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Sample records for cyclotron produced radionuclides

  1. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry

  2. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  3. Survey on radionuclide producing using cyclotron method in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fadli Mohammad Noh

    2008-01-01

    This research discuss about basic design and systems of medical cyclotron that Malaysia currently have, its applications in radionuclide production and upcoming technologies of cyclotron. Surveys have been carried out on cyclotron facilities at Hospital Putrajaya and Wijaya International Medical Center, WIMC as well as reactor facility at Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The sources in this research also involves on-line and library searches. Information obtained are recorded, categorized, synthesized and discussed. systems of cyclotron of Hospital Putrajaya are further discussed in details. Based from the surveys carried out, it is found out that cyclotron facilities both in Hospital Putrajaya and WIMC only produce ( 18 F)FDG with radioactivity of 18 F produced in 2007 are 16479 mCi and 92546 mCi respectively. Survey also revealed that radioisotope production at Nuclear Malaysia has had its operation been ceased. A new radiopharmaceutical, namely CHOL is suggested to be synthesized by both facilities as a new PET tracer. Latest developments concerning technologies of cyclotron as well as other accelerators such as laser for future medical accelerator, prospect of boron neutron capture and the potential of hadron therapy in Malaysia are discussed here. Radioisotope production in Malaysia is expected to keep booming in future due to increase in usage of PET techniques and the construction of more compact, easy to handle and less costly cyclotrons. (author)

  4. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Larson, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This new DOE proposal appropriately builds on past developments. The development and application of radionuclides for diagnosis, treatment and research has been a continuing concern for more than the past three decades. A brief description of this development and previous achievements was considered important in order to provide a frame of reference for the evolving program here. Earlier, the use of certain radionuclides, radon progeny and I-131 in particular, and also x-rays, had been developed by the work of such pioneers as Failla, Quimby and Marinelli. In 1952, at the instigation of Dr. C.P. Rhoads, Director of both Memorial Hospital and Sloan-Kettering Institute, the restoration of the Department of Physics and Biophysics was undertaken in response to a perceived need to promote the utilization of radionuclides and of high energy radiations for therapeutic, diagnostic and research purposes. This resulted in several research and developmental projects with close clinical collaboration in areas of radiation treatment; medical studies with radionuclides and labeled compounds; the diagnostic uses of x-rays; and some projects in surgery and other clinical areas. Aspects of some of these projects that have had some relevance for the evolving AEC-DOE projects are outlined briefly. 34 refs

  5. Assessment of radionuclidic impurities in cyclotron produced Tc-99m

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; van Lier, E. J.; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan; Zyuzin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2012), s. 1286-1291 ISSN 0969-8051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Technetium-99m * cyclotron * proton irradiation * radionuclidic impurities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.517, year: 2012

  6. Cyclotron produced radionuclides: Guidelines for setting up a facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Establishment of a cyclotron based radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical production facility is a major undertaking regardless of the scope and size of the facility. Regulatory demands of radiation protection and pharmaceutical manufacturing only add to the need for meticulous attention to a large number of factors in overall planning and successful implementation. Also, a significant commitment of resources, not just during the onset of the project, but also for sustained continuity further adds to the already difficult decision making process. In this publication, all these issues have been addressed and discussed conceptually for the benefit of planners and stakeholders of a new facility. The need for a clear vision and realistic scope of the programme has been repeatedly emphasized throughout this book as this aspect of project planning is absolutely vital for defining and achieving the mission and objectives of the facility. The most critical aspects in conceptualization, planning and subsequent implementation have been discussed in detail and are highlighted below as necessary actions: - Performing a feasibility study which balances wishful thinking with project viability; - Forming a task force composed of the stakeholders to evaluate strategically the various aspects of project planning to ultimately recommend the scope and objectives of the facility, and also to formulate the project plan; - Assessing the financial aspects of the project, including the set-up and operating costs of the facility through the development of business models and cost-benefit analyses; - Designing a facility and layout that encompasses the scope of the project and also takes into consideration the regulatory requirements; - Ensuring the availability of appropriately qualified and trained staff, critical for efficient and high quality operation of the facility; - Applying GMP regulations for the production of radiopharmaceutical products which are consistently safe for human use

  7. Biomedical research and application utilizing cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, January 1 1977--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on cyclotron production of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides ( 18 F, 15 O, 11 C, 13 N, 52 Fe, 38 K, 206 Bi, 73 Se, and 48 Cr) for use in the preparation labelled compounds for metabolic research in patients and animals. The chemical preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with cyclotron-produced radionuclides for pancreas and tumor scanning is discussed. The imaging capabilities of a total organ kinetic imaging monitor (TOKIM) gamma camera system operated in the positron coincidence mode were improved with the addition of computerized iterative correction procedures

  8. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides for Diagnosis and Therapy of Human Neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Larson MD

    2009-09-21

    This project funded since 1986 serves as a core project for cancer research throughout MSKCC, producing key radiotracers as well as basic knowledge about thel physics of radiation decay and imaging, for nuclear medicine applications to cancer diagnosis and therapy. In recent years this research application has broadened to include experiments intended to lead to an improved understanding of cancer biology and into the discovery and testing of new cancer drugs. Advances in immune based radiotargeting form the basis for this project. Both antibody and cellular based immune targeting methods have been explored. The multi-step targeting methodologies (MST) developed by NeoRex (Seattle,Washington), have been adapted for use with positron emitting isotopes and PET allowing the quantification and optimization of targeted delivery. In addition, novel methods for radiolabeling immune T-cells with PET tracers have advanced our ability to track these cells of prolonged period of time.

  9. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Comprehensive progress report, February 1, 1992--July 15, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1995-07-17

    This research continues the long term goals of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. This program fits into the nuclear medicine component of DOE`s mission, which is aimed at enhancing the beneficial applications of radiation, radionuclides, and stable isotopes in the diagnosis, study and treatment of human diseases. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology/Immunology; and Imaging Physics. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Section under the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 will be employed in the Pharmacology/Immunology component in the period 1996--1999. Imaging Physics resolves relevant imaging related physics issues that arise during the experimentation that results. In addition to the basic research mission, this project also provides a basis for training of research scientists in radiochemistry, immunology, bioengineering and imaging physics.

  10. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Comprehensive progress report, February 1, 1992--July 15, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This research continues the long term goals of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. This program fits into the nuclear medicine component of DOE's mission, which is aimed at enhancing the beneficial applications of radiation, radionuclides, and stable isotopes in the diagnosis, study and treatment of human diseases. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology/Immunology; and Imaging Physics. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Section under the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 will be employed in the Pharmacology/Immunology component in the period 1996--1999. Imaging Physics resolves relevant imaging related physics issues that arise during the experimentation that results. In addition to the basic research mission, this project also provides a basis for training of research scientists in radiochemistry, immunology, bioengineering and imaging physics

  11. Thin-target excitation functions: a powerful tool for optimizing yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity of cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    loci of the maxima of Y(E,ΔE) curves are present in most cases. As a relevant conclusion, use of target thickness larger than the 'effective' value, is unsuitable from technological point of view, due to larger power density deposited by the beam in target material itself, instead of target cooling system. Finally, this set of Thick-Target Yields and maxima permits calculating the optimum irradiation conditions to produce radionuclides with higher as possible yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity. In order to join the advantages of the accurate knowledge of thin-target excitation functions and cross-sections of radionuclide of interest and its radioisotopic impurities, very selective radiochemical separations were optimized to separate the radionuclide itself from the irradiated target without any addition of isotopic carrier. A large number of very high specific activity radionuclides for environmental, toxicological and biomedical research applications have been produced in No Carrier Added form, by medium energy proton, deuteron and alpha accelerating cyclotrons. Some practical examples of radionuclides produced recently are presented. (author)

  12. Short-lived radionuclides produced on the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron and High-Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of short-lived radionuclides at ORNL includes the preparation of target materials, irradiation on the 86-in. cyclotron and in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and chemical processing to recover and purify the product radionuclides. In some cases the target materials are highly enriched stable isotopes separated on the ORNL calutrons. High-purity 123 I has been produced on the 86-in. cyclotron by irradiating an enriched target of 123 Te in a proton beam. Research on calutron separations has led to a 123 Te product with lower concentrations of 124 Te and 126 Te and, consequently to lower concentrations of the unwanted radionuclides, 124 I and 126 I, in the 123 I product. The 86-in. cyclotron accelerates a beam of protons only but is unique in providing the highest available beam current of 1500 μA at 21 MeV. This beam current produces relatively large quantities of radionuclides such as 123 I and 67 Ga

  13. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on biomedical studies using cyclotron-produced 18 F, 15 O, 11 C, 13 N, 52 Fe, 38 K, 206 Bi, 73 Se, 53 Co, and 43 K. The following research projects are described: tumor detection and diagnosis; neurological studies; radiopharmaceutical development; 38 K as an indicator of blood flow to the myocardium; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes in animals and man; cyclotron development; positron tomographic imaging with the TOKIM System; and review of positron emission transaxial tomograph instruments

  14. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidance on Facility Design and Production of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced rapidly in recent years and is becoming an indispensable imaging modality for the evaluation and staging of cancer patients. A key component of the successful operation of a PET centre is the on-demand availability of radiotracers (radiopharmaceuticals) labelled with suitable positron emitting radioisotopes. Of the hundreds of positron labelled radiotracers, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most successful and widely used imaging agent in PET today. While FDG is utilized largely in oncology for the management of cancer patients, its applications in neurology and cardiology are also steadily growing. A large number of PET facilities have been established in Member States over the past few years, and more are being planned. The design and operation of a facility for the production of FDG requires attention to detail, in particular the application of good manufacturing practices (GMP) guidelines and quality assurance. The product must conform to the required quality specifications and must be safe for human use. This book is intended to be a resource manual with practical information for planning and operating an FDG production facility, including design and implementation of the laboratories, facility layout, equipment, personnel and FDG quality assessment. GMP and quality management are discussed only briefly, since these topics are covered extensively in the IAEA publication Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidelines for Setting up a Facility (Technical Reports Series No. 471). It should be noted that manufacturing processes and quality specifications for FDG are not currently globally harmonized, and these do vary to some extent. However, there is no disagreement over the need to ensure that the product is manufactured in a controlled manner, that it conforms to applicable quality specifications and that it is safe for human use. Administrators, managers, radiopharmaceutical scientists, production

  15. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidance on Facility Design and Production of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced rapidly in recent years and is becoming an indispensable imaging modality for the evaluation and staging of cancer patients. A key component of the successful operation of a PET centre is the on-demand availability of radiotracers (radiopharmaceuticals) labelled with suitable positron emitting radioisotopes. Of the hundreds of positron labelled radiotracers, 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most successful and widely used imaging agent in PET today. While FDG is utilized largely in oncology for the management of cancer patients, its applications in neurology and cardiology are also steadily growing. A large number of PET facilities have been established in Member States over the past few years, and more are being planned. The design and operation of a facility for the production of FDG requires attention to detail, in particular the application of good manufacturing practices (GMP) guidelines and quality assurance. The product must conform to the required quality specifications and must be safe for human use. This book is intended to be a resource manual with practical information for planning and operating an FDG production facility, including design and implementation of the laboratories, facility layout, equipment, personnel and FDG quality assessment. GMP and quality management are discussed only briefly, since these topics are covered extensively in the IAEA publication Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidelines for Setting up a Facility (Technical Reports Series No. 471). It should be noted that manufacturing processes and quality specifications for FDG are not currently globally harmonized, and these do vary to some extent. However, there is no disagreement over the need to ensure that the product is manufactured in a controlled manner, that it conforms to applicable quality specifications and that it is safe for human use. Administrators, managers, radiopharmaceutical scientists

  16. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1978-09-30

    Progress is reported on biomedical studies using cyclotron-produced /sup 18/F, /sup 15/O, /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, /sup 52/Fe, /sup 38/K, /sup 206/Bi, /sup 73/Se, /sup 53/Co, and /sup 43/K. The following research projects are described: tumor detection and diagnosis; neurological studies; radiopharmaceutical development; /sup 38/K as an indicator of blood flow to the myocardium; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes in animals and man; cyclotron development; positron tomographic imaging with the TOKIM System; and review of positron emission transaxial tomograph instruments. (HLW)

  17. Cyclotron produced {sup 67}Ga, a potential radionuclide for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu-khandaker@um.edu.my; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Production cross-sections of the {sup nat}Zn(d,x){sup 67}Ga reactions have been measured from a 24-MeV deuteron energy down to the threshold by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. An overall good agreement is found with some of the earlier measurements, whereas a partial agreement is obtained with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yield for the {sup 67}Ga radionuclide was deduced using the measured cross-sections, and found in agreement with the directly measured yield available in the literature. This study reveals that a low deuteron energy (<11 MeV) cyclotron and an enriched {sup 66}Zn target could be used to obtain {sup 67}Ga in no carrier added form.

  18. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopicka, K.; Fiser, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanc, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides /compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed. (author)

  19. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides: Progress report, February 1, 1988-September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Bading, J.R.; Balis, M.E.; Benua, R.S.; Brennan, M.F.; Gelbard, A.S.

    1988-09-01

    This report covers the completion of research carried out in the second year of a 3 year grant. During this period the new gamma camera system, which was designed in the Biophysics Laboratory and whose fabrication was funded by the Institute, was completed and bought into operation. It has capability to monitor simultaneously 3 different radionuclide labels, and to do so rapidly. These features are essential to the metabolic studies being carried out collaboratively by Dr. James Bading and Dr. Brennan's surgical research team. Design and fabrication of this instrument was essential regardless of whether there was access to a PET unit or not. Another instrumental development is the replacement of the cyclotron magnet coils, the addition of harmonic tuning coils and other improvements. The metabolic study program with labeled amino acids in man and animals has progressed significantly as is summarized. The list of compounds prepared and labeled with positron-emitting nuclides in our laboratory, some originally prepared here, illustrates another vital and active contribution to metabolic research from this laboratory

  20. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, February 1987--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.

    1989-12-31

    This report is divided into six sections, each section dealing with a separate aspect of the program. The six sections are entitled (1) In Vivo Measurement of Amino Acid Transport and Protein Synthesis, (2) Angiogenesis in Human Gliomas: Correlations with Blood Flow and Transport of C-11 AIB, (3) Use of F-18 Fluoropyrimidines for Design and Evaluation of Regional and Systemic Chemotherapeutic Strategies in Human Adenocarcinomas of the Gastrointestinal Tract, (4) Enzymatic Synthesis of Metabolites Labeled with N-13 or C-11, (5) Synthesis of Amino Acids Labeled with C-11, and (6) Instrumentation: Cyclotron and Imaging Systems.

  1. Biomedical research with cyclotron-produced radionuclides. Progress report, August 1, 1982-July 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Gelbard, A.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The contents include brief descriptions of the following research programs: an evaluation of chemotherapeutic regimens in solid tumors with N-13 labelled L-amino acids, studies of N-13 L-amino acid metabolism in vivo, and evaluation of N-13 labelled amino acids and ammonia for physiological studies of patients undergoing chemotherapy; biological studies with N-13 and C-11 labelled amino acids and ammonia; synthesis and development of N-13 and, C-11 labelled compounds; data analysis, modelling and instrumentation; and radionuclide production

  2. The preparation of organic radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds using short-lived cyclotron-produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenhut, G.J.; Koch, H.

    1982-01-01

    Accelerator-produced nuclides and radiopharmaceutical production are discussed with examples of pertinent methods of isotope production, methods of incorporation into organic molecules, and the general problems attandant on the production and use of these materials in this new and interdisciplinary effort. The literature is surveyed with stress being given to the use of 11 C, 13 N and 15 O. 205 references are included. (author)

  3. Producing new radionuclides for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Arronax cyclotron, a new particle accelerator dedicated to the production of radionuclides for medicine and research has been commissioned in Nantes (France). Because of its unique features: an energy of 70 MeV and an intensity of 750 μA, Arronax will produce radionuclides that can not be produce in present cyclotrons. Among others it will produce Strontium-82 and Germanium-68 that are the precursors for Rubidium-82 and Gallium-68 respectively. 20 per cent of the research works will be dedicated to other domains like radioactive wastes, the radiation biological damage and the radiation damage on electronic devices. (A.C.)

  4. Trends in cyclotrons for radionuclide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The IAEA recently concluded a worldwide survey of the cyclotrons used for radionuclide production. Most of the institutions responded to the questionnaire. The responses identified technical, utilisation and administrative information for 206 cyclotrons. Compiled data includes the characteristics, performance and popularity of each of the different commercial cyclotrons. Over 20 cyclotrons are scheduled for installation in 1998. The expansion in the number of cyclotron installations during the last decade was driven by the advent of advances in medical imaging instrumentation (namely, positron emission tomography (PET), and more recently by 511 KeV emission tomography); introduction of user friendly compact medical cyclotrons; and recent governmental decisions that permit reimbursement for cyclotron radiopharmaceutical studies by the government or insurance companies. The priorities for the production of clinical, commercial and research radionuclides were identified. The emphasis is on radionuclides used for medical diagnosis with SPET (e.g. 123 I, 201 Tl) and PET (e.g. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O, 18 F) radiopharmaceuticals, and for individualized patient radiation treatment planning (e.g. 64 Cu, 86 Y, 124 I) with PET. There is an emerging trend to advance the cyclotron as an alternative method to nuclear reactors for the production of neutron-rich radionuclides (e.g. 64 Cu, 103 Pd, 186 Re) needed for therapeutic applications. (authors)

  5. 57 Co produced in cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landini, Liliane; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    2000-01-01

    The Cyclotron CV-28 of IPEN-CNEN/SP is a particle accelerator, used mainly in the radioisotope production, applied in 'in vivo' diagnosis in nuclear medicine. Some of them are employed in the calibration of Diagnosis equipment, such as gamma and X-rays detectors. Co-57 is an example of this application. A natural nickel foil was used as target and irradiated with proton beams of 24 MeV energy. The radioactivity analysis of the irradiated target was performed by Gamma Spectroscopy with a HPGe detector. A 259,74MBq (7,02 mCi) Co-57 source was prepared, 67 days after the last bombardment, with impurity levels of 1.13% for Co-56 and 1.29% for Co-58. The thick target yields for Co-57 and for the main radionuclidic impurities were measured, after the chemical separation of the irradiated target, extrapolated to the last EOB: 1.076 MBq (29.09 mCi)/mA.h, 0.012 MBq (0.33 mCi)/mA.h and 0.014 MBq (0.37 mCi)/mA.h, for Co-57, Co-56 and Co-58, respectively. (author)

  6. Standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2000-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department (CRP) is an advanced and modern facility that encompasses two essential components: radioisotope research, and radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing. Radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program is not only quite unique, but also an essential component of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC) in providing quality patient care for the population of the Kingdom. Accurate diagnosis and therapy with medical imaging equipment requires quality radiopharmaceuticals that are available readily and with reliability. The CRP Department provides that quality and reliability. Research activities of the CRP Department are focused on developing new radiotracers with potential usefulness in biomedical research and clinical applications. Research projects consist of: developing cyclotron targetry for radioisotope production; developing synthesis methods for radiolabeling biomolecules; and developing analytical methods for quality control. The CRP Department operates a semi-commercial radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program that supplies the diagnostic radioactive products to several hospitals in the Kingdom and neighboring countries. These products for clinical applications are produced according to the international standards of Good Manufacturing Practices of quality and efficacy. At the heart of the radioisotope program is a medium energy cyclotron capable of accelerating a number of particles for transformation of non-radioactive atoms into radionuclides that are the primary sources for research and development activities, and for preparing radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to having the only cyclotron facility in the region, KFSH and RC also has the only Positron Emission Tomography Center (PET) in this part of the world. This combination of cyclotron and the ultra modern PET facility translates into advanced and specialized care for the patients at KFSH and RC

  7. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production is an update of the data base on cyclotrons that was compiled in 1983 by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The directory contains technical, utilization and administrative information supplied to the IAEA as of October 1997. The directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires sent to institutions that either have a cyclotron, or that were identified to be in the process of installation of a cyclotron. The directory contains 206 entries for cyclotrons operating in 34 Member States. The largest concentration of cyclotrons for radionuclide production are located in the United States of America (66), Japan (33) and Germany (22). The largest number of cyclotrons for a single country is the United States of America. The expansion in number of cyclotrons during the last decade has been driven by the advent of advances in medical imaging instrumentation (PET, SPET and more recently 511 KeV emission tomography); introduction of user friendly compact medical cyclotrons from several companies that manufacture cyclotrons; and recent decisions that {sup 15}O-oxygen PET studies in Japan, and {sup 18}F-FDG PET studies in Germany are eligible for reimbursement by government or insurance companies.

  8. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production is an update of the data base on cyclotrons that was compiled in 1983 by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The directory contains technical, utilization and administrative information supplied to the IAEA as of October 1997. The directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires sent to institutions that either have a cyclotron, or that were identified to be in the process of installation of a cyclotron. The directory contains 206 entries for cyclotrons operating in 34 Member States. The largest concentration of cyclotrons for radionuclide production are located in the United States of America (66), Japan (33) and Germany (22). The largest number of cyclotrons for a single country is the United States of America. The expansion in number of cyclotrons during the last decade has been driven by the advent of advances in medical imaging instrumentation (PET, SPET and more recently 511 KeV emission tomography); introduction of user friendly compact medical cyclotrons from several companies that manufacture cyclotrons; and recent decisions that 15 O-oxygen PET studies in Japan, and 18 F-FDG PET studies in Germany are eligible for reimbursement by government or insurance companies

  9. Investigation of radiopharmaceuticals from cyclotron produced radionuclides and development of mathematical models. Part of a coordinated programme on production of radiopharmaceuticals from accelerator-produced isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaus, I.

    1983-04-01

    Several radioisotopes for diagnostic uses in nuclear medicine studies are produced using the internal 15 MeV (30 MeV alphas) deuteron beam of the ''Ruder Boskovic'' Institute in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Some of the most important radioisotopes produced during the last few years are: Gallium-67 (d, xn reaction on a Cu/Ni/Zn target) with yield of 7.6 MBq/uAh, 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu 2 Br 2 target) with a yield of 99 MBq/uAh, Iodine-123 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Ag/Sb target) with a yield of 6.3 MBq/uAh, and Indium-111 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu/Ag target) with a yield of 7.2 MBq/uAh. In addition, a simple mathematical lung model for regional ventilation measurements was developed and used for ventilation studies on normal subjects and subjects with various lung diseases. Based on these studies, a more sophisticated and quantitative lung ventilation model for radioactive tracer tidal breathing was further developed. In this new model, the periodicity of breathing is completely taken into account, and it makes possible to actually determine lung ventilation and volume parameters. The model is experimentally verified on healthy subjects, and the value of the effective specific ventilation obtained is in agreement with comparable parameters in the literature. sup(81m)Kr from a generator was used to perform these experimental studies

  10. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wolf, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11 C and 18 F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  11. Manufacturing on the radiopharmaceuticals produced by cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Nobuo

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical (RP) produced by cyclotrons are widely used for the in vivo diagnosis of various diseases such as cancer, cerebral vascular disorders and cardiac diseases. The nuclides used as RPs and their nuclear reactions, and the quantity of RPs supplied in Japan in the last five years are shown. These RPs are delivered to about 1,100 hospitals in Japan. Thallium-201 and iodine-123 showed very high growth rate. Recently, two new I-123 RPs, BMIPP and MIBG which are heart-imaging agents, have been supplied. It suggests that the quantity of I-123 will increase much more in future. The image diagnostic method using RPs is called in vivo nuclear medicine, and has become the indispensable means for medical institutions together with X-ray CT, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonic diagnosis. The RPs for in vivo diagnosis generally used at present are classified into those labeled with the RIs produced with cyclotrons and those labeled with Tc-99m formed by the decay of Mo-99. The quantity being used is overwhelmingly more in the latter, but the former shows the tendency of growth. The commercial production of cyclotron RIs for medical use, the chemical forms and the diagnostic purposes of the RPs using cyclotron RIs, and the state of use of the cyclotron-produced RPs are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Report of the consultants' meeting on target and processing technologies for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    Cyclotron produced radionuclides are used routinely for the diagnosis of a wide variety of diseases. Recently a number of radionuclides available from cyclotrons have been proposed for use in radiotherapy. In fact Pd-103 has become routinely available in some parts of the world for incorporation into brachytherapy seeds for treating prostate cancer. The consultants meeting reviewed the status of target and processing technologies associated with cyclotron production of radionuclides. The main topics of discussion included the basic nuclear data that is crucial to the production of the desired radionuclides, gas and solid target systems, the automated chemical processing units, the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) required in order to use these radionuclides in human patients in a safe and efficacious manner and a review of possible candidate nuclides that show promise for use in Nuclear Medicine in the near future. Advances in the preparation of solid targets using electroplating technology has created the possibility of preparing targets capable of operating at very high beam currents which would make the production of large quantities of SPECT agents possible at cyclotron facilities throughout the world. Recognising the needs of the developing countries which have established cyclotron facilities, the consultants focussed on how to provide the technology for preparing solid targets that could be used in the existing facilities. While solid target technology can be used for many radionuclides the report concentrated on several key radionuclides, which are of current importance or show potential for use in the near future. Tl-201 is currently used for cardiac profusion studies throughout the world. New target preparation techniques could potentially make many of the member states self sufficient in the production of this nuclide. I-123 has tremendous potential because of the near ideal photon energy for SPECT cameras and its well-understood chemistry. However, it

  13. Cyclotron Production of Radionuclides for Nuclear Medicine at Academic Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging has led to the development of new accelerator targetry and separation techniques for isotope production. For example, the development of longer-lived position emitting radionuclides has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller cyclotrons (10-25 MeV) at academic or hospital based facilities. Recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 76Br and others. The smaller scale of these types of facilities can enable the straightforward involvement of students, thus adding to the next generation of nuclear science leaders. Research pertaining to development of robust and larger scale production technologies including solid target systems and remote systems for transport and purification of these isotopes has enabled both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases. In particular, our group has focused on the use of radiolabeled antibodies for imaging of receptor expression in preclinical models and in a clinical trial of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  14. Sensitivities and interferences in activation analysis with cyclotron-produced fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esprit, M.; Vandecasteele, C.; Hoste, J.

    1985-01-01

    Fast neutrons are produced by irradiation of a thick beryllium target with deuterons from a cyclotron. The spatial neutron flux distribution was studied. Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometry was used to measure the radionuclides produced. Detection limits are tabulated along with the nuclear interferences. (author)

  15. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.

    1979-09-01

    Progress is reported on: metabolic and tumor localization in man and animals; radiodrug development; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes; and radioactive material transfer system. Based on experience with /sup 13/N-glutamate in osteogenic sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, we conclude that (a) the /sup 13/N label enters tumor tissue rapidly at a rate similar to that at which activity leaves the blood, suggesting that the labeled glutamate itself is being transported into the tumor rather than some labeled metabolite; (b) uptake in the tumor is related to its metabolic activity, but factors such as blood flow are also important; (c) changes in the glutamate scan accurately reflect the response of osteogenic sarcoma to pre-operative chemotherapy as measured by conventional means, and that it is desirable to extend this experience to other types of tumors. /sup 13/N-Glutamate (and other /sup 13/N-labeled compounds) afford several advantages over conventional tumor imaging agents, such as rapid blood clearance and localization, low radiation exposure and the possibility of obtaining accurate, three-dimensional quantitative images via positron emission tomography. It is doubtful that these advantages will justify the routine use of /sup 13/N-glutamate to detect tumors or to monitor therapy except in clinical situations where conventional techniques are unsatisfactory. The value of /sup 1/3N-glutamate is as a tool to assess the metabolic requirement of neoplastic tissue in cancer patients in-vivo. (PCS)

  16. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.

    1979-09-01

    Progress is reported on: metabolic and tumor localization in man and animals; radiodrug development; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes; and radioactive material transfer system. Based on experience with 13 N-glutamate in osteogenic sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, we conclude that (a) the 13 N label enters tumor tissue rapidly at a rate similar to that at which activity leaves the blood, suggesting that the labeled glutamate itself is being transported into the tumor rather than some labeled metabolite; (b) uptake in the tumor is related to its metabolic activity, but factors such as blood flow are also important; (c) changes in the glutamate scan accurately reflect the response of osteogenic sarcoma to pre-operative chemotherapy as measured by conventional means, and that it is desirable to extend this experience to other types of tumors. 13 N-Glutamate (and other 13 N-labeled compounds) afford several advantages over conventional tumor imaging agents, such as rapid blood clearance and localization, low radiation exposure and the possibility of obtaining accurate, three-dimensional quantitative images via positron emission tomography. It is doubtful that these advantages will justify the routine use of 13 N-glutamate to detect tumors or to monitor therapy except in clinical situations where conventional techniques are unsatisfactory. The value of 1 3N-glutamate is as a tool to assess the metabolic requirement of neoplastic tissue in cancer patients in-vivo

  17. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in Member States [2006 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The present directory of cyclotron facilities used for the production of radionuclides in Member States is an update of the one compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in late 2001 and published in 2002. This directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires that the IAEA sent to known institutions operating cyclotrons for radionuclide production. Technical as well as administrative data supplied to the IAEA as of November 2005 were taken into account. The directory is considered to include most of the cyclotrons of the world that are used at least partially for radionuclide production. There are 262 entries for cyclotrons operating in 39 Member States of the IAEA. This is an increase of 7% over the 246 reported in the 2002 cyclotron directory. This can be compared to the 350 or so cyclotrons believed to be presently operating in the world, which are involved in some aspects of radionuclide production. The increase has been in the number of cyclotrons in developed countries, but even more so in the developing countries. The increase in number during the last four years was driven by several factors, i.e. advent of advances in medical imaging, introduction of compact, user friendly medical cyclotron, and a recent decision that costs for 15 O-oxygen position emission tomography (PET) studies in Japan and 18 F-FDG PET studies in Germany and the United States of America are eligible for reimbursement by government or health insurance companies. There is no doubt that the fastest growing segment of the market is in the commercial distribution of FDG to local hospitals. The IAEA is promoting cyclotron technology as applied to nuclear medicine. Requests for cyclotron technology is steadily increasing; many developing Member States are interested in this technology. There is need to stimulate, build and maintain consulting capability in interested developing Member States. There are good reasons to believe that the number of cyclotron

  18. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J. [Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    1997-12-31

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed. 30 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  19. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed

  20. Cyclotron production of radionuclides in aqueous target matrices as alternative to solid state targetry. Production of Y-86 as example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogg, A.T.J.; Lang, R.; Meier-Boeke, P.; Scheel, W.; Reske, S.N.; Neumaier, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin

    2004-07-01

    Commonly used ''organic'' positron emitting radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, and {sup 15}O are simply obtained from gaseous or aqueous targets, which enable an automated handling of target, i.e. both, filling and radionuclide delivery to a hot cell containing a chemistry processing and/or labelling module. In the recent years other - mostly metallic - radionuclides for PET gained more and more interest, since they can be used as surrogates for therapeutic nuclides attached to biomolecules like peptides or antibodies. The implication for surrogate nuclides results from the circumstance that an optimum dosimetric regime in endo radiotherapy relies on quantitative pharmacokinetic data obtained only by non invasive in vivo PET scans. However, for production of these alternative positron emitters the vast majority of them affords solid targets in form of metal foils, oxide or salt pellets which can not be operated by an automated processing. Those solid target systems have to be mounted and dismounted after irradiation by man, leading to two major disadvantages. First, manual cyclotron intervention is practically unsuited for daily routine radionuclide production and second the operating staff receives high radiation doses from the activated target. An alternative could be the irradiation of aqueous salts of target isotopes, allowing automated target operation. The major requirements are firstly a thermal stability of the dissolved compound, secondly the avoidance of counter ions containing nuclides which produce long-lived radionuclides under irradiation and thirdly a high solubility of the salt in the aqueous matrix. Here we report the proof of principle of the new radionuclide production concept by irradiation of strontium nitrate dissolved in water in order to produce {sup 86}Y (cf.). (orig.)

  1. Cyclotrons, radionuclides, precursors, and demands for routine versus research compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerators for producing commonly used short-lived positron emitters for positron emission tomography are addressed in the context of their use for the preparation of labeled compounds for research and routine biomedical applications. Progress and direction in the preparation and use of radiotracers for studies of the brain are discussed. Advancement to complete automation is stressed as an important factor for the eventual use of positron emission tomography as a routine clinical tool in universities and major medical centers

  2. Preparation of 199Tl radionuclide on U-120 (R-7M) cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glukhov, G.G.; Komov, A.I.; Maslennikov, Yu.S.; Malinin, A.B.; Skuridin, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of preparation of 199 Tl radionuclide, which can be successfully used instead of thallium-201 in radiopharmaceutical compound for medicine diagnosis due to nuclear-physical characteristics, is studied. It is established that thallium-199 free from thallium-298, but with thallium-200 impurity, is formed under irradiation of gold-197 target by 27.2-28 MeV energy α-particles. The construction of a thin-layer gold target allowing to decrease thallium-200 impurity up to >0.5 % is developed and tested. Perspectivity of thallium-199 production at domestic cyclotrons P-7M and u-120 is shown. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  3. Biomedical cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, N.S.; Birdsall, R.; Takahaski, J.; McConnel, L.; Wood, R.; Wakakuwa, S.

    1976-01-01

    During the fifth year of operation the mechanical performance of the cyclotron and accessory equipment was excellent. Major items put into operation were a small computer system interfaced with Ge-Li gamma spectrometer and a pneumatic-tube system for fast delivery of short-lived radionuclides. A table is presented listing the radionuclides produced

  4. Effective dose to immuno-PET patients due to metastable impurities in cyclotron produced zirconium-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfuraih, Abdulrahman; Alzimami, Khalid; Ma, Andy K.; Alghamdi, Ali; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Immuno-PET is a nuclear medicine technique that combines positron emission tommography (PET) with radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for tumor characterization and therapy. Zirconium-89 (89Zr) is an emerging radionuclide for immuno-PET imaging. Its long half-life (78.4 h) gives ample time for the production, the administering and the patient uptake of the tagged radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the nuclides will remain in the tumor cells after the mAbs are catabolized so that time series studies are possible without incurring further administration of radiopharmarceuticals. 89Zr can be produced in medical cyclotrons by bombarding an yttrium-89 (89Y) target with a proton beam through the 89Y(p,n)89Zr reaction. In this study, we estimated the effective dose to the head and neck cancer patients undergoing 89Zr-based immune-PET procedures. The production of 89Zr and the impurities from proton irradiation of the 89Y target in a cyclotron was calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the nuclear reaction code TALYS. The cumulated activities of the Zr isotopes were derived from real patient data in literature and the effective doses were estimated using the MIRD specific absorbed fraction formalism. The estimated effective dose from 89Zr is 0.5±0.2 mSv/MBq. The highest organ dose is 1.8±0.2 mSv/MBq in the liver. These values are in agreement with those reported in literature. The effective dose from 89mZr is about 0.2-0.3% of the 89Zr dose in the worst case. Since the ratio of 89mZr to 89Zr depends on the cooling time as well as the irradiation details, contaminant dose estimation is an important aspect in optimizing the cyclotron irradiation geometry, energy and time.

  5. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Manufacturing and quality control of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals produced by in-house cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish PET diagnosis as a routine clinical tool, manufacture's compliance with regulations under the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principle for PET radiopharmaceuticals is necessary. For this purpose, the Sub-committee on Medical Application of Positron Emitting Radionuclides, Medical Science and Pharmaceutical Committee of Japan Radioisotopes Association has proposed 'Standards for Compounds Labeled with Emitting Radionuclides Approved as Established Techniques for Medical Use'. This guideline includes the general notices, general rules for preparations, general tests for the quality control, quality of each PET agents, guideline for manufacturing environment and manufacturing process at manufacturing facilities of PET agents. Each facility should have a committee and establish an internal system to account for manufacturing compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides produced in the facility, and compile standards by referring to the 'Established Standard Techniques of Labeling Compounds with Emitting Radionuclides for use as Radiopharmaceuticals: approved by the Subcommittee on Medical Application of Cyclotron-Produced Radionuclides (revised in 2009)', in order to maintain the quality of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  6. Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency's Advisory Group meeting on ''Quality control of cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera-Ruiz, H.; Marcus, C.S.; Pike, V.W.

    1990-01-01

    The special requirements for the preparation and quality control of cyclotron-produced tracers have been described with particular reference to the production of short-lived positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The regulatory philosophy and training aspects of implementation are considered followed by various aspects of quality of control including good production practice, chemical purity, radionuclide purity, radiochemical purity, specific activity, shelf-life and sterility and apyrogenicity. Finally some organizational aspects such as legal and regulatory aspects, supply of radiopharmaceuticals and professional liability are considered. (UK)

  7. Proposal on ''standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparman, Ibon

    2000-01-01

    The Center for the Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals - National Nuclear Energy Agency (P2RR-BATAN) has one Cyclotron type CS-30 with maximum 30 MeV proton energy. It is used since 1990 for 201 Tl production. The main use of 201 Tl in Indonesia is for diagnosis and assessment of myocardial ischaemia, especially diagnosis of coronary artery disease, viability of the heart muscle and forecasting the outcome for patients with coronary disease. The Cyclotron facility is supported with a solid target station, two hot cells and the chemical equipment for electroplating. The yield of 201 Tl production currently achieved around 40-50%. The irradiation technique and chemical separation should be improved. We are also very interested in the development of the production of 103 Pd via 103 Rh (p,n) 103 Pd reaction. The objective of this proposal will support the main program of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) in enhancement of health care and in providing Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals for hospitals

  8. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B; Anspaugh, L; Chertok, R; Gofman, J; Harrison, F; Heft, R; Koranda, J; Ng, Y; Phelps, P; Potter, G; Tamplin, A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  9. The fate and importance of radionuclides produced in nuclear events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.; Anspaugh, L.; Chertok, R.; Gofman, J.; Harrison, F.; Heft, R.; Koranda, J.; Ng, Y.; Phelps, P.; Potter, G.; Tamplin, A.

    1969-01-01

    Some of the major program at the Bio-Medical Division concerned with the fate and importance of the fission products, the radionuclides induced in the device materials, the radionuclides induced in the environment surrounding the device, and the tritium produced in Plowshare cratering events will be discussed. These programs include (1) critical unknowns in predicting organ and body burdens from radionuclides produced in cratering events; (2) the analysis with a high-resolution solid state gamma ray spectrometer of radionuclides in complex biological and environmental samples; (3) the characterization of radioactive particles from cratering detonation; (4) the biological availability to beagles, pigs and goats of radionuclides in Plowshare debris; (5) the biological availability to aquatic animals of radionuclides in Plowshare and other nuclear debris and the biological turnover of critical nuclides in specific aquatic animals; (6) the biological availability of Plowshare and other nuclear debris radionuclides to dairy cows and the transplacental transport of debris radionuclides in the dairy cow; (7) the persistence and behavior of radionuclides, particularly tritium, at sites of Plowshare and other nuclear detonations; and (8) somatic effects of Low Dose Radiation: Chromosome studies. (author)

  10. Cyclotron produced Tc-99m: testing compatibility with established kits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Ráliš, Jan; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; van Lier, E. J.; Zyuzin, A.; Moša, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, 2 Supplement (2013), S424-S425 ISSN 1619-7070. [Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). 19.10.2013-23.10.2013, Lyon] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cyclotron U-120M * Tc-99m * 100Mo Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders

  11. Status and perspectives at the cyclotron IFIN-HH Bucharest for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudu, Dorin; Racolta, Petru Mihai

    2000-01-01

    All the radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine are produced artificially using either a nuclear reactor or a cyclotron. By attaching suitable chemical labels to the radioisotopes, radiopharmaceuticals are obtained, which can be made to seek a desired organ by taking part in the metabolic processes. When radiopharmaceuticals are injected into the human body and specifically taken up by an organ of choice, a lack of uptake, or delay in uptake, denotes loss of function in the organ. There are 297 operating research reactors listed in the 1994 IAEA reactor database and this number has been declining over the last ten years. Of these, only 20-25 reactors have the appropriate performance specifications, appropriate operating schedules and the motivation to support the regular 7-day and regular 4-week schedules required for production of nuclides. In numerical terms, it can be argued that there is a vast global over-capacity of neutrons and target positions, but, in practice, the availability of such irradiation positions is significantly compromised by the reactors' own schedules and maintenance shutdowns. This capacity position will be gradually eroded over the next ten years, as many research reactors reach an age beyond which they become economically viable as research tools, and government-based funding programs disappear. Although the majority of the radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine have been produced from research reactors for over 45 years and the methods are generally well established, several new initiatives and developments have occurred recently. One example is 103 Pd which is one of the few accelerator generated isotopes to be in common use for therapy, in this case as a short-lived isotope for permanent implant treatment of prostate cancer. Historically, 103 Pd used to be generated via the 102 Pd(n,γ) 103 Pd reaction which relied on the availability of 1% naturally abundant 102 Pd, in an enriched form and its moderately high neutron capture cross

  12. First meeting on the CRP 'standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, P. van den

    2000-01-01

    The Cyclotron Department of the VUB has three groups performing research in the field of target development, production of radionuclides and their application in nuclear medicine. 1. The Physics Group is busy on the optimization of beam parameters, on the determination of cross sections and on neutron spectrometry. 2. The Inorganic Radiochemistry Group performs research on solid target electroplating (Tl, Zn, Cd, Rh ... ), on optimisation of target carrier geometry and cooling and on automated PC-controlled radiochemistry (Tl-201, Ga-67, In-111) and recovery systems and the associated software written in Modula-2 and Visual Basic. 3. The Organic Radiochemistry Group develops new techniques for radiolabelling of organic molecules (fatty acids, neuroleptics, synthetic polypeptides...) useful in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. All three groups take part in bulk productions of radionuclides

  13. National Medical Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Rex.

    1991-01-01

    The National Medical Cyclotron, under construction at Sydney's Royal Prince Alfred Hospital(RPAH) is to be operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization in collaboration with the hospital. Its main purpose is to produce radioisotopes on commercial basis for distribution to hospitals through Australia as well as short-lived radioisotopes (2 minutes to 2 hours) for immediate application at RPAH in Positron Emission Tomography, to study the dynamics of human physiology and metabolism in organs, bones and soft tissues. A list of the principal cyclotron-produced radionuclides is provided. ills

  14. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop the radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with 12 '3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism

  15. Solid targets and irradiation facilities for production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides at the Debrecen cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkanyi, F.; Ando, L.; Szucs, Z.; Mahunka, I.; Kovacs, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The MGC-20E (NIIEFA, Leningrad, USSR) variable energy compact cyclotron (k=20) was installed in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) in 1985. Protons, deuterons, 3 He- and α-particles can be accelerated with currents up to 300 μA for internal irradiation and up to 50 μA for external beams. The establishment of the Cyclotron Laboratory was partly supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The application of the cyclotron is multipurpose: basic nuclear research, application of activation technique for analytical and wear studies, application of intense fast neutron source for agro-biological, bio-medical application and for radiation damage test of electronic components, and finally radioisotope production for medical diagnostics and for other scientific and applied fields. The cyclotron laboratory has six target rooms, a radiochemistry laboratory and a medical unit equipped with PET

  16. Graphical user interface for yield and dose estimations for cyclotron-produced technetium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, X; Vuckovic, M; Buckley, K; Bénard, F; Schaffer, P; Ruth, T; Celler, A

    2014-07-07

    The cyclotron-based (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction has been proposed as an alternative method for solving the shortage of (99m)Tc. With this production method, however, even if highly enriched molybdenum is used, various radioactive and stable isotopes will be produced simultaneously with (99m)Tc. In order to optimize reaction parameters and estimate potential patient doses from radiotracers labeled with cyclotron produced (99m)Tc, the yields for all reaction products must be estimated. Such calculations, however, are extremely complex and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a graphical user interface (GUI) that would automate these calculations, facilitate analysis of the experimental data, and predict dosimetry. The resulting GUI, named Cyclotron production Yields and Dosimetry (CYD), is based on Matlab®. It has three parts providing (a) reaction yield calculations, (b) predictions of gamma emissions and (c) dosimetry estimations. The paper presents the outline of the GUI, lists the parameters that must be provided by the user, discusses the details of calculations and provides examples of the results. Our initial experience shows that the proposed GUI allows the user to very efficiently calculate the yields of reaction products and analyze gamma spectroscopy data. However, it is expected that the main advantage of this GUI will be at the later clinical stage when entering reaction parameters will allow the user to predict production yields and estimate radiation doses to patients for each particular cyclotron run.

  17. Worldwide dispersion and deposition of radionuclides produced in atmospheric tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    Radionuclides produced in atmospheric nuclear tests were widely dispersed in the global environment. From the many measurements of the concentrations in air and the deposition amounts, much was learned of atmospheric circulation and environmental processes. Based on these results and the reported fission and total yields of individual tests, it has been possible to devise an empirical model of the movement and residence times of particles in the various atmospheric regions. This model, applied to all atmospheric weapons tests, allows extensive calculations of air concentrations and deposition amounts for the entire range of radionuclides produced throughout the testing period. Especially for the shorter-lived fission radionuclides, for which measurement results at the time of the tests are less extensive, a more complete picture of levels and isotope ratios can be obtained, forming a basis for improved dose estimations. The contributions to worldwide fallout can be inferred from individual tests, from tests at specific sites, or by specific countries. Progress was also made in understanding the global hydrological and carbon cycles from the tritium and 14C measurements. A review of the global measurements and modeling results is presented in this paper. In the future, if injections of materials into the atmosphere occur, their anticipated motions and fates can be predicted from the knowledge gained from the fallout experience.

  18. Calorimetric and ionometric dosimetry for cyclotron produced fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Ma, I.C.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    A portable tissue equivalent (TE) calorimeter, constructed of A-150 plastic, has been employed for the measurement of absorbed dose in two fast neutron fields produced by the 9 Be( 3 He,n) and 9 Be(d,n) interactions. A disc shaped ionization chamber has also been constructed of A-150 plastic and has a collecting volume geometrically equivalent to the calorimeter core (2 cm in diameter and 0.2 cm thick). A flow of methane compounded TE gas was maintained through the chamber at a rate of approximately 5 cc/min during the measurements. The ionization chamber was mounted within an irradiation enclosure which simulated the outer dimensions of the calorimeter housing. In this way, both detectors were placed at the same depth in TE plastic and each received approximately the same scattered radiation. The gamma-ray component of absorbed dose has been determined by the use of a miniature Geiger-Mueller dosimeter. It was found that the response sensitivity ratio for the TE ionization chamber in the two neutron fields relative to the 60 Co gamma-ray field, when normalized to the absorbed dose measured by the TE calorimeter, was approximately 1.07. Uncertainties in these calorimetric and ionometric methods for the measurements of the absorbed dose will be discussed along with measurements of the thermal defect for A-150 TE plastic

  19. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, R K [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). National Medical Cyclotron

    1998-12-31

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990`s was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  20. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990's was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year

  1. Short-lived cyclotron-produced radioisotopes: Medi-Physics, Inc.'s commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    Medi-Physics, Inc., is a major US supplier of short-lived cyclotron-produced radioisotopes for radiopharmaceuticals, as well as routinely producing and distributing the greatest number of 123 I radiopharmaceuticals. The present commercial production capacity for 123 I is more than ten times the theoretical need for existing procedures and is more than adequate for the research and development of new radiopharmaceuticals. However, production capacity is only one component of many that are required to supply a radioisotope for human use. These components are summarized in this paper

  2. First-in-Human PET/CT Imaging of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms with Cyclotron-Produced 44Sc-DOTATOC: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aviral; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina; Klette, Ingo; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Baum, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    44 Sc is a promising positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide (T 1/2  = 4.04 hours, E β+average  = 632 keV) and can be made available, using a cyclotron production route, in substantial quantities as a highly pure product. Herein, the authors report on a first-in-human PET/CT study using 44 Sc-DOTATOC prepared with cyclotron-produced 44 Sc. The production of 44 Sc was carried out through the 44 Ca(p,n) 44 Sc nuclear reaction at Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. After separation, 44 Sc was shipped to Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany, where radiolabeling was performed, yielding radiochemically pure 44 Sc-DOTATOC. Two patients, currently followed up after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, participated in this proof-of-concept study. Blood sampling was performed before and after application of 44 Sc-DOTATOC. PET/CT acquisitions, performed at different time points after injection of 44 Sc-DOTATOC, allowed detection of even very small lesions on delayed scans. No clinical adverse effects were observed and the laboratory hematological, renal, and hepatic profiles remained unchanged. In this study, cyclotron-produced 44 Sc was used in the clinic for the first time. It is attractive for theranostic application with 177 Lu, 90 Y, or 47 Sc as therapeutic counterparts. 44 Sc-based radiopharmaceuticals will be of particular value for PET facilities without radiopharmacy, to which they can be shipped from a centralized production site.

  3. Evaluation of concentration limits of radionuclides produced by accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi; Ohkubo, Tohru; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Iwai, Satoshi; Satoh, Osamu; Rintsu, Yukoh; Fukumoto, Toshiharu.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of concentration limits of 78 radionuclides typically produced by accelerator facilities and not listed in ICRP Pub. 30. The evaluation method and system have been developed in the present study. The evaluated values were compared with tremendously severe concentration limits given in the Annex Table 2 of the Science and Technology Agency Notification No. 15 which describes the concentration limits of the nuclides of which concentration limits are not given in the Annex Table 1 of the Agency Notification No. 15. The results show that two to nine order larger limits should be used. The new limits rationalize greatly the internal exposure control and the design of accelerator facilities. Simple and convenient techniques are also discussed for finding concentration limits of very-short-lived nuclides without knowing detail information about the nuclides such as decay scheme and metabolic data. (author)

  4. A Radium-223 microgenerator from cyclotron-produced trace Actinium-227

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou, Diane S.; Pickett, Juile; Mattson, John E.; Thorek, Daniel L.J.

    2017-01-01

    The alpha particle emitter Radium-223 dichloride ("2"2"3RaCl_2) has recently been approved for treatment of late-stage bone metastatic prostate cancer. There is considerable interest in studying this new agent outside of the clinical setting, however the supply of "2"2"3Ra is limited and expensive. We have engineered a "2"2"3Ra microgenerator using traces of "2"2"7Ac previously generated from cyclotron-produced "2"2"5Ac. Radiochemically pure "2"2"3RaCl_2 was made, characterized, evaluated in vivo, and the source was recovered in high yield for regeneration of the microgenerator. - Highlights: • A "2"2"3Ra microgenerator was built using residual "2"2"7Ac from cyclotron-produced "2"2"5Ac. • Following "2"2"5Ac decay, the residual "2"2"7Ac was processed into pure "2"2"3Ra. • "2"2"7Ac and "2"2"7Th were recovered in high yield for a permanent supply of "2"2"3Ra. • Clinically supplied and generator-produced "2"2"3Ra have equivalent in vivo distribution. • Microdose column provides sufficient material for research use.

  5. Medical Cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesel, D. L.; Antaya, T. A.

    Particle accelerators were initially developed to address specific scientific research goals, yet they were used for practical applications, particularly medical applications, within a few years of their invention. The cyclotron's potential for producing beams for cancer therapy and medical radioisotope production was realized with the early Lawrence cyclotrons and has continued with their more technically advanced successors — synchrocyclotrons, sector-focused cyclotrons and superconducting cyclotrons. While a variety of other accelerator technologies were developed to achieve today's high energy particles, this article will chronicle the development of one type of accelerator — the cyclotron, and its medical applications. These medical and industrial applications eventually led to the commercial manufacture of both small and large cyclotrons and facilities specifically designed for applications other than scientific research.

  6. Induction of mutations in antibiotic-producing microorganisms by fast neutrons from the U-120 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.; Huczkowski, J.; Siejka, D.; Krasnowolski, S.; Brodowicz, M.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of fast neutrons from a U-120 cyclotron in the induction of mutations in streptomycetes, resulting in strains with enhanced antibiotic production. Three streptomycete strains producing the antibiotics: lincomycin, moenomycin, and demethylchlorotetracycline were used. Correlation between the survival rate of spores of the examined strains and neutron dose was determined. Several morphological and physiological features (particularly production of antibiotics for 1543 variants derived from the parent strains) and their distribution within the population were also studied. The survival rate of the streptomycetes spores after irradiation with fast neutrons was found to be an individual strain property. Several variants with considerably increased antibiotic yield were isolated. The results are compared with those obtained after treatment with other mutagens. Several variants of one of the strains with a strongly enhanced antibiotic yield (200-220%) were isolated. No such variants were found after UV irradiation. (author)

  7. Study of the activation of the parts components of the CV-28 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.

    1986-08-01

    The CV-17 cyclotron, isochronous, compact, of variable energy is an accelerator of charged particles and is applied in several situations such as: radioisotopes production, neutron production, irradiation damage analysis, activation analysis. During the production of the particle beams, the parts components of the interior of the cyclotron are irradiated and become radioactive. Due the fact of the cyclotron require maintenance, the knowledgement of the radionuclides present is of primordial importance of the view point of the radioprotection. Taking the excitation function of a nuclear reaction is observed that determined reaction may happen and produce a radionuclide. The radionuclides formed in the parts components by charged particles are presented. (V.R.B.)

  8. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  9. A new approach for manufacturing and processing targets to produce 99mTc with cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, L.; McRae, G.; Galea, R.; Niculae, D.; Craciun, L.; Leonte, R.; Surette, G.; Langille, S.; Louis, C. St.; Gelbart, W.; Abeysekera, B.; Johnson, R. R.

    2017-06-01

    The most important radioisotope for nuclear medicine is 99mTc. After the supply crisis of 99Mo starting in 2008, the availability of 99mTc became a worldwide concern. Alternative methods for producing the medical imaging isotope 99mTc are actively being developed around the world. The reaction 100Mo(p, 2n)99mTc provides a direct route that can be incorporated into routine production in nuclear medicine centers that possess medical cyclotrons for production of other isotopes, such as those used for Positron Emission Tomography. This paper describes a new approach for manufacturing targets for the (p, 2n) nuclear reaction on 100Mo and the foundation for the subsequent commercial separation and purification of the 99mTc produced. Two designs of targets are presented. The targets used to produce 99mTc are subject to a number of operational constraints.They must withstand the temperatures generated by the irradiation, accommodate temperature gradients from cooling system of the target, must be resilient and must be easily post-processed to separate the 99mTc. After irradiation, the separation of Tc from Mo was carried out using an innovative two-step approach. The process described in this paper can be automated with modules that easily fit in standard production hot cells found in nuclear medicine facilities.

  10. Medical cyclotron basic concepts and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    More than 3000 nuclides are known, of which approximately 2700 are radioactive, and rest are stable. The majority of radionuclides are artificially produced in the reactor and cyclotron. In a cyclotron, Charge particle such as proton, Deuteron, á (Alpha) particle, 3 He particles and so forth are accelerated in circular paths within the Dees under vacuum by means of an electromagnetic field. These accelerated particles can possess few KeV to several BeV of kinetic energy depending on the design of the cyclotron. At our setup we have an 11 MeV dual beam multi target cyclotron which is capable producing 11 C, 13 N, 15 O, 18 F and 2 F radioisotopes and all have been successfully produced and tested in our lab. Earlier cyclotrons were the best source of high-energy beams for nuclear physics experiments; several cyclotrons are still in use for this type of research. Cyclotrons can be used to treat cancer. Ion beams from cyclotrons can be used, as in proton therapy. The positron emitting isotopes are suitable for PET imaging. As discussed we are producing mainly Carbon-11, Nitrogen-13, Oxygen-15, and Fluorine-18: These are positron emitters used in PET for studying brain physiology and pathology, in particular for localizing epileptic focus, and in dementia, psychiatry and neuropharmacology studies. So these are having significant role in diagnosis of Oncological, Neurological and Cardiological disorder. More than ninety percent we are producing 18 F in FDG. 18 F in FDG (Flouro-Deoxy-glucose) has become very important in detection of cancers and the monitoring of progress in their treatment, using PET. Medical cyclotron is complex equipment requiring delicate handling by highly trained personnel. The aim of this article is to highlight few finer aspects of Medical cyclotron operation, including precautions for safety and smooth functioning of this sophisticated equipment. (author)

  11. Medical cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Cyclotrons as tools for therapy and for the production of radionuclides for use in nuclear medicine have been extensively reviewed in the literature. The current world status with respect to cyclotrons used primarily for research, development and application in nuclear medicine is reviewed here in the context of geographical distribution and type of use, presently available commercial types, machine characteristics and trends. Aspects of design requirements from a user perspective such as machine, beam and target characteristics are covered. Some special problems concerning many factors which can lead to effective production of the desired radionuclide or product are considered in light of machine characteristics. Consideration is also given to future directions for accelerators in nuclear medicine

  12. History of medical radionuclide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  13. Development of Radiolabeled compounds using reactor-produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Park, K. B.; Park, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    To establish a robust technology for radiopharmaceutical development, we focused on the configuration of fundamental development of radiolabeled compounds for radioimmunotherapy and drug delivery as well as the development of bifunctional chelating agents and radiolabeling methods for the radiopharmaceuticals with highly specific activity to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site. In this project, we aim to improve the quality of life and the public welfare by fostering the medical application of radioisotopes for the effective treatment of malignant diseases and by developing efficient radiolabeling methods of specific bio-active materials with radioisotopes and new candidates for radiopharmaceutical application. We have established the procedure for the preparation of radiolabeled antibody and biotin with radioisotopes such as 166 Ho, 131 I, 90 Y and 111 In for tumour targeting. In the future, these technologies will be applicable to development of radioimmunotherapeutic drug. The combination treatment of radioisotope with anti-cancer agents or chemotherapeutic agents may produce a synergistic static effects in the tumour and this synergism would be exerted via gene level through the activation of a cell death pathway. The combination therapy may be very beneficial for cancer treatment and this can overcome not only the hazards of unnecessary exposure to high radiation level during therapy, but also the tendency for drug resistance caused by chemotherapy. To develop new drug delivery system suitable for CT imaging agent, a chitosan derivative and radiolabed Folate-targeted polymer with 131 I were synthesized. We also carried out the development of DTPA derivatives for CT imaging agent, radiolabeled precursor, and established a highly efficient radiolabeling methodology with lanthanide nuclide. In order to develop neuroreceptor targeting compounds, we synthesized WAY-100635 compound and 99m Tc(CO) 3 precursor from Chrysamine G derivatives

  14. Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes (Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivrakdal, Deniz; Ustaoğlu, Özgur; Soylu, Ayfer [Eczacibasi Nuclear Products Inc. (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    As positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals gain interest in nuclear medicine, more and more baby cyclotrons are installed. The number of cyclotrons in Turkey went up to nine whereas the number of PET or PET/CT cameras increased more than 50% within a year. At the moment there are 65 positron imaging cameras serving a population of around 70 million. Eczacıbası - Monrol Nuclear Products Industry and Trade Inc. has five cyclotrons three of them being of different brands. In this report production data collected with these cyclotrons using high current liquid targets of silver, tantalum and niobium will be presented. The data presented here covers the whole duration of the project. Another topic which will be discussed here is the work carried out about purification and analysis of used O-18 water for re-use purposes. (author)

  15. Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes (Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivrakdal, Deniz; Ustaoğlu, Özgur; Soylu, Ayfer

    2009-01-01

    As positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals gain interest in nuclear medicine, more and more baby cyclotrons are installed. The number of cyclotrons in Turkey went up to nine whereas the number of PET or PET/CT cameras increased more than 50% within a year. At the moment there are 65 positron imaging cameras serving a population of around 70 million. Eczacıbası - Monrol Nuclear Products Industry and Trade Inc. has five cyclotrons three of them being of different brands. In this report production data collected with these cyclotrons using high current liquid targets of silver, tantalum and niobium will be presented. The data presented here covers the whole duration of the project. Another topic which will be discussed here is the work carried out about purification and analysis of used O-18 water for re-use purposes. (author)

  16. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the $^{192}Os (p, n)^{192}$Ir reaction Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{192}$Ir

    CERN Document Server

    Hilgers, K; Sudar, S; 10.1016/j.apradiso.2004.12.010

    2005-01-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide /sup 192/Ir (T/sub 1/2/=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction /sup 192/Os(p, n)/sup 192/Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20MeV. Thin samples of enriched /sup 192/Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of /sup 192/Ir over the energy range E/sub p/=16 to 8MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/ mu A.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of /sup 192/Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product.

  17. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Pottery, Ceramic and Glasswares Produced in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, M.I.; Reaz, Rafia; Kamal, M.; Alam, M.N.; Mustafa, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured using gamma spectrometry in the finished products of pottery, glass, ceramic and tiles. Ceramic and pottery utensils, tiles, basin and glassware contained naturally occurring radionuclides. Pottery is produced from local clay materials, but ceramic, tiles, basin and glassware's are made from both local and imported raw materials. Radium and thorium radionuclides are concentrated during the making of pottery from the clay materials due to calcination. Radionuclides concentrated more in the highly calcined pottery products than the low calcined products. Glassware products contained very low quantities of radionuclides comparing with the ceramic and pottery products. Study on radioactivity in the pottery, ceramic and glassware products is important in the assessment of possible radiological hazards to human health. The knowledge is essential for the development of standards and guidelines for the use and management of these materials. (author)

  18. State of contamination of French food produces by artificial radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, B.; Guiard, A.; Tesolin, B.; Janin, F.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents the results of 40236 recorded levels of caesium 134 Cs and 137 Cs activities carried out on French food. These controls, performed through gamma-spectrometry, have been carried out in France by the Veterinary Services and the CNEVA-LCHA (Centre National d'Etudes Veterinaires - Laboratoire Central d'Hygiene Alimentaire), as part of a radionuclides survey after the Chernobyl accident. The results have been collected by the CNEVA-LCHA, and show in 1992 that 99.6% of the radioactivity levels in the French food are below 50 Bq/kg. The present situation seems to be satisfying. However, very small amounts of 137 Cs residues were noticed in some mushroom species, such as Cantharellus tubaeformis. (authors). 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Examination of tracer method using 43K produced with a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuida, Koichi; Kawarazaki, Yuji; Shibuya, Masao; Nozaki, Tadashi.

    1980-01-01

    The 43 K tracer produced with a cyclotron is contaminated with about the same amount of 42 K. During first 43 hours after the production, the rate of attenuation of its radioactivity was greater than the theoretical value of 43 K (half-life 22.4 hours) because of the rapid attenuation of radioactivity of the contaminating 42 K (half-life 12.4 hours). After that, however, the rate of attenuation in the radioactivity of 43 K tracer followed the attenuation curve of 22.4 hr half-life, i.e., the radioactivity of the contaminating 42 K was negligible. The potassium chloride fertilizer labelled with 43 K-tracer (or 42 K-tracer) was applied for 8 days (or 4.5 days in case of 42 K) to 2-month-old rice plants grown by hydroponics, and for 7 days to rice plants grown on soil (at ripening stage). The rice plants were then dried for 24 hours at 70 deg C, and the radioactivity was measured by a scintillation counter. 43 K was able to be traced for 13.3 days in the plants grown by hydroponics, and 42 K for 5.4 days, but 43 K was able to be traced only for 7.4 days in the plants grown on soil which absorb 43 K poorly. Since 43 K and 42 K are γ-ray emittors, and the energy is not low, microautoradiograms were not able to be made, but macroautoradiograms were made. The autoradiograms for 43 K and 42 K did not differ in resolution, and both were clear. The radioactivity of 43 K did not diminish so rapidly as 42 K, but was lost in one month. Such character of 43 K is beneficial both for tracer experiments and for the prevention of environmental pollution. (Kaihara, S.)

  20. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, August 1, 1983-July 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Gelbard, A.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) preliminary evaluation of tumor localization of N-13 labeled L-amino acids; (2) evaluation of N-13 labeled amino acids and ammonia for physiological studies in patients undergoing chemotherapy for colorectal hepatic metastases; (3) evaluation of C-11 labeled alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) in patients with prostate cancer; (4) biological studies with N-13 labeled metabolites; (5) amino acid transport studies with synthetic C-11 labeled amino acids; (6) development of an imaging technique for measurement of regional perfusion; (7) carbon-11 labeled thymidine for tumor imaging and metabolic studies; (8) enzymatic synthesis of metabolites labeled with N-13 and C-11; (9) organic synthesis of C-11 labeled amino acids; (10) the preparation of F-18 fluorinating agents; and (11) remotely controlled, semi-automatic preparation of N-13 ammonia

  1. Biomedical research with cyclotron-produced radionuclides. Progress report, August 1, 1982-February 28, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in the following research areas is reported: (1) exploratory clinical metabolic studies; (2) compound synthesis labeling and associated biological studies; and (3) data analysis, modeling and instrumentation

  2. Biomedical research with cyclotron-produced radionuclides. Progress report, August 1, 1981-July 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Gelbard, A.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Research progress for the period August 1981 through July 1982 is reported. Subject areas include the evaluation of solid tumor chemotherapy with N-13 labeled L-amino acids, in-vivo studies of L-amino acid metabolism in the liver, myocardium, pancreas and skeletal muscle of man, synthesis, labeling and associated tracer studies of N-13 ammonia, N-13 L-amino acids, C-11 amino acids, radiation exposure control through automation, quantitative positron-1 emission tomography, and data analysis

  3. Short-lived cyclotron produced radionuclides evaluation on the myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikitake, Tomoyuki; Tateno, Yukio; Yamane, Akiko; Matsumoto, Touru; Umegaki, Youichiro

    1978-01-01

    Organ uptake after venous administration of 13 N-ammonia, 43 K, 86 Rb, 201 Tl and after rectal administration of 13 N-ammonia was studied. Each nuclides highly accumulated in myocardium after intravenous injection, but rectal administrated 13 N-ammonia did not show this tendency. Intravenously injected 13 N-ammonia showed very early myocardial uptake and early secretion from kidney. Rectal administrated 13 N-ammonia was less accumulated in myocardium. 43 KCl and 13 NH 4 Cl were injected intravenously and administrated from the rectum to the rabbits under imaging scintilator system. Whole-body scintiscanner with display-processing unit was used for a 43 KCl injected rabbit. A positroncamera with computer system (TOSBAC 3400 on line system) was used for 13 NH 4 Cl (i.v. and rectal ad.) rabbits. The dynamic studies of 43 KCl, 13 NH 4 Cl were made from these imaging data. The countratio of heart to the liver after 43 K injection was nearly equal or less than the liver. The peakcount was at 15 min after 13 NH 4 Cl intravenous injection. 13 N accumulated promptly at upper mediastinal part and kidney, and soon disappeared from these part. Uptake of the heat was high and that of the liver was low. When 13 NH 4 Cl was administrated from the rectum, 13 N trapped at the liver, and uptake of the heart was very low level. Scintiscanning after 13 KCl intravenously injected, did not show the high resolution. Rabbit heart was distinguishable from the liver, but there are no visibility of the detail. Seeing positronscintigram after 13 NH 4 Cl administration both from intravenously and from rectum, the detail was well visible. We concluded the positron scintigram after 13 NH 4 Cl injection should be a good myocardial imaging agent. Furthermore, 13 Nh 4 Cl has two eminent characters as a myocardial imaging agent comparing 201 TlCl. One is prompt making of image, the others is the very low radiation dose. (auth.)

  4. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, August 1, 1984-July 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nine interrelated studies are reported on experimental and clinical uses of nitrogen-13 or carbon-11. Chemical and enzymatical methods are provided for the production of labelled amino acids. Comparative distribution studies of N-13 ammonia, glutamine, α-aminobutyric acid, methionine, valine, leucine, and glutamate after retro-orbital injection have been completed. The data show most of the label (% dose/organ) going to liver and muscle regardless of the injected agent. 25 refs., 4 figs., 17 tabs

  5. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, February 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: evaluation of chemotherapeutic regimens in solid tumors using 13 N-labelled amino acids; organ imaging with 13 N-labelled L-amino acids; imaging with 111 In-labelled-autologous platelets; synthesis and biological studies of 111 In-labelled ammonia and L-amino acids; synthesis and evaluation for pancreatic imaging of 11 C-labelled amino acides; radioisotope monitoring of myocardiol function; synthesis of 11 C-labelled precursor compounds; reduction of radiation exposure through automation and remote control; development of an anhydrous 18 F target; evaluation of radiolabelled 5-fluorouracils for scintigraphy; and methods of data analysis, modeling, and unproving instrumentation for positron-emission tomography

  6. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, February 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: evaluation of chemotherapeutic regimens in solid tumors using /sup 13/N-labelled amino acids; organ imaging with /sup 13/N-labelled L-amino acids; imaging with /sup 111/In-labelled-autologous platelets; synthesis and biological studies of /sup 111/In-labelled ammonia and L-amino acids; synthesis and evaluation for pancreatic imaging of /sup 11/C-labelled amino acides; radioisotope monitoring of myocardiol function; synthesis of /sup 11/C-labelled precursor compounds; reduction of radiation exposure through automation and remote control; development of an anhydrous /sup 18/F target; evaluation of radiolabelled 5-fluorouracils for scintigraphy; and methods of data analysis, modeling, and unproving instrumentation for positron-emission tomography. (EDB)

  7. Ca-48 handling for a cyclotron ECR ion source to produce highly intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.Ya.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Kutner, V.B.; Shamanin, A.N.; Yakushev, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Production of highly intense ion beams of 48 Ca is one of the main tasks in experiments carried out within the framework of the synthesis of new superheavy elements. 48 Ca is very rare and expensive isotope, therefore there is necessity to reach the high intensity of ion beams of the isotope at a low consumption rate. Analysis and our preliminary experiments have showed that the best way of producing highly intense calcium ion beams is evaporation of metallic calcium in an ECR ion source. So we have developed a technique of metallic 48 Ca production by reducing CaO (this chemical form is available at the market with 40-80% of 48 Ca ) with aluminium powder. We used two tantalum crucibles: a larger, with a mixture of CaO + Al heated up to 1250 deg C, which was connected to the smaller (2 mm I.D. and 30 mm long) in which calcium vapour condensed. The temperature distribution in the small crucible was about 50 deg C at the bottom and about 500 deg C in the middle of the crucible. The pressure inside of the set-up was between 0.1 and 1 Pa. The production rate of metallic 48 Ca was 10-20 mg/h. The crucible with the condensed metallic Ca in argon atmosphere was transferred to the ECR-4M ion source, where it was inserted in a wired tubular oven and the calcium evaporation was controlled through the oven power supply. The application of metallic 48 Ca as the working substance for the ECR-4M ion source of the U-400 cyclotron of allowed us to approach a stable high intensity of 48 Ca ion beams: the intensities for the internal and external beams were 10 13 c -1 and 3.10 12 c -1 , respectively, at a consumption rate about 0.4 mg/h. A technique was developed for the reclamation of 48 Ca from the residue inside of the large crucible and from the inner parts of the ECR ion source. Extracting Ca from the inner parts of the ion source enabled us to save up to some 25% of the calcium used in the ECR ion source, so that the actual consumption rate was about 0.3 mg/h at the highest 48

  8. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  9. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  10. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ''produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium

  11. Operational health and physics service during the maintenance of the Australian National Medical Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1994-01-01

    Modern Medical Cyclotrons use intense beams of high energy protons or deuterons to produce large activities of short and medium lived radionuclides. After continuous operation for prolonged periods the Cyclotron components become activated through various nuclear interactions therefore, the risk of personal radiation hazard while handling such activated cyclotron components is high. This paper describes all operational aspects of the Health Physics service evolved during the first preventative maintenance program of the Australian National Medical Cyclotron, which took place in June 1993. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Report on the 1st research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project on standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Radioisotopes produced with a cyclotron and their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have already been shown to be extremely valuable in basic medical research, disease diagnosis and radiotherapy treatment. There are more than 200 cyclotron facilities worldwide and the number is growing every year. A number of the Member States have acquired cyclotrons for the purpose of producing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and a number of others have expressed an interest in acquiring such facilities. This report is concerned with the production of four radiotracers: Iodine-123, Iodine-124, Thallium-201 and Palladium-103. Iodine-123 is already widely used in SPECT studies, I-124 has shown great promise and can be used for PET studies as well as in radiotherapy. Tl-201 is widely used throughout the world as 201 Tl + for measuring cardiac blood flow. It is a routine tool that is needed for the Nuclear Medicine communities and can be made available by those countries possessing a cyclotron facility with 30 MeV protons. Moreover, as preliminary results dealing with the labelling of chelated polypeptides with trivalent cationic Tl-201 are very promising; the nuclide can also be tried as a potential substitute for Indium tracers in SPECT diagnosis involving polypeptides. Palladium-103, an Auger electron emitter, has become an extremely important radionuclide for therapy. The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) focuses on the optimisation and standardisation of solid phase cyclotron target technology for the production of I-123, I-124, Tl-201 and Pd-103. In particular, as originally proposed and further discussed and agreed upon during the 1st Research Co-ordination Meeting, the main technical goals of the CRP are described as follows: (i) to investigate the possibility of using electrodeposited tellurium and melted tellurium oxide as target material for the production of I-123 and I-124. For the oxide target, the following parameters and techniques will be explored: 1) methods

  13. Radionuclides in produced water from Norwegian oil and gas installations - concentrations and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, D.Oe.; Sidhu, R.; Stralberg, E.; Iden, K.I.; Hylland, K.; Ruus, A.; Roeyset, O.; Berntssen, M.H.G.; Rye, H.

    2006-01-01

    Substantial amounts of produced water, containing elevated levels of radionuclides (mainly 226 Ra and 228 Ra) are discharged to the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. So far no study has assessed the potential radiological effects on marine biota in connection with radionuclide discharges to the North Sea. The main objective of the project is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium associated with other components in produced water from oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. This study reports results indicating that the presence of added chemicals such as scale inhibitors in produced water has a marked influence on the formation of radium and barium sulphates when produced water is mixed with sea water. Thus, the mobility and bioavailability of radium (and barium) will be larger than anticipated. Also, the bioavailability of food-borne radium is shown to increase due to presence of such chemicals. (author)

  14. Radionuclides in produced water from Norwegian oil and gas installations — Concentrations and bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, D. Ø.; Sidhu, R.; Strålberg, E.; Iden, K. I.; Hylland, K.; Ruus, A.; Røyset, O.; Berntssen, M. H. G.; Rye, H.

    2006-01-01

    Substantial amounts of produced water, containing elevated levels of radionuclides (mainly 226Ra and 228Ra) are discharged to the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. So far no study has assessed the potential radiological effects on marine biota in connection with radionuclide discharges to the North Sea. The main objective of the project is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium associated with other components in produced water from oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. This study reports results indicating that the presence of added chemicals such as scale inhibitors in produced water has a marked influence on the formation of radium and barium sulphates when produced water is mixed with sea water. Thus, the mobility and bioavailability of radium (and barium) will be larger than anticipated. Also, the bioavailability of food-borne radium is shown to increase due to presence of such chemicals.

  15. Short-lived radionuclide production capability at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mausner, L.F.; Richards, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Linac Isotope Producer is the first facility to demonstrate the capability of a large linear accelerator for efficient and economical production of difficult-to-make, medically useful radionuclides. The linac provides a beam of 200-MeV protons at an integrated beam current of up to 60 μA. The 200-MeV proton energy is very suitable for isotope production because the spallation process can create radionuclides unavailable at lower energy accelerators or reactors. Several medically important short-lived radionuclides are presently being prepared for on-site and off-site collaborative research programs. These are iodine-123, iron-52, manganese-52m, ruthenium-97, and the rubidium-81-krypton-81m system. The production parameters for these are summarized

  16. Atmospheric tracer study of the emissions from the University of Michigan Cyclotron/PET Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The University of Michigan (U of M) Cyclotron/Positron Emission Tomography (PET) facility consists of a cyclotron (Model CS-30, The Cyclotron Corporation), radiochemistry laboratory, and Pet scanner. Accelerator-produced radioactive materials, such as, carbon-11 and oxygen-15 are typically emitted from the Cyclotron/PET facility through short stacks located on the roof. This project studied the dispersion of emissions from the facility within the medical complex. To achieve this purpose, the research project had three phases: a physical modeling study; a preliminary field smoke release study; and, a field study using a tracer gas to simulate emission dispersion from the U of M Cyclotron/PET facility vault stack. The objective was to determine normalized concentrations, under selected wind directions and speeds, for use in establishing radionuclide concentrations at the air intakes of the Cyclotron/PET facility and surrounding buildings and at selected ground-level locations

  17. Improvements of High Current/ Low Pressure Liquid And Gas Targets For Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, M. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup (Korea, Republic of); Hong, B. H. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, J. S. [SungKyunKwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The development of the C-11 cylindrical target with cooling fin for 13 MeV and 30 MeV proton beams and the development of pleated double-foil O-18 water target were carried out. For the test of new target system it was done at 2 pilots of cyclotron centres in Korea. The development of pleated double-foil O-18 water target was also executed. The pleated foil has the more advantages than flat foil. With the same beam bombarding the pleated foil with cooling had more yield of F-18production. CFD and FEM study were considered to design of the pleated foil and flat foil structure. (author)

  18. Radionuclide concentrations in soils and produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo Gardens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    Radionuclide ( 3 H, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and total uranium) concentrations were determined in soils and produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens. All radionuclides in soils from Pueblo areas were within or just above regional statistical (natural and/or worldwide fallout) reference levels. Similarily, the average levels of radionuclides in produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens were not significantly different in produce collected from regional (background) locations. The effective (radiation) dose equivalent from consuming 352 lb of produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.036 (±0.016), 0.072 (±0.051), 0.012 (±0.027), and 0.110 (±0.102) mrem/yr, respectively. The highest calculated dose, based on the mean + 2 std dev (95% confidence level), was 0.314 mrem/yr; this was <0.4% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting members of the public

  19. ORNL-Safeguards and security: The Global producers of the 8 radionuclides of particular security concern

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, James (UTK); Creel, Althea (UTK); Milewski, Steven (UTK); Staub, James (UTK); Woofter, Angela (UTK); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2004-01-01

    To gather the available open source information about the worldwide producers of the radionuclides that could be used in a radiological dispersal device or "dirty bomb" was the objective of this project. This report was the culminating project for a group of students in the Business Intelligence course taught by Dr. Kendra Albright in spring 2004 at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The major focus of this Business Intelligence course was to give st...

  20. High current Tl-203, Rh-103 targets preparation for cyclotron production of Tl-201 and Pd-103 radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanov, A.; Berger, V.; Borissenko, A.; Gorodisskaya, N.; Ilmatov, I.; Knyazev, A.; Koptev, V.; Lyssukhin, S.; Platov, A.; Sychikov, G.; Zheltov, D.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the present work are to increase thermal stability of cyclotron targets for production of Tl-201 isotope, increase Tl-203 regeneration rate at radiochemical reprocessing of the targets and develop production technology for radiochemical sources based on Rd-103 isotope. Electrochemical coating of copper substrate with Tl increased the beam current at target irradiation from 100 μA to 125 μA. Further increase of the beam current results in sharp decrease of target stability time at irradiation to 15 min at beam current 150 μA. Thermal calculations and tests at the electron-beam stand predict satisfactory stability at such currents. The discrepancy with the irradiation results has not been explained. More accurate specification of regimes for Tl-203 electrochemical recovery from irradiated targets and better matching of the electrolyte composition made it possible to increase the recovery rate up to 99.5%. Before the present Project, the INP had no experience in production of radioactive sources based on Pd-103. Thermo-diffusion extraction of Pd-103 from irradiated rhodium foil has been chosen as a technology-defining method. The process assures good extraction rate and high purity of extracted isotope. Production of Pd-103 sources based on this technology is much simpler compared to the same based on electrochemical processes. (author)

  1. Determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in scales produced in oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masri, M S; Ali, A F; Kitue, M; Kawash, A [Atomic Energy Commission, Dept. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1997-04-01

    Scales produced by Oil production operations contain relatively high concentrations of natural radionuclides especially radium isotopes (Ra-226, Ra-228, Ra-224) and their daughters. These scales deposit in oil surface equipment such as separator tanks, tubular, and storage tanks. In this work, naturally occurring radionuclides and radiation exposure levels in some Syrian oil lines have been determined. Radiation measurements have shown high radiation exposure in some production sites and reached about 23 {mu}Sv/hr (production wellhead) which is higher than the normal background (0.09 - 012 {mu}Sv/hr). The highest value of the exposure around storage tanks was about o.5 {mu}Sv/hr. Moreover, the highest concentration of radionuclides in scales were found to be 47000 Bq/Kg and 55000 Bq/Kg for Ra-226 and Ra-228 respectively while in sludge samples, the Ra-226 concentration was about 24.2 Bq/Kg, a relatively very low activity. In addition, results have shown that soil contamination can occur by disposal of produced water to the surrounding environment. Furthermore, the present paper shows some of protection procedures, which should be followed by workers for radiation protection. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Distribution of Hanford reactor produced radionuclides in the marine environment, 1961-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    At Hanford (U.S.A.), the plutonium-producing reactors were in operation during 1944-1971. The period of maximum reactor operation was 1955-1965, when eight reactors were in operation. The reactor deactivation programme began in 1965 and the last reactor was deactivated in 1971. All these reactors were cooled by Columbia River water which passed through the reactors and then was discharged to the river and ultimately to the North Pacific. The Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE) of the University of Washington started an environmental survey programme in 1965 and continued it upto 1973 i.e. even after the last plutonium producing reactor was deactivated. The programme objectives were: (1) to find the geographical distribution and concentration of Hanford produced radionuclides in water, sediments and biota of the marine environment, (2) to relate the operation of the Hanford reactors during the period of deactivation to the concentration of radionuclides in marine organisms, and (3) to observe the rate at which the marine organisms cleansed themselves of 65 Zn after the primary source had been removed. An account of the programme and highlights of the observations are reported. Most of the radioactivity entering the river water and marine organisms was due to 51 Cr, 65 Zn and 32 P of which 65 Zn was found to be the most abundant radionuclide in the biological samples. The rate of radioactivity from the river water entering into the Ocean was about 1000 curies per day and it did not produce any observable effects on populations of marine organisms. The internal dose to man from 65 Zn via seafoods was only a small fraction of the permissible dose for individual members of the population. (M.G.B.)

  3. Determination of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of background radiation counting system, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is the third report of the progress report series on studies of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of low background radiation counting system. In Part I some characteristics of a low beta-gamma coincidence spectrometer are described -- counter system, electronics, background spectra, counting efficiencies -- and studies on radioactive impurities in materials for scientific research are also described. In Part II, suitable solvents for a large scale liquid scintillation counter were examined and best combinations of solvents, solutes and naphthalene are shown. In Part III, miscellaneous topics are reported. (auth.)

  4. Report of the 3{sup rd} RCM on Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The overall objective of this CRP was the development of new accelerator targetry technology including several target systems but focusing on the reliable production of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 in various chemical forms with a view to increasing production yields, specific activity, improving the economics of production and the availability of the radiotracers. Significant advances have been made under this CRP in the development and standardization of high power gas and liquid targets. This CRP has resulted in the development of methods which can be used in high power targets to increase Carbon-11, Fluorine-18, Nitrogen-13, Iodine-123 and Krypton-81m, specific activities (a least a two fold increase), chemical purities as well as ensuring reliability of the production of the radiopharmaceuticals derived from these radionuclides. More importantly, these advances have minimized the unnecessarily operator exposure to radiation. In addition, knowledge of recovery and characterization of enriched H{sub 2} {sup 18}O was also gained. Through this research the production capabilities with regard to [{sup 18}F]F{sup -}, [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} and [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 4} have increased 3 to 6 fold. A high current niobium target system has been designed, tested and put in service which could increase production capability of {sup 18}FDG by a factor of 2.5. A survey of target maintenance procedures has been carried out and the results of this survey are reported in this CRP. It was determined that the tritium introduced by the inevitable nuclear reactions does not pose any health physics problems either during the tracer manufacturer or during potential water reclamation. It was further determined that radionuclides produced in the metal foil during irradiation are found in the target water at very low concentrations. These impurities can be essentially eliminated by using noble metal plated foils. The radionuclides can also be reduced by the separation technology typically used

  5. Report of the 3rd RCM on Improved High Current Liquid and Gas Targets for Cyclotron Produced Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of this CRP was the development of new accelerator targetry technology including several target systems but focusing on the reliable production of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 in various chemical forms with a view to increasing production yields, specific activity, improving the economics of production and the availability of the radiotracers. Significant advances have been made under this CRP in the development and standardization of high power gas and liquid targets. This CRP has resulted in the development of methods which can be used in high power targets to increase Carbon-11, Fluorine-18, Nitrogen-13, Iodine-123 and Krypton-81m, specific activities (a least a two fold increase), chemical purities as well as ensuring reliability of the production of the radiopharmaceuticals derived from these radionuclides. More importantly, these advances have minimized the unnecessarily operator exposure to radiation. In addition, knowledge of recovery and characterization of enriched H 2 18 O was also gained. Through this research the production capabilities with regard to [ 18 F]F - , [ 11 C]CO 2 and [ 11 C]CH 4 have increased 3 to 6 fold. A high current niobium target system has been designed, tested and put in service which could increase production capability of 18 FDG by a factor of 2.5. A survey of target maintenance procedures has been carried out and the results of this survey are reported in this CRP. It was determined that the tritium introduced by the inevitable nuclear reactions does not pose any health physics problems either during the tracer manufacturer or during potential water reclamation. It was further determined that radionuclides produced in the metal foil during irradiation are found in the target water at very low concentrations. These impurities can be essentially eliminated by using noble metal plated foils. The radionuclides can also be reduced by the separation technology typically used for fluorine extraction from the O-18

  6. Review of research on impacts to biota of discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides in produced water to the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Ali; Brown, Justin E.; Gwynn, Justin P.; Dowdall, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Produced water has been described as the largest volume waste stream in the exploration and production process of oil and gas. It is accompanied by discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides raising concerns over the potential radiological impacts of produced water on marine biota. In the Northern European marine environment, radioactivity in produced water has received substantial attention owing to the OSPAR Radioactive Substances Strategy which aims at achieving ‘concentrations in the environment near background values for naturally occurring radioactive substances’. This review provides an overview of published research on the impacts to biota from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water by the offshore oil and gas industry. In addition to summarising studies and data that deal directly with the issue of dose and effect, the review also considers studies related to the impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. The review clearly illustrates that only a limited number of studies have investigated possible impacts on biota from naturally occurring radionuclides present in produced water. Hence, although these studies indicate that the risk to the environment from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water is negligible, the substantial uncertainties involved in the assessments of impact make it difficult to be conclusive. With regard to the complexity involved in the problem under consideration there is a pressing need to supplement existing data and acquire new knowledge. Finally, the present work identifies some knowledge gaps to indicate future research requirements. -- Highlights: ► Produced water from offshore oil industry contains naturally occurring radionuclides. ► Published research on the impacts to biota from these radionuclides is reviewed. ► Review includes impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. ► Studies indicate negligible risk to biota

  7. Preparation of cyclotron-produced {sup 186}Re and comparison with reactor-produced {sup 186}Re and generator-produced {sup 188}Re for the labeling of bombesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustapha, Moustapha E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ehrhardt, Gary J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Smith, Charles J. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Services, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Szajek, Lawrence P. [Positron Emission Tomography Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1180 (United States); Eckelman, William C. [Positron Emission Tomography Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1180 (United States); Jurisson, Silvia S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]. E-mail: jurissons@missouri.edu

    2006-01-15

    The radioisotopes {sup 186}Re and {sup 188}Re have been extensively investigated for various forms of radiotherapy due to their useful and high-abundance {beta} particle emissions, low-abundance and imageable {gamma}-rays, and chemical resemblance to technetium. In addition, {sup 188}Re is available in no-carrier-added (NCA) form from long lived W-188 generators, whereas {sup 186}Re can be produced in large quantities from reactors, although not in NCA form. However, NCA {sup 186}Re can be produced on a cyclotron by a (p,n) reaction on {sup 186}W. The purpose of this study was to compare labeling of the peptide bombesin with these three forms of rhenium radioisotopes. Cyclotron-produced NCA {sup 186}Re was separated radiochemically from enriched {sup 186}W (96.9%) targets using high-purity methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The resulting {sup 186}Re-MEK was then loaded onto a small alumina column to separate the resulting NCA {sup 186}Re from any remaining {sup 186}W. The experimental levels of impurities associated with {sup 186}Re at the end of the separation process were found to be 5.7x10{sup -6} Ci of {sup 182}Re (0.57%, t {sub 1/2}=12.7 h) and 1.283x10{sup -5} Ci of {sup 182m}Re (1.28%, t {sub 1/2}=2.67 days). The radionuclidic purity of the separated {sup 186}Re was found to be 99.6%, whereas the chemical identity was determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) to be perrhenate ({sup 186}ReO{sub 4} {sup -}). Generator-produced {sup 188}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and CA {sup 186}ReO{sub 4} {sup -} produced from a {sup 185}Re(n,{gamma}){sup 186}Re reaction at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) were used for comparison with the NCA {sup 186}Re in subsequent studies. N{sub 3}S-5-Ava-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2} conjugates provide flexibility for designing {sup 186,188}Re-labeled conjugates that retain high in vitro and in vivo specificity targeting of GRP receptor

  8. ARRONAX, a high-energy and high-intensity cyclotron for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Ferid; Guertin, Arnaud; Michel, Nathalie; Ferrer, Ludovic; Carlier, Thomas; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at establishing a list of radionuclides of interest for nuclear medicine that can be produced in a high-intensity and high-energy cyclotron. We have considered both therapeutic and positron emission tomography radionuclides that can be produced using a high-energy and a high-intensity cyclotron such as ARRONAX, which will be operating in Nantes (France) by the end of 2008. Novel radionuclides or radionuclides of current limited availability have been selected according to the following criteria: emission of positrons, low-energy beta or alpha particles, stable or short half-life daughters, half-life between 3 h and 10 days or generator-produced, favourable dosimetry, production from stable isotopes with reasonable cross sections. Three radionuclides appear well suited to targeted radionuclide therapy using beta ( 67 Cu, 47 Sc) or alpha ( 211 At) particles. Positron emitters allowing dosimetry studies prior to radionuclide therapy ( 64 Cu, 124 I, 44 Sc), or that can be generator-produced ( 82 Rb, 68 Ga) or providing the opportunity of a new imaging modality ( 44 Sc) are considered to have a great interest at short term whereas 86 Y, 52 Fe, 55 Co, 76 Br or 89 Zr are considered to have a potential interest at middle term. Several radionuclides not currently used in routine nuclear medicine or not available in sufficient amount for clinical research have been selected for future production. High-energy, high-intensity cyclotrons are necessary to produce some of the selected radionuclides and make possible future clinical developments in nuclear medicine. Associated with appropriate carriers, these radionuclides will respond to a maximum of unmet clinical needs. (orig.) 5

  9. Tritium contamination in [18O] water containing 18F produced by a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, S.; Saze, T.; Sakane, H.; Nishizawa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium in the target [ 18 O] water irradiated with 9.6 MeV protons for producing [ 18 F] fluoride by 18 O(p, n) 18 F reaction was predicted from the consideration on the Q value of the 18 O(p, t) 16 O reaction. A tritium beta ray spectrum was measured by a liquid scintillation counter equipped with a multichannel analyzer. The ratio of the 3 H activity to the 18 F activity in the [ 18 O] target water was 2.4x10 -6 at the beam current of 25μA. Tritium also was detected in the [ 18 O] water for recycling and the wasted acetonitrile [ 18 O] water. The purified [ 18 F]-FDG solution was not contaminated by 3 H. The 40% 3 H out of the produced activity was lost in the course of the [ 18 F]-FDG synthesis. It was suggested that 3 H evaporated into the air during [ 18 F]-FDG synthesis and caused contamination of the workroom. The radiation workers should be prevented from environmental 3 H contamination. (author)

  10. Radiation protection of cyclotron vault with maze in PET Cyclotron Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, Marko

    2003-01-01

    The PET Cyclotron center (PCC) is a complex for production, research and application of positron radiopharmaceuticals for PET (Positron Emission Tomography), which was commissioned this year (2004) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Positron radionuclides are produced by 18/9 MeV proton/deuteron cyclotron CYCLONE 18/9. Radiation protection of personnel and inhabitants against ionizing radiation in the PCC is solved with regard to the ICRP recommendations and Slovak regulatory system, protection rules and criteria and optimization of radiation protection. In the article comparisons of calculated and measured neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates around the CYCLONE 18/9 and at various points behind the shielding of cyclotron vault with maze are presented. Description of the CYCLONE 18/9 as a source of angular distribution of neutron energy spectra (production of 18 F was considered) was simulated by Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Code MCNP4B was used for shielding calculation of cyclotron vault with maze. Neutron energy spectra behind the shielding were measured by Bonner spectrometer. The values of neutron dose equivalent, which were calculated and measured around the CYCLONE 18/9 and at various points behind the shielding of cyclotron vault with maze, are within the range of factor 2. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of residual radioactivity and dose rate of a target assembly in an IBA cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seon Yong; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    When a cyclotron produces 18F-, accelerated protons interact with metal parts of the cyclotron machine and induces radioactivity. Especially, the target window and chamber of the target assembly are the main parts where long-lived radionuclides are generated as they are incident by direct beams. It is of great importance to identify radionuclides induced in the target assembly for the safe operation and maintenance of a cyclotron facility. In this study, we analyzed major radionuclides generated in the target assembly by an operation of the Cyclotron 18/9 machine and measured dose rates after the operation to establish the radiation safety guideline for operators and maintenance personnel of the machine. Gamma spectroscopy with HPGe was performed on samples from the target chamber and Havar foil target window to identify the radionuclides generated during the operation for production of 18F-- isotope and their specific activity. Also, the dose rates from the target were measured as a function of time after an operation. These data will help improve radiological safety of operating the cyclotron facilities.

  12. Supernova-produced radionuclides in deep-sea sediments measured with AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feige, J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to computational micromagnetics, where several new numerical methods are In this work a set of long-lived radionuclides is measured to detect supernova-traces presumably deposited on Earth 2-3 Myr ago. Approximately 100 samples of four deep-sea sediment cores (Indian Ocean) were analyzed for 26 Al, 53Mn, and 60 Fe with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Additionally, 10 Be was measured to confirm the existing paleomagnetic chronology of the sediments. A signal of extraterrestrial 60 Fe, which is not produced in-situ on Earth, was detected in a time period of 1.7-3.2 Myr in the sediments used for this work. 60 Fe/ 26 Al ratios were used to calculate limits on theoretical nucleosynthesis models. A supernova-signature of 26 Al is hidden behind a terrestrial background. The measured 26 Al/ 10 Be ratios indicate, that the major source of 26 Al detected in the sediments is of atmospheric origin. Because of the extraordinarily good depth profile for the deep-sea sediments from the measured 26 Al data, this radionuclide was used for dating. (author) [de

  13. Monitoring of radionuclides in carbon steel blooms produced by EAF process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofilić T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because natural and artificial isotopes in steel might originate from steel scrap or from the residue of the material that was used in the technological process, thus monitoring especially artificial radionuclides 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir deserve special attention. The analysis by g-spectrometry has been applied to determine the presence of natural isotopes 40K, 226Ra, 232Th and 238U as well as of the artificial isotope 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir and their activity in the produced steel round blooms in the Steel Mill of CMC Sisak d.o.o. At the same time the content of radionuclides in the other materials (ferroalloys, bauxite, fluorite, lime, coke, graphite electrodes, refractory blocks used in the same steel making process was investigated. The measured values regarding the presence of individual isotopes and their activity in steel were as follows: 40K all values were less than 1.6 Bqkg-1; 232Th all activities values were less than 0.02 Bqkg-1; 226Ra all activities values were less than 0.01 Bqkg-1; 238U all activities values were less than 1.10 Bqkg-1; 60Co all activities values were less than 0.02 Bqkg-1; 192Ir all activities values were less than 0.02 Bqkg-1 and 137Cs all activities values were less than 0.30 Bqkg-1.

  14. New Developments in Positron Scintigraphy and the Application of Cyclotron-Produced Positron Emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownell, G. L.; Burnham, C. A.; Wilensky, S.; Aronow, S.; Kazemi, H.; Strieder, D. [Massachusetts General Hospital. Boston, MA (United States)

    1969-01-15

    The use of positron-emitting radioisotopes offers unique advantages inscintigraphy and dynamic function studies. The detection of the two annihilation quanta provides, in principle, the possibility of utilization of all the positron annihilations with good resolution. In practice, very high efficiencies can be achieved with large area annihilation quanta detectors. The use of multi-detector matrices as large area detectors permits high levels o f activity and yields very high data acquisition rates. The independence of attenuation with depth of a source offers marked advantages for quantitative measurement. The use of time-of-flight techniques opens the possibility of true three-dimensional visualization. Finally, a number of very short-lived positron emitting radioisotopes such as {sup 15}O, {sup 19}N and {sup 11}C are available. A hybrid positron scanner has been constructed and is undergoing tests for brain tumour localization using {sup 74}As. The scanner uses two rows of detectors each containing 9 Nal scintillators and phototubes. The detector array moves continuously in the horizontal direction and in steps in the vertical direction, producing a scintigram with no line structure. The data is recorded on tape for replay or for computer processing. In either case, the plane of best focus can be positioned at will. The techniques developed for the hybrid scanner will be used in a stationary device employing two two-dimensional arrays of detectors. The design will emphasize the very rapid collection of data and the sequential production of scintigrams. The advantages and techniques of positron annihilation detection are also applicable to devices for study of dynamic function. We have constructed and are testing a fast six-detector coincidence system for pulmonary function studies. The measurement of time-of-flight offers the possibility of three-dimensional visualization of a distribution of positron-emitting radioisotope. We a re studying systems with

  15. Cyclotron for medicine and research; Zyklotron fuer Medizin und Forschung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2012-11-01

    35 tons, weighs the major medical device, which has been delivered in early may at the Julic campus. A heavy-duty crane hoisted the new compact cyclotron to its destination, an underground concrete bunker. There it will from summer 2013 produce radionuclides for the synthesis of radiopharmaca, by which it is possible among others to detect tumors, to pursue metabolic processes, and to investigate the mechanisms of action of drugs.

  16. Radiochemical studies relevant to cyclotron production of the radionuclides 71,72As, 68Ge/68Ga and 76,77,80mBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, Mohamed Mostafa Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    .c.a. radiogallium was studied using different solvents. Additionally separation of n.c.a. radiobromine was also done via solvent extraction using TOA in o-xylene. Finally an optimized procedure applicable to the production of 77 Br and 67 Ga was developed, and the quality control of the products was done. The nuclear reaction cross section of the Auger electron emitting radionuclide 80m Br (T 1/2 =4.4 h), was determined for its production using enriched 80 Se targets. Thin 80 Se samples were irradiated with incident protons of energies up to 18 MeV and the induced radioactivity was measured via nondestructive γ-ray spectrometery, allowing the determination and extension of the excitation function of the 80 Se(p,n) 80m Br reaction. The possible thick target yield was calculated and the energy range for production is discussed, especially with regard to the yield and radionuclidic purity of the produced radionuclide.

  17. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jong Seo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, You Seok; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Seok; Lee, Min Yong

    1995-12-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-59 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-70 .mu.A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed. (author). 8 tabs., 17 figs., 10 refs.

  18. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Seok; Chai, Jong Seo; Bak, Seong Ki; Park, Chan Won; Jo, Young Ho; Hong, Seong Seok; Lee, Min Yong; Jang Ho Ha

    2000-01-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-50 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-60μA. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23 days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed

  19. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seok; Chai, Jong Seo; Bak, Seong Ki; Park, Chan Won; Jo, Young Ho; Hong, Seong Seok; Lee, Min Yong; Jang Ho Ha

    2000-01-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-50 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-60{mu}A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23 days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed.

  20. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Jong Seo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, You Seok; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Seok; Lee, Min Yong.

    1995-12-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-59 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-70 .mu.A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed. (author). 8 tabs., 17 figs., 10 refs

  1. Biomedical research with cyclotron-produced radionuclides. Summary report to the US Department of Energy: 1979-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, R.

    1982-08-01

    A variety of clinical research projects include the use of Fe-52 citrate in the evaluation of hematopoietic disorders, N-13 ammonia as an imaging agent for the heart and as a tracer for the physiologic study of brain and whole-body ammonia metabolism in patients with severe liver disease, C-11 carbon monoxide in the evaluation of the changes in vascularity in tumors and normal tissues and N-13 L-glutamate and other N-13 labeled amino acids in the evaluation of solid tumors. The primary goal is to develop radiolabeled compounds of physiologic importance, as well as instrumentational and image-processing techniques, which can be used for investigating the nature of and treatment for human disease, particularly cancer. The information gained from in-vivo and in-vitro metabolic studies of the transport and metabolism of physiologic substrates and drugs in patients and in animal models will ultimately lead to improved diagnosis and treatment for cancer, and to reduced morbidity and mortality from that disease. Accomplishments since 1979 are briefly described

  2. transfer factor of radionuclides from soil-to-palm oil produced

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunjo Samuel

    The activity concentration of the natural radionuclides were determined using a single crystal 0.51cm x 0.51cmNaI ... variety of food, cosmetic and hygiene products, and can be .... solubility of the radionuclide that may lead to high uptake or.

  3. Superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.; Johnson, D.A.; Burleigh, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Superconducting cyclotrons are particularly appropriate for acceleration of heavy ions. A review is given of design features of a superconducting cyclotron with energy 440 (Q 2 /A) MeV. A strong magnetic field (4.6 tesla average) leads to small physical size (extraction radius 65 cm) and low construction costs. Operating costs are also low. The design is based on established technology (from present cyclotrons and from large bubble chambers). Two laboratories (in Chalk River, Canada and in East Lansing, Michigan) are proceeding with construction of full-scale prototype components for such cyclotrons

  4. New radionuclide generator systems for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atcher, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A current emphasis in nuclear medicine is to better match the physical lifetime of the radionuclides used in vivo for diagnosis and treatment to the biological lifetime of the diagnostic procedure or to minimize radiation dose to areas other than those to be treated. In many cases the biological lifetime is on the order of minutes. Since the direct production of radionuclides with half lives of minutes requires the user to be near a suitable reactor or accelerator, this study was undertaken to produce short-lived radionuclides indirectly. If a long-lived radionuclide decays into a short-lived radionuclide, quick separation of the daughter activity from the parent enables the user to have a short-lived daughter while freeing him from the constraint of proximity to a cyclotron. Systems where a short-lived daughter is separated from a long-lived parent are called radionuclide generators. Two generator systems were developed for use in nuclear medicine, one in diagnostic work and the other for therapeutic work. The yield and breakthrough characteristics were within the limits required to minimize unnecessary radiation exposure in patients. Two parent radionuclides were produced using 4 He beams available from medium energy cyclotrons. The yield was high enough to produce generators that would be useful in clinical applications

  5. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-08-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40K, 235U, 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232Th, 228Ra and 40K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

  6. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-01-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40 K, 235 U, 238 U, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 232 Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232 Th, 228 Ra and 40 K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose

  7. Cyclotrons: 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation is presented of the experimental facilities of the world's cyclotrons including history and status, staff and operation, research staff, target facilities, magnet, acceleration system, vacuum system, characteristic beams, beam properties, and a plan view of the facility for each cyclotron

  8. Galactic cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides in Antarctic meteorites and a lunar core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclide depth effects in a meteorite, the history and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and processes on the lunar surface are discussed in six chapters. A depth profile of 26 Al, 10 Be and 53 Mn activities have been measured in eleven metal phase samples of the Antarctic meteorite ALHA78084 to determine the importance of the secondary cascade in producing these nuclides in a 30 centimeter diameter meteorite. The results show a buildup of lower energy reaction products and a flat profile for high energy reaction products with depth. The activity of 53 Mn has been measured as a function of depth in eleven soil samples from the lunar double drive tubes 15011/15010. The results agree within error with the previous results of Nishiizumi. These data are consistent with the previously published 26 Al results of the Battelle Northwest group which indicated a disturbed profile down to 17 g/cm 2 and an accumulation rate of 2 cm/My. Comparison with the gardening models of Arnold and Langevin and the local topography suggests such a continuous accumulation is the result of steady downslope transport of surface soil for 7 to 10 My at this site. The 53 Mn activity was determined in eleven samples in eight Allan Hills-80 Antarctic meteorites and one sample from an Elephant Moraine Antarctic meteorite. Mineralogic and field relation data suggest that Allan Hills meteorites to be two sets of paired falls. The 53 Mn results are consistent with the grouping of these meteorites as paired falls excluding the meteorite ALHA80127. comparison with future nuclear particle track work and results from the measurement of other cosmogenic nuclides will provide more definitive results

  9. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  10. Application of accelerator-produced short-lived radionuclides in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupsch, H.

    1986-01-01

    Several problems such as corrosion, catalysis, wear, process optimization and diagnosis, damage analysis, arising in idustry can be solved using short-lived radioisotopes. Some examples of technological target designs which have been developed are demonstrated for the radionuclide production based on p,n; d,α; α,n; α,2n; α,p; γ,n; γ,p nuclear reactions. Applications of short-lived radionuclides in plants and processes of electrodeposition and gas concrete production are described. (author)

  11. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  13. Football coil: a device to produce absolute minimum magnetic field and an isochronous cyclotron for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szu, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    An electric solenoid is considered which consists of several discrete, circular and superconducting wires. The size of each loop varies from one to several meters in the radius. Furthermore, if such a solenoid is made into a football shape by squeezing the ends symmetrically, it is referred to here as a football coil. A discussion is given of the theory of synergic focusing; phase stability and universal orbit; application and computer simulation; and ion self-fields and self-focusing. An isochronous cyclotron was designed using the superconducted football coil and van resonators with flare height. It can accelerate various species of heavy ions; the heavier the rest mass of an ion, the better the present scheme will be

  14. An investigation into the technical feasibility of cyclotron production of technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, G.F.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The role of technetium-99m in nuclear medicine is well established with 80 per cent to 90 per cent of all nuclear medicine studies utilising this isotope. Technetium-99m is currently produced from nuclear reactors via production of the parent radionuclide molybdenum-99. The reactor production of 99m Tc has both significant financial and environmental costs, with unresolved problems in the areas of radioactive waste disposal and reactor decommissioning. Recent scientific publications have indicated that medical quality 99m Tc may be produced using cyclotrons without having the associated problems of waste disposal and decommissioning. Further scientific research is now required to demonstrate the feasibility of this cyclotron production technique. A collaboration between the Cyclotron and PET Centre, Austin Hospital, the National Medical Cyclotron, ANSTO, Sydney, and the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California, Davis, USA has been proposed. The general objective of the proposed collaboration is to acquire additional scientific data to evaluate the 99m Tc cyclotron production method and to determine the feasibility of cyclotron technology for Australian nuclear medicine. 16 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Radiation shielding analysis of medical cyclotron at Radiation Medicine Centre, Parel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gathibandhe, M.V.; Agrawal, R.A.; Utge, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a diagnostic method to obtain 3-D functional images of the distribution of radio-nuclides introduced in the human body as tracers for specific biological processes. Tracers are produced by bombardment of different target nuclides by protons and deuterons of high energy produced in the cyclotron. A Wipro-GE medical cyclotron was installed in the basement of RMC, Parel. Shielding around the cyclotron is provided in the form of borated concrete walls of required thickness to limit dose rates to design values as per AERB criteria. The roof of the cyclotron room is made of heavy concrete. Entry in to the room is through a maze. Shielding analysis for the cyclotron room has been carried out using computer code ANISN. The maze has been analyzed using code MCNP. Based on the analysis carried out additional shielding was recommended to meet the design requirements. The paper discusses the shielding analysis carried out for the cyclotron room and the maze. Dose rate estimated at various locations are highlighted

  16. Preparation of proton rich radionuclides in support of radiochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, Simon; Larijani, Cyrus; Parker, David

    2012-01-01

    The production of proton rich radionuclides supports a wide range of radiochemical analyses via radioactive yield tracers ( 95m Tc and 236 Pu). In recent years, NPL and the University of Birmingham cyclotron have collaborated to produce these, and other, radionuclides. - Highlights: ► In this paper we options for the production of Tc and Pu tracers. ► The irradiation and measurement of targets producing Tc-95 m and Pu-236 are described. ► Options for production are discussed. ► The results of this study and future work needed are described.

  17. Radionuclide solubilities in boom clay. Final report, part 2 : a report produced for ONDRAF/NIRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.; Baston, G.M.N.; Boult, K.A. [and others

    2000-07-01

    The release of radionuclides from a High Level Radioactive Waste repository situated in the Boom Clay at Mol would depend, in part, on their retardation within the Boom Clay. A number of parameters are required to assess such retardation; these include the solubilities of key radionuclides and their sorption behaviour. ONDRAF/NIRAS has identified neptunium, technetium, selenium, uranium and plutonium as elements for study. AEA Technology plc was requested to undertake a joint experimental and modelling study to determine the solubilities of these five elements under conditions representative of those in the Boom Clay (the in situ chemical conditions are pH{approx}8, Eh {approx} -230 mV). The work programme was carried out over three years, and for completeness this final report includes all the results.

  18. Radionuclide solubilities in boom clay. Final report, part 2 : a report produced for ONDRAF/NIRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Baston, G.M.N.; Boult, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The release of radionuclides from a High Level Radioactive Waste repository situated in the Boom Clay at Mol would depend, in part, on their retardation within the Boom Clay. A number of parameters are required to assess such retardation; these include the solubilities of key radionuclides and their sorption behaviour. ONDRAF/NIRAS has identified neptunium, technetium, selenium, uranium and plutonium as elements for study. AEA Technology plc was requested to undertake a joint experimental and modelling study to determine the solubilities of these five elements under conditions representative of those in the Boom Clay (the in situ chemical conditions are pH∼8, Eh ∼ -230 mV). The work programme was carried out over three years, and for completeness this final report includes all the results

  19. Gamma emitting radionuclides in fruits and vegetables produced in the Canary Islands: domestic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triguero-Perez, M.; Duarte-Rodriguez, X.; Lopez-Perez, M.; Hernandez-Armas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Determine the possible effects due to ingestion of radionuclides that can be found in health food is of interest from the viewpoint of radiation protection of the population. these determinations and analysis of the consequences on the health of people and jobs has led to studies that have had consequences in the form of rules to follow and values have to be attended to limit dictated by national and international agencies. (Author)

  20. Leachability of radionuclides from cement solidified waste forms produced at operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croney, S.T.

    1985-03-01

    This study determined the leachability indexes of radionuclides contained in solidified liquid wastes from operating nuclear power plants. Different sizes of samples of cement-solidified liquid wastes were collected from two nuclear power plants - a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor - to correlate radionuclide leaching from small- and full-sized (55-gallon) waste forms. Diffusion-based model analysis (ANS 16.1) of measured radionuclide leach data from both small- and full-sized samples was performed and indicate that leach data from small samples can be used to determine leachability indexes for full-sizes waste forms. The leachability indexes for cesium, strontium, and cobalt isotopes were determined for waste samples from both plants according to the models used for ANS 16.1. The leachability indexes for the pressurized water reactor samples were 6.4 for cesium, 7.1 for strontium, and 10.4 for cobalt. Leachability indexes for the boiling water reactor samples were 6.5 for cesium, 8.6 for strontium, and 11.1 for cobalt

  1. Cyclotron to Oslo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstad, J.

    1978-01-01

    The new cyclotron was delivered to Oslo University on September 21st 1978, and was mannfactured by A/B Scandtronix of Uppsala, Sweden. The contract price was 6,8 million Norwegian kroner and installation will cost a further 4 million. The main specifications are given. The energy will be 36 MeV for protons and alpha particles, 18 MeV deuterons and 48 MeV for helium 3. The principle of a cyclotron is briefly described. While the primary purpose of the machine is nuclear research it is also planned to produce short-lived radioisotopes, primarily iodine 123. (JIW)

  2. Simple and effective method for nuclear tellurium isomers separation from antimony cyclotron targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarevskij, S.I.; Eremin, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Simple and effective method of generation of tellurium nuclear isomers from irradiated on cyclotron metallic antimony is suggested. Basically this method consists in consideration of the big difference in volatilities of metallic forms of antimony, tin and tellurium. Heating of the tin-antimony alloy at 1200 K permits to separate about 90 % of produced quantity of 121m Te and 123m Te (in this case impurity of antimony radionuclides is not more than 1 % on activity) [ru

  3. Medical cyclotron: why, where, how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, Kurt; Comar, Dominique; Kellershohn, Claude

    1976-01-01

    Cyclotrons for medical purposes are particularly useful for the production of radioactive isotopes of elements normally constituting organic matter ( 15 O, 13 N, 11 C). The short half-life and positron emission of those elements are of great interest in medical diagnosis. Many others carrier-free radioisotopes can be produced by cyclotrons. Three categories of cyclotrons are mentioned. Desk top cyclotron only adapted to the production of short-lived radioisotopes in a hospital; low energy and average energy cyclotrons which require well-entrained personnel for their operation and are best adapted to the production of radioelements on a regional or even national scale. Examples relative to the interest of short-lived radioisotopes in lung and brain investigations and tumor detection are given

  4. Implementation of a metrology programme to provide traceability for radionuclides activity measurements in the CNEN Radiopharmaceuticals Producers Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Erica A.L. de; Braghirolli, Ana M.S.; Tauhata, Luiz; Gomes, Regio S.; Silva, Carlos J., E-mail: erica@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delgado, Jose U.; Oliveira, Antonio E.; Iwahara, Akira, E-mail: ealima@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The commercialization and use of radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil are regulated by Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA) which require Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) certification for Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Centers. Quality Assurance Program should implement the GMP standards to ensure radiopharmaceuticals have requirements quality to proving its efficiency. Several aspects should be controlled within the Quality Assurance Programs, and one of them is the traceability of the Radionuclides Activity Measurement in radiopharmaceuticals doses. The quality assurance of activity measurements is fundamental to maintain both the efficiency of the nuclear medicine procedures and patient and exposed occupationally individuals safety. The radiation doses received by patients, during the nuclear medicine procedures, is estimated according to administered radiopharmaceuticals quantity. Therefore it is very important either the activity measurements performed in radiopharmaceuticals producer centers (RPC) as the measurements performed in nuclear medicine services are traceable to national standards. This paper aims to present an implementation program to provide traceability to radionuclides activity measurements performed in the dose calibrators(well type ionization chambers) used in Radiopharmaceuticals Producer Center placed in different states in Brazil. The proposed program is based on the principles of GM Pand ISO 17025 standards. According to dose calibrator performance, the RPC will be able to provide consistent, safe and effective radioactivity measurement to the nuclear medicine services. (author)

  5. Possibilities of 140Nd production by the VINCY cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comor, J.J.; Dakovic, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of positron emission tomography (PET) in modern medical diagnosis relies on the application of short lived radionuclides 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F, presuming their production in the close vicinity of the PET camera. Application of long-lived positron emitters would enable the regional distribution of PET radiopharmaceuticals, which would significantly lower the price of PET diagnosis, as well as enable its application in fields currently inhibited by the short half-life of available positron emitters. One of the candidates for application in PET is the generator system 140 Nd/ 140 Pr, due to the long half-life of 140 Nd (3,37 days). Theoretical calculations confirm that this radionuclide can be produced with high yields by protons accelerated to energies bellow 30 MeV. Due to its optimal operating parameters, the VINCY Cyclotron could produce enough 140 Nd for its regional distribution to a number of PET centers (author)

  6. Cyclotrons in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, Hernan

    2004-01-01

    Cyclotron accelerators are prolific sources of charged particle for the production of radionuclides and have become an essential tool in the practice of modern nuclear medicine by providing reliable radiotracers for SPECT and PET studies. In a recent survey conducted by the IAEA in 2001, the growth in the number of cyclotron facilities installed in laboratories and hospitals in developed as well as developing countries was recorded. This trend, which started in the late 70's, continues in the present time also and all indications are that it will continue in the next five to ten years. The reasons for this growth are several: technology involved has become more user or 'hospital friendly', third party reimbursement for several clinical studies based on F-18 PET radiopharmaceuticals at least in some of the advanced countries started in 1998 and above all, the clear irrefutable and demonstrable conclusion of the positive cost/benefit outcomes of PET studies in the field of oncology to a lesser degree, thus far, for cardiology and neurology. It is however recognizable that the overall financial cost of the technology, which comprises the premises to house the facility, the cyclotron accelerator, the corresponding radiochemistry and quality control equipment and the PET cameras can be nevertheless an expensive proposition that requires careful advance planning. This fact is even more relevant when the facility is planned for installation in a developing country, which, frequently, in addition to having a lack of sufficient financial resources, do have shortage of qualified human resources to efficiently run the facility. In spite of the above, it is fact that more and more public as well as private organizations in the developing countries are setting up cyclotron/PET programmes or are seriously considering the installation of such a facility

  7. The relative effectiveness of inhaled alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in producing lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmetter, R.A.; Griffith, W.C.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    Proper assessment of a long-term human health risks associated with inhaled radionuclides requires knowledge of dose to critical cells and tissues and relationships between dose and effect for different biological end points. Results from epidemiological studies of exposed human populations provided important information for such assessments. However, because the types of exposures are limited, these results need to be supplemented with more detailed information on dosimetry and biological effects available through studies in laboratory animals and in vitro systems. To provide health risk information for inhaled fission product and actinide aerosols, life-span studies are being conducted using beagle dogs and other species at the Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). Results of two life-span studies in dogs involving inhalation of the beta emitter 91 Y in fused aluminosilicate particles or the alpha emitter 239 PuO 2 are reported here

  8. Investigation of bio-oil produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of food waste using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Vlaskin, Mikhail; Borisova, Ludmila; Zherebker, Alexander; Perminova, Irina; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-02-01

    Recent research has revealed that more than 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted globally every year. The disposal of such huge biomass has become a challenge. In the present paper, we report the production of the bio-oil by hydrothermal liquefaction of three classes of food waste: meat, cheese and fruits. The highest yield of the bio-oil was observed for meat (∼60%) and cheese (∼75%), while for fruits, it was considerably low (∼10%). The molecular composition of the obtained bio-oil was investigated using ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry and was found to be similar to that obtained from algae. Several thousand heteroatom compounds (N, N 2 , ON 2 , etc. classes) were reliably identified from each sample. It was found that bio-oils produced from meat and cheese have many compounds (∼90%) with common molecular formulas, while bio-oil produced from fruits differs considerably (∼30% of compounds are unique).

  9. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takács, S., E-mail: stakacs@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Atomki, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Takács, M.P.; Ditrói, F. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Atomki, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Aikawa, M. [Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haba, H.; Komori, Y. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the {sup nat}Ti(α,x){sup 51}Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with E{sub α} = 20.7 and E{sub α} = 51.25 MeV, I{sub α} = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the {sup 72,73,75}Se, {sup 71,72,74,76,78}As, and {sup 69}Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  10. Commercial and PET radioisotope manufacturing with a medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, T.E.; McLeod, T.F.; Plitnikas, M.; Kinney, D.; Tavano, E.; Feijoo, Y.; Smith, P.; Szelecsenyi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Mount Sinai has extensive experience in producing radionuclides for commercial sales and for incorporation into radiopharmaceuticals, including PET. Currently, an attempt is being made to supply radiochemicals to radiopharmaceutical manufacturers outside the hospital, to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for in-house use, and to prepare PET radiopharmaceuticals, such as 2-[F-18] FDG, for outside sales. This use for both commercial and PET manufacturing is atypical for a hospital-based cyclotron. To accomplish PET radiopharmaceutical sales, the hospital operates a nuclear pharmacy. A review of operational details for the past several years shows a continuing dependence on commercial sales which is reflected in research and developmental aspects and in staffing. Developmental efforts have centered primarily on radionuclide production, target development, and radiochemical processing optimization. (orig.)

  11. Commercial and PET radioisotope manufacturing with a medical cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, T. E.; McLeod, T. F.; Plitnikas, M.; Kinney, D.; Tavano, E.; Feijoo, Y.; Smith, P.; Szelecsényi, F.

    1993-06-01

    Mount Sinai has extensive experience in producing radionuclides for commercial sales and for incorporation into radiopharmaceuticals, including PET. Currently, an attempt is being made to supply radiochemicals to radiopharmaceutical manufacturers outside the hospital, to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for in-house use, and to prepare PET radiopharmaceuticals, such as 2-[F-18] FDG, for outside sales. This use for both commercial and PET manufacturing is atypical for a hospital-based cyclotron. To accomplish PET radiopharmaceutical sales, the hospital operates a nuclear pharmacy. A review of operational details for the past several years shows a continuing dependence on commercial sales which is reflected in research and developmental aspects and in staffing. Developmental efforts have centered primarily on radionuclide production, target development, and radiochemical processing optimization.

  12. Production, administration and disposal of cyclotron produced shortlived radioactive gases for positron emission tomography studies at the Austin Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, G.F.; O`Keefe, G. [Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Midgley, S.; Phana, K.S.; Sachinidis, J.; Chan, J.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Centre is operational at the Austin Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne. The major equipment consists of a 10 MeV cyclotron and a whole body PET scanner. Radioactive gases produced and used directly in clinical studies include [{sup 15}O]O{sub 2}, [{sup 15}O]CO, and [{sup 15}O]CO{sub 2}, whilst [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} is also produced for use in radiochemistry syntheses. Radioactivity delivery rates of 3.7, 3.3, and 1.6 GBq/min to the scanner suite have been achieved for [{sup 15}O]O{sub 2}, [{sup 15}O]CO{sub 2}, and [{sup 15}O]CO respectively, and batch productions of 36.3 GBq of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} have been produced. The production. patient administration and disposal of the short-lived radioactive gases has been achieved in compliance with radiation protection principles. Radioactive gas doses of 1.7 GBq are administered to patients with less than 0.02 MBq/m{sup 3} leakage into the scanner suite. Less than 13 MBq of [ {sup 15}O]-labelled gases are released into the environment per patient study at a concentration of 0.018 MBq/m{sup 3}. Annually less than 2 GBq is expected to be released into the environment. The centre design and first four months` experience of radioactive gas production, administration and disposal is presented. 5 refs., 4 tab., 1 fig.

  13. Effect of electrode for producing the highly charged heavy ions from RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Tetsuro; Nakagawa, Takahide; Kidera, Masanori

    1999-01-01

    We successfully produced the intense beam of highly charged Kr ions using an electrode. Under the pulsed mode operation, we found that the depth of the plasma potential dip strongly depends on the duration of the microwave and takes about 40 ms to reach the equilibrium state. Taking these results into account, we compared the beam intensities of highly charged Kr ions with and without the use of an electrode under the pulsed mode operation. We observed that the density of highly charged Kr ions and ion confinement time increase with increasing mirror magnetic field strength. The plasma potential dip becomes shallower with insertion of the electrode. Consequently, when we increase the mirror magnetic field strength and insert the electrode into the plasma, the beam intensities of highly charged ions increase. (author)

  14. SU-E-T-534: Level of Residual Radioactivity of Activated Parts of a Decommissioned Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, HHF; Leung, TM; Chiu, TL; Yang, B; Wu, PM; Cheung, KY; Yu, SK

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: CTI cyclotron RDS-111 was used at the Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital (HKSH) to produce radiopharmaceuticals and radioactive tracers for diagnostic scans between 1999 and 2007. During the operation, some machine components became radioactive by activation. For the safety of staff, decommissioning took place in 2009, two years after the cyclotron had stopped operation. This study investigates the residual radioactivity and radionuclides found in different cyclotron components in 2014 in compliance with the local regulations in Hong Kong for transfer of radioactive waste. Methods: A representative sample of each part was counted using a high-purity germanium detector (manufacturer: ORTECT) for at least four hours. GammaVision, a multichannel analyzer software, was used to identify the radionuclides found in the cyclotron components, as well as the associated activities. A standard library and a Mariscotti peak search algorithm were used to identify the present radionuclides. Only radionuclides with half-life greater than 180 days were considered. Results: Among the components, the Havar target foil has the highest specific activity ((4.6±0.6)×10 2 Bq/g), with Co-60 being the most prominent ((3.8±0.5)×10 2 Bq/g). The total activity of the target foil, however, is still low due to its small mass of 0.04 g. Radioisotopes Mn-54 (46±6 Bq/g), Na-22 (6.8±0.8 Bq/g), Co-57 (7.3±0.9 Bq/g), and Fe-59 (6.0±0.9 Bq/g) have also been detected in the target foil. The target window holder and the vacuum window register a specific activity of 88.3±0.6 Bq/g and 48.6±0.1 Bq/g, respectively. Other components, such as the collimator, the target tube, the valve body and the beamline, are also found with trace amounts of radionuclides. Conclusion: Even seven years after the cyclotron had stopped operation, some components still exhibited residual radioactivity from activation exceeding the IAEA clearance levels. Special consideration for radiological protection may need

  15. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  16. Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge

    Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron...... isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able...

  17. Electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.; Hamamatsu, K.

    1981-09-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron harmonic waves just below the electron cyclotron harmonics are investigated numerically and experimentally. Backward waves which are observed to propagate nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field just below the electron cyclotron frequency in a high density magnetoplasma are confirmed to be in accord with the theoretical electromagnetic cyclotron waves. (author)

  18. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta 'crossfire' and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet TM , a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere TM , an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  19. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Colombia (United States). Departments of Radiology, Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta `crossfire` and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet{sup TM}, a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere{sup TM}, an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  20. Study of radionuclides created by 181Ta(γ,xn yp) reactions for bremsstrahlung photons produced by 150-MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.A.; Dickens, J.K.

    1991-12-01

    Ten radionuclides, including isomers, from 172 Ta to 180 Ta and 180m Hf were produced by photon interactions with a sample of elemental tantalum and measured by counting photons using a high-resolution detection system. Relative yields of these radionuclides were obtained. In addition, precision half lives were obtained for 175,176,180 Ta and 180m Hf. Those obtained for the three Ta isotopes agree with previously reported values. For 180m Hf, the present measurements resulted in a half life determination of 6.05±0.06 hr, or about 10% longer than the currently adopted value for this half life

  1. Measured radionuclide production from copper, gold and lead spallation targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A.; Belian, A.P. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Spallation target materials are chosen so as to produce large numbers of neutrons while at the same time avoiding the creation of long-lived radioactive wastes. While there has been considerable research to determine the number of neutrons produced per incident particle for various target materials, there has been less effort to precisely quantify the types and amounts of radionuclides produced. Accurate knowledge of the radioactive species produced by spallation reactions is important for specifying waste disposal criteria for targets. In order to verify the production rates calculated by LAHET, a study has been conducted using the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Cyclotron to measure radionuclide yields from copper, gold, and lead targets.

  2. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron-produced

  3. Recent achievements in Tc-99m radiopharmaceutical direct production by medical cyclotrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-09-01

    99m Tc is the most commonly used radionuclide in the field of diagnostic imaging, a noninvasive method intended to diagnose a disease, assess the disease state and monitor the effects of treatments. Annually, the use of 99m Tc, covers about 85% of nuclear medicine applications. This isotope releases gamma rays at about the same wavelength as conventional X-ray diagnostic equipment, and owing to its short half-life (t ½  = 6 h) is ideal for diagnostic nuclear imaging. A patient can be injected with a small amount of 99m Tc and within 24 h almost 94% of the injected radionuclide would have decayed and left the body, limiting the patient's radiation exposure. 99m Tc is usually supplied to hospitals through a 99 Mo/ 99m Tc radionuclide generator system where it is produced from the β decay of the parent nuclide 99 Mo (t ½  = 66 h), which is produced in nuclear reactors via neutron fission. Recently, the interruption of the global supply chain of reactor-produced 99 Mo, has forced the scientific community to investigate alternative production routes for 99m Tc. One solution was to consider cyclotron-based methods as potential replacement of reactor-based technology and the nuclear reaction 100 Mo(p,2n) 99m Tc emerged as the most worthwhile approach. This review reports some achievements about 99m Tc produced by medical cyclotrons. In particular, the available technologies for target design, the most efficient extraction and separation procedure developed for the purification of 99m Tc from the irradiated targets, the preparation of high purity 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals and the first clinical studies carried out with cyclotron produced 99m Tc are described.

  4. Practicality of the cyclotron production of radiolanthanide 142Pr. A potential for therapeutic applications and biodistribution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi Sadeghi; Bakht, M.K.; Leila Mokhtari

    2011-01-01

    Radiolanthanide praseodymium-142 (T 1/2 = 19.12 h, E β - = 2.162 MeV (96.3%), E γ = 1575 keV (3.7%)) due to its high β-emission and low specific γ-emission could not only be a therapeutic radionuclide, but also a suitable radionuclide in order for biodistribution studies. Conventionally, 142 Pr produces via 141 Pr(n,γ) 142 Pr reaction by irradiation in a low-fluence reactor and this study evaluates cyclotron reaction production of it. 142 Pr excitation function via nat La(α,n) 142 Pr, 142 Ce(p,n) 142 Pr, and nat Pr(d,p) 142 Pr reactions were calculated by TALYS-1.2 and EMPIRE-2.19beta codes, and with the data taken from the TENDL-2010 database. In addition, we compared them with the reported measurement by experimental data. Requisite thickness of targets was obtained by SRIM-2010 code for each reaction. The 142 Pr production yield was evaluated with attention to excitation function and stopping power. Similar to reactor produced 142 Pr; 141 Pr impurity exists in cyclotron produced 142 Pr while it could not be separated by chemical methods. Therefore, cyclotron and reactor produced 142 Pr will be in carrier added form. (author)

  5. Radiation shielding and health physics instrumentation for PET medical cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Modern Medical Cyclotrons produce a variety of short-lived positron emitting PET radioisotopes, and as a result are the source of intense neutron and gamma radiations. Since such cyclotrons are housed within hospitals or medical clinics, there is significant potential for un-intentional exposure to staff or patients in proximity to cyclotron facilities. Consequently, the radiological hazards associated with Cyclotrons provide the impetus for an effective radiological shielding and continuous monitoring of various radiation levels in the cyclotron environment. Management of radiological hazards is of paramount importance for the safe operation of a Medical Cyclotron facility. This work summarised the methods of shielding calculations for a compact hospital based Medical Cyclotron currently operating in Canada, USA and Australia. The design principle and operational history of a real-time health physics monitoring system (Watchdog) operating at a large multi-energy Medical Cyclotron is also highlighted

  6. Study of the half-life of 123I and the determination of possible radionuclidic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Silva, Carlos Jose da; Araujo, Camila Cristina Cunha; Candido, Marcos Antonio; Pereira, Wagner do Prado

    2013-01-01

    During the process of production of the radiopharmaceutical nuclear reactor or cyclotron, impurities can be generated from biological, chemical and radionuclidic. The development of the present work was to study the half-life of Na 123 I sample produced in IEN (Institute of Nuclear Engineering) using the technique of gamma-ray spectrometry with germanium detector in order to Identify such impurities. The results Indicate values of half-life consistent with recent publications with a deviation of 0,08% and 0:11% of uncertainty as well as the identification of impurities to radionuclides 95m Tc, 96 Tc and 121 Te. (author)

  7. Radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Chapter 8 presents tables on selected alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray emitters by increasing energy; information on specific activity for selected radionuclides; naturally occurring radionuclides; the natural decay series; and the artificially produced neptunium series. A table of alpha emitters is listed by increasing atomic number and by energy. The table of β emitters presented is useful in identifying β emitters whose energies and possibly half-lives have been determined by standard laboratory techniques. It is also a handy guide to β-emitting isotopes for applications requiring specific half-lives and/or energies. Gamma rays for radionuclides of importance to radiological assessments and radiation protection are listed by increasing energy. The energies and branching ratios are important for radionuclide determinations with gamma spectrometry detectors. This section also presents a table of x-ray energies which are useful for radiochemical analyses. A number of nuclides emit x-rays as part of their decay scheme. These x-rays may be counted with Ar proportional counters, Ge planar or n-type Ge co-axial detectors, or thin crystal NaI(T1) scintillation counters. In both cases, spectral measurements can be made and both qualitative and quantitative information obtained on the sample. Nuclear decay data (energy and probability by radiation type) for more than one hundred radionuclides that are important to health physicists are presented in a schematic manner

  8. Target development for 67Cu, 82Sr radionuclide production at the RIC-80 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleev, V. N.; Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Krotov, S. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2018-01-01

    A high-current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed and commissioned at PNPI (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute). One of the main goals of cyclotron C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. To date, the project development of a radioisotope facility RIC-80 (radioisotopes at cyclotron C-80) has been completed. The feature of the project is the use of a mass-separator combined with the ion-target device for obtaining ion beams of radioisotopes with a high purity of separation that is especially important for medical applications. The first results of a new high-temperature method for extracting 82Sr and 67Cu radioisotopes from irradiated targets have been presented.

  9. Developing the smallest possible medical cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a portable medical cyclotron operated in a conventional radioactive facility at a hospital. Imagine a nurse or technician switching it on and producing isotopes at the patient’s bedside. Sounds like science fiction? Think again.   CERN has teamed up with Spain’s national scientific research centre (CIEMAT) to develop an avant-garde cyclotron to be used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). “We plan to make a cyclotron that doesn't need an insulated building or ‘vault’: a cyclotron small enough to fit inside a hospital lift,” explains Jose Manuel Perez, who is leading the CIEMAT/CERN collaboration. “It will be the smallest possible medical cyclotron for single patient dose production and will dramatically reduce costs for hospitals.” While PET technology has transformed imaging techniques, many of its medical benefits have remained confined to highly specialised hospitals. “Studies have foun...

  10. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures

  11. Study of solid target preparation for developing I-124, Pd-103, Cu-64 radioisotopes based cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hong; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sub; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hee Dong [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The decay characteristics of I-124, Pd-103 and Cu-64 radioisotopes produced by cyclotron have considered useful agents for diagnostic imaging or therapy. Numbers of radioisotopes used in medical applications or promised for development are produced with solid targets. The aims of developing solid targets are to obtain large quantities of radionuclides from accelerators. The scope of the study is to develop optimized target system and chemical procedures of these radioisotopes. In order to increase the availability of the radionuclides, the investigation for the design of the solid target and different procedures yielding efficient production of high specific activity will be carrying. In this work, we will present the issue of the primary target design concept.

  12. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lominadse, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The book deals with fundamental physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities conditioned by the presence in plasma of direct or alternating electric currents passing in it perpendicularily to a magnetic field. A great variety of problems is considered connected with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium and electron plasma of metals and semiconductors. Parametric excitations of electron cyclotron oscillations of plasma in an alternating electric field are studied. Particular attention is paid to the investigation of plasma turbulence arising as a result of development of cyclotron instabilities. Experimental data are discussed and compared with theoretical results

  13. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  14. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  15. Concepts and strategies to establish a cyclotron/PET center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernan Vera Ruiz; D, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    detailed cost/benefit and market potential analysis, a thorough comparative evaluation of the available technologies in the market and their costs, and finally, a realistic assessment of the human and financial resources available, for facilities of this type are long term commitments for governments or private institutions. The definition of the utilization programme necessarily has to derive from the definition of the mission statement of the facility as well as after having close consultations with the nuclear medicine community as users of the PET products. The current needs of the nuclear medicine community for cyclotron produced radionuclides are by large satisfied with a reliable production of the four classical PET radionuclides tracers, e.g. F-18, N-13, O-15 and C-11 and a few of their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals, most notably, F-18FDG, the most commonly used PET radiopharmaceutical in the world today. For this situation, the industry offers a wide variety of cyclotrons with special features optimized for a reliable and prolific production programme. The presentation will provide examples and suggestions for advanced planning and project structure, define the critical steps that need careful consideration to avoid pitfalls, as well as for actual project implementation and management. (authors)

  16. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  17. JSW's baby cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Y.; Kaneda, Y.; Satoh, Y.; Suzukawa, I.; Yamada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Designed by The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., specially for installation in a hospital's medical department and nuclear research laboratory, '' JSW BABY CYCLOTRON '' has been developed to produce short-lived radioisotopes such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. JSW's Baby Cyclotron has some design features. 1) Fixed energy and four sector azimuthally varying field. 2) Compact figure desired for hospital's nuclear medical department 3) A bitter type magnet yoke shielding activity 4) Simple control and operation 5) Easy maintenance without skilled personnel. Type BC105 (P:10MeV, d:5MeV), BC107 (P:10MeV, d:7MeV), BC168 (P:16MeV, d:8MeV) and BC1710 (P:17MeV, d:10MeV) are available according to required amount of radioisotopes. In our radioisotope production test, yield and purity of 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F are usable to clinical diagnosis

  18. Study of the radionuclides contained in wastes produced by the phosphate industry and their impact on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetsle, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report reviews the present state of the management and disposal of waste associated with mining, milling and reprocessing of phosphate ores with regard to its content on naturally occurring radionuclides. The main areas of investigation are: phosphate ores and their characteristics and phosphate trade in the Member States of the European Community, production and processing methods of phosphoric acids and phosphates, interaction of phosphate products and wastes with the environment, standards and regulations for radioactivity released during processing in the phosphate industry

  19. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  20. PIXE analysis by baby cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hyogo; Tanaka, Teruaki; Ito, Takashi; Toda, Yohjiro; Wakasa, Hideichiro

    1988-01-01

    The Japan Steel Works, Ltd. has been supplying a very small sized cyclotron (Baby Cyclotron) to hospitals and research facilities. The cyclotron is designed to produce short-lived radioisotopes for medical use. In the present study, this cyclotron is modified so that it can serve for PIXE analysis. The PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) technique has the following features: (1) Down to 1 ng of trace material in a sample (mg - μg) can be detected, (2) An analysis run is completed in one to ten minutes, permitting economical analysis for a large number of samples, (3) Several elements can be analyzed simultaneously, with an almost constant sensitivity for a variety of elements ranging from aluminum to heavy metals, (4) Analysis can be performed nondestructively without a chemical process, and (5) The use of microbeam can provide data on the distribution of elements with a resolution of several μm. Software for analysis is developed to allow the modified equipment to perform peak search, background fitting, and identification and determination of peaks. A study is now being conducted to examine the performance of the equipment for PIXE analysis of thin samples. Satisfactory results have been obtained. The analysis time, excluding the background correction, is 5-10 min. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  2. Initial operation of the cyclotron CYTRACK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, Yu.N.; Dolya, S.N.; Kalinichenko, V.V.; Karamysheva, G.A.; Kostromin, S.A.; Fedorenko, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    The industrial cyclotron CYTRACK is dedicated to produce the track membranes. It is the basic instrument for the industry of membrane products to be consumed in medicine, biotechnology, pharmacology, microelectronics and many other industries. Cyclotron CYTRACK started working in August 2002. Argon ions were accelerated to the project energy - 2.4 MeV/nucleon, the extracted beam intensity was about 200 nA, the extraction efficiency totaled ∼50%

  3. Production of radionuclides by 14 MeV neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.

    1983-01-01

    Due to the short half-lives of these nuclides they have to be produced in situ or at least not far from the place of use. The cost of 14 MeV neutron generators have been compared with the typical middle-sized cyclotrons and it was found that the capital costs are much lower in the case of neutron generators. This is the main reason for the availability of 14 MeV neutron generators in many scientific institutes compared to the scarcity of cyclotrons. Lately, the use of 14 MeV neutrons for cancer therapy was studied in several medical centers. A number of hospitals and cancer research centers have high intensity 14 MeV neutron generators for this purpose. The advantages of using short-lived in-house produced radionuclides suggest the use of the available 14 MeV neutron generators for biological studies and in medical diagnosis. 14 MeV neutron generators can be used to produce some of the medically useful radionuclides, such as /sup 18/F, /sup 80/Br, /sup 199m/Hg, and others. However, the amount required for medicine can only be prepared by the new high intensity neutron generators, used for neutron therapy and not by the smaller ones, commonly used in university laboratories (--10/sup 11/ n/sec). On the other hand, these relatively small neutron generators can be used for the preparation of radionuclides for biological studies. They facilitate the study of metabolism of elements for which radionuclides cannot be usually purchased due to short half-lives or the high price of the long-lived ones, such as /sup 34m/Cl, /sup 18/F, /sup 28,29/Al, /sup 27/Mg, and others. An example is the work done on the fate of Al and Mg in rats using /sup 28/Al and /sup 27/Mg./sup 13/

  4. Non-conventional measurement techniques for the determination of some long-lived radionuclides produced in nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.J.

    1992-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on non-radiometric analytical techniques for the determination of long-lived radionuclides are described. The methods which have been considered are accelerator mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. Neutron activation analysis has been commonly used for the determination of 129 I and 237 Np in environmental samples. Inductively coupled mass spectrometry seems likely to become the method of choice for the determination of 99 Tc, 237 Np and Pu-isotopes. The methods are discussed and the chemical separation methods described. (orig.)

  5. Medical applications of cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, R.; Fauchet, M.

    1978-01-01

    Isochronous cyclotrons used to accelerate different charged particles (protons, deuterons, alphas...) at variable energies, have important medical applications, for neutron teletherapy, in vivo or in vitro activation analysis or production of short-lived radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. The characteristics of the cyclotron presently available are described for these three applications (low energy 'compact' cyclotrons, cyclotrons of intermediate and high energies), and their advantages are discussed from the points of view of the medical requirements, the financial investments and the results obtained. (orig.) [de

  6. MICHIGAN: Cyclotron conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A sense of excitement was in the air as cyclotron physicists and engineers from 17 countries convened on 30 April for the opening of the Tenth International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications. Some 50 years after its invention, the redoubtable cyclotron remains a topic of compelling current interest. Cyclotron experts gathered at Michigan State University's Kellogg Center to hear of latest developments, of progress and successes on new machines which had come into operation, of new projects which were underway, and of dreams which lay ahead

  7. MICHIGAN: Cyclotron conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    A sense of excitement was in the air as cyclotron physicists and engineers from 17 countries convened on 30 April for the opening of the Tenth International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications. Some 50 years after its invention, the redoubtable cyclotron remains a topic of compelling current interest. Cyclotron experts gathered at Michigan State University's Kellogg Center to hear of latest developments, of progress and successes on new machines which had come into operation, of new projects which were underway, and of dreams which lay ahead.

  8. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Heavy ion reactors, nuclear structure and fundamental interactions; atomic and materials studies; nuclear theory; and superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation

  9. A search for long-lived radionuclides produced by fast-neutron irradiations of copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1990-01-01

    Identical sample packets, each containing samples of elemental copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium, as well as titanium, iron and nickel as dosimeters, have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields (at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory in the U.S.A., and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan) as part of an interlaboratory research collaboration to search for the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. This paper is a progress report on this project. To date, we have detected the following activities, and have obtained preliminary experimental cross section values for several of these: Ag-106m,108m,110m; Eu-150m,152g,154; Tb-158,160; and Hf-175,178m2,179m2,181. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  10. Medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  11. 20 years Rossendorf cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of initiating of the Rossendorf cyclotron accounts are given of most important works and results in the field of accelerator engineering and utilization of this machine. The reports show the trend of development and actual spectrum of application. The enclosed literature lists give a survey of technical and experimental works at cyclotron. (author)

  12. In-house cyclotron production of high-purity Tc-99m and Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Zagni, Federico; Corazza, Andrea; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Skliarova, Hanna; Mou, Liliana; Cisternino, Sara; Carturan, Sara; Melendez-Alafort, Laura; Uzunov, Nikolay M; Bello, Michele; Alvarez, Carlos Rossi; Esposito, Juan; Duatti, Adriano

    2018-05-30

    In the last years, the technology for producing the important medical radionuclide technetium-99m by cyclotrons has become sufficiently mature to justify its introduction as an alternative source of the starting precursor [ 99m Tc][TcO 4 ] - ubiquitously employed for the production of 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals. These technologies make use almost exclusively of the nuclear reaction 100 Mo(p,2n) 99m Tc that allows direct production of Tc-99m. In this study, it is conjectured that this alternative production route will not replace the current supply chain based on the distribution of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators, but could become a convenient emergency source of Tc-99m only for in-house hospitals equipped with a conventional, low-energy, medical cyclotron. On this ground, an outline of the essential steps that should be implemented for setting up a hospital radiopharmacy aimed at the occasional production of Tc-99m by a small cyclotron is discussed. These include (1) target production, (2) irradiation conditions, (3) separation/purification procedures, (4) terminal sterilization, (5) quality control, and (6) Mo-100 recovery. To address these issues, a comprehensive technology for cyclotron-production of Tc-99m, developed at the Legnaro National Laboratories of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (LNL-INFN), will be used as a reference example. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vancouver Cyclotron Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Although no longer on the high energy frontier, the cyclotron field is still a major scientific growth area. Its progress is highlighted at the international conference on cyclotron design, development and utilization held at intervals of about three years, under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Vancouver, surrounded by mountains, water and some cyclotrons, provided a pleasant setting for the 13th Conference, held last summer. With over 200 cyclotrons in operation around the world, the attendance, 241 delegates and 26 industrial exhibitors, was a near record, reflecting the flourishing state of the field. The early sessions covered the initial operation of new or upgraded cyclotron facilities. Major facilities completed since the previous Conference in Berlin in May 1989 included the 400 MeV ring cyclotron at Osaka, the U400M cyclotron at Dubna which will be coupled to the U400 to give 20 MeV nucléon uranium beams, the 130 MeV cyclotron at Jyvaskyla (in Finland, the furthest north!), the 110 MeV JAERI machine in Japan, and the 65 MeV proton therapy cyclotron in Nice. Among the facility upgrades were the KFA cyclotron at Julich which will inject the 2.5 GeV storage ring COSY, and the addition of an FM mode to the K=200 CW mode at Uppsala to give protons up to 180 MeV. The impressive current of 1.5 mA at 72 MeV obtained from the PSI Injector II will soon be injected into the 590 MeV ring

  14. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  15. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.R. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada)]. E-mail: djohnson@advancedcyclotron.com; Watt, R. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Kovac, B. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Zyuzin, A. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Van Lier, E. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Erdman, K.L. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Gyles, Wm. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); Sabaiduc, V. [Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7851 Alderbridge Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 2A4 (Canada); McQuarrie, S.A. [Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Wilson, J. [Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Backhouse, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Gelbart, Wm. [Advanced System Design, C22, S6, RR1, Garden Bay, BC, V0N 1S0 (Canada); Kuo, T. [4654 N. Larwin Ave., Concorde, CA 94521 United States (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed.

  16. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Watt, R.; Kovac, B.; Zyuzin, A.; Van Lier, E.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Sabaiduc, V.; McQuarrie, S. A.; Wilson, J.; Backhouse, C.; Gelbart, Wm.; Kuo, T.

    2007-08-01

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed.

  17. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.R.; Watt, R.; Kovac, B.; Zyuzin, A.; Van Lier, E.; Erdman, K.L.; Gyles, Wm.; Sabaiduc, V.; McQuarrie, S.A.; Wilson, J.; Backhouse, C.; Gelbart, Wm.; Kuo, T.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed

  18. Diagnostic system for the nuclear medicine with baby cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Masao; Wakasa, Shyuichiro

    1982-01-01

    The system of cyclotron nuclear medicine consists of ''RI-production by using the cyclotron'', ''production of radio-pharmaceuticals labeled with RI'', ''positron tomography''. On the other hand, Ultra compact cyclotron (Baby cyclotron) itself, RI production technique and positron tomography have been rapidly developed and advanced. We think that these three functions must be balance in the development in order to spread this system into the routine work in the hospital. However, since the technology of the synthesis for the labeled compounds is not so developed so far, more advance can be strongly expected. In this report, construction of the cyclotron nuclear medicine, utility for the practical use of RI produced by using the cyclotron, technique of RI production, and the studies on automated and efficient productions of radio-pharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived positron emitters for medical diagnostic use are described. (author)

  19. Computer modeling of magnetic structure for IC-35 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenitskij, Yu.G.; Morozov, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive series of calculations has been carried out in order to design the magnetic structure of the IC-35 cyclotron for radioisotope production. The calculations were carried out by 2-D POISCR code. The average magnetic field and its variation were produced with the help of two different calculation models. The parameters of the cyclotron magnetic system are presented

  20. Considerations, measurements and logistics associated with low-energy cyclotron decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunderland, J. J.; Erdahl, C. E.; Bender, B. R.; Sensoy, L.; Watkins, G. L.

    2012-01-01

    The University of Iowa’s 20-year-old 17 MeV Scanditronix cyclotron underwent decommissioning in the summer of 2011. To satisfy local, state and federal regulations defining removal, transportation and long-term safe and environmentally secure disposal of the 22 ton activated cyclotron, a series of nuclear spectroscopic measurements were performed to characterize the nature and extent of proton and neutron activation of the 22-ton cyclotron, its associated targets, and the concrete wall that was demolished to remove the old cyclotron. Neutron activation of the concrete wall was minimal and below exempt concentrations resulting in standard landfill disposal. The cyclotron assessment revealed the expected array of short and medium-lived radionuclides. Subsequent calculations suggest that meaningful levels residual activity will have decayed virtually to background after 15 years, with the total residual activity of the entire cyclotron dropping below 37 MBq (1 mCi).

  1. Operational experience and recent developments at the National Medical Cyclotron, Sydney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, E.M.; Arnott, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The National Medical Cyclotron, Sydney, Australia commenced operation in mid 1991, with a mission to provide PET and SPECT radionuclides throughout Australia. The realization of the present production capacity has been synonymous with the development of the facility's industrial cyclotron (IBA Cyclone 30). The choice of cyclotron was based on the Cyclone 30's virtues as a compact, user-friendly, energy efficient cyclotron, offering the beam quality characteristic of negative ion technology. Development of the cyclotron has improved reliability and increased beam capacity, while improvements to targetry have increased production reliability. More recently, the installation and commissioning of a new solid target irradiation facility has provided much needed redundancy. This paper describes the major cyclotron and targetry developments carried out to date. (orig.)

  2. Cyclotrons for isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.F.; Stevenson, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radioisotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, and isotope production, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. We will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 100 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic coil which forms the first section of the proton extraction channel in the improved synchro-cyclotron. The photograph shows the positioning gear and the current septum. An extraction efficiency above 50% is expected.

  4. Assessment of radionuclide concentration and absorbed dose from consumption of community water supplies in oil and gas producing areas in delta State Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokossa, P.; Olomo, J.B.; Balogun, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of radioactivity concentration in water supplies used for domestic and industrial purposes in the oil and gas producing communities of Delta State, Nigeria was carried out using a well-calibrated High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector system. The study area was partitioned into ten sections and a total of two samples per partition were collected for analysis. Samples of water from a non-producing area 14 were also collected as control. In all, a total number of forty three samples were collected and analyzed. Each sample was acidified at the rate of 10 ml of 11 M HCI per litre of water to prevent the absorption of radionuclides into the wall of the container and sealed in a properly cleaned container for at least one month so as to attain a state of secular radioactive equilibrium before analysis. The photo peaks observed with reliable regularity belong to the naturally occurring series-decay radionuclide headed by 238U and 232Th, as well as the non-series decay type 40K. The mean specific activity obtained for 40K was 49.15±15.35 BqL-1 with a range of 6.03 and 177.04 Bq L-1 while for 226Ra, the mean specific activity was 3.36±1.28 Bq L-1 with a range of 1.29 and 12.08 BqL-1 and the mean specific activity for 228Ra was 3.21± 2.69 BqL-1 with a range of 1.61 and 9.83 BqL-1 and the total annual effective dose did not show any significant health impact. (author)

  5. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using {sup 125}I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of {sup 131}I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by {sup 125}I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to {sup 131}I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system.

  6. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June Key

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using 125 I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of 131 I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by 125 I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to 131 I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system

  7. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity 14 C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate 14 C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect 14 C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible

  8. Building on TR-24 success. Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc. launches a new cyclotron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell Watt; William Gyles; Alexander Zyuzin

    2015-01-01

    ACSI is designing a new 30 MeV cyclotron based on the TR-24. While minimizing changes from the proven TR-24, including maintaining the same outer dimensions, the energy of the cyclotron will be increased to 30 MeV, which will make it the most compact, non-superconducting, 30 MeV cyclotron design to date. Maximum beam current will match the TR-24 at 1 mA. With the size and footprint of a typical low energy PET cyclotron, this system will offer users a cost effective solution for a diversified facility capable of producing a wide spectrum of PET and SPECT radioisotopes for research and commercial distribution. (author)

  9. Hydrologic processes and radionuclide distribution in a cavity and chimney produced by the Cannikin nuclear explosion, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of hydraulic, chemical, and radiochemical data obtained in the vicinity of the site of a nuclear explosion (code-named Cannikin, 1971), on Amchitka Island, Alaska, was undertaken to describe the hydrologic processes associated with the saturation of subsurface void space produced by the explosion. Immediately after detonation of the explosive, a subsurface cavity was created surrounding the explosion point. This cavity soon was partly filled by collapse of overburden, producing void volume in a rubble chimney extending to land surface and forming a surface-collapse sink. Surface and groundwater immediately began filling the chimney but was excluded for a time from the cavity by the presence of steam. When the steam condensed, the accumulated water in the chimney flowed into the cavity region, picking up and depositing radioactive materials along its path. Refilling of the chimney voids then resumed and was nearly complete about 260 days after the explosion. The hydraulic properties of identified aquifers intersecting the chimney were used with estimates of surface-water inflow, chimney dimensions, and the measured water-level rise in the chimney to estimate the distribution of explosion-created porosity in the chimney, which ranged from about 10 percent near the bottom to 4 percent near the top. Chemical and radiochemical analyses of water from the cavity resulted in identification of three aqueous phases: groundwater, surface water, and condensed steam. Although most water samples represented mixtures of these phases, they contained radioactivity representative of all radioactivity produced by the explosion

  10. Production of radionuclides with generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khujaev, S.; Egamediev, S.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The radionuclide generator provides a convenient means for researchers and clinicians to obtain a source of radionuclides without dependence on nuclear facilities (nuclear reactor or cyclotron). It should be noted that radionuclide generator technique yields products of very high purity and it offers moreover the only possible way of obtaining very short-lived radionuclides for practical applications. Therefore at present radionuclide generators have found important uses in nuclear medicine. This talk reviews the development of preparation methods for radionuclide generators of current interest: 99 Mo- 99m Tc, 188 W- 188 Re and 68 Ge- 68 Ga. 99 Mo- 99m Tc generator. 99m Tc is presently the most widely used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The reason for such a preeminent position of 99m Tc in clinical uses is its extremely favorable nuclear properties with γ-energy of 140 keV and short half-life of 6 hours. Chromatographic generator of 99 Mo- 99m Tc based on aluminium oxide using as eluent of isotonic saline solution, containing nitrate-ions has been produced in INP AS RU. However, the main disadvantage of this generator is that the eluent-saline solution contains some amount of nitrate-ions. Nitrate-ions added to maximize and stabilize 99m Tc yields would interfere with the chemical reactions which involve Sn(II) reduction of the pertechnetate ion and which are used subsequently in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore we proposed the new method for preliminary treatment of aluminium oxide by the external gamma (Co-60) irradiation. It is found that the aluminium oxide has got electron-acceptor properties after gamma-irradiation. Adsorption of 99 Mo radionuclide as isopolymolybdate on gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide is very high and molybdenum is firmly retained. Adsorption capacity of gamma-irradiated aluminium oxide at pH 2-4 is 60-80 mg Mo per gram of Al 2 O 3 . The yields of 99m Tc from experimental generators remained high

  11. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  12. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the oxygen

  13. The application of selected radionuclides for monitoring of the D-D reactions produced by dense plasma-focus device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jednorog, S; Szydlowski, A; Bienkowska, B; Prokopowicz, R

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device-DPF-1000U which is operated at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion is the largest that type plasma experiment in the world. The plasma that is formed in large plasma experiments is characterized by vast numbers of parameters. All of them need to be monitored. A neutron activation method occupies a high position among others plasma diagnostic methods. The above method is off-line, remote, and an integrated one. The plasma which has enough temperature to bring about nuclear fusion reactions is always a strong source of neutrons that leave the reactions area and take along energy and important information on plasma parameters and properties as well. Silver as activated material is used as an effective way of neutrons measurement, especially when they are emitted in the form of short pulses like as it happens from the plasma produced in Dense Plasma-Focus devices. Other elements such as beryllium and yttrium are newly introduced and currently tested at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion to use them in suitable activation neutron detectors. Some specially designed massive indium samples have been recently adopted for angular neutrons distribution measurements (vertical and horizontal) and have been used in the recent plasma experiment conducted on the DPF-1000U device. This choice was substantiated by relatively long half-lives of the neutron induced isotopes and the threshold character of the 115 In(n,n') 115m In nuclear reaction.

  14. Slow wave cyclotron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Lin, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclotron masers such as Gyrotrons and the Autoresonance Masers, are fast wave devices: the electromagnetic wave's phase velocity v rho , is greater than the electron beam velocity, v b . To be able to convert the beam kinetic energy into radiation in these devices the beam must have an initial transverse momentum, usually obtained by propagating the beam through a transverse wiggler magnet, or along a nonuniform guide magnetic field before entry into the interaction region. Either process introduces a significant amount of thermal spread in the beam which degrades the performance of the maser. However, if the wave phase velocity v rho v b , the beam kinetic energy can be converted directly into radiation without the requirement of an initial transverse beam momentum, making a slow wave cyclotron maser a potentially simpler and more compact device. The authors present the linear and nonlinear physics of the slow wave cyclotron maser and examine its potential for practical application

  15. Production of radiopharmaceuticals by cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, F.; Van Naemen, J.; Monclus, M.; Van Gansbeke, B.; Kadiata, M.; Ekelmans, D.; Moray, M.; Penninckx, R.; Goldman, S.

    2004-01-01

    Companies specialized in the development and installation of accelerator-based systems dedicated to the medical applications brought on the market cyclotrons well fitted to the requests of the industrial community or universities and so covering every segment of the market. These machines are fully automatic, and need reduced maintenance; they are highly specialized for defined tasks. They can produce high beam intensity and realize dual beam irradiation. Also the prices are reducing considerably. The targets and the automatic system follow the same trend. Unfortunately, the flexibility of these devices for new area of research and development has been dramatically reduced. The growing number of PET cameras has increased the popularity of PET tracers used for nuclear imaging. Consequently, there is a growing demand for these radiopharmaceuticals compounds labeled with short-lived radioisotopes for clinical applications. From a research and development tool in the eighties, PET has now grown up to a clinical tool. Moreover, depending of the social welfare, reimbursement of some PET examinations is granted, which accelerates the trend for an extended use of PET tracers. Regulatory affairs try to establish and standardize the control on these radiopharmaceutical compounds produced in a growing number of local radio pharmacies owning a baby cyclotron. On the other hand, the attention of equipment suppliers was brought in the setting up of a total quality control follow up. These efforts were successively achieved by getting for instance the ISO 9001 certificate

  16. How cyclotrons work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, D.

    1992-01-01

    The operating principles of a cyclic accelerator are presented based on the IBA Cyclone 30 negative ion cyclotron, selected for the Australia's first medical cyclotron. Its main features are: acceleration with variable energy of between 15-30 million electron volts, the capability of extracting two beams simultaneously, low power consumption, easy maintenance. Other aspects not directly related to the principle of operation discussed include the vacuum and the radio-frequency systems as well as the complex computerized control system used to automatically control start-up and shut-down operations. ills

  17. Ramifide resonators for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The resonators with the conductors ramified form for cyclotrons are systematized and separated into the self-contained class - the ramified resonators for cyclotrons (Carr). The ramified resonators are compared with the quarter-wave and half-wave nonramified resonators, accomplished from the transmitting lines fragments. The CRR are classified into two types: ones with the additional structural element, switched in parallel and in series. The CRR may include several additional structural elements. The CRR calculations may be concluded by analytical methods - the method of matrix calculation or the method of telegraph equations and numerical methods - by means of the ISFEL3D, MAFIA and other programs [ru

  18. Direct production of 99mTc using a small medical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapi, Suzanne [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-10-03

    This project describes an investigation towards the production of 99mTc with a small medical cyclotron. This endeavor addresses the current urgent problem of availability of 99mTc due to the ongoing production reactor failures and the upcoming Canadian reactor shut down. Currently, 99mTc is produced via nuclear fission using highly enriched uranium which is a concern due to nuclear proliferation risks. In addition to this, the United States is dependent solely on currently unreliable foreign sources of this important medical isotope. Clearly, a need exists to probe alternative production routes of 99mTc. In the first year, this project measured cross-sections and production yields of potential pathways to 99mTc and associated radionuclidic impurities produced via these pathways using a small 15 MeV medical cyclotron. During the second and third years target systems for the production of 99mTc via the most promising reaction routes were developed and separation techniques for the isolation of 99mTc from the irradiated target material will be investigated. Systems for the recycling of the enriched target isotopes as well as automated target processing systems were examined in years four and five. This project has the potential to alleviate some of the current crisis in the medical community by developing a technique to produce 99mTc on location at a university hospital. This technology will be applicable at many other sites in the United States as many other similar, low energy (<20 MeV) cyclotrons (currently used for a few hours per day for the production of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose) are available for production of 99mTc though this method, thus leading to job creation and preservation.

  19. The analysis of impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nerosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was analyzed. On engineering software MATHCAD the program for calculation of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was created. To verify this algorithm the calculation model for MCNP code was established and represented the area consisted of soft biological tissue or any other tissue in which the grid of microsources was incorporated. Using the developed system the value of possible systematic irregular coating of radioactivity on the microsource’s core was analyzed. The distribution of activity along the surface of microsource was simulated to create distribution of absorbed dose rate corresponding to experimental data on radiation injury. The obtained model of microsource with irregular distribution of activity was compared to conventional microsource with core coated regularly along the entire area of the silver stem by main dosimetry characteristics. The results showed that even for extremely irregular distribution of activity the distribution of dose rate produced by microsource in the tumor area was not substantially different from dose-rate field obtained for microsource with regularly coated activity. The differences in dose rates (up to 10% in areas which were the nearest to the center of the grid were significantly lower than its decline from center to periphery of the grid. For spatial distribution of absorbed dose for specific configuration of microsource set and tracing of curves of equal level by selected cut-off the program SEEDPLAN was developed. The developed program represents precisely enough the spatial distribution of selected configuration set of microsources using results of calculation data for absorbed dose around the single microsource as basic data and may be used for optimal planning of brachytherapy with microsources. 

  20. Use of maze in cyclotron hoppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Fernando A.; Alves, Juliano S.; Fochesatto, Cintia; Cerioli, Luciane; Borges, Joao Alfredo; Gonzalez, Delfin; Silva, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: the increasing number of cyclotrons in Brazil due to constitutional amendment 49 /06 that enabled the production of radiopharmaceuticals with a short half - life by private companies. The radionuclides used for PET - CT require production centers near or within the diagnostic centers. In order to minimize maintenance and operating risks, gaining efficiency, our facility was the first in Brazil to use the access to a cyclotron bunker via maze, rather than armored door stopper type. Materials: the design calculations were based on the Monte Carlo method (MCNP5 - Monte Carlo N-Particletransportcode version 5). At the ends of the labyrinth are installed a door of polyethylene, for thermalization of neutrons, and other of wood for limiting access. Both legs of the maze have wall thickness of 100cm. In inspection Brazilian CNEN realize measures of dose rate for neutrons and gamma 9 points: 7 around the bunker, 1 over the bunker and 1 in the exhaust with the cyclotron operating with maximum load, double beam of 50uA for 2 hours. After commissioning were carried out around the bunker, the following measures: cumulative dose in three months with dosimeters for neutron rate dose with a gas proportional detector type filled with 3 He and polyethylene neutron moderator and dose rate with a Geiger - Mueller detector for gamma radiation. Readings with neutron detectors were classified as background radiation and dose rates were always below the limits established in standard EN 3.01, and the calculation of the predicted regardless of the intensity of irradiation inside the bunker. Conclusion: the use of labyrinths as a way to access the bunkers cyclotron has been shown to be effective as the radiation shielding and efficient by allowing quick and easy access, virtually eliminating the maintenance

  1. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  2. Cyclotron production of high-purity 123I for medical applications via the 127I(p,5n)123Xe → 123I nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of iodine-123 in nuclear medicine procedures is well documented in the scientific literature. Also, several methods for its production based on accelerator techniques have been described. Indirectly made 123 I via the 127 I(p,5n) 123 Xe → 123 I reaction produces 123 I of > 99.9% radionuclidic purity, with only 125 I ( 123 I production were developed at the University of California at Davis, where since 1974 the 76-in. isochronous cyclotron of the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory has been used for routine biweekly production of high-purity no-carrier-added 123 I

  3. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  4. Electron-Cyclotron Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1994-01-01

    The essential elements of the theory of electron cyclotron waves are reviewed, The two main electro-magnetic modes of propagation are identified and their dispersion and absorption properties are discussed. The importance of the use of the relativistic resonance condition is stressed.

  5. A solvent-extraction module for cyclotron production of high-purity technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Duatti, Adriano; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Esposito, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a fully-automated, remotely controlled module for the extraction and purification of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), produced by proton bombardment of enriched Mo-100 molybdenum metallic targets in a low-energy medical cyclotron, is here described. After dissolution of the irradiated solid target in hydrogen peroxide, Tc-99m was obtained under the chemical form of 99m TcO 4 - , in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity, by solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The extraction process was accomplished inside a glass column-shaped vial especially designed to allow for an easy automation of the whole procedure. Recovery yields were always >90% of the loaded activity. The final pertechnetate saline solution Na 99m TcO 4 , purified using the automated module here described, is within the Pharmacopoeia quality control parameters and is therefore a valid alternative to generator-produced 99m Tc. The resulting automated module is cost-effective and easily replicable for in-house production of high-purity Tc-99m by cyclotrons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation exposure to workers at cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.S.; Sanches, M.P.; Sanchez, A.S.; Rodrigues, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals quickly furnish the information doctors need to establish a precise diagnosis of the patient's condition, and therefore to prescribe the most effective therapy. In cancerology, F18-FDG, the most widely used PET imaging tracer, excels in the early detection of cancer tumors, even very tiny ones, which it locates and clearly distinguishes from healthy surrounding tissues. IPEN-CNEN/SP has two cyclotron accelerators used mainly for radioisotope production to be utilized in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy. The first is a CV-28 cyclotron, variable energy that came into operation in 1982, which was used to produce F18-FDG and Iodine 123 up to 1998. The second, a Cyclone 30 cyclotron, 30 MeV, commenced operation in 1998 for certification purpose, and due to increase demand for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil, started F18-FDG production in 1999. Cyclotron Laboratory will be a reference Research and Developing Center in our country and will help the Brazilian and Latin-American community. It is necessary to have an adequate database to allow regular follow up and analysis of the individual dose distributions for each group involved in the cyclotron activities. These databases are also important means to assess the effectiveness of efforts in order to maintain doses ALARA and reduce inequalities. The official individual occupational dosimetry is provided by certified Laboratory of Thermoluminescent Dosimetry at IPEN-CNEN/SP. This paper describes the occupational doses distribution in Laboratory of Cyclotrons at IPEN-CNEN/SP from January, 1998 to July, 2000 and propose improvements for the future. (author)

  7. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  8. Modern compact cyclotrons for nuclear medicine designed and manufactured in NIIEFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, P.V.; Vasilchenko, I.N.; Gavrish, Yu.N.; Galchuk, A.V.; Grigorenko, S.V.; Kuzhlev, A.N.; Menshov, Yu.D.; Mudroyubov, V.G.; Ponomarenko, V.I.; Strokach, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    A series of compact cyclotrons, the CC-12, CC-18/9 and MCC-30/15, intended for the production of radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy directly in medical institutions has been designed and manufactured in NIIEFA. These cyclotrons provide the acceleration of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions injected from external sources. Beams of accelerated particles are extracted by stripping negative ions to protons and deuterons by carbon foils. Shielding-type electromagnets with the vertically located median plane are applied in these cyclotrons.

  9. Recent developments in cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The major areas of interest over the past two years are briefly reviewed. These include: (1) tracers for in vivo measurements of blood flow; (2) tracers for in vivo measurements of regional metabolism; (3) tracers for the measurement of receptor sensitivities; and (4) radioisotope generator systems

  10. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  11. Evaluation of the production capabilities of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O PET isotopes at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    OpenAIRE

    Auditore, Lucrezia; Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The production of 18F, 11C, 13N, and 15O positron emitting radionuclides for PET imaging is usually accomplished in Nuclear Medicine Departments through direct nuclear reactions induced by protons accelerated by compact medical cyclotrons on liquid or gaseous targets. Messina University has funded the construction of a PET-cyclotron-radio-chemistry plant at the Messina University Hospital, equipped with a 11 MeV self-shielded cyclotron. We estimated the expected production yields of these nuc...

  12. Routine production of 18F using 16.5 MeV cyclotron for synthesis of 2-(18F)fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Jalil Abd Hamid; Soni, P.S.; Rajan, M.G.R.

    2006-01-01

    A medium energy cyclotron with maximum of 75 mA beam current is capable of producing most common Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides in sufficient quantities. The cyclotron has two targets for production of Flourine-18. One is high yield target system (HYT) (1.2 mL) and the other is HYT Generation II (Gen-II) (2.2 mL) and capable of producing 110 and 170 GBq respectively. Enriched 18 O water (>95%) is used for the routine production of Flourine-18 using the 18 O(p,n) 18 F nuclear reaction and irradiated under helium gas pressurized at 59-65 kPa at a beam current of 35 mA - 55 mA for 20-67 minutes. The [ 18 F]fluoride ion produced are used for the synthesis of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-[ 18 F]FDG). Various factors that may effect the production of PET radionuclides and one such factor includes the silver target body often introduce impurity such as silver oxides in form of black particles that can impede the (ID 0.75 mm) delivery line. Such contaminants would reduce the quantity of the available useful radioisotopes, and hinder the subsequent radiopharmaceutical processes. Used of HYT and HYT Gen-II for the routine production of 18 F- in few ten GBq quantities were reported

  13. Radioisotope production with a medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvester, D.J.

    1974-01-01

    The cyclotron of Hammersmith hospital in England was completed and started the operation in 1955. The feature is in its design operable at high beam current, reaching 500μA in internal beam and 300μA in external beam. In 1960's, twelve nuclides of radioactive pharmaceuticals were produced with the cyclotron. C-11, N-13 and O-15 have been used in the form of radioactive gases such as CO or H 2 O to test lung functions. F-18 has been used for bone scanning. K-43 is employed in the research of electrolyte balancing together with Na-24 and Br-77. Fe-52 is utilized in iron ion researches as a tracer. Cs-129 is highly evaluated as an isotope for imaging cardiac clogging part. Radioisotopes must be much more used in the examination of in vivo metabolic function. For this purpose, peculiarly labelled compounds should be further developed. It is welcome that the persons paying attention to the medical prospect of cyclotrons are increasing. The author hopes to continue his endeavour to find new products made with the cyclotron for human welfare. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Emergency situation in a medical cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bhat, M.K.; Singh, D.K.; Pthania, B.S.; Pandit, A.G.; Jacob, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Medical cyclotron is a particle accelerator used in producing short lived radioisotopes such as 18 F, 11 C, 15 O, 13 N, 18 F-2 gas etc. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging modality that has rapidly gained favour. 18 F-FDG is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical with a half-life of 109.8 min. Having more than five years experience in this field we face lots of emergency conditions in the medical cyclotron facility. On the basis of harm we have divided in to three categories i.e. Harm of (a) working personnel, (b) Equipment and (c) environment. Radioactive gas leak and Target foil rupture is considered as the major emergency situations during medical cyclotron operations because there is a potential of over exposure to the working personnel. Radiation protection survey of a self-shielded medical cyclotron installation was carried out during normal and emergency conditions. It is found that the induced activity in the target foil increases with its successive usages. Recommendations have also been made to reduce personal exposure while handling the radioactive gas leak and target foil rupture conditions

  15. Goodbye Synchro-Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-12-15

    On 17 December, after having seen many other physics machines come and go during its 33-year career, CERN's 600 MeV SynchroCyclotron (SC) is being shut down. Judged simply by its length (to say nothing of its quality), the research career of this machine testifies to the wisdom and imagination of the CERN pioneers who proposed it in the early 1950s.

  16. Goodbye Synchro-Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    On 17 December, after having seen many other physics machines come and go during its 33-year career, CERN's 600 MeV SynchroCyclotron (SC) is being shut down. Judged simply by its length (to say nothing of its quality), the research career of this machine testifies to the wisdom and imagination of the CERN pioneers who proposed it in the early 1950s

  17. The Medical Cyclotron Facility in RMC, Parel, BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishna, Arjun; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    The Medical Cyclotron Facility in Radiation Medicine Centre (RMC) is the first one of its kind, installed in 2002. "1"8F based radiotracers are produced in this facility on a routine basis for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), of in-house patients, as well as for supply to other nuclear medicine centers in Mumbai as well as Pune. The facility consists of the following sub parts - Cyclotron and support equipment; Radiochemistry synthesis laboratory; Quality control (QC) laboratory

  18. Cyclotron Development and Technical Aspects on Accelerator Based Laboratory Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarhadijoso

    2000-01-01

    BATAN is planning to establish an accelerator-based laboratory at P3TM Yogyakarta as an effort in the development and use of accelerator technology for improving industrial performance and public welfare. This paper reviews several aspects of cyclotron technology and describes the combination of a linear accelerator - cyclotron system as an alternative to be considered in the planing of the laboratory. The progress of cyclotron technology is discussed covering three generations, i.e. conventional cyclotron, synchrocyclotron and AVF cyclotron generations. The planning should not consider the accelerator application for radioisotope production because it is established in Serpong with the existing negative ion cyclotron. The proposed facility at P3TM may comprise two linear accelerators coupled with a positive ion cyclotron of synchrocyclotron generation. In fact, the attachment of the synchrocyclotron unit is flexible and it can be installed subsequently if the higher energy particle beam, which can not be produced by the linear accelerators, is extremely needed. Some technical aspects related to ion beam application, building construction and infrastructure, human resources, and specification of function test are discussed for additional information in the implementation of the planning. (author)

  19. Startup work on Inshas cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorogushin, M.F.; Strokach, A.P.; Shikhov, V.Ya.; Galchuk, A.V.; Soliman, A.N.; El-Abyad, M.; Comsan, M.N.H.; Saleh, Z.A.; Azzam, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Startup works on the MGC-20 variable energy cyclotron in the Inshas Nuclear Research Center (Egypt) are described. The cyclotron is intended for acceleration of hydrogen and helium ions in a wide energy range (for protons - from 5 to 20 MeV). Main units of the cyclotron and results of computer experimental acceleration of protons to 18 MeV are described. The prospects of furthers investigations are presented [ru

  20. Distribution of residual long-lived radioactivity in the inner concrete walls of a compact medical cyclotron vault room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Baba, Shingo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Komiya, Isao; Umedzu, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Compact medical cyclotrons have been set up to generate the nuclides necessary for positron emission tomography. In accelerator facilities, neutrons activate the concrete used to construct the vault room; this activation increases with the use of an accelerator. The activation causes a substantial radioactive waste management problem when facilities are decommissioned. In the present study, several concrete cores from the walls, ceiling and floor of a compact medical cyclotron vault room were samples 2 years after the termination of operations, and the radioactivity concentrations of radionuclides were estimated. Cylindrical concrete cores 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length were bored from the concrete wall, ceiling and floor. Core boring was performed at 18 points. The gamma-ray spectrum of each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector. The degree of activation of the concrete in the cyclotron vault room was analyzed, and the range and tendency toward activation in the vault room were examined. (60)Co and (152)Eu were identified by gamma-ray spectrometry of the concrete samples. (152)Eu and (60)Co are produced principally from the stable isotopes of europium and cobalt by neutron capture reactions. The radioactivity concentration did not vary much between the surface of the concrete and at a depth of 10 cm. Although the radioactivity concentration near the target was higher than the clearance level for radioactive waste indicated in IAEA RS-G-1.7, the mean radioactivity concentration in the walls and floor was lower than the clearance level. The radioactivity concentration of the inner concrete wall of the medical cyclotron vault room was not uniform. The areas exceeding the clearance level were in the vicinity of the target, but most of the building did not exceed the clearance levels.

  1. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  2. Radiological impact on the UK population of industries which use or produce materials containing enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Part II: the steel production industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockett, G.M.; Smith, K.R.; Oatway, W.B.; Mobbs, S.F.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains an assessment of the radiological impact on the UK population of the steel production industry within the UK. The radiological impact of the primary industry, the waste streams produced and the use of by-product slag have been considered. Individual doses from atmospheric releases from ail currently operating integrated steel plants in the UK are less than 10 μSv y -1 for all age groups. The per caput dose rate in the UK population from 500 years of continuous steel production at the current levels is estimated to be 0.1 μSv y -1 . Estimated maximum doses to workers at the steel production plant, landfill workers, and workers manufacturing and using building materials containing slag were generally less than 20 μSv y -1 . The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag depend upon the radon emanation fraction assumed for the material. Experimental data in this area is sparse, and thus a range was considered. The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag ranged between 7.0 and 10.8 Bq m -3 , compared with 9.9 Bq m -3 when slag-free concrete is assumed. The estimated dose from radon exposure ranges between 363 μSv y -1 and 559 μSv y -1 , compared with 510 μSv y -1 when slag-free concrete is used. The estimated external dose to an individual in a house constructed using concrete containing slag is 790 μSv y -1 compared with 758 μSv y -1 for slag-free concrete. The overall effect of the use of the slag in building materials therefore ranges between a reduction in dose of 115 μSv y -1 and an increase of 81 μSv y -1 . Other scenarios involving exposure of members of the public to slag resulted in doses of less than 5 μSv y -1 . The estimated peak individual risk from landfill disposal of steel industry waste is less than approximately 1 10 -8 y -1 . Currently, radiological controls on the operation of steel production sites are confined to the

  3. H-superconducting cyclotron for PET isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.L.; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Vincent, J.

    2014-01-01

    The scientific design of a 14-MeV H - compact superconducting cyclotron for producing of the 18 F and 13 N isotopes has been developed. Main requirements to the facility as a medical accelerator are met in the design. In particular, the main requirement for the cyclotron was the smallest possible size due to the superconducting magnet. The calculations show that the proposed cyclotron allows extracted beam intensity over 500 μA. To increase system reliability and production rates, an external H - ion source is applied. The choice of the cyclotron concept, design of the structure elements, calculation of the electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics from the ion source to the extraction system were performed.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas in tokamak and EBT configurations has been studied using 1-2/2 and 2-1/2 dimensional fully self-consistent electromagnetic particle codes. We have tested two major antenna configurations; we have also compared heating efficiencies for one and two ion species plasmas. We model a tokamak plasma with a uniform poloidal field and 1/R toroidal field on a particular q surface. Ion cyclotron waves are excited on the low field side by antennas parallel either to the poloidal direction or to the toroidal direction with different phase velocities. In 2D, minority ion heating (vsub(perpendicular)) and electron heating (vsub(parallel),vsub(perpendicular)) are observed. The exponential electron heating seems due to the decay instability. The minority heating is consistent with mode conversion of fast Alfven waves and heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron modes. Minority heating is stronger with a poloidal antenna. The strong electron heating is accompanied by toroidal current generation. In 1D, no thermal instability was observed and only strong minority heating resulted. For an EBT plasma we model it by a multiple mirror. We have tested heating efficiency with various minority concentrations, temperatures, mirror ratios, and phase velocities. In this geometry we have beach or inverse beach heating associated with the mode conversion layer perpendicular to the toroidal field. No appreciable electron heating is observed. Heating of ions is linear in time. For both tokamak and EBT slight majority heating above the collisional rate is observed due to the second harmonic heating. (author)

  5. A new internal target system for production of 211At on the cyclotron U-120M

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Jiran, Rudolf; Ráliš, Jan; Štursa, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2005), s. 49-53 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4048302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radionuclides production * 211At * cyclotron Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.757, year: 2005

  6. Solid targetry for compact cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comor, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present experimental results of solid targetry for compact cyclotrons. It is concluded: Solid targetry is not restricted to large accelerator centers anymore; Small and medium scale radioisotope production is feasible with compact cyclotrons; The availability of versatile solid target systems is expected to boost the radiochemistry of 'exotic' positron emitters

  7. Status report on cyclotron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, P.; Szuecs, I.; Ander, I.; Lakatos, T.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ditroi, F.; Takacs, S.; Tarkanyi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of the cyclotron in 2003 was again concentrated to 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance, renewal works and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4051 hours. The cyclotron was available for users for 3682 hours. In order to improve the circumstances of the irradiations renewal and improvements were done. (N.T.)

  8. Study of alternative routes for the production of innovative radionuclides for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a specialty that uses radioactive nuclei for therapy or diagnosis of diseases such as different types of cancer. These radionuclides are coupled to carrier molecules to target sick cells. Currently, only few isotopes are used in clinical practice. However, many others may be of medical interest due to their emitted radiation and/or their half-life that can be adapted to the carrier molecule transit time and to the pathology. The aim of this PhD thesis is to study the production of innovative radionuclides for therapy and diagnosis applications in collaboration with the GIP ARRONAX, which possesses a multi-particle high energy cyclotron. A fundamental physical parameter to access the production rate of a radionuclide is the production cross section. Experimental data were measured for a selection of radionuclides: photon emitter (Tc-99m) and positron emitter (Sc-44g) for diagnosis, as well as electron emitters (Re-186, Tb-155 and Sn-117m) and α particles emitters (Th-226, Ra-223 and Bi-213) for therapeutic applications. These acquired data are obtained using alternative production routes compared to the commonly used. Data related to the contaminants produced during the irradiations were also extracted. The experimental cross section values are compared with theoretical model predictions. The large set of data obtained contributes to the theoretical physicist studies allowing to constrain their models to improve and/or validate them. (author)

  9. Operation of a quasioptical electron cyclotron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, E.C.; Pyle, R.V.

    1984-12-01

    The electron cyclotron maser or gyrotron concept has been developed to produce sources producing 200 kW at 28 GHz continuously, and higher power outputs and frequencies in pulsed mode. These sources have been useful in electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetically confined fusion devices. However, higher frequencies and higher power levels will be required in reactor-grade fusion plasmas, with likely requirements of 1.0 MW or more per source at 140 GHz. Conventional gyrotrons follow a trend of decreasing power for increasing frequency. In order to circumvent this problem, the quasioptical electron cyclotron maser was proposed. In this device, the closed resonator of the conventional gyrotron is replaced with an open, Fabry-Perot type resonator. The cavity modes are then the TEM-type modes of an optical laser. The advantage of this configuration is that the cavity size is not a function of frequency, since the length can be any half-integer number of wavelengths. Furthermore, the beam traverses across the cavity transverse to the direction of radiation output, and thus the rf window design is less complicated than in conventional tubes. The rf output, if obtained by diffraction coupling around one of the mirrors, could be in a TEM mode, which would allow for quasioptical transmission of the microwaves into the plasma in fusion devices. 4 references, 1 figure

  10. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.; Barletta, W. A.; Winslow, L. A.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Conrad, J. M.; Toups, M.; Adelmann, A.

    2014-01-01

    As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEδALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEδALUS—Hyper-K search for CP violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4° to 12° are presented

  11. Review of Cyclotrons for the Production of Radioactive Isotopes for Medical and Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmor, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Radioactive isotopes are used in a wide range of medical, biological, environmental and industrial applications. Cyclotrons are the primary tool for producing the shorter-lived, proton-rich radioisotopes currently used in a variety of medical applications. Although the primary use of the cyclotron-produced short-lived radioisotopes is in PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) diagnostic medical procedures, cyclotrons are also producing longer-lived isotopes for therapeutic procedures as well as for other industrial and applied science applications. Commercial suppliers of cyclotrons are responding by providing a range of cyclotrons in the energy range of 3-70MeV for the differing needs of the various applications. These cyclotrons generally have multiple beams servicing multiple targets. This review article presents some of the applications of the radioisotopes and provides a comparison of some of the capabilities of the various current cyclotrons. The use of nuclear medicine and the number of cyclotrons supplying the needed isotopes are increasing. It is expected that there will soon be a new generation of small "tabletop" cyclotrons providing patient doses on demand.

  12. New irradiation facilities at the Australian national medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcell, S.K.; Arnott, D.W.; Conard, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two new irradiation facilities have been developed at the National Medical Cyclotron for radionuclide production. The first relocates PET irradiations from the cyclotron vault to a dedicated PET beam room, to improve accessibility and reduce radiation exposures associated with target maintenance. This new facility consists of a beam line to transport 16-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to 1 of 8 PET targets mounted on a target rack. The target rack has increased the number of targets available for production and experimentation. The second is a completely independent solid target irradiation facility for SPECT. This facility consists of a beam line to transport 26-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to a dedicated beam room containing one solid target station. A new pneumatic target transfer system was also developed to transport the solid target to and from the existing chemistry hot cells. The beam line and target components are operated under the control of a dedicated PLC with a PC based user interface. The development and some technical aspects of these new irradiation facilities are discussed here. (author)

  13. Gamma emitting radionuclides in fruits and vegetables produced in the Canary Islands: domestic consequences; Radionuclidos emisores gamma en frutas y hortalizas producidas en Canarias: consecuencias dosimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triguero-Perez, M.; Duarte-Rodriguez, X.; Lopez-Perez, M.; Hernandez-Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    Determine the possible effects due to ingestion of radionuclides that can be found in health food is of interest from the viewpoint of radiation protection of the population. these determinations and analysis of the consequences on the health of people and jobs has led to studies that have had consequences in the form of rules to follow and values have to be attended to limit dictated by national and international agencies. (Author)

  14. Positron emitting radionuclides for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchbank, S.; Van der Walt, T.N.; Sharpey-Shafer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In South Africa there are currently two projects underway to supply and utilise positron emitting radionuclides for imaging in clinical nuclear medicine facilities. The advantages and applications of such radio nuclides are numerous and well known. However the premier initial application will be to employ 1BF, at first in the compound fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F)-FDG, for patients with cancers and neoplasms. The two projects are sited at iThemba LABS, where production of a generator supplying 66 Ga and the provision of ( 18 F]-FDG, are in an advanced state of planning; the former already fully financed by the Innovation Fund of the National Research Foundation. The two positron emitting radionuclides, 18 F and 68 Ge, will be produced using a cyclotron induced reaction on 1802 and Ga, respectively, at iThemba LABS. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator consists of an anion exchanger loaded with 68 Ge, which decays to 68 Ga. The resulting radiopharmaceuticals, ( 18 F]-FDG and 68 Ga citrate, will be produced by the Radionuclide Production Group of iThemba LABS, using well described methods. However the structures and processes to be used in the generator to provide 68 Ga are novel and will be explained. Initially provision of the CBF]-FDG will be to selected clinical medicine facilities in the Western Cape and Gauteng. It should be noted that the logistical problems of providing this radiopharmaceutical (which are much complicated by its short half life of 109.7 min) to Gauteng, were shown to be surmountable in the 1970s, by a regular delivery of 18 F between Gauteng and Cape Town, after the advent of a commercial service using jet aircraft. The obvious requirement that there should be appropriate nuclear medicine facilities to image patients, at the sites to which the positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals will be supplied, has been addressed. Proposed solutions will be outlined, in terms of a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) camera and a gamma

  15. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The status of radionuclide generators for chemical research and applications related to the life sciences and biomedical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed upon convenient, efficient and rapid separation of short-lived daughter radionuclides in a chemical form suitable for use without further chemical manipulation. The focus is on the production of the parent, the radiochemistry associated with processing the parent and daughter, the selection and the characteristic separation methods, and yields. Quality control considerations are briefly noted. The scope of this review includes selected references to applications of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and the life sciences, particularly in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. The 99 Mo-sup(99m)Tc generator was excluded. 202 references are cited. (orig.)

  16. Cyclotron production of {sup 44}Sc for clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewski, S.; Bilewicz, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cydzik, I. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Inst. for Health and Consumer Protection; Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Heavy Ion Lab.; Abbas, K. [European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Institute for Transuranium Elements; Bulgheroni, A.; Simonelli, F.; Holzwarth, U. [European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Inst. for Health and Consumer Protection

    2013-08-01

    {sup 44} is a promising {beta}{sup +}-emitter for molecular imaging with intermediate half-life of 4 h. Due to the chemical similarity of Sc{sup 3+} to the Lu{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} cations, {sup 44}Sc-DOTA bioconjugates are expected to demonstrate similar properties in vivo as the {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-bioconjugates, what is important in planning the radionuclide therapy. {sup 44}Sc can be obtained from the {sup 44}Ti/{sup 44}Sc generator. An alternative method for {sup 44}Sc production can be the irradiation of {sup 44}Ca target at small cyclotrons. The aim of our work was to optimize the parameters of {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} irradiation and to develop a simple procedure for {sup 44}Sc separation from the calcium target. For optimization study, {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} targets were irradiated by protons in the energy range of 5.6-17.5 MeV with 9 MeV being found to be the best energy for {sup 44}Ca irradiations. A simple and fast separation procedure of {sup 44}Sc from calcium target was developed using chelating resin Chelex 100. DOTATATE conjugate was successfully radiolabelled with high yield at elevated temperature using the produced {sup 44}Sc. While {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} is relatively expensive, the cost of {sup 44}Sc-DOTATATE production can be reduced by target recovery. Due to low proton energy required to produce GBq activity level of {sup 44}Sc, the availability of {sup 44}Sc radioisotope could be enhanced to open new opportunities for applications in medical imaging. (orig.)

  17. Applied research with cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.; Dmitriev, S.; Gulbekian, G.; Gikal, B.; Ivanov, O.; Reutov, V.; Skuratov, V.

    2005-01-01

    During the past three decades the Flerov laboratory carried out research and development of a number of applications that have found or may find use in modern technologies. One of the applications is the so-called ion track technology enabling us to create micro- and nano-structured materials. Accelerated heavy ion beams are the unique tools for structuring insulating solids in a controllable manner. At FLNR JINR the U-400 cyclotron and the IC-100 cyclotron are employed for irradiation of materials to be modified by the track-etch technique. For practical applications, U-400 delivers the 86 Kr ion beams with total energies of 250, 350, 430 and 750 MeV, and the 136 Xe ion beams with the energy of 430 MeV. The cyclotron is equipped with a specialized channel for irradiation of polymer foils. IC-100 is a compact accelerator specially designed for the technological uses. High-intensity krypton ion beams with the energy of ∼ 1 MeV/u are available now at IC-100. Production of track-etch membranes is an example of mature technology based on irradiation with accelerated ions. The track-etch membranes offer distinct advantages over other types of membranes due to their precisely determined structure. One-pore, oligo-pore and multi-pore samples can serve as models for studying the transport of liquids, gases, particles, solutes, and electrolytes in narrow channels. Track-etch pores are also used as templates for making nano wires, nano tubes or array of nano rods. The microstructures obtained this way may find use in miniaturized devices such as sensors for biologically important molecules. Bulk and surface modification for the production of new composites and materials with special optical properties can be performed with ion beams. Flexible printed circuits, high-performance heat transfer modules, X-ray filters, and protective signs are examples of products developed in collaboration with research and industrial partners. Some recent achievements and promising ideas that

  18. Isochronous cyclotron data base description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyan, I.N.; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Tarashkevich, R.

    2004-01-01

    The relational data base of the control parameters of the isochronous cyclotron, Isochronous Cyclotron Data Base (ICDB), is described. The relational data base under consideration, written in Transact SQL for the MS SQL Server 2000 with the use of MS Enterprise Manager and MS Query Analyzer, was installed on the server of the AIC144 isochronous cyclotron in Krakow, which operates under the control of the operating system MS Windows Server 2003 (Standard Edition). The interface of the data base under considerations is written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ .NET and is built in the Cyclotron Operator Help Program (COHP), which is used for modeling the operational modes of the isochronous cyclotron. Communication between the COHP and the relational data base is realised on the base of the Open Data Base Connectivity protocol. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron is intended: firstly, for systematization and automatic use of all measured and modelled magnetic field maps in the process of modeling the operational modes; secondly, for systematization and convenient access to the stored operational modes; thirdly, for simplifying the operator's work. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron reflects its physical structure and the logic of its operator's work. (author)

  19. Assessment of the direct cyclotron production of (99m)Tc: An approach to crisis management of (99m)Tc shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovais, Mohammad Reza Aboudzadeh; Aardaneh, Khosro; Aslani, Gholamreza; Rahiminejad, Ali; Yousefi, Kamran; Boulouri, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, the cyclotron production of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) has been increased, due to the worldwide (99m)Tc generator shortage. In the present work, an improved strategy for the production of (99m)Tc, using the proton irradiation of the enriched (100)Mo was developed. The performance of this method in terms of the production yield, chemical purity, radiochemical purity, as well as radionuclide purity was evaluated. The average production yield was measured to be 356MBqμA(-1)h(-1). A good agreement was found between the calculated production yield and the experimental one. The radiochemical separation and total recovery yields of (99m)Tc were 92% and 69%, respectively. The radiochemical and the radionuclide purities of the (99m)Tc were 99% and >99.99% at the end of purification, respectively. The results of quality control tests (QC) support the concept that cyclotron-produced (99m)Tc is suitable for preparation of USP-compliant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains descriptions of research programs carried out by Institute staff, as well as progress on new instrumentation during the period, April 1, 1990, to March 31, 1991. The K500 cyclotron and ECR source provided beam for 4140 hours during the period. The beam was actually available for experiments 1927.50 hours and 1110.50 hours was devoted to developing new beams and exploring cyclotron performance. A wide range of beams from protons to Xe with energies from 2.4 MeV/u to 60 MeV/U have been used in experiments. The highest total energy beam accelerated was 35 MeV/u 63 Cu. The ECR source, made a tremendous improvement in accelerator performance and reliability. Substantial amounts of beam time were devoted to investigations of hot nuclei, electron-positron, giant resonances, atomic effects of high velocity ion beams, astrophysics related reactions and proton and alpha bremsstrahlung. Scientific accomplishments included determination of the heat capacity of nuclei through new insight into the level densities and establishing a lower limit for electron positron resonances a factor of ten better than previous measurements. The proton spectrometer, constructed for studies of the Gamow-Teller interaction is complete, and initial physics measurements will be made in the next few months. All of the BaF 2 crystals have been delivered and acceptance tests are underway. A K=315 MDM spectrometer has been obtained from Oxford University and is scheduled for installation in Spring 1992, after removal of the K=150 Enge split pole spectrometer. Institute groups continue participation in MEGA, instrumentation projects for RHIC, and few nucleon studies at LAMPF and KEK. Reports of these activities are included

  1. Radionuclide generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wollongong Univ.; Tomiyoshi, K.; Sekine, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present status and future directions of research and development on radionuclide generator technology are reported. The recent interest to develop double-neutron capture reactions for production of in vivo generators; neutron rich nuclides for radio-immunotherapeutic pharmaceuticals: and advances with ultra-short lived generators is highlighted. Emphasis is focused on: production of the parent radionuclide; the selection and the evaluation of support materials and eluents with respect to the resultant radiochemical yield of the daughter, and the breakthrough of the radionuclide parent: and, the uses of radionuclide generators in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, biomedical and industrial applications. The 62 Zn → 62 Cu, 66 Ni → 66 Cu, 103m Rh → 103 Rh, 188 W → 188 Re and the 225 Ac → 221 Fr → 213 Bi generators are predicted to be emphasized for future development. Coverage of the 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator was excluded, as it the subject of another review. The literature search ended June, 1996. (orig.)

  2. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  3. Ion Cyclotron Heating on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J. F.; Kafle, N.; Ray, H. B.; Showers, M. A.; Piotrowicz, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion cyclotron heating will be used on Proto-MPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment) to increase heat flux to the target, to produce varying ion energies without substrate biasing, and to vary the extent of the magnetic pre-sheath for the case of a tilted target. A 25 cm long, 9 cm diameter dual half-turn helical ion cyclotron antenna has been installed in the device located at the magnetic field maximum. It couples power to ions via single pass damping of the slow wave at the fundamental resonance, and operates with ω 0.8ωci at the antenna location. It is designed to operate at power levels up to 30 kW, with a later 200 kW upgrade planned. Near term experiments include measuring RF loading at low power as a function of frequency and antenna gap. The plasma is generated by a helicon plasma source that has achieved ne > 5 ×1019m-3 operating with deuterium, as measured downstream from the ion cyclotron antenna location. Measurements will be compared with 1-D and 2-D models of RF coupling. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Katsumichi

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is one of the intense methods of plasma heating, and which utilizes the collisionless electron-cyclotron-resonance-interaction between the launched electromagnetic waves (called electron cyclotron waves) and electrons which are one of the constituents of the high temperature plasmas. Another constituent, namely the ions which are subject to nuclear fusion, are heated indirectly but strongly and instantly (in about 0.1 s) by the collisions with the ECH-heated electrons in the fusion plasmas. The recent progress on the development of high-power and high-frequency millimeter-wave-source enabled the ECH experiments in the middle size tokamaks such as JFT-2M (Japan), Doublet III (USA), T-10 (USSR) etc., and ECH has been demonstrated to be the sure and intense plasma heating method. The ECH attracts much attention for its remarkable capabilities; to produce plasmas (pre-ionization), to heat plasmas, to drive plasma current for the plasma confinement, and recently especially by the localization and the spatial controllability of its heating zone, which is beneficial for the fine controls of the profiles of plasma parameters (temperature, current density etc.), for the control of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, or for the optimization/improvement of the plasma confinement characteristics. Here, the present status of the ECH studies on tokamak plasmas are reviewed. (author)

  5. Radionuclidic contamination of 99Mo, 131I and 103Ru in the eluate of 99Mo-99mTc chromatographic generator: comparision on fission produced 99Mo from RPC, Nordio and ARI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soenarjo, Sunarhadijoso; Gunawan, Adang Hardi

    1996-01-01

    The 99 Mo- 99m Tc Chromatographic generators is the most popular system to provide 99m Tc medical radioisotope. Radioisotope Production Centre (RPC)- BATAN has routinely produced the generator loaded with 99 Mo prepared by 235 U fission. By using fission produced 99 Mo, the resulting 99m Tc is potentially contaminated by other fission products which are difficult to eliminate completely. In order to study the characteristic of the generator and radionuclidic impurity pattern of the 99m Tc eluates, an evaluation of gamma spectrometric determination has been carried out. The bulk solutions of 99 Mo produced by RPC BATAN (Indonesia), Nordion (Canada) and ARI (Australia) were loaded to generators manufactured between July 1993 to May 1994. The saline-eluate 99m Tc, in a total volume of 10 ml each, was subjected to gamma spectrometric determination. The radiation of 99m Tc was eliminated by lead shield of 0.6913 cm thickness. The 99m Tc yield fluctuation from 28 generators indicated that the characteristics of the generator columns were very good. The 99m Tc eluates were consistently contaminated by 99 Mo, 131 I and 103 Ru, although the contamination level in all cases did not exceed the maximum permissible levels. The fluctuation of radionuclidic impurities were probably caused by variation in the irradiation parameter or by variation in the 99 Mo separation methods. (author), 23 refs, 1 tab, 3 figs

  6. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility (ICR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — his facility is charged with developing and exploiting the unique capabilities of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and leads the...

  7. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-01

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development of this

  8. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  9. Present and future superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief review of the status of present superconducting (SC) cyclotron projects, including the two which are currently operating and the six which are under construction. The next section summarizes the main features shared by five of these machines, while the third section presents recent developments and new concepts introduced in the other three ''second generation'' SC cyclotrons. Projects in early stages of development are discussed in the fourth section

  10. The Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhorsky, D.; Ruzicka, J.; Macasek, F.; Makaiova, I.; Saro, S.; Kristiak, J.; Fulup, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic was established at the beginning of August 1999 - within the Slovak-Office of Standards, Metrology and Testing (SOSMT), in Bratislava, Slovak Republic. It will have two cyclotrons - a large heavy and light cyclotron DC-72, which will be constructed by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russian Federation, and a small commercial light ion cyclotron IBA 18/9. The heavy ion source of the electron resonance type (DECRS-2M) will be used for low and medium energy experiments in physics. The small electron accelerator is planned for different applications, including improving the properties of plastics, increasing the resistance of cables to fire and temperature, the sterilization of medical disposables in the CC SR. The main purpose of the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic (CC SR) is to catch the present approach and trends in the area of improving of inhabitants life and health quality using the progressive technology, which is introduced by bringing into practice of the physical equipment - accelerators, producing beams of high energy particles. Experts of nuclear physics and of the related branches have no experimental basis in Slovakia, as after dissolution of the former the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic all bigger nuclear equipment were left in the Czech Republic. The Slovak Republic is one of the European countries where cancer and cardiovascular diseases have a rapidly increasing tendency (the rate of new oncological cases is approximately 20,000/year at the population of 5 million inhabitants) - early diagnostics of population is necessary to be updated urgently. The Slovak Republic use a great part of electricity (about 60 %) from its own nuclear power stations and thus it is in need of education of rising generations of experts from different nuclear fields. The Government of the Slovak republic on June 18, 1996 approved the strategic aim of building up the Cyclotron Laboratory at the

  11. Life Sciences at the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhorsky, D.; Kovac, P.; Macasek, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation the history and present status of the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak (CC SR) are presented. A state run scientific center and production facility ensuring: - the basic and applied research in nuclear physics, chemistry, biology and medicine; - production of radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals; - and applications of heavy ions and electron accelerator technologies in medicine and material science. Current financial status of the CC SR is following: Deblocation of the Russian; Federation debt to the Slovak Republic (94 %); State budget of the Slovak Republic (3 %); IAEA (3 %)

  12. CYGNE, Foundation for Cyclotron Applications in Medicine, Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van de Bosch, R L.P. [Technische Hogeschool Eindhoven (Netherlands). Afdeling Technische Natuurkunde; Smithuis, L O.M.J. [St. Lambertusziekenhuis, Helmond (Netherlands). Afd. Nucleaire Geneeskunde

    1981-01-01

    At the Technical University of Eindhoven (Netherlands) a Foundation named CYGNE is established with the purpose to further the use of the research cyclotrons present in the country for the production of short-living radioisotopes specifically on behalf of nuclear medicine. The cooperation with a hospital and its pharmacist are procured for the production of various radiopharmaceuticals. This is the first time such a facility is available in the Netherlands. The foundation has four working groups to do research on radionuclides for positron emission tomography, neutron therapy, trace element analysis, and routine production or new production methods.

  13. Injection and extraction for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, P.

    1994-01-01

    External ion sources for cyclotrons are needed for polarised and heavy ions. This calls for injection systems, either radial or axial. Radial injection is also needed when a cyclotron works as a booster after another cyclotron or a linear accelerator (usually tandem). Requirements for injection differ from separated sector cyclotrons where there is plenty of room to house inflectors and/or strippers, to superconducting cyclotrons where the space is limited by a small magnet gap, and high magnetic field puts other limitations to the inflectors. Several extraction schemes are used in cyclotrons. Stripping injection is used for H - and also for heavy ions where the q/m ratio is usually doubled. For other cases, electric and magnetic deflection has to be used. To increase the turn separation before the first deflector, both resonant and non-resonant schemes are used. In this lecture, external injection systems are surveyed and some rules to thumb for injection parameters are given. Extraction schemes are also reviewed. (orig.)

  14. Modeling of a cyclotron target for the production of 11C with Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappiniello, Andrea; Zagni, Federico; Infantino, Angelo; Vichi, Sara; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Morigi, Maria Pia; Marengo, Mario

    2018-04-12

    In medical cyclotron facilities, 11C is produced according to the 14N(p,α)11C reaction and widely employed in studies of prostate and brain cancers by Positron Emission Tomography. It is known from literature [1] that the 11C-target assembly shows a reduction in efficiency during time, meaning a decrease of activity produced at the end of bombardment. This effect might depend on aspects still not completely known. Possible causes of the loss of performance of the 11C-target assembly were addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. Geant4 was used to model the 11C-target assembly of a GE PETtrace cyclotron. The physical and transport parameters to be used in the energy range of medical applications were extracted from literature data and 11C routine productions. The Monte Carlo assessment of 11C saturation yield was performed varying several parameters such as the proton energy and the angle of the target assembly with respect to the proton beam. The estimated 11C saturation yield is in agreement with IAEA data at the energy of interest, while is about the 35% greater than experimental value. A more comprehensive modeling of the target system, including thermodynamic effect, is required. The energy absorbed in the inner layer of the target chamber was up to 46.5 J/mm2 under typical irradiation conditions. This study shows that Geant4 is potentially a useful tool to design and optimize targetry for PET radionuclide productions. Tests to choose the Geant4 physics libraries should be performed before using this tool with different energies and materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Risk assessment of 30 MeV cyclotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Jin Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Yeal [Dept. of Radiation Science and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A cyclotron is a kind of particle accelerator that produces a beam of charged particles for the production of medical, industrial, and research radioisotopes. More than 30 cyclotrons are operated in Korea to produce 18F, an FDG synthesis at hospitals. A 30-MeV cyclotron was installed at ARTI (Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, KAERI) mainly for research regarding isotope production. In this study, we analyze and estimate the items of risk such as the problems in the main components of the cyclotron, the loss of radioactive materials, the leakage of coolant, and the malfunction of utilities, fres and earthquakes. To estimate the occurrence frequency in an accident risk assessment, five levels, i.e., Almost certain, Likely, Possible, Unlikely, and Rare, are applied. The accident consequence level is classified under four grades based on the annual permissible dose for radiation workers and the public in the nuclear safety law. The analysis of the accident effect is focused on the radioactive contamination caused by radioisotope leakage and radioactive material leakage of a ventilation filter due to a free. To analyze the risks, Occupation Safety and Health Acts is applied. In addition, action plans against an accident were prepared after a deep discussion among relevant researchers. In this acts, we will search for hazard and introduce the risk assessment for the research 30-MeV cyclotron facilities of ARTI.

  16. The PET / cyclotron facility at Putrajaya Hospital - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Suzilawati Muhd Sarowi; Munira Shaikh Nasir; Zulkifli Mohamed Hashim

    2006-01-01

    Malaysia desire to have a cyclotron for nuclear medical use came into realisation recently with the establishment of a PET/Cyclotron Facility at Putrajaya Hospital. The testing and commissioning of the cyclotron, hot cells, QC equipment and PET/CT started on March 27, culminating in the first patient to be injected on May 10 2006. Three other patients were to be followed on May 15. The patients from both the Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya Hospital were pre-selected by physicians from these hospitals. The 18 MeV cyclotron is capable of generating 16.4 MeV protons and 8.4 MeV deuterons. The cyclotron at Putrajaya has three targets (2 liquid and 1 gas) and is capable of producing 18 F-FDG and 18 F-DOPA. To complement this, the facility has 2 modules for FDG synthesis, 1 for F-DOPA and 1 for nucleophilic synthesis. The facility will be GMP compliant. For the first production for human use, the water-18 target was irradiated for 50 minutes at 20 mA to produce 1.3 Ci of F-18. At the end of synthesis, the activity of the FDG obtained was 600 mCi. The product was then injected to a 26-year-old female, with a suspected adenocarcinoma. (Author)

  17. Risk assessment of 30 MeV cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Chong Yeal

    2017-01-01

    A cyclotron is a kind of particle accelerator that produces a beam of charged particles for the production of medical, industrial, and research radioisotopes. More than 30 cyclotrons are operated in Korea to produce 18F, an FDG synthesis at hospitals. A 30-MeV cyclotron was installed at ARTI (Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, KAERI) mainly for research regarding isotope production. In this study, we analyze and estimate the items of risk such as the problems in the main components of the cyclotron, the loss of radioactive materials, the leakage of coolant, and the malfunction of utilities, fres and earthquakes. To estimate the occurrence frequency in an accident risk assessment, five levels, i.e., Almost certain, Likely, Possible, Unlikely, and Rare, are applied. The accident consequence level is classified under four grades based on the annual permissible dose for radiation workers and the public in the nuclear safety law. The analysis of the accident effect is focused on the radioactive contamination caused by radioisotope leakage and radioactive material leakage of a ventilation filter due to a free. To analyze the risks, Occupation Safety and Health Acts is applied. In addition, action plans against an accident were prepared after a deep discussion among relevant researchers. In this acts, we will search for hazard and introduce the risk assessment for the research 30-MeV cyclotron facilities of ARTI

  18. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  19. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  20. State of contamination of French food produces by artificial radionuclides; Etat de la contamination par les radionucleides artificiels des produits alimentaires francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boursier, B.; Guiard, A.; Tesolin, B.; Janin, F. [Centre National d`Etudes Veterinaires et Alimentaires, 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-05-01

    This study presents the results of 40236 recorded levels of caesium {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs activities carried out on French food. These controls, performed through gamma-spectrometry, have been carried out in France by the Veterinary Services and the CNEVA-LCHA (Centre National d`Etudes Veterinaires - Laboratoire Central d`Hygiene Alimentaire), as part of a radionuclides survey after the Chernobyl accident. The results have been collected by the CNEVA-LCHA, and show in 1992 that 99.6% of the radioactivity levels in the French food are below 50 Bq/kg. The present situation seems to be satisfying. However, very small amounts of {sup 137}Cs residues were noticed in some mushroom species, such as Cantharellus tubaeformis. (authors). 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  2. Tachyonic cyclotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaschitz, R.

    2006-01-01

    We study superluminal cyclotron emission by electrons and muons in semiclassical orbits. The tachyonic line spectra of hydrogenic ions such as H, 56 Fe 25+ , and 238 U 91+ , as well as their muonic counterparts pμ - , 56 Fe 26+ μ - and 238 U 92+ μ - are calculated, in particular the tachyonic power transversally and longitudinally radiated, the total intensity, and the power radiated in the individual harmonics. We also investigate tachyonic continuum radiation from electrons and protons cycling in the surface and light cylinder fields of γ -ray and millisecond pulsars, such as the Crab pulsar, PSR B1509-58, and PSR J0218 + 4232. The superluminal spectral densities generated by non-relativistic, mildly relativistic and ultra-relativistic source particles are derived. We study the parameters determining the global shape of the transversal and longitudinal densities and the energy scales of the broadband spectrum. The observed cutoff frequency in the γ-ray band of the pulsars is used to infer the upper edge of the orbital energy, and we conclude that electrons and nuclei cycling in the surface fields can reach energies beyond the ''ankle'' of the cosmic ray spectrum. This suggests γ-ray pulsars as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. (orig.)

  3. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  4. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 saw the initial runs of three new spectrometers, which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP) (data from which are shown on the cover of this document), the Mass Achroniat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole Dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. The ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. The beam was on target 39% of this time. Studies of nuclear dynamics and nuclear thermodynamics using the neutron ball have come to fruition. A critical re-evaluation of the available data on the giant monopole resonance indicated that the incompressibility is not specified to a range smaller than 200--350 MeV by those data. New systematic experiments using the MDM spectrometer are now underway. The MEGA collaboration obtained the first data on the μ → eγ decay rate and determination of the Michel parameter in normal μ decay. Experiments appear to confirm the existence of monoenergetic pair peaks even for relatively low Z projectile -- Z target combinations. Studies of the (α,2α) knockout reaction indicate that this reaction may prove to be a valuable tool for determination of reaction rates of astrophysical interest. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. New measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported. The research is presented in nearly 50 brief summaries usually including data and references

  5. A new RF system for a rejuvenated Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The Synchro-cyclotron is shown here shortly after the completion of the improvement programme, which left the steel magnet yoke as almost the only remaining component of the original machine. On the left can be seen the rotary condenser which produces the frequency modulation required for the acceleration (one of a pair available -in this instance ROTCO II). (see photo 7506015)

  6. Radiation protection problems by the operation of the cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durcik, M.; Nikodemova, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Cyclotron Center in Bratislava will consist of two cyclotrons. First - cyclotron DC-72 with maximal energy of 72 MV for protons for making experiments, for teaching process, for radioisotope production as 123 I and for neutron and proton therapy. Second - compact cyclotron with maximal proton energy of 18 MeV will be used for radioisotopes production for medical diagnosis as 1 *F (fluorodeoxyglucose), 81 Rb/ 81 Kr generator. This paper deals with the radiation protection problems by the operation of tis cyclotron facility as radiation protection of workers, monitoring plan, ventilation, safety lock and limitation and radiation monitoring. For proposed and continuing practices at the accelerator facility, the following general principles have to be fulfilled: (1) practices should produce sufficient benefit to offset the radiation detriment they case (justification); (2) the magnitude of the individual doses should be kept as low as achievable (optimization of protection); (3) individual exposures are subject to dose limits and some control of risk from potential exposures (dose and risk limits)

  7. Potential of cyclotron based accelerators for energy production and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stammbach, T.; Adam, S.; Fitze, H.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    PSI operates a 590 MeV-cyclotron facility for high intensity proton beams for the production of intense beams of pions and muons. The facility, commissioned in 1974, has been partially upgraded and is now operated routinely at a beam current of 1 mA, which corresponds to a beam power of 0.6 MW. At this current, the beam losses in the cyclotron are about 0.02%. By the end of 1995 the authors expect to have 1.5 mA of protons. Extensive theoretical investigations on beam current limitations in isochronous cyclotrons were undertaken. They show that the longitudinal space charge effects dominate. Based on their experience the authors present a preliminary design of a cyclotron scheme that could produce a 10 MW beam as a driver for an {open_quotes}energy amplifier{close_quotes} as proposed by C. Rubbia and his collaborators. The expected efficiency for the conversion of AC into beam power would be about 50% (for the RF-systems only). The beam losses in the cyclotron are expected to be a few {mu}A, leading to a tolerable activation level.

  8. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  9. Radioisotope production by reactors and cyclotrons in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Yukio

    1978-01-01

    Present status of radioisotope production in Japan and the increasing demand from various fields are generally reviewed. Future problems associated with the shortage of economical supply are also discussed. The first half of this report is devoted to general review of the increasing demand for various radioisotopes from increasing number of users. The present status and future trends of the distribution of users of specific radioisotopes and their demands are shown. The remaining half of this report reviews the production with reactors and cyclotrons. The Japanese reactors producing radioisotopes are limited to low flux (10 13 ) research reactors at JAERI. Some problems associated with the improvement of availability and with the organizational structure are discussed. As for the production with cyclotrons, available facilities and the method of production are explained in detail. For clinical use, especially for the production of short lived radioisotopes, the advantage of a small special purpose cyclotron at each medical organization is emphasized. (Aoki, K.)

  10. Radiation monitoring in a self-shielded cyclotron installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capaccioli, L.; Gori, C.; Mazzocchi, S.; Spano, G.

    2002-01-01

    As nuclear medicine is approaching a new era with the spectacular growth of PET diagnosis, the number of medical cyclotrons installed within the major hospitals is increasing accordingly. Therefore modern medical cyclotron are highly engineered and highly reliable apparatus, characterised with reduced accelerating energies (as the major goal is the production of fluorine 18) and often self-shielded. However specific dedicated monitors are still necessary in order to assure the proper radioprotection. At the Careggi University Hospital in Florence a Mini trace 10 MeV self-shielded cyclotron produced by General Electric has been installed in 2000. In a contiguous radiochemistry laboratory, the preparation and quality control of 1 8F DG and other radiopharmaceuticals takes place. Aim of this work is the characterisation and the proper calibration of the above mentioned monitors and control devices

  11. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  12. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C.R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.; Salonika Univ., Greece)

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts. 31 references

  13. Present situation of 'baby cyclotron'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Teruo

    1981-01-01

    A ''baby cyclotron'' has been developed by the Japan Steel Works, Ltd. Its No. 1 model (proton 9.4 MeV) was delivered to the Nakano Hospital of National Sanatorium in March, 1979. It is being used successfully for the production of 11 C, 13 N and 15 O and labeled compounds. The proton or deuteron particles accelerated in the cyclotron collide on target materials. The target box, which is automatically changeable, is directly installed to the accelerating box, thereby taking the safety measures for any leaking radiation. The following matters are described: the production of short-lived radioisotopes (RI yields and treatment); the processes of production in the Nakano Hospital, with No. 1 baby cyclotron, including the photosynthesis of labeled compounds such as 11 C-labeled glucose; the research on the automation in the synthesis of organic labeled compounds like 11 C-palmitic acid. (J.P.N.)

  14. Status Report on Cyclotron Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, P.; Szuecs, I.; Ander, I.; Lakatos, T.; Tarkanyi, F.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The operation of the cyclotron in 2004 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 3554 hours, the time used for systematic maintenance was 450 hours. The breakdown periods amounted to 70 hours last year, included in it a 50 hours repair of RF control module under guarantee. The cyclotron was available for users during 3034 hours. The effectively used beam-on-target time statistics is summarized in Table 1. Developments: A new measuring site with a HPGe detector based gamma spectrometer is under installation in the basement of the Cyclotron Laboratory. A two channel pneumatic rabbit system is also under development to enable fast transport of samples between the new measuring site and two irradiation sites (the low intensity fast neutron irradiation site and the beam line used for Thin Layer Activation). (author)

  15. Development of Medical Cyclotron in KIRAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jong Seo; Jung, In Su; An, Dong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    This paper is presented on the development and status of medical cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) at present. We have developed medical cyclotron which is KIRAMS-13. And the improvement of KIRAMS-13 is presented. Furthermore, the design of new cyclotrons, such as KIRAMS-5 and KIRAMS-30 cyclotron, are presented, and R and D studies for future plan of heavy ion accelerator are discussed

  16. Environmental impact assessment for the apparatus of positron emission tomograph and cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shui; Gu Hongkun; Wu Songhuan; Zhang Wenying; Zhao Fa; Wang Gongpeng

    2000-01-01

    Cyclotron, type RDS 111, produced by CTI incorporation, was used as an example. According to the characteristic of the radiation source term, the environmental impacts of the apparatus working in normal and abnormal conditions were assessed

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim; Andersson, Jan T.; Mö ller, Isabelle; Amad, Maan H.; Witt, Matthí as; Sarathy, Mani

    2013-01-01

    oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same

  18. On the coupling of cyclotron motion to ion internal degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A possibility of significant coupling between gas-phase ion cyclotron motion and two internal angular momentum terms is explored. The first case, coupling with ion spin, is treated via the relativistic Hamiltonian, and found to produce only relativistic perturbations which are entirely negligible. The second case, coupling with ion rotation, is developed via its equivalence to a Stark effect. Small shifts in the cyclotron resonances frequency , ωsub(c) and the appearance of a weak cyclotron resonance at 2ωsub(c) are predicted, but these effects are negligible in general. If the cyclotron frequency is near an ion rotational transition, however, a shift of 10 -5 in cyclotron frequency may be observed, and could provide a means of investigating low-frequency rotational transitions of ions. (Auth.)

  19. Clinical diagnostic system using a small cyclotron for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Y.; Magata, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Since a small cyclotron and a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner have been installed at the Kyoto University Hospital in 1983, a great deal of effort has been directed to the clinical application of the PET-cyclotron system. This paper outlines the experience with PET in the clinical setting, including the facility, equipments and staff involved, weekly schedule, typical clinical protocols, and some results from the patients. The system consists of small cyclotron for production of the short-lived positron emitting radionuclides, fully automated synthesis system for labeling various compounds, scanning for measurement of radioactivities, and data analysis system for calculating physiological parameters. A resolving cylinder target system with eight smaller cylinders is equipped for production of C-11, N-13, O-15, and F-18. Labeled compounds are quickly delivered to the PET scanner room by two systems--the continuous delivery system for the labeled gas and the rapid delivery system for the liquid compounds by compressed air. A PET scanner devoted for clinical studies is a multislice whole-body PET scanner. Ten PET studies are performed weekly on the average for measuring blood flow and oxygen and glucose metabolism in the brain, blood flow and glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart, blood flow and amino acid uptake in the pancreas, lung ventilation, and tumor glucose metabolism. The availability of PET-cyclotron system is still limited in view of cost. The previous clinical studies suggest the contribution of PET to the the understanding of the mechanism of disease pathophysiology. (N.K.)

  20. Evolution of PET and SPECT tracers from cyclotrons: production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecklin, G.

    1992-01-01

    Small cyclotrons play an increasing role in the production of medically useful isotopes. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are major tools in modern nuclear medicine for monitoring regional physiological and pharmacological functions at a molecular level. This requires physiological substrates or drugs labeled with suitable positron emitters or single photon emitters. Short-lived neutron deficient radioisotopes of high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity are needed. Some examples of radionuclide production, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and SPECT, and their applications is presented with special emphasis on fluorine-18 and iodine-123. (author)

  1. Princeton Cyclotron QDDD spectrograph system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    A review of experiments involving the Princeton Quadrupole-Dipole-Dipole- Dipole (QDDD) spectrograph is given. The QDDD is a high resolution, large solid angle device which is combined with the azymuthally varying field (AVF) cyclotron. Some reactions involving 3 He beams are discussed

  2. Ion sources for cyclotron applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; McDonald, D.S.; Young, A.T.

    1992-07-01

    The use of a multicusp plasma generator as an ion source has many advantages. The development of both positive and negative ion beams based on the multicusp source geometry is presented. It is shown that these sources can be operated at steady state or cw mode. As a result they are very suitable for cyclotron operations

  3. Ponderomotive force near cyclotron resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Mitsuo; Sanuki, Heiji

    1987-01-01

    The ponderomotive force, which is involved in the excitation of macroscopic behaviors of plasma caused by wave motion, plays an important role in various non-linear wave motion phenomena. In the present study, equations for the pondermotive force for plasma in a uniform magnetic field is derived using a renormalization theory which is based on the Vlasov equation. It is shown that the pondermotive force, which diverges at the cyclotron resonence point according to adiabatic approximation, can be expressed by a non-divergent equation by taking into account the instability of the cyclotron orbit due to high-order scattering caused by a wave. This is related with chaotic particle behaviors near cyclotron resonance, where the pondermotive force is small and the diffusion process prevails. It is assumed here that the amplitude of the high-frequency electric field is not large and that the broadening of cyclotron levels is smaller than the distance between the levels. A global chaos will be created if the amplitude of the electric field becomes greater to allow the broadening to exceed the distance between the levels. (Nogami, K.).

  4. Cyclotron transitions of bound ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Pavlov, George G.

    2017-06-01

    A charged particle in a magnetic field possesses discrete energy levels associated with particle rotation around the field lines. The radiative transitions between these levels are the well-known cyclotron transitions. We show that a bound complex of particles with a nonzero net charge displays analogous transitions between the states of confined motion of the entire complex in the field. The latter bound-ion cyclotron transitions are affected by a coupling between the collective and internal motions of the complex and, as a result, differ from the transitions of a "reference" bare ion with the same mass and charge. We analyze the cyclotron transitions for complex ions by including the coupling within a rigorous quantum approach. Particular attention is paid to comparison of the transition energies and oscillator strengths to those of the bare ion. Selection rules based on integrals of collective motion are derived for the bound-ion cyclotron transitions analytically, and the perturbation and coupled-channel approaches are developed to study the transitions quantitatively. Representative examples are considered and discussed for positive and negative atomic and cluster ions.

  5. Status report on cyclotron operation

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, P; Ander, I; Lakatos, T; Fenyvesi, A; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Tarkanyi, F

    2003-01-01

    The operation of the cyclotron in 2002 was concentrated to 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4084 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 15 hours last year. In order to improve the circumstances of the irradiations, several following improvements were done. (R.P.)

  6. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating in a toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    rf power near the ion cyclotron-resonance frequency has been used to produce a hundredfold increase (from approximately-less-than1 to approx.100 eV) in the ion temperature in a toroidal octupole device. The heating produces no noticeable instabilities or other deleterious effects except for a high reflux of neutrals from the walls. The heating rate is consistent with theory and the limiting ion temperature is determined by charge-exchange losses

  7. Dynamic effects on cyclotron scattering in pulsar accretion columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brainerd, J.J.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    A resonant scattering model for photon reprocessing in a pulsar accretion column is presented. The accretion column is optically thin to Thomson scattering and optically thick to resonant scattering at the cyclotron frequency. Radiation from the neutron star surface propagates freely through the column until the photon energy equals the local cyclotron frequency, at which point the radiation is scattered, much of it back toward the star. The radiation pressure in this regime is insufficient to stop the infall. Some of the scattered radiation heats the stellar surface around the base of the column, which adds a softer component to the spectrum. The partial blocking by the accretion column of X-rays from the surface produces a fan beam emission pattern. X-rays above the surface cyclotron frequency freely escape and are characterized by a pencil beam. Gravitational light bending produces a pencil beam pattern of column-scattered radiation in the antipodal direction, resulting in a strongly angle-dependent cyclotron feature. 31 refs

  8. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs

  9. Acceleration of tritons with a compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegmann, H.; Huenges, E.; Muthig, H.; Moringa, H.

    1981-01-01

    With the compact cyclotron at the Faculty of Physics of the Technical University of Munich, tritons have been accelerated to an energy of 7 MeV. A safe and reliable operation of the gas supply for the ion source was obtained by a new tritium storage system. A quantity of 1500 Ci tritium is stored by two special Zr-Al getter pumps in a non-gaseous phase. The tritium can be released in well-defined amounts by heating the getter material. During triton acceleration the pressure in the cyclotron vacuum chamber is maintained only by a large titanium sputter-ion pump, thus forming a closed vacuum system without any exhaust of tritium contaminated gas. Any tritium contaminations in the air can be detected by an extremely sensitive tritium monitoring system. The triton beam with a maximum intensity of 30 μA has been used so far to produce neutron-rich radioisotopes such as 28 Mg, 43 K, or 72 Zn, which are successfully applied in tracer techniques in the studies of biological systems. (orig.)

  10. Radionuclide injury to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequently observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. 88 references

  11. A study of a superconducting heavy ion cyclotron as a post accelerator for the CRNL MP Tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.; Tunnicliffe, P.R.

    1975-08-01

    A novel design for a heavy ion cyclotron is described utilizing superconducting coils. Acting as a post accelerator for the CRNL MP Tandem accelerator, the proposed cyclotron is capable of producing an output energy of 10 MeV/u and intensities up to approximately 10 10 particles/s for uranium. (E.C.B.)

  12. Iodine-123 (123I) is promising radiopharmaceutical in the radionuclide diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhedinov, I.T.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper some advantages of the radiopharmaceuticals with 123 I against 99m Tc preparations are shown. It is noted that the 123 I is the most favourable among cyclotron radionuclides for radionuclide diagnostics by it nuclear-physical characteristics. With application of 123 I it is possible to attain a significant progress in the thyroid examination. 123 I labelled preparations should have a high bond strength providing the high information valuation of examinations

  13. Recovery of 201Tl by ion exchange chromatography from proton bombarded thallium cyclotron targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walt, T.N. van der; Naidoo, C.

    2000-01-01

    A method based on ion exchange chromatography is presented for the recovery of 201 Tl and its precursor 201 Pb from proton bombarded natural thallium cyclotron targets. After bombardment the target is dissolved in diluted nitric acid. Water, hydrazine and ammonium acetate are added to the solution and the lead radioisotopes separated from the thallium by cation exchange chromatography on a Bio-Rex 70 column. The sorbed lead radioisotopes are eluted with dilute nitric acid and the separation repeated on a second Bio-Rex 70 column. After elution of the remaining thallium the column is left for 32 hours and the 201 Tl formed by decay of 201 Pb is eluted with an ammonium acetate solution. The 201 Tl eluate is acidified with a HNO 3 -HBr-Br 2 mixture and the resulting solution is passed through an AG MP-1 anion exchanger column to remove any remaining lead isotopes. The 201 Tl is eluted with a hydrazine solution, the eluate evaporated to dryness and the 201 Tl finally dissolved in an appropriate solution to produce a 201 TlCl solution suitable for medical use. A high quality 201 Tl product is obtained containing ≤ 0.1 μg of Tl/mCi (37 MBq) 201 Tl. The radionuclidic impurities are less than the maximum values specified by the US Pharmacopoeia and the British Pharmacopoeia. (orig.)

  14. Development of cyclotron solid targetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, J.; Deans, T.; Cryer, D.; Price, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Western Australia's first medical cyclotron was recently installed in the Department of Medical Technology and Physics at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The cyclotron is routinely used for 18 F production using a liquid target, and now research is being undertaken into solid target bombardment for production of novel isotopes such as 124 I, 64 Cu and 96 Tc. The IBA Cyclone 18/9 has a maximum proton beam energy of 18MeV and maximum beam current of 80μA. A proton beam is generated by the acceleration of H- ions in the evacuated cyclotron (10 -6 bar) which are then stripped of 2 electrons just prior to exiting a target port. Each port has two strippers which are made of 10μm thick carbon with dimensions 12mmxl3mm. Due to their thinness, the strippers are easily ruptured. The Cyclone 18/9 has 8 target ports. In order to fit a target onto the cyclotron when the cyclotron is already evacuated the target is first evacuated to 10 -3 bar by a roughing pump before an isolation valve at the port is opened. This stops any damage that may occur by the flow of air from the target reservoir to the cyclotron eg to the strippers. The first step in the project to develop solid targetry is to build a beam line in order to measure the beam profile. If successful, this design will be improved in order to have a beam line and target holder that are suitable for use in solid target bombardment. A 40cm beam line with an internal diameter of 3.6cm was built to fit onto the IBA Cyclone 18/9. The beam line, made out of aluminium, incorporates a step 5cm from the end at which a target material can be fitted. A cover fits onto the beam line, behind the target in order to maintain vacuum. The cover is held in place by the vacuum within the beam line. At the end of bombardment, the beam line can be isolated from the vacuum of the target and normal air pressure restored. In doing so the cover plate falls open and the target falls into a lead pot, ready for removal from the cyclotron

  15. 40 CFR 141.66 - Maximum contaminant levels for radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... beta particle and photon radioactivity from man-made radionuclides in drinking water must not produce.../year). (2) Except for the radionuclides listed in table A, the concentration of man-made radionuclides... may make this technology too complex for small surface water systems. e Removal efficiencies can vary...

  16. Radiation safety and operational health physics of hospital based medical cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Compact, low energy, high current Medical Cyclotrons are now primarily used to produce large activities of short lived, neutron deficient, positron- emitting radioisotopes. These isotopes constitute the key ingredients of important PET (Positron Emission Tomography) radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The PET-radioisotope producing Medical Cyclotrons are now increasingly installed in modern urban hospitals in many countries of the world. Modern Medical Cyclotrons run at a very high beam current (∼100-200 micro Amp) level and thereby produce intense fields of parasitic gamma rays and neutrons, causing the activation of cyclotron components, ambient air and radiation exposure to patients and members of the public. This report highlights the important operational aspects and the characteristics of the radiation fields produced by Medical Cyclotrons. The pathways of personnel radiation exposure are also analyzed. The above information constitutes the scientific basis of a sound operational health physics service, which is manifested in an effective dose reduction and an enhanced radiological safety of the Medical Cyclotron facility within the framework of ALARA

  17. Neutron radiography with the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Shuichi; Asada, Yorihisa; Yano, Munehiko; Nakanii, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiography is well recognized as a powerful tool in nondestructive testing, but not widely used yet owing to lack of high intense thermal neutron source convenient for practical use. This article presents a new neutron radiograph facility, utilizing a sub-compact cyclotron as neutron source and is equipped with vertical and horizontal irradiation ports. The article describes a series of experiments, we conducted using beams of a variable energy cyclotron at Tohoku University to investigate the characteristics of thermal neutron obtained from 9 Be(p, n) reaction and thermalized by elastic scattering process. The article also describes a computer simulation of neutron moderator to analyze conditions getting maximal thermal neutron flux. Further, some of practical neutron radiograph examinations of aero-space components and museum art objects of classic bronze mirror and an attempt realizing real time imaging technique, are introduced in the article. (author)

  18. Cyclotron radiation from hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, F.; Henning, J.; Duechs, D.

    1975-11-01

    In calculating the energy transport and losses due to cyclotron radiation there are two major requirements: the absorption coefficient has to be known and the proper geometry of the plasma has to be taken into account. In this report Trubnikov's integral formulae for the absorption coefficient have been evaluated numerically and compared with the approximative formulas of previous authors. Deviations by a factor of 2 - 10 in various frequency regimes are not unusual. With these coefficients the rate of change of the energy density due to cyclotron radiation in a plasma as well as the radiation density at a plasma surface are computed for plasma slab and plasma cylinder. Sometimes considerable differences to the results of previons papers can found. Many simple formulae interpolating the numerical results are given in the text, and the FORTRAN computer programs have been reproduced in the appendices. (orig.) [de

  19. The application of biotechnology to the treatment of wastes produced from the nuclear fuel cycle: Biodegradation and bioaccumulation as a means of treating radionuclide-containing streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macaskie, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent concerns on the radiotoxicity and longevity of nuclides have prompted the development of new technologies for their removal from wastes produced from nuclear power programs and nuclear fuel reprocessing activities. Alongside developments from traditional chemical treatment processes, interest has also centered on the application of biotechnology for efficient waste treatment. Many biological techniques have relied on empirical approaches in simple model systems, with scant regard to the nature and volume of actual target wastes; such considerations may limit the application of the new technologies in practice. This review aims to identify some of the likely problems, to discuss the various approaches under current consideration, and to evaluate ways in which either the target waste or the detoxifying biomass may be modified or presented for the most efficient treatment. 278 references

  20. New development of neutron radiography with a small cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yasushi; Ohkubo, Kohei; Kato, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Tomihisa; Fuji, Takayoshi.

    1990-01-01

    A series of neutron radiography testing has been performed for several years by using a small accelerator called 'Baby Cyclotron' manufactured by Japan Steel Works, Ltd. The Baby Cyclotron produces fast neutrons at the rate of 4x10 12 n/cm 2 s, and enables to perform neutron radiography imaging by various techniques. The most important application of this Baby Cyclotron radiography system is the non-destructive testing (NDT) of various explosive devices prepared for space launch vehicles. It is assured that thermal neutron radiography testing is a very useful means for the NDT. Also fast neutron radiography testing is in progress. The fast neutron radiography with a CR39 track-etch image recorder was developed, and it was shown to be the very useful NDT means when the thicker objects used for new H-2 launch vehicles had to be examined. Because thermal neutron radiography has the high detectability of hydrogenous materials, organic elastomers such as O-rings and explosive powder are clearly observable through the opaque steel walls of containers. The Baby Cyclotron and the neutron radiography facility, thermal neutron and fast neutron radiography testings and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  1. Operational experience and recent developments at the National Medical Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, E.; Pac, B.; Arnott, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Medical Cyclotron is a radioisotope production facility run by ANSTO and located on the grounds of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, Australia. A CYCLONE 30 (IBA) cyclotron is used in the production of short-lived PET radiopharmaceuticals required by the hospital's PET Scanner and also to produce a number of bulk radiochemicals for processing and distribution throughout Australasia. Following commissioning of the cyclotron and beam lines in October 1991, and the overcoming of a number of early open-quote teething close-quote problems especially relating to the reliability of the r.f. and solid target transport systems, a steady program of improvements has been pursued. These improvements have included development of new beam diagnostics and the design and installation of a new beam line for SPECT radioisotope production. The current operations schedule includes the production of 18 FDG, 13 NH 3 , 15 O 2 and 201 Tl, 67 Ga and 123 I. This paper will discuss the process of development of the cyclotron to ably meet the present demands on it, and the problems resolved in the pursuit of this goal

  2. Cyclotron production of Cu-61

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Ráliš, Jan; Seifert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, 2 Supplement (2013), S323-S323 ISSN 1619-7070. [Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). 19.10.2013-23.10.2013, Lyon] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010797 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cyclotron U-120M * PET * Cu-61 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  3. Status report on the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormany, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The operation of the cyclotron in 2001 was again concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4300 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 66 hours last year. The cyclotron was available for users during 3751 hours, the effectively used beam-on-target time is summarized in Table 1. The total time required for machine setup and beam tuning or spent waiting for the start of an irradiation was 272 hours. The control of the adjustable collimators applied in the beam transport system of the cyclotron was renewed during the winter maintenance period. They have been connected to the programmable logic controllers (PLC) and their new control code frees the operators from the long and slow manual setting process. The successful renewal of the control of this and other subsystems (cyclotron and beam transport power supplies) made lots of adjusting and measuring elements on the original control desk needless. To provide more space for the control PCs and remove all unnecessary devices, the unused part of the control desk has been dismantled. The short beam line used mainly for radiation hardness studies was equipped with a new oil-diffusion vacuum system during the summer maintenance. Its components are also connected to the PLC and the same automatic control has been provided like for the other vacuum stands of- the beam transport system. Another short beam line - basically a mirror image of the first one - has also been installed and successfully tested by trial irradiations. (R.P.)

  4. In-house cyclotron and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateno, Yukio; Shishido, Fumio; Yamazaki, Toshiro

    1982-01-01

    In-house cyclotron produced radioisotopes and positron computed tomography provide a unique technique which gives cross-sectional bodyimages of various kinds of physiological activities of living human body. Applications of the technique to clinical study might throw a new light on the etiologically unknown disorders of human central nervous system and etc. However, some difficulties should be settled before the establishment of this technique as an useful research and diagnostic tool. One of them was spatial resolution of positron computed tomography, and another was selection and development of really effective labeled compounds for the disease in question. A rotary positron emission computed tomography device was developed by our physicist team, and our chemist team developed various kinds of radiopharmaceuticals. Clinical applications of the technique started in our institute in November 1979, using the positron computed tomography machine named Positrologica I and the pharmaceuticals, 13sup( n h3, )11sup( C o and )18 F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose. (author)

  5. Neutron radiography using a transportable superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.A. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Hawkesworth, M.R. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Beynon, T.D. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Green, S. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Rogers, J.D. (Rolls-Royce, Derby (United Kingdom)); Allen, M.J. (Rolls-Royce, Derby (United Kingdom)); Plummer, H.C. (Rolls-Royce, MatEval, Derby (United Kingdom)); Boulding, N.J. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom)); Cox, M. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom)); McDougall, I. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom))

    1994-12-30

    A thermal neutron radiography system based on a compact 12 MeV superconducting proton cyclotron is described. Neutrons are generated using a thick beryllium target and moderated in high density polyethylene. Monte Carlo computer simulations have been used to model the neutron and photon transport in order to optimise the performance of the system. With proton beam currents in excess of 100 [mu]A, it can provide high thermal neutron fluxes with L/D ratios of between 50 and 300 for various applications. Both film and electronic imaging are used to produce radiographs. The electronic imaging system consists of a [sup 6]Li-loaded ZnS intensifier screen, and a low light CCD or SIT camera. High resolution images can be recorded and computer-controlled data processing, analysis and display are possible. ((orig.))

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  7. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. We will also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author)

  8. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA

  9. Future cyclotron systems : an industrial perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, N.R.; Dickie, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    The use of commercial cyclotron systems for the production of radioisotopes continues to grow on a world-wide scale. Improvements in technology have significantly increased the production capabilities of modem cyclotron-based isotope production facilities. In particular, the change to negative ion acceleration and new high power systems have resulted in dramatic improvements in reliability, increases in capacity, and decreases in personnel radiation dose. As more and more older machines are retired decisions regarding their replacement are made based on several factors including the market's potential and the cyclotron system's abilities. Taking the case of the recently upgraded TR30 cyclotron at TRIUMF/Nordion, we investigate the requirements industrial/medical users are likely to impose on future commercial cyclotron systems and the impact this will have on cyclotron technology by the end of the century. (author)

  10. Future cyclotron systems: An industrial perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, N.R.; Dickie, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    The use of commercial cyclotron systems for the production of radioisotopes continues to grow on a world-wide scale. Improvements in technology have significantly increased the production capabilities of modern cyclotron-based isotope production facilities. In particular, the change to negative ion acceleration and new high power systems have resulted in dramatic improvements in reliability, increases in capacity, and decreases in personnel radiation dose. As more and more older machines are retired, decisions regarding their replacement are made based on several factors including the market's potential and the cyclotron system's abilities. Taking the case of the recently upgraded TR30 cyclotron at TRIUMF/Nordion, the authors investigate the requirements industrial/medical users are likely to impose on future commercial cyclotron systems and the impact this will have on cyclotron technology by the end of the century

  11. A new cyclotron for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolber, G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the rationale for replacing the old AEG Compact Cyclotron (built in 1969/71) of the Institute for Radiology and Pathophysiology at the German Cancer Research Center by a 30 MeV H - /15 MeV D - cyclotron. A status report is followed by the scientific and technical reasoning as well as budgetary and organizational considerations. In the appendix we tried to explain the function of a cyclotron in a simple and comprehensive manner. (orig.) [de

  12. 40. anniversary of cyclotron of Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umerov, R.A.; Uzakov, J.M.; Gulamov, I.R.

    2004-01-01

    and manufacture of radioisotopes. The further reconstruction of the accelerator was required: intensity of a beam was increased up to 600 microampere. With this purpose were developed and made new plates, duants, target station. The technology of an irradiation of the targets was mastered maintaining the big thermal loadings. In 1991 on the basis of a Cyclotron U-150-II, were created Scientific Technological Enterprise (STE) 'TEZLATGICH' producing isotopes, basically Cobalt-57, and Joint Uzbek-German Enterprise 'TEZINKO' through which delivery of radioactive isotopes for foreign countries. The Cyclotron became independent division and bringing significant currency receipts to the state. STE 'TEZLATGICH' has increased the nomenclature of producing isotopes, such as Cd-109, Pd-103

  13. Advances in superconducting cyclotrons at MSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.; Antaya, T.; Au, R.

    1987-01-01

    Intensive work on superconducting cyclotrons began at MSU in late 1973 (a brief earlier study had occurred in the early 1960's) and continues vigorously at present. One large cyclotron, the ''K500'', has been operating for a number of years, a second, the ''K800'', is nearing completion, the first operating tests of its magnet having occurred at the time of the previous conference, and a third, the ''medical cyclotron'', is now also nearing completion with first operation of its magnet expected just after the present conference. These cyclotrons like other superconducting cyclotrons are all dramatically smaller than comparable room temperature machines; overall weight is typically about 1/20th of that of room temperature cyclotrons of the same energy. This large reduction in the quantities of materials is partially offset by added complexity, but finally, a net overall cost savings of 50 to 70 % typically results; as a consequence the superconducting cyclotron is widely viewed as the cyclotron of the future. The thirteen years of experience at MSU involving three of these cyclotrons, together with much important work at other laboratories, gives a rather clear view of the advantages and disadvantages of various design approaches including by now a rather significant period of long term evaluation. This paper reviews highlights of this program. (author)

  14. A new slow positron beam facility using a compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Masafumi

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, Sumitomo Heavy Industries became the first in the world to successfully produce a slow positron beam using a compact cyclotron. Slow positron beam production using an accelerator had mainly consisted of using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC). However, the newly developed system that uses a compact cyclotron enabled cost reduction, downsizing of equipment, production of a DC slow positron beam, a polarized slow positron beam, and other benefits. After that, a genuine slow positron beam facility was developed with the construction of compact cyclotron No.2, and beam production in the new facility has already been started. The features of this new slow positron beam facility are explained below. 1) It is the world's first compact slow positron beam facility using a compact cyclotron. 2) It is the only genuine slow positron beam facility in the world which incorporates the production and use of a slow positron beam in the design stage of the cyclotron. To use a slow positron beam for non-destructive detection of lattice defects in semiconductor material, it is necessary to convert the beam into ultra-short pulses of several hundreds of pico-seconds. Sumitomo Heavy Industries has devised a new short-pulsing method (i.e. an induction bunching method) that enables the conversion of a slow positron beam into short pulses with an optimum pulsing electric field change, and succeeded in converting a slow positron beam into short pulses using this method for the first time in the world. Non-destructive detection of lattice defects in semiconductor material using this equipment has already been started, and some information about the depth distribution, size, density, etc. of lattice defects has already been obtained. (J.P.N.)

  15. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  16. ECR heavy-ion source for the LBL 88-inch cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.; Kalnins, J.G.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    An Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heavy-ion source is under construction at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron. This source will produce very-high-charge-state heavy ions, such as 0 8 + and Ar 12 + , which will increase cyclotron energies by a factor of 2-4, up to A = 80. It is a two-stage source using room-temperature coils, a permanent-magnet sextupole, and a 6-9 GHz microwave system. Design features include adjustable first-to-second-stage plasma coupling, a variable second-stage mirror ratio, high-conductance radial pumping of the second stage, and a beam-diagnostic system. A remotely movable extraction electrode will optimize extraction efficiency. The project includes construction of a transport line and improvements to the cyclotron axial-injection system. The construction period is expected to be two years

  17. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, A.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Brodeur, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D.J.; Schwarz, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed “ion surfing” method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  18. Summary on electron cyclotron theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhof, E.

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented within the Theory Sessions of the conference clearly reflect the general trends of the research field. The growing use of Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW) for plasma heating and current drive in overdense plasmas goes hand in hand with an increased theoretical understanding of EBW excitation. While the expanding number of devices with powerful ECRH systems allowing ever more detailed experiments is reflected in the increased detail of modelling and consequent understanding of the experimental results. Apart from these general trends, some more fundamental contributions to the field of electron cyclotron wave propagation are highlighted. (author)

  19. Optimisation of the radiation shielding of medical cyclotrons using a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar

    2000-01-01

    Effective radiation shielding is imperative for safe operation of modern Medical Cyclotrons producing large activities of short-lived radioisotopes on a commercial basis. The optimal cyclotron shielding design demands a careful balance between the radiological, economical and often the sociopolitical factors. One is required to optimize the cost of radiation protection and the cost of radiological-health detriment. The cost of radiation protection depends explicitly on a) the nature of the radiation field produced by the cyclotron, b) the cyclotron operation condition, c) the cost of shielding material, d) the level of dose reduction, e) the projected net revenue from the sale of the radioisotopes, and f) the depreciation rate of the cyclotron facility. The Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used for a cost -benefit analysis of this problem. The GA is a mathematical technique that emulates the Darwinian Evolution paradigm. It is ideally suited to search for a global optimum in a large multi-dimensional solution space, having demonstrated strength compared to the classical analytical methods. Furthermore the GA method runs on a PC in a Windows environment. This paper highlights an interactive spreadsheet macro program for the cost benefit analysis of the optimize Medical Cyclotron shielding using a GA search engine. (author)

  20. Study of the activation of targets containing Mo for the production of 99Mo by the 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo nuclear reaction and the behaviour of the radionuclidic impurities of the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, Renata Correa

    1998-01-01

    The most used radioisotope in Nuclear Medicine is 99m Tc, in the 99 Mo- 99m Tc generator form. 99 Mo can be produced by several nuclear reactions in reactors and cyclotrons. The cyclotron production is not technically and economically viable. The production in the reactor can be done in two different ways: by the fission of 235 U and by 98 Mo(n,γ) 99 Mo reaction. A project for the production of 99 Mo by the activation of Mo and the preparation of gel type generators is under development at the 'Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares'. In the present work, the radionuclidic impurities produced in the activation of MOO 3 and MoZr gel were evaluated, and these represent the two possible ways of preparing the gel of MoZr. A target of metallic Mo was also studied. The radionuclidic purity of 99m Tc eluted from generators prepared in these ways was also measured and compared with the generators prepared with fission 99 Mo. The results showed that, by all the parameters analysed, the best way of preparing the generator of 99 Mo - 99m Tc is the irradiation of MOO 3 and further preparation of the gel and the generators. (author)

  1. Studies of electron cyclotron emission on text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandy, R.F.

    1990-07-01

    The Auburn University electron cyclotron emission (ECE) system has made many significant contributions to the TEXT experimental program during the past five years. Contributions include electron temperature information used in the following areas of study: electron cyclotron heating (ECH), pellet injection, and impurity/energy transport. Details of the role which the Auburn ECE system has played will now be discussed

  2. Cyclotrons for the production of radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics and design choices for modern cyclotrons. Cyclotrons can be used in 3 areas in the radioactive beam field: the production of high energy heavy ion beams for use in fragmentation, the spallation of targets with high energy protons, and the acceleration of radioactive beams from low energy to the MeV/u range. 16 refs., 6 figs

  3. Isochronous cyclotron for thermonuclear reactors driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenitskij, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    The main requirements to an accelerator as a part of an electronuclear power plant are considered. The range of the parameters of the accelerated proton and deuteron beams, for which the isochronous cyclotron is the most profitable, is proposed. An opportunity of using the cyclotron to drive the research reactors of various types is considered

  4. Wave fronts of electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous high-density magnetized plasma, the spatial properties of the wave fronts and ray trajectories of electromagnetic ordinary and extraordinary cyclotron harmonic waves are investigated. Those waves which are radiated from a local source are found to have wave fronts which are almost parallel to the magnetic field. Also, the reflective properties of the electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves are confirmed

  5. Technique for producing cardiac radionuclide motion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, I.C.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    Sequential frames of different portions of the cardiac cycle are gated into a minicomputer by using an EKG signal recorded onto digital tape simultaneously with imaging information. Serial display of these frames on the computer oscilloscope or projection of 35-mm half frames of these images provides a cardiac motion image with information content adequate for qualitatively assessing cardiac motion. (U.S.)

  6. Radionuclide production for PET with a linear electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shefer, R.E.; Hughey, B.J.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of linear electrostatic accelerator for the production of short-lived radionuclides for PET has been developed at Science Research Laboratory. The tandem cascade accelerator (TCA) is a low energy (3.7 MeV) proton and deuteron accelerator which can generate the four short-lived PET radionuclides in the quantities required for clinical use. The compact size, low weight, low power consumption and reduced radiation shielding requirements of the TCA result in a significant reduction in capital and operating costs when compared with higher energy cyclotron-based systems. Radioisotope target for the production of O-15, F-18, N-13 and C-11 have been designed specifically for use with the low energy TCA beam. A simple to use PC-based computer control system allows fully automated system operation and advanced scheduling of isotope production. Operating experience with the TCA and its PET radionuclide targets is described

  7. Recent development and progress of IBA cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeven, W., E-mail: Willem.Kleeven@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Abs, M., E-mail: Michel.Abs@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Delvaux, J.L., E-mail: Jean-Luc.Delvaux@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Forton, E., E-mail: Eric.Forton@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Jongen, Y., E-mail: Yves.Jongen@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Medeiros Romao, L., E-mail: Luis.MedeirosRomao@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nactergal, B., E-mail: Benoit.Nactergal@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nuttens, V., E-mail: Vincent.Nuttens@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Servais, T., E-mail: Thomas.Servais@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vanderlinden, T., E-mail: Thierry.Vanderlinden@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Zaremba, S., E-mail: Simon.Zaremba@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-12-15

    Several cyclotron development projects were recently realized by Ion Beam Applications S.A. (IBA). This contribution presents three of them: (i) the intensity enhancement of the Cyclone 30 cyclotron, a machine mainly used for the production of SPECT isotopes. This project is related with the increased demand for {sup 201}Tl because of the shortage of Mo/Tc generators from nuclear reactors, (ii) development of a new versatile multiple-particle K = 30 isotope-production cyclotron (the Cyclone 30XP) being able to accelerate H{sup -}, D{sup -} and also {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-beam of this cyclotron will allow the production of new therapeutic isotopes (e.g. {sup 211}At) and (iii) commissioning of the Cyclone 70 cyclotron installed for Arronax in France. This machine is similar to the C30XP but provides higher energy (K = 70) and allows research on new types of medical isotopes.

  8. Computer design of a compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing Wang; Huanfeng Hao; Qinggao Yao; Jinquan Zhang; Mingtao Song; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Smirnov, V.L.; Hongwei Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Here we present results of the computer design of the structural elements of a compact cyclotron by the example of HITFiL cyclotron selected as the driving accelerator that is under construction at the Institute of Modern Physics (Lanzhou, China). In the article a complex approach to modeling of the compact cyclotron, including calculation of electromagnetic fields of the structural elements and beam dynamics calculations, is described. The existing design data on the axial injection, magnetic, acceleration and extraction systems of the cyclotron are used as a starting point in the simulation. Some of the upgrades of the cyclotron structural elements were proposed, which led to substantial improvement of the beam quality and transmission

  9. Cyclotron-Resonance-Maser Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesar, A.; Lei, L.; Dikhtyar, V.; Korol, M.; Jerby, E.

    1999-01-01

    The cyclotron-resonance-maser (CRM) array [1] is a radiation source which consists of CRM elements coupled together under a common magnetic field. Each CRM-element employs a low-energy electron-beam which performs a cyclotron interaction with the local electromagnetic wave. These waves can be coupled together among the CRM elements, hence the interaction is coherently synchronized in the entire array. The implementation of the CRM-array approach may alleviate several technological difficulties which impede the development of single-beam gyro-devices. Furthermore, it proposes new features, such as the phased-array antenna incorporated in the CRM-array itself. The CRM-array studies may lead to the development of compact, high-power radiation sources operating at low-voltages. This paper introduces new conceptual schemes of CRM-arrays, and presents the progress in related theoretical and experimental studies in our laboratory. These include a multi-mode analysis of a CRM-array, and a first operation of this device with five carbon-fiber cathodes

  10. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in an axisymmetric tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Tapia, C.; Beltran-Plata, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Dept. de Fisica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The neoclassical transport theory is applied to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in an axisymmetric tokamak in the low-collisionality regime. The tokamak ordering is used to obtain a system of equations that describe the dynamics of the plasma where the nonlinear ponderomotive (PM) force due to high-power radio-frequency (RF) waves is included. The PM force is produced around an electron cyclotron resonant surface at a specific poloidal location. The ECCD efficiency is analyzed in the cases of first and second harmonics (for different impinging angles of the RF waves) and it is validated using experimental parameter values from TCV and T-10 tokamaks. The results are in agreement with those obtained by means of Green's function techniques. (authors)

  11. Cyclotron spectra from inhomogeneous accretion columns. II. Polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.; Chanmugam, G.

    1989-01-01

    Circularly and linearly polarized radiation from inhomogeneous cyclotron emission regions with uniform magnetic field and temperature but different electron density profiles are studied. Calculations show that the inhomogeneous models generally produce larger polarization for low harmonics and smaller polarization for high harmonics compared to the homogeneous models. Polarization light curves for different inhomogeneous models with a wide variety of parameters are presented, providing handy theoretical results to compare with observations. The observed polarization light curves of ST LMi, EF Eri, and BL Hydri are fitted using an inhomogeneous model for the first time, and good fits are obtained, supporting the hypothesis that the cyclotron emission regions of AM Her systems have a complicated structure. 37 refs

  12. Permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with remote window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma has been used in conjunction with a solid metal sputter target for Cu deposition over 200 mm diameters. The goal is to develop a deposition system and process suitable for filling submicron, high-aspect ratio ULSI features. The system uses a permanent magnet for creation of the magnetic field necessary for ECR, and is significantly more compact than systems equipped with electromagnets. A custom launcher design allows remote microwave injection with the microwave entrance window shielded from the copper flux. When microwaves are introduced at an angle with respect to the plasma, high electron densities can be produced with a plasma frequency significantly greater than the electron cyclotron frequency. Copper deposition rates of 1000 A/min have been achieved

  13. Introduction to ECR [electron cyclotron resonance] sources in electrostatic machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source technology has developed rapidly since the original pioneering work of R. Geller and his group at Grenoble in the early 1970s. These ion sources are capable of producing intense beams of highly charged positive ions and are used extensively for cyclotron injection, linac injection, and atomic physics research. In this paper, the possible use of ECR heavy-ion sources in the terminals of electrostatic machines is discussed. The basic concepts of ECR sources are reviewed in the next section using the ORNL source as a model. The possible advantages of ECR sources over conventional negative ion injection and foil stripping are discussed in Section III. The last section describes the possible installation of an ECR source in a large machine such as the HHIRF 25-MV Pelletron. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Gas breakdown at cyclotron resonance with a submillimeter laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.P.; Temkin, R.J.; Lax, B.

    1976-01-01

    A pulsed 496-μm CH 3 F laser is used to produce gas breakdown in He at pressures between 1 and 300 Torr in an intense longitudinal magnetic field. Breakdown is detected by the observation of visible light when the electron cyclotron frequency (eB/m) equals the laser frequency, which occurs at B=216 kG for lambda=496 μm. At the lowest helium pressures and near cyclotron resonance, the focused laser intensity of 40 kW/cm 2 gives rise to very large electron heating rates, well beyond the limit of validity of conventional equilibrium breakdown theory. The observed result is an intensity-dependent resonant linewidth, much larger than predicted by equilibrium theories

  15. Studies of radioisotope production with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production of radioisotopes to be used mainly for nuclear medicine and biology is studied with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA. A production method of no-carrier-added {sup 186}Re with the {sup 186}W(p,n){sup 186}Re reaction has been developed; this product may be used as a therapeutic agent in radioimmunotherapy due to the adequate nuclear and chemical properties. For the study of the function of plants using a positron-emitter two-dimensional imaging system, a simple method of producing the positron emitter {sup 18}F in water was developed by taking advantage of a highly-energetic {alpha} beam from the AVF cyclotron. (author)

  16. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  17. Preparing a suitable solid target for generating copper-64 using a biomedical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, Charmaine; Cryer, David; Chan, Sun; Asad, Ali; Fleming, Adam; Hubble, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Radiopharmaceutical research at SCGH has been advancing in the production of copper-64, a promising radionuclide for PET. Production has commenced using a self-manufactured solid target with alBA 18/9 cyclotron, via the 6 4 N i(p,n) 6 4 C u reaction pathway. One aspect of the project has been the preparation of a suitable solid target for irradiation. The chosen production method involves electrolysis of a solution of nickel ammonium sulphate in a self-manufactured electroplating cell, using a gold disk as the cathode for deposition of nickel metal. Various defects in the nickel surface were observed ∼ including cracks, formation of pits and inclusions, loose powder-like plating, lack of metallic lustre and lifting of the plated nickel. Several variables were investigated - including adjustment of the anode-cathode distance, anode composition, solution composition, and voltage/current settings. A suitable method that produced acceptable plating was achieved - the surface was then analysed to ensure there were no underlying defects. Three analytical techniques were used - AFM, SEM and optical profilometry. Two disks were ana lysed (approx. 3 0 m g of natNi plated). The depth of plating, evenness of plating and surface uniformity were of particular interest. Conclusions: Analysis revealed that the surface was not completely uniform (thinner at edges, 'well' in centre, with inclusions on the surface more prevalent than pitting), and required more nickel to be plated to reach optimum thickness. Final target specifications are still being optimised, however test irradiation of a solid target ( 3 1 n ickel, I l0 m g) proved that a sound solid target can be reliably produced and irradiated.

  18. Status and perspectives for the Pd-103 radioactive seeds production at the cyclotron IFIN-HH from Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudu, D.; Popa, V.; Racolta, P.M.; Tetcu, N.; Voiculescu, Dana

    2001-01-01

    Historically, 103 Pb, a short-lived isotope for permanent implant treatment of early stage prostate cancer, was generated via the 102 Pd(n,γ) 103 Pd reaction which relied on the availability of 1% naturally abundant 102 Pd in an enriched form and its moderately high neutron capture cross section. For the last 12 years, the accelerator production method for 103 Pd has been based on the irradiation of the rhodium metal with rather low energy protons via the reaction 103 Rh(p,n) 103 Pd. Big corporations from USA operate more than 10 dedicated accelerators to produce this nuclide. The prostate cancer market with 180,000 new cases reported annually justifies the effort for this radionuclide production. Recently, a manufacture in Europe also brought the USA patented type of 103 Pd seed implants on the world market. Our interest for this radioisotope production was started in 2000, as a result of the demand of two big hospitals from Bucharest and the opportunity to participate in a research programme (333-F2-RC 832) co-ordinated by the IAEA in Vienna. The U-120 Cyclotron, made in 1956 and brought from Russia, was quite a reliable machine. The accelerator is a classical cyclotron with adjustable energy. Now at the level of our technology, we can maintain it by ourselves and operate it quite independently. The experiments for the first year were focused on obtaining homemade data on cross-section, thick target yields and possible contaminants for the nuclear reaction 103 Rh (p,n) 103 Pb in the proton energy region 5-14 MeV. The experiments were performed at our Van de Graaff HV Tandem FN 15 accelerator (8 MV on terminal) by using proton beams up to 14 MeV with a current intensity of 100 nA. Design and adaptation of a dedicated beam line at IFIN-HH Cyclotron for the 103 production was a priority in our work planning for the first year

  19. Water, soil, crops and radionuclides. Studies on the behavior of radionuclides in the terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    In order to predict the migration of artificially-produced radionuclides into a human body and its radiation dose rates of human body and to decrease the exposed radiation doses of human body, the behavior of radionuclides in the environment must be elucidated. In National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), the environmental radioecological research group of Nakaminato Laboratory for Marine Radioecology has progressed the survey and research on the behavior of artificially-produced radionuclides in the terrestrial environment. This article describes the research results (the radioactivity of water, soil, and crops) made so far at Nakaminato Laboratory for Marine Radioecology. (M.H.)

  20. Experimental monitoring of ozone production in a PET cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanibellato, L.; Cicoria, G.; Pancaldi, D.; Boschi, S.; Mostacci, D.; Marengo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ozone produced from radiolytic processes was investigated as a possible health hazard in the working environment at the University Hospital 'S.Orsola-Malpighi' PET facility. Intense radiation fields can generate ozone, known to be the most toxic gas produced by ionizing radiation around a particle accelerator. To evaluate ozone concentration in air, two different measurement campaigns were conducted with passive diffusion detectors. Comparison of the results with the concentration limits recommended by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) demonstrated that ozone poses no health hazard to workers around a biomedical cyclotron.

  1. The new solid target system at UNAM in a self-shielded 11 MeV cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Gaspar-Carcamo, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, V.; Flores-Moreno, A.; Trejo-Ballado, F.; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    A dual beam line (BL) self-shielded RDS 111 cyclotron for radionuclide production was installed at the School of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 2001. One of the BL’s was upgraded to Eclipse HP (Siemens) in 2008 and the second BL was recently upgraded (June 2011) to the same version with the option for the irradiation of solid targets for the production of metallic radioisotopes.

  2. Nuclear data relevant to the production and application of diagnostic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    The types of nuclear data and their quality required in the production and application of diagnostic radionuclides are outlined. The radioactive decay data determine the suitability of a radioisotope for in vivo tracer studies, both from the imaging and internal radiation dose considerations. The nuclear reaction cross section data allow optimisation of production routes. Both reactors and cyclotrons are used for production purposes. The nuclear data needed in the two cases and their present status are discussed. Special attention is paid to radionuclides suitable for emission tomography (PET and SPECT). The controversy about reactor vs cyclotron production of the widely used sup 9 sup 9 Mo/ sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc generator system is discussed. Some special considerations in cyclotron production of radionuclides are outlined. The need of accurate data near reaction thresholds, the constraint of available particles and their energies at a small cyclotron, the influence of increasing incident particle energy, and the formation of isomeric impurities are discussed in detail. The role of nuclear model calculations in predicting unknown data is considered. (author)

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1 (Hungary); Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-01-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  5. Channeling experiments at IPNE Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, F; Dumitru, M; Ivan, A [Cyclotron Laboratory, Institute of Atomic Physics, Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-76900 Bucharest, P.O.Box MG-6, (Romania)

    1992-01-01

    Channeling experiments have been performed at the I.P.N.E Cyclotron using a 3 MeV alpha beam. A slide system cut the beam up to 5 minutes spatial resolution with a maximum 60 nA beam current on the target. The two-axis goniometer, fully computer-controlled, moves the target, a silicon wafer, with 2.5 minute resolution, while an alpha particle sensitive solid state detector, monitors the backscattered particle fluence. In the first stage, channeling appears to be a simple, fast and reliable method for precise monocrystal orientation. A reduction of the host yield by a factor of two allowed impurities and defects to be studied. (Author).

  6. Cyclotron resonance in bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E A; Jiang, Z; Tung, L-C; Schwartz, M E; Takita, M; Wang, Y-J; Kim, P; Stormer, H L

    2008-02-29

    We present the first measurements of cyclotron resonance of electrons and holes in bilayer graphene. In magnetic fields up to B=18 T, we observe four distinct intraband transitions in both the conduction and valence bands. The transition energies are roughly linear in B between the lowest Landau levels, whereas they follow square root[B] for the higher transitions. This highly unusual behavior represents a change from a parabolic to a linear energy dispersion. The density of states derived from our data generally agrees with the existing lowest order tight binding calculation for bilayer graphene. However, in comparing data to theory, a single set of fitting parameters fails to describe the experimental results.

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    , constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early cyclotrons, accelerating protons to 80,000 volts using less than 1,000 volts on a semi-circular accelerating electrode, now called the ''dee''. Following the discovery by J. D. Cockcroft and E. T. S. Walton of how to produce larger currents at higher voltages, Lawrence constructed the first two-dee 27-Inch (69-cm) Cyclotron, which produced protons and deuterons of 4.8 MeV. The 27-Inch Cyclotron was used extensively in early investigations of nuclear reactions involving neutrons and artificial radioactivity. In 1939, working with William Brobeck, Lawrence constructed the 60-Inch (150-cm) Cyclotron, which accelerated deuterons to 19 MeV. It was housed in the Crocker Laboratory, where scientists first made transmutations of some elements, discovered several transuranic elements, and created hundreds of radioisotopes of known elements. At the Crocker Laboratory the new medical modality called nuclear medicine was born, which used radioisotopes for diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. In 1939 Lawrence was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, and later element 103 was named ''Lawrencium'' in his honor.

  8. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  9. Neutron spectra due 13N production in a PET cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente, J.A.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Lacerda, M.A.S.; Fonseca, T.C.F.; Faria, F.P.; Silva, T.A. da

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during 13 N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1 MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for 18 F production in a previous work. - Highlights: • MCNPX code was used to estimate the neutron spectra in a PET cyclotron. • Neutrons were estimated when 13 N is produced. • Neutron spectra show evaporation and room-return neutrons. • Calculated H*(10) were compared with measured H*(10)

  10. All-magnetic extraction for cyclotron beam reacceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-07-22

    An isochronous cyclotron can be modified to provide an initial electron stripping stage, a complete acceleration of the stripped ions through the cyclotron to a first energy state, means for returning the ions to an intermediate cyclotron orbit through a second stripping stage, further acceleration of the now higher energy stripped ions through the cyclotron to their final energy, and final extraction of the ions from the cyclotron. (auth)

  11. Prospects for the methods of radionuclide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Dmitriev, S.N.

    2014-01-01

    Methods of radionuclide production for the nuclear-medicine purposes are described. In a budget approach, the application of low-energy accelerators is especially advantageous. Intense flux of bremsstrahlung at electron accelerators or high-current cyclotron beams of alpha particles must supply a great yield for many isotopes. The choice of a target material and of the projectile energy provides enough variation for concrete species formation. The innovating procedures are here proposed for optimizing of methods, for instance, application of the noble-gas target for production and transport of activities. The known and new variants of the 'generator' scheme are discussed. Many isotopes are listed as promising in the context of the therapeutic and theragnostic applications. Among them are isotopes/isomers emitting soft radiation for the selective and careful body treatment, also the positron emitters for PET, and the halogen and alkali-metal species convenient for chemical separation.

  12. NORTICA - a new code for cyclotron analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelov, D.; Johnson, D.; Marti, F.

    2001-01-01

    The new package NORTICA (Numerical ORbit Tracking In Cyclotrons with Analysis) of computer codes for beam dynamics simulations is under development at NSCL. The package was started as a replacement for the code MONSTER developed in the laboratory in the past. The new codes are capable of beam dynamics simulations in both CCF (Coupled Cyclotron Facility) accelerators, the K500 and K1200 superconducting cyclotrons. The general purpose of this package is assisting in setting and tuning the cyclotrons taking into account the main field and extraction channel imperfections. The computer platform for the package is Alpha Station with UNIX operating system and X-Windows graphic interface. A multiple programming language approach was used in order to combine the reliability of the numerical algorithms developed over the long period of time in the laboratory and the friendliness of modern style user interface. This paper describes the capability and features of the codes in the present state

  13. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  14. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-01-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes

  15. 10 GHz ECRIS for Warsaw Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Sudlitz, K

    1999-01-01

    Cusp type, 10 GHz ECRIS has been built and tested earlier. For obtaining intensive beams, more relevant for cyclotron, cusp geometry has been replaced by hexapole. Discharge chamber (stainless steel, 50 mm diameter, 250 mm long) is an extension of a coaxial line, feeding RF (9,6 GHz, up to 200 W) to the plasma. The NdFeB hexapole (0,52 T on the surface) has been used. The axial magnetic field is created by water cooled coils. The axial injection line dedicated to K160 isochronous heavy ion cyclotron has been constructed. The line consists of Glaser lenses, double focusing magnet, solenoid and mirror type inflector. The system provides sufficient transmission of the beam from ECR ion source to the firsts orbits of the cyclotron for m/q ranging from 7 to 2. After successful initial tests which were done in July 1997 the ECRIS serves as an external source for Warsaw Cyclotron.

  16. Application of superconductivity in cyclotron construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews major concepts and design features of the new class of cyclotrons which use superconducting coils to provide main magnet excitation. The discussion begins with a brief historical review tracing the evolution of these ''superconducting'' cyclotrons and the impact of this application of superconductivity in pushing back traditional cyclotron construction limits. This is followed by a review of the principal phenomena which come into play to set new limits on the operating regime, and the nature of these limits, some of which arise from orbit properties and some of which result from construction intricacies in the coil and in the rf system. Conclusions anticipate a future widely encompassing role in the application of superconductivity to cyclotron

  17. Progress report: Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of the progress report brings out the scientific and technical activities of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta during the year 1999. This includes brief review of the various R and D activities of the Centre and outside users of the cyclotron from the universities and other research institutes. The operational activities of the cyclotron with ECR ion sources, accelerator oriented research activities, activities on detector, target and electronics are reported. The activities of the Computer and Informatics group are described. The status report of the ongoing projects is also provided. The main activities of the superconducting cyclotron project, radioactive ion beam project, heavy ion experimental facility, advanced computational facility, recovery and analysis of helium from hot springs and material science research are described

  18. Electron cyclotron emission imaging in tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsat, T.; Domier, C.W.; Kong, X. Y.; Liang, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Tobias, B. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Classen, I.G.J.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the recent history and latest developments of the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic technique, wherein electron temperature is measured in magnetically confined plasmas with two-dimensional spatial resolution. The key enabling technologies for this technique are the

  19. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  20. Cyclotron method for heavy ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gikal, B.N.; Gul'bekyan, G.G.; Kutner, V.B.; Oganesyan, R.Ts.

    1984-01-01

    Studies on heavy ion beams in a wide range of masses (up to uranium) and energies disclose essential potential opportunities for solution of both fundamental scientific and significant economical problems. A cyclotron method for heavy ion acceleration is considered. Development of low and medium energy heavy ion accelerators is revealed. The design of a complex comprising two isochronous cyclotrons which is planned to be constrdcted 1n the JINR is described. The cyclotron complex includes the U-400 and the U-400 M cyclotrons and it is intended for acceleration of both 35-20 MeV/nucleon superheavy ions such as Xe-U and 120 MeV/nucleon light ions. Certain systems of the accelerators are described. Prospects of the U-400 and the U-400 M development are displayed

  1. Production of Cobalt-57 from irradiation of proton beams on nickel at CV-28 cyclotron of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Liliane Landini Mota; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    1996-01-01

    The 57 Co is produced at the Cyclotron of IPEN-CNEN/SP through the irradiation of natural Nickel with a protons beam of 24 MeV energy. The aim of this work was to measure the thick target production yield of 57 Co and of its principal radionuclide impurities and the determination of the excitation functions of the nuclear reactions on Ni, to evaluate the best conditions for the 57 Co production. The technique used was of the stacked-foil, of Ni, Cu and Al, being the two latter utilized as current and energy monitors of the protons beam, respectively. The thick target production yield of 57 Co, through the somatory of indirect and direct reaction, 11,31 days after E.O.B., was 905,76 kBq/μA.h (24,48 μCi/μA.h) and only by indirect reaction was 174,64 kBq/μA.h (4,72 μCi/μA.h). (author)

  2. [Preparation, quality control and thyroid molecule imaging of solid-target based radionuclide ioine-124].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Wang, F; Guo, X Y; Li, L Q; Duan, D B; Liu, Z B; Yang, Z

    2018-04-18

    To provide useful information for the further production and application of this novel radio-nuclide for potential clinical application. 124 Te (p,n) 124 I nuclide reaction was used for the 124 I production. Firstly, the target material, 124 TeO 2 (200 mg) and Al2O3 (30 mg) mixture, were compressed into the round platinum based solid target by tablet device. HM-20 medical cyclotron was applied to irradiate the solid target slice for 6-10 h with helium and water cooling. Then, the radiated solid target was placed for 12 h (overnight) to decay the radioactive impurity; finally, 124 I was be purified by dry distillation using 1 mL/min nitrogen for about 6 hours and radiochemical separation methods. Micro-PET imaging studies were performed to investigate the metabolism properties and thyroid imaging ability of 124 I.After 740 kBq 124 I was injected intravenously into the tail vein of the normal mice, the animals were imaged with micro-PET and infused with CT. The micro-PET/CT infusion imaging revealed actual state 124 I's metabolism in the mice. It was been successfully applied for 200 mg 124 TeO 2 plating by the tablet device on the surface of platinum. It showed smooth, dense surface and without obviously pits and cracks. The enriched 124 Te target was irradiated for 6 to 10 hours at about 12.0 MeV with 20 μA current on HM-20 cyclotron. Then 370-1 110 MBq 124 I could be produced on the solid target after irradiation and 370-740 MBq high specific activity could be collected afterdry distillation separation and radio-chemical purification. 124 I product was finally dissolved in 0.01 mol/L NaOH for the future distribution. The gamma spectrum of the produced 124 I-solution showed that radionuclide purity was over 80.0%. The micro-PET imaging of 124 I in the normal mice exhibited the thyroid and stomach accumulations and kidney metabolism, the bladder could also be clearly visible, which was in accordance with what was previously reported. To the best of our knowledge

  3. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  4. Progress report on the Milan superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acerbi, E.; Alessandria, F.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bellomo, G.; Birattari, C.; Bosotti, A.; Broggi, F.; Cortesi, G.; DeMartinis, C.; Fabrici, E.; Ferrari, A.; Giove, D.; Giussani, A.; Giussani, W.; Michelato, P.; Pagani, C.; Rivoltella, G.; Rossi, L.; Serafini, L.; Sussetto, A.; Torri, V.; Varisco, G.; Cuttone, G.; Raia, G.; Kai, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the construction of the K800 superconducting cyclotron at the University of Milan underway since February 1981. The delay in the construction of the new building and a defect of the weldings of the helium vessel have caused a shift in the project schedule of about two years. Currently, the cyclotron magnet and the cryogenic plant have been completed and installed. First operation of the magnet and magnetic field mapping are to begin shortly

  5. NIRS-Chiba isochronous cyclotron 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, H.; Kumamoto, Y.; Yamada, T.; Hiramoto, T.

    1976-02-01

    The cyclotron facility installed according to the recommendation of the Atomic Energy Committee of Japan is used for neutron therapy and production of short-lived radioisotopes. Construction on the facility was started in the autumn of 1972, and completed in March 1974. Described are the following: beam transport and the experimental hall, machine research and improvement, machine time sharing and the particles and energies, characteristics of the cyclotron, and facility personnel. (auth.)

  6. Cyclotron beam dynamic simulations in MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamysheva, G.A.; Karamyshev, O.V.; Lepkina, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    MATLAB is useful for beam dynamic simulations in cyclotrons. Programming in an easy-to-use environment permits creation of models in a short space of time. Advanced graphical tools of MATLAB give good visualization features to created models. The beam dynamic modeling results with an example of two different cyclotron designs are presented. Programming with MATLAB opens wide possibilities of the development of the complex program, able to perform complete block of calculations for the design of the accelerators

  7. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  8. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  9. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  10. Radionuclide cinematography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.E.; Sigel, H.; Geffers, H.; Bitter, F.; Meyer, G.; Kampmann, H.; Stauch, M.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide cinematography is described as a procedure making use of radiation-level variations above the heart after equipartitioning of sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin in the blood pool. Regional ventricular and vestibular variations are phase-shifted. This procedure permits delineation of aneurysmas with interphasic course, cicatrization of the cardiac wall not producing any cyclical variation. The study included normal subjects and 16 patients with full course infarction. Characteristic disturbances of motility distribution were found in all cases of scarred or aneurysmic alterations in the frontal and side walls of the left ventricle. The procedure was unable to detect two small infarction scars on the rear wall. The possibility of using radionuclide cinematography to prove coronary insufficiency as well as a comparison with other methods are discussed

  11. Repair of radiation damage caused by cyclotron-produced neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, B.I.

    1979-01-01

    Hall et al. present experimental data on repair of sublethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 60 Co γ rays. Hall and Kraljevic present experimental data on repair of potentially lethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 210 kVp x rays. These results of Hall et al. are very difficult to explain from basic concepts in radiobiology. Contrary to Rossi, these data do not support his thesis that repair of radiation damage is dose-dependent and linear energy transfer independent. Nor do these results meet the expectations of multitarget-single hit theory which would require dose-independent repair equal to n. The observation of the same extrapolation number for neutrons and for x rays is also surprising. From the point of view of radiotherapy, the doses of interest are about 140 rad for neutrons and about 300 rad for x rays. There are no data for repair of potentially lethal damage below 800 rad for x rays and 400 rad for neutrons. The difference in survival between single and split dose is negligible up to a total of about 600 rad of x rays or of neutrons. These data of Hall et al. therefore have little significance to radiotherapists and are an enigma to radiobiologists

  12. External injection systems applied in modern cyclotrons designed and manufactured in NIIEFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, P.V.; Vasilchenko, I.N.; Veresov, O.L.; Gavrish, Yu.N.; Grigorenko, S.V.; Zuev, Yu.V.; Kozienko, M.T.; Mudrolyubov, V.G.; Strokach, A.P.; Tsygankov, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    The main parameters and design features of the external injection systems applied in modern cyclotrons designed and manufactured in NIIEFA and intended for production of radionuclides for medicine are presented. The use of these external injection systems instead of a traditional internal source allows the current of the accelerated beam to be significantly increased and the in-leakage of the working gas to the acceleration chamber to be reduced, which results in reduced beam losses in the process of acceleration and lower equipment activation.

  13. Light ions cyclotron bombardment to simulate fast neutron radiation damage in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, E.; Lucki, G.; Aguiar, D.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability and limitations of the use of cyclotron light ions bombardment to simulate the effects of the neutron irradiation are presented. Light ions with energies of about 10 MeV are capable to produce homogeneous damage in specimens suitable for measuring bulk mechanical properties although their low damage rate of 10 -5 dpa.sec -1 limit the dose range to a few dpa. On the other hand, cyclotron alpha particle implantation provides a fast and convenient way of introducing helium with a minimum of side effects so that we can take advantage of this technique to get better understanding of the mechanism by which this insoluble gas produces high temperature embrittlement. Some experimental details such as dimensions and cooling techniques are described. Finally a description of the infrastructure for cyclotron alpha particle implantation and a creep-test facility of the Division of Radiation Damage at IPEN-CNEN/SP are presented. (Author) [pt

  14. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  15. Ion-cyclotron-resonance- and Fourier-transform-ion-cyclotron-resonance spectroscopy: technology and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luederwald, I.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and technology of Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance and Fourier-Transform-Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Spectroscopy are described. The method can be applied to studies of ion/molecule reactions in gas phase, to obtain thermodynamic data as gas phase acidity or basicity, proton and electron affinity, and to establish reaction mechanisms and ion structures. (orig.) [de

  16. A national medical cyclotron facility: report to the Minister of Health by the Medical Cyclotron Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Research and training in nuclear medicine in Australia are both limited by the lack of a medical cyclotron facility. The Committee recommends the establishment of a national medical cyclotron to provide a supply of short-lived radioisotopes for research in relevant fields of medicine, and for diagnostic use in nuclear medicine

  17. Electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guest, Gareth

    2009-01-01

    As nuclear fusion becomes an increasingly important potential energy source in these times of global oil and energy crises, the development of technologies that can lead to the realization of this virtually inexhaustible source of energy takes on ever greater urgency. Over the past decade electron cyclotron heating has undergone a significant maturation and has emerged as an essential component of the major approaches to achieving controlled nuclear fusion. The gyrotron, first developed in the Soviet Union, has made it possible to employ ECH in large tokamak and stellarator fusion devices by providing megawatts of microwave power at frequencies above 100 GHz. A contemporary VGT-8110 gyrotron, for example, shown here with Kevin Felch and Pat Cahalan of Communications and Power Industries, is capable of delivering 10 second pulses of 1 MW of power at 110 GHz. The present monograph addresses the ECH physics critical to the international fusion reactor experiment, ITER, but also presents the fundamentals of ECH that are essential to its successful implementation in applications that range from active experiments in planetary magnetospheres to commercial plasma sources for the manufacture of computer chips. The book seeks to convey the physics of ECH in an orderly and coherent fashion to a professional audience by presenting the basic theoretical foundations and then using the theory to interpret a number of established experimental results. Exercises are included to aid the reader in making the theory more concrete. (orig.)

  18. Cyclotron tubes - a theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourier, G

    1980-12-01

    The introduction presents a general discussion of electron cyclotron masers (ECM): resonance, relativistic effects, elementary quantum aspects, the classical relativistic bunching and the optimum value of the electric field. The practical structure - in particular that of the gyrotron - is specified only insofar as it is useful for understanding the following chapters. The main parameters are discussed. Section 2 develops a nonlinear adiabatic or orbital theory of electron motion which alleviates calculations considerably while keeping numerical errors low enough for many practical cases. Its results are compared to a rigorous integration in one case. Other cases show the importance of the electric field profile inside the resonant cavity. Section 3 is devoted to space charge phenomena, and, for the most part, to a linear theory with space charge. In its limited range of validity (low-energy electrons), the theory indicates a strong impact of space charge for low a.c. fields and exhibits a pure beam instability. Section 4 is devoted to circuit equations with emphasis on the special features of cavities consisting of a long waveguide near cutoff. The conclusion indicates some trends of gyrotron development and corresponding theoretical problems.

  19. TORCAPP: time-dependent cyclotron orbit calculation and plotting package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, L.B.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1979-11-01

    TORCAPP calculates the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields with time as the independent variable, and produces a variety of printed and plotted output of results. Finite-size beam behavior is studied conveniently by following groups of particles which define an appropriate phase space area. Since time is the independent variable, general motion in the near-median-plane region may be followed. This includes, for example, loops not enclosing the origin and strongly radial motions. Thus, TORCAPP is particularly useful for injection studies for isochronous cyclotrons, or other devices with near-median-plane charged particle motion

  20. Elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides produced in installations authorized on the account of the Public Health Code - ASN guide nr 18 - Release of the 26/01/2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document aims at specifying the modalities of application of a decision taken by the ASN in January 2008 regarding the technical rules which the elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides must comply with. First, it describes the objective of the 'waste zoning' concept. Then, it addresses the management of contaminated wastes: general rules, wastes contaminated by radionuclides of very short period (less than 100 days) and of period longer than 100 days, and the management of wastes with 'hybrid risks'. It addresses the management of contaminated effluents: radioactive liquid effluent with a period either shorter or longer than 100 days, radioactive gaseous effluents. It addresses the warehousing conditions (premise design, exploitation rules). The other parts deal with the convention between several establishments within a same site (notably in the case of nuclear medicine departments), with the management plan, and with the agenda for the implementation of the ASN decision

  1. Foodstuffs, radionuclides, monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisikov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide contamination of water and food stuffs as a result of the Chernobyl accident and permissible contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs are considered in brief. A method of radiation monitoring of food stuffs and water for the radionuclides mentioned is suggested. The method permits employment of the simplest and cheapest radiometric equipment for analysis, whole the high degree of radionuclide concentration using fiber sorbents permits using the instrumentation without expensive shields against external radiation. A description of ion-exchange unit for radiation monitoring of liquid samples of food stuffs or water, is provided [ru

  2. Generator for radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisner, P.S.; Forrest, T.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radionuclide generator of the kind in which a parent radionuclide, adsorbed on a column of particulate material, generates a daughter radionuclide which is periodically removed from the column. This invention is particularly concerned with technetium generators using single collection vials. The generator comprises a column, a first reservoir for the eluent, a second reservoir to contain the volume of eluent required for a single elution, and means connecting the first reservoir to the second reservoir and the second reservoir to the column. Such a generator is particularly suitable for operation by vacuum elution

  3. Research and development studies into isotope production using the Harwell Variable Energy Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Bett, R.; Cuninghame, J.G.; Goodall, J.A.B.; Hill, J.I.S.; Sims, H.E.; Willis, H.H.

    1979-11-01

    Many useful radioisotopes can be produced by means of the Harwell Chemistry Division's Variable Energy Cyclotron. This report describes the preliminary preparation of a number of these neutron deficient isotopes (i.e. F18, S38, Fe52, Sr82-Rb82, Nb92m, Rh99, I123, Xe125, Tl201, Pu236, Pu237). Recently a targetry development programme has been initiated to optimise isotope yields. Gas, liquid and solid targets have been designed that can be quickly and safely removed from the cyclotron beam-line so that the target activity can be rapidly processed after the irradiation, if necessary. (author)

  4. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doster, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18

  5. Neutron radiography by using JSW baby cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Yojiro

    1995-01-01

    At present, JSW baby cyclotrons are mostly used for the production of the radioisotopes for medical use. The attempt to use this baby cyclotron for neutron radiography began already in 1981. The feasibility of the neutron radiography for the explosives in metallic cases which are used for H1 rockets was investigated. In 1983, it was shown that the neutron radiography by using the baby cyclotron in Muroran Works, Japan Steel Works, Ltd. was able to be carried out as a routine work. Since then, the nondestructive inspection by neutron radiography has been performed for rocket pyrotechnic articles, and contributed to heighten their reliability. Further, the radiography by using fast neutrons was developed and put to practical use for recent large H2 rockets. The JSW baby cyclotron BC 168 which has been used for neutron radiography can accelerate 16 MeV protons or 8 MeV deuterons up to 50 μA. The principle of thermal neutron radiography is the generation of fast neutrons by irradiating a Be target with the proton beam accelerated by a baby cyclotron, the moderation of the fast neutrons, the formation of the thermal neutron flux of uniform distribution with a collimator, the thermal neutron flux hitting the Gd plate in a film cassette through an object, and the exposure of an X-ray film to electrons from the Gd plate. Fast neutron radiography apparatus, and commercial neutron radiography are described. (K.I.)

  6. 83-inch cyclotron research program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, W.C.

    1983-07-01

    In June of 1960 the US Atomic Energy Commission authorized the construction of a modern variable energy cyclotron facility at The University of Michigan to be used for research in nuclear spectroscopy. The Legislature of the State of Michigan made available funds for construction of a building to house the 83-inch cyclotron and auxiliary equipment as well as the University's remodeled 42-inch cyclotron. The research program centered around the 83-inch cyclotron was funded by the AEC and its successors, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), from September 1964 through March 1977. The program represented a continuation of the research effort using the 42-inch cyclotron facility which had been supported continuously by the AEC since February 1950. This final report to DOE briefly describes the research facility, the research program, and highlights the principal accomplishments of the effort. It begins with a historical note to place this effort within the context of nuclear physics research in the Department of Physics of the University of Michigan

  7. Recycling and recommissioning a used biomedical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, L.R.; Ramsey, F.; Armbruster, J.; Montenero, M.

    2001-01-01

    Biomedical Cyclotrons have a very long life, but there eventually comes a time when any piece of equipment has to be retired from service. From time to time, we have the opportunity to help find new homes for used cyclotrons which, with relatively modest overhaul and refurbishment, can have many additional years of productive service, and thus represent a very valuable asset. The reasons for retiring a cyclotron vary, of course, but in our experience it is often due to an institution's changing priorities or changing needs, rather than the due to any fundamental age-related deficiency in the cyclotron itself. In this paper we will report on the relocation and successful restoration of a used TCC CP-42 cyclotron, which was moved from M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston to Denton, Texas in early 1998, where it is presently being used for R and D and commercial production of biomedical isotopes. Ownership of the machine has been transferred to the University of North Texas; facility, manpower, and operational resources are provided by International Isotopes, Inc

  8. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  9. Focusing and bunching of ion beam in axial injection channel of IPHC cyclotron TR24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T.; Ivanenko, I.; Kazarinov, N.; Osswald, F.; Traykov, E.

    2017-07-01

    The CYRCe cyclotron (CYclotron pour la ReCherche et l’Enseignement) is used at IPHC (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien) for the production of radio-isotopes for diagnostics, medical treatments and fundamental research in radiobiology. The TR24 cyclotron produced and commercialized by ACSI (Canada) delivers a 16-25 MeV proton beam with intensity from few nA up to 500 μA. The solenoidal focusing instead of existing quadrupole one is proposed in this report. The changing of the focusing elements will give the better beam matching with the acceptance of the spiral inflector of the cyclotron. The parameters of the focusing solenoid are found. Additionally, the main parameters of the bunching system are evaluated in the presence of the beam space charge. This system consists of the buncher installed in the axial injection beam line of the cyclotron. The using of the grid-less multi harmonic buncher may increase the accelerated beam current and will give the opportunity to new proton beam applications.

  10. Cost benefit analysis of the radiological shielding of medical cyclotrons using a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar

    2001-01-01

    Adequate radiation shielding is vital to the safe operation of modern commercial medical cyclotrons producing large yields of short-lived radioisotopes. The radiological shielding constitutes a significant capital investment for any new cyclotron-based radioisotope production facility; hence, the shielding design requires an accurate cost-benefit analysis often based on a complex multi-variant optimization technique. This paper demonstrates the application of a Genetic Algorithm (GA) for the optimum design of the high yield target cave of a Medical Cyclotron radioisotope production facility based in Sydney, Australia. The GA is a novel optimization technique that mimics the Darwinian Evolution paradigm and is ideally suited to search for global optima in a large multi-dimensional solution space

  11. Status of Simulations for the Cyclotron Laboratory at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asova, G.; Goutev, N.; Tonev, D.; Artinyan, A.

    2018-05-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is preparing to operate a high-power cyclotron for production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, research in radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics. The cyclotron is a TR24 produced by ASCI, Canada, capable to deliver proton beams in the energy range of 15 to 24 MeV with current as high as 400 µA. Multiple extraction lines can be fed. The primary goal of the project is the production of PET and SPECT isotopes as 18F, 67,68Ga, 99mTc, etc. This contribution reports the status of the project. Design considerations for the cyclotron vault will be discussed for some of the target radioisotopes.

  12. Pumping system of 30,000 l/sec for CIME cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbowa, A.; Buhler, S.; Blache, Ph.; Chevrollier, R.; Grolet, D.; Pilot, A.; Szott, Ph.; Languiller, J.; Gallardo, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The cyclotron CIME (SPIRAL facilities) has to accelerate radioactive ions produced from primary heavy beams delivered by GANIL. To avoid beam losses by charge exchange on the residual gas, the ultimate pressure in the cyclotron is expected to be better than 5.10 -8 mbar. In order to reach such a low pressure, a system of 30.000 l/sec twin cryo-panels has been designed for being installed inside the cyclotron. Each cryo-panel will be individually cooled by a separate set of two cryo-generators. From cryo-generators to cryo-panels, the cooling power is transferred through heat-pipes over several meters. The complete system designed and constructed in the IPN and GANIL laboratories, is presently under testing at the GANIL location. (authors)

  13. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 μA, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  14. Medical radioisotopes production at the isochronous cyclotron in Alma-Ata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanov, A.A.; Batischev, V.N.; Gladun, V.K.; Kochetkov, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    High efficiency cyclotron operations (up to 5200 hours of beam time a year) considerably increased the possibility to perform both fundamental and applied scientific work. There appeared possibility to accelerate protons in a wide energy range from 6 to 30 MeV and realize correspondingly the nuclear reactions up to (A, 3n). This paper reports that among different applied tasks performed at the cyclotron the special program of cyclotron production of short-lived medical radioisotopes iodine-123, thallium-201, cadmium-109 in the first place and some others to satisfy clinic needs of Alma-Ata and its region has special importance. In accordance with this program the preparation to produce iodine-123 is being held and regular production of Thallium chloride, thallium-201 pharmaceptical is started

  15. Gaseous radioactive effluent restrictions, measurement, and minimization at a PET/cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plascjak, P.S.; Kim, K.K.; Googins, S.W.; Meyer, W.C. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In the US, restrictions on the release of radioactive effluents from PET (positron emission tomography)/cyclotron facilities are typically imposed by State regulatory agencies and may be based on various methodologies and limits published by numerous agencies. This work presents suitable effluent concentration limits for various chemical forms of radioisotopes routinely produced in PET/cyclotron facilities. They were determined by application of metabolic models defined by ICRP 53 and ICRP 26/30 which will result in compliance with effective dose equivalent limits of 100 mrem per year at the release point. The NIH Cyclotron Facility effluent air monitoring system, environmental dosimetry program, and simple, effective systems for radioactive effluent minimization are also described. (orig.)

  16. Radionuclides in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tousset, J.

    1984-01-01

    Applications of radionuclides in analytical chemistry are reviewed in this article: tracers, radioactive sources and activation analysis. Examples are given in all these fields and it is concluded that these methods should be used more widely [fr

  17. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  18. Plasma heating by radiofrequency in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da; Aihara, S.; Universidade Estadual de Campinas

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of the experimental set-up mounted in the Physical Institute of UFF (Brazil) to produce the gas ionization by radio-frequency are shown and its behaviour when confined by a mirror-geometry magnetic field is studied. The diagnostic is made by a langmuir probe and a prisme spectrogaph is used in order to verify the nature of the ionized helium gas and the degree of purity through its spectral lines. The argon ionization by R.f. is produced in the 'LISA' machine obtain a plasma column of approximatelly 60 cm length and with the Langmuir probe the study of the profile distribution of the plasma parameters such as: electron temperature and density and floating potencial in function of the magnetic field variation is made. The main focus is given to the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). A new expression on the ion saturation current (I sub(is)) produced by radiofrequency is developed. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Cyclotron production, radiochemical separation and quality control of platinum radiotracers for toxicological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, M.; Birattari, C.; Groppi, F.; Arginelli, D.; Gini, L.; Gallorini, M.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing concentration of Pt, Pd and Rh in the environment is mainly due to the release of these elements from the catalytic converters of the motorvehicles. This situation makes it necessary to carry out metallotoxicological experiments on both cell cultures and laboratory animals, in order to assess their impact on living organisms after a Long Term and Low Level Exposure (LLE). Both nuclear reactions nat Ir(p,xn) and nat Os(α,xn) were investigated in the energy range up to 45 MeV for protons and 38 MeV for alpha-particles, in order to optimize the irradiation parameters for the production of 188,189,191 Pt. Several sets of thin- and thick-target excitation functions were determined experimentally by cyclotron irradiation at both Milano and Ispra cyclotrons. This paper reports the irradiation parameters studied and adopted and two radiochemical procedures for the separation of radio-Pt from an Os target, as well as from ruthenium, iridium and gold impurities. These procedures were used to obtain very high specific activity Pt radionuclides in No Carrier Added (NCA) form. Radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity measurements were carried out by the use of several techniques like γ-spectrometry, ion-exchange radio-chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. (author)

  20. Statistical fluctuations in cooperative cyclotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    Shot noise is the cause of statistical fluctuations in cooperative cyclotron radiation generated by an ensemble of electrons oscillating in magnetic field. Autophasing time - the time required for the cooperative cyclotron radiation power to peak - is the critical parameter characterizing the dynamics of electron-oscillators interacting via the radiation field. It is shown that premodulation of charged particles leads to a considerable narrowing of the autophasing time distribution function for which the analytic expression is obtained. When the number of particles Ne exceeds a certain value that depends on the degree to which the particles have been premodulated, the relative root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the autophasing time δT changes from a logarithmic dependence on Ne (δT ∼ 1 / lnNe) to square-root (δT ∼ 1 /√{Ne }). A slight energy spread (∼4%) results in a twofold drop of the maximum attainable power of cooperative cyclotron radiation.

  1. Decommissioning analyzis of a university cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.X.; Buls, N.; Hermanne, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the widespread use of some medical nuclear facilities, such as cyclotrons for isotope production, Life cycle analyzis, including decommissioning, was not taken into account. The structural materials of an accelerator and the concrete shielding of the bunker are activated by neutrons. This could yield a considerable volume of nuclear waste and needs radiation protection concern for occupational workers and the environment during some decennia. At the university of Brussels (WB) a prospective radiation protection and waste analyzis is being made for the later decommissioning of their cyclotron. Only few similar studies have been published. In Belgium future nuclear dismantling operations will be submitted to a radiation protection authorization procedure. Meanwhile the nuclear waste authorities insist on dismantling planning, including financial provisioning. An optimization exercise was made at the VUB-cyclotron, taking into account international trends to clearance levels for low level nuclear waste. Conceptual prevention opportunities e.g. selective material choice could be identified for future accelerator constructions. (author)

  2. Scientific instruments, scientific progress and the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, David; Faust, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Philosophers speak of science in terms of theory and experiment, yet when they speak of the progress of scientific knowledge they speak in terms of theory alone. In this article it is claimed that scientific knowledge consists of, among other things, scientific instruments and instrumental techniques and not simply of some kind of justified beliefs. It is argued that one aspect of scientific progress can be characterized relatively straightforwardly - the accumulation of new scientific instruments. The development of the cyclotron is taken to illustrate this point. Eight different activities which promoted the successful completion of the cyclotron are recognised. The importance is in the machine rather than the experiments which could be run on it and the focus is on how the cyclotron came into being, not how it was subsequently used. The completed instrument is seen as a useful unit of scientific progress in its own right. (UK)

  3. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  4. Knowledge based operation assist system for JAERI AVF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agematsu, T.; Okumura, S.; Yokota, W.; Arakawa, K.; Murakami, T.; Okamura, T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two operation assist systems for easy and rapid operation of the JAERI AVF cyclotron. One is a knowledge based expert system guiding the sequence of parameter adjustment to inexperienced cyclotron operators. The other is a real-time simulation of the beam trajectories which are calculated from actual operating parameters. It graphically indicates feasible setting range of parameters that satisfies the acceptance of the cyclotron. These systems provide a human interface to adjust the parameters of the cyclotron. (author)

  5. Commissioning of cryogen delivery system for superconducting cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, G.; Nandi, C.; Bhattacharyya, T.K.; Chaudhuri, J.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    A K-500 superconducting cyclotron is being constructed at VECC Kolkata. The cryogen delivery system distributes liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to the superconducting cyclotron. Liquid helium is required to cool the cyclotron magnet and cryopanels. Liquid nitrogen is used to reduce the capacity of the helium liquefier. This paper describes the system, the current status and the commissioning experiences of cryogen delivery system for cyclotron magnet. (author)

  6. ECR ion source for variable energy cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, D K; Taki, G S; Nabhiraj, P Y; Pal, G; Dasgupta, B; Mallik, C; Das, S K; Bandopadhaya, D K; Bhandari, R K [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta (India)

    1995-09-01

    Some performance characteristics of 6.4 GHz two stage ECR ion source which was under development at this centre is presented. The present ion source will facilitate acceleration of light heavy ions with the existing k=130 variable energy cyclotron. Multiply charged heavy ion (MCHI) beam from the source will also be utilized for atomic physics studies. Oxygen beam has already been used for ion implantation studies. The external injection system under development is nearing completion. Heavy ion beam from cyclotron is expected by end of 1995. (author).

  7. Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Neutron Star Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Jörn; Schönherr, Gabriele; Schmid, Julia; Dauser, Thomas; Kreykenbohm, Ingo

    2009-05-01

    Cyclotron lines are formed through transitions of electrons between discrete Landau levels in the accretion columns of accreting neutron stars with strong (1012 G) magnetic fields. We summarize recent results on the formation of the spectral continuum of such systems, describe recent advances in the modeling of the lines based on a modification of the commonly used Monte Carlo approach, and discuss new results on the dependence of the measured cyclotron line energy from the luminosity of transient neutron star systems. Finally, we show that Simbol-X will be ideally suited to build and improve the observational database of accreting and strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  8. Cyclotron production of radioactive gas from gaseous targets: inhomogeneity of the target activity - optimum flow rate of the carrier gas - cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.-M.; Fiore, G. del; Quaglia, L.; Depresseux, J.-C.; Bartsch, P.

    1979-01-01

    When short-lived radioactive gases are produced by cyclotron-irradiated gaseous targets, the yield of activity, at the site of delivery, depends on the flow rate in the gas-carrying line. The authors improve a preliminarily published previous single model by the introduction of a supplementary hypothesis which takes into account the inhomogeneity of the activity in the gaseous target. By substituting the NTP volume of the gas in the irradiation cell Vsub(c) by a visible volume Vsub(a) depending on the flow rate and expressed by Vsub(a) = Vsub(infinity) +(V 0 - Vsub(infinity))exp(-kDsub(p)), they derive the following general expression for the optimum flow rate D which gives a maximum yield of production. D 2 -bD-bc-D 2 akexp(-kD)-abexp(-kD) = 0, a=lambda(V 0 -Vsub(infinity)), b = lambdaVsub(r), c = lambdaVsub(infinity), lambda = the decay constant of the radionuclide produced,Vsub(r) the inner volume of the gas-carrying line. The unknown parameters Vsub(r), Vsub(a), V 0 , Vsub(infinity), and k can be determined experimentally. The authors also suggest a new method for the determination of experimental cross sections with their gaseous target. (Auth.)

  9. Radioisotope production in the I. Ph. P. E. cyclotron for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnov, N.N.; Dmitriyev, P.P.; Konjakhin, N.A.; Ognev, A.A. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Obninsk. Fiziko-Ehnergeticheskij Inst.)

    1982-01-01

    The production methods for seven radioisotopes, Ga-67, Sr-85, Pd-103, In-111, Tm-167, Hg-197 and Pb-203, by using a classical 1.5m cyclotron in the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, USSR, are described. At present, more than 50 cyclotrons in different countries are used for the production of radioisotopes applied to medicine. Radioisotopes are produced with the cyclotron in the I.Ph.P.E. in the form of irradiated targets, which are delivered to Moscow radiopharmaceutical factory, where radiopharmaceuticals are produced on the base of these targets. The cyclotron is operated in two regimes providing the acceleration of protons, deuterons and alpha -particles. Two types of target assemblies are used for irradiation, the one is intended for the internal beam, and the other is for the external beam. The reactions used for the production of seven radioisotopes described above, the types of targets, particle energy, respective irradiated materials, beam current, thick target yield and the amount of respective radioisotopes produced per year are reported. Metals have large heat conductivity, therefore the use of metal targets increases beam current, and increases the production rate of radioisotopes.

  10. Intensity limits of the PSI Injector II cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, A.; Adelmann, A.; Barlow, R.; Baumgarten, C.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate limits on the current of the PSI Injector II high intensity separate-sector isochronous cyclotron, in its present configuration and after a proposed upgrade. Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors, neutron and neutrino experiments, and medical isotope production all benefit from increases in current, even at the ∼ 10% level: the PSI cyclotrons provide relevant experience. As space charge dominates at low beam energy, the injector is critical. Understanding space charge effects and halo formation through detailed numerical modelling gives clues on how to maximise the extracted current. Simulation of a space-charge dominated low energy high intensity (9.5 mA DC) machine, with a complex collimator set up in the central region shaping the bunch, is not trivial. We use the OPAL code, a tool for charged-particle optics calculations in large accelerator structures and beam lines, including 3D space charge. We have a precise model of the present (production) Injector II, operating at 2.2 mA current. A simple model of the proposed future (upgraded) configuration of the cyclotron is also investigated. We estimate intensity limits based on the developed models, supported by fitted scaling laws and measurements. We have been able to perform more detailed analysis of the bunch parameters and halo development than any previous study. Optimisation techniques enable better matching of the simulation set-up with Injector II parameters and measurements. We show that in the production configuration the beam current scales to the power of three with the beam size. However, at higher intensities, 4th power scaling is a better fit, setting the limit of approximately 3 mA. Currents of over 5 mA, higher than have been achieved to date, can be produced if the collimation scheme is adjusted.

  11. Evaluation of the production capabilities of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O PET isotopes at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia Auditore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of 18F, 11C, 13N, and 15O positron emitting radionuclides for PET imaging is usually accomplished in Nuclear Medicine Departments through direct nuclear reactions induced by protons accelerated by compact medical cyclotrons on liquid or gaseous targets. Messina University has funded the construction of a PET-cyclotron-radio-chemistry plant at the Messina University Hospital, equipped with a 11 MeV self-shielded cyclotron. We estimated the expected production yields of these nuclides, accounting for target thickness, production of other radioactive nuclides, and time effects on the irradiated target purity. To this aim, both TALYS code (v. 1.8 and an analytical approach based on EXFOR experimental data were used. The general agreement between the two approaches, and with the available literature data, allows to assess the expected yields at the End of Bombardment, and relative target purities, to be used for further radiopharmaceutical preparation steps.

  12. Use of maze in cyclotron hoppers; Utilizacao de labirinto em bunker de ciclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Fernando A.; Alves, Juliano S.; Fochesatto, Cintia; Cerioli, Luciane; Borges, Joao Alfredo; Gonzalez, Delfin; Silva, Daniel C., E-mail: fernandofernandes@biofarmaco.com.br [Delfin Farmacos e Derivados (Biofarmaco Marcadores Moleculares), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: the increasing number of cyclotrons in Brazil due to constitutional amendment 49 /06 that enabled the production of radiopharmaceuticals with a short half - life by private companies. The radionuclides used for PET - CT require production centers near or within the diagnostic centers. In order to minimize maintenance and operating risks, gaining efficiency, our facility was the first in Brazil to use the access to a cyclotron bunker via maze, rather than armored door stopper type. Materials: the design calculations were based on the Monte Carlo method (MCNP5 - Monte Carlo N-Particletransportcode version 5). At the ends of the labyrinth are installed a door of polyethylene, for thermalization of neutrons, and other of wood for limiting access. Both legs of the maze have wall thickness of 100cm. In inspection Brazilian CNEN realize measures of dose rate for neutrons and gamma 9 points: 7 around the bunker, 1 over the bunker and 1 in the exhaust with the cyclotron operating with maximum load, double beam of 50uA for 2 hours. After commissioning were carried out around the bunker, the following measures: cumulative dose in three months with dosimeters for neutron rate dose with a gas proportional detector type filled with {sup 3}He and polyethylene neutron moderator and dose rate with a Geiger - Mueller detector for gamma radiation. Readings with neutron detectors were classified as background radiation and dose rates were always below the limits established in standard EN 3.01, and the calculation of the predicted regardless of the intensity of irradiation inside the bunker. Conclusion: the use of labyrinths as a way to access the bunkers cyclotron has been shown to be effective as the radiation shielding and efficient by allowing quick and easy access, virtually eliminating the maintenance.

  13. Development of positron emitting radionuclides for imaging with improved positron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.

    1976-10-01

    Recent advances in positron cameras and positron ring detectors for transverse section reconstruction have created renewed interest in positron emitting radionuclides. This paper reports on: generator-produced 82 Rb; cyclotron-produced 62 Zn; and reactor-produced 64 Cu. Investigation of the 82 Sr (25 d)-- 82 Rb (75 s) generator determined the elution characteristics for Bio-Rex 70, a weakly acidic carboxylic cation exchanger, using 2% NaCl as the eluent. The yield of 82 Rb and the breakthrough of 82 Sr were determined for newly prepared columns and for long term elution conditions. Spallation-produced 82 Sr was used to charge a compact 82 Rb generator to obtain multi-millicurie amounts of 82 Rb for myocardial imaging. Zinc accumulates in the islet cells of the pancreas and in the prostate. Zinc-62 was produced by protons on Cu foil and separated by column chromatography. Zinc-62 was administered as the amino acid chelates and as the ZnCl 2 to tumor and normal animals. Tissue distribution was determined for various times after intravenous injection. Pancreas-liver images of 62 Zn-histidine uptake were obtained in animals with the gamma camera and the liver uptake of /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid was computer subtracted to image the pancreas alone. The positron camera imaged uptake of 62 Zn-histidine in the prostate of a dog at 20 h. 64 Cu was chelated to asparagine, a requirement of leukemic cells, and administered to lymphoma mice. Uptake in tumor and various tissues was determined and compared with the uptake of 67 Ga citrate under the same conditions. 64 Cu-asparagine had better tumor-to-soft tissue ratios than 67 Ga-citrate

  14. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterbeek, J.W.; Bürger, A.; Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) bea...

  15. Microbiological Transformations of Radionuclides in the Subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous in subsurface environments although their populations sizes and metabolic activities can vary considerably depending on energy and nutrient inputs. As a result of their metabolic activities and the chemical properties of their cell surfaces and the exopolymers they produce, microorganisms can directly or indirectly facilitate the biotransformation of radionuclides, thus altering their solubility and overall fate and transport in the environment. Although biosorption to cell surfaces and exopolymers can be an important factor modifying the solubility of some radionuclides under specific conditions, oxidation state is often considered the single most important factor controlling their speciation and, therefore, environmental behavior.

  16. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax

  17. Assessment of waste management of volatile radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altomare, P.M.; Barbier, M.; Lord, N.; Nainan, D.

    1979-05-01

    This document presents a review of the Technologies for Waste Management of the Volatile Radionuclides of iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium, and carbon-14. The report presents an estimate of the quantities of these volatile radionuclides as are produced in the nuclear power industry. The various technologies as may be used, or which are under investigation, to immobilize these nuclides and to contain them during storage and in disposal are discussed. Also, the alternative disposal options as may be applied to isolate these radioactive wastes from the human environment are presented. The report contains information which was available through approximately January 1978

  18. ROKCY-12 (KCCH PET-dedicated cyclotron): main features and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, J. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yang, Y. T.; Jung, I. S.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, M. Y.; Jang, H. S.; Kim, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of 13 MeV cyclotron (ROKCY-12) that can be used for a Position Emission Tomography(PET) purpose. This cyclotron with a maximum beam energy of 13 MeV can produce radio isotopes especially 18 F which has a relatively short half lifetime of 110 minutes. First, we show the beam characteristics can be used to carry out the operation of ROCKY-12. Based on this, a computer program has been developed to determine main cyclotron parameters such as cyclotron magnet, RF system, ion source, vacuum system and other cyclotron operation parameters. And then we show the result of design and manufacturing feature of ROKCY-12. By using this design program, one can determines magnet yoke geometry and the average magnetic fields etc. And then the three-dimensional computer program OPERA-3D has been invoked to determine magnet pole tips. Validity of the design can be seen by investigating magnetic fields, radial and vertical focusing frequencies as a function of the beam energy. In this paper, we show the results of cyclotron beam by ROCKY-12. We designed 77.3 MHz RF system and ion source system. We tested RF resonance each coupling methods. We show the result of RF design and prototype operation. Developed ion source is PIG type. We described our design methods and implementation. We report the result of getting negative hydrogen ion. Cyclotron controller asks inputs of every sensor and output of every instrument for notifying current condition to operator. It has independent controllers, for example DC power supply, vacuum system, beam profile system, beam extraction system, RF system, ion source, cooling unit and so on. Basically, each control system uses RS-485 for communication to main control computer. Consumers reward products and services that feature quality, originality, a distinct personality and charm. The International Standardization Organization (ISO) requires, as its mission, that we achieve competitive superiority by

  19. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1991-01-01

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  20. Preliminary analysis of radiologic consequence in accident cases with radiation sources in laboratories of the Physics Department of the IEN, cyclotrons and laboratories annexed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Silva, J.J.G. da.

    1987-03-01

    The requirements necessaries to the elaboration of the situation of Emergency PLans of the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN), Brazil, in particular, cases of radiation emergency are presented. An estimate of radiation in the laboratories of the Physic Department of the IEN, in case of accident, are given. The results presented are based in some hypothesis, values of radionuclide activity furnished by Radioisotopes Division and values of activities estimated by Radiation Protection Section of the IEN in function of datas achieved with cyclotron Division. The dose calculations are done to the cases of radionuclides inhalation and immersion of person in a semi-infinite cloud of contaminants. (V.R.B.)

  1. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holly, D.J.; Prager, S.C.; Shepard, D.A.; Sprott, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed

  2. Passive cyclotron current drive for fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernbichler, W.

    1995-01-01

    The creation of toroidal current using cyclotron radiation in a passive way is, together with the well known bootstrap current, an interesting method for stationary current drive in high-temperature fusion reactors. Here, instead of externally applied RF-waves, fish-scale like structures at the first wall help to create enough asymmetry in the self generated cyclotron radiation intensity to drive a current within the plasma. The problem of computing passive cyclotron current drive consists of actually two linked problems, which are the computation of the electron equilibrium under the presence of self-generated radiation, and the computation of the photon equilibrium in a bounded system with a distorted electron distribution. This system of integro-differential equations cannot be solved directly in an efficient way. Therefore a linearization procedure was developed to decouple both sets of equations, finally linked through a generalized local current drive efficiency. The problem of the exact accounting for the wall profile effects was reduced to the solution of a Fredholm-type integral equation of the 2 nd -kind. Based on all this an extensive computer code was developed to compute the passively driven current as well as radiation losses, radiation transport and overall efficiencies. The results therefrom give an interesting and very detailed insight into the problems related to passive cyclotron current drive

  3. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits

  4. The Data Cyclotron query processing scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncalves, R.; Kersten, M.

    2011-01-01

    A grand challenge of distributed query processing is to devise a self-organizing architecture which exploits all hardware resources optimally to manage the database hot set, minimize query response time, and maximize throughput without single point global coordination. The Data Cyclotron

  5. The Data Cyclotron query processing scheme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Goncalves (Romulo); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractA grand challenge of distributed query processing is to devise a self-organizing architecture which exploits all hardware resources optimally to manage the database hot set, minimize query response time, and maximize throughput without single point global coordination. The Data Cyclotron

  6. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  7. <600> MeV synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    One of the 14 pancakes of the new magnet coils for the 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron which were wound and coated with epoxy resin on the CERN site. These new coils will replace the present ones which have been in use for more than 14 years but are now showing signs of deteriorations.

  8. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical.

  9. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical

  10. Automated cyclotron tuning using beam phase measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmer, J.H.; Roecken, H.; Stephani, T.; Baumgarten, C.; Geisler, A.

    2006-01-01

    The ACCEL K250 superconducting cyclotron is specifically designed for the use in proton therapy systems. The compact medical 250 MeV proton accelerator fulfils all present and future beam requirements for fast scanning treatment systems and is delivered as a turn key system; no operator is routinely required. During operation of the cyclotron heat dissipation of the RF system induces a small drift in iron temperature. This temperature drift slightly detunes the magnetic field and small corrections must be made. A non-destructive beam phase detector has been developed to measure and quantify the effect of a magnetic field drift. Signal calculations were made and the design of the capacitive pickup probe was optimised to cover the desired beam current range. Measurements showed a very good agreement with the calculated signals and beam phase can be measured with currents down to 3 nA. The measured phase values are used as input for a feedback loop controlling the current in the superconducting coil. The magnetic field of the cyclotron is tuned automatically and online to maintain a fixed beam phase. Extraction efficiency is thereby optimised continuously and activation of the cyclotron is minimised. The energy and position stability of the extracted beam are well within specification

  11. A visual assistance environment for cyclotron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Tetsuya; Murakami, Tohru; Agematsu, Takashi; Okumura, Susumu; Arakawa, Kazuo.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-based operation system for a cyclotron which assists inexperienced operators has been developed. Cyclotron start-up operations require dozens of adjustable parameters to be finely tuned to maximize extracted beam current. The human interfaces of the system provide a visual environment designed to enhance beam parameter adjustments. First, the mental model of operators is analyzed. It is supposed to be composed of five partial mental models: beam behavior model, feasible setting regions model, parameter sensitivity model, parameter mutual relation model, and status map model. Next, based on these models, three visual interfaces are developed, i.e., (1) Beam trajectory is rapidly calculated and graphically displayed whenever the operators change the cyclotron parameters. (2) Feasible setting regions (FSR) of the parameters that satisfy the cyclotron's beam acceptance criteria are indicated. (3) Search traces, being a historical visual map of beam current values, are superimposed on the FSRs. Finally, to evaluate system effectiveness, the search time required to reach maximum beam current conditions was measured. In addition, system operability was evaluated using written questionnaires. Results of the experiment showed that the search time to reach specific beam conditions was reduced by approximately 65% using these interfaces. The written questionnaires survey showed the operators highly evaluate system operability. (author)

  12. Microwave power coupling with electron cyclotron resonance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    600 W microwave power with an average electron density of ∼ 6 × 1011 cm. −3 ... the angular frequency of the cyclotron motion, e is the electron charge, m is the mass of .... is also suitable for ECR plasma-based applications like high-quality ...

  13. Development of HM12 cyclotron for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takuzo; Kawama, Tetsuo; Fujii, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, there are at present more than 30 PET (Positron Emission Tomography) facilities. The movements of medical insurance application to the PET diagnosis using [ 18 F] FDG (2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose) by the Ministry of Health and Welfare are being enhanced by PET related people. Therefore, more clinical centers using PET system are expected to be built in the near future. HM12 cyclotron was developed to meet such market demands for PET, and the prototype machine has been rent to Cyclotron Radio Isotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University since Oct. 1998 for their use of clinical research with positron emitters like 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F. We got many technical data of HM12 Cyclotron on the clinical base. The data was enough to establish the reliability of HM12 system operation under the clinical condition. The first commercial product of HM12 Cyclotron was delivered to National Cancer Center in March 2000. The final performance test will be finished by the end of June 2000. (author)

  14. Electron cyclotron emission from thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Granata, G.

    1978-02-01

    Electron cyclotron radiation from a warm inhomogeneous plasma is investigated. A direct calculation of the emissive power of a plasma slab is performed using Rytov's method and the result is compared with the solution of the transfer equation. It is found that, for arbitrary directions of emission, the two results differ, which reflects the fact that Kirchhoff's law is not generally obeyed

  15. Electron cyclotron heating and associated parallel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapozo, C. da C.; Assis, A.S. de; Busnardo Neto, J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been experimentally observed that during the electron-cyclotron heating the electron longitudinal temperature drops as the perpendicular temperature increases. The experiment was carried in a linear mirror machine with a low density (10 10 cm -3 ) weakly ionized (< 1.0 %) plasma. (Author)

  16. On Resonant Heating Below the Cyclotron Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liu; Lin, Zhihong; White, R.

    2001-01-01

    Resonant heating of particles by an electrostatic wave propagating perpendicular to a confining uniform magnetic field is examined. It is shown that, with a sufficiently large wave amplitude, significant perpendicular stochastic heating can be obtained with wave frequency at a fraction of the cyclotron frequency

  17. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Currents driven by electron cyclotron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is used to verify the theory of Fisch and Boozer and to extend their results into the nonlinear regime. Relativistic effects on the current generated are discussed. Applications to steady-state tokamak reactors are considered

  19. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  20. Cyclotron operating mode determination based on intelligent methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouda, M.M.E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators are generators that produce beams of charged particles with energies depending on the accelerator type. The MGC-20 cyclotron is a cyclic particle accelerator used for accelerating protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and helium-3 to different energies. Main applications are isotopes production, nuclear reactions studies, and mass spectroscopy studies and other industrial applications. The cyclotron is a complicated machine depends on using a strong magnetic field and high frequency-high voltage electric field together to accelerate and bend charged particles inside the accelerating chamber. It consists of the following main parts, the radio frequency system, the main magnet with the auxiliary concentric and harmonic coils, the electrostatic deflector, and the ion source, the beam transport system, and high precision and high stability DC power supplies.To accelerate a particle to certain energy, one has to adjust the cyclotron operating parameters to be suitable to accelerate this particle to that energy. If the cyclotron operating parameters together are adjusted to accelerate a charged particle to certain energy, then these parameters together are named the operating mode to accelerate this particle to that energy. For example the operating mode to accelerate protons to 18 MeV is named the (18 MeV protons operating mode). The operating mode includes many parameters that must be adjusted together to be successful to accelerate, extract, focus, steer a particle from the ion source to the experiment. Due to the big number of parameters in the operating modes, 19 parameters have been selected in this thesis to be used in an intelligent system based on feed forward back propagation neural network to determine the parameters for new operating modes. The new intelligent system depends on the available information about the currently used operating modes.The classic way to determine a new operating mode was depending on trial and error method to

  1. Radioactivity: radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.E.; Baratta, E.J.; Jelinek, C.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are summarized of the analysis for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-131, ruthenium-106, and potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, in samples of total diet and selected import commodities in the foods compliance program of the Food and Drug Administration. On the basis of the radionuclide intake guidelines established by the Federal Radiation Council (FRC), the low content of radionuclides found in the total diet samples for fiscal years 1973 and 1974 demonstrates the need for surveillance only at the present level. The low levels of radionuclides found in a limited number of edible imported commodities indicate that their contribution to the total diet would not increase the levels of these radionuclides above those recommended for only periodic surveillance by the FRC. The potassium levels, determined from potassium-40 activity, found in meats and fish agree with the value for normal muscle tissue for the reference man reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. Of the other commodities, nuts contained the highest levels, while sugar, beverages, and processed foods contained the lowest levels of potassium. Although cesium and potassium are chemical analogs with similar metabolic properties, because of their variable content in some leafy samples as a result of surface contamination, a correlation between cesium-137 levels and the cesium-137-to-potassium ratio was inconclusive

  2. Radioisotope production at the cyclotron in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.G. da; Lemos, O.F.; Britto, J.L.O. de; Osso, J.A.; Bastos, M.A.V.; Braghirolli, A.M.S.; Chamma, D.F.S.; Newton, G.W.A.; Weinreich, R.

    1982-01-01

    A radioisotope production laboratory has been installed at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro. It is intended primarily for processing short-lived radioisotopes produced by a multiparticle, variable energy, isochronous, compact CV-28 Cyclotron and for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals and labelled molecules. Carrier-free iodine-123, indium-111, thalium-201, bromine-77 and gallium-67 with high purity have been produced. An irradiated target transport system has been built. Special targets that can dissipate high surface power densities are being developed. Each radioisotope is processed in a remotely controlled cell equiped with electric and pneumatic systems as well as manipulators ans tongs. Quality control is achieved by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, spot tests, gamma-ray spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography. Biological tests in mice have confirmed the good quality of the radiopharmaceuticals. (Author) [pt

  3. Control system specification for a cyclotron and neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacky, J.; Risler, R.; Kalet, I.; Wootton, P.; Barke, A.; Brossard, S.; Jackson, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is usually considered an essential element of good practice in engineering to produce a specification for a system before building it. However, it has been found to be quite difficult to produce useful specifications of large software systems. The authors have nearly completed a comprehensive specification for the computer control system of a cyclotron and treatment facility that provides particle beams for cancer treatments with fast neutrons, production of medical isotopes, and physics experiments. They describe the control system as thoroughly as is practical using standard technical English, supplemented by tables, diagrams, and some algebraic equations. This specification comprises over 300 single-spaced pages. A more precise and compact specification might be achieved by making greater use of formal mathematical notations instead of English. They have begun work on a formal specification of the system, using the Z and Petri net notations

  4. THE ROLE OF THE CYCLOTRON IN MEDICAL RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Joseph G.

    1950-04-19

    The uses of radioactive isotopes in medical research can be conveniently divided into three principal categories; namely, the applications as tracers for the study of metabolic phenomena, as diagnostic aids in clinical medicine, and finally their role in therapy. Frequently radioisotopes available from the chain-reacting pile do not have a sufficient degree of specific activity for satisfactory use. A number of radioisotopes which can be produced with high specific activity in the pile possess half-lives too short to be of any practical value. Then, there are a few cases in which the desired radioisotope may be made in the pile with high specific activity, but concomitantly there is formed another radioisotope of the same element whose half-life is of such duration as to render its use hazardous in man. Finally, there are several elements of biological and medical interest whose radioactive isotopes can be produced only by the cyclotron.

  5. Radionuclides incorporation in activated natural nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Parra

    2016-01-01

    Natural palygorskite nanotubes show suitable physical and chemical properties and characteristics to be use as potential nanosorbent and immobilization matrix for the concentration and solidification of radionuclides present in nuclear wastes. In the development process of materials with sorption properties for the incorporation and subsequent immobilization of radionuclides, the most important steps are related with the generation of active sites simultaneously to the increase of the specific surface area and suitable heat treatment to producing the structural folding. This study evaluated the determining parameters and conditions for the activation process of the natural palygorskite nanotubes aiming at the sorption of radionuclides in the nanotubes structure and subsequent evaluation of the parameters involve in the structural folding by heat treatments. The optimized results about the maximum sorption capacity of nickel in activated natural nanotubes show that these structures are apt and suitable for incorporation of radionuclides similar to nickel. By this study is verified that the optimization of the acid activation process is fundamental to improve the sorption capacities for specifics radionuclides by activated natural nanotubes. Acid activation condition optimized maintaining structural integrity was able to remove around 33.3 wt.% of magnesium cations, equivalent to 6.30·10 -4 g·mol -1 , increasing in 42.8% the specific surface area and incorporating the same molar concentration of nickel present in the liquid radioactive waste at 80 min. (author)

  6. Cyclotron motion in a microwave cavity: an analog of the Lamb shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.

    1985-09-01

    The interaction of a bound electron with the radiation field produced by the image charges that represent a surrounding metallic cavity produces a shift in its orbital frequency and in its radiative decay time. This is an analog to the Lamb shift in atomic systems, but it is purely a classical effect. We outline the calculation of the frequency shift and the change in the damping constant for a cyclotron motion at the midpoint of a lossy, cylindrical cavity

  7. Production of radioisotopes by 1.5 m cyclotron and their utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Fang

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotopes characterized by nuclear property and uses can be produced on the accelerator, especially those playing an important role in scientific researches and biomedical uses. The status of Radioisotopes produced by 1.5 m cyclotron and their applications in our institute are summarized in this paper. The details of preparation and the results of use for radioactive sources, radiochemicals, radiopharmaceuticals of 57 Co, 109 Cd, 68 Ge- 68 Ga, and 167 Tm are given respectively. (author)

  8. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-01-01

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers

  9. Production of exotic beams at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron by the ISOL method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Users of the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron are preparing a proposal to produce exotic, i.e., radioactive beams. The facility will consist of a high-current 30 MeV cyclotron to generate the radioactive nuclei, an ECR source that can be coupled to different production targets, and the 88-Inch Cyclotron to accelerate the radioactive ions. Thus, the basic concept is that of the double cyclotron system pioneered at Louvain-la-Neuve, although the initial emphasis will be on producing a variety of light proton-rich beams at energies up to 10 MeV/A. At this workshop we wish to outline what is being planned, to invite comments and suggestions, and, especially, to encourage participation. We believe that this facility will be an important step toward establishing the scientific and technical basis for a National High Intensity Facility. This can be achieved through active participation by members of the radioactive beam (RB) community in (1) experiments with high quality radioactive beams of moderate intensity and, (2) R ampersand D on high beam-power targets and highly efficient ion sources. 5 refs., 4 figs

  10. Atmospheric tracer tests and assessment of a potential accident at the National Medical Cyclotron, Camperdown, NSW, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G H; Bartsch, F J.K.; Stone, D J.M.

    1994-08-01

    In order to assess the impact of a potential atmospheric release of radionuclides from the National Medical Cyclotron facility, in Camperdown, an atmospheric tracer release, sampling and analysis system using SF{sub 6} was developed. During eight experiments conducted in a variety of meteorological conditions, ten samplers were located in the vicinity of the Cyclotron building and other nearby buildings on the rapid downward movement of the tracer gas plume. The atmospheric dilution factors which lead to the highest observed air concentrations were then applied to the releases of I{sup 123} and Xe{sup 123} from a potential accident scenario in order to assess the impact on nearby receptors. Even given the conservative assumptions about the release of I{sup 123}, the estimated radiation doses were at least an order of magnitude below the international standards for doses to member of the public. 27 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Atmospheric tracer tests and assessment of a potential accident at the National Medical Cyclotron, Camperdown, NSW, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.H.; Bartsch, F.J.K.; Stone, D.J.M.

    1994-08-01

    In order to assess the impact of a potential atmospheric release of radionuclides from the National Medical Cyclotron facility, in Camperdown, an atmospheric tracer release, sampling and analysis system using SF 6 was developed. During eight experiments conducted in a variety of meteorological conditions, ten samplers were located in the vicinity of the Cyclotron building and other nearby buildings on the rapid downward movement of the tracer gas plume. The atmospheric dilution factors which lead to the highest observed air concentrations were then applied to the releases of I 123 and Xe 123 from a potential accident scenario in order to assess the impact on nearby receptors. Even given the conservative assumptions about the release of I 123 , the estimated radiation doses were at least an order of magnitude below the international standards for doses to member of the public. 27 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs

  12. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  13. Project of positron source at the U-120 Cyclotron, Bucharest. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, P.M.; Popa Simil, L.; Voiculescu, Dana; Miron, N.

    1999-01-01

    To extend the applications with our U-120 Cyclotron we started a project of off-line and on-line positron sources produced at the cyclotron. This machine may be successfully used for producing positron sources with few day half-life for off-line positron studies (eg. 48 V), or a cyclotron on-line intense positron beam (eg. 27 Si) with a variable energy for various materials study experiments, enough to cover a depth range from few micrometers down to tens of nanometers. Until now, using a 48 V positron source we performed experiments for determination of the Doppler broadening of the 511 KeV peak for different materials (copper, lead, indium). This research is carrier out on a cooperation agreement between IFIN-HH Bucharest and LISES-Chisinau. The positron source project is now in its initial stage. This stage consists of the experiments on the off-line version using positron sources produced in the cyclotron (eg. 48 V, 22 Na), to develop experience with detection chains (Doppler broadening and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy), to choose proper experiments in order to select moderator materials (W, Mo, Pt, etc.) and to study and design the different versions for the on-line production of positrons with the cyclotron. Slow positrons are valuable tools in atomic physics, materials science and solid state physics research. The controlled energy beam facility can be used to probe defects in metals, to study Fermi surfaces and materials surfaces and interfaces and to obtain detailed information about the electronic structure of materials. The aim of this project is to perform applications in the semiconductor industry, for coating materials, polymers, biomaterials etc. (authors)

  14. Project of positron source at the U-120 cyclotron Bucharest status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, P.M.; Simil Popa, L.; Voiculescu, Dana; Miron, N.

    2000-01-01

    To extend the applications with our U-120 Cyclotron we started a project of off-line positron sources produced at the cyclotron. This machine may be successfully used for producing positron sources with few day half-life for off-line positron studies (e.g. 48 V), or a cyclotron on-line intense positron beam (e.g. 27 Si) with a variable energy for various materials study experiments, enough to cover a depth range from a few micrometers down to tens of nanometers. Until now, using a 48 V positron source we performed experiments for determination of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV peak for different materials (copper, lead, indium). This research is carried out on a cooperation agreement between IFIN-HH Bucharest and LISES-Chisinau. The positron source project is now in its initial stage. This stage consists of the experiments on the off-line version using positron source produced in the cyclotron (e.g. 48 V, 22 Na), to develop experience with detection chains (Doppler broadening and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy) to choose proper experiments in order to select moderator materials (W, Mo, Pt, etc.) and to study and design the different versions for the on-line positron production by cyclotron. Slow positrons are valuable tools in atomic physics, materials science and solid state physics research. The controlled energy beam facility can be used to probe defects in metals, to study Fermi surfaces and materials surfaces and interfaces and to obtained detailed information about electronic structures of materials. The aim of this project is to perform applications in the semiconductor industry, for coating materials, polymers, biomaterials, etc. (authors)

  15. Radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  16. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  17. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  18. Radionuclide deposition control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for controlling the deposition, on to the surfaces of reactor components, of the radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from a liquid stream containing the radionuclides. The method consists of disposing a getter material (nickel) in the liquid stream, and a non-getter material (tantalum, tungsten or molybdenum) as a coating on the surfaces where deposition is not desired. The process is described with special reference to its use in the coolant circuit in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. (U.K.)

  19. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  20. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  1. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2003-04-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. This project is composed of 6 subjects such as data production required for safety assessments, sorption properties and mechanisms, nuclide migration in the fractured rock, colloid formation and migration, nuclide speciation in deep geological environments, and total evaluation of geochemical behaviors considering multi-factors. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  2. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities

  3. Separation of radionuclides from water by magnesium oxide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Chia-Lian; Lo, Jem-Mau; Yeh, Si-Jung

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption by magnesium oxide of more than forty radionuclides in respective ionic species in water was observed. Generally, the radionuclides in di-valent and/or multi-valent cations are favorably adsorbed by magnesium oxide; but not for the those in mono-valent cations. In addition, the adsorption by magnesium oxide was not effective to most of the radionuclides in negative ionic species. From the observations, the adsorption mechanism is more prominently by the ion exchange of the di- or multi-valent cation species with the hydrous magnesium oxide. Separation of the radionuclides related to the corrosion products possibly produced in a nuclear power plant from natural seawater was attempted by the magnesium oxide adsorption method. It should be emphasized that the adsorption method was found to be practical for separating radionuclides from a large quantity of natural seawater with high recovery and high reproducibility. (author)

  4. Taking radionuclides to heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  5. Radionuclides deposition over Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourchet, M.; Magand, O.; Frezzotti, M.; Ekaykin, A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive map of the distribution patterns for both natural and artificial radionuclides over Antarctica has been established. This work integrates the results of several decades of international programs focusing on the analysis of natural and artificial radionuclides in snow and ice cores from this polar region. The mean value (37±20 Bq m -2 ) of 241 Pu total deposition over 28 stations is determined from the gamma emissions of its daughter 241 Am, presenting a long half-life (432.7 yrs). Detailed profiles and distributions of 241 Pu in ice cores make it possible to clearly distinguish between the atmospheric thermonuclear tests of the fifties and sixties. Strong relationships are also found between radionuclide data ( 137 Cs with respect to 241 Pu and 210 Pb with respect to 137 Cs), make it possible to estimate the total deposition or natural fluxes of these radionuclides. Total deposition of 137 Cs over Antarctica is estimated at 760 TBq, based on results from the 90-180 deg. East sector. Given the irregular distribution of sampling sites, more ice cores and snow samples must be analyzed in other sectors of Antarctica to check the validity of this figure

  6. Soil burden by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.E.H.; Wenzel, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity - half-lifes and radiation type of man-made nuclides, radionuclide behaviour in soils, effects on soil condition and soil functions are described. The only mode of decontamination is by decay and thus primarily dependent on the half-life of nuclides

  7. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  8. Radionuclide body function imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A transverse radionuclide scan field imaging apparatus is claimed. It comprises: a plurality of highly focused closely laterally adjacent collimators arranged inwardly focused in an array which surrounds a scan field, each collimator being moveable relative to its adjacent collimator; means for rotating the array about the scan field and means for imparting travel to the collimators

  9. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω + ), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω + quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω + frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω + frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Research and education by SF cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report represents the current activities in research and education using the cyclotron facility and related apparatus which are supported by Nuclear Physics Division and this is a continuation of INS-T-466 (1986, December). In this version an iron-free β-ray spectrometer and a cooler-synchrotron (TARN II) are briefly described also in the first chapter. The second chapter explains experimental programs performed in the last 5 years. The third chapter gives the number of publications on researches performed in 1975-1991, and also gives twelve topics obtained from the cyclotron and the β-ray spectrometer in recent 5 years. The last chapter provides the whole list of the works for Doctor and Master theses performed at the facility in the last 10 years. (J.P.N.)

  11. MMS Observations of Harmonic Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M.; Ahmadi, N.; Ergun, R.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Mauk, B.; Le Contel, O.; Giles, B. L.; Russell, C. T.; Burch, J.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Harmonically related electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves with the fundamental frequency near the O+ cyclotron frequency were observed by the four MMS spacecraft on May 20, 2016. The wave activity was detected by the spacecraft on their inbound passage through the Earth's morning magnetosphere during generally quiet geomagnetic conditions but enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure. It was also associated with an enhancement of energetic H+ and O+ ions. The waves are seen in both magnetic and electric fields, formed by over ten higher order harmonics, most pronounced in the electric field. The wave activity lasted for about an hour with some wave packets giving rise to short-lived structures extending from Hz to kHz range. These observations are particularly interesting since they suggest cross-frequency coupling between the lower and higher frequency modes. Further work will focus on examining the nature and role of these waves in the energetic particle dynamics from a theoretical perspective.

  12. Neutron radiography with the cyclotron, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi; Fujishiro, Masatoshi; Tsujii, Yukio

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiography is well recognized as a powerful tool in nondestructive testing, but not widely used yet owing to lack of high intense thermal neutron source convenient for practical use. A new neutron radiograph facility, utilizing a sub-compact cyclotron as neutron source and equipped with vertical and horizontal irradiation ports, is presented in this article. A series of experiment, prior to its construction, was conducted using beams of a variable energy cyclotron at Tohoku University to investigate the characteristics of thermal neutron obtained, from 9 Be (p, n) reaction and thermalized by elastic scattering process. This article describes a computer simulation of neutron moderator to analyze conditions getting maximal thermal neutron flux. Some of practical neutron radiograph examination of aero-space components and museum art objects of classic bronze mirror are also presented together with an attempt realizing real time imaging technique. (author)

  13. Research activities by INS cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    Research activities made by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo, have been reviewed in terms of the associated scientific publications. This publication list, which is to be read as a continuation of INS-Rep.-608 (October, 1986), includes experimental works on low-energy nuclear physics, accelerator technology, instrumental developments, radiation physics and other applications in interdisciplinary fields. The publications are classified into the following four categories. (A) : Internal reports published in INS. (B) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental research works done by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at INS. Those made by outside users are also included. (C) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental low-energy nuclear physics, which have been done by the staff of INS Nuclear Physics Division using facilities outside INS. (D) : Contributions to international conferences. (author)

  14. New design for a medical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M

    1985-12-01

    The Oxford Instruments Group PLC, have designed a 30 MeV energy proton cyclotron incorporating a super-conducting magnet and a novel RF accelerating cavity. The energy range is suitable for the production of isotopes such as /sup 67/Ga, /sup 111/In, /sup 123/I and /sup 201/Tl, and the short lived isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine for use in Positron Emmission Tomography (PET). A new magnet and RF cavity design permit a considerable power and weight reduction and a compact size (1.5m dia x 1.9m high), allowing the cyclotron to be transported to a shielded site as an assembly after factory testing. A method of beam extraction has been adopted which minimises activation of the accelerator components and so allows hands on maintenance to be carried out when required.

  15. Matching of ion sources to cyclotron inflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baartman, R.

    1988-06-01

    In general, cyclotron inflectors strongly couple the two transverse subspaces. This leads to a growth in emittance projections for a beam with no initial correlation between the two transverse subspaces. Only in the case of the Mueller (hyperboloid) inflector is there no emittance growth. We have made calculations using an optimization routine to match a given beam through the axial injection system. We find that in the limit where all the emittance is due to a beam's axial angular momentum (for example, from an ECR source), matching with no emittance growth is possible even in the case of mirror or spiral inflectors. Moreover, any one of the two transverse emittances circulating in the cyclotron can be made smaller than the source emittance while maintaining the sum of the emittances constant. This is achieved by rotating the matching quadrupoles with respect to the inflector and retuning

  16. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  17. Evaluation of {sup 18}F radioactive concentration in exhaust at cyclotron facility at Chosun University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Cheol Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chsoun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    the recent prevalence of PET examinations in Korea has led to an increase in the number of cyclotrons. the medical isotope 18F produced in most cyclotron facilities currently operating in Korea is emitted into the environment during the production of [{sup 18}F]FdG, a cancerdiagnosis reagent. the amount of [{sup 18}F]FdG synthesized determines the radioactive concentration of {sup 18}F in the exhaust. at some facilities, this amount temporarily exceeds the emission limit. In this study, we evaluated the {sup 18}F radioactivity concentration in the exhaust from the cyclotron facility at chosun university. the {sup 18}F radioactivity concentration was measured using an air sampler and a hPGe semiconductor detector. the measurements showed that the radioactive concentration of {sup 18}F in the exhaust at the cyclotron facility at Chosun university was the highest during [{sup 18}F]FdG synthesis but remained under the legal limit of 2,000 Bq m{sup -3}.

  18. Comparative study of ion cyclotron waves at Mars, Venus and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T. L.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2011-08-01

    Ion cyclotron waves are generated in the solar wind when it picks up freshly ionized planetary exospheric ions. These waves grow from the free energy of the highly anisotropic distribution of fresh pickup ions, and are observed in the spacecraft frame with left-handed polarization and a wave frequency near the ion's gyrofrequency. At Mars and Venus and in the Earth's polar cusp, the solar wind directly interacts with the planetary exospheres. Ion cyclotron waves with many similar properties are observed in these diverse plasma environments. The ion cyclotron waves at Mars indicate its hydrogen exosphere to be extensive and asymmetric in the direction of the interplanetary electric field. The production of fast neutrals plays an important role in forming an extended exosphere in the shape and size observed. At Venus, the region of exospheric proton cyclotron wave production may be restricted to the magnetosheath. The waves observed in the solar wind at Venus appear to be largely produced by the solar-wind-Venus interaction, with some waves at higher frequencies formed near the Sun and carried outward by the solar wind to Venus. These waves have some similarity to the expected properties of exospherically produced proton pickup waves but are characterized by magnetic connection to the bow shock or by a lack of correlation with local solar wind properties respectively. Any confusion of solar derived waves with exospherically derived ion pickup waves is not an issue at Mars because the solar-produced waves are generally at much higher frequencies than the local pickup waves and the solar waves should be mostly absorbed when convected to Mars distance as the proton cyclotron frequency in the plasma frame approaches the frequency of the solar-produced waves. In the Earth's polar cusp, the wave properties of ion cyclotron waves are quite variable. Spatial gradients in the magnetic field may cause this variation as the background field changes between the regions in which

  19. Electron cyclotron emission from the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Arunasalam, V.; Cano, R.

    1977-07-01

    Experimental measurements of electron cyclotron emission from the PLT tokamak plasma reveal that black-body emission occurs at the fundamental frequency. Such emission, not possible by direct thermal excitation of electromagnetic waves, is herein attributed to thermal excitation of electrostatic (Bernstein) waves which then mode convert into electromagnetic waves. The local feature of the electrostatic wave generation permits spatially and time resolved measurements of electron temperature as for the second harmonic emission

  20. The superconducting separated orbit cyclotron TRITRON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinks, U.

    1984-01-01

    At the Munich 13 MV-Tandem Laboratory the TRITRON is under development, which will be the prototype of a superconducting separated orbit cyclotron for acceleration of heavy ions with 0.04 or approx.20) of the revolution frequency. Thus the frequency range for acceleration of ions with different revolution frequency can be kept small (+-3%). The magnets as well as the cavities are contained in the same cavity. (orig.)