of several lattice constants from the dislocation core are known, they may be used in MC simulations for the quantitative determination of dislocation depth distribution profiles. The final outcome of the deconvolution procedure are cross-sections values calculated for two types of defects observed (RDA and dislocations)

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of backscattering process in dislocation-containing SrTiO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, P.; Sathish, N.; Nowicki, L.; Jagielski, J.; Turos, A.; Kovarik, L.; Arey, B.

    2014-05-01

    Studies of defects formation in crystals are of obvious importance in electronics, nuclear engineering and other disciplines where materials are exposed to different forms of irradiation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are the most convenient tool for this purpose, as they allow one to determine several features of lattice defects: their type, concentration and damage accumulation kinetic. On the other hand various irradiation conditions can be efficiently modeled by ion irradiation method without leading to the radioactivity of the sample. Combination of ion irradiation with channeling experiment and MC simulations appears thus as a most versatile method in studies of radiation damage in materials. The paper presents the results on such a study performed on SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals irradiated with 320 keV Ar ions. The samples were analyzed also by using HRTEM as a complementary method which enables the measurement of geometrical parameters of crystal lattice deformation in the vicinity of dislocations. Once the parameters and their variations within the distance of several lattice constants from the dislocation core are known, they may be used in MC simulations for the quantitative determination of dislocation depth distribution profiles. The final outcome of the deconvolution procedure are cross-sections values calculated for two types of defects observed (RDA and dislocations).

  14. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia [Division of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: cecilia.jarlskog@matfys.lth.se

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008.

  15. Mean magnetic field calculation program with allowance for flutter for isochronous cyclotron (Cyclotron Analytic Model Program - CAMP)

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyan, I N; Vorozhtsov, S B

    2002-01-01

    The Cyclotron Analytic Model Program (CAMP) written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the mean magnetic field calculation of the isochronous cyclotron with allowance for flutter. The program algorithm was developed on the basis of the paper 'Calculation of Isochronous Fields for Sector-Focused Cyclotrons', by M.M.Gordon (Particle Accelerators. 1983. V.13). The accuracy of the calculations, performed with this program, was tested with the use of maps of isochronous magnetic fields of different cyclotrons with the azimuthally varying fields - AVF cyclotrons, in which the ion beams were produced. The calculation by CAMP showed that the isochronous mean magnetic field curve for the measured magnetic field, in which the ion beam was produced, exactly corresponded to the curve of the isochronous mean magnetic field, calculated with the allowance for flutter for all the AVF cyclotrons that were considered. As is evident from the calculations, this program can be used for cal...

  16. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for ITER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, W; Austin, M; Beno, J; Ellis, R; Feder, R; Ouroua, A; Patel, A; Phillips, P

    2010-10-01

    Electron temperature measurements and electron thermal transport inferences will be critical to the nonactive and deuterium phases of ITER operation and will take on added importance during the alpha heating phase. The diagnostic must meet stringent criteria on spatial coverage and spatial resolution during full field operation. During the early phases of operation, it must operate equally well at half field. The key to the diagnostic is the front end design. It consists of a quasioptical antenna and a pair of calibration sources. The radial resolution of the diagnostic is less than 0.06 m. The spatial coverage extends at least from the core to the separatrix with first harmonic O-mode being used for the core and second harmonic X-mode being used for the pedestal. The instrumentation used for the core measurement at full field can be used for detection at half field by changing the detected polarization. Intermediate fields are accessible. The electron cyclotron emission systems require in situ calibration, which is provided by a novel hot calibration source. The critical component for the hot calibration source, the emissive surface, has been successfully tested. A prototype hot calibration source has been designed, making use of extensive thermal and mechanical modeling.

  17. Cyclotron-based effects on plant gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.; Sobol, M.; Kalinina, Ia.; Bogatina, N.; Kondrachuk, A.

    Primary roots exhibit positive gravitropism and grow in the direction of the gravitational vector, while shoots respond negatively and grow opposite to the gravitational vector. We first demonstrated that the use of a weak combined magnetic field (CMF), which is comprised of a permanent magnetic field and an alternating magnetic field with the frequency resonance of the cyclotron frequency of calcium ions, can change root gravitropism from a positive direction to negative direction. Two-day-old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in a chamber that was placed into a μ-metal shield where this CMF was created. Using this "new model" of a root gravitropic response, we have studied some of its components including the movement of amyloplasts-statoliths in root cap statocytes and the distribution of Ca 2+ ions in the distal elongation zone during gravistimulation. Unlike results from the control, amyloplasts did not sediment in the distal part of a statocyte, and more Ca 2+ accumulation was observed in the upper side of a gravistimulated root for seedlings treated with the CMF. For plants treated with the CMF, it appears that a root gravitropic reaction occurs by a normal physiological process resulting in root bending although in the opposite direction. These results support the hypothesis that both the amyloplasts in the root cap statocytes and calcium are important signaling components in plant gravitropism.

  18. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsche, K.J.

    1989-11-01

    Direct detection of {sup 14}C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of {sup 14}C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring {sup 14}C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as {sup 3}H, and {sup 10}Be, and {sup 26}Al, are discussed. 70 refs.

  19. Conceptual Design Study of 13 MeV Proton Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silakhuddin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the conceptual design of a 13 MeV proton cyclotron for PET (Positron Emission Tomography facility has been carried out. Based on studies on reactions of PET radioisotopes production, reaction cross-sections and some design references, a design of the proton cyclotron is proposed. The design criteria for the main components are decided using empirical and semitheoretical methods, as well as by referring to data regarding cyclotrons for PET production. The empirical method was carried out by using some data from operational experiences of BATAN cyclotron at Serpong, while the semitheoretical method was carried out by using the commonly used equations of cyclotron basic theory. The general layout of components and the main components, namely the ion source, the RF dees, the magnet, and the extractor are discussed. Based on the calculations and on the data used, the cyclotron is designed as a negative ion acceleration cyclotron with internal ion source. The designated proton energy and beam currents are 13 MeV and 50 µA. Its magnetic field is in the relativistic mode with sectors on the pole. The magnetic field intensity at the extraction radius is 12.745 kG and in the innermost radius is 12.571 kG. The magnetic poles consist of four sectors to make adequate space for components placement such as dees, ion source, extractor and beam probe. The dee angle is 430. The dee operates at 78 MHz on the fourth harmonic. A multifoil extractor is chosen to obtain an efficient operation

  20. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  1. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  2. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  3. Cyclotron-based of plant gravisensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.; Kalinina, Ia.; Bogatina, N.; Kondrachuk, A.

    Roots exhibit positive gravitropism they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector while shoots respond negatively and grow opposite to a gravitational vector We first demonstrated the inversion of roots gravitropism from positive to negative one under gravistimulation in the weak combined magnetic field WCMF consisted of permanent magnetic field PMF with the magnitude of order of 50 mu T and altering magnetic field AMF with the 6 mu T magnitude and a frequency of 32 Hz It was found that the effect of inversion has a resonance nature It means that in the interval of frequencies 1-45 Hz inversion of root gravitropism occurs only at frequency 32 Hz 2-3-day old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in moist chambers which are placed in mu -metal shields Inside mu -metal shields combined magnetic fields have been created The magnitude of magnetic fields was measured by a flux-gate magnetometer Experiments were performed in darkness at temperature 20 pm 1 0 C We measured the divergence angle of a growing root from its horizontal position After 1 h of gravistimulation in the WCMF we observed negative gravitropism of cress roots i e they grow in the opposite direction to a gravitational vector Frequency of 32 Hz for the magnitude of the PMF applied formally corresponds to cyclotron frequency of Ca 2 ions This indicates possible participation of calcium ions in root gravitropism There are many evidences of resonance effects of the WCMF on the biological processes that involve Ca 2 but the nature of

  4. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  5. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  6. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  7. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  8. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  9. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Sunwoo [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sunwoo@korea.ac.kr; Kim, Kwang Hyun [Chosun University, 375, Seosuk-Dong, Dong-Gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-30

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  10. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  11. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  12. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  13. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  14. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this effort are to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles and temperature using a zenith looking lidar, designed for a small lander.The lidar...

  15. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  16. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  17. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  18. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  19. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  1. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster...

  2. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  3. Impact of carrier heating on backscattering in inversion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, R.; Palestri, P.; Selmi, L.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modeling are used to investigate quasi-ballistic transport in nanometric metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). In particular, we examine how the thermal nature of the distribution functions, which is implicitly assumed in the most common expression for the backscattering coefficient, leads to an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient in high field conditions and erroneous velocity distribution along the channel. An improved analytical model is proposed, which better captures the nonequilibrium nature of the distribution function and its impact on backscattering and by allowing velocity profiles to exceed the thermal limit. The improved model provides additional insights on the impact of several assumptions on backscattering and could serve as the basis for the development of physically based compact models of quasi-ballistic MOSFETs.

  4. Reson 8101 multibeam backscatter data from Galvez Bank.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the Mariana archipelago between the U.S. Territory of Guam and Farallon De Pajaros Island in the...

  5. Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, T.; Hartzell, R.; Liebermann, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and operation of a Moessbauer backscatter spectrometer with full data processing capability is described, and the investigation of the applicability of this technique to a variety of practical metallurgical problems is discussed. (WHK)

  6. Backscatter--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3319) of Offshore Refugio Beach map area, California. The raster data...

  7. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  8. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  9. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  10. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  11. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The raster...

  12. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  13. Optimal Time Allocation in Backscatter Assisted Wireless Powered Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Bin; Yang, Zhen; Gui, Guan; Sari, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a wireless powered communication network (WPCN) assisted by backscatter communication (BackCom). This model consists of a power station, an information receiver and multiple users that can work in either BackCom mode or harvest-then-transmit (HTT) mode. The time block is mainly divided into two parts corresponding to the data backscattering and transmission periods, respectively. The users first backscatter data to the information receiver in time division multiple access (TDMA) during the data backscattering period. When one user works in the BackCom mode, the other users harvest energy from the power station. During the data transmission period, two schemes, i.e., non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and TDMA, are considered. To maximize the system throughput, the optimal time allocation policies are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model. PMID:28587171

  14. Electric and Magnetic Vertical Focusing Study for 100 MeV High Intensity Proton Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>For the central region design of cyclotrons, the basic problem in the vertical motion is very different from the one in the radial motion. The reason is that vertical tune is almost zero at the center of cyclotrons,

  15. Aerosol Lidar for the Relative Backscatter Amplification Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.; Nadeev, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter amplification presents only in a turbulent atmosphere, when the laser beam is propagates twice through the same inhomogeneities. We proposed technical solution to detect backscatter amplification. An aerosol micro pulse lidar with a beam expansion via receiving telescope was built to study this effect. Our system allows simultaneous detection of two returns from the same scattering volume: exactly on the axis of the laser beam and off the axis.

  16. A Laboratory Investigation into Microwave Backscattering from Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    froze to form saline slush ice. Continued freezing of * the salty water directly beneath the slush ice led to the formation of columnar-textured...significant influence on backscatter from extremely smooth saline ice at C band. We determined that backscatter at C band from moderately smooth desalinated ...that volume scatter from desalinated ice is important at X band and that it is dominant at Ku band at angles of 100 or more from nadir Conclusions

  17. Analysis of forest backscattering characteristics based on polarization coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to make an inventory of vertical profiles of forest structure parameters in field measurements.However,analysis and understanding of forest backscattering characteristics contribute to estimation and detection of forest vertical structure because of the close relationships between backscattering characteristics and structure parameters.The vertical structure function in the complex interferometric coherence definition,which represents the vertical variation of microwave scattering with the penetration depth at a point in the 2-D radar image and can be used to analyze the forest backscattering characteristics,can be reconstructed from polarization coherence tomography(PCT).Based on PCT,the paper analyzes the forest backscattering characteristics and explores the inherent relationship between the result of PCT and the forest structure parameters from numerical simulation of Random Volume over Ground model(RVoG),Polarimetric SAR interferometry(PolInSAR)simulation of forest scene and PolInSAR data at L-band of the test site Traunstein.Firstly,the effects of the extinction coefficient and surface-to-volume scattering ratio in RVoG model on vertical backscattering characteristics are analyzed by means of numerical simulation.Secondly,by applying PCT to L-band POLInSAR simulations of forest scene,different variations of vertical backscattering due to different extinction coefficients and the ratios of surface-to-volume scattering resulting from different polarizations,forest types and densities are displayed and analyzed.Then a concept of relative average backscattering intensity is presented,and the factors which affect its vertical distribution are also discussed.Preliminary results show that there is high sensitivity of the vertical distribution of forest relative average backscattering intensity to the polarization,forest type and density.Finally,based on repeat pass DLR E-SAR L-band airborne POLInSAR data,the capability of PCT technology for detection

  18. Vertical Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic for TCV Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman T. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD are used to heat the plasma, to tailor the current profiles and to achieve different operating regimes of tokamak plasmas. Plasmas with ECRH/ECCD are characterized by non-thermal electrons, which cannot be described by a Maxwellian distribution. Non-thermal electrons are also generated during MHD activity, like sawteeth crashes. Quantifying the non-thermal electron distribution is therefore a key for understanding EC heated fusion plasmas. For this purpose a vertical electron cyclotron emission (V-ECE diagnostic is being installed at TCV. The diagnostic layout, the calibration, the analysis technique for data interpretation, the physics potentials and limitations are discussed.

  19. Calibration of the simulation model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković Saša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The MERMAID program will be used to isochronise the nominal magnetic field of the VINCY Cyclotron. This program simulates the response, i. e. calculates the magnetic field, of a previously defined model of a magnet. The accuracy of 3D field calculation depends on the density of the grid points in the simulation model grid. The size of the VINCY Cyclotron and the maximum number of grid points in the XY plane limited by MERMAID define the maximumobtainable accuracy of field calculations. Comparisons of the field simulated with maximum obtainable accuracy with the magnetic field measured in the first phase of the VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field measurements campaign has shown that the difference between these two fields is not as small as required. Further decrease of the difference between these fields is obtained by the simulation model calibration, i. e. by adjusting the current through the main coils in the simulation model.

  20. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  1. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  2. Accelerators for hadrontherapy: From Lawrence cyclotrons to linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Braccini, S., E-mail: Saverio.Braccini@cern.ch; Crescenti, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Garlasche, M.; Garonna, A.; Magrin, G.; Mellace, C.; Pearce, P.; Pitta, G.; Puggioni, P.; Rosso, E.; Verdu Andres, S.; Wegner, R.; Weiss, M.; Zennaro, R.

    2010-08-21

    Hadrontherapy with protons and carbon ions is a fast developing methodology in radiation oncology. The accelerators used and planned for this purpose are reviewed starting from the cyclotrons used in the thirties. As discussed in the first part of this paper, normal and superconducting cyclotrons are still employed, together with synchrotrons, for proton therapy while for carbon ion therapy synchrotrons have been till now the only option. The latest developments concern a superconducting cyclotron for carbon ion therapy, fast-cycling high frequency linacs and 'single room' proton therapy facilities. These issues are discussed in the second part of the paper by underlining the present challenges, in particular the treatment of moving organs.

  3. Accelerators for hadrontherapy: From Lawrence cyclotrons to linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Braccini, S; Garlasche, M; Weiss, M; Crescenti, M; Pearce, P; Rosso, E; Wegner, R; Magrin, G; Pitta, G; Amaldi, U; Puggioni, P; Degiovanni, A; Mellace, C; Zennaro, R; Bonomi, R; Garonna, A

    2010-01-01

    Hadrontherapy with protons and carbon ions is a fast developing methodology in radiation oncology. The accelerators used and planned for this purpose are reviewed starting from the cyclotrons used in the thirties. As discussed in the first part of this paper, normal and superconducting cyclotrons are still employed, together with synchrotrons, for proton therapy while for carbon ion therapy synchrotrons have been till now the only option. The latest developments concern a superconducting cyclotron for carbon ion therapy, fast-cycling high frequency linacs and `single room' proton therapy facilities. These issues are discussed in the second part of the paper by underlining the present challenges, in particular the treatment of moving organs. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Calibration of the simulation model of the Vincy cyclotron magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Cirkovic, S; Vorozhtsov, A S; Vorozhtsov, S B

    2002-01-01

    The MERMAID program will be used to isochronise the nominal magnetic field of the VINCY Cyclotron. This program simulates the response, i. e. calculates the magnetic field, of a previously defined model of a magnet. The accuracy of 3D field calculation depends on the density of the grid points in the simulation model grid. The size of the VINCY Cyclotron and the maximum number of grid points in the XY plane limited by MERMAID define the maximum obtainable accuracy of field calculations. Comparisons of the field simulated with maximum obtainable accuracy with the magnetic field measured in the first phase of the VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field measurements campaign has shown that the difference between these two fields is not as small as required. Further decrease of the difference between these fields is obtained by the simulation model calibration, i. e. by adjusting the current through the main coils in the simulation model.

  5. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  6. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope.

  7. New insights into the generalized Rutherford equation for nonlinear neoclassical tearing mode growth from 2D reduced MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.; Pratt, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional reduced MHD simulations of neoclassical tearing mode growth and suppression by ECCD are performed. The perturbation of the bootstrap current density and the EC drive current density perturbation are assumed to be functions of the perturbed flux surfaces. In the case of ECCD, this implies that the applied power is flux surface averaged to obtain the EC driven current density distribution. The results are consistent with predictions from the generalized Rutherford equation using common expressions for Δ \\text{bs}\\prime and Δ \\text{ECCD}\\prime . These expressions are commonly perceived to describe only the effect on the tearing mode growth of the helical component of the respective current perturbation acting through the modification of Ohm’s law. Our results show that they describe in addition the effect of the poloidally averaged current density perturbation which acts through modification of the tearing mode stability index. Except for modulated ECCD, the largest contribution to the mode growth comes from this poloidally averaged current density perturbation.

  8. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, I. G. J. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Donne, A. J. H. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Park, H. K. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Munsat, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  9. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on the large helical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; England, A.; Ito, Y.; Bretz, N.; McCarthy, M.; Taylor, G.; Doane, J.; Ikezi, H.; Edlington, T.; Tomas, J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic system is installed on the large helical device (LHD). The system includes the following instruments: a heterodyne radiometer, a Michelson spectrometer, and a grating polychromator. A 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide system is fully utilized. Large collection optics and notch filters at the frequency of the LHD electron cyclotron heating (ECH) were developed for this system. In addition to these filters, the rectangular waveguide notch filters, the ECE measurement with the radiometer has been successfully performed during the ECH.

  10. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  11. Electron Plasmas Cooled by Cyclotron-Cavity Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Povilus, A P; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Hardy, W N; Hunter, E D; Martens, I; Robicheaux, F; Shanman, S; So, C; Wang, X; Wurtele, J S

    2016-01-01

    We observe that high-Q electromagnetic cavity resonances increase the cyclotron cooling rate of pure electron plasmas held in a Penning-Malmberg trap when the electron cyclotron frequency, controlled by tuning the magnetic field, matches the frequency of standing wave modes in the cavity. For certain modes and trapping configurations, this can increase the cooling rate by factors of ten or more. In this paper, we investigate the variation of the cooling rate and equilibrium plasma temperatures over a wide range of parameters, including the plasma density, plasma position, electron number, and magnetic field.

  12. Optimal Design of Proposed 800 MeV Proton Cyclotron Beam Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jian-jun; LI; Ming; ZHANG; Tian-jue; SONG; Guo-fang; AN; Shi-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The high intensity beam dynamic simulation shows that the theoretic beam current limit of the original design version of the 800 MeV proton cyclotron CYCIEA-800is 1mA.In order to further improve the current limit and reduce beam losses in the cyclotron,the layout of the cyclotron

  13. Analysis of the quench propagation along Nb3Sn Rutherford cables with the THELMA code. Part II: application to the quench longitudinal propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Manfreda, G.; Bajas, H.; Perez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the technology of the new generation of accelerator magnets, prototypes are being manufactured and tested in several laboratories. In parallel, many numerical analyses are being carried out to predict the magnets behaviour and interpret the experimental results. This paper focuses on the quench propagation velocity, which is a crucial parameter as regards the energy dissipation along the magnet conductor. The THELMA code, originally developed for cable-in-conduit conductors for fusion magnets, has been used to study such quench propagation. To this purpose, new code modules have been added to describe the Rutherford cable geometry, the material non-linear thermal properties and to describe the thermal conduction problem in transient regime. THELMA can describe the Rutherford cable at the strand level, modelling both the electrical and thermal contact resistances between strands and enabling the analysis of the effects of local hot spots and quench heaters. This paper describes the model application...

  14. Angioplastia infra-inguinal em pacientes com isquemia crítica grau III, categoria 5 de Rutherford Infra-inguinal angioplasty in patients with critical limb ischemia Rutherford grade III, category 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo Farret Neto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a eficiência da angioplastia primária infra-inguinal como método de salvamento de membros em pacientes portadores de lesões tróficas por isquemia crítica. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 36 pacientes submetidos a angioplastias primárias sem stent. Todos os pacientes apresentavam isquemia crítica com lesão trófica - grau III, categoria 5 de Rutherford -, sendo 17 lesões na artéria femoral superficial, 16 na artéria poplítea e 51 em artérias da perna, totalizando 84 angioplastias. Foram analisadas também as prevalências em relação a sexo, membro afetado, idade e principais comorbidades, sendo tecidas considerações técnicas sobre os procedimentos, assim como os materiais utilizados. RESULTADOS: Considerou-se sucesso quando a lesão trófica que motivou a angioplastia cicatrizou, ou o nível de amputação limitou-se a artelhos ou ao antepé, sem ter havido necessidade de procedimento cirúrgico de reconstituição do fluxo sanguíneo (bypass, independentemente de tempo, drogas associadas e números de desbridamentos realizados. CONCLUSÃO: As angioplastias no segmento femoropoplíteo e infrapoplíteo são procedimentos de elevado sucesso técnico, baixa morbidade e mortalidade, constituindo-se procedimento eficaz em pacientes com isquemia crítica de membro inferior.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of infra-inguinal, primary angioplasty as a method of limb salvage in patients with trophic lesions secondary to critical ischemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients submitted to primary percutaneous transluminal angioplasty without stenting were evaluated. All of them presented critical limb ischemia with trophic lesion (Rutherford grade III, category 5. Eighty-four angioplasties were performed for 17 lesions in superficial femoral artery, 16 lesions in popliteal artery, and 51 lesions in below-knee arteries. Additionally, prevalence in relation to sex, age, limb involved and main comorbidities

  15. Effect of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E; Marshall, Peyton L; Viano, Ann M; Lee, Sang-Rok

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to diagnose osteoporosis. Tissues that lie between the transducer and the ultrasonically interrogated region of bone may produce errors in backscatter measurements. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of intervening tissues on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of bone. Measurements were performed on 24 cube shaped specimens of human cancellous bone using a 5 MHz transducer. Measurements were repeated after adding a 1 mm thick plate of cortical bone to simulate the bone cortex and a 3 cm thick phantom to simulate soft tissue at the hip. Signals were analyzed to determine three apparent backscatter parameters (apparent integrated backscatter, frequency slope of apparent backscatter, and frequency intercept of apparent backscatter) and three backscatter difference parameters [normalized mean backscatter difference (nMBD), normalized slope of the backscatter difference, and normalized intercept of the backscatter difference]. The apparent backscatter parameters were impacted significantly by the presence of intervening tissues. In contrast, the backscatter difference parameters were not affected by intervening tissues. However, only one backscatter difference parameter, nMBD, demonstrated a strong correlation with bone mineral density. Thus, among the six parameters tested, nMBD may be the best choice for in vivo backscatter measurements of bone when intervening tissues are present.

  16. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  17. Fokker-Planck Study of Tokamak Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren; LONGYongxing; DONGJiaqi; LIWenzhong; JIAOYiming; WANGAike

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we add a subroutine for describing the electron cyclotron resonant heating calculation to the Fokker-Planck code. By analyzing the wave-particle resonance condition in tokamak plasma and the fast motion of electrons along magnetic field lines, suitable quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are given.

  18. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritz, A.H.

    1991-11-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

  19. Beam phase measurement in the AGOR-cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, S; Roobol, LP; Schreuder, HW; de Vries, L; Laune, B; Baron, E.; Lieuvin, M.

    1999-01-01

    The AGOR cyclotron is equipped with thirteen phase probes for optimization of the isochronism The beam phase is measured at the 2(nd) harmonic of the RF frequency, in order to be able to suppress the large RF interference from the nearby resonators. At low RF frequencies a phase accuracy of 1 deg. i

  20. Traveling wave ion transport for the cyclotron gas stopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodeur, M., E-mail: maxime.brodeur.2@nd.edu; Joshi, N.; Gehring, A.E.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D.J.; Schwarz, S.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Estimated transport time of thermal ions of 5 ms or less for the cyclotron gas stopper using the ion surfing method. • Experimental investigation of a prototype ion conveyor to transport ions in the magnet magnetic field gradient. • Efficient long-distance ion transport with the conveyor is expected. -- Abstract: Next generation beam thermalization devices such as the cyclotron gas stopper are being developed to efficiently deliver a broad range of radioactive isotopes to experiments. Ion transport methods utilizing a traveling wave were investigated experimentally as part of the developments needed for this device. The “ion surfing” method, which will be used to transports thermal ions inside the main chamber of the cyclotron gas stopper, was found to transport ions at speeds reaching 75 m/s, resulting in net transport times as short as 5 ms. A second traveling wave transport method called the “ion conveyor” was investigated for the challenging task of extracting the ions through the cyclotron gas stopper magnetic field gradient. Results from the first prototype conveyor show a strong pressure and wave amplitude dependance for the transport efficiency. A second prototype designed to operate over a larger pressure range is currently being tested.

  1. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves with frequencies near the cyclotron frequency {Omega}{sub c{sub s}} of a given plasma species s is developed for a multispecies non-neutral plasma column with general radial density and electric field profiles. Terms in the perturbed distribution function up to O(1/{Omega}{sub c{sub s}{sup 2}}) are kept, as are the effects of finite cyclotron radius r{sub c} up to O(r{sub c}{sup 2}). At this order, the equilibrium distribution is not Maxwellian if the plasma temperature or rotation frequency is not uniform. For r{sub c}{yields}0, the theory reproduces cold-fluid theory and predicts surface cyclotron waves propagating azimuthally. For finite r{sub c}, the wave equation predicts that the surface wave couples to radially and azimuthally propagating Bernstein waves, at locations where the wave frequency equals the local upper hybrid frequency. The equation also predicts a second set of Bernstein waves that do not couple to the surface wave, and therefore have no effect on the external potential. The wave equation is solved both numerically and analytically in the WKB approximation, and analytic dispersion relations for the waves are obtained. The theory predicts that both types of Bernstein wave are damped at resonances, which are locations where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local cyclotron frequency as seen in the rotating frame.

  2. Vacuum Pre-designing for CYCIAE-230 Superconducting Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Su-ping; PAN; Gao-feng; LI; Zhen-guo; QIN; Jiu-chang

    2015-01-01

    CYCIAE-230superconducting cyclotron has two separate vacuum system,one is for beam chamber,another is for cryostat.Beam chamber and cryostat shall maintain separate vacuum against atmospheric pressure.The pressure of pumps inlet is better than 1×10-4Pa and the

  3. Digital control in LLRF system for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Wang, Chuan

    2016-05-21

    As a driven accelerator, the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron is designed by China Institute of Atomic Energy for the Beijing Radio Ion-beam Facility project. The cyclotron RF system is designed to use two RF power sources of 100 kW to drive two half-wavelength cavities respectively. Two Dee accelerating electrodes are kept separately from each other inside the cyclotron, while their accelerating voltages are maintained in phase by the efforts of LLRF control. An analog–digital hybrid LLRF system has been developed to achieve cavity tuning control, dee voltage amplitude and phase stabilization etc. The analog subsystems designs are focused on RF signal up/down conversion, tuning control, and dee voltage regulation. The digital system provides an RF signal source, aligns the cavity phases and maintains a Finite State Machine. The digital parts combine with the analog functions to provide the LLRF control. A brief system hardware introduction will be given in this paper, followed by the review of several major characteristics of the digital control in the 100 MeV cyclotron LLRF system. The commissioning is also introduced, and most of the optimization during the process was done by changing the digital parts.

  4. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  5. Unstable Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves Exited by an Ion Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewhat...

  6. Cyclotrons with Fast Variable and/or Multiple Energy Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarten, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the principle possibility of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate sector cyclotrons (and/or FFAGs). If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of drifts) and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the reverse bend - even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in $H_2^+$-cyclotrons, which allow to double the charge to mass ratio by stripping. However the principle could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an $H_2^+$-beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies - for instance 15 MeV, 30 MeV and 70 MeV - thus allowing to have beam on several isotope production targets. In this case it is desired ...

  7. Radiation safety aspects of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, JPM; de Meijer, RJ

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes shielding calculations and skyshine estimates for the new AGOR K=600 superconducting cyclotron facility. Both simple, semi-empirical models and Monte-Carlo simulations were used. The calculations are based on a 200 MeV proton beam incident on a trick aluminum target. Also the

  8. Heavy stable isotope separation by ion cyclotron resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvet, P.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Larousse, B.; Patris, M.

    1994-12-31

    The scientific feasibility of the ion cyclotron resonance process (ICR), as well as the technical one, has been investigated carefully for light metallic elements, whose masses lies between 40 and 100/1,2/. The present work deals mainly with the same demonstration for heavier elements such as ytterbium, gadolinium and barium. Recent results, as well as future prospects, are considered here. (authors).

  9. The development of technology for the improvement of cyclotron performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Y. S.; Ha, J. H.; Lee, M. Y.; Lee, H. S

    1999-05-01

    We show the first-order beam optics theory which is a simplified theory that can be used to carry out the initial design of a cyclotron. Based on this, a computer program has been developed to determine main cyclotron parameters such as number of magnet sectors, sector angle, hill and valley fields, and overall size of the cyclotron etc. We then show the result of two-dimensional magnetic field calculation using POISSON program. By using this program, one can determine magnet yoke geometry and the average magnetic fields etc. Finally, the three-dimensional computer program OPERA-3D had been invoked to determine magnet pole tips (i.e. sector). Validity of the design can be seen by investigating magnetic fields, radial and vertical focusing frequencies as a function of the beam energy. In this report, we show the results of cyclotron magnet design. And we designed 72 MHz RF system and ion source system. We tested RF resonance each coupling methods. We show the result of RF design and prototype operation. Our developed ion source is PIG type. We described our design methods and implementation. We report the result of getting negative hydrogen ion.

  10. A new RF system for a rejuvenated Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The Synchro-cyclotron is shown here shortly after the completion of the improvement programme, which left the steel magnet yoke as almost the only remaining component of the original machine. On the left can be seen the rotary condenser which produces the frequency modulation required for the acceleration (one of a pair available -in this instance ROTCO II). (see photo 7506015)

  11. Radiation safety aspects of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, JPM; de Meijer, RJ

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes shielding calculations and skyshine estimates for the new AGOR K=600 superconducting cyclotron facility. Both simple, semi-empirical models and Monte-Carlo simulations were used. The calculations are based on a 200 MeV proton beam incident on a trick aluminum target. Also the de

  12. Asymmetric Wave Transmission During Electron-Cyclotron Resonant Heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Smits, F. M. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Westerhof, E.

    1995-01-01

    In low density plasmas in the RTP tokamak the single-pass absorption of O-mode waves at the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance is observed to be toroidally asymmetric. The absorption is highest for waves travelling in the direction opposite to the toroidal plasma current. Fokker-Planck

  13. THE DEMINERALIZED WATER SYSTEM FOR THE NRL CYCLOTRON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    handling system was considered impractical to handle this heat load. Therefore, the demineralized water system for the NRL Sector-Focusing Cyclotron...decided to run the water system on a continuous basis. Continuous operation can be dangerous, because it can cause a large leak to occur, but this

  14. Ion-Beam-Excited, Electrostatic, Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  15. Development of beam instruments at JAERI cyclotron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Agematsu, Takashi; Yokota, Watalu; Nara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiteru; Arakawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A beam phase monitor and two kinds of fluence distribution monitors have been developed for measuring characteristics of cyclotron beams. The beam phase monitor provides a beam phase signal for tuning a beam chopping system and a beam phase selection system. A two-dimensional fluence distribution on a large area is measured with fluence distribution monitors. (author)

  16. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-29

    Efforts are reported on the installation and checkout of cyclotron components which had been previously fabricated. Final integration of subsystems and major systems leading to internal beam tests is reported near completion. Progress is reported in relation to control system components, focus and steering magnet design, and rf system testing. (LEW)

  17. Digital control in LLRF system for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Wang, Chuan

    2016-05-01

    As a driven accelerator, the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron is designed by China Institute of Atomic Energy for the Beijing Radio Ion-beam Facility project. The cyclotron RF system is designed to use two RF power sources of 100 kW to drive two half-wavelength cavities respectively. Two Dee accelerating electrodes are kept separately from each other inside the cyclotron, while their accelerating voltages are maintained in phase by the efforts of LLRF control. An analog-digital hybrid LLRF system has been developed to achieve cavity tuning control, dee voltage amplitude and phase stabilization etc. The analog subsystems designs are focused on RF signal up/down conversion, tuning control, and dee voltage regulation. The digital system provides an RF signal source, aligns the cavity phases and maintains a Finite State Machine. The digital parts combine with the analog functions to provide the LLRF control. A brief system hardware introduction will be given in this paper, followed by the review of several major characteristics of the digital control in the 100 MeV cyclotron LLRF system. The commissioning is also introduced, and most of the optimization during the process was done by changing the digital parts.

  18. Effect of Quantizing Magnetic Field on Cyclotron Energy and Cyclotron Effective Mass in Size Quantized Films with Non-Parabolic Energy Band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.(I). GUL(I)YEV; R. F. EM(I)NBEYL(I); A. KORKUT

    2007-01-01

    The Fermi energy, cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass of degenerate electron gas in a size-quantized semiconductor thin film with non-parabolic energy bands are studied. The influences of quantizing magnetic field on these quantities in two-band approximation of the Kane model are investigated. It is shown that the Fermi energy oscillates in a magnetic field. The period and positions of these oscillations are found as a function of film thickness and concentration of electrons. Cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass are investigated as a function of film thickness in detail. The results obtained here are compared with experimental data on GaAs quantum wells.

  19. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  20. Use of cyclotrons in medical research: Past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, James B.; Myers, Lee T.

    1985-05-01

    The use of cyclotrons in medical research started in the late 1930s with the most prominent use being neutron irradiation in cancer therapy. Due to a lack of understanding of the biological effect of neutrons, the results were less than encouraging. In the 1940s and 1950s, small cyclotrons were used for isotope production and in the mid 60s, the biological effect of neutrons was more thoroughly studied, with the result that a second trial of neutron therapy was initiated at Hammersmith Hospital, England. Concurrent with this, work on the use of high energy charged particles, initially protons and alphas, was initiated in Sweden and Russia and at Harvard and Berkeley. The English success in neutron therapy led to some pilot studies in the USA using physics cyclotrons of various energies and targets. These results in turn lead to the present series of machines presently being installed at M.D. Anderson Hospital (42 MeV), Seattle (50 MeV) and UCLA (46 MeV). The future probably bodes well for cyclotrons at the two extremes of the energy range. For nuclear medicine the shift is away from the use of multiple isotopes, which requires a large range of particles and energies to 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F, which can be incorporated in metabolic specific compounds and be made with small 8-10 MeV p+ "table top" cyclotrons. For tumor therapy machines of 60 MeV or so will probably be the choice for the future, as they allow the treatment of deep seated tumors with neutrons and the charged particles have sufficient range to allow the treatment of ocular tumors.

  1. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  2. Measurement of backscatter factor for diagnostic radiology: methodology and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, P.H.G.; Nogueira, M.D.S.; Squair, P.L.; Da Silva, T.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnoogia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN) 30123-970, Minas Gerais (Brazil)]. e-mail: phgr@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic X-ray qualities recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for primary beams (RQR). Harshaw LiF-1 100H thermoluminescent dosemeters used for determining the backscatter were calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to the National Metrology Laboratory. A 300mm x 300mm x 150mm PMMA slab phantom was used for deep-doses measurements. To perform the in-phantom measurements, the dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at five different depths d in the phantom (5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm) upstream the beam direction. The typical combined standard uncertainty of the backscatter factor value was 6%. The main sources of uncertainties were the calibration procedure, the TLD dosimetry and the use of deep-dose curves. (Author)

  3. Backscatter signatures of biological aerosols in the infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Evan; Salciccioli, Nicolas; Brown, David M; Siegrist, Karen; Brown, Andrea M; Thomas, Michael E; Boggs, Nathan; Carter, Christopher C

    2012-04-20

    To develop a deeper understanding of the optical signatures of both biological aerosols and potential interferents, we made field measurements of optical cross sections and compared them to model-based predictions. We measured aerosol cross sections by conducting a hard-target calibration of a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) based on the Frequency Agile Laser (FAL). The elastic backscatter cross sections are estimated at 19 long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths spanning the range from 9.23 to 10.696 μm. The theoretical modeling of the elastic backscatter cross sections is based on the measured refractive index and size distribution of the aerosols, which are used as inputs into Mie calculations. Both model calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement and also indicate the presence of spectral features based on single particle absorption in the backscatter cross sections that can be used as a basis for discrimination for both standoff and point sensors.

  4. Effects of optical backscattering on silicon photonic hybrid laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacradouni, V.; Klein, J.; Pond, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical results on the effect of backscattering at the junctions of double bus ring resonators in a Vernier ring hybrid laser design. The structure is comprised off a pair of III-V gain media evanescently coupled to a silicon on insulator racetrack comprised of a pair of double bus ring resonators coupled together through straight and flared waveguide sections. We show how the small backscattering at the ring resonator junctions has the effect of splitting and shifting the resonances off the clockwise and counter clockwise propagating modes thereby modifying the feedback spectrum from the ideal case. We then simulate results such as light current (LI) curves, relative intensity noise (RIN) and laser spectrum, and compare the laser performance including backscattering effects with the ideal case.

  5. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  6. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  7. Recovering an electromagnetic obstacle by a few phaseless backscattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic scattering from a convex polyhedral PEC or PMC obstacle due to a time-harmonic incident plane wave. It is shown that the modulus of the far-field pattern in the backscattering aperture possesses a certain local maximum behavior. Using the local maximum indicating phenomena, one can determine the exterior unit normal directions, as well as the face areas, of the front faces of the obstacle. Then we propose a recovery scheme of reconstructing the obstacle by phaseless backscattering measurements. This work significantly extends our recent study in Li and Liu (2014 preprint) from two dimensions and acoustic scattering to the more challenging three dimensions and electromagnetic scattering.

  8. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over ~8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10−5, 5×10−6, and 2×10−6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    bbp distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1 + 0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    – The clearest waters sampled were found at

  9. Optical backscattering properties of the "clearest" natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Twardowski

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the BIOSOPE field campaign October–December 2004, measurements of inherent optical properties from the surface to 500 m depth were made with a ship profiler at stations covering over 8000 km through the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Data from a ~3000 km section containing the very clearest waters in the central gyre are reported here. The total volume scattering function at 117°, βt(117°, was measured with a WET Labs ECO-BB3 sensor at 462, 532, and 650 nm with estimated uncertainties of 2×10-5, 5×10-6, and 2×10-6 m−1 sr−1, respectively. These values were approximately 6%, 3%, and 3% of the volume scattering by pure seawater at their respective wavelengths. From a methodological perspective, there were several results:

    – distributions were resolvable even though some of the values from the central gyre were an order of magnitude lower than the lowest previous measurements in the literature;
    – Direct in-situ measurements of instrument dark offsets were necessary to accurately resolve backscattering at these low levels;
    – accurate pure seawater backscattering values are critical in determining particulate backscattering coefficients in the open ocean (not only in these very clear waters; the pure water scattering values determined by Buiteveld et al. (1994 with a [1+0.3S/37] adjustment for salinity based on Morel (1974 appear to be the most accurate estimates, with aggregate accuracies as low as a few percent; and
    – closure was demonstrated with subsurface reflectance measurements reported by Morel et al. (2007 within instrument precisions, a useful factor in validating the backscattering measurements.

    This methodology enabled several observations with respect to the hydrography and the use of backscattering as a biogeochemical proxy:

    –The clearest waters sampled were found at depths between 300 and 350 m, from 23.5° S

  10. Summary of EC-17: the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (Deurne, The Netherlands, 7-10 May 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Austin, M. E.; Kubo, S.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Plaum, B.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is given of the papers presented at the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The meeting covered all aspects of the research field ranging from theory to enabling technologies. From the workshop, advanced control by ele

  11. Influence of Contractility on Myocardial Ultrasonic Integrated Backscatter and Cyclic Variation in Integrated Backscatter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕小军; 邓又斌; 潘敏; 杨好意; 向慧娟; 常青; 黎春雷

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To evaluate the effects of left ventricular contractility on the changes of average image intensity (AII) of the myocardial integrated backscatter (IB) and cyclic variation in IB (CVIB), 7 adult mongrel dogs were studied. The magnitude of AII and CVIB were measured from myocardial IB carves before and after dobutamine or propranolol infusion. Dobutamine or propranolol did not affect the magnitude of AII (13.8±0. 7 vs 14.7±0. 5, P>0. 05 or 14.3±0.5 vs 14.2±0. 4, P>0. 05). However, dobutamine produced a significant increase in the magnitude of CVIB (6.8±0.3 vs 9.5 ± 0. 6, P<0. 001) and propranolol induced significant decrease in the magnitude of CVIB (7.1±0. 2 vs 5.2±0. 3, P<0. 001). The changes of the magnitude of AII and CVIB in the myocardium have been demonstrated to reflect different myocardial physiological and pathological changes respectively. The alteration of contractility did not affect the magnitude of AII but induced significant change in CVIB. The increase of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant rise of the magnitude of CVIB and the decrease of left ventricular contractility resulted in a significant fall of the magnitude of CVIB.

  12. Differential scattering cross-sections, inelastic energy losses and ion fractions in backscattering of keV He sup + ions from monolayer metal adsorbates on solid surfaces measured by means of CAICISS

    CERN Document Server

    Kishi, N

    2002-01-01

    Energy spectra of He atoms and He sup + ions backscattered at an angle of approx 180 deg. by monolayer metal adsorbates (Ag, Sn, Sb, Pb and Bi) on the Si(1 1 1)-sq root 3x sq root 3 surfaces and monolayer Si atoms on the graphite surface have been measured by means of the coaxial impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy technique combined with low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry techniques in the energy range from 0.5 to 3.0 keV. It is found from their data analysis that the ratios of the experimental scattering cross-section to the magic formula of the Thomas-Fermi cross-section for different adsorbates deviate from unity: for instance 1.2 for Si, 0.8 for Ag, 1.5 for Sn, 1.2 for Sb, 1.2 for Pb and 1.6 for Bi. It is also found that the average inelastic energy loss for Si increases monotonically with increasing the incident energy, while those for the other adsorbates increase stepwisely at around 1.0 keV and thereafter gradually. Moreove...

  13. Examination of the Plasma located in PSI Ring Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Schneider, Markus; Stingelin, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    A plasma has been observed inside the vacuum chamber of the PSI Ring Cyclotron. This ionized gas cloud maybe a substantial contributor to several interior components having reduced lifetimes. The plasma's generation has been directly linked to the voltage that is applied to the Flat Top Cavity through visual confirmation using CCD cameras. A spectrometer was used to correlate the plasma's intensity and ignition to the Flat Top Cavity voltage as well as to determine the composition of the plasma. This paper reports on the analysis of the plasma using spectroscopy. The spectrometer data was analyzed to determine the composition of the plasma and that the plasma intensity (luminosity) directly corresponds to the Flat Top voltage. The results showed that the plasma was comprised of elements consistent with the cyclotrons vacuum interior

  14. Vortex dynamics and shear layer instability in high intensity cyclotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-01-01

    We show that the space charge dynamics of high intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam break up behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that beam break up is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  15. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  16. RF cavity design for KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Su, E-mail: jis@kirams.re.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Kim, Hyun Wook; Kim, Chang Hyeuk [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRMAS), 75 Nowon-Gil, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Key Ho [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Natural Sciences Campus, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) has developed a superconducting cyclotron for the carbon therapy, which is called KIRAMS-430. The cyclotron is designed to accelerate only {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions up to the energy of 430 MeV/u. It uses two normal conducting RF cavities. The RF frequency is about 70.76 MHz. The nominal dee voltage is 70 kV at the center and 160 kV at the extraction. The RF cavity was designed with 4 stems by using CST microwave studio (MWS). In this paper, we represent the simulation results and the optimized design of the RF cavity for the KIRAMS-430.

  17. Studies of radioisotope production with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production of radioisotopes to be used mainly for nuclear medicine and biology is studied with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA. A production method of no-carrier-added {sup 186}Re with the {sup 186}W(p,n){sup 186}Re reaction has been developed; this product may be used as a therapeutic agent in radioimmunotherapy due to the adequate nuclear and chemical properties. For the study of the function of plants using a positron-emitter two-dimensional imaging system, a simple method of producing the positron emitter {sup 18}F in water was developed by taking advantage of a highly-energetic {alpha} beam from the AVF cyclotron. (author)

  18. Cyclotron resonance studies on InAs/GaSb heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Petchsingh, C

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared cyclotron resonance is used to study the magneto-optical properties of semimetallic InAs/GaSb heterostructures. Spatially separated two-dimensional electron and hole gases coexist in this 'broken-gap' type-ll system due to charge transfer across the interfaces. Hybridisations of the overlapping electron and hole wavefunctions are investigated experimentally in samples of varying growth parameters. A self-consistent 8-band k centre dot p model is used to assist in the interpretation of experimental results. In samples subjected to varying magnetic field, hybridisations result in oscillations of cyclotron resonance mass, amplitude and linewidth, accompanied by transition splittings in the vicinity of Landau level anticrossings. Asymmetries introduced by InSb interface biasing enhance these effects. Comparison of samples with varying confinement energies (at specified magnetic field) shows effective mass enhancement greater than the standard nonparabolicity effect. The mass enhancement increases wit...

  19. Physics of electron cyclotron current drive on DIII-D

    CERN Document Server

    Petty, C C; Harvey, R W; Kinsey, J E; Lao, L L; Lohr, J; Luce, T C; Makowski, M A; Prater, R

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  20. On the maximum backscattering cross section of passive linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solymar, L.; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1974-01-01

    The maximum backscattering cross section of an equispaced linear array connected to a reactive network and consisting of isotropic radiators is calculated forn = 2, 3, and 4 elements as a function of the incident angle and of the distance between the elements. On the basis of the results obtained...

  1. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  2. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  3. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  4. Using Back-Scattering to Enhance Efficiency in Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P; Hall-Wilton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The principle of using strongly scattering materials to recover efficiency in neutron detectors, via back-scattering of unconverted thermal neutrons, is discussed in general. Feasibility of the method is illustrated through Geant4-based simulations of a specific setup involving a moderator-like material placed behind a single layered boron-10 thin film gaseous detector.

  5. Backscatter C [Fugro]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  6. The Growth and Decay of Equatorial Backscatter Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    spatially connected to bottomside backscatter, a feature noted in Jica - marca radar observations that led Woodman and La Hoz (1976) to speculate that...described in Section Ill-B, this pattern of plume growth resembles the "C-shaped" and "fishtail" patterns found in Jica - marca radar RTI displays of 50-MHz

  7. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  8. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  9. Backscatter gauge description for inspection of neutron absorber content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R. A.; Gibbs, K. M.; Couture, A. H.

    2013-01-19

    This paper describes design, calibration, and testing of a dual He-3 detector neutron backscatter gauge for use in the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel project. The gauge is demonstrated to measure boron content and uniformity in concrete slabs used in the facility construction.

  10. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore Coal Oil Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3302 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3302) of the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area, California. The...

  11. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The raster data...

  12. Transport properties and superconductivity in presence of backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Mattis, D. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics); Rudin, S. (Army Electronics Technology and Devices Lab., Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States))

    1992-04-20

    In this paper, the authors achieve an exact evaluation of the Kubo formula for electrical resistivity, with a model in which random impurity scattering is parametrized by random back-scattering matrix elements. If the alloy is a superconductor, our theory allows us to correlate T{sub c} with the normal-phase resistivity. The results are in nice agreement with experiment.

  13. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    , significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  14. Tracking California seafloor seeps with bathymetry, backscatter and ROVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Daniel L.; Yun, Janet; Maher, Norman; Barry, James; Greene, Gary

    2002-11-01

    The California (USA) margin includes two different tectonic regimes: subduction north of the Mendocino Triple Junction and translation south. Both margins include seeps, and their distribution can be inferred using seafloor bathymetry and backscatter as well as subsurface seismic data. Anomalous bathymetric and backscatter features related to fluid expulsion include headless submarine canyons, fault zones, anticlines, pockmarks, and mud volcanoes. Anomalous backscatter may be caused by authigenic carbonate (related to the bacterial oxidation of methane) or cold seep clams—both have an impedance and roughness that may be higher than the surrounding seafloor. Remote-operated vehicle (ROV) dives to such suspect seep sites document the presence of extensive authigenic carbonate, areally restricted cold seep communities, carpets of chemoautotrophic bacteria, and bubbling gas. Our operations in the Monterey Bay, on the translational California margin, and the Eel River basin, on the convergent margin, indicate that bathymetric and backscatter maps of the seafloor, if sufficiently high resolution, can be used to map seep sites, and that the distribution of such seeps can be used to constrain subsurface conduits of fluid flow. ROVs, due to their combination of visualization, propulsion, manipulation, sonar, and navigation, provide an excellent platform for ground-truthing, mapping, and sampling seafloor seeps.

  15. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method...

  16. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  17. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, A.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  18. Development of Production Procedure of 64Cu on Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ji-xin; CHEN; Yu-qing; LI; Guang; DENG; Xue-song; SHEN; Yi-jia; QIAO; Lai-cheng; LIU; Yu-ping; JIANG; Hua; LI; Gui-qun

    2013-01-01

    Due to intermediate half-life(12.7 h)and favourable coordination chemistry,64Cu is an important emerging medical radionuclide that is suitable for labeling a wide range of radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging and radiotherapy of tumor.The aim of this study is to develop the procedure for 64Cu production on Cyclone-30 cyclotron providing energy from 15-30 MeV.

  19. Heavy ion beam transmission in the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Ayanangsha

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the TRImP program initiated at the KVI in 2002, the AGOR cyclotron was used to accelerate low energy heavy ion beams up to a beam intensity (>=10^12 particles per second). Typical beam ions are: 206Pb accelerated to 8 MeV/amu and 20Ne accelerated to 25 MeV/amu. In the course of b

  20. Multimegawatt DAE$\\delta$ALUS Cyclotrons for Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abs, M; Alonso, J R; Barletta, W A; Barlow, R; Calabretta, L; Calanna, A; Campo, D; Celona, L; Conrad, J M; Gammino, S; Kleeven, W; Koeth, T; Maggiore, M; Okuno, H; Piazza, L A C; Seidel, M; Shaevitz, M H; Stingelin, L; Yang, J J; Yeck, J

    2012-01-01

    DAE$\\delta$ALUS (Decay-At-rest Experiment for $\\delta_{CP}$ studies At the Laboratory for Underground Science) provides a new approach to the search for CP violation in the neutrino sector. High-power continuous-wave proton cyclotrons efficiently provide the necessary proton beams with an energy of up to 800 MeV to create neutrinos from pion and muon decay-at-rest. The experiment searches for $\\bar{\

  1. Design options for an ITER ion cyclotron system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, D. W.; Baity, F. W.; Bigelow, T. S.; Ryan, P. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Carter, M. D.; Stallings, D. C.; Batchelor, D. B.; Hoffman, D. J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent changes have occurred in the design requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron system, requiring in-port launchers in four main horizontal ports to deliver 50 MW of power to the plasma. The design is complicated by the comparatively large antenna-separatrix distance of 10-20 cm. Designs of a conventional strap launcher and a folded waveguide launcher that can meet the new requirements are presented.

  2. Design options for an ITER ion cyclotron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Bigelow, T.S.; Ryan, P.M.; Goulding, R.H.; Carter, M.D.; Stallings, D.C.; Batchelor, D.B.; Hoffman, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2009, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Recent changes have occurred in the design requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron system, requiring in-port launchers in four main horizontal ports to deliver 50 MW of power to the plasma. The design is complicated by the comparatively large antenna-separatrix distance of 10{endash}20 cm. Designs of a conventional strap launcher and a folded waveguide launcher that can meet the new requirements are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Design options for an ITER ion cyclotron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Bigelow, T.S.; Ryan, P.M.; Goulding, R.H.; Carter, M.D.; Stallings, D.C.; Batchelor, D.B.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Recent changes have occurred in the design requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron system, requiring in-port launchers in four main horizontal ports to deliver 50 MW of power to the plasma. The design is complicated by the comparatively large antenna-separatrix distance of 10--20 cm. Designs of a conventional strap launcher and a folded waveguide launcher than can meet the new requirements are presented.

  4. Coaxial Ring Cyclotron as a Perspective Nuclear Power Engineering Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Tumanyan, A. R.; Simonyan, Kh. A.; Mkrtchyan, R. L.; Amatuni, A. Ts.; Avakyan, R. O.; Khudaverdyan, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    The circuit arrangement of the proposed coaxial ring cyclotron (CRC) is described, and its main advantages, such as simple injection technique, several injected beams summation option, high efficiency, are considered. The proposed proton accelerator is a perspective machine for the solution of the main problems of the present day nuclear power engineering as well as for the next-generation nuclear power plants, representing a combination of subcritical reactors and particle accelerators. The ...

  5. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  7. Characterizing Indian Ocean manganese nodule-bearing seafloor using multi-beam angular backscatter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.

    backscattering in delineating seafloor parameters characteristic of nodule-rich sediments. In this paper, processed Hydrosweep multi-beam backscatter data from 45 spot locations in the CIOB (where nodule samples are available) were analysed to estimate seafloor...

  8. BackscatterA [8210]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  9. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  12. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter from maize during water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; van de Giesen, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave backscatter from vegetated surfaces is influenced by vegetation structure and vegetation water content (VWC), which varies with meteorological conditions and moisture in the root zone. Radar backscatter observations are used for many vegetation and soil moisture monitoring applications und

  15. Super-virtual Interferometric Separation and Enhancement of Back-scattered Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect near-surface reflectors with steep dips. A robust surface-wave migration requires the prior separation of the back-scattered surface-wave events from the data. This separation is often difficult to implement because the back-scattered surface waves are masked by the incident surface waves. We mitigate this problem by using a super-virtual interferometric method to enhance and separate the back-scattered surface waves. The key idea is to calculate the virtual back-scattered surface waves by stacking the resulting virtual correlated and convolved traces associated with the incident and back-scattered waves. Stacking the virtual back-scattered surface waves improves their signal-to-noise ratio and separates the back-scattered surface-waves from the incident field. Both synthetic and field data results validate the robustness of this method.

  16. Multibeam Backscatter Data for Selected U.S. Locations in the Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry for selected U.S. locations in the Pacific. The backscatter datasets include data collected using the...

  17. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...