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Sample records for cyclin dependent kinases

  1. Localization of two mammalian cyclin dependent kinases during mammalian meiosis

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    Ashley, T.; Walpita, D.; de rooij, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian meiotic progression, like mitotic cell cycle progression, is regulated by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). However, the unique requirements of meiosis (homologous synapsis, reciprocal recombination and the dual divisions that segregate first homologues, then sister chromatids)

  2. The Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 of Human Cytomegalovirus Interacts with Cyclins

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    Laura Graf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV-encoded protein kinase, pUL97, is considered a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK ortholog, due to shared structural and functional characteristics. The primary mechanism of CDK activation is binding to corresponding cyclins, including cyclin T1, which is the usual regulatory cofactor of CDK9. This study provides evidence of direct interaction between pUL97 and cyclin T1 using yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed partial colocalization of pUL97 with cyclin T1 in subnuclear compartments, most pronounced in viral replication centres. The distribution patterns of pUL97 and cyclin T1 were independent of HCMV strain and host cell type. The sequence domain of pUL97 responsible for the interaction with cyclin T1 was between amino acids 231–280. Additional co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed cyclin B1 and cyclin A as further pUL97 interaction partners. Investigation of the pUL97-cyclin T1 interaction in an ATP consumption assay strongly suggested phosphorylation of pUL97 by the CDK9/cyclin T1 complex in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of interaction between a herpesviral CDK ortholog and cellular cyclins.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

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    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  4. Prediction of cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation substrates.

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    Emmanuel J Chang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation, mediated by a family of enzymes called cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks, plays a central role in the cell-division cycle of eukaryotes. Phosphorylation by Cdks directs the cell cycle by modifying the function of regulators of key processes such as DNA replication and mitotic progression. Here, we present a novel computational procedure to predict substrates of the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 (Cdk1 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Currently, most computational phosphorylation site prediction procedures focus solely on local sequence characteristics. In the present procedure, we model Cdk substrates based on both local and global characteristics of the substrates. Thus, we define the local sequence motifs that represent the Cdc28 phosphorylation sites and subsequently model clustering of these motifs within the protein sequences. This restraint reflects the observation that many known Cdk substrates contain multiple clustered phosphorylation sites. The present strategy defines a subset of the proteome that is highly enriched for Cdk substrates, as validated by comparing it to a set of bona fide, published, experimentally characterized Cdk substrates which was to our knowledge, comprehensive at the time of writing. To corroborate our model, we compared its predictions with three experimentally independent Cdk proteomic datasets and found significant overlap. Finally, we directly detected in vivo phosphorylation at Cdk motifs for selected putative substrates using mass spectrometry.

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

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    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  7. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 Activity Regulates Neutrophil Spontaneous Apoptosis

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    Hazeldine, Jon; Krystof, Vladimir; Strnad, Miroslav; Pechan, Paul; M., Janet

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases. PMID:22276149

  8. Characterization of cyclin-dependent kinases and Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunits in Trichomonas vaginalis.

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    Amador, Erick; López-Pacheco, Karla; Morales, Nataly; Coria, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2017-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have important roles in regulating key checkpoints between stages of the cell cycle. Their activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including through binding with cyclin proteins and the Cdc2/Cdc28 kinase subunit (CKS), and their phosphorylation at specific amino acids. Studies of the components involved in cell cycle control in parasitic protozoa are limited. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis in humans and is therefore important in public health; however, some of the basic biological processes used by this organism have not been defined. Here, we characterized proteins potentially involved in cell cycle regulation in T. vaginalis. Three genes encoding protein kinases were identified in the T. vaginalis genome, and the corresponding recombinant proteins (TvCRK1, TvCRK2, TvCRK5) were studied. These proteins displayed similar sequence features to CDKs. Two genes encoding CKSs were also identified, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were found to interact with TvCRK1 and TvCRK2 by a yeast two-hybrid system. One putative cyclin B protein from T. vaginalis was found to bind to and activate the kinase activities of TvCRK1 and TvCRK5, but not TvCRK2. This work is the first characterization of proteins involved in cell cycle control in T. vaginalis.

  9. Sanguinarine causes cell cycle blockade and apoptosis of human prostate carcinoma cells via modulation of cyclin kinase inhibitor-cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase machinery.

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    Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Reagan-Shaw, Shannon R; Nihal, Minakshi; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2004-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males in the United States. This warrants the development of novel mechanism-based strategies for the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. Several studies have shown that plant-derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an alkaloid derived from the bloodroot plant Sanguinaria canadensis, has been shown to possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Previously, we have shown that sanguinarine possesses strong antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and immortalized human HaCaT keratinocytes. Here, employing androgen-responsive human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells and androgen-unresponsive human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells, we studied the antiproliferative properties of sanguinarine against prostate cancer. Sanguinarine (0.1-2 micromol/L) treatment of LNCaP and DU145 cells for 24 hours resulted in dose-dependent (1) inhibition of cell growth [as evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay], (2) arrest of cells in G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle (as assessed by DNA cell cycle analysis), and (3) induction of apoptosis (as evaluated by DNA ladder formation and flow cytometry). To define the mechanism of antiproliferative effects of sanguinarine against prostate cancer, we studied the effect of sanguinarine on critical molecular events known to regulate the cell cycle and the apoptotic machinery. Immunoblot analysis showed that sanguinarine treatment of both LNCaP and DU145 cells resulted in significant (1) induction of cyclin kinase inhibitors p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1; (2) down-regulation of cyclin E, D1, and D2; and (3) down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, 4, and 6. A highlight of this study was the fact that sanguinarine induced growth inhibitory and antiproliferative effects in human prostate carcinoma cells irrespective of their androgen

  10. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

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    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2010-01-01

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and cyclin E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic

  11. Acetylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is mediated by GCN5

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    Lee, Juhyung; Yun, Nuri; Kim, Chiho [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Young; Park, Kang-Sik [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Science Institute, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young J., E-mail: yjoh@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is present as an acetylated form. • CDK5 is acetylated by GCN5. • CDK5’s acetylation site is mapped at Lys33. • Its acetylation may affect CDK5’s kinase activity. - Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a member of atypical serine/threonine cyclin-dependent kinase family, plays a crucial role in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Its kinase activity and substrate specificity are regulated by several independent pathways including binding with its activator, phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. In the present study, we report that acetylation of CDK5 comprises an additional posttranslational modification within the cells. Among many candidates, we confirmed that its acetylation is enhanced by GCN5, a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyl-transferase family of histone acetyltransferase. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescent localization study indicated that GCN5 physically interacts with CDK5 and they are co-localized at the specific nuclear foci. Furthermore, liquid chromatography in conjunction with a mass spectrometry indicated that CDK5 is acetylated at Lys33 residue of ATP binding domain. Considering this lysine site is conserved among a wide range of species and other related cyclin-dependent kinases, therefore, we speculate that acetylation may alter the kinase activity of CDK5 via affecting efficacy of ATP coordination.

  12. Synthesis of the small peptide analogues of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK4) for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Romsaiyud, Jariya

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a group of enzymes that are involved in cell cycle progression regulation. The CDKs activate host proteins through phosphorylation on serine or threonine using adenosine triphosphate as a phosphate donor. Especially, cyclindependent kinase 4 (CDK4) has attracted much attention as a potential therapeutic target in treating cancer because it is the key player in the control of cell proliferation. Comparison of the best model of CDK4 with the structures of CDK...

  13. Selective Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors Discriminating between Cell Cycle and Transcriptional Kinases Future Reality or Utopia?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wesierska-Gadek, J.; Kryštof, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1171, - (2009), s. 228-241 ISSN 0077-8923 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/0511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cell cycle * CYC202 * cyclin-dependent kinase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.670, year: 2009

  14. Flavopiridol, the first cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor: recent advances in combination chemotherapy.

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    Wang, L M; Ren, D M

    2010-10-01

    The cell cycle is the series of events necessary for the division and duplication of a cell. The dysregulation of the cell cycle can promote the development of cancer. A group of proteins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), that control the cell cycle, provide new targets for treating cancer. As a result, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) represent a novel class of chemotherapeutic agents. Of these, flavopiridol, a semisynthetic flavonoidal alkaloid, emerged as the first CDKI to enter clinical trials. Preclinical data indicate that flavopiridol could block the proliferation of neoplastic cells and induce programmed cell death as a single agent. Furthermore, recent emerging data revealed that flavopiridol can potentiate, generally in a dose- and sequence-dependent manner, the anti-tumor effects of many established chemotherapeutic agents. This review is primarily focused on the role of flavopiridol in combination with various therapeutic agents that are in or near clinical development.

  15. Heterobiaryl purine derivatives as potent antiproliferative agents: inhibitors of cyclin dependent kinases. Part II.

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    Trova, Michael P; Barnes, Keith D; Alicea, Luis; Benanti, Travis; Bielaska, Mark; Bilotta, Joseph; Bliss, Brian; Duong, Thuy Nguyen; Haydar, Simon; Herr, R Jason; Hui, Yu; Johnson, Matthew; Lehman, John M; Peace, Denise; Rainka, Matthew; Snider, Patricia; Salamone, Susan; Tregay, Steven; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Friedrich, Thomas D

    2009-12-01

    C-6 Biarylmethylamino purine derivatives of roscovitine (1) inhibit cyclin dependent kinases and demonstrate potent antiproliferative activity. Replacement of the aryl rings of the C-6 biarylmethylamino group with heterobiaryl rings has provided compounds with significantly improved activity. In particular, derivatives 18 g and 9 c demonstrated 1000-fold and 1250-fold improvements, respectively, in the growth inhibition of HeLa cells compared to roscovitine (1).

  16. Cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors including palbociclib as anticancer drugs.

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    Roskoski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) are important regulatory components that are required for cell cycle progression. The levels of the cell cycle CDKs are generally constant and their activities are controlled by cyclins, proteins whose levels oscillate during each cell cycle. Additional CDK family members were subsequently discovered that play significant roles in a wide range of activities including the control of gene transcription, metabolism, and neuronal function. In response to mitogenic stimuli, cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle produce cyclins of the D type that activate CDK4/6. These activated enzymes catalyze the monophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. Then CDK2-cyclin E catalyzes the hyperphosphorylation of Rb that promotes the release and activation of the E2F transcription factors, which in turn lead to the generation of several proteins required for cell cycle progression. As a result, cells pass through the G1-restriction point and are committed to complete cell division. CDK2-cyclin A, CDK1-cyclin A, and CDK1-cyclin B are required for S, G2, and M-phase progression. Increased cyclin or CDK expression or decreased levels of endogenous CDK inhibitors such as INK4 or CIP/KIP have been observed in various cancers. In contrast to the mutational activation of EGFR, Kit, or B-Raf in the pathogenesis of malignancies, mutations in the CDKs that cause cancers are rare. Owing to their role in cell proliferation, CDKs represent natural targets for anticancer therapies. Abemaciclib (LY2835219), ribociclib (Lee011), and palbociclib (Ibrance(®) or PD0332991) target CDK4/6 with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. Palbociclib and other CDK inhibitors bind in the cleft between the small and large lobes of the CDKs and inhibit the binding of ATP. Like ATP, palbociclib forms hydrogen bonds with residues in the hinge segment of the cleft. Like the adenine base of ATP, palbociclib interacts with catalytic spine residues CS6 and CS7

  17. Structural basis of divergent cyclin-dependent kinase activation by Spy1/RINGO proteins

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    McGrath, Denise A.; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Marceau, Aimee H.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Porter, Lisa A.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Windsor)

    2017-06-30

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are principal drivers of cell division and are an important therapeutic target to inhibit aberrant proliferation. Cdk enzymatic activity is tightly controlled through cyclin interactions, posttranslational modifications, and binding of inhibitors such as the p27 tumor suppressor protein. Spy1/RINGO (Spy1) proteins bind and activate Cdk but are resistant to canonical regulatory mechanisms that establish cell-cycle checkpoints. Cancer cells exploit Spy1 to stimulate proliferation through inappropriate activation of Cdks, yet the mechanism is unknown. We have determined crystal structures of the Cdk2-Spy1 and p27-Cdk2-Spy1 complexes that reveal how Spy1 activates Cdk. We find that Spy1 confers structural changes to Cdk2 that obviate the requirement of Cdk activation loop phosphorylation. Spy1 lacks the cyclin-binding site that mediates p27 and substrate affinity, explaining why Cdk-Spy1 is poorly inhibited by p27 and lacks specificity for substrates with cyclin-docking sites. We identify mutations in Spy1 that ablate its ability to activate Cdk2 and to proliferate cells. Our structural description of Spy1 provides important mechanistic insights that may be utilized for targeting upregulated Spy1 in cancer.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase five mediates activation of lung xanthine oxidoreductase in response to hypoxia.

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    Bo S Kim

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is involved in oxidative metabolism of purines and is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. As such, XOR has been implicated in oxidant-mediated injury in multiple cardiopulmonary diseases. XOR enzyme activity is regulated, in part, via a phosphorylation-dependent, post-translational mechanism, although the kinase(s responsible for such hyperactivation are unknown.Using an in silico approach, we identified a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 consensus motif adjacent to the XOR flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding domain. CDK5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase historically linked to neural development and injury. We tested the hypothesis that CDK5 and its activators are mediators of hypoxia-induced hyperactivation of XOR in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (EC and the intact murine lung. Using complementary molecular and pharmacologic approaches, we demonstrated that hypoxia significantly increased CDK5 activity in EC. This was coincident with increased expression of the CDK5 activators, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5r1 or p35/p25, and decreased expression of the CDK5 inhibitory peptide, p10. Expression of p35/p25 was necessary for XOR hyperactivation. Further, CDK5 physically associated with XOR and was necessary and sufficient for XOR phosphorylation and hyperactivation both in vitro and in vivo. XOR hyperactivation required the target threonine (T222 within the CDK5-consensus motif.These results indicate that p35/CDK5-mediated phosphorylation of T222 is required for hypoxia-induced XOR hyperactivation in the lung. Recognizing the contribution of XOR to oxidative injury in cardiopulmonary disease, these observations identify p35/CDK5 as novel regulators of XOR and potential modifiers of ROS-mediated injury.

  19. A quantitative model for cyclin-dependent kinase control of the cell cycle: revisited.

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    Uhlmann, Frank; Bouchoux, Céline; López-Avilés, Sandra

    2011-12-27

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle encompasses an ordered series of events. Chromosomal DNA is replicated during S phase of the cell cycle before being distributed to daughter cells in mitosis. Both S phase and mitosis in turn consist of an intricately ordered sequence of molecular events. How cell cycle ordering is achieved, to promote healthy cell proliferation and avert insults on genomic integrity, has been a theme of Paul Nurse's research. To explain a key aspect of cell cycle ordering, sequential S phase and mitosis, Stern & Nurse proposed 'A quantitative model for cdc2 control of S phase and mitosis in fission yeast'. In this model, S phase and mitosis are ordered by their dependence on increasing levels of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. Alternative mechanisms for ordering have been proposed that rely on checkpoint controls or on sequential waves of cyclins with distinct substrate specificities. Here, we review these ideas in the light of experimental evidence that has meanwhile accumulated. Quantitative Cdk control emerges as the basis for cell cycle ordering, fine-tuned by cyclin specificity and checkpoints. We propose a molecular explanation for quantitative Cdk control, based on thresholds imposed by Cdk-counteracting phosphatases, and discuss its implications.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase activity enhances phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by repressing phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity.

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    Craddock, Christian P; Adams, Nicolette; Kroon, Johan T M; Bryant, Fiona M; Hussey, Patrick J; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of endomembrane biogenesis with cell cycle progression is considered to be important in maintaining cell function during growth and development. We previously showed that the disruption of PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE (PAH) activity in Arabidopsis thaliana stimulates biosynthesis of the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and causes expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we show that PC biosynthesis is repressed by disruption of the core cell cycle regulator CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 (CDKA;1) and that this repression is reliant on PAH. Furthermore, we show that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) phosphorylate PAH1 at serine 162, which reduces both its activity and membrane association. Expression of a CDK-insensitive version of PAH1 with a serine 162 to alanine substitution represses PC biosynthesis and also reduces the rate of cell division in early leaf development. Together our findings reveal a physiologically important mechanism that couples the rate of phospholipid biosynthesis and endomembrane biogenesis to cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Identifying allosteric fluctuation transitions between different protein conformational states as applied to Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2

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    Gu Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying protein function and associated conformational change are dominated by a series of local entropy fluctuations affecting the global structure yet are mediated by only a few key residues. Transitional Dynamic Analysis (TDA is a new method to detect these changes in local protein flexibility between different conformations arising from, for example, ligand binding. Additionally, Positional Impact Vertex for Entropy Transfer (PIVET uses TDA to identify important residue contact changes that have a large impact on global fluctuation. We demonstrate the utility of these methods for Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a system with crystal structures of this protein in multiple functionally relevant conformations and experimental data revealing the importance of local fluctuation changes for protein function. Results TDA and PIVET successfully identified select residues that are responsible for conformation specific regional fluctuation in the activation cycle of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2. The detected local changes in protein flexibility have been experimentally confirmed to be essential for the regulation and function of the kinase. The methodologies also highlighted possible errors in previous molecular dynamic simulations that need to be resolved in order to understand this key player in cell cycle regulation. Finally, the use of entropy compensation as a possible allosteric mechanism for protein function is reported for CDK2. Conclusion The methodologies embodied in TDA and PIVET provide a quick approach to identify local fluctuation change important for protein function and residue contacts that contributes to these changes. Further, these approaches can be used to check for possible errors in protein dynamic simulations and have the potential to facilitate a better understanding of the contribution of entropy to protein allostery and function.

  2. Improved tumor control through circadian clock induction by Seliciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

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    Iurisci, Ida; Filipski, Elisabeth; Reinhardt, Jens; Bach, Stéphane; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Iacobelli, Stefano; Meijer, Laurent; Lévi, Francis

    2006-11-15

    The circadian timing system and the cell division cycle are frequently deregulated in cancer. The therapeutic relevance of the reciprocal interactions between both biological rhythms was investigated using Seliciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CDKI). Mice bearing Glasgow osteosarcoma received Seliciclib (300 mg/kg/d orally) or vehicle for 5 days at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 3, 11, or 19. On day 6, tumor mRNA 24-hour expression patterns were determined for clock genes (Per2, Rev-erbalpha, and Bmal1) and clock-controlled cell cycle genes (c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin B1, and CDK1) with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Affinity chromatography on immobilized Seliciclib identified CDK1/CDK2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/ERK2, CDK7/CDK9, and casein kinase CK1epsilon as Seliciclib targets, which respectively regulate cell cycle, transcription, and circadian clock in Glasgow osteosarcoma. Seliciclib reduced tumor growth by 55% following dosing at ZT3 or ZT11 and by 35% at ZT19 compared with controls (P clock gene expression patterns with physiologic phase relations only after ZT3 dosing. c-Myc and Wee1 mRNAs displayed synchronous circadian rhythms in the tumors of control mice receiving vehicle only but not in those of mice given the drug. Seliciclib further enhanced Wee1 expression irrespective of dosing time, an effect that reinforced G(2)-M gating. Seliciclib also inhibited CK1epsilon, which determines circadian period length. The coordination of clock gene expression patterns in tumor cells was associated with best antitumor activity of Seliciclib. The circadian clock and its upstream regulators represent relevant targets for CDKIs.

  3. Identification and Functional Characterisation of CRK12:CYC9, a Novel Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK-Cyclin Complex in Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Séverine Monnerat

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, is spread by the tsetse fly and causes trypanosomiasis in humans and animals. Both the life cycle and cell cycle of the parasite are complex. Trypanosomes have eleven cdc2-related kinases (CRKs and ten cyclins, an unusually large number for a single celled organism. To date, relatively little is known about the function of many of the CRKs and cyclins, and only CRK3 has previously been shown to be cyclin-dependent in vivo. Here we report the identification of a previously uncharacterised CRK:cyclin complex between CRK12 and the putative transcriptional cyclin, CYC9. CRK12:CYC9 interact to form an active protein kinase complex in procyclic and bloodstream T. brucei. Both CRK12 and CYC9 are essential for the proliferation of bloodstream trypanosomes in vitro, and we show that CRK12 is also essential for survival of T. brucei in a mouse model, providing genetic validation of CRK12:CYC9 as a novel drug target for trypanosomiasis. Further, functional characterisation of CRK12 and CYC9 using RNA interference reveals roles for these proteins in endocytosis and cytokinesis, respectively.

  4. Drug Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Inhibitor for Melanoma from Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Hsin-Chieh Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One has found an important cell cycle controller. This guard can decide the cell cycle toward proliferation or quiescence. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a unique target among the CDK family in melanoma therapy. We attempted to find out TCM compounds from TCM Database@Taiwan that have the ability to inhibit the activity of CDK2 by systems biology. We selected Tetrahydropalmatine, Reserpiline, and (+-Corydaline as the candidates by docking and screening results for further survey. We utilized support vector machine (SVM, multiple linear regression (MLR models and Bayesian network for validation of predicted activity. By overall analysis of docking results, predicted activity, and molecular dynamics (MD simulation, we could conclude that Tetrahydropalmatine, Reserpiline, and (+-Corydaline had better binding affinity than the control. All of them had the ability to inhibit the activity of CDK2 and might have the opportunity to be applied in melanoma therapy.

  5. Synaptic roles of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 & its implications in epilepsy

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    Aparna Banerjee Dixit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy to find novel prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers to prevent epilepsy patients at risk. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 is involved in multiple neuronal functions and plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating intracellular signalling cascades at synapses. CDK5 deregulation is shown to be associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The association between chronic loss of CDK5 and seizures has been reported in animal models of epilepsy. Genetic expression of CDK5 at transcriptome level has been shown to be abnormal in intractable epilepsy. In this review various possible mechanisms by which deregulated CDK5 may alter synaptic transmission and possibly lead to epileptogenesis have been discussed. Further, CDK5 has been proposed as a potential biomarker as well as a pharmacological target for developing treatments for epilepsy.

  6. Multiple cyclin-dependent kinases signals are critical mediators of ischemia/hypoxic neuronal death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Juliet; Iyirhiaro, Grace; Aleyasin, Hossein; Rios, Mario; Vincent, Inez; Callaghan, Steven; Bland, Ross J; Slack, Ruth S; During, Matthew J; Park, David S

    2005-09-27

    The mechanisms involving neuronal death after ischemic/hypoxic insult are complex, involving both rapid (excitotoxic) and delayed (apoptotic-like) processes. Recent evidence suggests that cell cycle regulators such as cyclin-dependent kinases are abnormally activated in neuropathological conditions, including stroke. However, the function of this activation is unclear. Here, we provide evidence that inhibition of the cell cycle regulator, Cdk4, and its activator, cyclinD1, plays critical roles in the delayed death component of ischemic/hypoxic stress by regulating the tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein. In contrast, the excitotoxic component of ischemia/hypoxia is predominately regulated by Cdk5 and its activator p35, components of a cyclin-dependent kinase complex associated with neuronal development. Hence, our data both characterize the functional significance of the cell cycle Cdk4 and neuronal Cdk5 signals as well as define the pathways and circumstances by which they act to control ischemic/hypoxic damage.

  7. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, dinaciclib in preclinical treatment models of thyroid cancer.

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    Shu-Fu Lin

    Full Text Available We explored the therapeutic effects of dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor, in the treatment of thyroid cancer.Seven cell lines originating from three pathologic types of thyroid cancer (papillary, follicular and anaplastic were studied. The cytotoxicity of dinaciclib was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The expression of proteins associated with cell cycle and apoptosis was assessed using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were measured by flow cytometry and fluorometric assay. Mice bearing flank anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC were treated with intraperitoneal injections of dinaciclib.Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Dinaciclib had a low median-effect dose (≤ 16.0 nM to inhibit cell proliferation in seven thyroid cancer cell lines. Dinaciclib decreased CDK1, cyclin B1, and Aurora A expression, induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and induced accumulation of prophase mitotic cells. Dinaciclib decreased Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and survivin expression, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis. In vivo, the growth of ATC xenograft tumors was retarded in a dose-dependent fashion with daily dinaciclib treatment. Higher-dose dinaciclib (50 mg/kg caused slight, but significant weight loss, which was absent with lower-dose dinaciclib (40 mg/kg treatment.Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These findings support dinaciclib as a potential drug for further studies in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with refractory thyroid cancer.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer: palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapisz, Dorota

    2017-11-01

    The cyclin D-cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-inhibitor of CDK4 (INK4)-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression and its dysregulation is an important contributor to endocrine therapy resistance. CDK4/6 inhibitors trigger cell cycle arrest in Rb protein (pRb)-competent cells. Recent years have seen the development of selective CDK4/6 inhibitors, which have delivered promising results of efficacy and manageable safety profiles. The main objective of this review is to discuss preclinical and clinical data to date, and ongoing clinical trials with palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib in breast cancer. A literature search of above topics was carried out using PubMed and data reported at international oncology meetings and clinicaltrials.gov were included. The highly selective oral CDK4/6 inhibitors have been tested in combination with endocrine therapy in Phase III studies in metastatic breast cancer. Results led to the US Food and Drug Administration approval of palbociclib (PD0332991) and ribociclib (LEE011), and abemaciclib (LY2835219) is in development. Studies of these agents, in combination with endocrine therapy, are also underway in ER-positive early breast cancer in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. Moreover, they are also being investigated with other agents in the advanced setting and in triple negative breast cancer. After having demonstrated impressive activity in ER-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, currently CDK4/6 inhibitors are in further development. It is obvious that this class of agents with their efficacy, low and easily manageable toxicity, and oral dosage is a very important treatment option for breast cancer patients.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase activity controls the onset of the HCMV lytic cycle.

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    Martin Zydek

    Full Text Available The onset of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV lytic infection is strictly synchronized with the host cell cycle. Infected G0/G1 cells support viral immediate early (IE gene expression and proceed to the G1/S boundary where they finally arrest. In contrast, S/G2 cells can be infected but effectively block IE gene expression and this inhibition is not relieved until host cells have divided and reentered G1. During latent infection IE gene expression is also inhibited, and for reactivation to occur this block to IE gene expression must be overcome. It is only poorly understood which viral and/or cellular activities maintain the block to cell cycle or latency-associated viral IE gene repression and whether the two mechanisms may be linked. Here, we show that the block to IE gene expression during S and G2 phase can be overcome by both genotoxic stress and chemical inhibitors of cellular DNA replication, pointing to the involvement of checkpoint-dependent signaling pathways in controlling IE gene repression. Checkpoint-dependent rescue of IE expression strictly requires p53 and in the absence of checkpoint activation is mimicked by proteasomal inhibition in a p53 dependent manner. Requirement for the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor p21 downstream of p53 suggests a pivotal role for CDKs in controlling IE gene repression in S/G2 and treatment of S/G2 cells with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine alleviates IE repression independently of p53. Importantly, CDK inhibiton also overcomes the block to IE expression during quiescent infection of NTera2 (NT2 cells. Thus, a timely block to CDK activity not only secures phase specificity of the cell cycle dependent HCMV IE gene expression program, but in addition plays a hitherto unrecognized role in preventing the establishment of a latent-like state.

  11. The Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor SCH 727965 (Dinacliclib) Induces the Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells

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    Fu, Wei; Ma, Le; Chu, Baoky; Wang, Xue; Bui, Marilyn M.; Gemmer, Jennifer; Altiok, Soner; Pledger, W. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Although rare, osteosarcoma is an aggressive cancer that often metastasizes to the lungs. Toward the goal of developing new treatment options for osteosarcoma, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor SCH 727965 (SCH) induces the apoptosis of several osteosarcoma cell lines including those resistant to doxorubicin and dasatinib. Cell lines prepared in our laboratory from patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy and explants derived from a human osteosarcoma xenograft in mice were also responsive to SCH. Apoptosis occurred at low nanomolar concentrations of SCH, as did CDK inhibition, and was p53-independent. SCH activated the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as evidenced by caspase-9 cleavage and accumulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c. Amounts of the apoptotic proteins Bax and Bim increased in mitochondria, whereas amounts of the antiapoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL declined. Osteosarcoma cells apoptosed when codepleted of CDK1 and CDK2 but not when depleted of other CDK combinations. We suggest that SCH triggers the apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells by inactivating CDK1 and CDK2 and that SCH may be useful for treatment of drug-resistant osteosarcomas. SCH also induced the apoptosis of other sarcoma types but not of normal quiescent osteoblasts or fibroblasts. PMID:21490307

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  13. A novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glycogen synthesis involving serotonin and cyclin-dependent kinase-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudhope, Susan J; Wang, Chung-Chi; Petrie, John L; Potts, Lloyd; Malcomson, Fiona; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Arden, Catherine; Hampson, Laura J; Agius, Loranne

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic autonomic nerves regulate postprandial hepatic glucose uptake, but the signaling pathways remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose disposal. Ligands of diverse 5-HT receptors were used to identify signaling pathway(s) regulating glucose metabolism in hepatocytes. 5-HT had stimulatory and inhibitory effects on glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes mediated by 5-HT1/2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. Agonists of 5-HT1/2A receptors lowered blood glucose and increased hepatic glycogen after oral glucose loading and also stimulated glycogen synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes with greater efficacy than 5-HT. This effect was blocked by olanzapine, an antagonist of 5-HT1/2A receptors. It was mediated by activation of phosphorylase phosphatase, inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase, and activation of glycogen synthase. Unlike insulin action, it was not associated with stimulation of glycolysis and was counteracted by cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. A role for cdk5 was supported by adaptive changes in the coactivator protein p35 and by elevated glycogen synthesis during overexpression of p35/cdk5. These results support a novel mechanism for serotonin stimulation of hepatic glycogenesis involving cdk5. The opposing effects of serotonin, mediated by distinct 5-HT receptors, could explain why drugs targeting serotonin function can cause either diabetes or hypoglycemia in humans.

  14. Curcumin: Synthesis optimization and in silico interaction with cyclin dependent kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural product with enormous biological potential. In this study, curcumin synthesis was revisited using different reaction solvents, a catalyst (n-butylamine and a water scavenger [(n-BuO3B], to develop the optimal procedure for its rapid acquisition. During synthesis, solvent choice was found to be an important parameter for better curcumin yield and high purity. In a typical reaction, acetyl acetone was treated with boron trioxide, followed by condensation with vanillin in the presence of tri-n-butyl borate as water scavenger and n-butylamine as catalyst at 80 °C in ethyl acetate to afford curcumin. Moreover, curcumin was also extracted from turmeric powder and spectroscopic properties such as IR, MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR with synthetic curcumin were established to identify any impurity. The purity of synthetic and extracted curcumin was also checked by TLC and HPLC-DAD. To computationally assess its therapeutic potential against cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs, curcumin was docked in different isoforms of CDKs. It was observed that it did not dock at the active sites of CDK2 and CDK6. However, it could enter into weak interactions with CDK4 protein.

  15. The efficacy of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor in endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohito Tanaka

    Full Text Available PD-0332991, the selective cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib, causes cell cycle arrest by inhibiting phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb protein. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of PD-0332991 in endometrial cancer.Four human endometrial cancer cell lines, ECC, HEC1A, HEC108 and TEN, were treated with PD-0332991 and their function was evaluated. In vivo, the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in a model of subcutaneous endometrial cancer. An immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 337 endometrial cancer specimens. A proliferation assay revealed that 2 of the 4 cell lines that expressed Rb were sensitive to PD-0332991 with an IC50 of 0.65 μM (HEC1A and 0.58 μM (HEC108, respectively. Both cell lines had G0/G1 cell cycle arrest after treatment with PD-0332991 according to flow cytometry. In vivo, PD-0332991 had antitumoral efficacy with a reduction in the activity of Ki67 and phosphorylation of Rb. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the positive rate of Rb was 67.7%, however, there was no significant relationship between the expression levels of Rb and the tumor grade.PD-0332991 had therapeutic potential against endometrial cancer cell lines expressing Rb protein. Our immunohistochemical analysis revealed that approximately 70% of patients with endometrial cancer might have therapeutic indications for PD-0332991. Of note, the tumor grade had no impact on the indications for treatment.

  16. Locomotor conditioning by amphetamine requires cyclin-dependent kinase 5 signaling in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Bryan F; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Forneris, Justin; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Li, Dongdong; Bubula, Nancy; Vezina, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Intermittent systemic exposure to psychostimulants leads to several forms of long-lasting behavioral plasticity including nonassociative sensitization and associative conditioning. In the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), the protein serine/threonine kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its phosphorylation target, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor kalirin-7 (Kal7), may contribute to the neuroadaptations underlying the formation of conditioned associations. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 in the NAcc prevents the increases in dendritic spine density normally observed in this site following repeated cocaine. Mice lacking the Kal7 gene display similar effects. As increases in spine density may relate to the formation of associative memories and both Cdk5 and Kal7 regulate the generation of spines following repeated drug exposure, we hypothesized that either inhibiting Cdk5 or preventing its phosphorylation of Kal7 in the NAcc may prevent the induction of drug conditioning. In the present experiments, blockade in rats of NAcc Cdk5 activity with roscovitine (40 nmol/0.5 μl/side) prior to each of 4 injections of amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg; i.p.) prevented the accrual of contextual locomotor conditioning but spared the induction of locomotor sensitization as revealed on tests conducted one week later. Similarly, transient viral expression in the NAcc exclusively during amphetamine exposure of a threonine-alanine mutant form of Kal7 [mKal7(T1590A)] that is not phosphorylated by Cdk5 also prevented the accrual of contextual conditioning and spared the induction of sensitization. These results indicate that signaling via Cdk5 and Kal7 in the NAcc is necessary for the formation of context-drug associations, potentially through the modulation of dendritic spine dynamics in this site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

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    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R. (GSKNC)

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  18. S-Phase Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Promote Sister Chromatid Cohesion in Budding Yeast ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W.-S.; Erickson, S. L.; Tsai, H.-J.; Andrews, C. A.; Vas, A. C.; Clarke, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome stability depends on faithful chromosome segregation, which relies on maintenance of chromatid cohesion during S phase. In eukaryotes, Pds1/securin is the only known inhibitor that can prevent loss of cohesion. However, pds1Δ yeast cells and securin-null mice are viable. We sought to identify redundant mechanisms that promote cohesion within S phase in the absence of Pds1 and found that cells lacking the S-phase cyclins Clb5 and Clb6 have a cohesion defect under conditions of replication stress. Similar to the phenotype of pds1Δ cells, loss of cohesion in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 is dependent on Esp1. However, Pds1 phosphorylation by Cdk-cyclin is not required for cohesion. Moreover, cells lacking Clb5, Clb6, and Pds1 are inviable and lose cohesion during an unperturbed S phase, indicating that Pds1 and specific B-type cyclins promote cohesion independently of one another. Consistent with this, we find that Mcd1/Scc1 is less abundant on chromosomes in cells lacking Clb5 and Clb6 during replication stress. However, clb5Δ clb6Δ cells do accumulate Mcd1/Scc1 at centromeres upon mitotic arrest, suggesting that the cyclin-dependent mechanism is S phase specific. These data indicate that Clb5 and Clb6 promote cohesion which is then protected by Pds1 and that both mechanisms are required during replication stress. PMID:21518961

  19. The tuberous sclerosis genes and regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Freilinger, Angelika; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2006-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor syndrome that affects approximately 1 in 6000 individuals. It is characterized by the development of tumors, named hamartomas, in the kidneys, heart, skin and brain. The latter often cause seizures, mental retardation, and a variety of developmental disorders, including autism. This disease is caused by mutations within the tumor suppressor gene TSC1 on chromosome 9q34 encoding hamartin or within TSC2 on chromosome 16p13.3 encoding tuberin. TSC patients carry a mutant TSC1 or TSC2 gene in each of their somatic cells, and loss of heterozygosity has been documented in a wide variety of TSC tumors. Recent data suggest that functional inactivation of TSC proteins might also be involved in the development of other diseases not associated with TSC, such as sporadic bladder cancer, breast cancer, ovarian carcinoma, gall bladder carcinoma, non-small-cell carcinoma of the lung, and Alzheimer's disease. Tuberin and hamartin form a heterodimer, suggesting they might affect the same processes. Tuberin is assumed to be the functional component of the complex and has been implicated in the regulation of different cellular functions. The TSC proteins regulate cell size control due to their involvement in the insulin signalling pathway. Furthermore, they are potent positive regulators of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27, a major regulator of the mammalian cell cycle. Here we review the current knowledge on how mutations within the TSC genes could trigger deregulation of stability and localization of the tumor suppressor p27.

  20. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Lan [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Yongsheng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma.

  1. Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in 2,5-hexanedione-induced neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Cui-Li; Hou, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Yang, Xi-Wei; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-06-03

    Occupational exposure to n-hexane produces a neuropathy characterized as a central-peripheral distal axonopathy, which is mediated by 2,5-hexanedione (HD). To investigate the mechanisms of the neuropathy induced by HD, the contents and activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and activators (p35 precursor, p35 and p25) in rats' cerebrum cortex (CC), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) were determined. The results showed that the levels and activities of CDK5 in CC of 200 or 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were significantly decreased in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions and negatively correlated with gait abnormality in the cytosolic fraction. However, CDK5 contents and activities in SN of rats treated with 200 or 400mg/kg HD were significantly increased and positively correlated with gait abnormality in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions. Although increases of CDK5 contents in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions of SC in 200 and 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were also observed, CDK5 activities were significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction and negatively correlated with gait abnormality. The changes of p35 precursor, p35 and p25 contents in CC, SC and SN showed the same pattern with that of CDK5 activities. Thus, HD intoxication was associated with deregulation of CDK5 and its activator p35 or p25 in nerve tissues. The inconsistent changes of CDK5 activities in CNS and PNS might delegate the different mechanisms of HD-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  2. Palbociclib: A Novel Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor for Hormone Receptor-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangini, Neha S; Wesolowski, Robert; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Lustberg, Maryam B; Berger, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    To review palbociclib, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, and its current place in therapy for the treatment of hormone receptor (HMR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-negative advanced breast cancer. Four phase I trials, 2 phase II trials, and 1 phase III trial were identified from May 2004 to May 2015 using PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) abstracts, and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) abstracts. In the first-line setting, the phase II PALbociclib: Ongoing trials in the Management of breast cAncer (PALOMA)-1 trial randomized patients to receive letrozole alone or letrozole plus palbociclib 125 mg daily for 3 weeks, followed by 1 week off, as initial therapy for advanced breast cancer. The investigator-assessed median progression-free survival (PFS) was 20. 2 months for the combination versus 10.2 months for letrozole alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.488; 95% CI = 0.319-0.748; 1-sided P = 0.0004). The ensuing Food and Drug Administration approval of palbociclib was given a "breakthrough therapy" designation, where preliminary evidence suggests substantial improvement over existing therapies for a serious or life-threatening disease. A confirmatory phase III trial, PALOMA-2, is under way. In patients who were previously treated with endocrine therapy for advanced breast cancer, the phase III PALOMA-3 trial randomized patients to fulvestrant plus palbociclib versus fulvestrant plus placebo. The investigator-assessed median PFS at the time of a preplanned analysis was 9.2 months with palbociclib-fulvestrant compared with 3.8 months with placebo-fulvestrant (HR = 0.42; 95% CI = 0.32-0.56; P Palbociclib, the first-in-class CDK4/6 inhibitor, significantly extended PFS in combination with endocrine therapy in the first and subsequent lines of treatment for HMR-positive, Her2-negative advanced breast cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE8 Differentially Regulates Plant Immunity to Fungal Pathogens through Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Functions in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingfang; Schluttenhoffer, Craig M.; Wang, Pengcheng; Fu, Fuyou; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2014-01-01

    CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE8 (CDK8) is a widely studied component of eukaryotic Mediator complexes. However, the biological and molecular functions of plant CDK8 are not well understood. Here, we provide evidence for regulatory functions of Arabidopsis thaliana CDK8 in defense and demonstrate its functional and molecular interactions with other Mediator and non-Mediator subunits. The cdk8 mutant exhibits enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea but susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola. The contributions of CDK8 to the transcriptional activation of defensin gene PDF1.2 and its interaction with MEDIATOR COMPLEX SUBUNIT25 (MED25) implicate CDK8 in jasmonate-mediated defense. Moreover, CDK8 associates with the promoter of AGMATINE COUMAROYLTRANSFERASE to promote its transcription and regulate the biosynthesis of the defense-active secondary metabolites hydroxycinnamic acid amides. CDK8 also interacts with the transcription factor WAX INDUCER1, implying its additional role in cuticle development. In addition, overlapping functions of CDK8 with MED12 and MED13 and interactions between CDK8 and C-type cyclins suggest the conserved configuration of the plant Mediator kinase module. In summary, while CDK8’s positive transcriptional regulation of target genes and its phosphorylation activities underpin its defense functions, the impaired defense responses in the mutant are masked by its altered cuticle, resulting in specific resistance to B. cinerea. PMID:25281690

  4. CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE8 differentially regulates plant immunity to fungal pathogens through kinase-dependent and -independent functions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingfang; Schluttenhoffer, Craig M; Wang, Pengcheng; Fu, Fuyou; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2014-10-01

    CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE8 (CDK8) is a widely studied component of eukaryotic Mediator complexes. However, the biological and molecular functions of plant CDK8 are not well understood. Here, we provide evidence for regulatory functions of Arabidopsis thaliana CDK8 in defense and demonstrate its functional and molecular interactions with other Mediator and non-Mediator subunits. The cdk8 mutant exhibits enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea but susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola. The contributions of CDK8 to the transcriptional activation of defensin gene PDF1.2 and its interaction with MEDIATOR COMPLEX SUBUNIT25 (MED25) implicate CDK8 in jasmonate-mediated defense. Moreover, CDK8 associates with the promoter of AGMATINE COUMAROYLTRANSFERASE to promote its transcription and regulate the biosynthesis of the defense-active secondary metabolites hydroxycinnamic acid amides. CDK8 also interacts with the transcription factor WAX INDUCER1, implying its additional role in cuticle development. In addition, overlapping functions of CDK8 with MED12 and MED13 and interactions between CDK8 and C-type cyclins suggest the conserved configuration of the plant Mediator kinase module. In summary, while CDK8's positive transcriptional regulation of target genes and its phosphorylation activities underpin its defense functions, the impaired defense responses in the mutant are masked by its altered cuticle, resulting in specific resistance to B. cinerea. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical and laboratory studies of the novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor dinaciclib (SCH 727965) in acute leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Gojo, Ivana; Sadowska, Mariola; Walker, Alison; Feldman, Eric J.; Iyer, Swaminathan Padmanabhan; Baer, Maria R; Sausville, Edward A.; Lapidus, Rena G.; Zhang, Da; Zhu, Yali; Jou, Ying-Ming; Poon, Jennifer; Small, Karen; Bannerji, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dinaciclib inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 5, and 9 with a better therapeutic index than flavopiridol in preclinical studies. This study assessed the activity of dinaciclib in acute leukemia both in the clinic and in vitro. Methods Adults with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n?=?14) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n?=?6) were treated with dinaciclib 50?mg/m2 given as a 2-h infusion every 21?days. Results Most patients had dramatic but transient reduction in circulatin...

  6. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2012-11-22

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation.

  7. A plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase is involved in the control of G2/M progression in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, A; Stals, H; Reichheld, J P; Segers, G; De Veylder, L; Barroco, R P; Casteels, P; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2001-09-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the key transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. All the CDKs known to control G(2)/M progression in yeast and animals are distinguished by the characteristic PSTAIRE motif in their cyclin-binding domain and are closely related. Higher plants contain in addition a number of more divergent non-PSTAIRE CDKs with still obscure functions. We show that a plant-specific type of non-PSTAIRE CDKs is involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression. In synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells, the corresponding protein, accumulated in a cell cycle-regulated fashion, peaking at the G(2)/M transition. The associated histone H1 kinase activity reached a maximum in mitosis and required a yet unidentified subunit to be fully active. Down-regulation of the associated kinase activity in transgenic tobacco plants using a dominant-negative mutation delayed G(2)/M transition. These results provide the first evidence that non-PSTAIRE CDKs are involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression in plants.

  8. Prediction of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor potency using the fragment molecular orbital method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazanetz Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reliable and robust estimation of ligand binding affinity continues to be a challenge in drug design. Many current methods rely on molecular mechanics (MM calculations which do not fully explain complex molecular interactions. Full quantum mechanical (QM computation of the electronic state of protein-ligand complexes has recently become possible by the latest advances in the development of linear-scaling QM methods such as the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO method. This approximate molecular orbital method is sufficiently fast that it can be incorporated into the development cycle during structure-based drug design for the reliable estimation of ligand binding affinity. Additionally, the FMO method can be combined with approximations for entropy and solvation to make it applicable for binding affinity prediction for a broad range of target and chemotypes. Results We applied this method to examine the binding affinity for a series of published cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 inhibitors. We calculated the binding affinity for 28 CDK2 inhibitors using the ab initio FMO method based on a number of X-ray crystal structures. The sum of the pair interaction energies (PIE was calculated and used to explain the gas-phase enthalpic contribution to binding. The correlation of the ligand potencies to the protein-ligand interaction energies gained from FMO was examined and was seen to give a good correlation which outperformed three MM force field based scoring functions used to appoximate the free energy of binding. Although the FMO calculation allows for the enthalpic component of binding interactions to be understood at the quantum level, as it is an in vacuo single point calculation, the entropic component and solvation terms are neglected. For this reason a more accurate and predictive estimate for binding free energy was desired. Therefore, additional terms used to describe the protein-ligand interactions were then

  9. Several Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, Structurally Related to Roscovitine, As New Anti-Malarial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Houzé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs. There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains. Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  10. Flavopiridol protects against inflammation by attenuating leukocyte-endothelial interaction via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Sass, Gabriele; Khandoga, Alexander G; Joore, Jos; Mayer, Bettina A; Berberich, Nina; Totzke, Frank; Krombach, Fritz; Tiegs, Gisa; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor flavopiridol is currently being tested in clinical trials as anticancer drug. Beyond its cell death-inducing action, we hypothesized that flavopiridol affects inflammatory processes. Therefore, we elucidated the action of flavopiridol on leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and endothelial activation in vivo and in vitro and studied the underlying molecular mechanisms. Flavopiridol suppressed concanavalin A-induced hepatitis and neutrophil infiltration into liver tissue. Flavopiridol also inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in the mouse cremaster muscle. Endothelial cells were found to be the major target of flavopiridol, which blocked the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin), as well as NF-κB-dependent transcription. Flavopiridol did not affect inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase, the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of p65, or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA-binding activity. By performing a cellular kinome array and a kinase activity panel, we found LIM domain kinase-1 (LIMK1), casein kinase 2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), CDK4, CDK6, CDK8, and CDK9 to be influenced by flavopiridol. Using specific inhibitors, as well as RNA interference (RNAi), we revealed that only CDK9 is responsible for the action of flavopiridol. Our study highlights flavopiridol as a promising antiinflammatory compound and inhibition of CDK9 as a novel approach for the treatment of inflammation-associated diseases.

  11. Clinical significance of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 expression and proliferation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Skjødt, Karsten; Mortensen, Leif Spange

    1999-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 is a negative cell cycle regulator linking extracellular growth-regulatory signals to the cell cycle machinery in G1. We investigated the pattern and prognostic value of p27Kip1 expression in a population-based group of 203 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL...... between p27Kip1 and Ki-67 expression. Low expression of p27Kip1, defined as nuclear p27Kip1 expression in lymphomas behaved differently as those with low p27Kip1...... expression tended to do better. Likewise, a high proliferation rate (Ki-67 >40%) was associated with poor survival in indolent and aggressive lymphomas. Multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model showed that only p27Kip1, and not Ki-67, maintained independent prognostic significance...

  12. Identification and structural-functional analysis of cyclin-dependent kinases of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Gomes

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN for caspase 3-7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco, a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation.

  13. Dual regulation by pairs of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and histone deacetylases controls G1 transcription in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Huang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available START-dependent transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two transcription factors SBF and MBF, whose activity is controlled by the binding of the repressor Whi5. Phosphorylation and removal of Whi5 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK Cln3-Cdc28 alleviates the Whi5-dependent repression on SBF and MBF, initiating entry into a new cell cycle. This Whi5-SBF/MBF transcriptional circuit is analogous to the regulatory pathway in mammalian cells that features the E2F family of G1 transcription factors and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb. Here we describe genetic and biochemical evidence for the involvement of another CDK, Pcl-Pho85, in regulating G1 transcription, via phosphorylation and inhibition of Whi5. We show that a strain deleted for both PHO85 and CLN3 has a slow growth phenotype, a G1 delay, and is severely compromised for SBF-dependent reporter gene expression, yet all of these defects are alleviated by deletion of WHI5. Our biochemical and genetic tests suggest Whi5 mediates repression in part through interaction with two histone deacetylases (HDACs, Hos3 and Rpd3. In a manner analogous to cyclin D/CDK4/6, which phosphorylates Rb in mammalian cells disrupting its association with HDACs, phosphorylation by the early G1 CDKs Cln3-Cdc28 and Pcl9-Pho85 inhibits association of Whi5 with the HDACs. Contributions from multiple CDKs may provide the precision and accuracy necessary to activate G1 transcription when both internal and external cues are optimal.

  14. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  15. Anticancer screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals against Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2: An in-silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajahat Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinases family and plays an important role in regulation of various eukaryotic cell division events. Over-expression of CDK2 during cell cycle may lead to several cellular functional aberrations including diverse types of cancers (lung cancer, primary colorectal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma and pancreatic carcinoma in humans. Medicinal plants phytochemicals which have anticancer potential can be used as an alternative drug resource. Methods: This study was designed to find out anticancer phytochemicals from medicinal plants which could inhibit CDK2 with the help of molecular docking technique. Molecular Operating Environment (MOE v2009 software was used to dock 2300 phytochemicals in this study. Results: The outcome of this study shows that four phytochemicals Kushenol T, Remangiflavanone B, Neocalyxins A and Elenoside showed the lowest S-score (-17.83, -17.57, -17.26, -17.17 respectively and binds strongly with all eight active residues Tyr15, Lys33, Ileu52, Lys56, Leu78, phe80, Asp145 and Phe146 of CDK2 binding site. These phytochemicals could successfully inhibit the CDK2. Conclusion: These phytochemicals can be considered as potential anticancer agents and used in drug development against CDK2. We anticipate that this study would pave way for phytochemical based novel small molecules as more efficacious and selective anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

  16. Efficacy of cyclin dependent kinase 4 inhibitors as potent neuroprotective agents against insults relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyankar Sanphui

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no cure till today. Aberrant activation of cell cycle regulatory proteins is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. We and others have shown that Cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 is activated in AD brain and is required for neuron death. In this study, we tested the efficiency of commercially available Cdk4 specific inhibitors as well as a small library of synthetic molecule inhibitors targeting Cdk4 as neuroprotective agents in cellular models of neuron death. We found that several of these inhibitors significantly protected neuronal cells against death induced by nerve growth factor (NGF deprivation and oligomeric beta amyloid (Aβ that are implicated in AD. These neuroprotective agents inhibit specifically Cdk4 kinase activity, loss of mitochondrial integrity, induction of pro-apoptotic protein Bim and caspase3 activation in response to NGF deprivation. The efficacies of commercial and synthesized inhibitors are comparable. The synthesized molecules are either phenanthrene based or naphthalene based and they are synthesized by using Pschorr reaction and Buchwald coupling respectively as one of the key steps. A number of molecules of both kinds block neurodegeneration effectively. Therefore, we propose that Cdk4 inhibition would be a therapeutic choice for ameliorating neurodegeneration in AD and these synthetic Cdk4 inhibitors could lead to development of effective drugs for AD.

  17. [Therapeutic effect of flavopiridol, a small molecular cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in human ovarian carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yue; Shen, Keng; Tang, Ping-ping

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of flavopiridol in ovarian cancer. After the treatment with flavopiridol of AO cells, cell apoptotic rate and cell cycle distribution were detected by flow cytometer and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labelling (TUNEL). Real time PCR was used to detect the expression of cyclin D and active caspase-3 in AO cells. Subcutaneous tumor models and abdominally spread tumor models of human ovarian carcinoma using AO cells in BALB/c nude mice were established. The mouse survival rates were measured for abdominally spread tumor models and the volume of tumor nodules was determined for subcutaneous tumor models following the treatments of flavopiridol. TUNEL was used to detect cell apoptosis, and immunohistochemistry was used to measure microvessel density (MVD) in tumor tissues. AO cells showed apoptotic rates of 4.1%, 10.7% and 7.6% following the treatments with flavopiridol at 150, 300 and 500 nmol/L respectively, accompanied by an increase in G(1) progression and a decrease in S phase progression. The level of active caspase-3 increased (2.55 vs 2.49) and the level of cyclin D expression decreased significantly (0.25 vs 0.69, P flavopiridol. Flavopiridol prolonged mouse survival [mean survival time of (141 +/- 14) days] and suppressed tumor growth significantly (tumor growth suppression rate of 40%), when compared with treatment using phosphate-buffered saline [(106 +/- 11) days, P flavopiridol. MVD of tumor tissue was 12 +/- 5 following flavopiridol treatment, significantly higher than that of 35 +/- 10 treated with phosphate-buffered saline (P Flavopiridol results in significant suppression of ovarian carcinoma cell growth and prolongs survival of mice.

  18. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol sensitizes human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Kazumi; Shiraki, Katsuya; Fuke, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomoko; Yamanaka, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Yumi; Yamamoto, Norihiko; Ito, Keiichi; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Nakano, Takeshi

    2006-08-01

    Flavopiridol was one of the first cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors demonstrated to have an antitumor effect in several cancer types. Here, we investigated the effects of flavopiridol on TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines HLE and HepG2, and evaluated the role of flavopiridol in apoptosis. To better understand the mechanism of increased TRAIL sensitivity in HCC cells, we determined the effect of flavopiridol on cell surface expression of TRAIL and TRAIL receptors using flow cytometry analysis. The levels of survivin, FLIP, Bcl-xL and X-chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) in treated and untreated cells was also determined. Flavopiridol decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in the two HCC cell lines tested. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK did not inhibit the effect. However, subtoxic levels of flavopiridol dramatically enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in both cells. Flavopiridol up-regulated TRAIL, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 in both cell lines. In addition, flavopiridol down-regulated expression of survivin in both cell lines, and expression of FLIP and Bcl-xL were down-regulated in HLE cells. In summary, flavopiridol augmented TRAIL sensitivity by up-regulation of TRAIL receptors and down-regulation of survivin, FLIP and Bcl-xL. Thus, combining flavopiridol with a TRAIL agonist may prove to be an effective new strategy for treatment of HCC.

  19. A phase I clinical trial of FOLFIRI in combination with the pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Mark A; Shah, Manish A; Rathkopf, Dana; Tse, Archie; Carvajal, Richard D; Wu, Nian; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Gonen, Mithat; Cane, Lauren M; Dials, Heather J; Schwartz, Gary K

    2010-11-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol increases irinotecan- and fluorouracil-induced apoptosis. We conducted a phase I trial of FOLFIRI + flavopiridol in patients with advanced solid tumors. FOLFIRI + flavopiridol were administered every 2 weeks. Based on sequence-dependent inhibition, flavopiridol was given 3 h after irinotecan but before 5-FU. Two maximum tolerated doses were determined, one with flavopiridol administered over 1 h, and one with flavopiridol split as a 30-min bolus followed by a 4-h infusion. A total of 74 patients were enrolled and 63 were evaluable. The MTD with FOLFIRI was flavopiridol 80 mg/m(2) over 1 h or 35 mg/m(2) bolus + 35 mg/m(2) over 4 h. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea, fatigue, neutropenia, and neuropathy. Clinical activity included 2 partial responses in small bowel cancer and bladder cancer and 1 complete response in mucosal melanoma. Stable disease was seen in 22 patients. Pharmacokinetic studies showed increasing C(max) with increasing flavopiridol dose. Clinical benefit was correlated with the presence of wild-type p53. Of 25 patients with colorectal cancer, 11 had as best response SD for >3 m (median 6 m, range 4.2-15.4 m), despite failing ≥1 irinotecan-containing regimen. Treatment with flavopiridol and FOLFIRI is a safe and effective regimen. Concentrations of flavopiridol that enhance the effects of FOLFIRI can be achieved. Clinical activity is encouraging and includes prolonged stable disease in patients with irinotecan-refractory colorectal cancer.

  20. B-Myb switches from Cyclin/Cdk-dependent to Jnk- and p38 kinase-dependent phosphorylation and associates with SC35 bodies after UV stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werwein, E; Dzuganova, M; Usadel, C; Klempnauer, K-H

    2013-01-01

    B-Myb is a highly conserved member of the Myb transcription factor family that has essential roles in cell-cycle progression. Recent work has suggested that B-Myb is also involved in the cellular DNA-damage response. Here, we have investigated the fate of B-Myb in UV-irradiated cells. UV stress leads to the appearance of phosphorylated B-Myb in nuclear SC35 speckles during transcriptional shutdown. Furthermore, we show that UV irradiation leads to a change of the phosphorylation pattern of B-Myb, which is caused by a switch from Cyclin/Cdk-dependent to Jnk and p38 kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Taken together, we have identified Jnk and p38 kinase as novel regulators of B-Myb and established the localization of phosphorylated B-Myb in SC35 speckles as a potential novel regulatory mechanism for B-Myb in UV irradiated cells. PMID:23449447

  1. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan; Friedman, Ran

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein-drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary-based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein-drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well-conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6-dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein-drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  2. Regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases are crucial for maintaining genome integrity in S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is of critical importance to cells. To identify key regulators of genomic integrity, we screened a human cell line with a kinome small interfering RNA library. WEE1, a major regulator of mitotic entry, and CHK1 were among the genes identified. Both kinases are impo...

  3. Risk Factors for Tumor Lysis Syndrome in patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treated with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Flavopiridol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kristie A.; Ruppert, Amy S.; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Andritsos, Leslie; Flynn, Joseph M.; Rovin, Brad; Villalona-Calero, Miguel; Ji, Jia; Phelps, Mitchell; Johnson, Amy J.; Grever, Michael R.; Byrd, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) has been described in over 40% of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treated with the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol. We conducted a retrospective analysis to determine predictive factors for TLS. In 116 patients, the incidence of TLS was 46% (95% CI: 36%-55%). In univariable analysis, female gender, greater number of prior therapies, Rai stages III-IV, adenopathy ≥ 10 cm, splenomegaly, del(11q), decreased albumin, and increased absolute lymphocyte count, white blood cell count (WBC), β2-microglobulin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were associated (pflavopiridol (p=0.71). In a multivariable analysis controlling for number of prior therapies, cytogenetics, Rai stage, age, and gender, progression-free survival (PFS) was inferior in patients with TLS (p=0.01). Female patients and patients with elevated β2-microglobulin, increased WBC, adenopathy ≥ 10 cm, and decreased albumin were at highest risk and should be monitored for TLS with flavopiridol. TLS does not appear to be predictive of response or improved PFS in patients receiving flavopiridol. PMID:21606960

  4. Clinical and laboratory studies of the novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor dinaciclib (SCH 727965) in acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojo, Ivana; Sadowska, Mariola; Walker, Alison; Feldman, Eric J; Iyer, Swaminathan Padmanabhan; Baer, Maria R; Sausville, Edward A; Lapidus, Rena G; Zhang, Da; Zhu, Yali; Jou, Ying-Ming; Poon, Jennifer; Small, Karen; Bannerji, Rajat

    2013-10-01

    Dinaciclib inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 5, and 9 with a better therapeutic index than flavopiridol in preclinical studies. This study assessed the activity of dinaciclib in acute leukemia both in the clinic and in vitro. Adults with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n = 14) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 6) were treated with dinaciclib 50 mg/m(2) given as a 2-h infusion every 21 days. Most patients had dramatic but transient reduction in circulating blasts; however, no remissions were achieved on this schedule. The most common toxicities were gastrointestinal, fatigue, transaminitis, and clinical and laboratory manifestations of tumor lysis syndrome, including one patient who died of acute renal failure. Dinaciclib pharmacokinetics showed rapid (2 h) achievement of maximum concentration and a short elimination/distribution phase. Pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated in vivo inhibition of Mcl-1 expression and induction of PARP cleavage in patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells 4 h after dinaciclib infusion, but the effects were lost by 24 h and did not correlate with clinical outcome. Correlative in vitro studies showed that prolonged exposures to dinaciclib, at clinically attainable concentrations, result in improved leukemia cell kill. While dinaciclib given as a 2-h bolus did not exhibit durable clinical activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data support the exploration of prolonged infusion schedules in future trials in patients with acute leukemias.

  5. Bacterial cyclomodulin Cif blocks the host cell cycle by stabilizing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Watrin, Claude; Jubelin, Grégory; Oswald, Eric; Taieb, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is a cyclomodulin produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Upon injection into the host cell by the bacterial type III secretion system, Cif inhibits the G2/M transition via sustained inhibition of the mitosis inducer CDK1 independently of the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Cif induces not only G2, but also G1 cell cycle arrest depending on the stage of cells in the cell cycle during the infection. In various cell lines including differentiated and untransformed enterocytes, the cell cycle arrests are correlated with the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). Cif-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor accumulation is independent of the p53 pathway but occurs through inhibition of their proteasome-mediated degradation. Our results provide a direct link between the mode of action of Cif and the host cell cycle control.

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase-like function is shared by the beta- and gamma- subset of the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad V Kuny

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5, is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks. A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been termed the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases (CHPKs to distinguish them from other human herpesvirus-encoded kinases. To determine if the Cdk-like activities of UL97 were shared by all of the CHPKs, we individually expressed epitope-tagged alleles of each protein in human Saos-2 cells to test for Rb phosphorylation, human U-2 OS cells to monitor nuclear lamina disruption and lamin A phosphorylation, or S. cerevisiae cdc28-13 mutant cells to directly assay for Cdk function. We found that the ability to phosphorylate Rb and lamin A, and to disrupt the nuclear lamina, was shared by all CHPKs from the beta- and gamma-herpesvirus families, but not by their alpha-herpesvirus homologs. Similarly, all but one of the beta and gamma CHPKs displayed bona fide Cdk activity in S. cerevisiae, while the alpha proteins did not. Thus, we have identified novel virally-encoded Cdk-like kinases, a nomenclature we abbreviate as v-Cdks. Interestingly, we found that other, non-Cdk-related activities reported for UL97 (dispersion of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs and disruption of cytoplasmic or nuclear aggresomes showed weak conservation among the CHPKs that, in general, did not segregate to specific viral families. Therefore, the genomic and evolutionary conservation of these kinases has not been fully maintained at the functional level. Our data indicate that these related kinases, some of which are targets of approved or developmental antiviral drugs

  7. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 8 Module Expression Profiling Reveals Requirement of Mediator Subunits 12 and 13 for Transcription of Serpent-dependent Innate Immunity Genes in Drosophila*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Hakala, Heini; Havula, Essi; Sahal Estimé, Michelle; Rämet, Mika; Hietakangas, Ville; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2014-01-01

    The Cdk8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8) module of Mediator integrates regulatory cues from transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. It consists of four subunits where Med12 and Med13 link Cdk8 and cyclin C (CycC) to core Mediator. Here we have investigated the contributions of the Cdk8 module subunits to transcriptional regulation using RNA interference in Drosophila cells. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrated separation of Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 profiles. However, transcriptional regulation by Cdk8-CycC was dependent on Med12-Med13. This observation also revealed that Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 often have opposite transcriptional effects. Interestingly, Med12 and Med13 profiles overlapped significantly with that of the GATA factor Serpent. Accordingly, mutational analyses indicated that GATA sites are required for Med12-Med13 regulation of Serpent-dependent genes. Med12 and Med13 were also found to be required for Serpent-activated innate immunity genes in defense to bacterial infection. The results reveal a novel role for the Cdk8 module in Serpent-dependent transcription and innate immunity. PMID:24778181

  8. Up-regulation of CDK9 kinase activity and Mcl-1 stability contributes to the acquired resistance to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Chen, Rong; Hessler, Joshua; Mahoney, Emilia; Lehman, Amy M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Grever, Michael R.; Plunkett, William; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a small molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) known to impair global transcription via inactivation of positive transcription elongation factor b. It has been demonstrated to have significant activity predominantly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in phase I/II clinical trials while other similar CDK inhibitors are vigorously being pursued in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Although flavopiridol is a potent therapeutic agent against blood diseases, some patients still have primary or acquired resistance throughout their clinical course. Considering the limited knowledge of resistance mechanisms of flavopiridol, we investigated the potential mechanisms of resistance to flavopiridol in a cell line system, which gradually acquired resistance to flavopiridol in vitro, and then confirmed the mechanism in patient samples. Herein, we present that this resistant cell line developed resistance through up-regulation of phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain, activation of CDK9 kinase activity, and prolonged Mcl-1 stability to counter flavopiridol's drug actions. Further analyses suggest MAPK/ERK activation-mediated Mcl-1 stabilization contributes to the resistance and knockdown of Mcl-1 in part restores sensitivity to flavopiridol-induced cytotoxicity. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that CDK9 is the most relevant target of flavopiridol and provide avenues to improve the therapeutic strategies in blood malignancies. PMID:25596730

  9. Regulation of T cell differentiation and alloimmunity by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p18ink4c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Rowell

    Full Text Available Cellular proliferation in response to mitogenic stimuli is negatively regulated by the Cip/Kip and the Ink4 families of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors. Several of these proteins are elevated in anergic T cells, suggesting a potential role in the induction or maintenance of tolerance. Our previous studies showed that p27kip1 is required for the induction of T cell anergy and transplantation tolerance by costimulatory blockade, but a role for Ink4 proteins in these processes has not been established. Here we show that CD4+ T cells from mice genetically deficient for p18ink4c divide more rapidly than wild-type cells in response to antigenic, costimulatory and growth factor signals. However, this gain of proliferative function was accompanied by a moderate increase in the rate of cell death, and was accompanied by an overall defect in the generation of alloreactive IFNγ-producing effector cells. Consistent with this, p18ink4c-deficient T cells were unable to induce graft-vs-host disease in vivo, and p18ink4c deficiency cooperated with costimulatory blockade to significantly increase the survival of fully mismatched allografts in a cardiac transplantation model. While both p18ink4c and p27kip1 act to restrict T cell proliferation, p18ink4c exerts an opposite effect from p27kip1 on alloimmunity and organ transplant rejection, most likely by sustaining T cell survival and the development of effector function. Our studies point to additional important links between the cell cycle machinery and the processes of T cell differentiation, survival and tolerance.

  10. Induction of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the hippocampus by chronic electroconvulsive seizures: role of [Delta]FosB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Zhang, Y; Kelz, M B; Steffen, C; Ang, E S; Zeng, L; Nestler, E J

    2000-12-15

    The transcription factor DeltaFosB is induced in the hippocampus and other brain regions by repeated electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an effective antidepressant treatment. The unusually high stability of this protein makes it an attractive candidate to mediate some of the long-lasting changes in the brain caused by ECS treatment. To understand how DeltaFosB might alter brain function, we examined the gene expression profiles in the hippocampus of inducible transgenic mice that express DeltaFosB in this brain region by the use of cDNA expression arrays that contain 588 genes. Of the 430 genes detected, 20 genes were consistently upregulated, and 14 genes were downregulated, by >50%. One of the upregulated genes is cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5). On the basis of its purported role in regulating neuronal structure, we studied directly whether cdk5 is a true target for DeltaFosB. Upregulation of cdk5 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus was confirmed by Western blotting in the DeltaFosB-expressing transgenic mice as well as in rats treated chronically with ECS. Chronic ECS treatment also increased, in the hippocampus, the phosphorylation state of tau, a microtubule-associated protein that is a known substrate for cdk5. A 1.6 kb fragment of the cdk5 promoter was cloned, and activity of the promoter was found to be increased after overexpression of DeltaFosB in cell culture. Moreover, mutation of the single consensus activator protein-1 site contained within the cdk5 promoter fragment completely abolished activation of the promoter by DeltaFosB. Together, these results suggest that cdk5 is one target by which DeltaFosB produces some of its physiological effects in the hippocampus and thereby mediates certain long-term consequences of chronic ECS treatment.

  11. Palbociclib (PD0332991)-a Selective and Potent Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor: A Review of Pharmacodynamics and Clinical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy S; Karasic, Thomas B; DeMichele, Angela; Vaughn, David J; O'Hara, Mark; Perini, Rodolfo; Zhang, Paul; Lal, Priti; Feldman, Michael; Gallagher, Maryann; O'Dwyer, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Palbociclib (PD0332991) is a newly developed drug that received breakthrough designation and recent US Food and Drug Administration approval in combination with endocrine therapy in the treatment of hormone receptor positive, ERBB2-negative (formerly HER2 or HER2/neu) breast cancer in the first-line metastatic setting. Herein we describe the preclinical and translational data and early- and late-phase clinical trials in which palbociclib has been investigated in a broad array of tumor types. We discuss the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, toxic effects, and clinical response rates. On March 1, 2015, we conducted a review of the literature describing the development of palbociclib. We used the PubMed search terms "PD0332991," "palbociclib," and "CDK4/6 inhibitor" to find all published articles of interest, without limitation as to publication date. Palbociclib is a potent and specific oral cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor that has strong preclinical data to support its activity in retinoblastoma protein-expressing tumors. Phase 1 trials have demonstrated safety, and phase 2 trials have shown single-agent activity in mantle-cell lymphoma, breast cancer, liposarcoma, and teratoma with reversible neutropenia as the main toxic effect. Addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy improves progression-free survival in endocrine therapy-naïve and endocrine therapy-resistant metastatic settings. Palbociclib is well tolerated and has therapeutic potential for multiple cancers, including breast cancer, where its efficacy has been demonstrated alone and in combination with endocrine therapy. Additional combinations of palbociclib with endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy have potential in various tumors, and phase 3 trials are under way.

  12. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity phenotype in mice lacking the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 cofactor p35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drerup, Justin M; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Cui, Huxing; Mettlach, Gabriel L; Long, Michael A; Marvin, Marian; Sun, Xiankai; Goldberg, Matthew S; Lutter, Michael; Bibb, James A

    2010-12-15

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may result from delayed establishment of corticolimbic circuitry or perturbed dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Despite the widespread use of stimulants to treat ADHD, little is known regarding their long-term effects on neurotransmitter levels and metabolism. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates DA signaling through control of synthesis, postsynaptic responses, and vesicle release. Mice lacking the Cdk5-activating cofactor p35 are deficient in cortical lamination, suggesting altered motor/reward circuitry. We employed mice lacking p35 to study the effect of altered circuitry in vivo. Positron emission tomography measured glucose metabolism in the cerebral cortex using 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F] fluoro-d-glucose as the radiotracer. Retrograde dye tracing and tyrosine hydroxylase immunostains assessed the effect of p35 knockout on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), especially in relation to mesolimbic circuit formation. We defined the influence of Cdk5/p35 activity on catecholaminergic neurotransmission and motor activity via examination of locomotor responses to psychostimulants, monoamine neurotransmitter levels, and DA signal transduction. Here, we report that mice deficient in p35 display increased glucose uptake in the cerebral cortex, basal hyperactivity, and paradoxical decreased locomotion in response to chronic injection of cocaine or methylphenidate. Knockout mice also exhibited an increased susceptibility to changes in PFC neurotransmitter content after chronic methylphenidate exposure and altered basal DAergic activity in acute striatal and PFC slices. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of Cdk5/p35 activity during development may contribute to ADHD pathology, as indicated by the behavioral phenotype, improperly established mesolimbic circuitry, and aberrations in striatal and PFC catecholaminergic signaling in p35 knockout mice. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase suppression by WEE1 kinase protects the genome through control of replication initiation and nucleotide consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2012-01-01

    . Furthermore, addition of nucleosides counteracts the effects of unscheduled CDK activity on fork speed and DNA DSB formation. Finally, we show that WEE1 regulates the IR-induced S phase checkpoint, consistent with its role in control of replication initiation. In conclusion, these results suggest...... that deregulated CDK activity, such as that occurring following inhibition of WEE1 kinase or activation of oncogenes, induces replication stress and loss of genomic integrity through increased firing of replication origins and subsequent nucleotide shortage....

  14. Recruitment of trimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases following DNA damage with platinum-based antitumour agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G; Kuang, J; Koomen, J; Kobayashi, R; Khokhar, A R; Siddik, Z H

    2013-10-29

    In cycling tumour cells, the binary cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk4/cyclin D or Cdk2/cyclin E complex is inhibited by p21 following DNA damage to induce G1 cell-cycle arrest. However, it is not known whether other proteins are also recruited within Cdk complexes, or their role, and this was investigated. Ovarian A2780 tumour cells were exposed to the platinum-based antitumour agent 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane(trans-diacetato)(dichloro)platinum(IV) (DAP), which preferentially induces G1 arrest in a p21-dependent manner. The Cdk complexes were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. The active forms of Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes in control tumour cells have a molecular size of ~140 kDa, which increased to ~290 kDa when inhibited following G1 checkpoint activation by DAP. Proteomic analysis identified Cdk, cyclin, p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the inhibited complex, and biochemical studies provided unequivocal evidence that the increase in ~150 kDa of the inhibited complex is consistent with p21-dependent recruitment of PCNA as a trimer, likely bound to three molecules of p21. Although p21 alone was sufficient to inhibit the Cdk complex, PCNA was critical for stabilising p21. G1 Cdk complexes inhibited by p21 also recruit PCNA, which inhibits degradation and, thereby, prolongs activity of p21 within the complex.

  15. Enhancement of cell proliferation in various mammalian cell lines by gene insertion of a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantopoulos Konstantinos

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics tools, particularly DNA microarrays, have found application in a number of areas including gene discovery and disease characterization. Despite the vast utility of these tools, little work has been done to explore the basis of distinct cellular properties, especially those important to biotechnology such as growth. And so, with the intent of engineering cell lines by manipulating the expression of these genes, anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent HeLa cells, displaying markedly different growth characteristics, were analyzed using DNA microarrays. Results Two genes, cyclin-dependent kinase like 3 (cdkl3 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox15, were up-regulated in the faster growing, anchorage-independent (suspension HeLa cells relative to the slower growing, anchorage-dependent (attached HeLa cells. Enhanced expression of either gene in the attached HeLa cells resulted in elevated cell proliferation, though insertion of cdkl3 had a greater impact than that of cox15. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis indicated that cells with an insert of cdkl3 were able to transition from the G0/G1 phases to the S phase faster than control cells. In turn, expression of cox15 was seen to increase the maximum viable cell numbers achieved relative to the control, and to a greater extent than cdkl3. Quantitatively similar results were obtained with two Human Embryonic Kidney-293 (HEK-293 cell lines and a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell line. Additionally, HEK-293 cells secreting adipocyte complement-related protein of 30 kDa (acrp30 exhibited a slight increase in specific protein production and higher total protein production in response to the insertion of either cdkl3 or cox15. Conclusion These results are consistent with previous studies on the functionalities of cdkl3 and cox15. For instance, the effect of cdkl3 on cell growth is consistent with its homology to the cdk3 gene which is involved in G1 to S phase transition

  16. Isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis of human bladder cancer T24 cells via a cyclin-dependent kinase-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lingling; Yang, Xinhui; Yan, Xinyan; Wang, Yanming; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an increase in cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity is involved in apoptosis of human bladder cancer T24 cells induced by isoliquiritigenin (ISL). The viability of T24 cells was estimated using a sulforhodamine B assay. Cell morphological changes were examined using Hoechst 33258 staining. The apoptotic rate was determined by staining cells with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide labeling. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was measured using 5,5,6,6-tetrachloro-1,1, 3,3-tetraethyl benzimidazole carbocyanine iodide. Alterations in the apoptosis-related regulators B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), apoptotic protease-activating facter-1 (Apaf-1), caspase-9 and caspase-3 were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR methods. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3. CDK2 activity was measured using a spectrometric assay. Following treatment with ISL (between 30 and 70 µg/ml) for 24 h, typical apoptotic morphological changes were observed in T24 cells, exhibiting an edge set of chromosomes, nuclear condensation, nuclear fragmentation and other morphological features. Treatment with ISL increased the apoptotic ratio of T24 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and induced a decrease in the ΔΨm in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with ISL upregulated the expression of Bax, Bim, Apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3, downregulated the expression of Bcl-2, and increased CDK2 activity. MK-8776 (an inhibitor of CDK2) antagonized the apoptosis induced by ISL, and, compared with treatment with ISL alone, pretreatment with MK-8776 inhibited the decrease in ΔΨm, downregulated the mRNA expression of Bax, Bim, Apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3, and upregulated Bcl-2 mRNA expression. Western blot analysis demonstrated

  17. The effect of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol on anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells and relationship with NPM-ALK kinase expression and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvini, Paolo; Zorzi, Elisa; Mussolin, Lara; Monaco, Giovanni; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe; Rosolen, Angelo

    2009-07-01

    The loss of cell cycle regulation due to abnormal function of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdk) occurs in tumors and leads to genetic instability of chemotherapy-resistant cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of the cdk inhibitor flavopiridol in anaplastic large cell lymphomas, in which unrestrained proliferation depends on NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase activity. Effects of flavopiridol were examined in ALK-positive and -negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells by means of immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses to assess cdk expression and activity, quantitative real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure drug-induced changes in transcription, and FACS analyses to monitor changes in proliferation and survival. Treatment with flavopiridol resulted in growth inhibition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells, along with accumulation of subG(1) cells and disappearance of S phase without cell cycle arrest. Consistent with flavopiridol activity, phosphorylation at cdk2, cdk4, cdk9 sites on RB and RNA polymerase II was inhibited. This correlated with induction of cell death through rapid mitochondrial damage, inhibition of DNA synthesis, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins and transcripts. Notably, flavopiridol was less active in ALK-positive cells, as apoptosis was observed at higher concentrations and later time points, and resistance to treatment was observed in cells maintaining NPM-ALK signaling. NPM-ALK inhibition affected proliferation but not survival of anaplastic large cell lym-phoma cells, whereas it resulted in a dramatic increase in apoptosis when combined with flavopiridol. This work provides the first demonstration that targeting cdk is effective against anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells, and proves the critical role of NPM-ALK in the regulation of responsiveness of tumor cells with cdk dysregulation.

  18. Phase I study of palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kenji; Mukai, Hirofumi; Naito, Yoichi; Yonemori, Kan; Kodaira, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuko; Yamamoto, Noboru; Osera, Shozo; Sasaki, Masaoki; Mori, Yuko; Hashigaki, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Takashi; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Yoshino, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    This phase I study in Japanese patients evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of palbociclib, a highly selective and reversible oral cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, as monotherapy for solid tumors (part 1) and combined with letrozole as first-line treatment of postmenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer (part 2). Part 1 evaluated palbociclib 100 and 125 mg once daily (3 weeks on/1 week off; n = 6 each group) to determine the maximum tolerated dose. Part 2 evaluated palbociclib maximum tolerated dose (125 mg) plus letrozole 2.5 mg (n = 6). The most common treatment-related adverse event was neutropenia (all grades/grade 3/4): 100 mg, 83%/67%; 125 mg, 67%/33%; and palbociclib plus letrozole, 100%/83%. Heavier pretreatment with chemotherapy may have resulted in higher neutropenia rates observed with the 100-mg dose. Palbociclib exposure was higher with 125 vs 100 mg (mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve over dosing interval [τ]: 1322 vs 547.5 ng·h/mL [single dose], 2838 vs 1276 ng·h/mL [multiple dose]; mean maximum plasma concentration: 104.1 vs 41.4 ng/mL [single dose], 185.5 vs 77.4 ng/mL [multiple dose]). Half-life was 23-26 h. No drug-drug interactions between palbociclib and letrozole occurred. Four patients had stable disease (≥24 weeks in one patient with rectal cancer [100 mg] and one with esophageal cancer [125 mg]) in part 1; two patients had partial response and two had stable disease (both ≥24 weeks) in part 2. Palbociclib at the 125-mg dose (schedule 3/1) was tolerated and is the recommended dose for monotherapy and letrozole combination therapy in Japanese patients. The trials are registered with www.ClinicalTrials.gov: A5481010 and NCT01684215. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna Marla K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Results Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. Conclusions p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia

  20. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Theresa A; Smith Adams, Lorraine B; Moore, Preston D; Perna, Marla K; Sword, Jarrod D; Defoe, Dennis M

    2011-04-20

    Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia and tissue disruption seen in certain developing p27Kip1

  1. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Synovial Sarcoma : Palbociclib as a Potential Treatment for Synovial Sarcoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlenterie, Myrella; Hillebrandt-Roeffen, Melissa H S; Schaars, Esther W M; Flucke, Uta E.; Fleuren, Emmy D G; Navis, Anna C.; Leenders, William P J; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M H; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2016-01-01

    Background: In synovial sarcomas alterations in the cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb axis have been described. Also, β-catenin, a cyclin D1 regulator, is often overexpressed. Additionally, studies have shown that the t(X;18) translocation influences tumor behavior partly through cyclin D1 activation. We

  2. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Synovial Sarcoma: Palbociclib as a Potential Treatment for Synovial Sarcoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlenterie, M.; Hillebrandt-Roeffen, M.H.; Schaars, E.W.; Flucke, U.E.; Fleuren, E.D.G.; Navis, A.C.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Y.M.H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In synovial sarcomas alterations in the cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb axis have been described. Also, beta-catenin, a cyclin D1 regulator, is often overexpressed. Additionally, studies have shown that the t(X;18) translocation influences tumor behavior partly through cyclin D1 activation. We

  3. Plant Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors of the KRP Family: Potent Inhibitors of Root-Knot Nematode Feeding Sites in Plant Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vieira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp., are distributed worldwide and impose severe economic damage to many agronomically important crops. The plant cell cycle machinery is considered one of the pivotal components for the formation of nematode feeding sites (NFSs or galls. These feeding sites contain five to nine hypertrophied giant cells (GC resulting from developmental reprogramming of host root cells by this pathogen. GC undergo synchronous waves of mitotic activity uncoupled from cytokinesis giving rise to large multinucleate cells. As development of the NFS progresses, multiple rounds of DNA synthesis occur in the nuclei of GC, coupled with nuclear and cellular expansion. These cells are highly metabolically active and provide the nematode with nutrients necessary for its development and completion of its life cycle. In Arabidopsis seven cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs belonging to the interactors/inhibitors of the cyclin dependent kinases (ICK family, also referred as Kip-Related Proteins (KRPs have been identified. Interactions of KRPs with CDK/Cyclin complexes decrease CDK activity, affecting both cell cycle progression and DNA content in a concentration-dependent manner. We performed the functional analysis of all Arabidopsis KRP gene members during RKN interaction in Arabidopsis to obtain more insight into their role during gall development. We demonstrated that three members of this family (KRP2, KRP5, and KRP6 were highly expressed in galls and were important for cell cycle regulation during NFS development as shown by their different modes of action. We also pointed out that cell cycle inhibition through overexpression of all members of the KRP family can affect NFS development and consequently compromise the nematode’s life cycle. In this review we summarized our recent understanding of the KRP family of genes, and their role in controlling cell cycle progression at the RKN feeding site.

  4. Crystal structure of human cyclin-dependent kinase-2 complex with MK2 inhibitor TEI-I01800: insight into the selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, Aiko; Fukushima, Kei; Kubota, Takaharu; Kosugi, Tomomi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori, E-mail: m.kamimura@teijin.co.jp [Teijin Pharma Limited, 4-3-2 Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-8512 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The Gly-rich loop of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) bound to TEI-I01800 as an MK2 specific inhibitor forms a β-sheet which is a common structure in CDK2–ligand complexes. Here, the reason why TEI-I01800 does not become a strong inhibitor against CDK2 based on the conformation of TEI-I01800 is presented. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2 or MAPKAP-K2) is a Ser/Thr kinase from the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and plays an important role in inflammatory diseases. The crystal structure of the MK2–TEI-I01800 complex has been reported; its Gly-rich loop was found to form an α-helix, not a β-sheet as has been observed for other Ser/Thr kinases. TEI-I01800 is 177-fold selective against MK2 compared with CDK2; in order to understand the inhibitory mechanism of TEI-I01800, the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) complex structure with TEI-I01800 was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Interestingly, the Gly-rich loop of CDK2 formed a β-sheet that was different from that of MK2. In MK2, TEI-I01800 changed the secondary structure of the Gly-rich loop from a β-sheet to an α-helix by collision between Leu70 and a p-ethoxyphenyl group at the 7-position and bound to MK2. However, for CDK2, TEI-I01800 bound to CDK2 without this structural change and lost the interaction with the substituent at the 7-position. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the reason for the selectivity of TEI-I01800 is the favourable conformation of TEI-I01800 itself, making it suitable for binding to the α-form MK2.

  5. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates the effects of topoisomerase I poisons by suppressing Rad51 expression in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Grazia; Seelman, Sharon L; Qin, Li-Xuan; Schwartz, Gary K

    2008-04-01

    The results of a phase I clinical trial of the topoisomerase I (Topo I) poison CPT-11 followed by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol in patients with advanced solid tumors indicate that patients whose tumors were wild-type, but not mutant, for p53 obtained the most clinical benefit from this combination therapy. We elected to elucidate the mechanistic basis for this effect in isogenic-paired HCT116 colon cancer cells that were either wild-type (+/+) or null (-/-) for p53. With the combination therapy of SN-38 (the active metabolite of CPT-11) followed by flavopiridol, the induction of apoptosis was 5-fold greater in the p53+/+ cells compared with the p53-/- cells. This sequential treatment induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(15), which interacted with Rad51, a DNA repair protein involved in homologous recombination. Rad51 bound to p53-Ser(15) within the first 5 hours of combination therapy, and then was transcriptionally suppressed at 24 hours by flavopiridol only in p53+/+ cells. Microarray analysis also revealed suppression of Rad51 in a p53-dependent manner. Depletion of Rad51 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) sensitized both p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to SN-38-induced apoptosis with increase of gamma H2AX, a marker of DNA damage. Conversely, overexpression of Rad51 rescued p53+/+ cells from SN-->F-induced apoptosis. Because flavopiridol inhibits Cdk9, we found that inhibition of Cdk9 by DRB or by siRNA could recapitulate the flavopiridol effects, with suppression of Rad51 and induction of apoptosis only in p53+/+ cells. In conclusion, after DNA damage by Topo I poisons, flavopiridol targets homologous recombination through a p53-dependent down-regulation of Rad51, resulting in enhancement of apoptosis.

  6. Misexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor ICK1/KRP1 in single-celled Arabidopsis trichomes reduces endoreduplication and cell size and induces cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, Arp; Weinl, Christina; Bouyer, Daniel; Schöbinger, Ulrike; Hülskamp, Martin

    2003-02-01

    A positive correlation between cell size and DNA content has been recognized in many plant cell types. Conversely, misexpression of a dominant-negative cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) or CDK inhibitor proteins (ICK/KRPs) in Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves has revealed that cell growth can be uncoupled from cell cycle progression and DNA content. However, cell growth also appears to be controlled in a non-cell-autonomous manner by organ size, making it difficult in a ubiquitous expression assay to judge the cell-autonomous function of putative cell growth regulators. Here, we investigated the function of the CDK inhibitor ICK1/KRP1 on cell growth and differentiation independent of any compensatory influence of an organ context using Arabidopsis trichomes as a model system. By analyzing cell size with respect to DNA content, we dissected cell growth in a DNA-dependent and a DNA-independent process. We further found that ICK1/KRP1 misexpression interfered with differentiation and induced cell death, linking cell cycle progression, differentiation, and cell death in plants. The function of ICK1/KRP1 in planta was found to be dependent on a C-terminal domain and regulated negatively by an N-terminal domain. Finally, we identified CDKA;1 and a D-type cyclin as possible targets of ICK1/KRP1 expression in vivo.

  7. Regulation of the Action of Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 on the Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome by Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshe, Yakir; Bar-On, Ortal; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is characterized by alternating activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). During S-phase APC/C is inhibited by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1) to allow the accumulation of cyclins A and B and to prevent re-replication. Emi1 is degraded at prophase by a Plk1-dependent pathway. Recent studies in which the degradation pathway of Emi1 was disrupted have shown that APC/C is activated at mitotic entry despite stabilization of Emi1. These results suggested the possibility of additional mechanisms other than degradation of Emi1, which release APC/C from inhibition by Emi1 upon entry into mitosis. In this study we report one such mechanism, by which the ability of Emi1 to inhibit APC/C is negatively regulated by CDKs. We show that in Plk1-inhibited cells Emi1 is stabilized and phosphorylated, that Emi1 is phosphorylated by CDKs in mitotic but not S-phase cell extracts, and that Emi1 phosphorylation by mitotic cell extracts or purified CDKs markedly reduces the ability of Emi1 to bind and to inhibit APC/C. Finally, we show that the addition of extracts from S-phase cells to extracts from mitotic cells protects Emi1 from CDK-mediated inactivation. PMID:21454540

  8. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R.; Khareedu, Venkateswara R.

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants. PMID:28239388

  9. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R; Khareedu, Venkateswara R

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants.

  10. THE USE OF PALBOCKLIB, A CYCLINE-DEPENDENT KINASE 4/6 INHIBITOR, IN THE TREATMENT OF METASTATIC BREAST CANCER. A COST-CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Pavlinsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of aromatase inhibitors and target therapy directed at cycline-dependent kinases 4 and 6 gives a new opportunity to treat metastatic breast cancer. However, the cost of innovative therapy remains high. We present results of the cost-consequence analysis of combination therapy with fulvestrant and palbociclib compared to fulvestrant monotherapy or combination of exemestan and everolimus as a second-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer. It was shown that the combination therapy involving palbociclib increased the length of quality-adjusted life by 191 days and overall survival by almost a year. The use of palbociclib increased the length of quality-adjusted life by 0.06 QALY compared to the combination arm consisting of everolimus. The cumulative 10 year cost per patient was equal to 5.3 million rubles for combination therapy with palbociclib and 3.5 million rubles for combination therapy with everolimus.

  11. Characterization of human cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) and CDK13 complexes in C-terminal domain phosphorylation, gene transcription, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Gao, Xin; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and CDK12 have each been demonstrated to phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) at serine 2 of the heptad repeat, both in vitro and in vivo. CDK9, as part of P-TEFb and the super elongation complex (SEC), is by far the best characterized of CDK9, CDK12, and CDK13. We employed both in vitro and in vivo assays to further investigate the molecular properties of CDK12 and its paralog CDK13. We isolated Flag-tagged CDK12 and CDK13 and found that they associate with numerous RNA processing factors. Although knockdown of CDK12, CDK13, or their cyclin partner CCNK did not affect the bulk CTD phosphorylation levels in HCT116 cells, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed that CDK12 and CDK13 losses in HCT116 cells preferentially affect expression of DNA damage response and snoRNA genes, respectively. CDK12 and CDK13 depletion also leads to a loss of expression of RNA processing factors and to defects in RNA processing. These findings suggest that in addition to implementing CTD phosphorylation, CDK12 and CDK13 may affect RNA processing through direct physical interactions with RNA processing factors and by regulating their expression. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Insight into the interactions between novel isoquinolin-1,3-dione derivatives and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 combining QSAR and molecular docking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxia Zheng

    Full Text Available Several small-molecule CDK inhibitors have been identified, but none have been approved for clinical use in the past few years. A new series of 4-[(3-hydroxybenzylamino-methylene]-4H-isoquinoline-1,3-diones were reported as highly potent and selective CDK4 inhibitors. In order to find more potent CDK4 inhibitors, the interactions between these novel isoquinoline-1,3-diones and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 was explored via in silico methodologies such as 3D-QSAR and docking on eighty-one compounds displaying potent selective activities against cyclin-dependent kinase 4. Internal and external cross-validation techniques were investigated as well as region focusing, bootstraping and leave-group-out. A training set of 66 compounds gave the satisfactory CoMFA model (q2 = 0.695, r2 = 0.947 and CoMSIA model (q2 = 0.641, r2 = 0.933. The remaining 15 compounds as a test set also gave good external predictive abilities with r2pred values of 0.875 and 0.769 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. The 3D-QSAR models generated here predicted that all five parameters are important for activity toward CDK4. Surflex-dock results, coincident with CoMFA/CoMSIA contour maps, gave the path for binding mode exploration between the inhibitors and CDK4 protein. Based on the QSAR and docking models, twenty new potent molecules have been designed and predicted better than the most active compound 12 in the literatures. The QSAR, docking and interactions analysis expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained isoquinoline-1,3-diones and contribute towards the development of more active CDK4 subtype-selective inhibitors.

  13. Chemoproteomic Evaluation of Target Engagement by the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 and 6 Inhibitor Palbociclib Correlates with Cancer Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Sharma, Geeta; Brown, Heidi; Wu, Jiangyue; Aban, Arwin; Vogeti, Subha; Alemayehu, Senait; Sykes, Maria; Rosenblum, Jonathan S; Kozarich, John W

    2016-09-27

    Palbociclib is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/CDK6 inhibitor approved for breast cancer that is estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative. We profiled palbociclib in cells either sensitive or resistant to the drug using an ATP/ADP probe-based chemoproteomics platform. Palbociclib only engaged CDK4 or CDK6 in sensitive cells. In resistant cells, no inhibition of CDK4 or CDK6 was observed, although the off-target profiles were similar in both cell types. Prolonged incubation of sensitive cells with the compound (24 h) resulted in the downregulation of additional kinases, including kinases critical for cell cycle progression. This downregulation is consistent with cell cycle arrest caused by palbociclib treatment. Both the direct and indirect targets were also observed in a human tumor xenograft study using the COLO-205 cell line in which phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was tracked as the pharmacodyanamic marker. Together, these results suggest that this probe-based approach could be an important strategy toward predicting patient responsiveness to palbociclib.

  14. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Synovial Sarcoma: Palbociclib as a Potential Treatment for Synovial Sarcoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlenterie, Myrella; Hillebrandt-Roeffen, Melissa H S; Schaars, Esther W M; Flucke, Uta E; Fleuren, Emmy D G; Navis, Anna C; Leenders, William P J; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M H; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2016-09-01

    In synovial sarcomas alterations in the cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb axis have been described. Also, β-catenin, a cyclin D1 regulator, is often overexpressed. Additionally, studies have shown that the t(X;18) translocation influences tumor behavior partly through cyclin D1 activation. We investigated how alterations in the cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb axis impact prognosis and studied effects of targeting this axis with the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Synovial sarcoma samples (n = 43) were immunohistochemically stained for β-catenin, cyclin D1, p16, p21, p27, Rb, and phospho-Rb. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to detect CCND1 amplification or translocation. In 4 synovial sarcoma cell lines sensitivity to palbociclib was investigated using cell viability assays, and effects on the sensitive cell lines were evaluated on protein level and by cell cycle arrest. Expression of nuclear phospho-Rb and nuclear β-catenin in the patient samples was associated with poor survival. FISH showed a sporadic translocation of CCND1 in a subset of tumors. An 8-fold CCND1 amplification was found in 1 cell line, but not in the patient samples investigated. Palbociclib effectively inhibited Rb-phosphorylation in 3 cell lines, resulting in an induction of a G1 arrest and proliferation block. In this series nuclear phospho-Rb and nuclear β-catenin expression were negative prognostic factors. In vitro data suggest that palbociclib may be a potential treatment for a subset of synovial sarcoma patients. Whether this effect can be enhanced by combination treatment deserves further preclinical investigations.

  15. Lidocaine inhibits NIH-3T3 cell multiplication by increasing the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sukumar P; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A; Kodama, Shohta

    2008-11-01

    We explored molecular mechanisms by which lidocaine inhibits growth in the murine embryonic fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Local anesthetics can adversely affect cell growth in vitro. Their effects on wound healing are controversial. We examined the effects and novel mechanisms by which lidocaine affects in vitro multiplication of the murine fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. NIH-3T3 cells were grown in culture with lidocaine [0, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 mM]. Cell multiplication was assessed by determining cell counts on subsequent days, while mechanisms by which inhibition occurred were evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine uptake, gene expression using polymerase chain reaction array, and Western blot analysis to verify increased levels of affected proteins. Lidocaine caused dose-dependent inhibition of multiplication of NIH-3T3 cells. Effects ranged from no inhibition [0.05 and 0.5 mM] and mild inhibition [1 mM], to severe inhibition [2 and 5 mM] [P = 0.006]. Lidocaine 2 mM inhibited bromodeoxyuridine uptake at day 3.5 [P = 0.02 versus control, and P = 0.0495 vs 1 mM lidocaine]. On day 1.5, lidocaine upregulated expression of cyclin-D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A [p21]. On day 2.5, lidocaine increased the levels of p21 protein. Low concentrations of lidocaine, as would be seen in plasma after spinal, epidural, or plexus anesthesia, do not significantly affect multiplication of fibroblasts. Higher doses of lidocaine arrest cell multiplication at the S-phase of the growth cycle by upregulation of p21, an extremely potent inhibitor of cell multiplication. Higher concentrations, as would be seen after tissue infiltration, severely inhibit fibroblast multiplication and thus may impair wound healing.

  16. Regulation of proliferation in developing human tooth germs by MSX homeodomain proteins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19INK4d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Darko; Vukojevic, Katarina; Stazic, Petra; Sundov, Danijela; Mardesic Brakus, Snjezana; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2017-10-02

    Before the secretion of hard dental tissues, tooth germs undergo several distinctive stages of development (dental lamina, bud, cap and bell). Every stage is characterized by specific proliferation patterns, which is regulated by various morphogens, growth factors and homeodomain proteins. The role of MSX homeodomain proteins in odontogenesis is rather complex. Expression domains of genes encoding for murine Msx1/2 during development are observed in tissues containing highly proliferative progenitor cells. Arrest of tooth development in Msx knockout mice can be attributed to impaired proliferation of progenitor cells. In Msx1 knockout mice, these progenitor cells start to differentiate prematurely as they strongly express cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19 INK4d . p19 INK4d induces terminal differentiation of cells by blocking the cell cycle in mitogen-responsive G1 phase. Direct suppression of p19 INK4d by Msx1 protein is, therefore, important for maintaining proliferation of progenitor cells at levels required for the normal progression of tooth development. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of MSX1, MSX2 and p19 INK4d in human incisor tooth germs during the bud, cap and early bell stages of development. The distribution of expression domains of p19 INK4d throughout the investigated period indicates that p19 INK4d plays active role during human tooth development. Furthermore, comparison of expression domains of p19 INK4d with those of MSX1, MSX2 and proliferation markers Ki67, Cyclin A2 and pRb, indicates that MSX-mediated regulation of proliferation in human tooth germs might not be executed by the mechanism similar to one described in developing tooth germs of wild-type mouse.

  17. Disruption of zebrafish cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK function impairs the expression of Notch-dependent genes during neurogenesis and causes defects in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeto Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The J-domain-containing protein auxilin, a critical regulator in clathrin-mediated transport, has been implicated in Drosophila Notch signaling. To ask if this role of auxilin is conserved and whether auxilin has additional roles in development, we have investigated the functions of auxilin orthologs in zebrafish. Results Like mammals, zebrafish has two distinct auxilin-like molecules, auxilin and cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK, differing in their domain structures and expression patterns. Both zebrafish auxilin and GAK can functionally substitute for the Drosophila auxilin, suggesting that they have overlapping molecular functions. Still, they are not completely redundant, as morpholino-mediated knockdown of the ubiquitously expressed GAK alone can increase the specification of neuronal cells, a known Notch-dependent process, and decrease the expression of Her4, a Notch target gene. Furthermore, inhibition of GAK function caused an elevated level of apoptosis in neural tissues, resulting in severe degeneration of neural structures. Conclusion In support of the notion that endocytosis plays important roles in Notch signaling, inhibition of zebrafish GAK function affects embryonic neuronal cell specification and Her4 expression. In addition, our analysis suggests that zebrafish GAK has at least two functions during the development of neural tissues: an early Notch-dependent role in neuronal patterning and a late role in maintaining the survival of neural cells.

  18. Immunohistochemical and Proteomic Evaluation of Nuclear Ubiquitous Casein and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Substrate in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Ziółkowski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS is 27 kDa chromosomal protein of unknown function. Its amino acid composition as well as structure of its DNA binding domain resembles that of high-mobility group A, HMGA proteins. HMGA proteins are associated with various malignancies. Since changes in expression of HMGA are considered as marker of tumor progression, it is possible that similar changes in expression of NUCKS could be useful tool in diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. For identification and analysis of NUCKS we used proteomic and histochemical methods. Analysis of patient-matched samples of normal and breast cancer by mass spectrometry revealed elevated levels of NUCKS in protein extracts from ductal breast cancers. We elicited specific antibodies against NUCKS and used them for immunohistochemistry in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast. We found high expression of NUCKS in 84.3% of cancer cells. We suggest that such overexpression of NUCKS can play significant role in breast cancer biology.

  19. Autophagy and ER stress play an essential role in the mechanism of action and drug resistance of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Emilia; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2013-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a mature B cell malignancy and is the most prevalent type of leukemia in adults. There is no curative therapy for this disease; however, several new agents have shown very promising results. Autophagy has not been studied in CLL and in this study we first sought to determine if autophagy was functional in CLL with classic inducers, and if this contributes to direct cytotoxicity or protection from cell death. While autophagy is activated with all classic stimuli of this process, only unfolded protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated autophagy protects from cell death. Interestingly, select therapeutic agents (fludarabine, GS-1101, flavopiridol), which are active in CLL, also induce autophagy. Of interest, only the broad cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol has improved efficacy when autophagy is antagonized biochemically (chloroquine) or by siRNA. This promoted an investigation which demonstrated unexpectedly that flavopiridol mediates ER stress and downstream activation of MAP3K5/ASK1, which ultimately is responsible for cell death. Similarly, autophagy activated in part via ER stress and also CDK5 inhibition is protective against cell death induced by this process. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that in CLL, autophagy is induced by multiple stimuli but only acts as a mechanism of resistance against ER stress-mediating agents. Similarly, flavopiridol mediates ER stress as a primary mechanism of action in CLL, and autophagy serves as a mechanism of resistance to this agent.

  20. ER stress and autophagy: new discoveries in the mechanism of action and drug resistance of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Emilia; Lucas, David M; Gupta, Sneha V; Wagner, Amy J; Herman, Sarah E M; Smith, Lisa L; Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Andritsos, Leslie; Jones, Jeffrey A; Flynn, Joseph M; Blum, Kristie A; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lehman, Amy; Kong, Hui; Gurcan, Metin; Grever, Michael R; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C

    2012-08-09

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, such as flavopiridol, demonstrate significant single-agent activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but the mechanism of action in these nonproliferating cells is unclear. Here we demonstrate that CLL cells undergo autophagy after treatment with therapeutic agents, including fludarabine, CAL-101, and flavopiridol as well as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing agent thapsigargin. The addition of chloroquine or siRNA against autophagy components enhanced the cytotoxic effects of flavopiridol and thapsigargin, but not the other agents. Similar to thapsigargin, flavopiridol robustly induces a distinct pattern of ER stress in CLL cells that contributes to cell death through IRE1-mediated activation of ASK1 and possibly downstream caspases. Both autophagy and ER stress were documented in tumor cells from CLL patients receiving flavopiridol. Thus, CLL cells undergo autophagy after multiple stimuli, including therapeutic agents, but only with ER stress mediators and CDK inhibitors is autophagy a mechanism of resistance to cell death. These findings collectively demonstrate, for the first time, a novel mechanism of action (ER stress) and drug resistance (autophagy) for CDK inhibitors, such as flavopiridol in CLL, and provide avenues for new therapeutic combination approaches in this disease.

  1. Risk factors for tumor lysis syndrome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, K A; Ruppert, A S; Woyach, J A; Jones, J A; Andritsos, L; Flynn, J M; Rovin, B; Villalona-Calero, M; Ji, J; Phelps, M; Johnson, A J; Grever, M R; Byrd, J C

    2011-09-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) has been described in over 40% of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol. We conducted a retrospective analysis to determine predictive factors for TLS. In 116 patients, the incidence of TLS was 46% (95% CI: 36-55%). In univariable analysis, female gender, greater number of prior therapies, Rai stages III-IV, adenopathy ≥ 10 cm, splenomegaly, del(11q), decreased albumin and increased absolute lymphocyte count, white blood cell count (WBC), β2-microglobulin, and lactate dehydrogenase were associated (P flavopiridol (P = 0.71). In a multivariable analysis, controlling for number of prior therapies, cytogenetics, Rai stage, age and gender, progression-free survival (PFS) was inferior in patients with TLS (P = 0.01). Female patients and patients with elevated β2-microglobulin, increased WBC, adenopathy ≥ 10 cm and decreased albumin were at highest risk and should be monitored for TLS with flavopiridol. TLS does not appear to be predictive of response or improved PFS in patients receiving flavopiridol.

  2. Radioiodination of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor Olomoucine loaded Fe rate at Au nanoparticle and evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy on cancerous cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takan, Gokhan; Guldu, Ozge Kozgus; Medine, Emin Ilker [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have promising biomedical applications such as drug delivery, novel therapeutics and diagnostic imaging. Magnetic drug delivery combination works on the delivery of magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drug to the target tissue by means of an external magnetic field. Gold coated iron oxide (Fe rate at Au) nanoparticles can provide useful surface chemistry and biological reactivity. Covalent conjugation to the Fe rate at Au nanoparticles through cleavable linkages can be used to deliver drugs to tumor cells, then the drug can be released by an external. In this paper, purine based cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitor Olomoucine (Olo) [2-(Hydroxyethylamino)-6-benzylamino-9-methylpurine] was loaded on gold coated iron oxide (Fe rate at Au) nanoparticles and radiolabeled with {sup 131}I to combine magnetic targeted drug delivery and radiotherapy. Fe rate at Au nanoparticles were synthesized by microemulsion method. The characterization of nanoparticles was examined by TEM, VSM and XRD. Amine activation was utilized by cysteamine hydrochloride and then CDI was used for conjugation of Olomoucine. Antiproliferative effect and cytotoxicity of Olomoucine loaded Fe rate at Au nanoparticles (Fe rate at Au-Olo) were investigated on MCF7 and A549 cell lines. Proliferation rate was decreased while uptake of Fe rate at Au-Olo on both cell lines was high in comparison with Olomoucine. Also, enhanced incorporation ratio was observed under external magnetic field.

  3. Phase 2 trial of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in patients with retinoblastoma protein-expressing germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, David J; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lal, Priti; Rosen, Mark A; Gallagher, Maryann; O'Dwyer, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Alterations in the retinoblastoma pathway in germ cell tumors (GCTs) have been described. In the phase 1 trials of the selective cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib, 3 patients with unresectable, growing, mature teratoma syndrome achieved prolonged disease stabilization. The authors conducted an open-label, phase 2 study to determine the efficacy and safety of palbociclib in patients with incurable, refractory, retinoblastoma protein (pRB)-expressing GCTs. Patients who had incurable, refractory GCTs that demonstrated pRB expression by immunohistochemistry received oral palbociclib 125 mg daily for 21 days followed by a 7-day break. The primary endpoint was the 24-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate. A 24-week PFS rate ≥15% was considered promising, and a PFS rate ≤5% was not considered promising. Thirty patients received treatment, and 29 were evaluable for the primary endpoint. The estimated 24-week PFS rate was 28% (90% exact confidence interval, 15%-44%). Patients who had teratoma and teratoma with malignant transformation had significantly better PFS than patients who had nonteratomatous GCTs. Toxicity was manageable and was principally hematologic. Treatment with palbociclib was associated with a favorable 24-week PFS rate in patients with refractory, pRB-expressing GCTs. Benefit was mainly observed in patients who had unresectable teratomas and teratomas with malignant transformation. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Phase 1/2 study of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (PD-0332991) with bortezomib and dexamethasone in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesvizky, Ruben; Badros, Ashraf Z; Costa, Luciano J; Ely, Scott A; Singhal, Seema B; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Haideri, Nisreen A; Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Hess, Georg; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Spicka, Ivan; Chanan-Khan, Asher A; Raab, Marc S; Tarantolo, Stefano; Vij, Ravi; Zonder, Jeffrey A; Huang, Xiangao; Jayabalan, David; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Huang, Xin; Jiang, Yuqiu; Kim, Sindy T; Randolph, Sophia; Chen-Kiang, Selina

    2015-01-01

    This phase 1/2 study was the first to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-specific inhibitor palbociclib (PD-0332991) in sequential combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. The recommended phase 2 dose was palbociclib 100 mg orally once daily on days 1-12 of a 21-day cycle with bortezomib 1.0 mg/m2 (intravenous) and dexamethasone 20 mg (orally 30 min pre-bortezomib dosing) on days 8 and 11 (early G1 arrest) and days 15 and 18 (cell cycle resumed). Dose-limiting toxicities were primarily cytopenias; most other treatment-related adverse events were grade≤3. At a bortezomib dose lower than that in other combination therapy studies, antitumor activity was observed (phase 1). In phase 2, objective responses were achieved in 5 (20%) patients; 11 (44%) achieved stable disease. Biomarker and pharmacodynamic assessments demonstrated that palbociclib inhibited CDK4/6 and the cell cycle initially in most patients.

  5. Immunohistochemical study of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1 in invasive breast carcinoma of no special type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Duś-Szachniewicz, Kamila; Woźniak, Marta; Murawski, Marek; Kołodziej, Paweł; Osiecka, Beata; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate 1 (NUCKS1) in invasive breast carcinoma of no special type, in association with clinicopathological characteristics, including the tumor grade, frequency of lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. In addition, associations between NUCKS1 and other tumor subtype markers, including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67 and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK 5/6), were investigated. NUCKS1 expression was shown to be associated with the formation of distant metastases and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, an association between the presence of NUCKS1 and histological grading was observed. The results confirmed that the expression of NUCKS1 in low grade invasive breast carcinoma of no special type was significantly less common compared with cases of high grade carcinoma. With regard to the additional tumor subtype markers, NUCKS1 expression was demonstrated to be significantly associated with Ki-67 and CK 5/6; however, no association was identified with ER, PR and HER2. Therefore, NUCKS1 may be a novel prognostic marker in the histopathological evaluation of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type.

  6. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  7. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in drug-resistant osteosarcoma and Ewing's family tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Li, Xu; Okada, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Takasaki, Minoru; Yamamoto, Shunsaku; Oda, Yoshinao; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2007-09-15

    Multimodal therapies play important roles in the treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) and Ewing's family of tumors (EFTs), two most frequent malignant bone tumors. Although the clinical outcome of primary OS and EFTs is greatly improved, the relapsed cases often are associated with multidrug resistance of the tumors and the prognosis of these patients is still poor. Flavopiridol, a pan cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor is a novel antitumor agent that can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many cancer cells. However, there have been no studies about the effects of flavopiridol on drug-resistant OS and EFTs. Here, we demonstrated that flavopiridol induced the cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in a time and dose dependent manner in adriamycin-resistant OS and EFTs cells expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP(1)) as effectively as in their parental cells. Our data also showed that flavopiridol caused the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9, caspase-8 and caspase-3, with an increase ratio of the proapoptotic protein level (Bax) to the antiapoptotic protein level (Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L)), while apoptosis was inhibited by pan caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK), not by caspase-8 inhibitor (Z-IETD-FMK). The treatment with flavopiridol further inhibited the tumor growth in mouse models of the drug-resistant OS and EFTs. These results suggest that flavopiridol might be promising in clinical therapy for the relapsed OS and EFTs. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates STAT3 and androgen receptor activation through phosphorylation of Ser⁷²⁷ on STAT3 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fu-Ning; Chen, Mei-Chih; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Peng, Yu-Ting; Li, Pei-Chi; Lin, Eugene; Chiang, Ming-Ching; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lin, Ho

    2013-10-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is known to regulate prostate cancer metastasis. Our previous results indicated that Cdk5 activates androgen receptor (AR) and supports prostate cancer growth. We also found that STAT3 is a target of Cdk5 in promoting thyroid cancer cell growth, whereas STAT3 may play a role as a regulator to AR activation under cytokine control. In this study, we investigated the regulation of Cdk5 and its activator p35 on STAT3/AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. Our results show that Cdk5 biochemically interacts with STAT3 and that this interaction depends on Cdk5 activation in prostate cancer cells. The phosphorylation of STAT3 at Ser⁷²⁷ (p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3) is regulated by Cdk5 in cells and xenograft tumors. The mutant of STAT3 S727A reduces its interaction with Cdk5. We further show that the nuclear distribution of p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 and the expression of STAT3-regulated genes (junB, c-fos, c-myc, and survivin) are regulated by Cdk5 activation. STAT3 mutant does not further decrease cell proliferation upon Cdk5 inhibition, which implies that the role of STAT3 regulated by Cdk5 correlates to cell proliferation control. Interestingly, Cdk5 may regulate the interaction between STAT3 and AR through phosphorylation of Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 and therefore upregulate AR protein stability and transactivation. Correspondingly, clinical evidence shows that the level of p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 is significantly correlated with Gleason score and the levels of upstream regulators (Cdk5 and p35) as well as downstream protein (AR). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Cdk5 regulates STAT3 activation through Ser⁷²⁷ phosphorylation and further promotes AR activation by protein-protein interaction in prostate cancer cells.

  10. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates doxorubicin efficacy in advanced sarcomas: preclinical investigations and results of a phase I dose escalation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J.; D’Adamo, David R.; Dickson, Mark A.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Carvajal, Richard D.; Maki, Robert G.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Musi, Elgilda; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are important to the growth of some sarcomas. Flavopiridol is a pan-CDK inhibitor that has been shown to potentiate chemotherapy. As such, we explored the potentiation of doxorubicin by flavopiridol in sarcoma, in vitro and in vivo, and performed a phase I trial of flavopiridol with doxorubicin in patients with advanced sarcomas. Design Sarcoma cell lines and xenografts were treated with flavopiridol alone and in combination with doxorubicin. In the phase I study, doxorubicin and flavopiridol were administered on 2 flavopiridol schedules; a 1 hour bolus and split dosing as a 30 minute bolus followed by a 4 hour infusion. Results Pre-clinically, flavopiridol potentiated doxorubicin. In vivo, doxorubicin administered 1 hour prior to flavopiridol was more active than doxorubicin alone. Clinically, 31 patients were enrolled on protocol and flavopiridol was escalated to target dose in 2 schedules (90 mg/m2 bolus; 50 mg/m2 bolus + 40 mg/m2 infusion) both in combination with doxorubicin (60 mg/m2). Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia, leukopenia and febrile neutropenia but no maximum tolerated dose was defined. Flavopiridol pharmacokinetics showed increasing Cmax with increasing dose. RECIST responses included 2 partial responses however stable disease was seen in 16 patients. Of 12 evaluable patients with progressive well- and de-differentiated liposarcoma, 8 had stable disease greater than 12 weeks. Conclusions The sequential combination of doxorubicin followed flavopiridol is well tolerated on both schedules. Disease control was observed in well- and de-differentiated liposarcoma specifically, a disease where CDK4 is known to be amplified. PMID:22374332

  11. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates doxorubicin efficacy in advanced sarcomas: preclinical investigations and results of a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; D'Adamo, David R; Dickson, Mark A; Keohan, Mary Louise; Carvajal, Richard D; Maki, Robert G; de Stanchina, Elisa; Musi, Elgilda; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K

    2012-05-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases are important to the growth of some sarcomas. Flavopiridol is a pan-CDK inhibitor that has been shown to potentiate chemotherapy. As such, we explored the potentiation of doxorubicin by flavopiridol in sarcoma, in vitro and in vivo, and conducted a phase I trial of flavopiridol with doxorubicin in patients with advanced sarcomas. Sarcoma cell lines and xenografts were treated with flavopiridol alone and in combination with doxorubicin. In the phase I study, doxorubicin and flavopiridol were administered on two flavopiridol schedules; a 1-hour bolus and split dosing as a 30-minute bolus followed by a 4-hour infusion. Preclinically, flavopiridol potentiated doxorubicin. In vivo, doxorubicin administered 1 hour before flavopiridol was more active than doxorubicin alone. Clinically, 31 patients were enrolled on protocol and flavopiridol was escalated to target dose in two schedules (90 mg/m(2) bolus; 50 mg/m(2) bolus + 40 mg/m(2) infusion) both in combination with doxorubicin (60 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia, leukopenia, and febrile neutropenia but no maximum tolerated dose was defined. Flavopiridol pharmacokinetics showed increasing C(max) with increasing dose. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) responses included two partial responses, however, stable disease was seen in 16 patients. Of 12 evaluable patients with progressive well- and dedifferentiated liposarcoma, eight had stable disease greater than 12 weeks. The sequential combination of doxorubicin followed by flavopiridol is well tolerated on both schedules. Disease control was observed in well- and dedifferentiated liposarcoma specifically, a disease in which CDK4 is known to be amplified. ©2012 AACR.

  12. Fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis among patients with breast cancer receiving cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasheen, Shaimaa; Shohdy, Kyrillus S; Kassem, Loay; Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2017-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors emerge as efficacious agents in hormone positive metastatic breast cancer with more acceptable toxicity profiles than cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, some adverse effects such as fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis, vastly concern patients. The search was conducted in PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting library, European Society for Medical Oncology meeting abstract, and the San Antonio meeting abstract databases. We identified phase 2 or 3 trials recruiting patients with breast cancer, randomized to receive hormonal treatment plus either CDK4/6 inhibitors or placebo. We considered studies providing incidence of fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis relevant. One thousand records were screened. 34 studies were considered relevant. Four studies were found to be eligible for meta-analysis with a total of 2007 patients. The relative risk for all grade fatigue was 1.34 [95% CI: 1.17-1.54, p alopecia was 2.14 [95% CI: 1.23-3.73, p = 0.007], and for all grade stomatitis 4.87 [95% CI: 2.11-11.24, p = 0.0002]. In addition, the relative risk for high grade fatigue was 2.40 [95% CI: 1.10-5.26, p = 0.03]. CDK4/6 inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of fatigue, alopecia and stomatitis. Further studies with self-reported questionnaires may elucidate the impact of the increased risk of these selected adverse effects on the patients' quality of life.

  13. Immunocytochemical studies on the nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate following 5-aminolevulinicacid-mediated photodynamic therapy on MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotowy, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Marta; Duś, Kamila; Czapińska, Elżbieta; Osiecka, Beata; Krzystek-Korpacka, Małgorzata; Bronowicz, Andrzej; Wiśniewski, Jacek; Gamian, Andrzej; Terlecki, Grzegorz; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2013-12-01

    Recent data indicates that nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) may play role in tumor growth. In present study authors examined whether photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induces NUCKS expression in breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. In the experiment concentration of 5-ALA was 6.5mM. Excitation wavelength was 630 ± 20 nm, total light dose of light 5 or 10 J/cm(2) and irradiance 60 mW/cm(2) was used. Cells were collected at established time points and Western blot and immunocytochemical studies were performed using antibody against NUCKS. Studies proved strong cytotoxic effects in cells following PDT with 6.5mM of precursor and 10 J/cm(2). Western blot analysis revealed the strongest expression of NUCKS at 7h after PDT. At next time points, 18 and 24h, expression of NUCKS decreased and became similar to that of control group. Further immunocytochemical studies showed very strong expression of NUCKS following PDT with 5-ALA and light irradiation of 5 J/cm(2). Early, at 0 h, that expression was predominantly seen in nuclei, while at 7h expression of NUCKS was observed in disseminated manner within entire cells in both nuclei and cytoplasm, with prevalence of cytoplasmic staining. Authors suggest that NUCKS is involved in cellular responses following PDT, and since parallel induction of NUCKS and proapoptotic marker Bax and inhibition of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was observed, this protein might also be involved in induction of apoptosis following PDT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation and clinical significance of cyclin-dependent kinase5 expression in cervical lesions: a clinical research study in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Deng-Hua; Zhu, Mei-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Miao; Lin, Xing-Gu; He, Rong-Quan; Ling, Yan-Xin; Su, Shi-Tao; Wickramaarachchi, Madushi Mihiranganee; Dang, Yi-Wu; Wei, Kang-Lai; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-12

    Studies have been reported that cyclin-dependent kinase5 (CDK5) was associated with the development of several cancers. However, the relationship between CDK5 level and clinicopathological factors is still poorly understood in cervical diseases. The aim of the current study was to investigate the expression of CDK5 and its clinical significance in variant cervical lesions. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect CDK5 expression in 54 cases of chronic cervicitis, 42 cases of condyloma acuminate (CA), 38 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 360 cases of cervical cancers [adenocarcinoma, n = 63; squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n = 263; adenosquamous carcinoma, n = 34]. The clinicopathological characteristics in relation to CDK5 were examined by Pearson's Chi-square test. The positive rates of CDK5 were 27.8, 31.0, 50, 54.0, 58.8, and 62.7 % in chronic cervicitis, CA, carcinoma in situ, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma and SCC, respectively. Statistically analysis showed that CDK5 expression in cervical cancer tissues was higher than non-cervical cancer tissues (inflammation and CA) (P < 0.001). The overexpression of CDK5 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (r = 0.317; P < 0.001), histological type (r = 0.198; P < 0.001), FIGO stage (r = 0.358; P < 0.001), TNM stage (r = 0.329; P < 0.001) and pathological grade (r = 0.259; P < 0.001) in cervical lesions evaluated by Pearson's Chi-square test. Furthermore, the positive relationships were found between CDK5 and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001), FIGO stage (P < 0.001), TNM stage (P < 0.001) and pathological grade (P < 0.001) in SCC. CDK5 was positively interrelated to TNM stage (P = 0.017) in adenosquamous carcinoma. CDK5 may play a vital role in the development of cervical cancer, which may be a marker for the diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of cervical cancer.

  15. Efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier limit delivery and efficacy of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (PD-0332991) in an orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Karen E; Pokorny, Jenny; Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Bakken, Katrina; Sarkaria, Jann N; Elmquist, William F

    2015-11-01

    6-Acetyl-8-cyclopentyl-5-methyl-2-([5-(piperazin-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl]amino)pyrido(2,3-d)pyrimidin-7(8H)-one [palbociclib (PD-0332991)] is a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and is currently undergoing clinical trials for many solid tumors. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and has limited treatment options. The cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 pathway is commonly dysregulated in GBM and is a promising target in treating this devastating disease. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of drugs to invasive regions of GBM, where the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein can prevent treatments from reaching the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms limiting the effectiveness of palbociclib therapy in an orthotopic xenograft model. The in vitro intracellular accumulation results demonstrated that palbociclib is a substrate for both P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein. In vivo studies in transgenic mice confirmed that efflux transport is responsible for the limited brain distribution of palbociclib. There was an ∼115-fold increase in brain exposure at steady state in the transporter deficient mice when compared with wild-type mice, and the efflux inhibitor elacridar significantly increased palbociclib brain distribution. Efficacy studies demonstrated that palbociclib is an effective therapy when GBM22 tumor cells are implanted in the flank, but ineffective in an orthotopic (intracranial) model. Moreover, doses designed to mimic brain exposure were ineffective in treating flank tumors. These results demonstrate that efflux transport in the BBB is involved in limiting the brain distribution of palbociclib and this has critical implications in determining effective dosing regimens of palbociclib therapy in the treatment of brain tumors. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  16. Serum thymidine kinase 1 activity as a pharmacodynamic marker of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibition in patients with early-stage breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant palbociclib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagegni, Nusayba; Thomas, Shana; Liu, Ning; Luo, Jingqin; Hoog, Jeremy; Northfelt, Donald W; Goetz, Matthew P; Forero, Andres; Bergqvist, Mattias; Karen, Jakob; Neumüller, Magnus; Suh, Edward M; Guo, Zhanfang; Vij, Kiran; Sanati, Souzan; Ellis, Matthew; Ma, Cynthia X

    2017-11-21

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a cell cycle-regulated enzyme with peak expression in the S phase during DNA synthesis, and it is an attractive biomarker of cell proliferation. Serum TK1 activity has demonstrated prognostic value in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Because cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitors prevent G1/S transition, we hypothesized that serum TK1 could be a biomarker for CDK4/6 inhibitors. We examined the drug-induced change in serum TK1 as well as its correlation with change in tumor Ki-67 levels in patients enrolled in the NeoPalAna trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01723774). Patients with clinical stage II/III estrogen receptor-positive (ER+)/HER2-negative breast cancer enrolled in the NeoPalAna trial received an initial 4 weeks of anastrozole, followed by palbociclib on cycle 1, day 1 (C1D1) for four 28-day cycles, unless C1D15 tumor Ki-67 was > 10%, in which case patients went off study owing to inadequate response. Surgery occurred following 3-5 weeks of washout from the last dose of palbociclib, except in eight patients who received palbociclib (cycle 5) continuously until surgery. Serum TK1 activity was determined at baseline, C1D1, C1D15, and time of surgery, and we found that it was correlated with tumor Ki-67 and TK1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Despite a significant drop in tumor Ki-67 with anastrozole monotherapy, there was no statistically significant change in TK1 activity. However, a striking reduction in TK1 activity was observed 2 weeks after initiation of palbociclib (C1D15), which then rose significantly with palbociclib washout. At C1D15, TK1 activity was below the detection limit (palbociclib. There was high concordance, at 89.8% (95% CI: 79.2% - 96.2%), between changes in serum TK1 and tumor Ki-67 in the same direction from C1D1 to C1D15 and from C1D15 to surgery time points. The sensitivity and specificity for the tumor Ki-67-based response by palbociclib-induced decrease in serum TK1 were 94

  17. Antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line through induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and suppression of cyclin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriatno DRG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC is one of the most common cancers encountered in Indonesia, due to the prevalent habits of tobacco chewing, alcohol drinking and smoking. Oral tongue cancer is characterized by a high degree of local invasion and a high rate of metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes. Interestingly, treatment options for this cancer are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans (ant nest plant in a human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (B88 and to explore the possible mechanism in it. In the present study, B88 cells were treated with various concentration of ethanol extract of Papua’s M. pendans. The results revealed that B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans were remarkable suppressed in cell growth and cell invasion, and had a significant induction of apoptosis characterized by an increase in activation of caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, up-regulation of p27Kip1 and down-regulation of cyclin E protein was detected in B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans. These results indicated that Papua’s M. pendans exhibited a high potential antitumor activity in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma through induction of p27Kip1 and suppression of cycline E.

  18. Interaction between Yeast Cdc6 Protein and B-Type Cyclin/Cdc28 Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Elsasser, S; Lou, F; Wang, B.; Campbell, J L; de Jong, A.

    1996-01-01

    During purification of recombinant Cdc6 expressed in yeast, we found that Cdc6 interacts with the critical cell cycle, cyclin-dependent protein kinase Cdc28. Cdc6 and Cdc28 can be coimmunoprecipitated from extracts, Cdc6 is retained on the Cdc28-binding matrix p13-agarose, and Cdc28 is retained on an affinity column charged with bacterially produced Cdc6. Cdc6, which is a phosphoprotein in vivo, contains five Cdc28 consensus sites and is a substrate of the Cdc28 kinase in vitro. Cdc6 also inh...

  19. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A Gene Transcription by TFIID Subunits TAF1 and TAF7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Susan L.; Whiting, Jennifer L.; Gafken, Phil; Ranish, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The largest transcription factor IID (TFIID) subunit, TBP-associated factor 1 (TAF1), possesses protein kinase and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activities. Both enzymatic activities are essential for transcription from a subset of genes and G1 progression in mammalian cells. TAF7, another TFIID subunit, binds TAF1 and inhibits TAF1 HAT activity. Here we present data demonstrating that disruption of the TAF1/TAF7 interaction within TFIID by protein phosphorylation leads to activation of TAF1 HAT activity and stimulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin A gene transcription. Overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown experiments confirmed that TAF7 functions as a transcriptional repressor at these promoters. Release of TAF7 from TFIID by TAF1 phosphorylation of TAF7 increased TAF1 HAT activity and elevated histone H3 acetylation levels at the cyclin D1 and cyclin A promoters. Serine-264 of TAF7 was identified as a substrate for TAF1 kinase activity. Using TAF7 S264A and S264D phosphomutants, we determined that the phosphorylation state of TAF7 at S264 influences the levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A gene transcription and promoter histone H3 acetylation. Our studies have uncovered a novel function for the TFIID subunit TAF7 as a phosphorylation-dependent regulator of TAF1-catalyzed histone H3 acetylation at the cyclin D1 and cyclin A promoters. PMID:22711989

  20. In situ allicin generation using targeted alliinase delivery for inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 cells via epigenetic changes, oxidative stress and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabria, Sagar V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Li, Albert P; Kharkar, Prashant S; Desai, Krutika B

    2015-10-01

    Allicin, an extremely active constituent of freshly crushed garlic, is produced upon reaction of substrate alliin with the enzyme alliinase (EC 4.4.1.4). Allicin has been shown to be toxic to several mammalian cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study this cytotoxicity was taken to advantage to develop a novel approach to cancer treatment, based on site directed generation of allicin. Alliinase was chemically conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) which was directed against a specific pancreatic cancer marker, CA19-9. After the CA19-9 mAb-alliinase conjugate was bound to targeted pancreatic cancer cells (MIA PaCa-2 cells), on addition of alliin, the cancer cell-localized alliinase produced allicin, which effectively induced apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Specificity of anticancer activity of in situ generated allicin was demonstrated using a novel in vitro system-integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture technique. Further, allicin-induced caspase-3 expression, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest, p21(Waf1/Cip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression, ROS generation, GSH depletion, and led to various epigenetic modifications which resulted in stimulation of apoptosis. This approach offers a new therapeutic strategy, wherein alliin and alliinase-bound antibody work together to produce allicin at targeted locations which would reverse gene silencing and suppress cancer cell growth, suggesting that combination of these targeted agents may improve pancreatic cancer therapy.

  1. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  2. PaKRP, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor from avocado, may facilitate exit from the cell cycle during fruit growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabag, Michal; Ben Ari, Giora; Zviran, Tali; Biton, Iris; Goren, Moshe; Dahan, Yardena; Sadka, Avi; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies using 'Hass' avocado cultivar showed that its small-fruit (SF) phenotype is limited by cell number. To explore the molecular components affecting avocado cell production, we isolated four cDNAs encoding: an ICK/KRP protein, known to play cell cycle-regulating roles through modulation of CDK function; two CDK proteins and a D-type cyclin, and monitored their expression patterns, comparing NF (normal fruit) versus SF profiles. The accumulation of PaKRP gradually deceased during growth in both fruit populations. Despite these similarities, SF exhibited higher levels of PaKRP accumulation at early stages of growth. Moreover, in NF, augmented PaKRP expression coincided with a decrease in CDK and PaCYCD1 levels, whereas in SF, enhanced PaKPR expression was coupled with an earlier decline of CDK and PaCYCD1 levels. For both NF and SF, enhanced mesocarp PaKRP transcript accumulation, was associated with elevated abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA catabolites content. Nevertheless, the collective ABA levels, including catabolites, were substantially higher in SF tissues, as compared with NF tissues. Finally, additional expression analysis revealed that in cultured cells, PaKRP could be induced by ABA. Together, our data links PaKRP with exit from the fruit cell cycle and suggest a role for ABA in controlling its expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism. PMID:26962866

  4. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  5. Cyclin K dependent regulation of Aurora B affects apoptosis and proliferation by induction of mitotic catastrophe in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecher, Sabrina; Walter, Britta; Falkenstein, Michael; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Stenzel, Philipp; Krümpelmann, Kristina; Hadaschik, Boris; Perner, Sven; Kristiansen, Glen; Duensing, Stefan; Roth, Wilfried; Tagscherer, Katrin E

    2017-10-15

    Cyclin K plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation as well as cell development. However, the role of Cyclin K in prostate cancer is unknown. Here, we describe the impact of Cyclin K on prostate cancer cells and examine the clinical relevance of Cyclin K as a biomarker for patients with prostate cancer. We show that Cyclin K depletion in prostate cancer cells induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation accompanied by an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. Moreover, knockdown of Cyclin K causes mitotic catastrophe displayed by multinucleation and spindle multipolarity. Furthermore, we demonstrate a Cyclin K dependent regulation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B and provide evidence for an Aurora B dependent induction of mitotic catastrophe. In addition, we show that Cyclin K expression is associated with poor biochemical recurrence-free survival in patients with prostate cancer treated with an adjuvant therapy. In conclusion, targeting Cyclin K represents a novel, promising anti-cancer strategy to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death through induction of mitotic catastrophe in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, our results indicate that Cyclin K is a putative predictive biomarker for clinical outcome and therapy response for patients with prostate cancer. © 2017 UICC.

  6. Kinase Independent Functions of Cyclin D1 Which Contribute to its Oncogenic Potential In Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Landis, Mark

    2002-01-01

    .... Upon phosphorylation, pRb is inactivated, and cells pass from G1 into S phase. We and others have demonstrated that cyclin D1 has other functions, many of which are independent of kinase activity in vino...

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives as potential dual cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Li, Yanzhong; Gao, Guangwei; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Yun; Zhan, Xiaoping; Liu, Zenglu; Mao, Zhenmin; Chen, Shaoxiong; Wang, Liqun

    2014-10-30

    A series of N-alkyl or aryl substituted isoindigo derivatives have been synthesized and their anti-proliferative activity was evaluated by Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Some of the target compounds exhibited significant antitumor activity, including compounds 6h and 6k (against K562 cells), 6i (against HeLa cells) and 6j (against A549 cells). N-(p-methoxy-phenyl)-isoindigo (6k) exhibited a high and selective anti-proliferative activity against K562 cells (IC50 7.8 μM) and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 6k arrested the cell cycle at S phase in K562 cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin A and CDK2, which played critical roles in DNA replication and passage through G2 phase. Moreover, compound 6k down-regulated the expression of p-GSK-3β (Ser9), β-catenin and c-myc proteins, up-regulated the expression of GSK-3β, consequently, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. The binding mode of compound 6k with GSK-3β was simulated using molecular docking tools. All of these studies gave a better understanding to the molecular mechanisms of this class of agents and clues to develop dual CDK2/GSK-3β (Ser9) phosphorylation inhibitors applied in cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 and pRb promotes their dissociation to mediate release of the SAP30·mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Sadowski, Martin; Steel, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2011-02-18

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is mediated by phosphorylation of protein substrates by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A critical substrate of CDKs is the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, pRb, which inhibits G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression by binding and repressing E2F transcription factors. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb alleviates this inhibitory effect to promote G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression. pRb represses transcription by binding to the E2F transactivation domain and recruiting the mSin3·histone deacetylase (HDAC) transcriptional repressor complex via the retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBP1). RBP1 binds to the pocket region of pRb via an LXCXE motif and to the SAP30 subunit of the mSin3·HDAC complex and, thus, acts as a bridging protein in this multisubunit complex. In the present study we identified RBP1 as a novel CDK substrate. RBP1 is phosphorylated by CDK2 on serines 864 and 1007, which are N- and C-terminal to the LXCXE motif, respectively. CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 or pRb destabilizes their interaction in vitro, with concurrent phosphorylation of both proteins leading to their dissociation. Consistent with these findings, RBP1 phosphorylation is increased during progression from G(1) into S-phase, with a concurrent decrease in its association with pRb in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into CDK-mediated regulation of the pRb tumor suppressor during cell cycle progression, demonstrating that CDK-mediated phosphorylation of both RBP1 and pRb induces their dissociation to mediate release of the mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex from pRb to alleviate transcriptional repression of E2F.

  9. Interactions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors AT-7519, flavopiridol and SNS-032 with ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 transporters and their potential to overcome multidrug resistance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihalova, Daniela; Staud, Frantisek; Ceckova, Martina

    2015-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an important role in multidrug resistance (MDR) toward anticancer drugs. Here, we evaluated interactions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) AT-7519, flavopiridol and SNS-032 with the following ABC transporters in vitro: P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (ABCC1). Inhibitory potency of studied CDKi to the transporters was evaluated by accumulation assays using fluorescent substrates and MDCKII cells overexpressing human ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Resistance of transporter-expressing cells to the CDKi was evaluated by XTT proliferation assay. Observed interactions of CDKi were verified by ATPase assay in ABC transporter-expressing Sf9 membrane vesicles. Combination index analysis was additionally performed in ABC transporter-expressing cancer cell lines, HepG2 and T47D. Flavopiridol showed a significant inhibitory potency toward ABCG2 and ABCC1. SNS-032 also decreased ABCG2-mediated efflux, while AT-7519 failed to inhibit ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Both flavopiridol and SNS-032 showed synergistic antiproliferative effects in combination with relevant ABC transporter substrates such as daunorubicin and topotecan in cancer cells. ABCB1 was found to confer significant resistance to AT-7519 and SNS-032, but not to flavopiridol. In contrast, ABCG2 and ABCC1 conferred resistance to flavopiridol, but not to AT-7519 and SNS-032. Our data provide detailed information on interactions of flavopiridol, SNS-032 and AT-7519 with ABC transporters, which may help elucidate the pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicity of these compounds. Moreover, we show the ability of flavopiridol and SNS-032, but not AT-7519, to overcome ABC transporter-mediated MDR.

  10. Phosphorylation of phosphatidate phosphatase regulates its membrane association and physiological functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: identification of SER(602), THR(723), AND SER(744) as the sites phosphorylated by CDC28 (CDK1)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Su, Wen-Min; Morgan, Jeanelle M; Han, Gil-Soo; Xu, Zhi; Karanasios, Eleftherios; Siniossoglou, Symeon; Carman, George M

    2011-01-14

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol and plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. PAP is phosphorylated at multiple Ser and Thr residues and is dephosphorylated for in vivo function by the Nem1p-Spo7p protein phosphatase complex localized in the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In this work, we characterized seven previously identified phosphorylation sites of PAP that are within the Ser/Thr-Pro motif. When expressed on a low copy plasmid, wild type PAP could not complement the pah1Δ mutant in the absence of the Nem1p-Spo7p complex. However, phosphorylation-deficient PAP (PAP-7A) containing alanine substitutions for the seven phosphorylation sites bypassed the requirement of the phosphatase complex and complemented the pah1Δ nem1Δ mutant phenotypes, such as temperature sensitivity, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane expansion, decreased triacylglycerol synthesis, and derepression of INO1 expression. Subcellular fractionation coupled with immunoblot analysis showed that PAP-7A was highly enriched in the membrane fraction. In fluorescence spectroscopy analysis, the PAP-7A showed tighter association with phospholipid vesicles than wild type PAP. Using site-directed mutagenesis of PAP, we identified Ser(602), Thr(723), and Ser(744), which belong to the seven phosphorylation sites, as the sites phosphorylated by the CDC28 (CDK1)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase. Compared with the dephosphorylation mimic of the seven phosphorylation sites, alanine substitution for Ser(602), Thr(723), and/or Ser(744) had a partial effect on circumventing the requirement for the Nem1p-Spo7p complex.

  11. Functional characterization of a rare germline mutation in the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (CDKN1B) in a Spanish patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; De Gisi, Silvia; Riccardi, Miriam; Scrima, Marianna; De Marco, Carmela; Robledo, Mercedes; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of germline mutations in the CDKN1B gene that encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 in multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1)-like Spanish index patients. The CDKN1B gene has recently been identified as a tumor susceptibility gene for MEN4, with six germline mutations reported so far in patients with a MEN-like phenotype but negative for MEN1 mutations. Fifteen Spanish index cases with MEN-like symptoms were screened for mutations in the CDKN1B gene and the mutant variant was studied functionally by transcription/translation assays in vitro and in transiently transfected HeLa cells. We report the identification of a heterozygous GAGA deletion in the 5'-UTR of CDKN1B, NM_004064.3:c.-32_-29del, in a patient affected by gastric carcinoid tumor and hyperparathyroidism. This deletion falls inside the region that is responsible for CDKN1B transcription and is predicted to destroy a secondary stem and loop structure that includes the GAGAGA element responsible for ribosome recruitment. Accordingly, in vitro studies of coupled transcription/translation assays and transient transfection in HeLa cells showed that the GAGA deletion in the CDKN1B 5'-UTR significantly impairs the transcription of downstream reporter luciferase (of ∼40-60%) and, possibly, the translation of the corresponding mRNA. This mutation was associated with a significant reduction in the amount of CDKN1B mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes from the patient, as demonstrated by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results confirm that germline CDKN1B mutations may predispose to a human MEN4 condition and add novel evidence that alteration in the transcription/translation rate of CDKN1B mRNA might be the mechanism implicated in tumor susceptibility.

  12. NeoPalAna: Neoadjuvant Palbociclib, a Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitor, and Anastrozole for Clinical Stage 2 or 3 Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cynthia X; Gao, Feng; Luo, Jingqin; Northfelt, Donald W; Goetz, Matthew; Forero, Andres; Hoog, Jeremy; Naughton, Michael; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Suresh, Rama; Anderson, Karen S; Margenthaler, Julie; Aft, Rebecca; Hobday, Timothy; Moynihan, Timothy; Gillanders, William; Cyr, Amy; Eberlein, Timothy J; Hieken, Tina; Krontiras, Helen; Guo, Zhanfang; Lee, Michelle V; Spies, Nicholas C; Skidmore, Zachary L; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Thomas, Shana; Bumb, Caroline; Vij, Kiran; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Sanati, Souzan; Ellis, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 drives cell proliferation in estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. This single-arm phase II neoadjuvant trial (NeoPalAna) assessed the antiproliferative activity of the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in primary breast cancer as a prelude to adjuvant studies.Experimental Design: Eligible patients with clinical stage II/III ER(+)/HER2(-) breast cancer received anastrozole 1 mg daily for 4 weeks (cycle 0; with goserelin if premenopausal), followed by adding palbociclib (125 mg daily on days 1-21) on cycle 1 day 1 (C1D1) for four 28-day cycles unless C1D15 Ki67 > 10%, in which case patients went off study due to inadequate response. Anastrozole was continued until surgery, which occurred 3 to 5 weeks after palbociclib exposure. Later patients received additional 10 to 12 days of palbociclib (Cycle 5) immediately before surgery. Serial biopsies at baseline, C1D1, C1D15, and surgery were analyzed for Ki67, gene expression, and mutation profiles. The primary endpoint was complete cell cycle arrest (CCCA: central Ki67 ≤ 2.7%).Results: Fifty patients enrolled. The CCCA rate was significantly higher after adding palbociclib to anastrozole (C1D15 87% vs. C1D1 26%, P Palbociclib enhanced cell-cycle control over anastrozole monotherapy regardless of luminal subtype (A vs. B) and PIK3CA status with activity observed across a broad range of clinicopathologic and mutation profiles. Ki67 recovery at surgery following palbociclib washout was suppressed by cycle 5 palbociclib. Resistance was associated with nonluminal subtypes and persistent E2F-target gene expression.Conclusions: Palbociclib is an active antiproliferative agent for early-stage breast cancer resistant to anastrozole; however, prolonged administration may be necessary to maintain its effect. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4055-65. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Regulation of the G1/S Transition in Hepatocytes: Involvement of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Cdk1 in the DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Corlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A singular feature of adult differentiated hepatocytes is their capacity to proliferate allowing liver regeneration. This review emphasizes the literature published over the last 20 years that established the most important pathways regulating the hepatocyte cell cycle. Our article also aimed at illustrating that many discoveries in this field benefited from the combined use of in vivo models of liver regeneration and in vitro models of primary cultures of human and rodent hepatocytes. Using these models, our laboratory has contributed to decipher the different steps of the progression into the G1 phase and the commitment to S phase of proliferating hepatocytes. We identified the mitogen dependent restriction point located at the two-thirds of the G1 phase and the concomitant expression and activation of both Cdk1 and Cdk2 at the G1/S transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these two Cdks contribute to the DNA replication. Finally, we provided strong evidences that Cdk1 expression and activation is correlated to extracellular matrix degradation upon stimulation by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα leading to the identification of a new signaling pathway regulating Cdk1 expression at the G1/S transition. It also further confirms the well-orchestrated regulation of liver regeneration via multiple extracellular signals and pathways.

  14. Disruption of neuronal nitric oxide synthase dimerization contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease: Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase at Ser(293).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jo, Inho; Song, Kee-Ho; Han, Jung-Soo; Park, Seung Hwa; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Du-Hyong

    2016-10-01

    Although previous studies have suggested that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-derived NO has neuroprotective effects on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether and how disruption of nNOS dimerization contributes to the development of AD. No differences in synaptic number or expression of synaptic markers, including synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95, were found in the cortex of 5 × FAD mice, which possess 5 familial AD mutations, at 6 months of age compared with control littermates. nNOS dimerization was disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) shifted more diffusely toward a cytosolic compartment, but there was no change in total expression. Furthermore, the levels of p25, a CDK5 activator, increased significantly and it colocalized with nNOS in the 5 × FAD cortex. In silico analysis revealed that a new nNOS-specific GSP (glycine-serine-proline) motif was well-conserved across species at nNOS-Ser(293), which is located ahead of the N-terminal hook. This motif was not present in the closely related isoform, endothelial NOS. Motif scan analysis also predicted that CDK5 can phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293) with a high likelihood. An in vitro phosphorylation assay clearly showed that CDK5/p25 does indeed phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293). Finally, nNOS-S293D mutant, a phosphomimetic form of nNOS-Ser(293), and nNOS-S293A mutant, a neutral form of nNOS-Ser(293), significantly decreased nNOS dimerization and NO production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that nNOS dimers are disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, and nNOS-Ser(293), a potential site of CDK5 phosphorylation, may be involved in the decrease in nNOS dimerization and NO production, and the development of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Palbociclib, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase4/6, blocks HIV-1 reverse transcription through the control of sterile α motif and HD domain-containing protein-1 (SAMHD1) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Eduardo; Badia, Roger; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Ruiz, Alba; Permanyer, Marc; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Clotet, Bonaventura; Marti, Ramón; Ballana, Ester; Esté, José A

    2014-09-24

    Sterile α motif and HD domain-containing protein-1 (SAMHD1) inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcription by decreasing the pool of intracellular deoxynucleotides. SAMHD1 is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-mediated phosphorylation. However, the exact mechanism of SAMHD1 regulation in primary cells is unclear. We explore the effect of palbociclib, a CDK6 inhibitor, in HIV-1 replication. Human primary monocytes were differentiated into macrophages with monocyte-colony stimulating factor and CD4 T lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)/interleukin-2. Cells were treated with palbociclib and then infected with a Green fluorescent protein-expressing HIV-1 or R5 HIV-1 BaL. Viral DNA was measured by quantitative PCR and infection assessed by flow cytometry. Deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) content was determined using a polymerase-based method. Pan-CDK inhibitors AT7519, roscovitine and purvalanol A reduced SAMHD1 phosphorylation. HIV-1 replication was blocked by AT7519 (66.4 ± 3.8%; n = 4), roscovitine (47.3 ± 3.9%; n = 4) and purvalanol A (55.7 ± 15.7%; n = 4) at subtoxic concentrations. Palbociclib, a potent and selective CDK6 inhibitor, blocked SAMHD1 phosphorylation, intracellular dNTP levels, HIV-1 reverse transcription and HIV-1 replication in primary macrophages and CD4 T lymphocytes. Notably, treatment of macrophages with palbociclib led to reduced CDK2 activation, measured as the phosphorylation of the T-loop at the Thr160. The antiviral effect was lost when SAMHD1 was degraded by Vpx, providing further evidence for a role of SAMHD1 in mediating the antiretroviral effect. Our results indicate that SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction is controlled by CDK as previously suggested but point to a preferential role for CDK2 and CDK6 as mediators of SAMHD1 activation. Our study provides a new signaling pathway susceptible for the development of new therapeutic approaches against HIV-1 infection.

  16. A phase 1 study of SNS-032 (formerly BMS-387032), a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 7 and 9 administered as a single oral dose and weekly infusion in patients with metastatic refractory solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elisabeth I; Bible, Keith; Martell, Robert E; Adelman, Daniel C; Lorusso, Patricia M

    2008-02-01

    SNS-032, (formerly BMS-387032) is a potent and selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 2, 7 and 9. The primary objective of the study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), the maximum administered dose (MAD), dose limiting toxicity (DLT), and the recommended phase 2 dose for SNS-032 when administered as a weekly 1-h infusion. The secondary objective was to assess the safety and tolerability of SNS-032 and to evaluate its bioavailability as an oral solution. Patients with metastatic solid tumors or refractory lymphoma were treated with a starting dose of 4 mg/m2 intravenously administered over 1-h with a cycle defined as 3 weekly doses of SNS-032 every 21 days. Three patient cohorts were utilized in the dose-escalation schema. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed. For the 13 and 16 mg/m2 dose cohorts, the first dose of cycle 2 was given as an oral solution to estimate the oral bioavailability of the drug in humans. A total of 21 patients were enrolled. Twenty treated patients received a total of 39 cycles of treatment. The most common treatment-related adverse events occurring with greater than 20% incidence were fatigue (25%) and nausea (20%). Following intravenous administration, plasma concentrations declined in a biphasic manner, resulting in mean terminal half-lives between 5 and 10 hours. The mean Cmax and AUC0-inf increased nearly linearly with dose, ranging from 0.067 to 0.287 microg/ml and 0.103 to 0.553 microg h/ml, respectively. The CL and Vss remained unchanged with increasing dose levels, averaging 38 l/h/m2 and 212 l/m2, respectively. Average oral bioavailability was 19% (range: 4-33%). Three (15%) patients experienced a best response of stable disease. Study enrollment was terminated during dose-escalation due to a change in the development strategy for the study drug. SNS-032 administered as a weekly 1-h infusion was well tolerated, although study enrollment was terminated during dose-escalation and the MTD of SNS-032

  17. Iron chelators of the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone and 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone series inhibit HIV-1 transcription: identification of novel cellular targets--iron, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, and CDK9

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Breuer, Denitra; Lovejoy, David B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kumar, Krishna; Jerebtsova, Marina; Ray, Patricio; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gordeuk, Victor R; Richardson, Des R; Nekhai, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    ...)/cyclin T1 and other host transcriptional coactivators to the HIV-1 promoter. Tat itself is phosphorylated by CDK2, and inhibition of CDK2 by small interfering RNA, the iron chelator 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311...

  18. Casein kinase II phosphorylation of cyclin F at serine 621 regulates the Lys48-ubiquitylation E3 ligase activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Rayner, Stephanie L; De Luca, Alana; Gwee, Serene S L; Morsch, Marco; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Shahheydari, Hamideh; Ragagnin, Audrey; Shi, Bingyang; Yang, Shu; Williams, Kelly L; Don, Emily K; Walker, Adam K; Zhang, Katharine Y; Yerbury, Justin J; Cole, Nicholas J; Atkin, Julie D; Blair, Ian P; Molloy, Mark P; Chung, Roger S

    2017-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive weakness, paralysis and muscle loss often resulting in patient death within 3-5 years of diagnosis. Recently, we identified disease-linked mutations in the CCNF gene, which encodes the cyclin F protein, in cohorts of patients with familial and sporadic ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (Williams KL et al 2016 Nat. Commun.7, 11253. (doi:10.1038/ncomms11253)). Cyclin F is a part of a Skp1-Cul-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex and is responsible for ubiquitylating proteins for degradation by the proteasome. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation status of cyclin F and the effect of the serine to glycine substitution at site 621 (S621G) on E3 ligase activity. This specific mutation (S621G) was found in a multi-generational Australian family with ALS/FTD. We identified seven phosphorylation sites on cyclin F, of which five are newly reported including Ser621. These phosphorylation sites were mostly identified within the PEST (proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequence located at the C-terminus of cyclin F. Additionally, we determined that casein kinase II (CK2) can phosphorylate Ser621 and thereby regulate the E3 ligase activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) complex. Furthermore, the S621G mutation in cyclin F prevents phosphorylation by CK2 and confers elevated Lys48-ubiquitylation activity, a hallmark of ALS/FTD pathology. These findings highlight the importance of phosphorylation in regulating the activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) E3 ligase complex that can affect downstream processes and may lead to defective motor neuron development, neuron degeneration and ultimately ALS and FTD. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. "Nutritional and chemopreventive anti-cancer agents up-regulate expression of p27Kip1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in mouse JB6 epidermal and human MCF7, MDA-MB-321 and AU565 breast cancer cells"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eto Isao

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p27(Kip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. When up-regulated, p27 inhibits G1-to-S phase transition of the cell cycle. This report addresses the question of whether various nutritional and chemopreventive anti-cancer agents up-regulate the expression of p27 in preneoplastic and neoplastic cells. Results Experimental evidence presented in the first half of this report shows that these agents fairly faithfully up-regulate expression of p27 in mouse epidermal (JB6 and human breast cancer (MCF7, MDA-MB-321, and AU565 cells. Up-regulation appears to be specific to p27 because expression of cyclin D1, E, and A, and p21Cip1/Waf1 was not modulated by these agents. Up-regulation of the expression of p27 is likely due to the activation of translation rather than transcription of p27 because (a up-regulation is mediated by the 5'-untranslated region (-575 of the p27 gene and (b the antibiotic actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription, did not attenuate the up-regulation of p27. This latter finding is likely to preclude the existence of cryptic transcription factor binding site(s in the 5'-untranslated region of p27 gene. The experimental evidence, presented in the second half of this report, was obtained using the 5'-untranslated region (-575 of p27 gene. The evidence suggests that cancer preventive agents up-regulate expression of p27 by at least four different molecular signaling pathways: (a Caloric restriction is likely to up-regulate p27 expression via 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; a metabolic energy sensor or cellular fuel gauge, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Amino acid deficiencies also up-regulate the expression of p27 using some components of this pathway. (b 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (but not tamoxifen, genistein (but not genistin, daidzein, and probably other nutritional and chemopreventive anti-cancer agents could up-regulate expression of p27 via receptor protein

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 has a limited role in cell cycle regulation of cyclin D1 levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Masahiro

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression level of cyclin D1 plays a vital role in the control of proliferation. This protein is reported to be degraded following phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 on Thr-286. We recently showed that phosphorylation of Thr-286 is responsible for a decline in cyclin D1 levels during S phase, an event required for efficient DNA synthesis. These studies were undertaken to test the possibility that phosphorylation by GSK3 is responsible for the S phase specific decline in cyclin D1 levels, and that this event is regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT signaling pathway which controls GSK3. Results We found, however, that neither PI3K, AKT, GSK3, nor proliferative signaling activity in general is responsible for the S phase decline in cyclin D1 levels. In fact, the activity of these signaling kinases does not vary through the cell cycle of proliferating cells. Moreover, we found that GSK3 activity has little influence over cyclin D1 expression levels during any cell cycle phase. Inhibition of GSK3 activity by siRNA, LiCl, or other chemical inhibitors failed to influence cyclin D1 phosphorylation on Thr-286, even though LiCl efficiently blocked phosphorylation of β-catenin, a known substrate of GSK3. Likewise, the expression of a constitutively active GSK3 mutant protein failed to influence cyclin D1 phosphorylation or total protein expression level. Conclusion Because we were unable to identify any proliferative signaling molecule or pathway which is regulated through the cell cycle, or which is able to influence cyclin D1 levels, we conclude that the suppression of cyclin D1 levels during S phase is regulated by cell cycle position rather than signaling activity. We propose that this mechanism guarantees the decline in cyclin D1 levels during each S phase; and that in so doing it reduces the likelihood that simple over expression of cyclin D1 can lead to uncontrolled cell growth.

  1. Phase I trial of palbociclib, a selective cyclin dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, in combination with cetuximab in patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Loren; Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya M; Schaffer, András; Robinson, Anthony; Chun, Se-Eun; Lee, Wooin; Lewis, James; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Adkins, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    To test the safety of the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib with cetuximab in patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A phase I trial using 3+3 design was performed to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of palbociclib with standard dose weekly cetuximab. Palbociclib was administered orally days 1-21 every 28days: dose level 1 (100mg/d) and 2 (125mg/d; approved monotherapy dose). Pharmacokinetic assessments were performed on cycle 2, day 15. Cyclin D1, p16(INK4a), and Rb protein expression were measured on pre-treatment tumor. Tumor response was assessed using RECIST1.1. Nine patients (five p16(INK4a) negative; four positive) were enrolled across dose levels 1 (n=3) and 2 (n=6) and none experienced a DLT. A MTD of palbociclib was not reached. Myelosuppression was the most common adverse event. Six of nine patients had cetuximab-resistant and 4/9 had platin-resistant disease. Disease control (DC) occurred in 89%, including partial response (PR) in two (22%) and stable disease in six (67%) patients. PRs occurred in p16(INK4a) negative HNSCC. Five patients (56%) had measurable decreases in tumor target lesions. In cetuximab-resistant HNSCC, best tumor response was PR in 1 and DC in 5 and median TTP was 112days (range: 28-168). In platin-resistant HNSCC, best tumor response: PR in 1, DC in 3 and median TTP was 112days (range: 28-112). The Cmax and AUC0-24h appeared comparable in patients receiving 125 vs 100mg dose of palbociclib. This trial, the first to evaluate a CDK4/6 inhibitor in HNSCC, determined that palbociclib 125mg/day on days 1-21 every 28days with cetuximab was safe. Tumor responses were observed, even in cetuximab- or platin-resistant disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Elevated cyclin A associated kinase activity promotes sensitivity of metastatic human cancer cells to DNA antimetabolite drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Yin, Hailin; Panandikar, Ashwini; Gandhi, Varsha; Sen, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in successful systemic therapy of metastatic cancer. We analyzed the involvement of cell cycle regulatory proteins in eliciting response to N (phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA), an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, in two metastatic variants of human cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 isolated from lung (L-2) and brain (Br-1) in nude mouse, respectively. L-2 and Br-l cells markedly differed in their sensitivity to PALA. While both cell types displayed an initial S phase delay/arrest, Br-l cells proliferated but most L-2 cells underwent apoptosis. There was distinct elevation in cyclin A, and phosphorylated Rb proteins concomitant with decreased expression of bcl-2 protein in the PALA treated L-2 cells undergoing apoptosis. Markedly elevated cyclin A associated and cdk2 kinase activities together with increased E2F1-DNA binding were detected in these L-2 cells. Induced ectopic cyclin A expression sensitized Br-l cells to PALA by activating an apoptotic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated expression of cyclin A and associated kinase can activate an apoptotic pathway in cells exposed to DNA antimetabolites. Abrogation of this pathway can lead to resistance against these drugs in metastatic variants of human carcinoma cells.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A induces ubiquitin-dependent cyclin D1 degradation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Coombes R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of G1-S phase cell cycle transition and has been shown to be important for breast cancer development. GSK3β phosphorylates cyclin D1 on Thr-286, resulting in enhanced ubiquitylation, nuclear export and degradation of the cyclin in the cytoplasm. Recent findings suggest that the development of small-molecule cyclin D1 ablative agents is of clinical relevance. We have previously shown that the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA induces the rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells prior to repression of cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 transcription. TSA treatment also resulted in accumulation of polyubiquitylated GFP-cyclin D1 species and reduced levels of the recombinant protein within the nucleus. Results Here we provide further evidence for TSA-induced ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 and demonstrate that GSK3β-mediated nuclear export facilitates this activity. Our observations suggest that TSA treatment results in enhanced cyclin D1 degradation via the GSK3β/CRM1-dependent nuclear export/26S proteasomal degradation pathway in MCF-7 cells. Conclusion We have demonstrated that rapid TSA-induced cyclin D1 degradation in MCF-7 cells requires GSK3β-mediated Thr-286 phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome pathway. Drug induced cyclin D1 repression contributes to the inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation and can sensitize cells to CDK and Akt inhibitors. In addition, anti-cyclin D1 therapy may be highly specific for treating human breast cancer. The development of potent and effective cyclin D1 ablative agents is therefore of clinical relevance. Our findings suggest that HDAC inhibitors may have therapeutic potential as small-molecule cyclin D1 ablative agents.

  4. Proteins regulating cyclin dependent kinases Cdk4 and Cdk5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorthamer, M.J.M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The exact passage through the eukaryotic cell cycle is regulated by the progressive activation and inactivation of a family Cdk-s. Cancer cells evolve from normal cells when some essential processes in a dividing cell malfunction. This causes inappropriate replication, segregation and

  5. Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Targets in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Dizdaroglu M (1997) comparative genomic hybridization. Lab Invest 81: 717-723 Characterization and mechanism of action of Drosophila ribosomal...intracellular ox- 129. WVilson DM 3rd and Barsky D. The major humain ab isic idative environment of IL-2-stimulatcd BA/FHbeta cells. endonu clease...2001) Recognition of DNA Damage in Mammals. J. Biochem. & Mol. Biol. 34, 489- 495. 7. Rothfuss, A., Grompe, M. (2004) Repair kinetics of genomic

  6. Role of cyclins in neuronal differentiation of immortalized hippocampal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, W; Pestell, R; Rosner, M R

    1997-01-01

    The proto-oncogene cyclin D1 and the neuron-specific cyclins p35 and p39 are expressed during brain maturation. To investigate the role of these cyclins in neuronal differentiation, we used a conditionally immortalized rat hippocampal cell line, H19-7, that expresses cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 5 (cdk4 and -5). Cyclin D1, which activates cdk4 and binds but does not activate cdk5, was increased upon differentiation of the H19-7 cells. However, microinjection of either sense or antisense cyc...

  7. Activation of Cdk2/Cyclin E complexes is dependent on the origin of replication licensing factor Cdc6 in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Cara L; Chrivia, John C; Baldassare, Joseph J

    2010-11-15

    Cyclin E-associated CDK2 activity is required for the initiation of DNA synthesis in human cells. CDK2 activity is tightly regulated; CDK2 must be in the nucleus, bound to a cyclin, phosphorylated on T160, and dephosphorylated on T14/Y15 for complete kinase activation. Nuclear localization exposes CDK2 to activating enzymes (CAK, Cdc25A) in stimulated cells. Previous studies from our lab indicate CDK2 nuclear localization and cyclin E co-expression are insufficient to cause CDK2 activation or T160 phosphorylation in stimulated IIC9 cells; these activities still require serum stimulation and ERK kinase activity. Recent studies have implicated a role for origin of replication (ORC) licensing proteins in the activation of G1/S Cdks. In this study, we show that CDK2 associates with chromatin and Cdc6 in an ERK-dependent manner following stimulation of IIC9 CHEF cells. We show that nuclear-localized CDK2 (CDK2-NLS) ectopically expressed with cyclin E requires mitogenic stimulation and ERK activation for chromatin association, in addition to previously shown kinase activation and T160 phosphorylation in IIC9 cells. Additionally, we show that expression of Cdc6 in stimulated IIC9 cells treated with ERK inhibitor rescues CDK2-NLS chromatin association, kinase activation, and T160 phosphorylation. From the above data, we deduce ERK-dependent CDK2 activation is due in part to ERK-dependent Cdc6 expression. To examine the role of Cdc6 directly in stimulated primary human fibroblasts, we used RNA interference to attenuate the expression of Cdc6. We show that Cdc6 expression is required for CDK2 chromatin association and kinase activation in stimulated primary human fibroblasts. Additionally, we show that Cdc6 expression is required for the initiation of DNA synthesis and S phase entry in stimulated primary human fibroblasts. Ultimately, this data implicates Cdc6 expression as an important mitogen-induced mechanism in the activation of CDK2/cyclin E, the initiation of DNA

  8. The cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in combination with letrozole versus letrozole alone as first-line treatment of oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer (PALOMA-1/TRIO-18): a randomised phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Richard S; Crown, John P; Lang, Istvan; Boer, Katalin; Bondarenko, Igor M; Kulyk, Sergey O; Ettl, Johannes; Patel, Ravindranath; Pinter, Tamas; Schmidt, Marcus; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Thummala, Anu R; Voytko, Nataliya L; Fowst, Camilla; Huang, Xin; Kim, Sindy T; Randolph, Sophia; Slamon, Dennis J

    2015-01-01

    Palbociclib (PD-0332991) is an oral, small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 with preclinical evidence of growth-inhibitory activity in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells and synergy with anti-oestrogens. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of palbociclib in combination with letrozole as first-line treatment of patients with advanced, oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. In this open-label, randomised phase 2 study, postmenopausal women with advanced oestrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer who had not received any systemic treatment for their advanced disease were eligible to participate. Patients were enrolled in two separate cohorts that accrued sequentially: in cohort 1, patients were enrolled on the basis of their oestrogen receptor-positive and HER2-negative biomarker status alone, whereas in cohort 2 they were also required to have cancers with amplification of cyclin D1 (CCND1), loss of p16 (INK4A or CDKN2A), or both. In both cohorts, patients were randomly assigned 1:1 via an interactive web-based randomisation system, stratified by disease site and disease-free interval, to receive continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily or continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily plus oral palbociclib 125 mg, given once daily for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off over 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. Accrual to cohort 2 was stopped after an unplanned interim analysis of cohort 1 and the statistical analysis plan for the primary endpoint was amended to a combined analysis of cohorts 1 and 2 (instead of cohort 2 alone). The study is ongoing but closed to accrual; these are the results of the final analysis of progression-free survival. The study is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00721409. Between Dec 22, 2009, and May 12, 2012, we randomly assigned 165 patients, 84 to palbociclib

  9. Phosphorylation of pRb by cyclin D kinase is necessary for development of cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, R.; Hansen, A.H.; Busk, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A number of stimuli induce cardiac hypertrophy and may lead to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. It is believed that cardiomyocytes withdraw from the cell cycle shortly after birth and become terminally differentiated. However, cell cycle regulatory proteins take part in the development...... of hypertrophy, and it is important to elucidate the mechanisms of how these proteins are involved in the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes. MATERIALS AND METHODS, AND RESULTS: In the present study, by immunohistochemistry with a phosphorylation-specific antibody, we found that cyclin D-cdk4....../6-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb) during hypertrophy and expression of an unphosphorylatable pRb mutant impaired hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Transcription factor E2F was activated by hypertrophic elicitors but activation was impaired by pharmacological inhibition of cyclin D-cdk4...

  10. Regulation of the retinoblastoma protein-related p107 by G1 cyclin complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, R.L.; Carlée, L.; Kerkhoven, R.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The orderly progression through the cell cycle is mediated by the sequential activation of several cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) complexes. These kinases phosphorylate a number of cellular substrates, among which is the product of the retinoblastoma gene, pRb. Phosphorylation of pRb in late

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Cyclin Gene Family in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingyan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclins play important roles in cell division and cell expansion. They also interact with cyclin-dependent kinases to control cell cycle progression in plants. Our genome-wide analysis identified 52 expressed cyclin genes in tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino sequences of tomato and Arabidopsis cyclin genes divided them into 10 types, A-, B-, C-, D-, H-, L-, T-, U-, SDS- and J18. Pfam analysis indicated that most tomato cyclins contain a cyclin-N domain. C-, H- and J18 types only contain a cyclin-C domain, and U-type cyclins contain another potential cyclin domain. All of the cyclin genes are distributed throughout the tomato genome except for chromosome 8, and 30 of them were found to be segmentally duplicated; they are found on the duplicate segments of chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12, suggesting that tomato cyclin genes experienced a mass of segmental duplication. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicates that the expression patterns of tomato cyclin genes were significantly different in vegetative and reproductive stages. Transcription of most cyclin genes can be enhanced or repressed by exogenous application of gibberellin, which implies that gibberellin maybe a direct regulator of cyclin genes. The study presented here may be useful as a guide for further functional research on tomato cyclins.

  12. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

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    Afonnikov Dmitry A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events.

  13. NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 exerts cytoprotection against hypoxic injury upon EGFR activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi-Dong [Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Huzhou Normal College, Huzhou 313000, Zhejiang (China); Xu, Liang [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou 310000, Zhejiang (China); Tang, Kan-Kai [Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Huzhou Normal College, Huzhou 313000, Zhejiang (China); Gong, Fang-Xiao; Liu, Jing-Quan; Ni, Yin; Jiang, Ling-Zhi; Hong, Jun; Han, Fang; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiang-Hong [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou 310000, Zhejiang (China); Sun, Ren-Hua, E-mail: jqin168@hotmail.com [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou 310000, Zhejiang (China); Mo, Shi-Jing, E-mail: msj860307@163.com [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou 310000, Zhejiang (China)

    2016-09-10

    Apoptosis of neural cells is one of the main pathological features in hypoxic/ischemic brain injury. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) might be a potential therapeutic target for hypoxic/ischemic brain injury since NF-κB has been found to be inactivated after hypoxia exposure, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms of NF-κB inactivation are largely unknown. Here we report that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation prevents neuron-like PC12 cells apoptosis in response to hypoxia via restoring NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1. Functionally, EGFR activation by EGF stimulation mitigates hypoxia-induced PC12 cells apoptosis in both dose- and time-dependent manner. Of note, EGFR activation elevates IKKβ phosphorylation, increases IκBα ubiquitination, promotes P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as upregulates cyclin D1 expression. EGFR activation also abrogates the decrease of IKKβ phosphorylation, reduction of IκBα ubiquitination, blockade of P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as downregulation of cyclin D1 expression induced by hypoxia. Furthermore, NF-κB-dependent upregulation of cyclin D1 is instrumental for the EGFR-mediated cytoprotection against hypoxic apoptosis. In addition, the dephosphorylation of EGFR induced by either EGF siRNA transfection or anti-HB-EGF neutralization antibody treatment enhances hypoxic cytotoxicity, which are attenuated by EGF administration. Our results highlight the essential role of NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 in EGFR-mediated cytoprotective effects under hypoxic preconditioning and support further investigation of EGF in clinical trials of patients with hypoxic/ischemic brain injury. - Highlights: • EGFR activation significantly decreases hypoxia-induced PC12 cells injury. • EGFR activation abrogates the transcriptional repression of cyclin D1 induced by hypoxia in a NF-κB-dependent

  14. p21WAF1/CIP1 interacts with protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götz, C; Wagner, P; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    p21WAF1/CIP1 which belongs to a class of regulatory proteins that interact with cyclin dependent kinases is a potent inhibitor of these kinases. The inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinases induces an arrest of cells in the G phase of the cell cycle. In addition p21WAF1/CIP1 associates with PCN...

  15. Changes of protein kinase Calpha and cyclin D1 expressions in pulmonary arteries from smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaing, Min; Liu, Xiansheng; Zeng, Daxiong; Wang, Ran; Xu, Yongjian

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and cyclin D1 expressions in pulmonary arteries from smokers with normal lung function and smokers with mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The peripheral lung tissues were obtained from 10 non-smokers with normal lung function (non-smoker group), 14 smokers with normal lung function (smoker group), 11 smokers with mild to moderate COPD (COPD group). The morphological changes of pulmonary arteries were observed by HE-staining. The expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), PKCalpha and cyclin D1 proteins in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were immunohistochemically determined. The percentages of PCNA-positive cells were taken as the smooth muscle cells proliferation index (PI). The mRNA expressions of PKCalpha and cyclin D1 in PASMCs were evaluated by real-time fluorescence PCR. Morphometrical analysis showed that the ratio of pulmonary artery wall area to total area (WA%) in smoker group and COPD group was significantly greater than that in non-smoker group (P<0.01). The PASMCs proliferation index in smoker group and COPD group was significantly higher than that in nonsmoker group (P<0.01). The protein levels of PKCalpha and cyclin D1 in PASMCs were significantly increased in smoker group and COPD group as compared with non-smoker group (P<0.01). The mRNA expressions of PKCalpha and cyclin D1 in PASMCs were significantly elevated in smoker group and COPD group as compared with non-smoker group (P<0.01). Significant correlations were found between PKCalpha protein and WA% or PI (P<0.01). Correlations between cyclin D1 protein and WA% or PI also existed (P<0.01). The expression of PKCalpha was positively correlated with the expression of cyclin D1 at both protein and mRNA levels (P<0.01). In conclusion, increased expressions of PKCalpha and cyclin D1 might be involved in the

  16. Distinct and Overlapping Requirements for Cyclins A, B, and B3 in Drosophila Female Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Bourouh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis, like mitosis, depends on the activity of the cyclin dependent kinase Cdk1 and its cyclin partners. Here, we examine the specific requirements for the three mitotic cyclins, A, B, and B3 in meiosis of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that all three cyclins contribute redundantly to nuclear envelope breakdown, though cyclin A appears to make the most important individual contribution. Cyclin A is also required for biorientation of homologs in meiosis I. Cyclin B3, as previously reported, is required for anaphase progression in meiosis I and in meiosis II. We find that it also plays a redundant role, with cyclin A, in preventing DNA replication during meiosis. Cyclin B is required for maintenance of the metaphase I arrest in mature oocytes, for spindle organization, and for timely progression through the second meiotic division. It is also essential for polar body formation at the completion of meiosis. With the exception of its redundant role in meiotic maturation, cyclin B appears to function independently of cyclins A and B3 through most of meiosis. We conclude that the three mitotic cyclin-Cdk complexes have distinct and overlapping functions in Drosophila female meiosis.

  17. Modulation of Cyclins, p53 and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling in Breast Cancer Cell Lines by 4-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenoxybenzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Han Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in cancer therapy and early detection, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females worldwide. The aim of the current study was to investigate the antitumor activity of a novel compound, 4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenoxybenzoic acid (TMPBA and its mechanism of action, in breast cancer. Results indicated the relatively high sensitivity of human breast cancer cell-7 and MDA-468 cells towards TMPBA with IC50 values of 5.9 and 7.9 µM, respectively compared to hepatocarcinoma cell line Huh-7, hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2, and cervical cancer cell line Hela cells. Mechanistically, TMPBA induced apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells as indicated by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI nuclear staining, cell cycle analysis and the activation of caspase-3. Western blot analysis revealed the ability of TMPBA to target pathways mediated by mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and p53, of which the concerted action underlined its antitumor efficacy. In addition, TMPBA induced alteration of cyclin proteins’ expression and consequently modulated the cell cycle. Taken together, the current study underscores evidence that TMPBA induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells via the modulation of cyclins and p53 expression as well as the modulation of AMPK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling. These findings support TMPBA’s clinical promise as a potential candidate for breast cancer therapy.

  18. Nutrient availability regulates cell cycle through a Pho85 CDK-dependent control of Cln3 cyclin stability

    OpenAIRE

    Menoyo Molins, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle control by trophic factors has a key role in regulation of cell proliferation in all organisms. Nutrients are one of these important factors needed by cells to reproduce, so very well regulated mechanisms must exist that connect nutrient availability to cell cycle. Hence the importance on studying how exactly nutrient-dependent signaling pathways work. Cln3, the most upstream G1 cyclin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is one well demonstrated common effector of multiple nutrient-dep...

  19. Block of CDK1-dependent polyadenosine elongation of Cyclin B mRNA in metaphase-i-arrested starfish oocytes is released by intracellular pH elevation upon spawning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Hiroe; Aoto, Saki; Tachibana, Kazunori; Hara, Masatoshi; Chiba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic progression requires the translation of maternal mRNAs in a strict temporal order. In isolated animal oocytes, translation of maternal mRNAs containing a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE), such as cyclin B, is activated by in vitro stimulation of meiotic resumption which induces phosphorylation of CPEB (CPE-binding protein) and elongation of their polyadenosine (poly(A)) tails; whether or not this model can be applied in vivo to oocytes arrested at metaphase of meiosis I in ovaries is unknown. In this study, we found that active CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) phosphorylated CPEB in ovarian oocytes arrested at metphase I in the starfish body cavity, but phosphorylation of CPEB was not sufficient for elongation of cyclin B poly(A) tails. Immediately after spawning, however, mRNA was polyadenylated, suggesting that an increase in intracellular pH (pHi ) upon spawning triggers the elongation of poly(A) tails. Using a cell-free system made from maturing oocytes at metaphase I, we demonstrated that polyadenylation was indeed suppressed at pH below 7.0. These results suggest that a pH-sensitive process, functioning after CPEB phosphorylation, is blocked under physiologically low pHi (7.0) that occurs after spawning triggers polyadenylation of cyclin B mRNA and progression into meiosis II. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Age Dependent Switching Role of Cyclin D1 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Rinaldi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers, including breast cancer, functioning as an oncogene. The aim of this study was to better understand the molecular dynamics of ductal carcinomas with regard to proliferation and the ageing process.

  1. Cyclin A2 Is Required for Sister Chromatid Segregation, But Not Separase Control, in Mouse Oocyte Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A. Touati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In meiosis, two specialized cell divisions allow the separation of paired chromosomes first, then of sister chromatids. Separase removes the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together in a stepwise manner from chromosome arms in meiosis I, then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Using mouse oocytes, our study reveals that cyclin A2 promotes entry into meiosis, as well as an additional unexpected role; namely, its requirement for separase-dependent sister chromatid separation in meiosis II. Untimely cyclin A2-associated kinase activity in meiosis I leads to precocious sister separation, whereas inhibition of cyclin A2 in meiosis II prevents it. Accordingly, endogenous cyclin A is localized to kinetochores throughout meiosis II, but not in anaphase I. Additionally, we found that cyclin B1, but not cyclin A2, inhibits separase in meiosis I. These findings indicate that separase-dependent cohesin removal is differentially regulated by cyclin B1 and A2 in mammalian meiosis.

  2. Cyclin D2-cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 is required for efficient proliferation and tumorigenesis following Apc loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, A.M.; Myant, K.; Reed, K.R.; Ridgway, R.A.; Athineos, D.; van den Brink, G.R.; Muncan, V.; Clevers, H.; Clarke, A.R.; Sicinski, P.; Sansom, O.J.

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of the Apc gene is recognized as the key early event in the development of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), where its loss leads to constitutive activation of beta-catenin/T-cell factor 4 signaling and hence transcription of Wnt target genes such as c-Myc. Our and other previous

  3. Type II cGMP‑dependent protein kinase inhibits EGF‑induced JAK/STAT signaling in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Wu, Yan; Lan, Ting; Jiang, Lu; Qian, Hai; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)‑initiated signal transduction of MAPK‑mediated, PI3K/Akt‑mediated and PLCγ1‑mediated pathways through blocking EGF‑induced phosphorylation/activation of EGF receptor (EGFR). As EGF/EGFR signaling also initiated signal transduction of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)‑mediated pathway, the present study was performed to investigate whether PKG II exerts an inhibitory effect this pathway. AGS human gastric cancer cell line was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding the cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II), to increase the expression of PKG II, and treated with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the phosphorylation/activation of EGFR, JAK1, JAK2, STAT1 and STAT3 and the expression of cell cycle‑associated proteins, including cyclin D1 and cyclin E. EGF‑induced cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. Transcriptional activity was determined by a reporter gene assay. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, JAK1, JAK2, STAT1 and STAT3, increased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, promoted the cells to enter S phase, and stimulated transcriptional activity in the cells. Increased PKG II activity through infecting the cells with Ad‑PKG II and activating the kinase with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP efficiently reversed the changes caused by EGF. The results suggest that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced signal transduction of the JAK/STAT‑mediated pathway and further confirms that PKG II may be a cancer inhibitor.

  4. Age Dependent Switching Role of Cyclin D1 in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carmela; Malara, Natalia Maria; D’Angelo, Rosalia; Sidoti, Antonina; Leotta, Attilio; Lio, Santo; Caparello, Basilio; Ruggeri, Alessia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Amato, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers, including breast cancer, functioning as an oncogene. The aim of this study was to better understand the molecular dynamics of ductal carcinomas with regard to proliferation and the ageing process. Methods: 130 cases of ductal breast cancer in postmenopausal women, aged 52–96 in 3 age classes were selected. Tumoral tissues preserved in formaldehyde solution and subsequently embedded in paraffin were subjected to analysis Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT- PCR) and immuno-histochemical tests. The molecular variables studied were estimated in relation to the patients’ age. Results: The results obtained suggest that the increment of the levels of cyclin D1 in intra-ductal breast tumors in older woman that we have examined is significantly associated with a lower proliferation rate. Conclusion: Cyclin D1, which characterizes tumor in young women as molecular director involved in strengthening tumoral proliferation mechanisms, may be seen as a potential blocking molecular switch in corresponding tumours in old women. PMID:22231956

  5. dependent/calmodulin- stimulated protein kinase from moss ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lin-dependent protein kinase homolog; Planta 203 S91–. S97. Lu Y-T, Hidaka H and Feldman L J 1996 Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism; Planta. 199 18–24. Mitra D and Johri M M 2000 Enhanced expression of a cal-.

  6. The polo-like kinase Plx1 prevents premature inactivation of the APC(Fizzy)-dependent pathway in the early Xenopus cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassac, T; Castro, A; Lorca, T; Le Peuch, C; Dorée, M; Labbé, J C; Galas, S

    2000-08-03

    Members of the polo-like family of protein kinases have been involved in the control of APC (anaphase-promoting complex) during the cell cycle, yet how they activate APC is not understood in any detail. In Xenopus oocytes, Ca2+-dependent degradation of cyclin B associated with release from arrest at second meiotic metaphase was demonstrated to require the polo-like kinase Plx1. The aim of the present study was to examine, beyond Ca2+-dependent resumption of meiosis, the possible role of Plx1 in the control of cyclin degradation during the early mitotic cell cycle. Plx1 was found to be dispensable for MPF to turn on the cyclin degradation machinery. However, it is required to prevent premature inactivation of the APC-dependent proteolytic pathway. Microcystin suppresses the requirement for Plx1 in both Ca2+-dependent exit from meiosis, associated with degradation of both cyclin B and A downstream of CaMK2 activation, and prevention of premature APC(Fizzy) inactivation in the early mitotic cell cycle. These results are consistent with the view that Plx1 antagonizes an unidentified microcystin-sensitive phosphatase that inactivates APC(Fizzy).

  7. Function of the A-type cyclins during gametogenesis and early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2011-01-01

    The cyclins and their cyclin-dependent kinase partners, the Cdks, are the basic components of the machinery that regulates the passage of cells through the cell cycle. Among the cyclins, those known as the A-type cyclins are unique in that in somatic cells, they appear to function at two stages of the cell cycle, at the G1-S transition and again as the cells prepare to enter M-phase. Higher vertebrate organisms have two A-type cyclins, cyclin A1 and cyclin A2, both of which are expressed in the germ line and/or early embryo, following highly specialized patterns that suggest functions in both mitosis and meiosis. Insight into their in vivo functions has been obtained from gene targeting experiments in the mouse model. Loss of cyclin A1 results in disruption of spermatogenesis and male sterility due to cell arrest in the late diplotene stage of the meiotic cell cycle. In contrast, cyclin A2-deficiency is marked by early embryonic lethality; thus, understanding the function of cyclin A2 in the adult germ line awaits conditional mutagenesis or other approaches to knock down its expression.

  8. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation.

  9. The metaphase II arrest in mouse oocytes is controlled through microtubule-dependent destruction of cyclin B in the presence of CSF.

    OpenAIRE

    Kubiak, J Z; Weber, M; de Pennart, H; Winston, N J; Maro, B

    1993-01-01

    In unfertilized eggs from vertebrates, the cell cycle is arrested in metaphase of the second meiotic division (metaphase II) until fertilization or activation. Maintenance of the long-term meiotic metaphase arrest requires mechanisms preventing the destruction of the maturation promoting factor (MPF) and the migration of the chromosomes. In frog oocytes, arrest in metaphase II (M II) is achieved by cytostatic factor (CSF) that stabilizes MPF, a heterodimer formed of cdc2 kinase and cyclin. At...

  10. An active form of calcium and calmodulin dependant protein kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The DMI3 gene of the model legume Medicago truncatula encodes a calcium and calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) involved in the signalling pathways leading to the establishment of both mycorrhizal and rhizobial root symbiosis. The removal of the auto-inhibitory domain that negatively regulates the kinase ...

  11. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss ...

  12. Protein Kinase C Regulates Late Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Han, Namshik; Warwood, Stacey; Doris, Kathryn S.; Morgan, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    The control of the cell cycle in eukaryotes is exerted in part by the coordinated action of a series of transcription factor complexes. This is exemplified by the Mcm1p-Fkh2p-Ndd1p complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which controls the cyclical expression of the CLB2 cluster of genes at the G2/M phase transition. The activity of this complex is positively controlled by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and polo kinases. Here, we demonstrate that the protein kinase Pkc1p works in the opposite manner to inhibit the activity of the Mcm1p-Fkh2p-Ndd1p complex and the expression of its target genes. In particular, Pkc1p causes phosphorylation of the coactivator protein Ndd1p. Reductions in Pkc1p activity and the presence of Pkc1p-insensitive Ndd1p mutant proteins lead to changes in the timing of CLB2 cluster expression and result in associated late cell cycle defects. This study therefore identifies an important role for Pkc1p in controlling the correct temporal expression of genes in the cell cycle. PMID:22966207

  13. Protein kinase activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates cytokine-dependent cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    Full Text Available The dual specificity protein/lipid kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, promotes growth factor-mediated cell survival and is frequently deregulated in cancer. However, in contrast to canonical lipid-kinase functions, the role of PI3K protein kinase activity in regulating cell survival is unknown. We have employed a novel approach to purify and pharmacologically profile protein kinases from primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells that phosphorylate serine residues in the cytoplasmic portion of cytokine receptors to promote hemopoietic cell survival. We have isolated a kinase activity that is able to directly phosphorylate Ser585 in the cytoplasmic domain of the interleukin 3 (IL-3 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptors and shown it to be PI3K. Physiological concentrations of cytokine in the picomolar range were sufficient for activating the protein kinase activity of PI3K leading to Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival but did not activate PI3K lipid kinase signaling or promote proliferation. Blockade of PI3K lipid signaling by expression of the pleckstrin homology of Akt1 had no significant impact on the ability of picomolar concentrations of cytokine to promote hemopoietic cell survival. Furthermore, inducible expression of a mutant form of PI3K that is defective in lipid kinase activity but retains protein kinase activity was able to promote Ser585 phosphorylation and hemopoietic cell survival in the absence of cytokine. Blockade of p110α by RNA interference or multiple independent PI3K inhibitors not only blocked Ser585 phosphorylation in cytokine-dependent cells and primary human AML blasts, but also resulted in a block in survival signaling and cell death. Our findings demonstrate a new role for the protein kinase activity of PI3K in phosphorylating the cytoplasmic tail of the GM-CSF and IL-3 receptors to selectively regulate cell survival highlighting the importance of targeting

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol promotes remyelination in a cuprizone induced demyelination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Guiyun; Gao, Yunyun; Liu, Shuai; Ye, Enmao; Li, Yanyan; Jin, Xiao; Yang, Hongju; Yang, Zheng

    2016-10-17

    The cuprizone (CPZ) model has been widely used for the studies of de-and remyelination. The CPZ-exposed mice show oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) increase and mature oligodendrocytes decrease, suggesting an imbalance between proliferation and differentiation of OPCs. In the first experiment of this study, we examined the expression of cell cycle related genes in brains of mice following CPZ administration for 5 weeks by means of microarray assay. In addition, we performed a double labeling of BrdU and Ki-67 to calculate cell cycle exit index in the mice. Our results showed that CPZ administration up-regulated the expression of 16 cell cycle related genes, but down-regulated the expression of only one in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of mice compared to control group. The treatment inhibited potential precursor cells exit from cell cycle. In the second experiment, we evaluated effects of a CDK inhibitor flavopiridol (FLA) on CPZ-induced neuropathological changes and spatial working memory impairment in mice.FLA treatment for one week effectively attenuated the CPZ-induced increases in NG2 positive cells, microglia and astrocytes, alleviated the concurrent mature oligodendrocyte loss and myelin breakdown, and improved spatial working memory deficit in the CPZ-exposed mice. These results suggest that CPZ-induced neuropathological changes involve in dysregulation of cell cycle related genes. The therapeutic effects of FLA on CPZ-exposed mice may be related to its ability of cell cycle inhibition.

  15. Biaryl purine derivatives as potent antiproliferative agents: inhibitors of cyclin dependent kinases. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trova, Michael P; Barnes, Keith D; Barford, Curt; Benanti, Travis; Bielaska, Mark; Burry, Lori; Lehman, John M; Murphy, Christine; O'Grady, Harold; Peace, Denise; Salamone, Susan; Smith, Jennifer; Snider, Patricia; Toporowski, Joseph; Tregay, Steven; Wilson, Alison; Wyle, Michael; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Friedrich, Thomas D

    2009-12-01

    The introduction of an aryl ring onto the 4-position of the C-6 benzyl amino group of the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine (2), maintained the potent Cdk inhibition demonstrated by roscovitine (2) as well as greatly improving the antiproliferative activity. A series of C-6 biarylmethylamino derivatives was prepared addressing modifications on the C-6 biaryl rings, N-9 and C-2 positions to provide compounds that displayed potent cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines. In particular, derivative 21h demonstrated a >750-fold improvement in the growth inhibition of HeLa cells compared to roscovitine (2).

  16. A quantitative model for cyclin-dependent kinase control of the cell cycle: revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlmann, Frank; Bouchoux, C?line; L?pez-Avil?s, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle encompasses an ordered series of events. Chromosomal DNA is replicated during S phase of the cell cycle before being distributed to daughter cells in mitosis. Both S phase and mitosis in turn consist of an intricately ordered sequence of molecular events. How cell cycle ordering is achieved, to promote healthy cell proliferation and avert insults on genomic integrity, has been a theme of Paul Nurse's research. To explain a key aspect of cell cycle ordering, ...

  17. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN INDENE PYRAZOLE AND CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Enrique Torres

    Full Text Available Proteins have been traditionally out of reach of electronic structure methods. But with technological advances in the development of powerful computers and the need to extend the methods of computational chemistry to problems of biological interest, such as the rational design of drugs, new technologies in silico have been developed that allow to study condensed systems of phase, which consist of thousands of atoms. Here, there are some techniques that combine two or more methods of calculating in a calculation that allows precise chemical exploration of very large systems. The aim of this work is to find the binding affinity of CDK2 inhibitors calculating their electronic densities and then comparing the similarities of these with the biological activity of ligands developing a QSAR in order to establish correlations between quantum similarity, which is a physical-chemical property and biological activity of said set of molecules that change their properties by varying any of their substituents.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 is required for the survival of adult Drosophila melanogaster glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Lynette C

    2017-07-28

    Neuronal and glial progenitor cells exist in the adult Drosophila brain. The primarily glial progenitor cells rely on a microRNA, mir-31a, to inhibit the expression of a predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase, CG16947. Erroneous inheritance of CG16947 by the progeny when the neural progenitor cell divides leads to death of the progeny, however how CG16947 achieves glial cell death is unknown. I have identified the interacting partner of CG16947 to be cdk9. I show that reduction of cdk9 expression in glia causes glial loss; highlighting the importance of cdk9 in mediating the survival of glia. Further, glial loss observed in mir-31a mutants was prevented with adult-specific expression of cdk9 in glia. I provide biochemical evidence that the binding of CG16947 to cdk9 causes its degradation. Taken together, this data shows that cdk9 plays a role in the survival of adult glia in the Drosophila brain. Thus, a fine balance exists between mir-31a and CG16947 expression in the progenitor cells that in turn regulates the levels of cdk9 in the progeny. This serves to allow the progenitor cells to regulate the number of glia in the adult brain.

  19. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth.

  20. Apelin attenuates postburn sepsis via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B dependent mechanism: A randomized animal study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Keqin; Long, Huibao; Xu, Bincan; Luo, Yanling

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether apelin would regulate inflammatory response and promote survival in an experimental burn sepsis model through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B dependent pathway...

  1. Nucleoside triphosphate synthesis catalysed by adenylate kinase is ADP dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Martin; Kilstrup, M.

    2005-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP + (d)NDP ¿ ADP + (d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur...

  2. Study of possible changes in genes expression of mitotic cyclin under clinorotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    Cell cycle is regulated by cyclins, destruction and accumulation of which is the main process in cell cycle progress. In previous studies we have shown that slow horizontal clinorotation (2rpm) affects proliferative activity and cell cycle stages in inducted to grow 2-4 day old Pisum sativum seedlings. In the first cell cycle, delay in cell transition to S stage and delay in mitosis occur due to the prolongation of pre-synthetic stage. This observation is supported by accumulation of 2c DNA cells and transcripts of 3 cyclin in meristem cells. 3 cyclins are "plant" version of cyclin D, they regulate pre-synthetic stage of cell cycle. Cyclins A and B, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases, control the beginning of S-stage and are necessary for prevention of certain delay in cell cycle progression. We suggest that delay in mitosis, observed under clinorotation, may take place not only due to prolongation of pre-synthetic stage but also due to change of cyclin genes expression under above condition. Further investigations will be aimed on establishing the level of cyclin genes expression under clinorotation.

  3. Cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor p21 does not impact embryonic endochondral ossification in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinzei, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Shinya; Hashimoto, Shingo; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Iwasa, Kenjiro; Sakata, Shuhei; Kihara, Shinsuke; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Endochondral ossification at the growth plate is regulated by a number of factors and hormones. The cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor p21 has been identified as a cell cycle regulator and its expression has been reported to be essential for endochondral ossification in vitro. However, to the best of our knowledge, the function of p21 in endochondral ossification has not been evaluated in vivo. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the function of p21 in embryonic endochondral ossification in vivo. Wild‑type (WT) and p21 knockout (KO) pregnant heterozygous mice were sacrificed on embryonic days E13.5, E15.5 and E18.5. Sagittal histological sections of the forearms of the embryos were collected and stained with Safranin O and 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU). Additionally, the expression levels of cyclin D1, type II collagen, type X collagen, Sox9, and p16 were examined using immunohistochemistry, and the expression levels of p27 were examined using immunofluorescence. Safranin O staining revealed no structural change between the cartilage tissues of the WT and p21KO mice at any time point. Type II collagen was expressed ubiquitously, while type X collagen was only expressed in the hypertrophic zone of the cartilage tissues. No differences in the levels of Sox9 expression were observed between the two groups at any time point. The levels of cyclin D1 expression and BrdU uptake were higher in the E13.5 cartilage tissue compared with those observed in the embryonic cartilage tissue at subsequent time points. Expression of p16 and p27 was ubiquitous throughout the tissue sections. These results indicate that p21 may not be essential for embryonic endochondral ossification in articular cartilage of mice and that other signaling networks may compensate for p21 deletion.

  4. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai [Department of Neurology, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163001 (China); Chen, Jing [Department of Neurology, Daqing Longnan Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, 163001 China (China); Zhang, Jinghui [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150026 (China); Sun, Jiahang [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China); Guo, Mian, E-mail: guomian_hyd@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  5. HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 expression and pRb phosphorylation in infected podocytes: cell-cycle mechanisms contributing to the proliferative phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Mohammad

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aberrant cell-cycle progression of HIV-1-infected kidney cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy, however the mechanisms whereby HIV-1 induces infected glomerular podocytes or infected tubular epithelium to exit quiescence are largely unknown. Here, we ask whether the expression of HIV-1 genes in infected podocytes induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression, hallmarks of cyclin D1-mediated G1 → S phase progression. Results We assessed cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in two well-characterized models of HIV-associated nephropathy pathogenesis: HIV-1 infection of cultured podocytes and HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26. Compared to controls, cultured podocytes expressing HIV-1 genes, and podocytes and tubular epithelium from hyperplastic nephrons in Tg26 kidneys, had increased levels of phospho-pRb (Ser780, a target of active cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 known to promote G1 → S phase progression. HIV-1-infected podocytes showed markedly elevated cyclin D1 mRNA and cyclin D1 protein, the latter of which did not down-regulate during cell-cell contact or differentiation, suggesting post-transcriptional stabilization of cyclin D1 protein levels by HIV-1. The selective suppression of HIV-1 transcription by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, abrogated cyclin D1 expression, underlying the requirement for HIV-1 encoded products to induce cyclin D1. Indeed, HIV-1 virus deleted of nef failed to induce cyclin D1 mRNA to the level of other single gene mutant viruses. Conclusions HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in infected podocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 activates cyclin D1-dependent cell-cycle mechanisms to promote proliferation of infected renal epithelium.

  6. Phosphorylation of mammalian CDC6 by cyclin A/CDK2 regulates its subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Lukas, J; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    1999-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are essential for regulating key transitions in the cell cycle, including initiation of DNA replication, mitosis and prevention of re-replication. Here we demonstrate that mammalian CDC6, an essential regulator of initiation of DNA replication, is phosphorylated...... by CDKs. CDC6 interacts specifically with the active Cyclin A/CDK2 complex in vitro and in vivo, but not with Cyclin E or Cyclin B kinase complexes. The cyclin binding domain of CDC6 was mapped to an N-terminal Cy-motif that is similar to the cyclin binding regions in p21(WAF1/SDI1) and E2F-1. The in vivo...... phosphorylation of CDC6 was dependent on three N-terminal CDK consensus sites, and the phosphorylation of these sites was shown to regulate the subcellular localization of CDC6. Consistent with this notion, we found that the subcellular localization of CDC6 is cell cycle regulated. In G1, CDC6 is nuclear...

  7. Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kavita; Liu, Wan-Ju; Thompson, Keyata; Anders, Lars; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Dewi, Ruby; Buckley, Stephanie; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Polster, Brian; Dorsey, Susan G; Sun, Yezhou; Sicinski, Piotr; Girnun, Geoffrey D

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain normal blood glucose during periods of nutrient deprivation. Gluconeogenesis is controlled at multiple levels by a variety of signal transduction and transcriptional pathways. However, dysregulation of these pathways leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. While the effects of various signaling pathways on gluconeogenesis are well established, the downstream signaling events repressing gluconeogenic gene expression are not as well understood. The cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in the liver, despite the liver being a quiescent tissue. The most well-studied function of cyclin D1 is activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), promoting progression of the cell cycle. We show here a novel role for cyclin D1 as a regulator of gluconeogenic and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) gene expression. In mice, fasting decreases liver cyclin D1 expression, while refeeding induces cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of CDK4 enhances the gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas cyclin D1-mediated activation of CDK4 represses the gluconeogenic gene-expression program in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we show that cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis and OxPhos in part via inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α) activity in a CDK4-dependent manner. Indeed, we demonstrate that PGC1α is novel cyclin D1/CDK4 substrate. These studies reveal a novel role for cyclin D1 on metabolism via PGC1α and reveal a potential link between cell-cycle regulation and metabolic control of glucose homeostasis. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Mini review: Multifaceted role played by cyclin D1 in tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rachel John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss and put forward the various diversified roles of cyclin D1 in cancer. Neoplasia is defined by abnormal regulation of the cell cycle. Cyclin D1 could be a protein derived from the PRAD1, CCND1, or bcl-1 sequence on body 11q13 that is concerned in each traditional regulation of the cell cycle and pathologic process. Within the G1 (resting part of the cell cycle, cyclin D1 in conjunction with its cyclin-dependent enzyme (cyclin-dependent kinase partner is accountable for transition to the S (DNA synthesis part by phosphorylating the merchandise of the metastatic tumor sequence (protein retinoblastoma that then releases transcription factors vital within the initiation of DNA replication. Amplification of the sequence or overexpression of the cyclin D1 releases a cell from its traditional controls and causes transformation to a malignant composition. Analysis of those changes provides vital diagnostic information in oral carcinogenesis and is of prognostic value in several cancers. Data of cyclin D1's role in malignancy at the assorted sites provide a basis on which future treatment directed against this molecule will proceed.

  9. Polyploid giant cancer cells with budding and the expression of cyclin E, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, stathmin associated with the grading and metastasis in serous ovarian tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongcheng; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Guang; Yang, Zhengduo; Li, Yan; Fei, Fei; Zhang, Shiwu

    2014-08-08

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) exhibit cancer stem cell properties and express cell cycle-related proteins. HEY PGCCs induced by cobalt chloride generated daughter cells and the daughter cells had a strong migratory and invasive ability. This study is to compare the expression of cyclin E, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2), and stathmin between PGCCs with budding and control HEY cells, and determine the clinicopathological significance of cell cycle-related protein expression in ovarian tumors. We used western blot and immunocytochemical staining to compare the expression levels of cyclin E, SKP2 and stathmin between PGCC with budding daughter cells and control HEY cells. In addition, immunohistochemical staining for cyclin E, SKP2 and stathmin was performed on a total of 80 paraffin-embedded serous ovarian tumor tissue samples. The samples included 21 cases of primary high-grade carcinoma (group I) and their metastatic tumors (group II), 26 cases of primary low-grade carcinoma without metastasis (group III), and 12 cases of serous borderline cystadenoma (group IV). Single PGCC with budding in the stroma showed high correlation with the metastasis of ovarian carcinoma. Group I had a significantly higher number of single PGCCs with budding in the stroma than group III (85.71% [18/21] vs. 23.08% [6/26] cases; χ2 = 18.240, P = 0.000). The expression of cyclin E, SKP2, and stathmin was compared among the four groups. The expression levels of cyclin E, SKP2, and stathmin increased with the malignant grade of ovarian tumors and group II had the highest expression levels. The expression of cyclin E (χ2 = 17.985, P = 0.000), SKP2 (χ2 = 12.384, P = 0.000), and stathmin (χ2 = 20.226, P = 0.000) was significantly different among the 4 groups. These data suggest that the cell cycle-related proteins cyclin E, SKP2, and stathmin may be valuable biomarkers to evaluate the metastasis in patients with

  10. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Phytohormone Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wuwu Xu; Wenchao Huang

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs/CDPKs) are Ca2+-sensors that decode Ca2+ signals into specific physiological responses. Research has reported that CDPKs constitute a large multigene family in various plant species, and play diverse roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. Although numerous CDPKs have been exhaustively studied, and many of them have been found to be involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and response mechanisms, a comprehensive overview of the manner i...

  11. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Strich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13, translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail

  12. t-DARPP regulates phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent cell growth in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vangamudi Bhavatarini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent reports have shown that t-DARPP (truncated isoform of DARPP-32 can mediate trastuzumab resistance in breast cancer cell models. In this study, we evaluated expression of t-DARPP in human primary breast tumors, and investigated the role of t-DARPP in regulating growth and proliferation in breast cancer cells. Results Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis using primers specific for t-DARPP demonstrated overexpression of t-DARPP in 36% of breast cancers (13/36 as opposed to absent to very low t-DARPP expression in normal breast tissue (p ser473 and its downstream target phosphoser9 GSK3β, and increased Cyclin D1 and C-Myc protein levels. The knockdown of endogenous t-DARPP in HCC1569 cells led to a marked decrease in phosphorylation of AKTsser473 and GSK3βser9. The use of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Akt siRNA abrogated the t-DARPP-mediated phosphorylation of AKTser473 and led to a significant reduction in cell growth. Conclusions Our findings underscore the potential role of t-DARPP in regulating cell growth and proliferation through PI3 kinase-dependent mechanism.

  13. The catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 structurally deviates from its maize homologue in complex with the nucleotide competitive inhibitor emodin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha) attached to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits. Together with the cyclin-dependent kinases and the mitogen-activated protein kinases, CK2alpha belongs to the CMGC family of...

  14. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes

    KAUST Repository

    Roques, Magali

    2015-11-13

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  15. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI): a family of endogenous neuropeptides that modulate neuronal cAMP-dependent protein kinase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, George D; Dewey, William L

    2006-02-01

    Signal transduction cascades involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase are highly conserved among a wide variety of organisms. Given the universal nature of this enzyme it is not surprising that cAMP-dependent protein kinase plays a critical role in numerous cellular processes. This is particularly evident in the nervous system where cAMP-dependent protein kinase is involved in neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI) is an endogenous thermostable peptide that modulates cAMP-dependent protein kinase function. PKI contains two distinct functional domains within its amino acid sequence that allow it to: (1) potently and specifically inhibit the activity of the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and (2) export the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase from the nucleus. Three distinct PKI isoforms (PKIalpha, PKIbeta, PKIgamma) have been identified and each isoform is expressed in the brain. PKI modulates neuronal synaptic activity, while PKI also is involved in morphogenesis and symmetrical left-right axis formation. In addition, PKI also plays a role in regulating gene expression induced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Future studies should identify novel physiological functions for endogenous PKI both in the nervous system and throughout the body. Most interesting will be the determination whether functional differences exist between individual PKI isoforms which is an intriguing possibility since these isoforms exhibit: (1) cell-type specific tissue expression patterns, (2) different potencies for the inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and (3) expression patterns that are hormonally, developmentally and cell-cycle regulated. Finally, synthetic peptide analogs of endogenous PKI will continue to be invaluable tools that are used to elucidate the role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in a variety of cellular processes throughout the nervous

  16. Bam-dependent deubiquitinase complex can disrupt germ-line stem cell maintenance by targeting cyclin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shanming; Li, Chaoyi; Hu, Lin; Liu, Kehui; Mei, Jie; Luo, Yuewan; Tao, Yi; Xia, Zongping; Sun, Qinmiao; Chen, Dahua

    2017-06-13

    Drosophila germ-line stem cells (GSCs) provide an excellent model to study the regulatory mechanisms of stem cells in vivo. Bag of marbles (bam) has been demonstrated to be necessary and sufficient to promote GSC and cystoblast differentiation. Despite extensive investigation of its regulation and genetic functions, the biochemical nature of the Bam protein has been unknown. Here, we report that Bam is an ubiquitin-associated protein and controls the turnover of cyclin A (CycA). Mechanistically, we found that Bam associated with Otu to form a deubiquitinase complex that stabilized CycA by deubiquitination, thus providing a mechanism to explain how ectopic expression of Bam in GSCs promotes differentiation. Collectively, our findings not only identify a biochemical function of Bam, which contributes to GSC fate determination, but also emphasizes the critical role of proper expression of cyclin proteins mediated by both ubiquitination and deubiquitination pathways in balancing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

  17. Redox regulation of cardiomyocyte cell cycling via an ERK1/2 and c-Myc-dependent activation of cyclin D2 transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Smyrnias, Ioannis; Schnelle, Moritz; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Zhang, Min; Beretta, Matteo; Martin, Daniel; Anilkumar, Narayana; de Silva, Shana M.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes have a very limited capacity to proliferate, and consequently the loss of cells after cardiac stress promotes heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that administration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), can regulate redox-dependent signalling pathway(s) to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation in vitro, but the potential relevance of such a pathway in vivo has not been tested. We have generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the H2O2-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), is overexpressed within the postnatal cardiomyocytes, and observed that the hearts of 1–3 week old Tg mice pups are larger in comparison to wild type (Wt) littermate controls. We demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes of Tg mouse pups have increased cell cycling capacity in vivo as determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. Further, microarray analyses of the transcriptome of these Tg mouse hearts suggested that the expression of cyclin D2 is significantly increased. We investigated the molecular mechanisms which underlie this more proliferative phenotype in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) in vitro, and demonstrate that Nox4 overexpression mediates an H2O2-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which in turn phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor c-myc. This results in a significant increase in cyclin D2 expression, which we show to be mediated, at least in part, by cis-acting c-myc binding sites within the proximal cyclin D2 promoter. Overexpression of Nox4 in NRCs results in an increase in their proliferative capacity that is ablated by the silencing of cyclin D2. We further demonstrate activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, increased phosphorylation of c-myc and significantly increased expression of cyclin D2 protein in the Nox4 Tg hearts. We suggest that this pathway acts to maintain the proliferative capacity of cardiomyocytes in Nox4 Tg pups in vivo and so delays their exit from the cell

  18. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha...... and PKCgamma activations were significantly lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs after PLC stimulation. Protein levels of PKCalpha and PKCgamma were lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs. In contrast, PKCdelta levels were significantly elevated in PS1 and PS2 double knockout as well as in PS1 knockout......). These results show that PLC and PKC activations are modulated by PS and also that PSs differentially regulate the expression of PKC isoforms by both APP/AICD-dependent and independent mechanisms....

  19. Cyclin E-induced S phase without activation of the pRb/E2F pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, J; Herzinger, T; Hansen, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    In cells of higher eukaryotes, cyclin D-dependent kinases Cdk4 and Cdk6 and, possibly, cyclin E-dependent Cdk2 positively regulate the G1- to S-phase transition, by phosphorylating the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), thereby releasing E2F transcription factors that control S-phase genes. Here we...... performed microinjection and transfection experiments using rat R12 fibroblasts, their derivatives conditionally overexpressing cyclins D1 or E, and human U-2-OS cells, to explore the action of G1 cyclins and the relationship of E2F and cyclin E in S-phase induction. We demonstrate that ectopic expression...... that the cyclin E-induced S phase and completion of the cell division cycle can occur in the absence of E2F-mediated transactivation. Together with the ability of cyclin E to overcome a G1 block induced by expression of dominant-negative mutant DP-1, a heterodimeric partner of E2Fs, these results provide evidence...

  20. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shan-Shan [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Teng [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hui-Wen [Laboratory Center for Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tan, Lan [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Guo, Jun, E-mail: Guoj@njmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  1. Integrin-linked kinase is a functional Mn2+-dependent protein kinase that regulates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3beta phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Maydan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is a highly evolutionarily conserved, multi-domain signaling protein that localizes to focal adhesions, myofilaments and centrosomes where it forms distinct multi-protein complexes to regulate cell adhesion, cell contraction, actin cytoskeletal organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ILK can regulate the phosphorylation of various protein and peptide substrates in vitro, as well as the phosphorylation of potential substrates and various signaling pathways in cultured cell systems. Nevertheless, the ability of ILK to function as a protein kinase has been questioned because of its atypical kinase domain.Here, we have expressed full-length recombinant ILK, purified it to >94% homogeneity, and characterized its kinase activity. Recombinant ILK readily phosphorylates glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 peptide and the 20-kDa regulatory light chains of myosin (LC(20. Phosphorylation kinetics are similar to those of other active kinases, and mutation of the ATP-binding lysine (K220 within subdomain 2 causes marked reduction in enzymatic activity. We show that ILK is a Mn-dependent kinase (the K(m for MnATP is approximately 150-fold less than that for MgATP.Taken together, our data demonstrate that ILK is a bona fide protein kinase with enzyme kinetic properties similar to other active protein kinases.

  2. Inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV is detrimental in cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Louise D; Tarabishy, Sami; Liu, Lin; Benashski, Sharon; Xu, Yan; Ribar, Thomas; Means, Anthony; Li, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Elevation of intracellular calcium was traditionally thought to be detrimental in stroke pathology. However, clinical trials testing treatments that block calcium signaling have failed to improve outcomes in ischemic stroke. Emerging data suggest that calcium may also trigger endogenous protective pathways after stroke. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) is a major kinase activated by rising intracellular calcium. Compelling evidence has suggested that CaMKK and its downstream kinase CaMK IV are critical in neuronal survival when cells are under ischemic stress. We examined the functional role of CaMKK/CaMK IV signaling in stroke. We used a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in mice. Our data demonstrated that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of CaMKK aggravated stroke injury. Additionally, deletion of CaMKK β, one of the 2 CaMKK isoforms, reduced CaMK IV activation, and CaMK IV deletion in mice worsened stroke outcome. Finally, CaMKK β or CaMK IV knockout mice had exacerbated blood-brain barrier disruption evidenced by increased hemorrhagic transformation and activation of matrix metalloproteinase. We observed transcriptional inactivation including reduced levels of histone deacetylase 4 phosphorylation in mice with CaMKK β or CaMK IV deletion after stroke. Our data have established that the CaMKK/CaMK IV pathway is a key endogenous protective mechanism in ischemia. Our results suggest that this pathway serves as an important regulator of blood-brain barrier integrity and transcriptional activation of neuroprotective molecules in stroke.

  3. TSA-induced JMJD2B downregulation is associated with cyclin B1-dependent survivin degradation and apoptosis in LNCap cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shan; Li, Yueyang; Zhao, Li; Hou, Pingfu; Shangguan, Chenyan; Yao, Ruosi; Zhang, Weina; Zhang, Yu; Tan, Jiang; Huang, Baiqu; Lu, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as a novel class of anti-tumor agents and have manifested the ability to induce apoptosis of cancer cells, and a significant number of genes have been identified as potential effectors responsible for HDAC inhibitor-induced apoptosis. However, the mechanistic actions of these HDAC inhibitors in this process remain largely undefined. We here report that the treatment of LNCap prostate cancer cells with HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) resulted in downregulation of the Jumonji domain-containing protein 2B (JMJD2B). We also found that the TSA-mediated decrease in survivin expression in LNCap cells was partly attributable to downregulation of JMJD2B expression. This effect was attributable to the promoted degradation of survivin protein through inhibition of Cyclin B1/Cdc2 complex-mediated survivin Thr34 phosphorylation. Consequently, knockdown of JMJD2B enhanced TSA-induced apoptosis by regulating the Cyclin B1-dependent survivin degradation to potentiate the apoptosis pathways. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Resibufogenin Induces G1-Phase Arrest through the Proteasomal Degradation of Cyclin D1 in Human Malignant Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Ichikawa

    Full Text Available Huachansu, a traditional Chinese medicine prepared from the dried toad skin, has been used in clinical studies for various cancers in China. Resibufogenin is a component of huachansu and classified as bufadienolides. Resibufogenin has been shown to exhibit the anti-proliferative effect against cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism of resibufogenin remains unknown. Here we report that resibufogenin induces G1-phase arrest with hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma (RB protein and down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression in human colon cancer HT-29 cells. Since the down-regulation of cyclin D1 was completely blocked by a proteasome inhibitor MG132, the suppression of cyclin D1 expression by resibufogenin was considered to be in a proteasome-dependent manner. It is known that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β induces the proteasomal degradation of cyclin D1. The addition of GSK-3β inhibitor SB216763 inhibited the reduction of cyclin D1 caused by resibufogenin. These effects on cyclin D1 by resibufogenin were also observed in human lung cancer A549 cells. These findings suggest that the anti-proliferative effect of resibufogenin may be attributed to the degradation of cyclin D1 caused by the activation of GSK-3β.

  5. Metabolic control by S6 kinases depends on dietary lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R Castañeda

    Full Text Available Targeted deletion of S6 kinase (S6K 1 in mice leads to higher energy expenditure and improved glucose metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling these effects remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we analyze the potential role of dietary lipids in regulating the mTORC1/S6K system. Analysis of S6K phosphorylation in vivo and in vitro showed that dietary lipids activate S6K, and this effect is not dependent upon amino acids. Comparison of male mice lacking S6K1 and 2 (S6K-dko with wt controls showed that S6K-dko mice are protected against obesity and glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat diet. S6K-dko mice fed a high-fat diet had increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance, lower fat mass gain, and changes in markers of lipid metabolism. Importantly, however, these metabolic phenotypes were dependent upon dietary lipids, with no such effects observed in S6K-dko mice fed a fat-free diet. These changes appear to be mediated via modulation of cellular metabolism in skeletal muscle, as shown by the expression of genes involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that the metabolic functions of S6K in vivo play a key role as a molecular interface connecting dietary lipids to the endogenous control of energy metabolism.

  6. Fbw7α and Fbw7γ collaborate to shuttle cyclin E1 into the nucleolus for multiubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Nimesh; van Drogen, Frank; Ng, Hwee-Fang; Kumar, Raman; Ekholm-Reed, Susanna; Peter, Matthias; Sangfelt, Olle; Reed, Steven I

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin E1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) that promotes replicative functions, is normally expressed periodically within the mammalian cell cycle, peaking at the G(1)-S-phase transition. This periodicity is achieved by E2F-dependent transcription in late G(1) and early S phases and by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. The ubiquitin ligase that targets phosphorylated cyclin E is SCF(Fbw7) (also known as SCF(Cdc4)), a member of the cullin ring ligase (CRL) family. Fbw7, a substrate adaptor subunit, is expressed as three splice-variant isoforms with different subcellular distributions: Fbw7α is nucleoplasmic but excluded from the nucleolus, Fbw7β is cytoplasmic, and Fbw7γ is nucleolar. Degradation of cyclin E in vivo requires SCF complexes containing Fbw7α and Fbw7γ, respectively. In vitro reconstitution showed that the role of SCF(Fbw7α) in cyclin E degradation, rather than ubiquitylation, is to serve as a cofactor of the prolyl cis-trans isomerase Pin1 in the isomerization of a noncanonical proline-proline bond in the cyclin E phosphodegron. This isomerization is required for subsequent binding and ubiquitylation by SCF(Fbw7γ). Here we show that Pin1-mediated isomerization of the cyclin E phosphodegron and subsequent binding to Fbw7γ drive nucleolar localization of cyclin E, where it is ubiquitylated by SCF(Fbw7γ) prior to its degradation by the proteasome. It is possible that this constitutes a mechanism for rapid inactivation of phosphorylated cyclin E by nucleolar sequestration prior to its multiubiquitylation and degradation.

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase in mammalian brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmann, S M; Walter, U; Miller, P E; Greengard, P; De Camilli, P

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase in rat brain has been studied by an immunological approach involving radioimmunoassay and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Data obtained by radioimmunoassay indicate that cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase is 20- to 40-fold more concentrated in cerebellum than in other brain regions. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrate that the high concentration of immunoreactivity of the protein kinase in cerebellum is attributable to Purkin...

  8. Somatic inactivation of ATM in hematopoietic cells predisposes mice to cyclin D3 dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lori A; Yang-Iott, Katherine; DeMicco, Amy; Bassing, Craig H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a cancer of immature T cells that exhibits heterogeneity of oncogenic lesions, providing an obstacle for development of more effective and less toxic therapies. Inherited deficiency of ATM, a regulator of the cellular DNA damage response, predisposes young humans and mice to T-ALLs with clonal chromosome translocations. While acquired ATM mutation or deletion occurs in pediatric T-ALLs, the role of somatic ATM alterations in T-ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. We demonstrate here that somatic Atm inactivation in haematopoietic cells starting as these cells differentiate in utero predisposes mice to T-ALL at similar young ages and harboring analogous translocations as germline Atm-deficient mice. However, some T-ALLs from haematopoietic cell specific deletion of Atm were of more mature thymocytes, revealing that the developmental timing and celluar origin of Atm inactivation influences the phenotype of ATM-deficient T-ALLs. Although it has been hypothesized that ATM suppresses cancer by preventing deletion and inactivation of TP53, we find that Atm inhibits T-ALL independent of Tp53 deletion. Finally, we demonstrate that the Cyclin D3 protein that drives immature T cell proliferation is essential for transformation of Atm-deficient thymocytes. Our study establishes a pre-clinical model for pediatric T-ALLs with acquired ATM inactivation and identifies the cell cycle machinery as a therapeutic target for this aggressive childhood T-ALL subtype.

  9. Anticancer Alkaloid Lamellarins Inhibit Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Meijer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamellarins, a family of hexacyclic pyrrole alkaloids originally isolated from marine invertebrates, display promising anti-tumor activity. They induce apoptotic cell death through multi-target mechanisms, including inhibition of topoisomerase I, interaction with DNA and direct effects on mitochondria. We here report that lamellarins inhibit several protein kinases relevant to cancer such as cyclin-dependent kinases, dualspecificity tyrosine phosphorylation activated kinase 1A, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and PIM-1. A good correlation is observed between the effects of lamellarins on protein kinases and their action on cell death, suggesting that inhibition of specific kinases may contribute to the cytotoxicity of lamellarins. Structure/activity relationship suggests several paths for the optimization of lamellarins as kinase inhibitors.

  10. Studies of variations of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 genes in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus and related quantitative traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva-Maria D; Hansen, Lars; Stissing, Trine

    2005-01-01

    in the pathogenesis of the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, a disorder characterized by neonatal hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and pre- and post-natal overgrowth. The aim of this study was to investigate if variations in the proximal promoter and the coding region of the CDKN1C and CDK4 genes are associated with type 2...... glucose-tolerant subjects the most frequent variants did not show any difference in allele frequencies between the type 2 diabetic patients and the control subjects. However, in two genotype-quantitative trait correlation studies involving 206 glucose-tolerant offspring of type 2 diabetic patients and 359....... In conclusion, variants in CDKN1C may contribute to the inter-individual variation in birth weight....

  11. The proliferation marker pKi-67 organizes the nucleolus during the cell cycle depending on Ran and cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Broll, Rainer; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Bögler, Oliver; Duchrow, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The proliferation marker pKi-67 ('Ki-67 antigen') is commonly used in clinical and research pathology to detect proliferating cells, as it is only expressed during cell-cycle progression. Despite the fact that this antigen has been known for nearly two decades, there is still no adequate understanding of its function. This study has therefore identified proteins that interact with pKi-67, using a yeast two-hybrid system. A mammalian two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation studies were used to verify these interactions. Among other cell-cycle regulatory proteins, two binding partners associated with the small GTPase Ran were identified. In addition, DNA-structural and nucleolus-associated proteins binding to pKi-67 were found. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of pKi-67 is capable of self-binding to its own repeat region encoded by exon 13. Since RanBP, a protein involved in the transport of macromolecules over the nuclear lamina, was found to be a binding partner, a possible effect of pKi-67 on the localization of cell-cycle regulatory proteins was proposed. To test this hypothesis, a tetracycline-responsive gene expression system was used to induce the pKi-67 fragments previously used for the two-hybrid screens in HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining revealed the translocation of cyclin B1 from cytoplasm to nucleoli in response to this expression. It is suggested that pKi-67 is a Ran-associated protein with a role in the disintegration and reformation of the nucleolus and thereby in entry into and exit from the M-phase. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Ability of CK2beta to selectively regulate cellular protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgitte; Guerra, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The Wee1 protein kinase plays a prominent role in keeping cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) inactive during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. At the onset of mitosis, Wee1 is ubiquitinated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(beta-TrCP) and subsequently degraded by the proteasome machinery. Previously, it...

  13. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  14. Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campa, Daniele; Pastore, Manuela; Gentiluomo, Manuel; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Neoptolemos, John P.; Niesen, Willem; Vodicka, Pavel; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Gazouli, Maria; Pacetti, Paola; Di Leo, Milena; Ito, Hidemi; Klüter, Harald; Soucek, Pavel; Corbo, Vincenzo; Yamao, Kenji; Hosono, Satoyo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vashist, Yogesh; Gioffreda, Domenica; Strobel, Oliver; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Dijk, Frederike; Andriulli, Angelo; Ivanauskas, Audrius; Bugert, Peter; Tavano, Francesca; Vodickova, Ludmila; Federico Zambon, Carlo; Lovecek, Martin; Landi, Stefano; Key, Timothy J.; Boggi, Ugo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Mambrini, Andrea; Bambi, Franco; Busch, Olivier; Pazienza, Valerio; Valente, Roberto; Theodoropoulos, George E.; Hackert, Thilo; Capurso, Gabriele; Martina Cavestro, Giulia; Pasquali, Claudio; Basso, Daniela; Sperti, Cosimo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Büchler, Markus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Izbicki, Jakob; Costello, Eithne; Katzke, Verena; Michalski, Christoph; Stepien, Anna; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter

  15. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 inhibition protects cartilage from the catabolic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yik, Jasper H. N.; Hu, Zi’ang; Kumari, Ratna; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective CDK9 controls the activation of primary inflammatory response genes. We determined whether CDK9 inhibition protects cartilage from the catabolic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Methods Human chondrocytes were challenged with different pro-inflammatory stimuli (IL-1β, lipopolysaccharides, and TNFα), in the presence or absence of the CDK9 inhibitor Flavopiridol, or siRNA. The mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators, catabolic, and anabolic genes were determined by real-time PCR. Cartilage explants were incubated with IL-1β, with or without Flavopiridol, for 6 days. Cartilage matrix degradation was assessed by the release of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and cleaved Type II collagen (Col2a) peptides. Results CDK9 inhibition by Flavopiridol, or knockdown by siRNA, effectively suppressed iNOS mRNA induction by all three pro-inflammatory stimuli. Results from NFkB-targets PCR array showed that Flavopiridol suppressed the induction of a broad range of inflammatory mediator genes (59 out of 67 tested) by IL-1β. CDK9 inhibition also suppressed induction of catabolic genes MMP 1, 3, 9, 13, and ADAMTS4, 5; but did not affect the basal expression of anabolic genes such as Col2a, aggrecan, and COMP, and housekeeping genes. Flavopiridol had no apparent short-term cytotoxicity as assessed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Finally, in IL-1β-treated cartilage explants, Flavopiridol reduced the release of matrix degradation products GAG and cleaved Col2a peptides, but did not affect long-term chondrocyte viability. Conclusion CDK9 activity is required for the primary inflammatory response in chondrocytes. Flavopiridol suppresses the induction of inflammatory mediators and catabolic genes to protect cartilage from the deleterious effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, without impacting cell viability and functions. PMID:24470357

  16. Cinnamon and its Components Suppress Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Up-Regulating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeeun; Lee, Jung-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Won-Kyung; Gu, Min Jung; Lee, Kwang Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark has been used in traditional herbal medicine to treat a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the antiproliferative effect of cinnamon extract on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the corresponding restenosis has not been explored. Hence, after examining the effect of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation, we investigated the possible involvement of signal transduction pathways associated with early signal and cell cycle analysis, including regulatory proteins. Besides, to identify the active components, we investigated the components of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation. Cinnamon extract inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and suppressed the PDGF-stimulated early signal transduction. In addition, cinnamon extract arrested the cell cycle and inhibited positive regulatory proteins. Correspondingly, the protein levels of p21 and p27 not only were increased in the presence of cinnamon extract, also the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was inhibited by cinnamon extract. Besides, among the components of cinnamon extract, cinnamic acid (CA), eugenol (EG) and cinnamyl alcohol significantly inhibited the VSMC proliferation. Overall, the present study demonstrates that cinnamon extract inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs through a G0/G1 arrest, which down-regulated the expression of cell cycle positive regulatory proteins by up-regulating p21 and p27 expression.

  17. Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Pastore, M.; Gentiluomo, M.; Talar-Wojnarowska, R.; Kupcinskas, J.; Malecka-Panas, E.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Niesen, W.; Vodička, Pavel; Delle Fave, G.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Gazouli, M.; Pacetti, P.; Di Leo, M.; Ito, H.; Klüter, H.; Souček, P.; Corbo, V.; Yamao, K.; Hosono, S.; Kaaks, R.; Vashist, Y.; Gioffreda, D.; Strobel, O.; Shimizu, Y.; Dijk, F.; Andriulli, A.; Ivanauskas, A.; Bugert, P.; Tavano, F.; Vodičková, L.; Zambon, C.F.; Lovecek, M.; Landi, S.; Key, T. J.; Boggi, U.; Pezzilli, R.; Jamroziak, K.; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, B.; Mambrini, A.; Bambi, F.; Busch, O.; Pazienza, V.; Valente, R.; Theodoropoulos, G.E.; Hackert, T.; Capurso, G.; Cavestro, G.M.; Pasquali, C.; Basso, D.; Sperti, C.; Matsuo, K.; Büchler, M.; Khaw, K. T.; Izbicki, J.; Costello, E.; Katzke, V.; Michalski, Ch.; Stepien, A.; Rizzato, C.; Canzian, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 35 (2016), s. 57011-57020 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1734 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : pancreatic cancer * CDKN2A * single nucleotide polymorphisms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  18. Supervised machine learning techniques to predict binding affinity. A study for cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Maurício Boff; Xavier, Mariana Morrone; Pintro, Val Oliveira; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2017-12-09

    Here we report the development of a machine-learning model to predict binding affinity based on the crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes. We used an ensemble of crystallographic structures (resolution better than 1.5 Å resolution) for which half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) data is available. Polynomial scoring functions were built using as explanatory variables the energy terms present in the MolDock and PLANTS scoring functions. Prediction performance was tested and the supervised machine learning models showed improvement in the prediction power, when compared with PLANTS and MolDock scoring functions. In addition, the machine-learning model was applied to predict binding affinity of CDK2, which showed a better performance when compared with AutoDock4, AutoDock Vina, MolDock, and PLANTS scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 4-(Pyrazol-4-yl)-pyrimidines as Selective Inhibitors of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Shin; Borland, Maria; Brain, Christopher; Chen, Christine H. -T.; Cheng, Hong; Chopra, Rajiv; Chung, Kristy; Groarke, James; He, Guo; Hou, Ying; Kim, Sunkyu; Kovats, Steven; Lu, Yipin; O’Reilly, Marc; Shen, Junqing; Smith, Troy; Trakshel, Gary; Vögtle, Markus; Xu, Mei; Xu, Ming; Sung, Moo Je

    2010-11-25

    Identification and structure-guided optimization of a series of 4-(pyrazol-4-yl)-pyrimidines as selective CDK4/6 inhibitors is reported herein. Several potency and selectivity determinants were established based on the X-ray crystallographic analysis of representative compounds bound to monomeric CDK6. Significant selectivity for CDK4/6 over CDK1 and CDK2 was demonstrated with several compounds in both enzymatic and cellular assays.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells promote liver regeneration and prolong survival in small-for-size liver grafts: involvement of C-Jun N-terminal kinase, cyclin D1, and NF-κB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been highlighted recently for treatment of acute or chronic liver injury, by possibly differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells, reducing inflammation, and enhancing tissue repair. Despite recent progress, exact mechanisms of action are not clearly elucidated. In this study, we attempted to explore whether and how MSCs protected hepatocytes and stimulated allograft regeneration in small-for-size liver transplantation (SFSLT. METHODS: SFSLT model was established with a 30% partial liver transplantation (30PLT in rats. The differentiation potential and characteristics of bone marrow derived MSCs were explored in vitro. MSCs were infused transvenously immediately after graft implantation in therapy group. Expressions of apoptosis-, inflammatory-, anti-inflammatory-, and growth factor-related genes were measured by RT-PCR, activities of transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB were analyzed by EMSA, and proliferative responses of the hepatic graft were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. RESULTS: MSCs were successfully induced into hepatocyte-like cells, osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. MSCs therapy could not only alleviate ischemia reperfusion injury and acute inflammation to promote liver regeneration, but also profoundly improve one week survival rate. It markedly up-regulated the mRNA expressions of HGF, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, IL-6, IL-10, IP-10, and CXCR2, however, down-regulated TNF-α. Increased activities of AP-1 and NF-κB, as well as elevated expressions of p-c-Jun, cyclin D1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, were also found in MSCs therapy group. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that MSCs therapy promotes hepatocyte proliferation and prolongs survival in SFSLT by reducing ischemia reperfusion injury and acute inflammation, and sustaining early increased expressions of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase, Cyclin D1, and NF-κB.

  1. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  3. Apelin attenuates postburn sepsis via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B dependent mechanism: A randomized animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Keqin; Long, Huibao; Xu, Bincan; Luo, Yanling

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to investigate whether apelin would regulate inflammatory response and promote survival in an experimental burn sepsis model through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B dependent pathway. Male BALB/c mice were divided into the following groups: sham, burn, burn sepsis, burn sepsis treated with apelin, burn sepsis treated with apelin plus LY294002, and burn sepsis treated with LY294002 alone. Apelin level and inflammatory cytokines in serum were detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay. Apelin/APJ (apelin receptor, gene symbol APLNR) mRNA expression in spleen and adhesion molecules levels in lung was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Neutrophil infiltration in lung was determined by myeloperoxidase assay. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B in lung was determined by western blot. Mortality rate was monitored. Burn sepsis induced decreased apelin/APJ mRNA expression in spleen and reduced apelin level in plasma, which were both restored by exogenous apelin treatment. Burn sepsis treated with apelin resulted in decreased interleukin-6, tumor-necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin -1β and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in plasma. Mice with apelin treatment also showed decreased neutrophil infiltration and adhesion molecules expression, accompanied by a remarkable increased protein kinase B phosphorylation in lung tissue. The mortality rate in apelin treated animals was also significantly reduced. Importantly, the above effects of apelin were abolished by LY294002 treatment. Apelin regulates inflammatory response, diminishes inflammatory remote organ damage and improves survival in an experimental model of burn sepsis, which is at least partly mediated by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscarinic stimulation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in isolated rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z J

    1997-05-01

    To study whether M3 receptor occupation would lead to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II). In this study, we isolated rat pancreatic acini by collagenase digestion; measured the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent activity of autophosphorylated form of the CaM kinase II both before and after stimulation of the acini with muscarinic secretagogue bethanechol (Bet). Bet stimulated the activation of, or generation of Ca(2+)-independent activity of, this kinase, in a concentration (0.0001-1 mmol.L-1) and time (5-300 s)-dependent manner; with Bet of 100 mumol.L-1, Ca(2+)-independent activity increased from an unstimulated level of 4.5 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) to 8.9 +/- 1.3 (n = 4, P Ca2+ mobilizing secretagogue cholecystokinin (CCK) also activated the kinase; at 1 mumol.L-1, CCK increased Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity to 12.9 +/- 0.5 (n = 6, P -independent kinase activity (from control 3.90 +/- 0.28 to 4.53 +/- 0.47, n = 6, P > 0.05). Atropine completely blocked Bet activation of the kinase. CaM kinase II plays a pivotal role in digestive enzyme secretion, especially during the initial phase of amylase secretion.

  5. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans cyclin D/CDK4 and cyclin E/CDK2 induce distinct cell cycle re-entry programs in differentiated muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Korzelius

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation and differentiation are regulated in a highly coordinated and inverse manner during development and tissue homeostasis. Terminal differentiation usually coincides with cell cycle exit and is thought to engage stable transcriptional repression of cell cycle genes. Here, we examine the robustness of the post-mitotic state, using Caenorhabditis elegans muscle cells as a model. We found that expression of a G1 Cyclin and CDK initiates cell cycle re-entry in muscle cells without interfering with the differentiated state. Cyclin D/CDK4 (CYD-1/CDK-4 expression was sufficient to induce DNA synthesis in muscle cells, in contrast to Cyclin E/CDK2 (CYE-1/CDK-2, which triggered mitotic events. Tissue-specific gene-expression profiling and single molecule FISH experiments revealed that Cyclin D and E kinases activate an extensive and overlapping set of cell cycle genes in muscle, yet failed to induce some key activators of G1/S progression. Surprisingly, CYD-1/CDK-4 also induced an additional set of genes primarily associated with growth and metabolism, which were not activated by CYE-1/CDK-2. Moreover, CYD-1/CDK-4 expression also down-regulated a large number of genes enriched for catabolic functions. These results highlight distinct functions for the two G1 Cyclin/CDK complexes and reveal a previously unknown activity of Cyclin D/CDK-4 in regulating metabolic gene expression. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that many cell cycle genes can still be transcriptionally induced in post-mitotic muscle cells, while maintenance of the post-mitotic state might depend on stable repression of a limited number of critical cell cycle regulators.

  7. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  8. Identification of casein kinase 1, casein kinase 2, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Galán-Caridad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi contains protein kinases capable of phosphorylating endogenous substrates with apparent molecular masses in the range between 20 and 205 kDa. The major phosphopolypeptide band, pp55, was predominantly localized in the particulate fraction. Anti-alpha and anti-beta tubulin monoclonal antibodies recognized pp55 by Western blot analyses, suggesting that this band corresponds to phosphorylated tubulin. Inhibition experiments in the presence of emodin, heparin, and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate indicated that the parasite tubulin kinase was a casein kinase 2 (CK2-like activity. GTP, which can be utilized instead of ATP by CK2, stimulated rather than inactivated the phosphorylation of tubulin in the parasite homogenate and particulate fraction. However, GTP inhibited the cytosolic CK2 responsible for phosphorylating soluble tubulin and other soluble substrates. Casein and two selective peptide substrates, P1 (RRKDLHDDEEDEAMSITA for casein kinase (CK1 and P2 (RRRADDSDDDDD for CK2, were recognized as substrates in T. evansi. While the enzymes present in the soluble fraction predominantly phosphorylated P1, P2 was preferentially labeled in the particulate fractions. These results demonstrated the existence of CK1-like and CK2-like activities primarily located in the parasite cytosolic and membranous fractions, respectively. Histone II-A and kemptide (LRRASVA also behaved as suitable substrates, implying the existence of other Ser/Thr kinases in T. evansi. Cyclic AMP only increased the phosphorylation of histone II-A and kemptide in the cytosol, demonstrating the existence of soluble cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in T. evansi. However, no endogenous substrates for this enzyme were identified in this fraction. Further evidences were obtained by using PKI (6-22, a reported inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinases, which specifically hindered the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of histone II

  9. Regulation of microtubule dynamics by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV/Gr-dependent phosphorylation of oncoprotein 18.

    OpenAIRE

    Melander Gradin, H; Marklund, U; Larsson, N; Chatila, T A; Gullberg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Oncoprotein 18 (Op18; also termed p19, 19K, p18, prosolin, and stathmin) is a regulator of microtubule (MT) dynamics and is phosphorylated by multiple kinase systems on four Ser residues. In addition to cell cycle-regulated phosphorylation, external signals induce phosphorylation of Op18 on Ser-25 by the mitogen-activated protein kinase and on Ser-16 by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV/Gr (CaMK IV/Gr). Here we show that induced expression of a constitutively active mutant of CaMK IV/Gr...

  10. Evolutionary conservation of the signaling proteins upstream of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase and protein kinase C in gastropod mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S; Abrams, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) and the cAMP-dependent kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) pathways are known to play important roles in behavioral plasticity and learning in the nervous systems of a wide variety of species across phyla. We briefly review the members of the PKC and PKA family and focus on the evolution of the immediate upstream activators of PKC and PKA i.e., phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylyl cyclase (AC), and their conservation in gastropod mollusks, taking advantage of the recent assembly of the Aplysiacalifornica and Lottia gigantea genomes. The diversity of PLC and AC family members present in mollusks suggests a multitude of possible mechanisms to activate PKA and PKC; we briefly discuss the relevance of these pathways to the known physiological activation of these kinases in Aplysia neurons during plasticity and learning. These multiple mechanisms of activation provide the gastropod nervous system with tremendous flexibility for implementing neuromodulatory responses to both neuronal activity and extracellular signals. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Helicobacter pylori Induced Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH Kinase/mTOR Activation Increases Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α to Promote Loss of Cyclin D1 and G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Gastric Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Jimena; Valenzuela, Manuel; Bravo, Jimena; Cerda-Opazo, Paulina; Jorquera, Carla; Toledo, Héctor; Bravo, Denisse; Quest, Andrew F G

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen that has been linked to the development of several gastric pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. In the gastric epithelium, the bacterium modifies many signaling pathways, resulting in contradictory responses that favor both proliferation and apoptosis. Consistent with such observations, H. pylori activates routes associated with cell cycle progression and cell cycle arrest. H. pylori infection also induces the hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α, a transcription factor known to promote expression of genes that permit metabolic adaptation to the hypoxic environment in tumors and angiogenesis. Recently, however, also roles for HIF-1α in the repair of damaged DNA and inhibition of gene expression were described. Here, we investigated signaling pathways induced by H. pylori in gastric cells that favor HIF-1α expression and the consequences thereof in infected cells. Our results revealed that H. pylori promoted PI3K/mTOR-dependent HIF-1α induction, HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus, and activity as a transcription factor as evidenced using a reporter assay. Surprisingly, however, transcription of known HIF-1α effector genes evaluated by qPCR analysis, revealed either no change (LDHA and GAPDH), statistically insignificant increases SLC2A1 (GLUT-1) or greatly enhance transcription (VEGFA), but in an HIF-1α-independent manner, as quantified by PCR analysis in cells with shRNA-mediated silencing of HIF-1α. Instead, HIF-1α knockdown facilitated G1/S progression and increased Cyclin D1 protein half-life, via a post-translational pathway. Taken together, these findings link H. pylori-induced PI3K-mTOR activation to HIF-1α induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by a Cyclin D1-dependent mechanism. Thus, HIF-1α is identified here as a mediator between survival and cell cycle arrest signaling activated by H. pylori infection.

  12. Regulation of the interaction between protein kinase C-related protein kinase 2 (PRK2) and its upstream kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettori, Rosalia; Sonzogni, Silvina; Meyer, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    of numerous AGC kinases, including the protein kinase C-related protein kinases (PRKs). Here we studied the docking interaction between PDK1 and PRK2 and analyzed the mechanisms that regulate this interaction. In vivo labeling of recombinant PRK2 by (32)P(i) revealed phosphorylation at two sites......, the activation loop and the Z/TM in the C-terminal extension. We provide evidence that phosphorylation of the Z/TM site of PRK2 inhibits its interaction with PDK1. Our studies further provide a mechanistic model to explain different steps in the docking interaction and regulation. Interestingly, we found...... that the mechanism that negatively regulates the docking interaction of PRK2 to the upstream kinase PDK1 is directly linked to the activation mechanism of PRK2 itself. Finally, our results indicate that the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the interaction between PRK2 and PDK1 are specific for PRK2 and do...

  13. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavinikoo, Hadi; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Bamdad, Taravat; Teimoori, Ali; Goodarzi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results: Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis. PMID:26019803

  14. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Razavinikoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results:Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis

  15. Cyclin D3 is selectively required for proliferative expansion of germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cato, Matthew H; Chintalapati, Suresh K; Yau, Irene W; Omori, Sidne A; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    The generation of robust T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses requires the formation and expansion of germinal center structures within the follicular regions of the secondary lymphoid tissues. B-cell proliferation in the germinal center drives ongoing antigen-dependent selection and the generation of high-affinity class-switched plasma and memory B cells. However, the mechanisms regulating B-cell proliferation within this microenvironment are largely unknown. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is uniquely required for germinal center progression. Ccnd3(-/-) mice exhibit a B-cell-intrinsic defect in germinal center maturation and fail to generate an affinity-matured IgG response. We determined that the defect resulted from failed proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells. Mechanistically, sustained expression of cyclin D3 was found to be regulated at the level of protein stability and controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3 in a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A-dependent manner. The specific defect in proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells in Ccnd3(-/-) mice defines an underappreciated step in germinal center progression and solidifies a role for cyclin D3 in the immune response, and as a potential therapeutic target for germinal center-derived B-cell malignancies.

  16. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  17. The effect of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol on anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells and relationship with NPM-ALK kinase expression and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bonvini, Paolo; Zorzi, Elisa; Mussolin, Lara; Monaco, Giovanni; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe; Rosolen, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    This study by Bonvini and coworkersd describes in vitro data supporting a role for the CDK inhibitor flavopiridol in the treatment of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Moreover, their studies establish a link between ALK over-expression and flavopiridol, as inhibition of ALK activity sensitizes the cells to flavopiridol-induced cell death. See related perspective article on page 897.

  18. Cyclin A2 and CDK2 as Novel Targets of Aspirin and Salicylic acid: a Potential Role in Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachineni, Rakesh; Ai, Guoqiang; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Sadhu, Satya S.; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2015-01-01

    Data emerging from the past 10 years have consolidated the rationale for investigating the use of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; however, the mechanisms leading to its anti-cancer effects are still being elucidated. We hypothesized that aspirin’s chemopreventive actions may involve cell cycle regulation through modulation of the levels or activity of cyclin A2/cyclin dependent kinase-2 (CDK2). In this study, HT-29 and other diverse panel of cancer cells were used to demonstrate that both aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decreased cyclin A2 (CCNA2) and CDK2 protein and mRNA levels. The down regulatory effect of either drugs on cyclin A2 levels was prevented by pretreatment with lactacystin, an inhibitor of proteasomes, suggesting the involvement of 26S proteasomes. In-vitro kinase assays showed that lysates from cells treated with salicylic acid had lower levels of CDK2 activity. Importantly, three independent experiments revealed that salicylic acid directly binds to CDK2. Firstly, inclusion of salicylic acid in naïve cell lysates, or in recombinant CDK2 preparations, increased the ability of the anti-CDK2 antibody to immunoprecipitate CDK2, suggesting that salicylic acid may directly bind and alter its conformation. Secondly, in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS)-CDK2 fluorescence assays, pre-incubation of CDK2 with salicylic acid, dose-dependently quenched the fluorescence due to ANS. Thirdly, computational analysis using molecular docking studies identified Asp145 and Lys33 as the potential sites of salicylic acid interactions with CDK2. These results demonstrate that aspirin and salicylic acid down-regulate cyclin A2/CDK2 proteins in multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a novel target and mechanism of action in chemoprevention. Implications Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of aspirin are mediated through cyclin A2/CDK2. PMID:26685215

  19. Cyclin A2 and CDK2 as Novel Targets of Aspirin and Salicylic Acid: A Potential Role in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachineni, Rakesh; Ai, Guoqiang; Kumar, D Ramesh; Sadhu, Satya S; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-03-01

    Data emerging from the past 10 years have consolidated the rationale for investigating the use of aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; however, the mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are still being elucidated. We hypothesized that aspirin's chemopreventive actions may involve cell-cycle regulation through modulation of the levels or activity of cyclin A2/cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2). In this study, HT-29 and other diverse panel of cancer cells were used to demonstrate that both aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decreased cyclin A2 (CCNA2) and CDK2 protein and mRNA levels. The downregulatory effect of either drugs on cyclin A2 levels was prevented by pretreatment with lactacystin, an inhibitor of proteasomes, suggesting the involvement of 26S proteasomes. In-vitro kinase assays showed that lysates from cells treated with salicylic acid had lower levels of CDK2 activity. Importantly, three independent experiments revealed that salicylic acid directly binds to CDK2. First, inclusion of salicylic acid in naïve cell lysates, or in recombinant CDK2 preparations, increased the ability of the anti-CDK2 antibody to immunoprecipitate CDK2, suggesting that salicylic acid may directly bind and alter its conformation. Second, in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS)-CDK2 fluorescence assays, preincubation of CDK2 with salicylic acid dose-dependently quenched the fluorescence due to ANS. Third, computational analysis using molecular docking studies identified Asp145 and Lys33 as the potential sites of salicylic acid interactions with CDK2. These results demonstrate that aspirin and salicylic acid downregulate cyclin A2/CDK2 proteins in multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a novel target and mechanism of action in chemoprevention. Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the antiproliferative actions of aspirin are mediated through cyclin A2/CDK2. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. EXPERIMENT ON EFFECTS OF LOE-PROTEIN DIET SUPPLEMENTED WITH α-KETOACIDS ON HYPERTROPHY OF DIABETIC GLOMERULUS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LEVEL OF CYCLIN KINASE INHIBITOR P27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-protein diet supplemented with α-keto acids was reported to have renoprotective roles in diabetic nephropathy via inhibiting glomerular hypertrophy, however, the mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. the cyclin kinase inhibitor p27 play an important role in hypertrophy of diabetic glomerulus, The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the cyclin kinase inhibitor p27 and the effect of low-protein diet supplemented with α-keto acids on hypertrophy of diabetic glomerulus in rats. STZ-induced diabetic rats were given low-protein diet(5□ protein in fodder, LPD groupor low-protein diet supplemented with α-keto acids(5□ protein in fodder including 1□ protein supplied by α-keto acids, LPD+α-KA groupor normal-protein diet(10□protein in fodder, NPD groupfor 8 weeks□The p27 protein of glomerular lysate was detected with Western Blot. The extracellular matrix (ECMprotein(type IV collagen and fibronectin of glomerular lysate and 24 h urine albumin were examined with ELISA□ Image analysis system was used to detect the diameter of each glomerulus. Glomerular p27 protein increased in diabetic rats no matter what kinds of diet were given, meanwhile,the 24h urine albumin, glomerular ECM,glomerular diameter elevated as well as the ratio of kidney weight over body weight in diabetic rats□Both low-protein diet and low-protein diet supplemented with α-keto acids could attenuate changes occurred in diabetic rats with normal-protein diet□Glomerular p27 level(8.6±2.3 vs 11.1±3.6,P〈0.01,24 h urine albumin(13.21±2.49μg□24 h vs (18.13±3.23μg□24 h,P〈0.01,glomerular diameter(652±73μm2 vs (721±75μm2,P〈0.05,and the ratio of kidney weight over body weight(11.02±1.72 vs 12.03±1.85,P〈0.05were lower in LPD+α-KA group than LPD group. Solely glomerular p27 level was linearly related with the ratio of kidney weight over body weight in diabetic rats□The blood glucose and serum albumin

  1. Casein kinase 2 dependent phosphorylation of neprilysin regulates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Akt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Siepmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Neprilysin (NEP is a type II membrane metalloproteinase that cleaves physiologically active peptides at the cell surface thus regulating the local concentration of these peptides available for receptor binding and signal transduction. In addition, the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of NEP interacts with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN thereby regulating intracellular signaling via Akt. Thus, NEP serves dual functions in extracellular and intracellular signal transduction. Here, we show that NEP undergoes phosphorylation at serine residue 6 within the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain. In vitro and cell culture experiments demonstrate that Ser 6 is efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2. The phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of NEP inhibits its interaction with PTEN. Interestingly, expression of a pseudophosphorylated NEP variant (Ser6Asp abrogates the inhibitory effect of NEP on insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 stimulated activation of Akt. Thus, our data demonstrate a regulatory role of CK2 in the interaction of NEP with PTEN and insulin/IGF-1 signaling.

  2. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

    OpenAIRE

    Abhisheka Bansal; Ojo, Kayode K.; Jianbing Mu; Maly, Dustin J.; Van Voorhis,Wesley C.; Miller, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs). Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium?falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1). The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosph...

  3. Pharmacologic ATM but not ATR kinase inhibition abrogates p21-dependent G1 arrest and promotes gastrointestinal syndrome after total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendetti, Frank P; Leibowitz, Brian J; Barnes, Jennifer; Schamus, Sandy; Kiesel, Brian F; Abberbock, Shira; Conrads, Thomas; Clump, David Andy; Cadogan, Elaine; O'Connor, Mark J; Yu, Jian; Beumer, Jan H; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    We show that ATM kinase inhibition using AZ31 prior to 9 or 9.25 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) reduced median time to moribund in mice to 8 days. ATR kinase inhibition using AZD6738 prior to TBI did not reduce median time to moribund. The striking finding associated with ATM inhibition prior to TBI was increased crypt loss within the intestine epithelium. ATM inhibition reduced upregulation of p21, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and blocked G1 arrest after TBI thereby increasing the number of S phase cells in crypts in wild-type but not Cdkn1a(p21CIP/WAF1)-/- mice. In contrast, ATR inhibition increased upregulation of p21 after TBI. Thus, ATM activity is essential for p21-dependent arrest while ATR inhibition may potentiate arrest in crypt cells after TBI. Nevertheless, ATM inhibition reduced median time to moribund in Cdkn1a(p21CIP/WAF1)-/- mice after TBI. ATM inhibition also increased cell death in crypts at 4 h in Cdkn1a(p21CIP/WAF1)-/-, earlier than at 24 h in wild-type mice after TBI. In contrast, ATR inhibition decreased cell death in crypts in Cdkn1a(p21CIP/WAF1)-/- mice at 4 h after TBI. We conclude that ATM activity is essential for p21-dependent and p21-independent mechanisms that radioprotect intestinal crypts and that ATM inhibition promotes GI syndrome after TBI.

  4. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Ballana, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  5. Flavopiridol inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α production through inactivation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Abedul; Koide, Naoki; Iftakhar-E-Khuda, Imtiaz; Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Badamtseren, Battuvshin; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Flavopiridol is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and inhibits the growth of various cancer cells. The effect of flavopiridol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory mediator production was examined in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Flavopiridol significantly reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and, to a lesser extent, nitric oxide in LPS-stimulated cells. Flavopiridol inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and IκB kinase in response to LPS. Flavopiridol also inhibited the activation of a series of mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as p38, stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in response to LPS. However, flavopiridol did not alter the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) or CD14/toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Flavopiridol inhibited nitric oxide production induced by a MyD88-dependent TLR2 ligand, but not a MyD88-independent TLR3 ligand. Further, flavopiridol did not alter the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 in the MyD88-independent pathway. Therefore, it was suggested that flavopiridol exclusively inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in the MyD88-dependent pathway. Flavopiridol might be useful for the prevention of LPS-induced inflammatory response. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Nima- and Aurora-related kinases of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Teresa Gil; Doerig, Christian; Reininger, Luc

    2013-07-01

    Completion of the life cycle of malaria parasite requires a succession of developmental stages which vary greatly with respect to proliferation status, implying a tightly regulated control of the parasite's cell cycle, which remains to be understood at the molecular level. Progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle is controlled by members of mitotic kinase of the families CDK (cyclin-dependent kinases), Aurora, Polo and NIMA. Plasmodium parasites possess cyclin-dependent protein kinases and cyclins, which strongly suggests that some of the principles underlying cell cycle control in higher eukaryotes also operate in this organism. However, atypical features of Plasmodium cell cycle organization and important divergences in the composition of the cell cycle machinery suggest the existence of regulatory mechanisms that are at variance with those of higher eukaryotes. This review focuses on several recently described Plasmodium protein kinases related to the NIMA and Aurora kinase families and discusses their functional involvement in parasite's biology. Given their demonstrated essential roles in the erythrocytic asexual cycle and/or sexual stages, these enzymes represent novel potential drug targets for antimalarial intervention aiming at inhibiting parasite replication and/or blocking transmission of the disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases (2012). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated feedback phosphorylation controls the Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) dependence of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Akihiro; Hatano, Naoya; Fujiwara, Yuya; Bin Shari, Arian; Takabatake, Shota; Akano, Hiroki; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Nozaki, Naohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2017-10-03

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β(CaMKKβ)/5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation cascade affects various Ca(2+)-dependent metabolic pathways and cancer growth. Unlike recombinant CaMKKβ that exhibits higher basal activity (autonomous activity), activation of the CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling pathway requires increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+)/CaM dependence of CaMKKβ appears to arise from multiple phosphorylation events, including autophosphorylation and activities furnished by other protein kinases. However, the effects of proximal downstream kinases on CaMKKβ activity have not yet been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate feedback phosphorylation of CaMKKβ at multiple residues by CaMKKβ-activated AMPK in addition to autophosphorylation in vitro, leading to reduced autonomous, but not Ca(2+)/CaM-activated, CaMKKβ activity. MS analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of AMPK phosphorylation sites in CaMKKβ indicated that Thr144 phosphorylation by activated AMPK converts CaMKKβ into a Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent enzyme, as shown by completely Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent CaMKK activity of a phosphomimetic Thr144Glu CaMKKβ mutant. CaMKKβ mutant analysis indicated that the C-terminal domain (residues 471-587) including the autoinhibitory region plays an important role in stabilizing an inactive conformation in a Thr144 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis with antiphospho-Thr144 antibody revealed phosphorylation of Thr144 in CaMKKβ in transfected COS-7 cells that was further enhanced by exogenous expression of AMPKα. These results indicate that AMPK-mediated feedback phosphorylation of CaMKKβ regulates the CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling cascade and may be physiologically important for intracellular maintenance of Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK activation by CaMKKβ. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Therapeutically targeting cyclin D1 in primary tumors arising from loss of Ini1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa E.; Cimica, Velasco; Chinni, Srinivasa; Jana, Suman; Koba, Wade; Yang, Zhixia; Fine, Eugene; Zagzag, David; Montagna, Cristina; Kalpana, Ganjam V.

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumors (RTs) are rare, highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with poor prognosis and with no standard or effective treatment strategies. RTs are characterized by biallelic inactivation of the INI1 tumor suppressor gene. INI1 directly represses CCND1 and activates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors p16Ink4a and p21CIP. RTs are exquisitely dependent on cyclin D1 for genesis and survival. To facilitate translation of unique therapeutic strategies, we have used genetically engineered, Ini1+/− mice for therapeutic testing. We found that PET can be used to noninvasively and accurately detect primary tumors in Ini1+/− mice. In a PET-guided longitudinal study, we found that treating Ini1+/− mice bearing primary tumors with the pan-cdk inhibitor flavopiridol resulted in complete and stable regression of some tumors. Other tumors showed resistance to flavopiridol, and one of the resistant tumors overexpressed cyclin D1, more than flavopiridol-sensitive cells. The concentration of flavopiridol used was not sufficient to down-modulate the high level of cyclin D1 and failed to induce cell death in the resistant cells. Furthermore, FISH and PCR analyses indicated that there is aneuploidy and increased CCND1 copy number in resistant cells. These studies indicate that resistance to flavopiridol may be correlated to elevated cyclin D1 levels. Our studies also indicate that Ini1+/− mice are valuable tools for testing unique therapeutic strategies and for understanding mechanisms of drug resistance in tumors that arise owing to loss of Ini1, which is essential for developing effective treatment strategies against these aggressive tumors. PMID:21173237

  9. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  10. Overexpression of Aurora-A in primary cells interferes with S-phase entry by diminishing Cyclin D1 dependent activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer Christoph-Erik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora-A is a bona-fide oncogene whose expression is associated with genomic instability and malignant transformation. In several types of cancer, gene amplification and/or increased protein levels of Aurora-A are a common feature. Results In this report, we describe that inhibition of cell proliferation is the main effect observed after transient overexpression of Aurora-A in primary human cells. In addition to the known cell cycle block at the G2/M transition, Aurora-A overexpressing cells fail to overcome the restriction point at the G1/S transition due to diminished RB phosphorylation caused by reduced Cyclin D1 expression. Consequently, overexpression of Cyclin D1 protein is able to override the Aurora-A mediated G1 block. The Aurora-A mediated cell cycle arrest in G2 is not influenced by Cyclin D1 and as a consequence cells accumulate in G2. Upon deactivation of p53 part of the cells evade this premitotic arrest to become aneuploid. Conclusion Our studies describe that an increase of Aurora-A expression levels on its own has a tumor suppressing function, but in combination with the appropriate altered intracellular setting it might exert its oncogenic potential. The presented data indicate that deactivation of the tumor suppressor RB is one of the requirements for overriding a cell cycle checkpoint triggered by increased Aurora-A levels.

  11. Sphingosine kinase 1 dependent protein kinase C-δ activation plays an important role in acute liver failure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan

    2015-12-28

    To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-δ activation in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF) in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALF. BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to five groups, and ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multiparameteric analyzer. Serum levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after ALF induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of PKC-δ in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. The expression and activation of PKC-δ were up-regulated in liver tissue and PBMCs of mice with D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Inhibition of PKC-δ activation with rottlerin significantly increased the survival rates and decreased serum ALT/AST levels at 6, 12 and 24 h compared with the control group (P liver tissue were also decreased in the rottlerin treatment group. Furthermore, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) dependent PKC-δ activation played an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production in ALF. SphK1 dependent PKC-δ activation plays an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in ALF, and inhibition of PKC-δ activation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  12. FAK dimerization controls its kinase-dependent functions at focal adhesions

    KAUST Repository

    Brami-Cherrier, Karen

    2014-01-30

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) controls adhesion-dependent cell motility, survival, and proliferation. FAK has kinase-dependent and kinase-independent functions, both of which play major roles in embryogenesis and tumor invasiveness. The precise mechanisms of FAK activation are not known. Using x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and biochemical and functional analyses, we show that the key step for activation of FAK\\'s kinase-dependent functions-autophosphorylation of tyrosine-397-requires site-specific dimerization of FAK. The dimers form via the association of the N-terminal FERM domain of FAK and are stabilized by an interaction between FERM and the C-terminal FAT domain. FAT binds to a basic motif on FERM that regulates co-activation and nuclear localization. FAK dimerization requires local enrichment, which occurs specifically at focal adhesions. Paxillin plays a dual role, by recruiting FAK to focal adhesions and by reinforcing the FAT:FERM interaction. Our results provide a structural and mechanistic framework to explain how FAK combines multiple stimuli into a site-specific function. The dimer interfaces we describe are promising targets for blocking FAK activation. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Involvement of reperfusion injury salvage kinases in preconditioning depends critically on the preconditioning stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manintveld, Olivier C; Sluiter, Wim; Dekkers, Dick H W; te Lintel Hekkert, Maaike; Lamers, Jos M J; Verdouw, Pieter D; Duncker, Dirk J

    2011-07-01

    Different preconditioning stimuli can activate divergent signaling pathways. In rats, adenosine-independent pathways (triple 3-min coronary artery occlusion [3CAO3]) and adenosine-dependent pathways (one 15-min coronary artery occlusion [ICAO15]) exist, both ultimately converging at the level of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, while 3CAO3, 1CAO15 and exogenous adenosine (ADO) are equally cardioprotective, only 1CAO15 increases interstitial myocardial adenosine levels. Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway kinases have been implicated in ischemic preconditioning, but not all preconditioning stimuli activate this pathway. Consequently, we evaluated in anesthetized rats the effects of three distinctly different preconditioning stimuli (3CAO3, 1CAO15 or ADO) on infarct size (IS), signaling pathways with a special emphasis on kinases belonging to the RISK pathway (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-nitric oxide synthase and extracellular signal-related kinase [ERK]) and mitochondrial respiration. All three stimuli increased state-2 respiration (using succinate as complex-II substrate), thereby decreasing the respiratory control index, which was accompanied by a limitation of IS produced by a 60-min coronary artery occlusion (CAO). Nitric oxide synthase inhibition abolished the mitochondrial effects and the cardioprotection by 3CAO3, 1CAO15 or ADO. In contrast, the PI3 kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, blocked protection by 1CAO15, but did not affect protection by 3CAO3 or ADO. Western blotting confirmed that phosphorylation of Akt and ERK were increased by 1CAO15 (which was inhibited by wortmannin), but not by 3CAO3 or ADO. In conclusion, while the three cardioprotective stimuli 3CAO3, 1CAO15 and ADO afford cardioprotection via nitric oxide-mediated modulation of mitochondrial respiration, only the 1CAO15 exerts its protection via activation of kinases belonging to the RISK pathway.

  14. Inorganic polyphosphate promotes cyclin D1 synthesis through activation of mTOR/Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanian, S M; Ardeshirylajimi, A; Dinarvand, P; Rezaie, A R

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Polyphosphate (polyP) activates mTOR but its role in Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not known. PolyP-mediated cyclin D1 expression (β-catenin target gene) was monitored in endothelial cells. PolyP and boiled platelet-releasates induced the expression of cyclin D1 by similar mechanisms. PolyP establishes crosstalk between mTOR and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells. Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) elicits intracellular signaling responses in endothelial cells through activation of mTOR complexes 1 and 2. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is known to be a negative regulator of mTOR and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of polyP on the expression, degradation and subcellular localization of the Wnt/β-catenin target gene, cyclin D1, in endothelial cells. Methods Regulation of cyclin D1 expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization by polyP or platelet releasates was monitored in the absence and presence of pharmacological inhibitors and/or siRNA for specific molecules of the upstream mTOR/Wnt/β-catenin signaling network by established methods. Results Both synthetic polyP and boiled-platelet releasates induced the phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of GSK-3, thereby increasing the expression and nuclear localization, but inhibiting the degradation of cyclin D1. Inhibitors of mTORC1 (PI3K, AKT, PLC, PKC), rapamycin and siRNA for raptor (mTORC1-specific component) and β-catenin, all inhibited polyP-mediated regulation of cyclin D1 expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization in endothelial cells. The signaling effect of polyP was effectively inhibited by the recombinant extracellular domain of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and/or by the RAGE siRNA. Specific pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of ERK1/2 and NF-κB pathways indicated that polyP-mediated cyclin D1 expression and nuclear localization are IKK

  15. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N

    2000-01-01

    The signal transduction pathways associated with neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-induced neuritogenesis are only partially characterized. We here demonstrate that NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth depends on activation of p59(fyn), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma......), protein kinase C (PKC), and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This was done using a coculture system consisting of PC12-E2 cells grown on fibroblasts, with or without NCAM expression, allowing NCAM-NCAM interactions resulting in neurite outgrowth. PC12-E2 cells were transiently...... propose a model of NCAM signaling involving two pathways: NCAM-Ras-MAP kinase and NCAM-FGF receptor-PLCgamma-PKC, and we propose that PKC serves as the link between the two pathways activating Raf and thereby creating the sustained activity of the MAP kinases necessary for neuronal differentiation....

  16. A Stepwise Approach for the Synthesis of Folic Acid Conjugates with Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krajčovičová, S.; Gucký, Tomáš; Hendrychová, Denisa; Kryštof, Vladimír; Soural, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 24 (2017), s. 13530-13541 ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15264S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES * FOLATE RECEPTOR * REGIOSELECTIVE SYNTHESIS Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.849, year: 2016

  17. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico); Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  18. Characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Takano, Ryo; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-07-21

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa and a major pathogen of animals and immunocompromised humans, in whom it causes encephalitis. Understanding the mechanism of tachyzoite invasion is important for the discovery of new drug targets and may serve as a model for the study of other apicomplexan parasites. We previously showed that Plasmodium falciparum expresses a homolog of human calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) that is important for host cell invasion. In this study, to identify novel targets for the treatment of Toxoplasma gondii infection (another apicomplexan parasite), we sought to identify a CaMK-like protein in the T. gondii genome and to characterize its role in the life-cycle of this parasite. An in vitro kinase assay was performed to assess the phosphorylation activities of a novel CaMK-like protein in T. gondii by using purified proteins with various concentrations of calcium, calmodulin antagonists, or T. gondii glideosome proteins. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect the localization of this protein kinase by using the antibodies against this protein and organellar maker proteins of T. gondii. We identified a novel CaMK homolog in T. gondii, T. gondii CaMK-related kinase (TgCaMKrk), which exhibits calmodulin-independent autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation activity. However, calmodulin antagonists had no effect on its kinase activity. In T. gondii-infected cells, TgCaMKrk localized to the apical ends of extracellular and intracellular tachyzoites. TgCaMKrk phosphorylated TgGAP45 for phosphorylation in vitro. Our data improve our understanding of T. gondii motility and infection, the interaction between parasite protein kinases and glideosomes, and drug targets for protozoan diseases.

  19. CDK8 Kinase Phosphorylates Transcription Factor STAT1 to Selectively Regulate the Interferon Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bancerek, Joanna; Poss, Zachary C.; Steinparzer, Iris; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddäus; Mikulic, Ivana; Dölken, Lars; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Kovarik, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Gene regulation by cytokine-activated transcription factors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family requires serine phosphorylation within the transactivation domain (TAD). STAT1 and STAT3 TAD phosphorylation occurs upon promoter binding by an unknown kinase. Here, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the Mediator complex phosphorylated regulatory sites within the TADs of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, including S727 within the STAT1 TAD ...

  20. Meiotic Progression in Arabidopsis Is Governed by Complex Regulatory Interactions between SMG7, TDM1, and the Meiosis I–Specific Cyclin TAM[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulankova, Petra; Riehs-Kearnan, Nina; Nowack, Moritz K.; Schnittger, Arp; Riha, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division that produces four haploid nuclei from a single diploid cell in two rounds of chromosome segregation. Here, we analyze the role of Arabidopsis thaliana SUPPRESSOR WITH MORPHOGENETIC EFFECTS ON GENITALIA7 (SMG7), THREE DIVISION MUTANT1 (TDM1), and TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (TAM) in meiotic progression. SMG7 is a conserved nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor that is also, in Arabidopsis, essential for completion of meiosis. Examination of activating CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 phosophorylation at Thr-161 suggests that the meiotic arrest observed in smg7 mutants is likely caused by a failure to downregulate cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity at the end of the second meiotic division. Genetic analysis indicates that SMG7 and TDM1 act in the same pathway to facilitate exit from meiosis. We further demonstrate that the cyclin TAM is specifically expressed in meiosis I and has both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on progression to meiosis II. TAM knockouts skip the second meiotic division producing unreduced gametes, but inactivation of SMG7 or TDM1 alleviates TAM’s requirement for entry into meiosis II. We propose a model that meiotic progression in Arabidopsis pollen mother cells is driven by a yet to be identified cyclin-CDK activity that is modulated by regulatory interactions between TDM1, SMG7, and TAM. PMID:21119056

  1. 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase is phosphorylated and activated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Antonio Juel; Buch, M B; Krag, T O

    1999-01-01

    90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation of th...... of Ser(227), Ser(369), and Ser(386). Our study extend recent findings which implicate PDK1 in the activation of protein kinases B and C and p70(S6K), suggesting that PDK1 controls several major growth factor-activated signal transduction pathways.......90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation...... involvement of ERK, leading to partial activation of RSK2. Similarly, two other members of the RSK family, RSK1 and RSK3, were partially activated by PDK1 in COS7 cells. Finally, our data indicate that full activation of RSK2 by growth factor requires the cooperation of ERK and PDK1 through phosphorylation...

  2. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a calcium dependent protein kinase gene associated with cotton fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Quan-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yun; Gao, Peng; Wang, Guo-Ying; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2008-12-01

    The gene GhCPK1 encoding a calcium dependent protein kinase was identified from cotton. Transcripts of GhCPK1 accumulated primarily in the elongating fiber, and Arabidopsis plants transformed with GhCPK1 promoter-GUS construct exhibited GUS activity mainly in the developing trichomes, roots, young leaves and sepals. In the bombarded onion epidermal cells, GhCPK1-GFP fusion proteins showed a subcellular distribution in the plasma membrane. In vitro assays indicated that GhCPK1 was a functional calcium-dependent kinase able to undergo autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the known substrate histone III-S. Together, these results suggest that GhCPK1 may play a role in the calcium signaling events associated with fiber elongation.

  4. Aminopurvalanol A, a Potent, Selective, and Cell Permeable Inhibitor of Cyclins/Cdk Complexes, Causes the Reduction of in Vitro Fertilizing Ability of Boar Spermatozoa, by Negatively Affecting the Capacitation-Dependent Actin Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bernabò

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of high-througput technologies demonstrated that in mature spermatozoa are present proteins that are thought to be not present or active in sperm cells, such as those involved in control of cell cycle. Here, by using an in silico approach based on the application of networks theory, we found that Cyclins/Cdk complexes could play a central role in signal transduction active during capacitation. Then, we tested this hypothesis in the vitro model. With this approach, spermatozoa were incubated under capacitating conditions in control conditions (CTRL or in the presence of Aminopurvalanol A a potent, selective and cell permeable inhibitor of Cyclins/Cdk complexes at different concentrations (2, 10, and 20 μM. We found that this treatment caused dose-dependent inhibition of sperm fertilizing ability. We attribute this event to the loss of acrosome integrity due to the inhibition of physiological capacitation-dependent actin polymerization, rather than to a detrimental effect on membrane lipid remodeling or on other signaling pathways such as tubulin reorganization or MAPKs activation. In our opinion, these data could revamp the knowledge on biochemistry of sperm capacitation and could suggest new perspectives in studying male infertility.

  5. Plasmodium berghei Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Not Required for Host Cell Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Jebiwott; Kavitha Govindaswamy; Amos Mbugua; Purnima Bhanot

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase (CDPK1) is required for the development of sexual stages in the mosquito. In addition, it is proposed to play an essential role in the parasite's invasive stages possibly through the regulation of the actinomyosin motor and micronemal secretion. We demonstrate that Plasmodium berghei CDPK1 is dispensable in the parasite's erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stages. We successfully disrupted P. berghei CDPK1 (PbCDPK1) by homologous recombination. The r...

  6. A kinase-dependent role for Haspin in antagonizing Wapl and protecting mitotic centromere cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cai; Chen, Qinfu; Yi, Qi; Zhang, Miao; Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Linli; Zhang, Zhenlei; Qi, Feifei; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Fangwei

    2017-11-14

    Sister-chromatid cohesion mediated by the cohesin complex is fundamental for precise chromosome segregation in mitosis. Through binding the cohesin subunit Pds5, Wapl releases the bulk of cohesin from chromosome arms in prophase, whereas centromeric cohesin is protected from Wapl until anaphase onset. Strong centromere cohesion requires centromeric localization of the mitotic histone kinase Haspin, which is dependent on the interaction of its non-catalytic N-terminus with Pds5B. It remains unclear how Haspin fully blocks the Wapl-Pds5B interaction at centromeres. Here, we show that the C-terminal kinase domain of Haspin (Haspin-KD) binds and phosphorylates the YSR motif of Wapl (Wapl-YSR), thereby directly inhibiting the YSR motif-dependent interaction of Wapl with Pds5B. Cells expressing a Wapl-binding-deficient mutant of Haspin or treated with Haspin inhibitors show centromeric cohesion defects. Phospho-mimetic mutation in Wapl-YSR prevents Wapl from binding Pds5B and releasing cohesin. Forced targeting Haspin-KD to centromeres partly bypasses the need for Haspin-Pds5B interaction in cohesion protection. Taken together, these results indicate a kinase-dependent role for Haspin in antagonizing Wapl and protecting centromeric cohesion in mitosis. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP) quantifies the contribution of protein kinases to the regulation of cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Edmund H; Casado, Pedro; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Cutillas, Pedro R

    2017-09-01

    Cell survival is regulated by a signaling network driven by the activity of protein kinases; however, determining the contribution that each kinase in the network makes to such regulation remains challenging. Here, we report a computational approach that uses mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics data to rank protein kinases based on their contribution to cell regulation. We found that the scores returned by this algorithm, which we have termed kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP), were a quantitative measure of the contribution that individual kinases make to the signaling output. Application of KARP to the analysis of eight hematological cell lines revealed that cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1/2, casein kinase (CK) 2, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p21-activated kinase (PAK) were the most frequently highly ranked kinases in these cell models. The patterns of kinase activation were cell-line specific yet showed a significant association with cell viability as a function of kinase inhibitor treatment. Thus, our study exemplifies KARP as an untargeted approach to empirically and systematically identify regulatory kinases within signaling networks. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Calcium-binding properties of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum and the significance of individual calcium-binding sites for kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Pokutta, S; Maurer, P; Lindt, M; Franklin, R M; Kappes, B

    1994-03-29

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase from Plasmodium falciparum (PfCPK) is a multidomain protein composed of an N-terminal kinase domain connected via a linker region to a C-terminal CaM-like calcium-binding domain. The kinase can be activated by Ca2+ alone and associates with 45Ca2+. Here we describe the calcium-binding properties of the kinase and the significance of the individual calcium-binding sites with respect to enzymatic activation, as well as the Ca(2+)-induced conformational change as detected by circular dichroism. As predicted from the cDNA sequence, the kinase has four EF-hand calcium-binding sites in the C-terminal domain. To understand the roles of the individual calcium-binding sites, two series of mutations were generated at the individual EF-hand motifs. The highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position 12 in each calcium-binding loop was mutated to either lysine or glutamine, and therefore a total of eight mutants were generated. Either of these mutations (to lysine or glutamine) is sufficient to eliminate calcium binding at the mutated site. Sites I and II appear to be crucial for both Ca(2+)-induced conformational change and enzymatic activation. Whereas mutations at site II almost completely abolish kinase activity, mutations at site I are also deleterious and dramatically reduce the sensitivity of the Ca(2+)-induced conformational change and the Ca(2+)-dependent activation. Mutations at sites III and IV have minor effects.

  9. Localization and Dynamics of Cdc2-Cyclin B during Meiotic Reinitiation in Starfish OocytesV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Mark; Okumura, Ei-ichi; Hinkle, Beth; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    The Cdc2-cyclin B kinase has a central role in regulating the onset of M phase. In starfish oocytes, Cdc2-cyclin B begins to be activated ∼10 min after application of maturation hormone, followed by accumulation in the nucleus then nuclear envelope breakdown. By immunofluorescence and by expressing a green fluorescent (GFP) chimera of cyclin B, we find that cyclin B is present in aggregates in the cytoplasm of immature oocytes. The aggregates disperse at ∼10 min, suggesting that the dispersal is closely related to the activation of the kinase. Using cyclin B-GFP, the dispersion begins from the region containing the centrosomes. Extractability of Cdc2-cyclin B changes with similar kinetics during maturation. Active Cdc25 phosphatase released Cdc2-cyclin B from the detergent-insoluble fraction independently of its phosphatase activity. Live cell imaging also showed that Cdc2-cyclin B begins to accumulate in the nucleus before changes in nuclear pore permeability, consistent with Cdc2-cyclin B-induced disassembly of the pores. PMID:14551249

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase gamma mediates shear stress-dependent activation of JNK in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Y M; Park, H; Maland, M C; Darley-Usmar, V M; Stoyanov, B; Wetzker, R; Jo, H

    1998-11-01

    Shear stress differentially activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) by mechanisms involving Galphai2 and Gbeta/gamma proteins, respectively, in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The early events in this signaling mechanism by which G proteins regulate ERK and JNK in response to shear stress have not been defined. Here we show that BAEC endogenously express a G protein-dependent form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3Kgamma, and its activity is stimulated by shear stress. PI3Kgamma activity was measured in vitro using BAEC that were transiently transfected with an epitope-tagged PI3Kgamma (vsv-PI3Kgamma). Exposure of BAEC to shear stress rapidly and transiently stimulated the activity of vsv-PI3Kgamma (maximum by 15 s, with a return to basal after 1-min exposure to 5 dyn/cm2 shear stress). Activity of vsv-PI3Kgamma was stimulated by shear stress intensities as low as 0.5 dyn/cm2. Treatment of BAEC with an inhibitor of PI3K, wortmannin, inhibited shear-dependent activation of JNK but had no effect on that of ERK. Furthermore, expression of a kinase-inactive mutant (PI3KgammaK799R) in BAEC inhibited the shear-dependent activation of JNK but not ERK. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3Kgamma selectively regulates the shear-sensitive JNK pathway. This differential and novel signaling pathway may be responsible for coordinating various mechanosensitive events in endothelial cells.

  11. Phosphorylation of yeast phosphatidylserine synthase in vivo and in vitro by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, A J; Carman, G M

    1988-01-01

    Evidence is presented that demonstrates that phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphatidylserine synthase activity in cell extracts was reduced in the bcy1 mutant (which has high cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) and elevated in the cyr1 mutant (which has low cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) when compared with wild-ty...

  12. A modelling-experimental approach reveals insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-dependent regulation of adenosine monosphosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK) by insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonntag, Annika G; Dalle Pezze, Piero; Shanley, Daryl P; Thedieck, Kathrin

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase responds to growth factors, nutrients and cellular energy status and is a central controller of cellular growth. mTOR exists in two multiprotein complexes that are embedded into a complex signalling network. Adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK)

  13. Insulin inhibits extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3) kinase-dependent manner in Neuro2a cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Heide, L.P. van der; Hoekman, M.F.; Biessels, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Insulin signalling is well studied in peripheral tissue, but not in neuronal tissue. To gain more insight into neuronal insulin signalling we examined protein kinase B (PKB) and extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) regulation in serum-deprived Neuro2a cells. Insulin phosphorylated PKB in

  14. Copper Uptake in Mammary Epithelial Cells Activates Cyclins and Triggers Antioxidant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Villa dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxicologic effects of copper (Cu on tumor cells have been studied during the past decades, and it is suggested that Cu ion may trigger antiproliferative effects in vitro. However, in normal cells the toxicologic effects of high exposures of free Cu are not well understood. In this work, Cu uptake, the expression of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, and the levels of ROS production and related oxidative processes were evaluated in Cu-treated mammary epithelial MCF10A nontumoral cells. We have shown that the Cu additive is associated with the activation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, as well as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2. These nontumor cells respond to Cu-induced changes in the oxidative balance by increase of the levels of reduced intracellular glutathione (GSH, decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and accumulation during progression of the cell cycle, thus preventing the cell abnormal proliferation or death. Taken together, our findings revealed an effect that contributes to prevent a possible damage of normal cells exposed to chemotherapeutic effects of drugs containing the Cu ion.

  15. Kinase pathway dependence in primary human leukemias determined by rapid inhibitor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Tyner (Jeffrey); W.F. Yang (Wayne); A. Bankhead III (Armand); G. Fan (Guang); L.B. Fletcher (Luke); J. Bryant (Jade); J.M. Glover (Jason); B.H. Chang (Bill); S.E. Spurgeon (Stephen); W.H. Fleming (William); T. Kovacsovics; J. Gotlib (Jason); S.T. Oh (Stephen); M.W.N. Deininger (Michael W.); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.L. den Boer (Monique); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); T. O'Hare (Thomas); B.J. Druker (Brian); M.M. Loriaux (Marc)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractKinases are dysregulated in most cancers, but the frequency of specific kinase mutations is low, indicating a complex etiology in kinase dysregulation. Here, we report a strategy to rapidly identify functionally important kinase targets, irrespective of the etiology of kinase pathway

  16. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddouk, F Z; Ginnan, R; Singer, H A

    2017-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways are central regulators of differentiated vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractile function. In addition, Ca2+ signals regulate VSM gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of dedifferentiated or "synthetic" phenotype VSM cells. Synthetic phenotype VSM growth and hyperplasia are hallmarks of pervasive vascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, postangioplasty/in-stent restenosis, and vein graft failure. The serine/threonine protein kinase Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of intracellular Ca2+ signals. Its multifunctional nature, structural complexity, diversity of isoforms, and splice variants all characterize this protein kinase and make study of its activity and function challenging. The kinase has unique autoregulatory mechanisms, and emerging studies suggest that it can function to integrate Ca2+ and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species signaling. Differentiated VSM expresses primarily CaMKIIγ and -δ isoforms. CaMKIIγ isoform expression correlates closely with the differentiated phenotype, and some studies link its function to regulation of contractile activity and Ca2+ homeostasis. Conversely, synthetic phenotype VSM cells primarily express CaMKIIδ and substantial evidence links it to regulation of gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of VSM in vitro, and vascular hypertrophic and hyperplastic remodeling in vivo. CaMKIIδ and -γ isoforms have opposing functions at the level of cell cycle regulation, proliferation, and VSM hyperplasia in vivo. Isoform switching following vascular injury is a key step in promoting vascular remodeling. Recent availability of genetically engineered mice with smooth muscle deletion of specific isoforms and transgenics expressing an endogenous inhibitor protein (CAMK2N) has enabled a better understanding of CaMKII function in VSM and should facilitate future studies. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Cdk13/Cyclin K Complex

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    Ann Katrin Greifenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate the cell cycle and transcription in higher eukaryotes. We have determined the crystal structure of the transcription kinase Cdk13 and its Cyclin K subunit at 2.0 Å resolution. Cdk13 contains a C-terminal extension helix composed of a polybasic cluster and a DCHEL motif that interacts with the bound ATP. Cdk13/CycK phosphorylates both Ser5 and Ser2 of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD with a preference for Ser7 pre-phosphorylations at a C-terminal position. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 does not change the phosphorylation specificities of Cdk9, Cdk12, and Cdk13 but interacts with the phosphorylated CTD through its WW domain. Using recombinant proteins, we find that flavopiridol inhibits Cdk7 more potently than it does Cdk13. Gene expression changes after knockdown of Cdk13 or Cdk12 are markedly different, with enrichment of growth signaling pathways for Cdk13-dependent genes. Together, our results provide insights into the structure, function, and activity of human Cdk13/CycK.

  18. The role of Dbf4-dependent protein kinase in DNA polymerase ζ-dependent mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Luis N; Ferguson, Rebecca; Santoro, Irma; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    The yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) (composed of Dbf4 and Cdc7 subunits) is an essential, conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates multiple processes in the cell, including DNA replication, recombination and induced mutagenesis. Only DDK substrates important for replication and recombination have been identified. Consequently, the mechanism by which DDK regulates mutagenesis is unknown. The yeast mcm5-bob1 mutation that bypasses DDK's essential role in DNA replication was used here to examine whether loss of DDK affects spontaneous as well as induced mutagenesis. Using the sensitive lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assay, we show DDK is required to generate "complex" spontaneous mutations, which are a hallmark of the Polζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. DDK co-immunoprecipitated with the Rev7 regulatory, but not with the Rev3 polymerase subunit of Polζ. Conversely, Rev7 bound mainly to the Cdc7 kinase subunit and not to Dbf4. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ may be regulated by DDK phosphorylation as immunoprecipitates of yeast Cdc7 and also recombinant Xenopus DDK phosphorylated GST-Rev7 in vitro. In addition to promoting Polζ-dependent mutagenesis, DDK was also important for generating Polζ-independent large deletions that revert the lys2ΔA746 allele. The decrease in large deletions observed in the absence of DDK likely results from an increase in the rate of replication fork restart after an encounter with spontaneous DNA damage. Finally, nonepistatic, additive/synergistic UV sensitivity was observed in cdc7Δ pol32Δ and cdc7Δ pol30-K127R,K164R double mutants, suggesting that DDK may regulate Rev7 protein during postreplication "gap filling" rather than during "polymerase switching" by ubiquitinated and sumoylated modified Pol30 (PCNA) and Pol32. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. A systematic investigation of the protein kinases involved in NMDA receptor-dependent LTD: evidence for a role of GSK-3 but not other serine/threonine kinases

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    Peineau Stéphane

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signalling mechanisms involved in the induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD in the hippocampus are poorly understood. Numerous studies have presented evidence both for and against a variety of second messengers systems being involved in LTD induction. Here we provide the first systematic investigation of the involvement of serine/threonine (ser/thr protein kinases in NMDAR-LTD, using whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons. Results Using a panel of 23 inhibitors individually loaded into the recorded neurons, we can discount the involvement of at least 57 kinases, including PKA, PKC, CaMKII, p38 MAPK and DYRK1A. However, we have been able to confirm a role for the ser/thr protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3. Conclusion The present study is the first to investigate the role of 58 ser/thr protein kinases in LTD in the same study. Of these 58 protein kinases, we have found evidence for the involvement of only one, GSK-3, in LTD.

  20. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

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    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  1. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U.; Soroka, Carol J.; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of

  2. Effects of prostratin on Cyclin T1/P-TEFb function and the gene expression profile in primary resting CD4+ T cells

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    Rice Andrew P

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latent reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in resting CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to the clearance of infection by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Recent studies have focused on searches for adjuvant therapies to activate this reservoir under conditions of HAART. Prostratin, a non tumor-promoting phorbol ester, is a candidate for such a strategy. Prostratin has been shown to reactivate latent HIV-1 and Tat-mediated transactivation may play an important role in this process. We examined resting CD4+ T cells from healthy donors to determine if prostratin induces Cyclin T1/P-TEFb, a cellular kinase composed of Cyclin T1 and Cyclin-dependent kinase-9 (CDK9 that mediates Tat function. We also examined effects of prostratin on Cyclin T2a, an alternative regulatory subunit for CDK9, and 7SK snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein, two factors that associate with P-TEFb and repress its kinase activity. Results Prostratin up-regulated Cyclin T1 protein expression, modestly induced CDK9 protein expression, and did not affect Cyclin T2a protein expression. Although the kinase activity of CDK9 in vitro was up-regulated by prostratin, we observed a large increase in the association of 7SK snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein with CDK9. Using HIV-1 reporter viruses with and without a functional Tat protein, we found that prostratin stimulation of HIV-1 gene expression appears to require a functional Tat protein. Microarray analyses were performed and several genes related to HIV biology, including APOBEC3B, DEFA1, and S100 calcium-binding protein genes, were found to be regulated by prostratin. Conclusion Prostratin induces Cyclin T1 expression and P-TEFb function and this is likely to be involved in prostratin reactivation of latent HIV-1 proviruses. The large increase in association of 7SK and HEXIM1 with P-TEFb following prostratin treatment may reflect a requirement in CD4+ T cells for a precise balance between

  3. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  4. Neuronal phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Paquet, Claire

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and their relationship to accumulated prion protein (PrP) are unclear. A recent cell culture study showed that intracytoplasmic PrP may induce phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR(p))-mediated cell stress. The double-stranded RNA protein kinase PKR is a proapoptotic and stress kinase that accumulates in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer disease. To determine whether neuronal apoptosis in human CJD is associated with activation of the PKR(p) signaling pathway, we assessed in situ end labeling and immunocytochemistry for PrP, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD68, activated caspase 3, and phosphorylated PKR (Thr451) in samples of frontal, occipital, and temporal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum from 6 patients with sporadic CJD and 5 controls. Neuronal immunostaining for activated PKR was found in all CJD cases. The most staining was in nuclei and, in contrast to findings in Alzheimer disease, cytoplasmic labeling was not detected. Both the number and distribution of PKR(p)-positive neurons correlated closely with the extent of neuronal apoptosis, spongiosis, astrocytosis, and microglial activation and with the phenotype and disease severity. There was no correlation with the type, topography, or amount of extracellular PrP deposits. These findings suggest that neuronal apoptosis in human CJD may result from PKR(p)-mediated cell stress and are consistent with recent studies supporting a pathogenic role for intracellular or transmembrane PrP.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinase B mediates an oxygen-dependent replication switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Corrie; Liao, Reiling; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Rustad, Tige; Ollodart, Anja R.; Wright, Aaron T.; Sherman, David R.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-07

    In the majority of cases, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections are clinically latent, characterized by little or no bacterial replication and drug tolerance. Low oxygen tension is a major host factor inducing bacteriostasis, but the molecular mechanisms driving oxygen-dependent replication are poorly understood. Mtb encodes eleven serine/threonine protein kinases, a family of signaling molecules known to regulate similar replicative adaptations in other bacteria. Here, we tested the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in the Mtb response to altered oxygen status, using an in vitro model of latency (hypoxia) and reactivation (reaeration). Broad kinase inhibition compromised survival of Mtb in hypoxia. Activity-based protein profiling and genetic mutation identified PknB as the kinase critical for surviving hypoxia. Mtb replication was highly sensitive to changes in PknB levels in aerated culture, and even more so in hypoxia. A mutant overexpressing PknB specifically in hypoxia showed a 10-fold loss in viability in low oxygen conditions. In contrast, chemically reducing PknB activity during hypoxia specifically compromised resumption of growth during reaeration. These data support a model in which PknB activity is reduced to achieve bacteriostasis, and elevated when replication resumes. Together, these data show that phosphosignaling controls replicative transitions associated with latency and reactivation, that PknB is a major regulator of these transitions, and that PknB could provide a highly vulnerable therapeutic target at every step of the Mtb life cycle - active disease, latency, and reactivation.

  6. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase kinase and sucrose-phosphate synthase kinase activities in cauliflower florets: Ca2+ dependence and substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroser, D; Huber, S C

    1998-07-15

    Plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase(HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and synthetic peptides designed from the known phosphorylation sites of plant HMGR (SAMS*: KSHMKYNRSTKDVK), rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase (SAMS: HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR), spinach SPS (SP2: GRRJRRISSVEJJDKK), and spinach NADH:nitrate reductase (NR6: GPTLKRTASTPFJNTTSK) were used to characterize kinase activities from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. ) inflorescences. The three major peaks of protein kinase activity resolved by anion-exchange FPLC are homologs of those observed previously in spinach leaves and thus are designated PKI, PKIV, and PKIII, listed in order of elution. PKIV was the most active in terms of phosphorylation and inactivation of recombinant Nicotiana HMGR and was also strictly Ca2+ dependent. The novel aspects are that PKIII has not been detected in previous cauliflower studies, that SAMS* is a more specific peptide substrate to identify potential HMGR kinases, and that the major HMGR kinase in cauliflower is Ca2+ dependent. Of the three major kinases that phosphorylated the SP2 peptide only PKI (partially Ca2+ sensitive) and PKIII (Ca2+ insensitive) inactivated native spinach leaf SPS. Cauliflower extracts contained endogenous SPS that was inactivated by endogenous kinase(s) in an ATP-dependent manner and this may be one of the substrate target proteins for PKI and/or PKIII. The substrate specificity of the three kinase peaks was studied using synthetic peptide variants of the SP2 sequence. All three kinases had a strong preference for peptides with a basic residue at P-6 (as in SP2 and SAMS*; SAMS has a free amino terminus at this position) or a Pro at P-7 (as in NR6). This requirement for certain residues at P-6 or P-7 was not recognized in earlier studies but appears to be a general requirement. In plant HMGR, a conserved His residue at P-6 is involved directly in catalysis and this may explain why substrates reduced HMGR phosphorylation

  7. Potent enantioselective inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) by atropisomeric chromenone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Kate M; Rennison, Tommy; Jones, Gavin; Craven, Faye; Bardos, Julia; Golding, Bernard T; Griffin, Roger J; Haggerty, Karen; Hardcastle, Ian R; Thommes, Pia; Ting, Attilla; Cano, Céline

    2012-09-07

    Substitution at the 7-position of the chromen-4-one pharmacophore of 8-(dibenzo[b,d]thiophen-4-yl)-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-one NU7441, a potent and selective DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor, with allyl, n-propyl or methyl enabled the resolution by chiral HPLC of atropisomers. Biological evaluation against DNA-PK of each pair of atropisomers showed a marked difference in potency, with biological activity residing exclusively in the laevorotatory enantiomer.

  8. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules. II. Effect of retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Pezzotti, R; Nisticò, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of retinol on cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells and peritubular cells isolated from prepubertal rats has been investigated. Treatments longer than six hours induced a significant inhibition of type I protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells without appreciable variation of type II protein kinase. Short time treatments with the vitamin did not affect the Sertoli cell protein kinase activity. The vitamin A addition did not induce any appreciable variation of peritubular cell protein kinase activity.

  9. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

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    Abhisheka Bansal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs. Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1. The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosphorylation, was successfully introduced into the CDPK1 locus using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9. As methionine is a bulky residue, BKI 1294 had a 10-fold-greater effect in vitro on the wild-type enzyme than on the methionine mutant. However, in contrast to in vitro data with recombinant enzymes, BKI 1294 had a slightly greater inhibition of the growth of CDPK1 T145M parasites than the wild type. Moreover, the CDPK1 T145M parasites were more sensitive to the action of compound 2 (C2, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG. These results suggest that a reduction in the activity of CDPK1 due to methionine substitution at the gatekeeper position is compensated through the direct action of PKG or of another kinase under the regulation of PKG. The transcript levels of CDPK5 and CDPK6 were significantly upregulated in the CDPK1 T145M parasites. The increase in CDPK6 or some other kinase may compensate for decrease in CDPK1 activity during invasion. This study suggests that targeting two kinases may be more effective in chemotherapy to treat malaria so as not to select for mutations in one of the enzymes.

  10. Aldosterone producing adrenal adenomas are characterized by activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, S; Lichtenauer, U; Shapiro, I; Reincke, M; Beuschlein, F

    2011-02-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most prevalent cause of secondary hypertension. However, insights in pathophysiological mechanisms resulting in autonomous aldosterone secretion are limited. Although transcriptional regulators of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) including calcium-binding calmodulin kinase (CaMK) dependent pathways have been defined in vitro, it remains uncertain whether these mechanisms play a role in the context of dysregulated steroidogenesis in aldosterone producing adrenadenomas. Thus, we compared expression and activation of key components of CaMK pathways in aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) with normal adrenals glands (NAGs). As expected, aldosterone synthase expression in APAs was significantly higher in comparison to NAGs, suggesting transcriptional activation as a contributing factor of aldosterone excess. Along the same line, CaMKI was significantly upregulated in APAs on the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear localization of CaMKI in these tumors. The phosphorylation of CREB, a target protein for CaMKI was increased, which could represent a further stimulation of aldosterone synthase transcription. In summary, this study provides indirect evidence for a causative involvement of the CaM kinase signaling pathway in human aldosterone producing adenomas. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. MARK/Par1 Kinase Is Activated Downstream of NMDA Receptors through a PKA-Dependent Mechanism.

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    Laura P Bernard

    Full Text Available The Par1 kinases, also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARKs, are important for the establishment of cell polarity from worms to mammals. Dysregulation of these kinases has been implicated in autism, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Despite their important function in health and disease, it has been unclear how the activity of MARK/Par1 is regulated by signals from cell surface receptors. Here we show that MARK/Par1 is activated downstream of NMDA receptors in primary hippocampal neurons. Further, we show that this activation is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA, through the phosphorylation of Ser431 of Par4/LKB1, the major upstream kinase of MARK/Par1. Together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which MARK/Par1 is activated at the neuronal synapse.

  12. Capsaicinoids regulate airway anion transporters through Rho kinase- and cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yoshitaka; Morise, Masahiro; Ito, Yasushi; Mizutani, Takefumi; Matsuno, Tadakatsu; Ito, Satoru; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Sato, Mitsuo; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicinoids on airway anion transporters, we recorded and analyzed transepithelial currents in human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells. Application of capsaicin (100 μM) attenuated vectorial anion transport, estimated as short-circuit currents (I(SC)), before and after stimulation by forskolin (10 μM) with concomitant reduction of cytosolic cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was also observed in the response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM, a cell-permeable cAMP analog) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1 mM, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases). The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was attributed to suppression of bumetanide (an inhibitor of the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1)- and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (an inhibitor of basolateral HCO(3)(-)-dependent anion transporters)-sensitive components, which reflect anion uptake via basolateral cAMP-dependent anion transporters. In contrast, capsaicin potentiated apical Cl(-) conductance, which reflects conductivity through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel. All these paradoxical effects of capsaicin were mimicked by capsazepine. Forskolin application also increased phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, and the phosphorylation was prevented by capsaicin and capsazepine, suggesting that these capsaicinoids assume aspects of Rho kinase inhibitors. We also found that the increments in apical Cl(-) conductance were caused by conventional Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 (20 μM) and HA-1077 (20 μM), with selective inhibition of basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1. Collectively, capsaicinoids inhibit cAMP-mediated anion transport through down-regulation of basolateral anion uptake, paradoxically accompanied by up-regulation of apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion conductance. The latter is mediated by inhibition of Rho-kinase

  13. Phosphorylation of beta-catenin by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Qin, Yimin; Browning, Darren; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2006-04-14

    Beta-catenin is a signaling molecule that promotes cell proliferation by the induction of gene transcription through the activation of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) transcription factors. The canonical mechanism of the regulation of beta-catenin involves its phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 at the Ser-45 site and by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) at the Thr-41, Ser-37, and Ser-33 sites. This phosphorylation targets beta-catenin to ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome system. Mitogenic factors promote beta-catenin signaling through the inhibition of GSK3, resulting in reduced beta-catenin phosphorylation, its stabilization, and subsequent accumulation in the nucleus, where it stimulates TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. In the present study, we have shown that (i) beta-catenin can be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) in vitro and in intact cells at two novel sites, Ser-552 and Ser-675; (ii) phosphorylation by PKA promotes the transcriptional activity (TCF/LEF transactivation) of beta-catenin; (iii) mutation of Ser-675 attenuates the promoting effect of PKA; (iv) phosphorylation by PKA does not affect the GSK3-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin, its stability, or intracellular localization; and (v) phosphorylation at the Ser-675 site promotes the binding of beta-catenin to its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel, noncanonical mechanism of modulation of beta-catenin signaling through direct phosphorylation of beta-catenin by PKA, promoting its interaction with CREB-binding protein.

  14. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. A forward genetic screen reveals that calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 regulates egress in Toxoplasma.

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    Erin Garrison

    Full Text Available Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle.

  16. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from the green alga, Dunaliella salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase was partially purified and characterized from the green alga Dunaliella salina. The enzyme was activated at free Ca2+ concentrations above 10(-7) molar. and half-maximal activation was at about 3 x 10(-7) molar. The optimum pH for its Ca(2+)-dependent activity was 7.5. The addition of various phospholipids and diolein had no effects on enzyme activity and did not alter the sensitivity of the enzyme toward Ca2+. The enzyme was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide in a dose-dependent manner while the protein kinase C inhibitor, sphingosine, had little effect on enzyme activity up to 800 micromolar. Immunoassay showed some calmodulin was present in the kinase preparations. However, it is unlikely the kinase was calmodulin regulated, since it still showed stimulation by Ca2+ in gel assays after being electrophoretically separated from calmodulin by two different methods. This gel method of detection of the enzyme indicated that a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 showed protein kinase activity at each one of the several steps in the purification procedure. Gel assay analysis also showed that after native gel isoelectric focusing the partially purified kinase preparations had two bands with calcium-dependent activity, at isoelectric points 6.7 and 7.1. By molecular weight, by isoelectric point, and by a comparative immunoassay, the Dunaliella kinase appears to differ from at least some of the calcium-dependent, but calmodulin and phospholipid independent kinases described from higher plants.

  17. Citron kinase - renaissance of a neglected mitotic kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo

    2017-05-15

    Cell division controls the faithful segregation of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. Members of the Aurora, Polo and cyclin-dependent (Cdk) kinase families are known to regulate multiple events throughout cell division, whereas another kinase, citron kinase (CIT-K), for a long time has been considered to function solely during cytokinesis, the last phase of cell division. CIT-K was originally proposed to regulate the ingression of the cleavage furrow that forms at the equatorial cortex of the dividing cell after chromosome segregation. However, studies in the last decade have clarified that this kinase is, instead, required for the organization of the midbody in late cytokinesis, and also revealed novel functions of CIT-K earlier in mitosis and in DNA damage control. Moreover, CIT-K mutations have recently been linked to the development of human microcephaly, and CIT-K has been identified as a potential target in cancer therapy. In this Commentary, I describe and re-evaluate the functions and regulation of CIT-K during cell division and its involvement in human disease. Finally, I offer my perspectives on the open questions and future challenges that are necessary to address, in order to fully understand this important and yet unjustly neglected mitotic kinase. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Rising cyclin-CDK levels order cell cycle events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Oikonomou

    Full Text Available Diverse mitotic events can be triggered in the correct order and time by a single cyclin-CDK. A single regulator could confer order and timing on multiple events if later events require higher cyclin-CDK than earlier events, so that gradually rising cyclin-CDK levels can sequentially trigger responsive events: the "quantitative model" of ordering.This 'quantitative model' makes predictions for the effect of locking cyclin at fixed levels for a protracted period: at low cyclin levels, early events should occur rapidly, while late events should be slow, defective, or highly variable (depending on threshold mechanism. We titrated the budding yeast mitotic cyclin Clb2 within its endogenous expression range to a stable, fixed level and measured time to occurrence of three mitotic events: growth depolarization, spindle formation, and spindle elongation, as a function of fixed Clb2 level. These events require increasingly more Clb2 according to their normal order of occurrence. Events occur efficiently and with low variability at fixed Clb2 levels similar to those observed when the events normally occur. A second prediction of the model is that increasing the rate of cyclin accumulation should globally advance timing of all events. Moderate (<2-fold overexpression of Clb2 accelerates all events of mitosis, resulting in consistently rapid sequential cell cycles. However, this moderate overexpression also causes a significant frequency of premature mitoses leading to inviability, suggesting that Clb2 expression level is optimized to balance the fitness costs of variability and catastrophe.We conclude that mitotic events are regulated by discrete cyclin-CDK thresholds. These thresholds are sequentially triggered as cyclin increases, yielding reliable order and timing. In many biological processes a graded input must be translated into discrete outputs. In such systems, expression of the central regulator is likely to be tuned to an optimum level, as we

  19. Apelin increases cardiac contractility via protein kinase Cε- and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent mechanisms.

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    Ábel Perjés

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apelin, the endogenous ligand for the G protein-coupled apelin receptor, is an important regulator of the cardiovascular homoeostasis. We previously demonstrated that apelin is one of the most potent endogenous stimulators of cardiac contractility; however, its underlying signaling mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study we characterized the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK to the positive inotropic effect of apelin. METHODS AND RESULTS: In isolated perfused rat hearts, apelin increased contractility in association with activation of prosurvival kinases PKC and ERK1/2. Apelin induced a transient increase in the translocation of PKCε, but not PKCα, from the cytosol to the particulate fraction, and a sustained increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in the left ventricle. Suppression of ERK1/2 activation diminished the apelin-induced increase in contractility. Although pharmacological inhibition of PKC attenuated the inotropic response to apelin, it had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, the apelin-induced positive inotropic effect was significantly decreased by inhibition of MLCK, a kinase that increases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Apelin increases cardiac contractility through parallel and independent activation of PKCε and ERK1/2 signaling in the adult rat heart. Additionally MLCK activation represents a downstream mechanism in apelin signaling. Our data suggest that, in addition to their role in cytoprotection, modest activation of PKCε and ERK1/2 signaling improve contractile function, therefore these pathways represent attractive possible targets in the treatment of heart failure.

  20. Involvement of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases in mycelial growth of the basidiomycetous mushroom, Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameshita, Isamu; Yamada, Yusuke; Nishida, Tetsuyuki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Akira; Asada, Yasuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Although multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-kinases) are widely distributed in animal cells, the occurrence of CaM-kinases in the basidiomycetous mushroom has not previously been documented. When the extracts from various developmental stages from mycelia to the mature fruiting body of Coprinus cinereus were analyzed by Western blotting using Multi-PK antibodies, which had been generated to detect a wide variety of protein serine/threonine kinases (Ser/Thr kinases), a variety of stage-specific Ser/Thr kinases was detected. Calmodulin (CaM) overlay assay using digoxigenin-labeled CaM detected protein bands of 65 kDa, 58 kDa, 46 kDa, 42 kDa, and 38 kDa only in the presence of CaCl(2), suggesting that these bands were CaM-binding proteins. When the CaM-binding fraction was prepared from mycelial extract of C. cinereus by CaM-Sepharose and analyzed with Multi-PK antibodies, two major immunoreactive bands corresponding to 65 kDa and 46 kDa were detected. CaM-binding fraction, thus obtained, exhibited Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase activity toward protein substrates such as histones. These CaM-kinases were found to be highly expressed in the actively growing mycelia, but not in the resting mycelial cells. Mycelial growth was enhanced by the addition of CaCl(2) in the culture media, but inhibited by the addition of EGTA or trifluoperazine, a potent CaM inhibitor. This suggested that CaM-dependent enzymes including CaM-kinases play crucial roles in mycelial growth of basidiomycete C. cinereus.

  1. Substituted imidazopyridazines are potent and selective inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1)

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Osborne, Simon A.; Bouloc, Nathalie; Large, Jonathan M.; Wallace, Claire; Birchall, Kristian; Ansell, Keith H.; Jones, Hayley M.; Taylor, Debra; Clough, Barbara; Green, Judith L.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    A series of imidazopyridazines which are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1) was identified from a high-throughput screen against the isolated enzyme. Subsequent exploration of the SAR and optimisation has yielded leading members which show promising in vitro anti-parasite activity along with good in vitro ADME and selectivity against human kinases. Initial in vivo testing has revealed good oral bioavailability in a mouse PK study and modest...

  2. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  3. Robust kinase- and age-dependent dopaminergic and norepinephrine neurodegeneration in LRRK2 G2019S transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yulan; Neifert, Stewart; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Liu, Qinfang; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Lee, Byoung Dae; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Grima, Jonathan C; Mao, Xiaobo; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Swing, Deborah A; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Tessarollo, Lino; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2018-02-13

    Mutations in LRRK2 are known to be the most common genetic cause of sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Multiple lines of LRRK2 transgenic or knockin mice have been developed, yet none exhibit substantial dopamine (DA)-neuron degeneration. Here we develop human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter-controlled tetracycline-sensitive LRRK2 G2019S (GS) and LRRK2 G2019S kinase-dead (GS/DA) transgenic mice and show that LRRK2 GS expression leads to an age- and kinase-dependent cell-autonomous neurodegeneration of DA and norepinephrine (NE) neurons. Accompanying the loss of DA neurons are DA-dependent behavioral deficits and α-synuclein pathology that are also LRRK2 GS kinase-dependent. Transmission EM reveals that that there is an LRRK2 GS kinase-dependent significant reduction in synaptic vesicle number and a greater abundance of clathrin-coated vesicles in DA neurons. These transgenic mice indicate that LRRK2-induced DA and NE neurodegeneration is kinase-dependent and can occur in a cell-autonomous manner. Moreover, these mice provide a substantial advance in animal model development for LRRK2-associated PD and an important platform to investigate molecular mechanisms for how DA neurons degenerate as a result of expression of mutant LRRK2.

  4. Redox regulation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα in the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Eaton, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of oxidants in biological systems have been historically referred to as “oxidative stress,” a choice of words that perhaps conveys an imbalanced view of reactive oxygen species in cells and tissues. The term stress suggests a harmful role, whereas a contemporary view is that oxidants are also crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis or adaptive signaling that can actually limit injury. This regulatory role for oxidants is achieved in part by them inducing oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins which may alter their function or interactions. Such mechanisms allow changes in cell oxidant levels to be coupled to regulated alterations in enzymatic function (i.e., signal transduction), which enables “redox signaling.” In this review we focus on the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) Ia disulfide dimerisation, an oxidative modification that is induced by oxidants that directly activates the enzyme, discussing how this impacts on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, how this oxidative activation of PKG may coordinate with or differ from classical activation of this kinase by cGMP is also considered. PMID:26236235

  5. Redox regulation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Eaton, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of oxidants in biological systems have been historically referred to as "oxidative stress," a choice of words that perhaps conveys an imbalanced view of reactive oxygen species in cells and tissues. The term stress suggests a harmful role, whereas a contemporary view is that oxidants are also crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis or adaptive signaling that can actually limit injury. This regulatory role for oxidants is achieved in part by them inducing oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins which may alter their function or interactions. Such mechanisms allow changes in cell oxidant levels to be coupled to regulated alterations in enzymatic function (i.e., signal transduction), which enables "redox signaling." In this review we focus on the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) Ia disulfide dimerisation, an oxidative modification that is induced by oxidants that directly activates the enzyme, discussing how this impacts on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, how this oxidative activation of PKG may coordinate with or differ from classical activation of this kinase by cGMP is also considered.

  6. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  7. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo Takao

    Full Text Available Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency.

  8. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  9. Expression of CDK7, Cyclin H, and MAT1 Is Elevated in Breast Cancer and Is Prognostic in Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hetal; Abduljabbar, Rezvan; Lai, Chun-Fui; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Harrod, Alison; Gemma, Carolina; Steel, Jennifer H.; Patel, Naina; Busonero, Claudia; Jerjees, Dena; Remenyi, Judit; Smith, Sally; Gomm, Jennifer J.; Magnani, Luca; Győrffy, Balázs; Jones, Louise J.; Fuller-Pace, Frances; Shousha, Sami; Buluwela, Laki; Rakha, Emad A.; Ellis, Ian O.; Coombes, R. Charles; Ali, Simak

    2017-01-01

    Purpose CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is required for the regulation of the cell cycle and is a trimeric complex consisting of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7), Cyclin H, and the accessory protein, MAT1. CDK7 also plays a critical role in regulating transcription, primarily by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II, as well as transcription factors such as estrogen receptor-α (ER). Deregulation of cell cycle and transcriptional control are general features of tumor cells, highlighting the potential for the use of CDK7 inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. Experimental Design mRNA and protein expression of CDK7 and its essential cofactors cyclin H and MAT1 were evaluated in breast cancer samples to determine if their levels are altered in cancer. Immunohistochemical staining of >900 breast cancers was used to determine the association with clinicopathologic features and patient outcome. Results We show that expressions of CDK7, cyclin H, and MAT1 are all closely linked at the mRNA and protein level, and their expression is elevated in breast cancer compared with the normal breast tissue. Intriguingly, CDK7 expression was inversely proportional to tumor grade and size, and outcome analysis showed an association between CAK levels and better outcome. Moreover, CDK7 expression was positively associated with ER expression and in particular with phosphorylation of ER at serine 118, a site important for ER transcriptional activity. Conclusions Expressions of components of the CAK complex, CDK7, MAT1, and Cyclin H are elevated in breast cancer and correlate with ER. Like ER, CDK7 expression is inversely proportional to poor prognostic factors and survival. PMID:27301701

  10. Expression of CDK7, Cyclin H, and MAT1 Is Elevated in Breast Cancer and Is Prognostic in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hetal; Abduljabbar, Rezvan; Lai, Chun-Fui; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Harrod, Alison; Gemma, Carolina; Steel, Jennifer H; Patel, Naina; Busonero, Claudia; Jerjees, Dena; Remenyi, Judit; Smith, Sally; Gomm, Jennifer J; Magnani, Luca; Győrffy, Balázs; Jones, Louise J; Fuller-Pace, Frances; Shousha, Sami; Buluwela, Laki; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Coombes, R Charles; Ali, Simak

    2016-12-01

    CDK-activating kinase (CAK) is required for the regulation of the cell cycle and is a trimeric complex consisting of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7), Cyclin H, and the accessory protein, MAT1. CDK7 also plays a critical role in regulating transcription, primarily by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II, as well as transcription factors such as estrogen receptor-α (ER). Deregulation of cell cycle and transcriptional control are general features of tumor cells, highlighting the potential for the use of CDK7 inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. mRNA and protein expression of CDK7 and its essential cofactors cyclin H and MAT1 were evaluated in breast cancer samples to determine if their levels are altered in cancer. Immunohistochemical staining of >900 breast cancers was used to determine the association with clinicopathologic features and patient outcome. We show that expressions of CDK7, cyclin H, and MAT1 are all closely linked at the mRNA and protein level, and their expression is elevated in breast cancer compared with the normal breast tissue. Intriguingly, CDK7 expression was inversely proportional to tumor grade and size, and outcome analysis showed an association between CAK levels and better outcome. Moreover, CDK7 expression was positively associated with ER expression and in particular with phosphorylation of ER at serine 118, a site important for ER transcriptional activity. Expressions of components of the CAK complex, CDK7, MAT1, and Cyclin H are elevated in breast cancer and correlate with ER. Like ER, CDK7 expression is inversely proportional to poor prognostic factors and survival. Clin Cancer Res; 22(23); 5929-38. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

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    James Campbell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors.

  12. Induction of cyclins E and A in response to mitogen removal: a basic alteration associated with the arrest of differentiation of C2 myoblasts transformed by simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Tedesco, D; Baron, L; Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1997-01-01

    We previously showed that C2 myoblasts transformed by simian virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT) stop the myogenic process after the induction of myogenin and of high Rb levels; the induced Rb, however, becomes notably phosphorylated. We have analyzed the protein levels and activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) in untransformed C2 cells and in transformants of either SVLT or the cytoplasmic mutant NKT1 (which permits differentiation) upon a shift from growth medium (GM) to mitogen-poor di...

  13. Lipid Synthetic Transcription Factor SREBP-1a Activates p21WAF1/CIP1, a Universal Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Noriyuki; Shimano, Hitoshi; Nakakuki, Masanori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Sone, Hirohito; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toyoshima, Hideo; Yamada, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are membrane-bound transcription factors that regulate lipid synthetic genes. In contrast to SREBP-2, which regulates cellular cholesterol level in normal cells, SREBP-1a is highly expressed in actively growing cells and activates entire programs of genes involved in lipid synthesis such as cholesterol, fatty acids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Previously, the physiological relevance of this potent activity of SREBP-1a has been thought ...

  14. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Tursiella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL, which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I. Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C, in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF and p16(INK4a expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF and p16I(NK4a. By contrast, p16(INK4a was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1, a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1 expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the proliferation of Wp-R BL cells and LCLs.

  15. Novel functions of plant cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1, can act non-cell-autonomously and inhibit entry into mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinl, Christina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Kuijt, Suzanne J H

    2005-01-01

    numbers of cells consistent with a function of CKIs in blocking the G1-S cell cycle transition. Here, we demonstrate that at least one inhibitor from Arabidopsis, ICK1/KRP1, can also block entry into mitosis but allows S-phase progression causing endoreplication. Our data suggest that plant CKIs act...... independently from ICK1/KRP1-induced endoreplication. Strikingly, we found that endoreplicated cells were able to reenter mitosis, emphasizing the high degree of flexibility of plant cells during development. Moreover, we show that in contrast with animal CDK inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1 can move between cells...

  16. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction......The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells...... of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression...

  17. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Reid, Molly C; Kallur Siddaramaiah, Latha; Müller, Joachim; Winzer, Pablo; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Merritt, Ethan A; Hol, Wim G J; Maly, Dustin J; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1) is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs) previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for therapy of bovine

  18. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode K Ojo

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1 is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for

  19. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Gu

    Full Text Available Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK IIδ is predominantly expressed in the heart. There are three isoforms of CaMKIIδ resulting from the alternative splicing of exons 14, 15, and 16 of its pre-mRNA, which is regulated by the splicing factor SF2/ASF. Inclusion of exons 15 and 16 or of exon 14 generates δA or δB isoform. The exclusion of all three exons gives rise to δC isoform, which is selectively increased in pressure-overload-induced hypertrophy. Overexpression of either δB or δC induces hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting their specific role in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy and heart failure. It is well known that the β-adrenergic-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway is implicated in heart failure. To determine the role of PKA in the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ, we constructed mini-CaMKIIδ genes and used these genes to investigate the regulation of the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ by PKA in cultured cells. We found that PKA promoted the exclusion of exons 14, 15, and 16 of CaMKIIδ, resulting in an increase in δC isoform. PKA interacted with and phosphorylated SF2/ASF, and enhanced SF2/ASF's activity to promote the exclusion of exons 14, 15, and 16 of CaMKIIδ, leading to a further increase in the expression of δC isoform. These findings suggest that abnormality in β-adrenergic-PKA signaling may contribute to cardiomyopathy and heart failure through dysregulation in the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ exons 14, 15, and 16 and up-regulation of CaMKIIδC.

  20. The phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induces fragmentation: possible role of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-10-05

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) is a key enzyme, master regulator of cellular proliferation and metabolism; it is considered a key target for pharmacological intervention. Using membranes obtained from DDT1 MF-2 cells, phospho-PDK1 was identified by Western blotting, as two major protein bands of Mr 58-68 kDa. Cell incubation with the PDK1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in the amount of phospho-PDK1 with a concomitant appearance of a ≈42 kDa phosphorylated fragment. Knocking down PDK1 diminished the amount of phospho-PDK1 detected in membranes, accompanied by similarly decreased fragment generation. UCN-01-induced fragment generation was also observed in membranes from cells stably expressing a myc-tagged PDK1 construct. Other PDK1 inhibitors were also tested: OSU-03012 induced a clear decrease in phospho-PDK1 and increased the presence of the phosphorylated fragment in membrane preparations; in contrast, GSK2334470 and staurosporine induced only marginal increases in the amount of PDK1 fragment. Galardin and batimastat, two metalloproteinase inhibitors, markedly attenuated inhibitor-induced PDK1 fragment generation. Metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 9 co-immunoprecipitated with myc-PDK1 under baseline conditions and this interaction was stimulated by UCN-01; batimastat also markedly diminished this effect of the PDK1 inhibitor. Our results indicate that a series of protein kinase inhibitors, namely UCN-01 and OSU-03012 and to a lesser extent GSK2334470 and staurosporine induce PDK1 fragmentation and suggest that metalloproteinases could participate in this effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. TRAF6-Dependent Act1 Phosphorylation by the IκB Kinase-Related Kinases Suppresses Interleukin-17-Induced NF-κB Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fangfang; Gao, Hanchao; Zhu, Shu; Shi, Peiqing; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Jallal, Bahija; Yao, Yihong; Shi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is critically involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory disorders. IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)-proximal signaling complex (IL-17R-Act1-TRAF6) is essential for IL-17-mediated NF-κB activation, while IL-17-mediated mRNA stability is TRAF6 independent. Recently, inducible IκB kinase (IKKi) has been shown to phosphorylate Act1 on Ser 311 to mediate IL-17-induced mRNA stability. Here we show that TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), the other IKK-related kinase, directly phosphorylated Act1 on three other Ser sites to suppress IL-17R-mediated NF-κB activation. IL-17 stimulation activated TBK1 and induced its association with Act1. IKKi also phosphorylated Act1 on the three serine sites and played a redundant role with TBK1 in suppressing IL-17-induced NF-κB activation. Act1 phosphorylation on the three sites inhibited its association with TRAF6 and consequently NF-κB activation in IL-17R signaling. Interestingly, TRAF6, but not TRAF3, which is the upstream adaptor of the IKK-related kinases in antiviral signaling, was critical for IL-17-induced Act1 phosphorylation. TRAF6 was essential for IL-17-induced TBK1 activation, its association with Act1, and consequent Act1 phosphorylation. Our findings define a new role for the IKK-related kinases in suppressing IL-17-mediated NF-κB activation through TRAF6-dependent Act1 phosphorylation. PMID:22851696

  2. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induces Stress Granule Formation Depending on Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) in MARC-145 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanrong; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are sites of mRNA storage that are formed in response to various conditions of stress, including viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide since the late 1980s. In this study, we found that infection of PRRSV strain WUH3 (genotype 2 PRRSV) induced stable formation of robust SGs in MARC-145 cells, as demonstrated by the recruitment of marker proteins of SGs, including TIA1, G3BP1, and eIF3η. Treatment with specific inhibitors or siRNAs against the stress kinases that are involved in SG formation revealed that PRRSV induced SG formation through a PERK (protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase)-dependent mechanism. Impairment of SG assembly by concomitant knockdown of the SG marker proteins (TIA1, G3BP1, and TIAR) did not affect PRRSV growth, while significantly enhanced PRRSV-induced NF-κB subunit p65 phosphorylation and inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PRRSV induces SG formation via a PERK-dependent pathway and that SGs are involved in the signaling pathway of the PRRSV-induced inflammatory response in MARC-145 cells.

  3. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  4. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  5. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori, E-mail: fukumoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  6. A Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Is Systemically Induced upon Wounding in Tomato Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico, José Manuel; Raíces, Marcela; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Ulloa, Rita María

    2002-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone (LeCDPK1) from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was isolated by screening a cDNA library from tomato cell cultures exposed to Cladosporium fulvum elicitor preparations. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA reveals a high degree of similarity with other members of the CDPK family. LeCDPK1 has a putative N-terminal myristoylation sequence and presents a possible palmitoylation site. The in vitro translated protein conserves the biochemical properties of a member of the CDPK family. In addition, CDPK activity was detected in soluble and particulate extracts of tomato leaves. Basal levels of LeCDPK1 mRNA were detected by northern-blot analysis in roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of tomato plants. The expression of LeCDPK1 was rapidly and transiently enhanced in detached tomato leaves treated with pathogen elicitors and H2O2. Moreover, when tomato greenhouse plants were subjected to mechanical wounding, a transient increase of LeCDPK1 steady-state mRNA levels was detected locally at the site of the injury and systemically in distant non-wounded leaves. The increase observed in LeCDPK1 mRNA upon wounding correlates with an increase in the amount and in the activity of a soluble CDPK detected in extracts of tomato leaves, suggesting that this kinase is part of physiological plant defense mechanisms against biotic or abiotic attacks. PMID:11788771

  7. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  8. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for cAMP-dependent ......Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c......AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c...

  9. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, Ubc1, indirectly regulates SNF1 kinase activity via Forkhead-dependent transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Jiao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The SNF1 kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study the regulation and function of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK family of serine-threonine protein kinases. Yeast discoveries regarding the regulation of this non-hormonal sensor of metabolic/environmental stress are conserved in higher eukaryotes, including poly-ubiquitination of the α-subunit of yeast (Snf1 and human (AMPKα that ultimately effects subunit stability and enzyme activity. The ubiquitin-cascade enzymes responsible for targeting Snf1 remain unknown, leading us to screen for those that impact SNF1 kinase function. We identified the E2, Ubc1, as a regulator of SNF1 kinase function. The decreased Snf1 abundance found upon deletion of Ubc1 is not due to increased degradation, but instead is partly due to impaired SNF1 gene expression, arising from diminished abundance of the Forkhead 1/2 proteins, previously shown to contribute to SNF1 transcription. Ultimately, we report that the Fkh1/2 cognate transcription factor, Hcm1, fails to enter the nucleus in the absence of Ubc1. This implies that Ubc1 acts indirectly through transcriptional effects to modulate SNF1 kinase activity.

  10. Recruitment of Cln3 cyclin to promoters controls cell cycle entry via histone deacetylase and other targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyin Wang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In yeast, the G1 cyclin Cln3 promotes cell cycle entry by activating the transcription factor SBF. In mammals, there is a parallel system for cell cycle entry in which cyclin dependent kinase (CDK activates transcription factor E2F/Dp. Here we show that Cln3 regulates SBF by at least two different pathways, one involving the repressive protein Whi5, and the second involving Stb1. The Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex is also involved. Cln3 binds to SBF at the CLN2 promoter, and removes previously bound Whi5 and histone deacetylase. Adding extra copies of the SBF binding site to the cell delays Start, possibly by titrating Cln3. Since Rpd3 is the yeast ortholog of mammalian HDAC1, there is now a virtually complete analogy between the proteins regulating cell cycle entry in yeast (SBF, Cln3, Whi5 and Stb1, Rpd3 and mammals (E2F, Cyclin D, Rb, HDAC1. The cell may titrate Cln3 molecules against the number of SBF binding sites, and this could be the underlying basis of the size-control mechanism for Start.

  11. PAC exhibits potent anti-colon cancer properties through targeting cyclin D1 and suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qasem, Abeer; Al-Howail, Huda A; Al-Swailem, Mashael; Al-Mazrou, Amer; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although response rates and overall survival have been improved in recent years, resistance to multiple drug combinations is inevitable. Therefore, the development of more efficient drugs, with fewer side effects is urgently needed. To this end, we have investigated in the present report the effect of PAC, a novel cucumin analogue, on CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that PAC induces apoptosis, mainly via the internal mitochondrial route, and inhibits cell proliferation through delaying the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect was mediated through STAT3-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and its downstream target survivin. Indeed, change in the expression level of cyclin D1 modulated the expression of survivin and the response of CRC cells to PAC. Furthermore, using the ChIP assay, we have shown PAC-dependent reduction in the binding of STAT3 to the cyclin D1 promoter in vivo. Additionally, PAC suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal process through down-regulating the mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and Twist1) and inhibiting the invasion/migration abilities of the CRC cells via repressing the pro-migration/invasion protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2. In addition, PAC inhibited tumor growth and repressed the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways as well as their common downstream effectors cyclin D1 and survivin in humanized CRC xenografts. Collectively, these results indicate that PAC has potent anti-CRC effects, and therefore could constitute an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent, which may consolidate the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR. MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1 mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection.

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity regulates the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Ahrens, Molly J; Wu, Amy; Liu, Jennifer; Dudley, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    For tissues that develop throughout embryogenesis and into postnatal life, the generation of differentiated cells to promote tissue growth is at odds with the requirement to maintain the stem cell/progenitor cell population to preserve future growth potential. In the growth plate cartilage, this balance is achieved in part by establishing a proliferative phase that amplifies the number of progenitor cells prior to terminal differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we show that endogenous calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamkII, also known as Camk2) activity is upregulated prior to hypertrophy and that loss of CamkII function substantially blocks the transition from proliferation to hypertrophy. Wnt signaling and Pthrp-induced phosphatase activity negatively regulate CamkII activity. Release of this repression results in activation of multiple effector pathways, including Runx2- and β-catenin-dependent pathways. We present an integrated model for the regulation of proliferation potential by CamkII activity that has important implications for studies of growth control and adult progenitor/stem cell populations.

  14. Reactive Neutrophil Responses Dependent on the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase c-MET Limit Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glodde, Nicole; Bald, Tobias; van den Boorn-Konijnenberg, Debby; Nakamura, Kyohei; O'Donnell, Jake S; Szczepanski, Sabrina; Brandes, Maria; Eickhoff, Sarah; Das, Indrajit; Shridhar, Naveen; Hinze, Daniel; Rogava, Meri; van der Sluis, Tetje C; Ruotsalainen, Janne J; Gaffal, Evelyn; Landsberg, Jennifer; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Wilhelm, Christoph; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Müller, Andreas J; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Scolyer, Richard A; Long, Georgina V; Janzen, Viktor; Teng, Michele W L; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Smyth, Mark J; Tüting, Thomas; Hölzel, Michael

    2017-10-17

    Inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-MET are currently used in the clinic to target oncogenic signaling in tumor cells. We found that concomitant c-MET inhibition promoted adoptive T cell transfer and checkpoint immunotherapies in murine cancer models by increasing effector T cell infiltration in tumors. This therapeutic effect was independent of tumor cell-intrinsic c-MET dependence. Mechanistically, c-MET inhibition impaired the reactive mobilization and recruitment of neutrophils into tumors and draining lymph nodes in response to cytotoxic immunotherapies. In the absence of c-MET inhibition, neutrophils recruited to T cell-inflamed microenvironments rapidly acquired immunosuppressive properties, restraining T cell expansion and effector functions. In cancer patients, high serum levels of the c-MET ligand HGF correlated with increasing neutrophil counts and poor responses to checkpoint blockade therapies. Our findings reveal a role for the HGF/c-MET pathway in neutrophil recruitment and function and suggest that c-MET inhibitor co-treatment may improve responses to cancer immunotherapy in settings beyond c-MET-dependent tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinase activation profile associated with TGF-β-dependent migration of HCC cells: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransvea, Emilia; Mazzocca, Antonio; Santamato, Angela; Azzariti, Amalia; Antonaci, Salvatore; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2011-07-01

    To identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor cell migration is essential for developing agents that can prevent the relapse or the metastatic spread of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the effects of the transforming growth factor-β receptor I inhibitor LY2109761 on two different human HCC cell lines, in vitro and in vivo. LY2109761 inhibits HCC migration in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition is associated with the decreased phosphorylation of SMAD-2, FAK and β1-integrin, and with increased levels of E-cadherin. By contrast, LY2109761 did not alter the phosphorylation pattern of p38MAPkinase. In a two- and a three-day time-course and in dose-titration experiments, LY2109761 inhibited HCC migration as well as phospho-SMAD-2 and the adhesion proteins. LY2109761 showed the best effect on day 2 at 1 nM and for 3 days at 100 nM concentration. This suggests that maximum effects were sustained for several days and were not dependent on excess concentrations. Finally, in a xenograft model of HCC, LY2109761 strongly inhibits tumor growth, intravasation and metastasis at the aforementioned lower concentrations. In conclusion, inhibition of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) appears to occur at low concentrations of LY2109761 that displays multiple effects on kinases that control HCC cell migration. These findings may help the design of future clinical trials with inhibitors of TGF-β.

  16. Ca(2+ permeable AMPA receptor induced long-term potentiation requires PI3/MAP kinases but not Ca/CaM-dependent kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Asrar

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ influx via GluR2-lacking Ca(2+-permeable AMPA glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs can trigger changes in synaptic efficacy in both interneurons and principle neurons, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We took advantage of genetically altered mice with no or reduced GluR2, thus allowing the expression of synaptic CP-AMPARs, to investigate the molecular signaling process during CP-AMPAR-induced synaptic plasticity at CA1 synapses in the hippocampus. Utilizing electrophysiological techniques, we demonstrated that these receptors were capable of inducing numerous forms of long-term potentiation (referred to as CP-AMPAR dependent LTP through a number of different induction protocols, including high-frequency stimulation (HFS and theta-burst stimulation (TBS. This included a previously undemonstrated form of protein-synthesis dependent late-LTP (L-LTP at CA1 synapses that is NMDA-receptor independent. This form of plasticity was completely blocked by the selective CP-AMPAR inhibitor IEM-1460, and found to be dependent on postsynaptic Ca(2+ ions through calcium chelator (BAPTA studies. Surprisingly, Ca/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII, the key protein kinase that is indispensable for NMDA-receptor dependent LTP at CA1 synapses appeared to be not required for the induction of CP-AMPAR dependent LTP due to the lack of effect of two separate pharmacological inhibitors (KN-62 and staurosporine on this form of potentiation. Both KN-62 and staurosporine strongly inhibited NMDA-receptor dependent LTP in control studies. In contrast, inhibitors for PI3-kinase (LY294002 and wortmannin or the MAPK cascade (PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated this CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP. Similarly, postsynaptic infusion of tetanus toxin (TeTx light chain, an inhibitor of exocytosis, also had a significant inhibitory effect on this form of LTP. These results suggest that distinct synaptic signaling underlies GluR2-lacking CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP, and reinforces

  17. Structure and inhibitor specificity of the PCTAIRE-family kinase CDK16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Krojer, Tobias; Sharpe, Timothy D.; vonDelft, Frank; Sakamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    CDK16 (also known as PCTAIRE1 or PCTK1) is an atypical member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family that has emerged as a key regulator of neurite outgrowth, vesicle trafficking and cancer cell proliferation. CDK16 is activated through binding to cyclin Y via a phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 interaction and has a unique consensus substrate phosphorylation motif compared with conventional CDKs. To elucidate the structure and inhibitor-binding properties of this atypical CDK, we screened the CDK16 kinase domain against different inhibitor libraries and determined the co-structures of identified hits. We discovered that the ATP-binding pocket of CDK16 can accommodate both type I and type II kinase inhibitors. The most potent CDK16 inhibitors revealed by cell-free and cell-based assays were the multitargeted cancer drugs dabrafenib and rebastinib. An inactive DFG-out binding conformation was confirmed by the first crystal structures of CDK16 in separate complexes with the inhibitors indirubin E804 and rebastinib, respectively. The structures revealed considerable conformational plasticity, suggesting that the isolated CDK16 kinase domain was relatively unstable in the absence of a cyclin partner. The unusual structural features and chemical scaffolds identified here hold promise for the development of more selective CDK16 inhibitors and provide opportunity to better characterise the role of CDK16 and its related CDK family members in various physiological and pathological contexts. PMID:28057719

  18. Imidazopyridazine inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum calcium dependent protein kinase 1 also target cGMP-dependent protein kinase and heat shock protein 90 to kill the parasite at different stages of intracellular development.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, JL; Moon, RW; Whalley, D; Bowyer, PW; Wallace, C.; Rochani, A; Nageshan, RK; Howell, SA; Grainger, M.; Jones, HM; Ansell, KH; Chapman, TM; Taylor, DL; Osborne, SA; Baker, DA

    2015-01-01

    : Imidazopyridazine compounds are potent, ATP-competitive inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and of Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro. Here, we show that these compounds can be divided into two classes depending on the nature of the aromatic linker between the core and the R2 substituent group. Class 1 compounds have a pyrimidine linker and inhibit parasite growth at late schizogony, whereas class 2 compounds have a nonpyrimidine linker and inhibit growth in...

  19. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  20. The role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in bile canalicular plasma membrane biogenesis in hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtal, Kacper Andrze

    2007-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase A is one of the most important enzymes in the eukaryotic cell. The function of this protein is strictly in a close relation to the signaling pathways, which trigger the production of intracellular secondary messenger –cAMP. As a consequence of PKA activation numerous

  1. Taurolithocholic acid exerts cholestatic effects via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanisms in perfused rat livers and rat hepatocyte couplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Denk, Gerald U; Soroka, Carol J; Wimmer, Ralf; Rust, Christian; Paumgartner, Gustav; Boyer, James L

    2003-05-16

    Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) is a potent cholestatic agent. Our recent work suggested that TLCA impairs hepatobiliary exocytosis, insertion of transport proteins into apical hepatocyte membranes, and bile flow by protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon)-dependent mechanisms. Products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) stimulate PKCepsilon. We studied the role of PI3K for TLCA-induced cholestasis in isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) and isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC). In IPRL, TLCA (10 micromol/liter) impaired bile flow by 51%, biliary secretion of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of vesicular exocytosis, by 46%, and the Mrp2 substrate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione, by 95% and stimulated PI3K-dependent protein kinase B, a marker of PI3K activity, by 154% and PKCepsilon membrane binding by 23%. In IRHC, TLCA (2.5 micromol/liter) impaired canalicular secretion of the fluorescent bile acid, cholylglycylamido fluorescein, by 50%. The selective PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin (100 nmol/liter), and the anticholestatic bile acid tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 25 micromol/liter) independently and additively reversed the effects of TLCA on bile flow, exocytosis, organic anion secretion, PI3K-dependent protein kinase B activity, and PKCepsilon membrane binding in IPRL. Wortmannin also reversed impaired bile acid secretion in IRHC. These data strongly suggest that TLCA exerts cholestatic effects by PI3K- and PKCepsilon-dependent mechanisms that are reversed by tauroursodeoxycholic acid in a PI3K-independent way.

  2. N-terminal myristoylation is required for membrane localization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); T. Jarchau; S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells harbors a unique isozyme of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK type II) which acts as a key regulator of ion transport systems, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

  3. Identification of a Lifespan Extending Mutation in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cyclin Gene clg1+ by Direct Selection of Long-Lived Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-Ruei; Li, Yanhui; Eisenstatt, Jessica R.; Runge, Kurt W.

    2013-01-01

    Model organisms such as budding yeast, worms and flies have proven instrumental in the discovery of genetic determinants of aging, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a promising new system for these studies. We devised an approach to directly select for long-lived S. pombe mutants from a random DNA insertion library. Each insertion mutation bears a unique sequence tag called a bar code that allows one to determine the proportion of an individual mutant in a culture containing thousands of different mutants. Aging these mutants in culture allowed identification of a long-lived mutant bearing an insertion mutation in the cyclin gene clg1+. Clg1p, like Pas1p, physically associates with the cyclin-dependent kinase Pef1p. We identified a third Pef1p cyclin, Psl1p, and found that only loss of Clg1p or Pef1p extended lifespan. Genetic and co-immunoprecipitation results indicate that Pef1p controls lifespan through the downstream protein kinase Cek1p. While Pef1p is conserved as Pho85p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and as cdk5 in humans, genome-wide searches for lifespan regulators in S. cerevisiae have never identified Pho85p. Thus, the S. pombe system can be used to identify novel, evolutionarily conserved lifespan extending mutations, and our results suggest a potential role for mammalian cdk5 as a lifespan regulator. PMID:23874875

  4. Yeast Cip1 is activated by environmental stress to inhibit Cdk1-G1 cyclins via Mcm1 and Msn2/4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Lan; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Huang, Yu-Ching; Shen, Zih-Jie; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Hsieh, Meng-Hsun; Yang, Chia-Wei; Tognetti, Silvia; Canal, Berta; Subirana, Laia; Wang, Chien-Wei; Chen, Hsiao-Tan; Lin, Chi-Ying; Posas, Francesc; Teng, Shu-Chun

    2017-07-04

    Upon environmental changes, proliferating cells delay cell cycle to prevent further damage accumulation. Yeast Cip1 is a Cdk1 and Cln2-associated protein. However, the function and regulation of Cip1 are still poorly understood. Here we report that Cip1 expression is co-regulated by the cell-cycle-mediated factor Mcm1 and the stress-mediated factors Msn2/4. Overexpression of Cip1 arrests cell cycle through inhibition of Cdk1-G1 cyclin complexes at G1 stage and the stress-activated protein kinase-dependent Cip1 T65, T69, and T73 phosphorylation may strengthen the Cip1and Cdk1-G1 cyclin interaction. Cip1 accumulation mainly targets Cdk1-Cln3 complex to prevent Whi5 phosphorylation and inhibit early G1 progression. Under osmotic stress, Cip1 expression triggers transient G1 delay which plays a functionally redundant role with another hyperosmolar activated CKI, Sic1. These findings indicate that Cip1 functions similarly to mammalian p21 as a stress-induced CDK inhibitor to decelerate cell cycle through G1 cyclins to cope with environmental stresses.A G1 cell cycle regulatory kinase Cip1 has been identified in budding yeast but how this is regulated is unclear. Here the authors identify cell cycle (Mcm1) and stress-mediated (Msn 2/4) transcription factors as regulating Cip1, causing stress induced CDK inhibition and delay in cell cycle progression.

  5. Cdk-related kinase 9 regulates RNA polymerase II mediated transcription in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhijit S; Mitra, Pallabi; Kolagani, Ashok; Gurupwar, Rajkumar

    2018-02-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are an essential part of eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. In Apicomplexan parasites, the role and relevance of the kinases in the multistep process of transcription seeks more attention given the absence of full repertoire of canonical Cdks and cognate cyclin partners. In this study, we functionally characterize T. gondii Cdk-related kinase 9 (TgCrk9) showing maximal homology to eukaryotic Cdk9. An uncanonical cyclin, TgCyclin L, colocalizes with TgCrk9 in the parasite nucleus and co-immunoprecipitate, could activate the kinase in-vitro. We identify two threonines in conserved T-loop domain of TgCrk9 that are important for its activity. The activated TgCrk9 phosphorylates C-terminal domain (CTD) of TgRpb1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II highlighting its role in transcription. Selective chemical inhibition of TgCrk9 affected serine 2 phosphorylation in the heptapeptide repeats of TgRpb1-CTD towards 3' end of genes consistent with a role in transcription elongation. Interestingly, TgCrk9 kinase activity is regulated by the upstream TgCrk7 based CAK complex. TgCrk9 was found to functionally complement the role of its yeast counterpart Bur1 establishing its role as an important transcriptional kinase. In this study, we provide robust evidence that TgCrk9 is an important part of transcription machinery regulating gene expression in T. gondii. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  7. Specificity of ATP-dependent and GTP-dependent protein kinases with respect to ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Kiefer, M C; Traut, R R

    1975-01-01

    of the small ribosomal subunit, and to a lesser extent proteins L7 and L12 or the large subunit. Evidence is presented showing different phosphorylation patterns when either whole subunits or the extracted proteins were used as substrate for the protein kinase. Kinetic studies showed proteins S1 and S4......Two protein kinases differing in substrate specificity were used to phosphorylate the 30-S and the 50-S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli. The catalytic subunit from the rabbit skeletal muscle protein kinase phosphorylates proteins S1, S4, S9, S13 and S18 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L......4, L5, L16, L18 and L23 of the 50-S subunit with (gamma-32P)ATP as phosphoryl donor. A second protein kinase isolated from rabbit reticulocytes, formerly shown to phosphorylate preferentially acidic proteins and to use GTP as well as ATP, strongly phosphorylated protein S6, an acidic protein...

  8. Mutant p53 disrupts the stress MAP kinase activation circuit induced by ASK1-dependent stabilization of Daxx

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamura, Tetsuya; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Inoue, Masahiro; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Shindoh, Masanobu; Rogers, Buck E.; Usheva, Anny; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Daxx is a regulatory protein for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) which activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways in response to stressors such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Here we show that TNFα treatment induces the accumulation of Daxx protein through ASK1 activation by preventing its proteasome-dependent degradation. ASK1 directly phosphorylates Daxx at Ser176 and Ser184 and Daxx is required for the sustained activation of JNK. Tumorigenic mutant p53, which b...

  9. Genetic Activation of ERK5 MAP Kinase Enhances Adult Neurogenesis and Extends Hippocampus-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenes...

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent remodeling of Ca2+ current in pressure overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanggan; Tandan, Samvit; Cheng, Jun; Yang, Chunmei; Nguyen, Lan; Sugianto, Jessica; Johnstone, Janet L; Sun, Yuyang; Hill, Joseph A

    2008-09-12

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is increased in heart failure (HF), a syndrome characterized by markedly increased risk of arrhythmia. Activation of CaMKII increases peak L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and slows I(Ca) inactivation. Whether these events are linked mechanistically is unknown. I(Ca) was recorded in acutely dissociated subepicardial and subendocardial murine left ventricular (LV) myocytes using the whole cell patch clamp method. Pressure overload heart failure was induced by surgical constriction of the thoracic aorta. I(Ca) density was significantly larger in subepicardial myocytes than in subendocardial/myocytes. Similar patterns were observed in the cell surface expression of alpha1c, the channel pore-forming subunit. In failing LV, I(Ca) density was increased proportionately in both cell types, and the time course of I(Ca) inactivation was slowed. This typical pattern of changes suggested a role of CaMKII. Consistent with this, measurements of CaMKII activity revealed a 2-3-fold increase (p process could not be induced, suggesting already maximal activation. Internal application of active CaMKII in failing myocytes did not elicit changes in I(Ca). Finally, CaMKII inhibition by internal diffusion of a specific peptide inhibitor reduced I(Ca) density and inactivation time course to similar levels in control and HF myocytes. I(Ca) density manifests a significant transmural gradient, and this gradient is preserved in heart failure. Activation of CaMKII, a known pro-arrhythmic molecule, is a major contributor to I(Ca) remodeling in load-induced heart failure.

  11. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2017-06-01

    Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3) was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  12. Diacylglycerol kinase epsilon in bovine and rat photoreceptor cells. Light-dependent distribution in photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, Paola M; Zulian, Sandra E; Ilincheta de Boschero, Mónica G; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-07-01

    The present study shows the selective light-dependent distribution of 1,2-diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DAGKɛ) in photoreceptor cells from bovine and albino rat retina. Immunofluorescence microscopy in isolated rod outer segments from bleached bovine retinas (BBROS) revealed a higher DAGKɛ signal than that found in rod outer segments from dark-adapted bovine retinas (BDROS). The light-dependent outer segment localization of DAGKɛ was also observed by immunohistochemistry in retinas from albino rats. DAGK activity, measured in terms of phosphatidic acid formation from a) [(3)H]DAG and ATP in the presence of EGTA and R59022, a type I DAGK inhibitor, or b) [γ-(32)P]ATP and 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (SAG), was found to be significantly higher in BBROS than in BDROS. Higher light-dependent DAGK activity (condition b) was also found when ROS were isolated from dark-adapted rat retinas exposed to light. Western blot analysis of isolated ROS proteins from bovine and rat retinas confirmed that illumination increases DAGKɛ content in the outer segments of these two species. Light-dependent DAGKɛ localization in the outer segment was not observed when U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, was present prior to the exposure of rat eyecups (in situ model) to light. Furthermore, no increased PA synthesis from [(3)H]DAG and ATP was observed in the presence of neomycin prior to the exposure of bovine eyecups to light. Interestingly, when BBROS were pre-phosphorylated with ATP in the presence of 1,2-dioctanoyl sn-glycerol (di-C8) or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) as PKC activation conditions, higher DAGK activity was observed than in dephosphorylated controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that the selective distribution of DAGKɛ in photoreceptor cells is a light-dependent mechanism that promotes increased SAG removal and synthesis of 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid in the sensorial portion of this cell, thus demonstrating a novel mechanism of light

  13. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  14. The nuclear receptor DHR3 modulates dS6 kinase-dependent growth in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Montagne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available S6 kinases (S6Ks act to integrate nutrient and insulin signaling pathways and, as such, function as positive effectors in cell growth and organismal development. However, they also have been shown to play a key role in limiting insulin signaling and in mediating the autophagic response. To identify novel regulators of S6K signaling, we have used a Drosophila-based, sensitized, gain-of-function genetic screen. Unexpectedly, one of the strongest enhancers to emerge from this screen was the nuclear receptor (NR, Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3, a critical constituent in the coordination of Drosophila metamorphosis. Here we demonstrate that DHR3, through dS6K, also acts to regulate cell-autonomous growth. Moreover, we show that the ligand-binding domain (LBD of DHR3 is essential for mediating this response. Consistent with these findings, we have identified an endogenous DHR3 isoform that lacks the DBD. These results provide the first molecular link between the dS6K pathway, critical in controlling nutrient-dependent growth, and that of DHR3, a major mediator of ecdysone signaling, which, acting together, coordinate metamorphosis.

  15. The effect of DNA-dependent protein kinase on adeno-associated virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Kook Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a DNA repair enzyme and plays an important role in determining the molecular fate of the rAAV genome. However, the effect this cellular enzyme on rAAV DNA replication remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we characterized the roles of DNA-PK on recombinant adeno-associated virus DNA replication. Inhibition of DNA-PK by a DNA-PK inhibitor or siRNA targeting DNA-PKcs significantly decreased replication of AAV in MO59K and 293 cells. Southern blot analysis showed that replicated rAAV DNA formed head-to-head or tail-to-tail junctions. The head-to-tail junction was low or undetectable suggesting AAV-ITR self-priming is the major mechanism for rAAV DNA replication. In an in vitro replication assay, anti-Ku80 antibody strongly inhibited rAAV replication, while anti-Ku70 antibody moderately decreased rAAV replication. Similarly, when Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80 was depleted, less replicated rAAV DNA were detected. Finally, we showed that AAV-ITRs directly interacted with Ku proteins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our results showed that that DNA-PK enhances rAAV replication through the interaction of Ku proteins and AAV-ITRs.

  16. Expression of MMPs is dependent on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase in chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhao, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaomeng; Gao, Feng

    2017-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) serve an important role in chondrosarcoma. The present study investigated whether the expression of MMPs was dependent on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in chondrosarcoma. Surgical pathological specimens were collected to detect MMP-1, MMP-13, TIMP-1, type II collagen and phosphorylated MAPK levels in normal cartilage, enchondroma and chondrosarcoma tissues. The expression of MMP‑1, MMP‑13, TIMP‑1 and type II collagen was investigated utilizing MAPK inhibitors in chondrosarcoma cells. It was noted that the expression levels of MMP‑1, MMP‑13 and TIMP‑1 were increased in chondrosarcoma with the activity of MAPK. After chondrosarcoma cells were pretreated with MAPK inhibitors, the levels of MMP‑1, MMP‑13 and TIMP‑1 were inhibited. Furthermore, MMP‑1 and MMP‑13 are essential in regulating the degradation of type II collagen and decomposing cartilage matrix major. The high expression levels of MMP‑1 and MMP‑13 in chondrosarcoma expedite the invasion by chondrosarcoma cells and their expression can be depressed by MAPK inhibitors.

  17. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX, the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults.

  18. Gametogenesis in malaria parasites is mediated by the cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobert, Louisa; Taylor, Cathy J; Deng, Wensheng; Fivelman, Quinton L; Cummings, Ross M; Polley, Spencer D; Billker, Oliver; Baker, David A

    2008-06-03

    Malaria parasite transmission requires differentiation of male and female gametocytes into gametes within a mosquito following a blood meal. A mosquito-derived molecule, xanthurenic acid (XA), can trigger gametogenesis, but the signalling events controlling this process in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remain unknown. A role for cGMP was revealed by our observation that zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases that hydrolyse cGMP) stimulates gametogenesis in the absence of XA. Using cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors in conjunction with transgenic parasites expressing an inhibitor-insensitive mutant PKG enzyme, we demonstrate that PKG is essential for XA- and zaprinast-induced gametogenesis. Furthermore, we show that intracellular calcium (Ca2+) is required for differentiation and acts downstream of or in parallel with PKG activation. This work defines a key role for PKG in gametogenesis, elucidates the hierarchy of signalling events governing this process in P. falciparum, and demonstrates the feasibility of selective inhibition of a crucial regulator of the malaria parasite life cycle.

  19. Gametogenesis in malaria parasites is mediated by the cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa McRobert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasite transmission requires differentiation of male and female gametocytes into gametes within a mosquito following a blood meal. A mosquito-derived molecule, xanthurenic acid (XA, can trigger gametogenesis, but the signalling events controlling this process in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remain unknown. A role for cGMP was revealed by our observation that zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases that hydrolyse cGMP stimulates gametogenesis in the absence of XA. Using cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG inhibitors in conjunction with transgenic parasites expressing an inhibitor-insensitive mutant PKG enzyme, we demonstrate that PKG is essential for XA- and zaprinast-induced gametogenesis. Furthermore, we show that intracellular calcium (Ca2+ is required for differentiation and acts downstream of or in parallel with PKG activation. This work defines a key role for PKG in gametogenesis, elucidates the hierarchy of signalling events governing this process in P. falciparum, and demonstrates the feasibility of selective inhibition of a crucial regulator of the malaria parasite life cycle.

  20. An ant-plant mutualism through the lens of cGMP-dependent kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Turner, Kyle M; Doha, Manjima; Anreiter, Ina; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B; Frederickson, Megan E

    2017-09-13

    In plant-animal mutualisms, how an animal forages often determines how much benefit its plant partner receives. In many animals, foraging behaviour changes in response to foraging gene expression or activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) that foraging encodes. Here, we show that this highly conserved molecular mechanism affects the outcome of a plant-animal mutualism. We studied the two PKG genes of Allomerus octoarticulatus, an Amazonian ant that defends the ant-plant Cordia nodosa against herbivores. Some ant colonies are better 'bodyguards' than others. Working in the field in Peru, we found that colonies fed with a PKG activator recruited more workers to attack herbivores than control colonies. This resulted in less herbivore damage. PKG gene expression in ant workers correlated with whether an ant colony discovered an herbivore and how much damage herbivores inflicted on leaves in a complex way; natural variation in expression levels of the two genes had significant interaction effects on ant behaviour and herbivory. Our results suggest a molecular basis for ant protection of plants in this mutualism. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Endocytosis of somatodendritic NCKX2 is regulated by Src family kinase-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Hee eLee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that the surface expression of K+-dependent Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 2 (NCKX2 in the somatodendritic compartment is kept low by constitutive endocytosis, which results in the polarization of surface NCKX2 to the axon. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is initiated by interaction of the μ subunit of adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2 with the canonical tyrosine motif (YxxΦ of a target molecule. We examined whether endocytosis of NCKX2 involves two putative tyrosine motifs (365YGKL and 371YDTM in the cytoplasmic loop of NCKX2. Coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that the 365YGKL motif is essential for the interaction with the μ subunit of AP-2 (AP2M1. Consistently, either overexpression of NCKX2-Y365A mutant or knockdown of AP2M1 in cultured hippocampal neurons significantly reduced the internalization of NCKX2 from the somatodendritic surface and thus abolished the axonal polarization of surface NCKX2. Next, we tested whether the interaction between the tyrosine motif and AP2M1 is regulated by phosphorylation of the 365th tyrosine residue (Tyr-365. Tyrosine phosphorylation of heterologously expressed NCKX2-WT, but not NCKX2-Y365A, was increased by carbachol in PC-12 cells. The effect of carbachol was inhibited by PP2, a Src family kinase (SFK inhibitor. Moreover, PP2 facilitated the endocytosis of NCKX2 in both the somatodendritic and axonal compartments, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of NCKX2 by SFK negatively regulates its endocytosis. Supporting this idea, activation of SFK enhanced the NCKX activity in the proximal dendrites of dentate granule cells. These results suggest that endocytosis of somatodendritic NCKX2 is regulated by SFK-dependent phosphorylation of Tyr-365.

  2. Urea-Dependent Adenylate Kinase Activation following Redistribution of Structural States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogne, Per; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-10-04

    Proteins are often functionally dependent on conformational changes that allow them to sample structural states that are sparsely populated in the absence of a substrate or binding partner. The distribution of such structural microstates is governed by their relative stability, and the kinetics of their interconversion is governed by the magnitude of associated activation barriers. Here, we have explored the interplay among structure, stability, and function of a selected enzyme, adenylate kinase (Adk), by monitoring changes in its enzymatic activity in response to additions of urea. For this purpose we used a 31P NMR assay that was found useful for heterogeneous sample compositions such as presence of urea. It was found that Adk is activated at low urea concentrations whereas higher urea concentrations unfolds and thereby deactivates the enzyme. From a quantitative analysis of chemical shifts, it was found that urea redistributes preexisting structural microstates, stabilizing a substrate-bound open state at the expense of a substrate-bound closed state. Adk is rate-limited by slow opening of substrate binding domains and the urea-dependent redistribution of structural states is consistent with a model where the increased activity results from an increased rate-constant for domain opening. In addition, we also detected a strong correlation between the catalytic free energy and free energy of substrate (ATP) binding, which is also consistent with the catalytic model for Adk. From a general perspective, it appears that urea can be used to modulate conformational equilibria of folded proteins toward more expanded states for cases where a sizeable difference in solvent-accessible surface area exists between the states involved. This effect complements the action of osmolytes, such as trimethylamine N-oxide, that favor more compact protein states. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TCR comodulation of nonengaged TCR takes place by a protein kinase C and CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Rasmussen, B. A.; Lauritsen, J P

    2003-01-01

    of comodulation. Like internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was dependent on protein tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, we found that in contrast to internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was highly dependent on protein kinase C activity and the CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif. Based...

  4. Dbf4-dependent kinase and the Rtt107 scaffold promote Mus81-Mms4 resolvase activation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Lissa N; Wild, Philipp; Bittmann, Julia; Aguado, F Javier; Blanco, Miguel G; Matos, Joao; Pfander, Boris

    2017-03-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is under stringent cell cycle control. This includes the last step of the reaction, disentanglement of DNA joint molecules (JMs). Previous work has established that JM resolving nucleases are activated specifically at the onset of mitosis. In case of budding yeast Mus81-Mms4, this cell cycle stage-specific activation is known to depend on phosphorylation by CDK and Cdc5 kinases. Here, we show that a third cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK), targets Mus81-Mms4 in conjunction with Cdc5-both kinases bind to as well as phosphorylate Mus81-Mms4 in an interdependent manner. Moreover, DDK-mediated phosphorylation of Mms4 is strictly required for Mus81 activation in mitosis, establishing DDK as a novel regulator of homologous recombination. The scaffold protein Rtt107, which binds the Mus81-Mms4 complex, interacts with Cdc7 and thereby targets DDK and Cdc5 to the complex enabling full Mus81 activation. Therefore, Mus81 activation in mitosis involves at least three cell cycle kinases, CDK, Cdc5 and DDK Furthermore, tethering of the kinases in a stable complex with Mus81 is critical for efficient JM resolution. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  5. Characterization of cyclin E expression in multiple myeloma and its functional role in seliciclib-induced apoptotic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Josefsberg Ben-Yehoshua

    Full Text Available Multiple Myeloma (MM is a lymphatic neoplasm characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cell that eventually develops resistance to chemotherapy. Drug resistance, differentiation block and increased survival of the MM tumor cells result from high genomic instability. Chromosomal translocations, the most common genomic alterations in MM, lead to dysregulation of cyclin D, a regulatory protein that governs the activation of key cell cycle regulator--cyclin dependent kinase (CDK. Genomic instability was reported to be affected by over expression of another CDK regulator--cyclin E (CCNE. This occurs early in tumorigenesis in various lymphatic malignancies including CLL, NHL and HL. We therefore sought to investigate the role of cyclin E in MM. CCNE1 expression was found to be heterogeneous in various MM cell lines (hMMCLs. Incubation of hMMCLs with seliciclib, a selective CDK-inhibitor, results in apoptosis which is accompanied by down regulation of MCL1 and p27. Ectopic over expression of CCNE1 resulted in reduced sensitivity of the MM tumor cells in comparison to the paternal cell line, whereas CCNE1 silencing with siRNA increased the cell sensitivity to seliciclib. Adhesion to FN of hMMCLs was prevented by seliciclib, eliminating adhesion-mediated drug resistance of MM cells. Combination of seliciclib with flavopiridol effectively reduced CCNE1 and CCND1 protein levels, increased subG1 apoptotic fraction and promoted MM cell death in BMSCs co-culture conditions, therefore over-coming stroma-mediated protection. We suggest that seliciclib may be considered as essential component of modern anti MM drug combination therapy.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  7. Toxoplasma DJ-1 Regulates Organelle Secretion by a Direct Interaction with Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Matthew A; Garland, Megan; Foe, Ian; Madzelan, Peter; Treeck, Moritz; van der Linden, Wouter A; Oresic Bender, Kristina; Weerapana, Eranthie; Wilson, Mark A; Boothroyd, John C; Reese, Michael L; Bogyo, Matthew

    2017-02-28

    Human DJ-1 is a highly conserved and yet functionally enigmatic protein associated with a heritable form of Parkinson's disease. It has been suggested to be a redox-dependent regulatory scaffold, binding to proteins to modulate their function. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the Toxoplasma orthologue Toxoplasma gondii DJ-1 (TgDJ-1) at 2.1-Å resolution and show that it directly associates with calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1). The TgDJ-1 structure identifies an orthologously conserved arginine dyad that acts as a phospho-gatekeeper motif to control complex formation. We determined that the binding of TgDJ-1 to CDPK1 is sensitive to oxidation and calcium, and that this interaction potentiates CDPK1 kinase activity. Finally, we show that genetic deletion of TgDJ-1 results in upregulation of CDPK1 expression and that disruption of the CDPK1/TgDJ-1 complex in vivo prevents normal exocytosis of parasite virulence-associated organelles called micronemes. Overall, our data suggest that TgDJ-1 functions as a noncanonical kinase-regulatory scaffold that integrates multiple intracellular signals to tune microneme exocytosis in T. gondii IMPORTANCE Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium are obligate intracellular parasites that require the protective environment of a host cell in order to replicate and survive within a host organism. These parasites secrete effector proteins from specialized apical organelles to select and invade a chosen host cell. The secretion of these organelles is a tightly regulated process coordinated by endogenous small molecules and calcium-dependent protein kinases. We previously identified the Toxoplasma orthologue of the highly conserved protein DJ-1 as a regulator of microneme secretion, but the molecular basis for this was not known. We have now identified the molecular mechanism for how TgDJ-1 regulates microneme secretion. TgDJ-1 interacts with the kinase responsible for the secretion of these

  8. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  9. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress survival, and fertility in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases (Ca(2+)/CaMKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases that respond to change in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c) and play multiple cellular roles in organisms ranging from fungi to humans. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, four Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases, Ca(2+)/CaMK-1 to 4, are encoded by the genes NCU09123, NCU02283, NCU06177, and NCU09212, respectively. We found that camk-1 and camk-2 are essential for full fertility in N. crassa. The survival of ∆camk-2 mutant was increased in induced thermotolerance and oxidative stress conditions. In addition, the ∆camk-1 ∆camk-2, ∆camk-4 ∆camk-2, and ∆camk-3 ∆camk-2 double mutants display slow growth phenotype, reduced aerial hyphae, decreased thermotolerance, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, revealing the genetic interactions among these kinases. Therefore, Ca(2+)/CaMKs are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress tolerance, and fertility in N. crassa.

  10. Identification and characterization of CKLiK, a novel granulocyteCa^(++)/calmodulin-dependent kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verploegen, Sandra; Lammers, J.W.J.; Koenderman, L.; Coffer, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Human granulocytes are characterized by a variety of specific effector functions involved in host defense. Several widely expressed protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of these effector functions. A polymerase chain reaction- based strategy was used to identify

  11. Small molecule kinase inhibitors block the ZAK-dependent inflammatory effects of doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, John; Smith, Logan B; Magun, Eli A

    2013-01-01

    The adverse side effects of doxorubicin, including cardiotoxicity and cancer treatment-related fatigue, have been associated with inflammatory cytokines, many of which are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). ZAK is an upstream kinase of the MAPK cascade. Using mouse primary......, by reducing the production of inflammatory mediators, the inhibitors identified in the current study may be useful in minimizing the side effects of doxorubicin and potentially other chemotherapeutic drugs....

  12. HIV-1 causes CD4 cell death through DNA-dependent protein kinase during viral integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Arik; García, Mayra; Petrovas, Constantinos; Yamamoto, Takuya; Koup, Richard A; Nabel, Gary J

    2013-06-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) has infected more than 60 million people and caused nearly 30 million deaths worldwide, ultimately the consequence of cytolytic infection of CD4(+) T cells. In humans and in macaque models, most of these cells contain viral DNA and are rapidly eliminated at the peak of viraemia, yet the mechanism by which HIV-1 induces helper T-cell death has not been defined. Here we show that virus-induced cell killing is triggered by viral integration. Infection by wild-type HIV-1, but not an integrase-deficient mutant, induced the death of activated primary CD4 lymphocytes. Similarly, raltegravir, a pharmacologic integrase inhibitor, abolished HIV-1-induced cell killing both in cell culture and in CD4(+) T cells from acutely infected subjects. The mechanism of killing during viral integration involved the activation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a central integrator of the DNA damage response, which caused phosphorylation of p53 and histone H2AX. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK abolished cell death during HIV-1 infection in vitro, suggesting that processes which reduce DNA-PK activation in CD4 cells could facilitate the formation of latently infected cells that give rise to reservoirs in vivo. We propose that activation of DNA-PK during viral integration has a central role in CD4(+) T-cell depletion, raising the possibility that integrase inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PK may improve T-cell survival and immune function in infected individuals.

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase has diet-dependent and -independent roles in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2016-12-01

    Multiple aspects of organismal physiology influence the number and activity of stem cells and their progeny, including nutritional status. Previous studies demonstrated that Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs), follicle stem cells (FSCs), and their progeny sense and respond to diet via complex mechanisms involving many systemic and local signals. AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK, is a highly conserved regulator of energy homeostasis known to be activated under low cellular energy conditions; however, its role in the ovarian response to diet has not been investigated. Here, we describe nutrient-dependent and -independent requirements for AMPK in Drosophila oogenesis. We found that AMPK is cell autonomously required for the slow down in GSC and follicle cell proliferation that occurs on a poor diet. Similarly, AMPK activity is necessary in the germline for the degeneration of vitellogenic stages in response to nutrient deprivation. In contrast, AMPK activity is not required within the germline to modulate its growth. Instead, AMPK acts in follicle cells to negatively regulate their growth and proliferation, thereby indirectly limiting the size of the underlying germline cyst within developing follicles. Paradoxically, AMPK is required for GSC maintenance in well-fed flies (when AMPK activity is presumably at its lowest), suggesting potentially important roles for basal AMPK activity in specific cell types. Finally, we identified a nutrient-independent, developmental role for AMPK in cyst encapsulation by follicle cells. These results uncover specific AMPK requirements in multiple cell types in the ovary and suggest that AMPK can function outside of its canonical nutrient-sensing role in specific developmental contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2 in the brain of Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, L; Hincke, M T

    1999-05-31

    Antibodies directed against the mammalian alpha and beta subunits of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2 (CaMK2) and brain dissection were used for immunoblot analysis of these proteins in various brain regions of Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Western blots revealed that the CaMK2alpha antibody labeled a single band of the expected molecular mass (approximately 50 kDa) for this enzyme in rat cortex and electric fish brain. CaMK2alpha was enriched in fish forebrain and hypothalamus and also strongly expressed in midbrain sensory areas. Western blots revealed that CaMK2beta antibodies labeled bands in an appropriate molecular mass range (approximately 58-64 kDa) for this enzyme in mammalian cortex and electric fish brain. However, a higher molecular mass band (approximately 80 kDa) was also labeled; because all these bands were eliminated by preadsorbtion with the CaMK2-derived peptide antigen, they may all represent CaMK2beta-like isoforms. We mapped the brain distribution of CaMK2 isoforms with emphasis on the electrosensory system. CaMK2alpha was present at high density in dorsal forebrain, hypothalamic nuclei, torus semicircularis, and tectum. It was also enriched in discrete fiber tracts in forebrain, diencephalon, and rhombencephalon. CaMK2beta-like isoforms were enriched in ventral forebrain, hypothalamic nuclei, torus semicircularis and the reticular formation. Unlike CaMK2alpha, CaMK2beta -like isoforms were predominantly present in cell bodies and rarely found in fiber tracts or neuropil. In the electrosensory lateral line lobe, CaMK2alpha was restricted to specific feedback fibers, i.e., tractus stratum fibrosum and its terminal field in the ventral molecular layer. In contrast, CaMK2beta-like isoforms were enriched in somata and dendrites of pyramidal cells and granular interneurons.

  15. Interactions of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in monocyte adherence and TNFalpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, M R; Arbabi, S; Garcia, I; Maier, R V

    2000-03-01

    The circulating monocyte possesses a markedly different functional phenotype relative to the macrophage (Mphi). The adhesive interactions encountered by the monocyte, en route to the inflammatory focus, generate signals that culminate in the expression of a pro-inflammatory Mphi phenotype, marked by enhanced cytokine production. Previously, we demonstrated that calcium and calmodulin are essential for maximal Mphi activation and, in particular, TNFalpha production. These effects are likely to be mediated through signal transduction kinases that require the calcium/calmodulin complex. Here, we investigated the effect of adherence on calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and IV activation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 cascade and on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production by human monocytes. Adherence activated ERK 1/2 and led to an 8-fold potentiation in LPS-induced TNFalpha production over similarly stimulated non-adherent cells. Inhibition of CaMK II prior to adherence prevented ERK 1/2 activation and attenuated by up to 40%, the TNFalpha response to subsequent LPS stimulation. CaMK II inhibition after adherence, however, failed to modify cytokine release. Inhibition of CaMK IV, both after adherence and in non-adherent monocytes, significantly inhibited LPS-induced ERK 1/2 activation and abrogated TNFalpha production by up to 75%. These data suggest that the function of CaMK II in TNFalpha production by adherent monocytes occurs during adhesion, is mediated in part by activation of ERK 1/2, and appears to "prime" the monocyte for enhanced cytokine production. CaMK IV, through activation of ERK 1/2, appears to have a direct role in the LPS signal transduction for TNFalpha production.

  16. Genome-wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase and Its Closely Related Kinase Genes in Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanyang ecai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs play important roles in regulating the downstream components of calcium signaling, which are ubiquitously involved in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a comprehensive analysis of genes encoding pepper CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs was performed, and 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CaCPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the Capsicum annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and eight CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

  17. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  18. Bradykinin and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in rat Leydig cells by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we report that bradykinin stimulated phospholipase D activity in rat Leydig cells. Bradykinin added for 8 min stimulated choline formation in a dose-dependent manner and, in the presence of ethanol, bradykinin (100 nmol/l) stimulated transphosphatidylation by phospholipase D...... resulting in the formation of phosphatidylethanol. This stimulation was abolished after down-regulation of protein kinase C by long-term pretreatment for 22 h with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The stimulation of phospholipase D by the simultaneous addition for 8 min of maximum concentrations...... of PMA and vasopressin (AVP), PMA and bradykinin, or AVP and bradykinin produced no additive phosphatidylethanol or choline response, suggesting that AVP, bradykinin and PMA stimulated phospholipase D catalysed phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by a similar protein kinase C-dependent mechanism. Furthermore...

  19. Roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in long-term memory formation in crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mizunami

    Full Text Available Ca(2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is a key molecule in many systems of learning and memory in vertebrates, but roles of CaMKII in invertebrates have not been characterized in detail. We have suggested that serial activation of NO/cGMP signaling, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, Ca(2+/CaM and cAMP signaling participates in long-term memory (LTM formation in olfactory conditioning in crickets, and here we show participation of CaMKII in LTM formation and propose its site of action in the biochemical cascades. Crickets subjected to 3-trial conditioning to associate an odor with reward exhibited memory that lasts for a few days, which is characterized as protein synthesis-dependent LTM. In contrast, animals subjected to 1-trial conditioning exhibited memory that lasts for only several hours (mid-term memory, MTM. Injection of a CaMKII inhibitor prior to 3-trial conditioning impaired 1-day memory retention but not 1-hour memory retention, suggesting that CaMKII participates in LTM formation but not in MTM formation. Animals injected with a cGMP analogue, calcium ionophore or cAMP analogue prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention, and co-injection of a CaMKII inhibitor impaired induction of LTM by the cGMP analogue or that by the calcium ionophore but not that by the cAMP analogue, suggesting that CaMKII is downstream of cGMP production and Ca(2+ influx and upstream of cAMP production in biochemical cascades for LTM formation. Animals injected with an adenylyl cyclase (AC activator prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention. Interestingly, a CaMKII inhibitor impaired LTM induction by the AC activator, although AC is expected to be a downstream target of CaMKII. The results suggest that CaMKII interacts with AC to facilitate cAMP production for LTM formation. We propose that CaMKII serves as a key molecule for interplay between Ca(2+ signaling and cAMP signaling for LTM formation, a new role of Ca

  20. Conditioned taste aversion and Ca/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in the parabrachial nucleus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, J

    2001-07-01

    Bielavska and colleagues (Bielavska, Sacchetti, Baldi, & Tassoni, 1999) have recently shown that KN-62, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaCMK), induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) when introduced into the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of rats. The aim of the present report was to assess whether activity of CaCMK in the PBN is changed during CTA. We induced CTA in one group of rats by pairing saccharin consumption with an ip injection of lithium chloride. Another group of rats received lithium alone (without being paired with saccharin consumption) to test whether lithium has an effect on CaCMK in the PBN, independent of those effects due to training. In animals receiving CTA training, CaCMK activity in extracts of PBN was reduced by approximately 30% at the postacquisition intervals of 12, 24, and 48 h, compared to control animals receiving saccharin with saline injection. By 120 h after CTA training, no effect on CaCMK was present. At those postacquisition intervals showing CaCMK activity effects due to CTA, there were no effects attributable to lithium alone. Lithium alone produced only a short-lasting reduction in CaCMK activity (at 20 min a 30% decrease, at 60 min a 23% decrease; and at 6, 12, and 24 h no decrease). The time course of lithium-induced effects differed markedly from that of CTA training. All changes were Ca2+/- -dependent; we did not observe any changes in Ca-independent activity. CTA effects on CaCMK were selective for PBN, insofar as we did not observe any CTA effects on CaCMK in the visual cortex, a brain region unrelated to taste pathways. Since CTA produces a relatively long-lasting reduction in CaCMK activity (lasting 2 days or more) specifically in the PBN, which is critical a relay for taste information, the reduction of CaCMK activity may enable the consolidation of taste memory in an aversive situation.

  1. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates hippocampal glutamatergic plasticity during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guofu; Van Sickle, Bradley J; Tietz, Elizabeth I

    2010-08-01

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal anxiety is associated with potentiation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons attributable to increased synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing AMPARs. The contribution of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to enhanced glutamatergic synaptic strength during withdrawal from 1-week oral flurazepam (FZP) administration was further examined in hippocampal slices. As earlier reported, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude increased in CA1 neurons from 1- and 2-day FZP-withdrawn rats, along with increased single-channel conductance in neurons from 2-day rats, estimated by non-stationary noise analysis. Input-output curve slope was increased without a change in paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting increased AMPAR postsynaptic efficacy rather than altered glutamate release. The increased mEPSC amplitude and AMPAR conductance were related to CaMKII activity, as intracellular inclusion of CaMKIINtide or autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, but not scrambled peptide, prevented both AMPAR amplitude and conductance changes. mEPSC inhibition by 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine and the negative shift in rectification index at both withdrawal time points were consistent with functional incorporation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs. GluA1 but not GluA2 or GluA3 levels were increased in immunoblots of postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched subcellular fractions of CA1 minislices from 1-day FZP-withdrawn rats, when mEPSC amplitude, but not conductance, was increased. Both GluA1 expression levels and CaMKII alpha-mediated GluA1 Ser(831) phosphorylation were increased in PSD-subfractions from 2-day FZP-withdrawn rats. As phospho-Thr(286)CaMKII alpha was unchanged, CaMKII alpha may be activated through an alternative signaling pathway. Synaptic insertion and subsequent CaMKII alpha-mediated Ser(831) phosphorylation of GluA1 homomers

  2. Biodentine induces human dental pulp stem cell differentiation through mitogen-activated protein kinase and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhirong; Kohli, Meetu R; Yu, Qing; Kim, Syngcuk; Qu, Tiejun; He, Wen-xi

    2014-07-01

    Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossès, France), a new tricalcium silicate cement formulation, has been introduced as a bioactive dentine substitute to be used in direct contact with pulp tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to the material and whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signal pathways played a regulatory role in Biodentine-induced odontoblast differentiation. hDPCs obtained from impacted third molars were incubated with Biodentine. Odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the analysis of messenger RNA expression of the following differentiation gene markers: osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Cell cultures in the presence of Biodentine were exposed to specific inhibitors of MAPK (U0126, SB203580, and SP600125), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), and CaMKII (KN-93) pathways to evaluate the regulatory effect on the expression of these markers and mineralization assay. Biodentine significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation and the expression of OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP. The MAPK inhibitor for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (U0126) and Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125) significantly decreased the Biodentine-induced mineralized differentiation of hDPSCs and OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP messenger RNA expression, whereas p38 MAPK inhibitors (SB203580) had no effect. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 significantly attenuated and the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate further enhanced the up-regulation of Biodentine-induced gene expression and mineralization. Biodentine is a bioactive and biocompatible material capable

  3. The calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 from Toxoplasma gondii as target for structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardew, Emily M; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Pohl, Ehmke

    2018-02-01

    The apicomplexan protozoan parasites include the causative agents of animal and human diseases ranging from malaria (Plasmodium spp.) to toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii). The complex life cycle of T. gondii is regulated by a unique family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) that have become the target of intensive efforts to develop new therapeutics. In this review, we will summarize structure-based strategies, recent successes and future directions in the pursuit of specific and selective inhibitors of T. gondii CDPK1.

  4. Reduced surface expression of epithelial E-cadherin evoked by interferon-gamma is Fyn kinase-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Smyth

    Full Text Available Interferon gamma (IFNγ is an important regulatory cytokine that can exert a pro-inflammatory effect in the gut, where it has been shown to increase epithelial permeability via disruption of the tight junctions. Here we investigated the potential for IFNγ to regulate the adherens junction protein E-cadherin, an important mediator of normal epithelial tissue function, using the model T84 human colonic epithelial cell line. IFNγ (10 ng/ml stimulated increased internalization of E-cadherin as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy; internalization was reversed when cells were treated with PP1 (125 nM, a Src kinase-selective inhibitor. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated loss of E-cadherin from membrane fractions following IFNγ treatment and a corresponding increase in cytosolic E-cadherin and its binding partners, p120-catenin and beta-catenin: effects that were Src-kinase dependent. E-cadherin and p120-catenin phosphorylation was increased by IFNγ treatment and siRNA studies showed this was dependent upon the Src-kinase isoform Fyn. E-cadherin ubiquitinylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation stimulated by IFNγ was found to be dependent upon Fyn and the E-cadherin-selective ubiquitin ligase, Hakai. Use of Fyn and Hakai siRNA inhibited the internalization of E-cadherin as shown by immunoblotting and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Finally, IFNγ treatment resulted in a more fragile T84 cell monolayer with increased cell detachment in response to physical stress, which was prevented by PP1 and siRNA targeting Fyn or Hakai. Collectively, these results demonstrate a Fyn kinase-dependent mechanism through which IFNγ regulates E-cadherin stability and suggest a novel mechanism of disruption of epithelial cell contact, which could contribute to perturbed epithelial barrier function.

  5. Biotic and abiotic stress responses through calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) signaling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aili; Wang, Xiang; Leseberg, Charles H; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2008-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) sense the calcium concentration changes in plant cells and play important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses as indicated by emerging evidences. Among the 20 wheat CDPK genes studied, 10 were found to respond to drought, salinity and ABA treatments. Consistent with previous observations, one CDPK gene was shown to respond to multiple abiotic stresses in wheat suggesting that CDPKs could be converging points...

  6. MAP Kinase Pathway–dependent Phosphorylation of the L1-CAM Ankyrin Binding Site Regulates Neuronal Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Whittard, John D.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Cassella, Melanie R.; Gazdoiu, Mihaela; Felsenfeld, Dan P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of neuronal processes depends critically on the function of adhesion proteins that link extracellular ligands to the cytoskeleton. The neuronal adhesion protein L1-CAM serves as a receptor for nerve growth–promoting proteins, a process that is inhibited by the interaction between L1-CAM and the cytoskeleton adaptor ankyrin. Using a novel reporter based on intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have determined that the MAP kinase pathway regulates the phosphory...

  7. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635) by a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Hwang, Jinah; Sykes, Michelle; Michell, Belinda J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Lum, Hazel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production by phosphorylating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1179) in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. The eNOS has additional potential phosphorylation sites, including Ser(116), Thr(497), and Ser(635). Here, we studied these potential phosphorylation sites in response to shear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and 8-bromocAMP (8-BRcAMP) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). All three stimuli induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635), which was consistently slower than that at Ser(1179). Thr(497) was rapidly dephosphorylated by 8-BRcAMP but not by shear and VEGF. None of the stimuli phosphorylated Ser(116). Whereas shear-stimulated Ser(635) phosphorylation was not affected by phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, it was blocked by either treating the cells with a PKA inhibitor H89 or infecting them with a recombinant adenovirus-expressing PKA inhibitor. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates eNOS by two different mechanisms: 1) PKA- and PI3K-dependent and 2) PKA-dependent but PI3K-independent pathways. Phosphorylation of Ser(635) may play an important role in chronic regulation of eNOS in response to mechanical and humoral stimuli.

  8. Induction of cyclins E and A in response to mitogen removal: a basic alteration associated with the arrest of differentiation of C2 myoblasts transformed by simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, D; Baron, L; Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1997-03-01

    We previously showed that C2 myoblasts transformed by simian virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT) stop the myogenic process after the induction of myogenin and of high Rb levels; the induced Rb, however, becomes notably phosphorylated. We have analyzed the protein levels and activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) in untransformed C2 cells and in transformants of either SVLT or the cytoplasmic mutant NKT1 (which permits differentiation) upon a shift from growth medium (GM) to mitogen-poor differentiation medium (DM). After the shift, cdk4 levels remained constant and cdk6 levels decreased in all cell types; cdk2 minimally increased only in SVLT cells. Cyclin D1 was downregulated in DM in all cell types, and cyclin D3 was upregulated (albeit less strongly in SVLT cells than in the others). In contrast, a dramatic difference between SVLT cells and the other cells was observed for cyclins E and A, which essentially disappeared (as protein and RNA) in normal C2 and NKT1 cells upon the shift from GM to DM, whereas they increased in SVLT cells. Concurrently, cdk2 activity ceased in C2 and NKT1 cells in DM, whereas it persisted at 20% of the GM level in SVLT cells. cdk4 activity was detectable in all cells only in GM. Cyclin E and A induction thus appeared to sustain enough Rb phosphorylation to interfere with tissue-specific expression, with cdk activity not high enough to activate cyclin self-regulation. In DM, cdk2 complexed to D3 was underphosphorylated in all cells, and SVLT allowed strong inductions of p21 and p27 without affecting their complexes with cdks.

  9. Activation of the Cph1-dependent MAP kinase signaling pathway induces white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Ramírez-Zavala

    Full Text Available Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white to an elongated cell type (opaque, which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11(ΔN467 efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11(ΔN467-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase.

  10. Activation of the Cph1-dependent MAP kinase signaling pathway induces white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Zavala, Bernardo; Weyler, Michael; Gildor, Tsvia; Schmauch, Christian; Kornitzer, Daniel; Arkowitz, Robert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white) to an elongated cell type (opaque), which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11(ΔN467)) efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11(ΔN467)-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase.

  11. The lethal response to Cdk1 inhibition depends on sister chromatid alignment errors generated by KIF4 and isoform 1 of PRC1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Voets (Erik); J. Marsman (Judith); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); R.L. Beijersbergen (Roderick); R. Wolthuis (Rob)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is absolutely essential for cell division. Complete ablation of Cdk1 precludes the entry of G2 phase cells into mitosis, and is early embryonic lethal in mice. Dampening Cdk1 activation, by reducing gene expression or upon treatment with cell-permeable

  12. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  13. Differential effect of shear stress on extracellular signal-regulated kinase and N-terminal Jun kinase in endothelial cells. Gi2- and Gbeta/gamma-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, H; Sipos, K; Go, Y M; Law, R; Rong, J; McDonald, J M

    1997-01-10

    Shear stress differentially regulates production of many vasoactive factors at the level of gene expression in endothelial cells that may be mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and N-terminal Jun kinase (JNK). Here we show, using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), that shear stress differentially regulates ERK and JNK by mechanisms involving Gi2 and pertussis toxin (PTx)-insensitive G-protein-dependent pathways, respectively. Shear activated ERK with a rapid, biphasic time course (maximum by 5 min and basal by 30-min shear exposure) and force dependence (minimum and maximum at 1 and 10 dyn/cm2 shear stress, respectively). PTx treatment prevented shear-dependent activation of ERK1/2, consistent with a Gi-dependent mechanism. In contrast, JNK activity was maximally turned on by a threshold level of shear force (0.5 dyn/cm2 or higher) with a much slower and prolonged time course (requiring at least 30 min to 4 h) than that of ERK. Also, PTx had no effect on shear-dependent activation of JNK. To further define the shear-sensitive ERK and JNK pathways, vectors expressing hemagglutinin epitope-tagged ERK (HA-ERK) or HA-JNK were co-transfected with other vectors by using adenovirus-polylysine in BAEC. Expression of the mutant (alpha)i2(G203), antisense G(alpha)i2 and a dominant negative Ras (N17Ras) prevented shear-dependent activation of HA-ERK, while that of (alpha)i2(G204) and antisense (alpha)i3 did not. Expression of a Gbeta/gamma scavenger, the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARK-ct), and N17Ras inhibited shear-dependent activation of HA-JNK. Treatment of BAEC with genistein prevented shear-dependent activation of ERK and JNK, indicating the essential role of tyrosine kinase(s) in both ERK and JNK pathways. These results provide evidence that 1) Gi2-protein, Ras, and tyrosine kinase(s) are upstream regulators of shear-dependent activation of ERK and 2) that shear-dependent

  14. Aberrant Activation of p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Innate Immune Responses Is Toxic to Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesman, Hilary K; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Thekkiniath, Jose; Dowen, Robert H; Conery, Annie L; Pukkila-Worley, Read

    2016-01-27

    Inappropriate activation of innate immune responses in intestinal epithelial cells underlies the pathophysiology of inflammatory disorders of the intestine. Here we examine the physiological effects of immune hyperactivation in the intestine of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We previously identified an immunostimulatory xenobiotic that protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by inducing immune effector expression via the conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, but was toxic to nematodes developing in the absence of pathogen. To investigate a possible connection between the toxicity and immunostimulatory properties of this xenobiotic, we conducted a forward genetic screen for C. elegans mutants that are resistant to the deleterious effects of the compound, and identified five toxicity suppressors. These strains contained hypomorphic mutations in each of the known components of the p38 MAP kinase cassette (tir-1, nsy-1, sek-1, and pmk-1), demonstrating that hyperstimulation of the p38 MAPK pathway is toxic to animals. To explore mechanisms of immune pathway regulation in C. elegans, we conducted another genetic screen for dominant activators of the p38 MAPK pathway, and identified a single allele that had a gain-of-function (gf) mutation in nsy-1, the MAP kinase kinase kinase that acts upstream of p38 MAPK pmk-1. The nsy-1(gf) allele caused hyperinduction of p38 MAPK PMK-1-dependent immune effectors, had greater levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and was more resistant to killing by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to wild-type controls. In addition, the nsy-1(gf) mutation was toxic to developing animals. Together, these data suggest that the activity of the MAPKKK NSY-1 is tightly regulated as part of a physiological mechanism to control p38 MAPK-mediated innate immune hyperactivation, and ensure cellular homeostasis in C. elegans. Copyright © 2016 Cheesman et al.

  15. Green tea catechins enhance norepinephrine-induced lipolysis via a protein kinase A-dependent pathway in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-05-22

    Green tea catechins have been shown to attenuate obesity in animals and humans. The catechins activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and thereby increase fatty acid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscles. Green tea catechins have also been shown to reduce body fat in humans. However, the effect of the catechins on lipolysis in adipose tissue has not been fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of green tea catechins on lipolysis in adipocytes and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Differentiated mouse adipocyte cell line (3T3-L1) was stimulated with green tea catechins in the presence or absence of norepinephrine. Glycerol and free fatty acids in the media were measured. Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was determined by Western blotting, and the mRNA expression levels of HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and perilipin were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The cells were treated with inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase G (PKG), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to determine the responsible pathway. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with green tea catechins increased the level of glycerol and free fatty acids released into the media in the presence, but not absence, of norepinephrine, and increased the level of phosphorylated HSL in the cells. The catechins also increased mRNA and protein levels of HSL and ATGL. PKA inhibitor (H89) attenuated the catechin-induced increase in glycerol release and HSL phosphorylation. The results demonstrate that green tea catechins enhance lipolysis in the presence of norepinephrine via a PKA-dependent pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, providing a potential mechanism by which green tea catechins could reduce body fat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about 30 years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of, T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. The outcome of PKC activation is highly context-dependent, with the precise cell cycle target(s) and overall effects determined by the specific isozyme involved, the timing of PKC activation, the cell type, and the signaling environment. Although PKCs can regulate all stages of the cell cycle, they appear to predominantly affect G0/G1 and G2. PKCs can modulate multiple cell cycle regulatory molecules, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), cdk inhibitors and cdc25 phosphatases; however, evidence points to Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins as key mediators of PKC-regulated cell cycle-specific effects. Several PKC isozymes can target Cip/Kip proteins to control G0/G1 → S and/or G2 → M transit, while effects on D-type cyclins regulate entry into and progression through G1. Analysis of PKC signaling in T cells has largely focused on its roles in T cell activation; thus, observed cell cycle effects are mainly positive. A prominent role is emerging for PKCθ, with non-redundant functions of other isozymes also described. Additional evidence points to PKCδ as a negative regulator of the cell cycle in these cells. As in other cell types, context-dependent effects of individual isozymes have been noted in T cells, and Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins appear to be major PKC targets. Future studies are anticipated to take advantage of the similarities between these various systems to enhance understanding of PKC-mediated cell cycle regulation in T cells. PMID

  17. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  18. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine....../threonine kinases in MHC-I-mediated apoptosis in human B-cells and suggest the presence of several MHC-I signaling pathways leading to diverse effects in these cells....

  19. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Selective 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Jesus R.; Becker, Christopher J.; Blackledge, Charles W.; Duquenne, Celine; Feng, Yanhong; Grant, Seth W.; Heerding, Dirk; Li, William H.; Miller, William H.; Romeril, Stuart P.; Scherzer, Daryl; Shu, Arthur; Bobko, Mark A.; Chadderton, Antony R.; Dumble, Melissa; Gardiner, Christine M.; Gilbert, Seth; Liu, Qi; Rabindran, Sridhar K.; Sudakin, Valery; Xiang, Hong; Brady, Pat G.; Campobasso, Nino; Ward, Paris; Axten, Jeffrey M. (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a master regulator of the AGC family of kinases and an integral component of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. As this pathway is among the most commonly deregulated across all cancers, a selective inhibitor of PDK1 might have utility as an anticancer agent. Herein we describe our lead optimization of compound 1 toward highly potent and selective PDK1 inhibitors via a structure-based design strategy. The most potent and selective inhibitors demonstrated submicromolar activity as measured by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates as well as antiproliferative activity against a subset of AML cell lines. In addition, reduction of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates was demonstrated in vivo in mice bearing OCl-AML2 xenografts. These observations demonstrate the utility of these molecules as tools to further delineate the biology of PDK1 and the potential pharmacological uses of a PDK1 inhibitor.

  20. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  1. Recent Developments of Protein Kinase Inhibitors as Potential AD Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eHilgeroth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Present AD therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase (ACE inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3 β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specifity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A. Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit.

  2. Cytokine rescue of p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest is mediated by distinct Jak kinase signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelle, Frederick W.; Wang, JinLing; Feng, Jian; Wang, Demin; Cleveland, John L.; Ihle, James N.; Zambetti, Gerard P.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of hematopoietic progenitors to γ-irradiation (IR) induces p53-dependent apoptosis and a p53-independent G2/M cell cycle arrest. These responses to DNA-damage can be inhibited by treatment with cytokine growth factors. Here we report that γ-IR-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are suppressed by specific cytokines (e.g., erythropoietin and interleukin-3) and that activation of the Jak kinase is necessary and sufficient for these effects. Using myleoid cells expressing a series of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) mutants, we have demonstrated that Jak kinase-dependent signals initiated from the membrane proximal domain of EpoR were sufficient to prevent IR-induced apoptotic cell death, but failed to prevent cell cycle arrest. Cell survival by Epo did not require activation of other known signaling pathways including PI-3 kinase, PLC-γ, Ras or Stats. Signaling targets of Jak kinase pathways included members of the Bcl-2 family of anti-apoptotic proteins, and enforced expression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL was as effective as cytokine treatment in blocking IR-induced apoptosis but did not prevent growth arrest. A distinct signal derived from a membrane distal domain of EpoR is required to overcome growth arrest associated with DNA damage. These findings functionally link the Jak signaling pathway to suppression of p53-mediated cell death by cytokines and demonstrate that the apoptotic and growth arrest responses to DNA damage in hematopoietic cells are modulated by distinct, cytokine specific signal transduction pathways. PMID:9553040

  3. Genetic deletion of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKK β) or CaMK IV exacerbates stroke outcomes in ovariectomized (OVXed) female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; McCullough, Louise; Li, Jun

    2014-10-21

    Stroke is the primary cause of long-term disability in the United States. Interestingly, mounting evidence has suggested potential sex differences in the response to stroke treatment in patients as, at least in part, distinct cell death programs may be triggered in females and males following stroke. The NIH has recognized that females are strikingly under-represented in pre-clinical trials. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) is a major kinase that is activated by elevated intracellular calcium. It has recently been suggested that CaMKK and CaMK IV, a downstream target molecule, are neuroprotective in stroke in males. In this study, we examined stroke outcomes in ovariectomized CaMKK β and CaMK IV deficient females. Cell death/survival signaling and inflammatory responses were assessed. Our results demonstrated that CaMKK β or CaMK IV KO exacerbated both ischemic injury and behavioral deficits in female mice. Genetic deletion of CaMKK β or CaMK IV increased hemorrhagic transformation after stroke, and this was associated with both increased MMP9 activity and loss of the blood brain barrier (BBB) protein collagen IV. Transcriptional inactivation was observed in mice lacking either CaMKK β or CaMK IV, as indicated by reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) proteins. Finally, inhibiting this pathway exacerbated the inflammatory response to stroke as CaMKK β or CaMK IV KO mice had increased levels of the pro-inflammatory serum cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) after stroke. This suggests that the CaMKK pathway is involved in the immune response to brain injury. Inhibition of CaMKK signaling exacerbated stroke outcome and increased BBB impairment, transcriptional inactivation and inflammatory responses in females after stroke. Therefore, CaMKK signaling may be a potential target for stroke treatment in both males and females.

  4. Inhibition of Vascular Smooth Muscle Growth via Signaling Crosstalk between AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase

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    Joshua Daniel Stone

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal vascular smooth muscle (VSM growth is central in the pathophysiology of vascular disease yet fully effective therapies to curb this growth are lacking. Recent findings from our lab and others support growth control of VSM by adenosine monophosphate (AMP-based approaches including the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA. Molecular crosstalk between AMPK and PKA has been previously suggested, yet the extent to which this occurs and its biological significance in VSM remains unclear. Considering their common AMP backbone and similar signaling characteristics, we hypothesized that crosstalk exists between AMPK and PKA in the regulation of VSM growth. Using rat primary VSM cells, the AMPK agonist AICAR increased AMPK activity and phosphorylation of the catalytic Thr172 site on AMPK. Interestingly, AICAR also phosphorylated a suspected PKA-inhibitory Ser485 site on AMPK, and these cumulative events were reversed by the PKA inhibitor PKI suggesting possible PKA-mediated regulation of AMPK. AICAR also increased PKA activity in a reversible fashion. The cAMP stimulator forskolin increased PKA activity and completely ameliorated Ser/Thr protein phosphatase-2C activity, suggesting a potential mechanism of AMPK modulation by PKA since inhibition of PKA by PKI reduced AMPK activity. Functionally, AMPK inhibited serum-stimulated cell cycle progression and cellular proliferation; however, PKA failed to do so. Moreover, AMPK and PKA reduced PDGF-β-stimulated VSM cell migration. Collectively, these results show that AMPK is capable of reducing VSM growth in both anti-proliferative and anti-migratory fashions. Furthermore, these data suggest that AMPK may be modulated by PKA and that positive feedback may exist between these two systems. These findings reveal a discrete nexus between AMPK and PKA in VSM and provide basis for metabolically-directed targets in reducing pathologic VSM growth.

  5. Structural and evolutionary divergence of eukaryotic protein kinases in Apicomplexa

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    Talevich Eric

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Apicomplexa constitute an evolutionarily divergent phylum of protozoan pathogens responsible for widespread parasitic diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Many cellular functions in these medically important organisms are controlled by protein kinases, which have emerged as promising drug targets for parasitic diseases. However, an incomplete understanding of how apicomplexan kinases structurally and mechanistically differ from their host counterparts has hindered drug development efforts to target parasite kinases. Results We used the wealth of sequence data recently made available for 15 apicomplexan species to identify the kinome of each species and quantify the evolutionary constraints imposed on each family of apicomplexan kinases. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific adaptations in selected families, namely cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK and CLK/LAMMER, which have been identified as important in the pathogenesis of these organisms. Bayesian analysis of selective constraints imposed on these families identified the sequence and structural features that most distinguish apicomplexan protein kinases from their homologs in model organisms and other eukaryotes. In particular, in a subfamily of CDKs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum crk-5, the activation loop contains a novel PTxC motif which is absent from all CDKs outside Apicomplexa. Our analysis also suggests a convergent mode of regulation in a subset of apicomplexan CDPKs and mammalian MAPKs involving a commonly conserved arginine in the αC helix. In all recognized apicomplexan CLKs, we find a set of co-conserved residues involved in substrate recognition and docking that are distinct from metazoan CLKs. Conclusions We pinpoint key conserved residues that can be predicted to mediate functional differences from eukaryotic homologs in three identified kinase families. We discuss the structural, functional and

  6. Repeated predictable or unpredictable stress: effects on cocaine-induced locomotion and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity.

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    Araujo, Ana Paula N; DeLucia, Roberto; Scavone, Cristoforo; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2003-02-17

    Stressful experiences appear to have a strong influence on susceptibility to drug taking behavior. Cross-sensitization between stress and drug-induced locomotor response has been found. Locomotor response to novelty or cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the nucleus accumbens and basal corticosterone levels were evaluated in male adult rats exposed to acute and chronic predictable or unpredictable stress. Rats exposed to a 14-day predictable stress showed increased locomotor response to novelty and to cocaine, whereas rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress demonstrated increased cyclic AMP-dependent PKA activity in the nucleus accumbens. Both predictable and unpredictable stress increased basal corticosterone plasma levels. These experiments demonstrated that stress-induced early cocaine sensitization depends on the stress regime and is apparently dissociated from stress-induced changes in cyclic AMP-dependent PKA activity and corticosterone levels.

  7. NFκB-mediated cyclin D1 expression by microRNA-21 influences renal cancer cell proliferation.

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    Bera, Amit; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Dey, Nirmalya; Das, Falguni; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs regulate post-transcriptomic landscape in many tumors including renal cell carcinoma. We have recently shown significantly increased expression of miR-21 in renal tumors and that this miRNA contributes to the proliferation of renal cancer cells in culture. However, the mechanism by which miR-21 regulates renal cancer cell proliferation is poorly understood. Addiction to constitutive NFκB activity is hallmark of many cancers including renal cancer. Using miR-21 Sponge in renal cancer cells to block endogenous function of miR-21, we show inhibition of phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NFκB, IKKβ and IκB, which results in attenuation of NFκB transcriptional activity. Subtle reduction in the tumor suppressor PTEN has been linked to various malignancies. We showed previously that miR-21 targeted PTEN in renal cancer cells. Inhibition of PTEN by siRNAs restored miR-21 Sponge-induced suppression of phosphorylation of p65, IKKβ, IκB and NFκB transcriptional activity along with reversal of miR-21 Sponge-reduced phosphorylation of Akt. Expression of constitutively active Akt protected against miR-21 Sponge- and PTEN-mediated decrease in p65/IKKβ/IκB phosphorylation and NFκB transcriptional activity. Furthermore, IKKβ and p65 were required for miR-21-induced renal cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, miR-21 controlled the expression of cyclin D1 through NFκB-dependent transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that miR-21-regulated renal cancer cell proliferation is mediated by cyclin D1 and CDK4. Together, our results establish a molecular order of a phosphatase-kinase couple involving PTEN/Akt/IKKβ and NFκB-dependent cyclin D1 expression for renal carcinoma cell proliferation by increased miR-21 levels. © 2013.

  8. Fission yeast LAMMER kinase Lkh1 regulates the cell cycle by phosphorylating the CDK-inhibitor Rum1

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    Yu, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Hee; Kang, Won-Hwa; Park, Yun-Hee; Kim, Lila [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Moon, E-mail: hmpark@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Deletion of lkh1{sup +} made cells pass the G1/S phase faster than the wild type. ► Lkh1 can interact with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Rum1. ► Lkh1 can phosphorylate Rum1 to activate its CKI activity. ► Thr110 was confirmed as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation site of Rum1. ► Positive acting mechanism for the Rum1 activation is reported for the first time. - Abstract: In eukaryotes, LAMMER kinases are involved in various cellular events, including the cell cycle. However, no attempt has been made to investigate the mechanisms that underlie the involvement of LAMMER kinase. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of LAMMER kinase using the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. FACS analyses revealed that deletion of the gene that encodes the LAMMER kinase Lkh1 made mutant cells pass through the G1/S phase faster than their wild-type counterparts. Co-immunoprecipitation and an in vitro kinase assay also revealed that Lkh1 can interact with and phosphorylate Rum1 to activate this molecule as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which blocks cell cycle progression from the G1 phase to the S phase. Peptide mass fingerprinting and kinase assay with Rum1{sup T110A} confirmed T110 as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation residue. In this report we present for the first time a positive acting mechanism that is responsible for the CKI activity of Rum1, in which the LAMMER kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Rum1 is involved.

  9. The role of cyclin D2 and p21/waf1 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infected cells

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    Pumfery Anne

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax protein indirectly influences transcriptional activation, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. The function of Tax primarily relies on protein-protein interactions. We have previously shown that Tax upregulates the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21/waf1 and cyclin D2. Here we describe the consequences of upregulating these G1/S checkpoint regulators in HTLV-1 infected cells. Results To further decipher any physical and functional interactions between cyclin D2 and p21/waf1, we used a series of biochemical assays from HTLV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Immunoprecipitations from HTLV-1 infected cells showed p21/waf1 in a stable complex with cyclin D2/cdk4. This complex is active as it phosphorylates the Rb protein in kinase assays. Confocal fluorescent microscopy indicated that p21/waf1 and cyclin D2 colocalize in HTLV-1 infected, but not in uninfected cells. Furthermore, in vitro kinase assays using purified proteins demonstrated that the addition of p21/waf1 to cyclin D2/cdk4 increased the kinase activity of cdk4. Conclusion These data suggest that the p21/cyclin D2/cdk4 complex is not an inhibitory complex and that p21/waf1 could potentially function as an assembly factor for the cyclin D2/cdk4 complex in HTLV-1 infected cells. A by-product of this assembly with cyclin D2/cdk4 is the sequestration of p21/waf1 away from the cyclin E/cdk2 complex, allowing this active cyclin-cdk complex to phosphorylate Rb pocket proteins efficiently and push cells through the G1/S checkpoint. These two distinct functional and physical activities of p21/waf1 suggest that RNA tumor viruses manipulate the G1/S checkpoint by deregulating cyclin and cdk complexes.

  10. Characterization of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase SmcGK1 of Schistosoma mansoni

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    Silke Leutner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are trematode parasites and of worldwide medical importance for humans and animals. Growth and development of these parasites require a specific host environment, but also permanent communication processes between the two genders. Accumulating molecular evidence indicates that the responsible interactions are mediated by signal transduction processes. Conserved signaling molecules were identified, and first approaches made for their characterization. However, no representative of the conserved family of cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs has been described in this parasite yet. Within the Schistosoma mansoni genome data-set we identified cGK homologs, of which one was investigated in more detail in this study. We present the cloning of SmcGK1, whose sequence shows homology to cGKs of higher eukaryotes. SmcGK1 was found to be gender-independently transcribed in adult schistosomes. The occurrence of SmcGK1 sense and antisense transcripts suggests that the expression of this gene is controlled at the post-transcriptional level. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrated a gonad-preferential expression profile in both genders indicating a role of SmcGK1, at least during sexual development of schistosomes. Using a cGK-specific inhibitor to treat adult schistosomes in vitro finally resulted in a multifaceted phenotype including slow motion, oocyte congestion, and reduced egg production.Esquistossomos são parasitas trematodos de importância médica em todo o mundo para o homem e os animais. O crescimento e o desenvolvimento destes parasitas requerem um ambiente específico do hospedeiro, mas também um processo de comunicação permanente entre parasitas dos dois sexos. Evidência molecular tem se acumulado e indica que as interações são mediadas por processos de transdução de sinal. Moléculas sinalizadoras conservadas foram identificadas, e as primeiras abordagens têm sido feitas para sua caracterização. Contudo, não foi

  11. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

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    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 activity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, P R; Lamour, Y

    1997-09-26

    Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates both the phosphorylation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMK2) and its kinase activity in rat hippocampal slices. In addition, we find that: (i) the time course of BDNF action is not accompanied by a change in the spectrum of either alpha- and beta-subunits of CaMK2 detected by immunoblotting; (ii) both treatment of solubilized CaMK2 with alkaline phosphatase and treatment of immunoprecipitated CaMK2 with protein phosphatase 1 reverse phosphorylation and activation of the kinase; (iii) phospholipase C inhibitor D609 and intracellular Ca2+ chelation by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N",N',-tetracetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester or 8-(diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate but not omission of Ca2+ or Ca2+ chelation by EGTA, abolish the stimulatory effect of BDNF on phosphorylation and activation of CaMK2. These results strongly suggest that the conversion of CaMK2 into its active, autophosphorylated form, but not its concentration, is increased by BDNF via stimulation of phospholipase C and subsequent intracellular Ca2+ mobilization.

  13. Identification of Toxoplasma gondii cAMP dependent protein kinase and its role in the tachyzoite growth.

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    Hitomi Kurokawa

    Full Text Available cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA has been implicated in the asexual stage of the Toxoplasma gondii life cycle through assaying the effect of a PKA-specific inhibitor on its growth rate. Since inhibition of the host cell PKA cannot be ruled out, a more precise evaluation of the role of PKA, as well as characterization of the kinase itself, is necessary.The inhibitory effects of two PKA inhibitors, H89, an ATP-competitive chemical inhibitor, and PKI, a substrate-competitive mammalian natural peptide inhibitor, were estimated. In the in vitro kinase assay, the inhibitory effect of PKI on a recombinant T. gondii PKA catalytic subunit (TgPKA-C was weaker compared to that on mammalian PKA-C. In a tachyzoite growth assay, PKI had little effect on the growth of tachyzoites, whereas H89 strongly inhibited it. Moreover, T. gondii PKA regulatory subunit (TgPKA-R-overexpressing tachyzoites showed a significant growth defect.Our data suggest that PKA plays an important role in the growth of tachyzoites, and the inhibitory effect of substrate-competitive inhibitor PKI on T. gondii PKA was low compared to that of the ATP competitive inhibitor H89.

  14. Chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells are not dependent on Bcr-Abl kinase activity for their survival

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    Hamilton, Ashley; Helgason, G. Vignir; Schemionek, Mirle; Zhang, Bin; Myssina, Svetlana; Allan, Elaine K.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Bhatia, Ravi; Brunton, Valerie G.; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells are insensitive to kinase inhibitors and responsible for minimal residual disease in treated patients. We investigated whether CML stem cells, in a transgenic mouse model of CML-like disease or derived from patients, are dependent on Bcr-Abl. In the transgenic model, after retransplantation, donor-derived CML stem cells in which Bcr-Abl expression had been induced and subsequently shut off were able to persist in vivo and reinitiate leukemia in secondary recipients on Bcr-Abl reexpression. Bcr-Abl knockdown in human CD34+ CML cells cultured for 12 days in physiologic growth factors achieved partial inhibition of Bcr-Abl and downstream targets p-CrkL and p-STAT5, inhibition of proliferation and colony forming cells, but no reduction of input cells. The addition of dasatinib further inhibited p-CrkL and p-STAT5, yet only reduced input cells by 50%. Complete growth factor withdrawal plus dasatinib further reduced input cells to 10%; however, the surviving fraction was enriched for primitive leukemic cells capable of growth in a long-term culture-initiating cell assay and expansion on removal of dasatinib and addition of growth factors. Together, these data suggest that CML stem cell survival is Bcr-Abl kinase independent and suggest curative approaches in CML must focus on kinase-independent mechanisms of resistance. PMID:22184410

  15. Structural basis for Mob1-dependent activation of the core Mst-Lats kinase cascade in Hippo signaling.

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    Ni, Lisheng; Zheng, Yonggang; Hara, Mayuko; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2015-07-01

    The Mst-Lats kinase cascade is central to the Hippo tumor-suppressive pathway that controls organ size and tissue homeostasis. The adaptor protein Mob1 promotes Lats activation by Mst, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that human Mob1 binds to autophosphorylated docking motifs in active Mst2. This binding enables Mob1 phosphorylation by Mst2. Phosphorylated Mob1 undergoes conformational activation and binds to Lats1. We determine the crystal structures of phospho-Mst2-Mob1 and phospho-Mob1-Lats1 complexes, revealing the structural basis of both phosphorylation-dependent binding events. Further biochemical and functional analyses demonstrate that Mob1 mediates Lats1 activation through dynamic scaffolding and allosteric mechanisms. Thus, Mob1 acts as a phosphorylation-regulated coupler of kinase activation by virtue of its ability to engage multiple ligands. We propose that stepwise, phosphorylation-triggered docking interactions of nonkinase elements enhance the specificity and robustness of kinase signaling cascades. © 2015 Ni et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Cyclin D2 is a critical mediator of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

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    Luckey, Stephen W; Haines, Chris D; Konhilas, John P; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Messmer-Kratzsch, Antke; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2017-12-01

    A number of signaling pathways underlying pathological cardiac hypertrophy have been identified. However, few studies have probed the functional significance of these signaling pathways in the context of exercise or physiological pathways. Exercise studies were performed on females from six different genetic mouse models that have been shown to exhibit alterations in pathological cardiac adaptation and hypertrophy. These include mice expressing constitutively active glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3βS9A), an inhibitor of CaMK II (AC3-I), both GSK-3βS9A and AC3-I (GSK-3βS9A/AC3-I), constitutively active Akt (myrAkt), mice deficient in MAPK/ERK kinase kinase-1 (MEKK1 -/- ), and mice deficient in cyclin D2 (cyclin D2 -/- ). Voluntary wheel running performance was similar to NTG littermates for five of the mouse lines. Exercise induced significant cardiac growth in all mouse models except the cyclin D2 -/- mice. Cardiac function was not impacted in the cyclin D2 -/- mice and studies using a phospho-antibody array identified six proteins with increased phosphorylation (greater than 150%) and nine proteins with decreased phosphorylation (greater than 33% decrease) in the hearts of exercised cyclin D2 -/- mice compared to exercised NTG littermate controls. Our results demonstrate that unlike the other hypertrophic signaling molecules tested here, cyclin D2 is an important regulator of both pathologic and physiological hypertrophy. Impact statement This research is relevant as the hypertrophic signaling pathways tested here have only been characterized for their role in pathological hypertrophy, and not in the context of exercise or physiological hypertrophy. By using the same transgenic mouse lines utilized in previous studies, our findings provide a novel and important understanding for the role of these signaling pathways in physiological hypertrophy. We found that alterations in the signaling pathways tested here had no impact on exercise performance. Exercise

  17. Oxyhemoglobin-induced suppression of voltage-dependent K+ channels in cerebral arteries by enhanced tyrosine kinase activity.

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    Ishiguro, Masanori; Morielli, Anthony D; Zvarova, Katarina; Tranmer, Bruce I; Penar, Paul L; Wellman, George C

    2006-11-24

    Cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has devastating consequences. Oxyhemoglobin (oxyhb) has been implicated in SAH-induced cerebral vasospasm as it causes cerebral artery constriction and increases tyrosine kinase activity. Voltage-dependent, Ca(2+)-selective and K(+)-selective ion channels play an important role in the regulation of cerebral artery diameter and represent potential targets of oxyhb. Here we provide novel evidence that oxyhb selectively decreases 4-aminopyridine sensitive, voltage-dependent K(+) channel (K(v)) currents by approximately 30% in myocytes isolated from rabbit cerebral arteries but did not directly alter the activity of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated (BK) channels. A combination of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostin AG1478, tyrphostin A23, tyrphostin A25, genistein) abolished both oxyhb-induced suppression of K(v) channel currents and oxyhb-induced constriction of isolated cerebral arteries. The K(v) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine also inhibited oxyhb-induced cerebral artery constriction. The observed oxyhb-induced decrease in K(v) channel activity could represent either channel block, or a decrease in K(v) channel density on the plasma membrane. To explore whether oxyhb altered trafficking of K(v) channels to the plasma membrane, we used an antibody generated against an extracellular epitope of K(v)1.5 channels. In the presence of oxyhb, staining of K(v)1.5 on the plasma membrane surface was markedly reduced. Furthermore, oxyhb caused a loss of spatial distinction between staining with K(v)1.5 and the general anti-phosphotyrosine antibody PY-102. We propose that oxyhb-induced suppression of K(v) currents occurs via a mechanism involving enhanced tyrosine kinase activity and channel endocytosis. This novel mechanism may contribute to oxyhb-induced cerebral artery constriction following SAH.

  18. Involvement of Cyclin K Posttranscriptional Regulation in the Formation of Artemia Diapause Cysts

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    Zhao, Yang; Ding, Xia; Ye, Xiang; Dai, Zhong-Min; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. Principal Finding This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (Rpb1) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) survival signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways. PMID:22363807

  19. Involvement of cyclin K posttranscriptional regulation in the formation of Artemia diapause cysts.

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    Yang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. PRINCIPAL FINDING: This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of the largest subunit (Rpb1 of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II. Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK survival signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways.

  20. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

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    Hyun-Gwan Lee

    Full Text Available Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine, is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3 with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg

  1. Mixed Lineage Kinase 3 Mediates the Induction of CXCL10 by a STAT1-Dependent Mechanism During Hepatocyte Lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Kyoko; Kabashima, Ayano; Freeman, Brittany L; Bronk, Steven F; Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H

    2017-10-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFA) and their toxic metabolites contribute to hepatocyte lipotoxicity in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We previously reported that hepatocytes, under lipotoxic stress, express the potent macrophage chemotactic ligand C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), and release CXCL10-enriched extracellular vesicles (EV) by a mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3-dependent mechanism. In the current study, we sought to examine the signaling pathway responsible for CXCL10 induction during hepatocyte lipotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate a role for signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 in regulating CXCL10 expression. Huh7 and HepG2 cells were treated with lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), the toxic metabolite of the SFA palmitate. In LPC-treated hepatocytes, CXCL10 induction is mediated by a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade consisting of a relay kinase module of MLK3, MKK3/6, and p38. P38 in turn induces STAT1 Ser727 phosphorylation and CXCL10 upregulation in hepatocytes, which is reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of this MAPK signaling cascade. The binding and activity of STAT1 at the CXCL10 gene promoter were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase gene expression assays. Promoter activation was attenuated by MLK3/STAT1 inhibition or by deletion of the consensus STAT1 binding sites within the CXCL10 promoter. In lipotoxic hepatocytes, MLK3 activates a MAPK signaling cascade, resulting in the activating phosphorylation of STAT1, and CXCL10 transcriptional upregulation. Hence, this kinase relay module and/or STAT1 inhibition may serve as a therapeutic target to reduce CXCL10 release, thereby attenuating NASH pathogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3249-3259, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Novel Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed in actively growing mycelia of the basidiomycetous mushroom Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Keisuke; Yamada, Yusuke; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Akira; Asada, Yasuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    We isolated cDNA clones for novel protein kinases by expression screening of a cDNA library from the basidiomycetous mushroom Coprinus cinereus. One of the isolated clones was found to encode a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein consisting of 488 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 53,906, which we designated CoPK12. The amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain of CoPK12 showed 46% identity with those of rat Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) I and CaMKIV. However, a striking difference between these kinases is that the critical Thr residue in the activating phosphorylation site of CaMKI/IV is replaced by a Glu residue at the identical position in CoPK12. As predicted from its primary sequence, CoPK12 was found to behave like an activated form of CaMKI phosphorylated by an upstream CaMK kinase, indicating that CoPK12 is a unique CaMK with different properties from those of the well-characterized CaMKI, II, and IV. CoPK12 was abundantly expressed in actively growing mycelia and phosphorylated various proteins, including endogenous substrates, in the presence of Ca2+/CaM. Treatment of mycelia of C. cinereus with KN-93, which was found to inhibit CoPK12, resulted in a significant reduction in growth rate of mycelia. These results suggest that CoPK12 is a new type of multifunctional CaMK expressed in C. cinereus, and that it may play an important role in the mycelial growth.

  3. Hyperactivation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase promotes escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Fox, Emily M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chen, Heidi; Higham, Catherine; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Many breast cancers exhibit a degree of dependence on estrogen for tumor growth. Although several therapies have been developed to treat individuals with estrogen-dependent breast cancers, some tumors show de novo or acquired resistance, rendering them particularly elusive to current therapeutic strategies. Understanding the mechanisms by which these cancers develop resistance would enable the development of new and effective therapeutics. In order to determine mechanisms of escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive (ER-positive) breast cancer, we established 4 human breast cancer cell lines after long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). LTED cells showed variable changes in ER levels and sensitivity to 17β-estradiol. Proteomic profiling of LTED cells revealed increased phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) substrates p70S6 kinase and p85S6 kinase as well as the PI3K substrate AKT. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR induced LTED cell apoptosis and prevented the emergence of hormone-independent cells. Using reverse-phase protein microarrays, we identified a breast tumor protein signature of PI3K pathway activation that predicted poor outcome after adjuvant endocrine therapy in patients. Our data suggest that upon adaptation to hormone deprivation, breast cancer cells rely heavily on PI3K signaling. Our findings also imply that acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer may be abrogated by combination therapies targeting both ER and PI3K pathways. PMID:20530877

  4. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tucci, S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Muglia, V.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.B. Dos [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, G.E.B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  5. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed...... response factor at Ser103, a putative CaMKII substrate, was higher after 30 min of exercise. PLN phosphorylation at Thr17 was higher with increasing exercise intensities. These data indicate that CaMKII is the major multifunctional CaMK in skeletal muscle and its activation occurs rapidly and is sustained...

  6. Optimization of an Imidazopyridazine Series of Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 (PfCDPK1)

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Osborne, Simon A.; Wallace, Claire; Birchall, Kristian; Bouloc, Nathalie; Jones, Hayley M.; Ansell, Keith H.; Taylor, Debra L.; Clough, Barbara; Green, Judith L.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    A structure-guided design approach using a homology model of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1) was used to improve the potency of a series of imidazopyridazine inhibitors as potential antimalarial agents. This resulted in high affinity compounds with PfCDPK1 enzyme IC50 values less than 10 nM and in vitro P. falciparum antiparasite EC50 values down to 12 nM, although these compounds did not have suitable ADME properties to show in vivo efficacy in a mouse mode...

  7. Nonclassical Mechanisms of Progesterone Action in the Brain: II. Role of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Progesterone-Mediated Signaling in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Bhuvana; Portillo, Wendy; Reyna, Andrea; Chen, Jian Zhong; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Mani, Shaila K.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activation of classical progestin receptor-dependent genomic pathway, progesterone (P) can activate nonclassical, membrane-initiated signaling pathways in the brain. We recently demonstrated rapid P activation of second-messenger kinases, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN) and preoptic area (POA) of rat brain. To determine whether P can activate yet another Ca+2dependent kinase, we examined the rapid P modulation of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the VMN and POA in female rats. A rapid P-initiated activation of CaMKII basal activity was observed in the VMN but not the POA at 30 min. Estradiol benzoate (EB) priming enhanced this CaMKII basal activity in both the VMN and POA. CaMKII protein levels and phosphorylation of Thr-286 moiety on CaMKII, however, remained unchanged with EB and/or P treatments, suggesting that the changes in the CaMKII kinase activity are due to rapid P modulation of the kinase activity and not its synthesis or autoactivation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a CaMKII-specific inhibitor, KN-93, 30 min prior to the P infusion, in EB-primed, ovariectomized female rats inhibited CaMKII activation but not protein kinase A and protein kinase C activities. Interestingly, icv administration of KN-93 30 min prior to P infusion (icv) resulted in a reduction but not total inhibition of P-facilitated lordosis response in EB-primed female rats. These observations suggest a redundancy or, alternately, a hierarchy in the P-regulated activation of kinase signaling cascades in female reproductive behavior. PMID:18617607

  8. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  9. Galectin-3 and cyclin D1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołecki Marcin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lung cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Galectin-3 is multifunctional protein, which is involved in regulation of cell growth, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Cyclin D1 together with other cyclin plays an important role in cell cycle control. Cyclin D1 regulates the G1-to-S phase transition. The aim of this study was the evaluation of correlations between clinicopathological findings and cyclin D1 and galectin-3 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We wanted also to analyze the prognostic value of cyclin D1 and galectin-3 expression. Moreover we tried to evaluate the correlations between galectin-3 and cyclin D1 expression in tumor tissue. Materials and methods We used the immunochemistry method to investigate the expression of galectin-3 and cyclin D1 in the paraffin-embedded tumor tissue of 47 patients (32 men and 15 women; mean age 59.34 ± 8.90. years. We used monoclonal antibodies to cyclin D1 (NCL-L-cyclin D1-GM clone P2D11F11 NOVO CASTRA and to galectin-3 (mouse monoclonal antibody NCL-GAL3 NOVO CASTRA. Results Galectin-3 expression was positive in 18 cases (38.29% and cyclin D1 in 39 (82.97%. We showed only weak trend, that galectin-3 expression was lower in patients without lymph node involvement (p = 0.07 and cyclin D1 expression was higher in this group (p = 0.080. We didn't reveal differences in cyclin D1 and galectin-3 expression in SCC and adenocarcinoma patients. We didn't demonstrated also differences in galectin-3 and cyclin D1 expression depending on disease stage. Moreover we analyzed the prognostic value of cyclin D1 expression and galectin-3 in all examinated patients and separately in SCC and in adenocarcinoma and in all stages, but we didn't find any statistical differences. We demonstrated that in galectin-3 positive tumors cyclin D1 expression was higher (96.55% vs 61.11%, Chi2 Yatesa 7.53, p = 0.0061 and we revealed negative

  10. Methanol-dependent production of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol by mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha blocked in dihydroxyacetone kinase and glycerol kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, W. de; Weusthuis, R.A.; Harder, W.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    Various factors controlling dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and glycerol production from methanol by resting cell suspensions of a mutant of Hansenula polymorpha, blocked in DHA kinase and glycerol kinase, were investigated. The presence of methanol (250 mM) and an additional substrate (0.5%, w/v) to

  11. Dynamic interplay between O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hart, Gerald W

    2007-08-01

    O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine side chains of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins is dynamically regulated in response to various environmental and biological stimuli. O-GlcNAcylation is remarkably similar to O-phosphorylation and appears to have a dynamic interplay with O-phosphate in cellular regulation. A systematic glycoproteomics analysis of the affects of inhibiting specific kinases on O-GlcNAcylation should help reveal both the global and specific dynamic relationships between these two abundant post-translational modifications. Here we report the O-GlcNAc perturbations in response to inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a pivotal kinase involved in many signaling pathways. By combining immunoaffinity chromatography and SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture)-based quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified 45 potentially O-GlcNAcylated proteins. Quantitative measurements indicated that at least 10 proteins had an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition by lithium, whereas surprisingly 19 other proteins showed decreases. O-GlcNAcylation changes on a subset of the proteins were confirmed by follow-up experiments. By combining a new O-GlcNAc peptide enrichment method and beta-elimination followed by Michael addition with DTT, we also mapped the O-GlcNAc site (Ser-55) of vimentin, which showed an apparent increase of O-GlcNAcylation upon GSK-3 inhibition. Based on the MS data, we further investigated potential roles of O-GlcNAc on host cell factor-1, a transcription co-activator, and showed that dynamic regulation of O-GlcNAcylation on host cell factor-1 influenced its subcellular distribution. Taken together, these data indicated the complex interplay between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation that occurs within signaling networks.

  12. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Deguchi, Shinji [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University (Japan); Kaunas, Roland, E-mail: rkaunas@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. {yields} Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. {yields} Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  13. [Effect of calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinases on calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum of normal rabbit myocardium and in toxico-allergic myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanov, N V; Khugashvili, Z G

    1983-08-01

    It was demonstrated that under normal conditions calmodulin and exogenous 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase considerably active Ca2+ transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit myocardium; a combined action of these compounds produces an additive effect. The protein-inhibitor of 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase and trifluoroperazine eliminate the activating effect of 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase; in addition, trifluoroperazine decreases significantly the basal level of Ca2+ uptake. The 3':5'-AMP-dependent activation of Ca2+ transport becomes apparent after Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of FSR membrane proteins. In toxico-allergic myocarditis calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase do not activate the low level of Ca2+ uptake. No differences were observed between the action of calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase isolated from normal and pathological rabbit heart. A conclusion is drawn that the decrease of Ca2+ transport is due to the impairment of Ca2+-calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

  14. Specificity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases in mouse egg activation

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedev, Sergey; Stein, Paula; Schultz, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    CaMKIIγ, the predominant CaMKII isoform in mouse eggs, controls egg activation by regulating cell cycle resumption. In this study we further characterize the involvement and specificity of CaMKIIγ in mouse egg activation. Using exogenous expression of different cRNAs in Camk2g−/− eggs, we show that the other multifunctional CaM kinases, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, are not capable of substituting CaMKIIγ to initiate cell cycle resumption in response to a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Exogenous expression...

  15. Rho-kinase inhibition and electromechanical coupling in rat and guinea-pig ureter smooth muscle: Ca2+-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabir, S; Borisova, L; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, T

    2004-01-01

    Recent data have shown Ca2+-dependent activation of Rho-kinase by sustained depolarization of arterial smooth muscle. Visceral smooth muscles, however, contract phasically in response to action potentials and it is unclear whether Ca2+-dependent or -independent Rho-kinase activation occurs. We have therefore investigated this, under physiologically relevant conditions, in intact ureter. Action potentials, ionic currents, Ca2+ transients, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and phasic contraction evoked by action potentials in guinea-pig and rat ureter were investigated. In rat, but not guinea-pig ureter, three Rho-kinase inhibitors, Y-27632, HA-1077 and H-1152, significantly decreased phasic contractions and Ca2+ transients. Voltage- and current-clamp data showed that Rho-kinase inhibition reduced the plateau component of the action potential, inhibited Ca2+-channels and, indirectly, Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. The Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K8644 could reverse these effects. The K+ channel blocker TEA could also reverse the inhibitory effect of Y-27632 on the action potential and Ca2+ transient. Ca2+ transients and inward current, activated by carbachol-induced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+release, were not affected by Rho-kinase inhibition. Rho-kinase inhibition produced a Ca2+-independent increase in the relaxation rate of contraction, associated with acceleration of MLC dephosphorylation, which was sensitive to calyculin A. These data show for the first time that: (1) Rho-kinase has major effects on Ca2+ signalling associated with the action potential, (2) this effect is species dependent and (3) Rho-kinase controls relaxation of phasic contraction of myogenic origin. Thus Rho-kinase can modulate phasic smooth muscle in the absence of agonist, and the mechanisms are both Ca2+-dependent, involving ion channels, and Ca2+-independent, involving MLC phosphorylation activity. PMID:15331677

  16. Differential subcellular targeting and activity-dependent subcellular localization of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ito, Tsukasa; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Kaoru

    2007-08-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) plays a pivotal role in cellular signal transduction through regulating levels of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DG). Previous studies have revealed that DGK is composed of a family of isozymes that show remarkable heterogeneity in terms of molecular structure, functional domains, tissue and cellular gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that DG is produced in various subcellular compartments including the plasma membrane, internal membranes, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. However, it remains unclear how DG is regulated at distinct subcellular sites. To address this point, we have used an epitope-tag expression system in cultured cells and investigated the subcellular localization of DGK isozymes under the same experimental conditions. We show here that DGK isozymes are targeted differentially to unique subcellular sites in transfected COS7 cells, including the cytoplasm, actin stress fibers, Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. It is also shown that among the isozymes overexpression of DGKbeta causes fragmentation of actin stress fibers while a kinase-dead mutant of DGKbeta abolishes its colocalization with actin stress fibers. These data strongly suggest that each isozyme may be responsible for the metabolism of DG that is produced upon stimulation at a different and specific subcellular site and that DGKbeta activity might have effects on the reorganization of actin stress fibers in transfected COS7 cells.

  17. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80, is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM, high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM. The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  18. Plasma membrane cholesterol is a key molecule in shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H; Go, Y M; St John, P L; Maland, M C; Lisanti, M P; Abrahamson, D R; Jo, H

    1998-11-27

    Shear stress, the dragging force generated by fluid flow, differentially activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) (Jo, H., Sipos, K., Go, Y. M., Law, R., Rong, J., and McDonald, J. M. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 1395-1401). Here, we examine whether cholesterol-enriched compartments in the plasma membrane are responsible for such differential regulation. Pretreatment of BAEC with a cholesterol-binding antibiotic, filipin, did not inhibit shear-dependent activation of JNK. In contrast, filipin and other membrane-permeable cholesterol-binding agents (digitonin and nystatin), but not the lipid-binding agent xylazine, inhibited shear-dependent activation of ERK. The effect of cholesterol-binding drugs did not appear to be due to membrane permeabilization, since treatment of BAEC with a detergent, Triton X-100 which also permeabilizes membranes, did not inhibit shear-dependent activation of ERK. Furthermore, shear-dependent activation of ERK, but not JNK, was inhibited by cyclodextrin, a membrane-impermeable cholesterol-binding agent, which removes cell-surface cholesterol. Moreover, the effects of cyclodextrin were prevented by adding cholesterol during the incubation. These results indicate that cholesterol or cholesterol-sensitive compartments in the plasma membrane play a selective and essential role in activation of ERK, but not JNK, by shear stress. Although exposure to shear stress (1 h) increased the number of caveolae by 3-fold, treatment with filipin had no effect in either control or shear-exposed cells suggesting that caveolae density per se is not a crucial determinant in shear-dependent ERK activation. In summary, the current study suggests that cholesterol-sensitive microdomains in the plasma membrane, such as caveolae-like domains, play a critical role in differential activation of ERK and JNK by shear stress.

  19. Role of focal adhesion tyrosine kinases in GPVI-dependent platelet activation and reactive oxygen species formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naadiya Carrim

    Full Text Available We have previously shown the presence of a TRAF4/p47phox/Hic5/Pyk2 complex associated with the platelet collagen receptor, GPVI, consistent with a potential role of this complex in GPVI-dependent ROS formation. In other cell systems, NOX-dependent ROS formation is facilitated by Pyk2, which along with its closely related homologue FAK are known to be activated and phosphorylated downstream of ligand binding to GPVI.To evaluate the relative roles of Pyk2 and FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and to determine their location within the GPVI signaling pathway.Human and mouse washed platelets (from WT or Pyk2 KO mice were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors targeting FAK or Pyk2 (PF-228 and Tyrphostin A9, respectively and stimulated with the GPVI-specific agonist, CRP. FAK, but not Pyk2, was found to be essential for GPVI-dependent ROS production and aggregation. Subsequent human platelet studies with PF-228 confirmed FAK is essential for GPVI-mediated phosphatidylserine exposure, α-granule secretion (P-selectin (CD62P surface expression and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. To determine the precise location of FAK within the GPVI pathway, we analyzed the effect of PF-228 inhibition in CRP-stimulated platelets in conjunction with immunoprecipitation and pulldown analysis to show that FAK is downstream of Lyn, Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, PI3-K and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk and upstream of Rac1, PLCγ2, Ca2+ release, PKC, Hic-5, NOX1 and αIIbβ3 activation.Overall, these data suggest a novel role for FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and platelet activation and elucidate a proximal signaling role for FAK within the GPVI pathway.

  20. Intramolecular interactions stabilizing compact conformations of the intrinsically disordered kinase-inhibitor domain of Sic1: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eLambrughi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs are key regulatory proteins of the eukaryotic cell cycle, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk activity. CKIs perform their inhibitory effect by the formation of ternary complexes with a target kinase and its cognate cyclin. These regulators generally belong to the class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs, which lack a well-defined and organized three-dimensional structure in their free state, undergoing folding upon binding to specific partners. Unbound IDPs are not merely random-coil structures, but can present intrinsically folded structural units (IFSUs and collapsed conformations. These structural features can be relevant to protein function in vivo.The yeast CKI Sic1 is a 284-amino acid IDP that binds to Cdk1 in complex with the Clb5,6 cyclins, preventing phosphorylation of G1 substrates and, therefore, entrance to the S phase. Sic1 degradation, triggered by multiple phosphorylation events, promotes cell-cycle progression. Previous experimental studies pointed out a propensity of Sic1 and its isolated domains to populate both extended and compact conformations. The present contribution provides models of the compact conformations of the Sic1 kinase-inhibitory domain (KID by all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations in explicit solvent and in the absence of interactors. The results are integrated by spectroscopic and spectrometric data. Helical IFSUs are identified, along with networks of intramolecular interactions. The results identify a group of hub residues and electrostatic interactions which are likely to be involved in the stabilization of globular states.

  1. Mutant p53 disrupts the stress MAP kinase activation circuit induced by ASK1-dependent stabilization of Daxx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuya; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Inoue, Masahiro; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Shindoh, Masanobu; Rogers, Buck E.; Usheva, Anny; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Daxx is a regulatory protein for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) which activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways in response to stressors such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Here we show that TNFα treatment induces the accumulation of Daxx protein through ASK1 activation by preventing its proteasome-dependent degradation. ASK1 directly phosphorylates Daxx at Ser176 and Ser184 and Daxx is required for the sustained activation of JNK. Tumorigenic mutant p53, which binds to Daxx and inhibits Daxx-dependent activation of ASK1, prevents Daxx phosphorylation and stabilization. When mutant p53 was depleted in cancer cells, Daxx was accumulated and the cell killing effect of TNFα was restored. Our results indicate that Daxx not only activates ASK1 but also is a downstream target of ASK1 and that accumulated Daxx further activates ASK1. Thus, the Daxx-ASK1 positive feedback loop amplifying JNK/p38 signaling plays an important role for cell killing effects of stressors, such as TNFα. Tumorigenic mutant p53 disrupts this circuit and makes cells more tolerable to stresses, as its gain-of-function mechanism. PMID:19789335

  2. Differential roles of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases in posttetanic potentiation at input selective glutamatergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Maler, L

    1998-06-09

    The electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus is a layered medullary region receiving electroreceptor input that terminates on basal dendrites of interneurons and projection (pyramidal) cells. The molecular layer of the ELL contains two distinct glutamatergic feedback pathways that terminate on the proximal (ventral molecular layer, VML) and distal (dorsal molecular layer) apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. Western blot analysis with an antibody directed against mammalian Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase 2, alpha subunit (CaMK2alpha) recognized a protein of identical size in the brain of A. leptorhynchus. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that CaMK2 alpha expression in the ELL was restricted to fibers and terminals in the VML. Posttetanic potentiation (PTP) could be readily elicited in pyramidal cells by stimulation of either VML or DML in brain slices of the ELL. PTP in the VML was blocked by extracellular application of a CaMK2 antagonist (KN62) while intracellular application of KN62 or a CaMK2 inhibitory peptide had no effect, consistent with the presynaptic localization of CaMK2 alpha in VML. PTP in the dorsal molecular layer was not affected by extracellular application of KN62. Anti-Hebbian plasticity has also been demonstrated in the VML, but was not affected by KN62. These results demonstrate that, while PTP can occur independent of CaMK2, it is, in some synapses, dependent on this kinase.

  3. Ethylene-mediated cross-talk between calcium-dependent protein kinase and MAPK signaling controls stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andrea A; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Felix, Georg; Freymark, Gerald; Miersch, Otto; Wasternack, Claus; Boller, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan D G; Romeis, Tina

    2005-07-26

    Plants are constantly exposed to environmental changes and need to integrate multiple external stress cues. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are implicated as major primary Ca2+ sensors in plants. CDPK activation, like activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), is triggered by biotic and abiotic stresses, although distinct stimulus-specific stress responses are induced. To investigate whether CDPKs are part of an underlying mechanism to guarantee response specificity, we identified CDPK-controlled signaling pathways. A truncated form of Nicotiana tabacum CDPK2 lacking its regulatory autoinhibitor and calcium-binding domains was ectopically expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Infiltrated leaves responded to an abiotic stress stimulus with the activation of biotic stress reactions. These responses included synthesis of reactive oxygen species, defense gene induction,