WorldWideScience

Sample records for cusp polar observations

  1. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  2. Field-aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F region that are interpreted as being caused by the passage of the payload through a structured field-aligned current system. The field-aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of about 1 km. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of .001 A/sq m.

  3. Swarm in situ observations of F region polar cap patches created by cusp precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, L V; Miles, D M; Patra, S; van der Meeren, C; Buchert, S C; Burchill, J K; Clausen, L B N; Knudsen, D J; McWilliams, K A; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution in situ measurements from the three Swarm spacecraft, in a string-of-pearls configuration, provide new insights about the combined role of flow channel events and particle impact ionization in creating $\\textit{F}$ region electron density structures in the northern Scandinavian dayside cusp. We present a case of polar cap patch formation where a reconnection-driven low-density relative westward flow channel is eroding the dayside solar-ionized plasma but where particle impact ionization in the cusp dominates the initial plasma structuring. In the cusp, density features are observed which are twice as dense as the solar-ionized background. These features then follow the polar cap convection and become less structured and lower in amplitude. These are the first in situ observations tracking polar cap patch evolution from creation by plasma transport and enhancement by cusp precipitation, through entrainment in the polar cap flow and relaxation into smooth patches as they approach the nightside a...

  4. VLF/ELF wave activity in the vicinity of the polar cusp: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations by the Cluster spacecraft of VLF/ELF wave activity show distinct signatures for different regions in the vicinity of high altitude polar cusps, which are identified by using magnetic field and plasma data along spacecraft trajectories. These waves include: (1 Broad band magnetic noise observed in the polar cusp at frequencies from several Hz to ~100 Hz, below the local electron cyclotron frequency, fce. Similar magnetic noise is also observed in the high latitude magnetosheath and the magnetopause boundary layer. (2 Strong broad band electrostatic emissions observed in the cusp, in the magnetosheath, and in the high latitude magnetopause boundary layer, at frequencies extending from several Hz to tens of kHz, with maximum intensities below ~100 Hz. (3 Narrow-band electromagnetic whistler waves at frequencies ~0.2–0.6 fce, frequently observed in the closed boundary layer (CBL adjacent to the polar cusp. These waves are for the first time observed in this region to be accompanied by counter-streaming electron beams of ~100 eV, which suggests that the waves are excited by these electrons through wave-particle interaction. (4 Narrow-band electrostatic waves observed slightly above the local fce in the CBL. (5 Lion roars, observed in the high latitude magnetosheath, often in magnetic troughs of mirror mode oscillations. The above wave signatures can serve as indicators of the regions in the vicinity of the magnetospheric cusp.

  5. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow band waves at frequencies approximately 0.2 to 3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency, and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both lefthanded and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  6. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High-Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow-band waves at frequencies approx. 0.2-3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle, and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  7. Polar patches observed by ESR and their possible origin in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Smith

    Full Text Available Observations by the EISCAT Svalbard radar in summer have revealed electron density enhancements in the magnetic noon sector under conditions of IMF Bz southward. The features were identified as possible candidates for polar-cap patches drifting anti-Sunward with the plasma flow. Supporting measurements by the EISCAT mainland radar, the CUTLASS radar and DMSP satellites, in a multi-instrument study, suggested that the origin of the structures lay upstream at lower latitudes, with the modulation in density being attributed to variability in soft-particle precipitation in the cusp region. It is proposed that the variations in precipitation may be linked to changes in the location of the reconnection site at the magnetopause, which in turn results in changes in the energy distribution of the precipitating particles.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; polar ionosphere

  8. Polar spacecraft observations of the turbulent outer cusp/magnetopause boundary layer of Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 RE. The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfvén waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  9. Plasma convection across the polar cap, plasma mantle and cusp: Cluster EDI observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vaith

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report measurements of the convection obtained with the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI on Cluster. We use 20 passes that cross the between its dayside and nightside boundaries (or vice versa at geocentric distances ranging from about 5 to about 13RE, and at interspacecraft separations (transverse to the ambient magnetic field between a few km and almost 10000km. We first illustrate the nature of the data by presenting four passes in detail. They demonstrate that the sense of convection (anti-sunward vs. sunward essentially agrees with the expectations based on magnetic reconnection occurring on the dayside or poleward of the cusp. The most striking feature in the EDI data is the occurrence of large-amplitude fluctuations that are superimposed on the average velocities. One type of fluctuation appears to grow when approaching the dayside boundary. The examples also show that there is a variable degree of inter-spacecraft correlation, ranging from excellent to poor. We then present statistical results on all 20 passes. Plotting 10-min averages of the convection velocities vs. IMF Bz one recovers the expected dependence, albeit with large scatter. Looking at the variances computed over the same 10-min intervals, one confirms that there is indeed one type of contribution that grows towards the dayside boundary, but that variances can be high anywhere. Finally, computing the inter-spacecraft correlations as a function of their separation distance transverse to the magnetic field shows that the average correlation drops with increasing distance, but that even at distances as large as 5000km the correlation can be very good. To put those scales into context, the separation distances have also been scaled to ionospheric altitudes where they range between a few hundred meters and 600km.

  10. Cusp observations during a sequence of fast IMF BZ reversals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a large number of papers have reported the response of the cusp to solar wind variations under conditions of northward or southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF Z-component (BZ. These studies have shown the importance of both temporal and spatial factors in determining the extent and morphology of the cusp and the changes in its location, connected to variations in the reconnection geometry. Here we present a comparative study of the cusp, focusing on an interval characterised by a series of rapid reversals in the BZ-dominated IMF, based on observations from space-borne and ground-based instrumentation. During this interval, from 08:00 to 12:00 UT on 12 February 2003, the IMF BZ component underwent four reversals, remaining for around 30 min in each orientation. The Cluster spacecraft were, at the time, on an outbound trajectory through the Northern Hemisphere magnetosphere, whilst the mainland VHF and Svalbard (ESR radars of the EISCAT facility were operating in support of the Cluster mission. Both Cluster and the EISCAT were, on occasion during the interval, observing the cusp region. The series of IMF reversals resulted in a sequence of poleward and equatorward motions of the cusp; consequently Cluster crossed the high-altitude cusp twice before finally exiting the dayside magnetopause, both times under conditions of northward IMF BZ. The first magnetospheric cusp encounter, by all four Cluster spacecraft, showed reverse ion dispersion typical of lobe reconnection; subsequently, Cluster spacecraft 1 and 3 (only crossed the cusp for a second time. We suggest that, during this second cusp crossing, these two spacecraft were likely to have been on newly closed field lines, which were first reconnected (opened at low latitudes and later reconnected again (re-closed poleward of the northern cusp. At ionospheric altitudes, the latitudinal excursions of the cusp/cleft region in response to the series of the IMF polarity

  11. Observations of an enhanced convection channel in the cusp ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnock, M.; Rodger, A.S.; Dudeney, J.R. (Natural Environment Research Council, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Baker, K.B.; Neweli, P.T.; Greenwald, R.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)); Greenspan, M.E. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Transient or patchy magnetic field line merging on the dayside magnetopause, giving rise to flux transfer events (FTEs), is thought to play a significant role in energizing high-latitude ionospheric convection during periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field. Several transient velocity patterns in the cusp ionosphere have been presented as candidate FTE signatures. Instrument limitations, combined with uncertainties about ionospheric signature of FTEs have yet to be presented. This paper describes combined observations by the PACE HF backscatter radar and the DMSP F9 polar-orbiting satellite of a transient velocity signature in the southern hemispheric cusp. The prevailing solar wind conditions suggest that it is the result of enhanced magnetic merging at the magnetopause. The satellite particle precipitation data associated with the transient are typically cusplike in nature. The presence of spatially discrete patches of accelerated ions at the equatorward edge of the cusp is consistent with the ion acceleration that could occur with merging. The combined radar line-of-sight velocity data and the satellite transverse plasma drift data are consistent with a channel of enhanced convection superposed on the ambient cusp plasma flow. This channel is at least 900 km in longitudinal extent but only 100 km wide. It is zonally aligned for most of its extent, except at the western limit where it rotates sharply poleward. Weak return flow is observed outside the channel. These observations are compared with and contrasted to similar events seen by the EISCAT radar and by optical instruments. 30 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Cusp observations with Cluster and THEMIS in preparation for the SMILE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C.-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission, being designed in collaboration between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Science. Its objective is to observe solar wind-magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, soft X-Ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps, and UV images of global auroral distributions. The observations of the cusps and magnetosheath with the X-ray imager are possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions, first at comets and subsequently in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. To prepare for the mission, we must determine the cusp's expected morphology, motion, and in situ properties (density, velocity, temperature). We have selected a series of Cluster cusp crossings that define these properties and can therefore be used to estimate X-ray emissions across the width of the cusp for different IMF orientations. We will show that the peak soft X-ray emissions occur near the centre of the cusp where ion densities maximize. We then show that the integral lines of sight emissions through the cusp are a factor of 2.4 times larger for IMF-Bz northward than for IMF-Bz southward. The mid-altitude cusp is a factor of 7 brighter than the exterior cusp.

  13. Observations of the cusp region under northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pitout

    Full Text Available We present a comparative study of the cusp region using the EISCAT Svalbard Radars (ESR and the Cluster spacecraft. We focus in this paper on 2 February 2001, over the time period from 07:30 UT to 12:00 UT when the oblique ESR antenna pointing northward at a low elevation recorded latitudinal motions of the cusp region in response to the IMF. Meanwhile, the Cluster satellites were flying over the EISCAT Svalbard Radar field-of-view around local magnetic noon. The spacecraft first flew near ESR, northeast of Svalbard and then passed over the field-of-view of the antenna at about 11:30 UT. From 08:00 UT to 09:00 UT, the IMF remains primarily southward yet several variations in the Z-component are seen to move the cusp. Around 09:00 UT, an abrupt northward turning of the IMF moves the cusp region to higher latitudes. As a result, the Cluster satellites ended up in the northernmost boundary of the high-altitude cusp region where the CIS instrument recorded highly structured plasma due to ion injections in the lobe of the magnetosphere. After 09:00 UT, the IMF remains northward for more than two hours. Over this period, the ESR records sunward plasma flow in the cusp region due to lobe reconnection, while Cluster spacecraft remain in the high-altitude cusp.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers; plasma convection Ionosphere (polar ionosphere

  14. MHD Flow Visualization of Magnetopause and Polar Cusps Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Kessel, R. L.; Shao, X.; Boller, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed analysis of Wind, Geotail, and Cluster data shows how magnetopause boundary and polar cusps vortices associated with high speed streams can be a carrier of energy flux to the Earth's magnetosphere. For our analysis time interval, March 29 . - April 5 2002, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) is primarily northward and MHD simulations of vortices along the flanks within nine hours of the time interval suggest that a Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) instability is likely present. Vortices were classified by solar wind input provided by the Wind satellite located 70-80 RE upstream from Earth. We present statistics for a total of 304 vortices found near the ecliptic plane on the magnetopause flanks, 273 with northward IMF and 31 with southward IMF. The vortices generated under northward IMF were more driven into the dawnside than into the duskside, being substantially more ordered on the duskside. Most of the vortices were large in scale, up to 10 RE, and with a rotation axis closely aligned with the Z(sub GSE) direction. They rotated preferentially clockwise on the dawnside, and. counter-clockwise on the duskside. Those generated under southward IMF were less ordered, fewer in number, and also smaller in diameter. Significant vortex activity occurred on the nightside region of the magnetosphere for these southward cases in contrast to the northward IMF cases on which most of the activity was driven onto the magnetopause flanks. Magnetopause crossings seen by the Geotail spacecraft for the time interval were analyzed and compared with the MHD simulation to validate our results. Vortices over the polar cusps are also being analyzed and the simulation results will be compared to the multi-point measurements of the four Cluster satellites.

  15. Correlated electric field and low-energy electron measurements in the low-altitude polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.; Ackerson, K. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Correlated electric field and low-energy electron measurements are presented for two passes of Hawkeye 1 through the south polar cusp at 2000-km altitude during local morning. In one case the electric field reversal coincides with the boundary of detectable 5.2keV electron intensities and the equatorward boundary of the cusp. In the other case the electric field reversal and the 5.2 keV electron trapping boundary coincide, but the equatorward edge of the cusp as determined from the presence of 180 eV electron intensities is 5 degrees invariant latitude equatorward of the electric field reversal. It is concluded that in the second case, electron intensities associated with the polar cusp populate closed dayside field lines, and hence the corresponding equatorward edge of these electron intensities is not always an indicator of the boundary between closed dayside field lines and polar cap field lines.

  16. Field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region during northward IMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils

    2002-01-01

    [1] The field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region are examined using magnetic data from the low-altitude polar-orbiting satellite Orsted. The study is confined to cases where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a steady northward component and to a rather narrow region...

  17. Sounding rocket observations of particle data in the cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, M.; Lynch, K.; Kintner, P.; Lundberg, E.; Lessard, M.

    2008-12-01

    The winter 2008 Scifer-2 sounding rocket campaign studied ionospheric outflow in the cusp region. The rocket was launched on January 18, 2008 at 0730 UT from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway, reaching an apogee of 1468 km over the Eiscat Svalbard Radar. The Scifer 2 campaign was designed as a joint case study, involving both ground and in situ observations, of the low altitude signatures of ionospheric outflow. In situ observations show a thermal ion population with temperatures around 0.6 - 0.8 eV, while ESR observes the temperature at lower altitudes to be ~0.2 eV. This difference is a result of calculating the average over all in situ look directions, which would artificially raise the temperature. In addition to the thermal ion population, there are several bursts of a hotter population of ions with temperatures ranging between 12 -20 eV, along with concurrent elevated wave activity. These hotter ions appear to have been accelerated to energies of several hundred eV, and show interesting velocity dispersion signatures with repeated bands at increasing energies. These two populations are not observed simultaneously, but rather are localized in different regions bordering one another. Additionally, the pitch angle distributions for each of these populations are different. Similar signatures have been seen by other nightside low altitude sounding rockets where upgoing low energy ions are seen adjacent to and coincident with higher energy ion precipitation. Neither observed ion population has a clear local relationship to the variations in the ambient electron temperature, which is a tracer for soft precipitation. We will continue to explore these populations and their boundaries as a case study of structuring in particle signatures in the cusp.

  18. Optical Observation of Oxygen Ion Upflow in the Cusp/Cleft Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, S.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.; Takizawa, Y.; Ogawa, Y.; Miyake, W.; Nakamura, M.

    2002-12-01

    We built the Extreme ultraviolet scanner (XUV) for imaging oxygen ions to outflow from the polar ionosphere into the magnetosphere. The XUV onboard a sounding rocket SS-520-2 imaged the oxygen ions above 1000 km altitude near the polar cusp on December 4, 2000. The XUV is a normal incidence telescope that has a peak sensitivity at the wavelength 83.4 nm of OII emission and consists of a Mo coated mirror, a band pass filter and a channel electron multiplier. The band pass filter selectively transmits OII emission and eliminates background emissions such as HeI emission at the 30.4 nm, HeII emission at the 58.4 nm, and HI emission at the 121.6 nm. The observed OII emission intensity is proportional to the ion density integrated along the line of sight. Therefore the observed OII emission intensity distribution makes possible to determine the oxygen ion distribution. After 0928UT, the sudden increase in the OII emission intensity was observed from the cusp region identified by the radar observation. In this presentation, we will discuss the cause of the sudden increase in the OII emission intensity in comparison with the result of ground-based observations.

  19. Interplanetary magnetic field control of Saturn's polar cusp aurora

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    E. J. Bunce

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Dayside UV emissions in Saturn's polar ionosphere have been suggested to be the first observational evidence of the kronian "cusp" (Gérard et al., 2004. The emission has two distinct states. The first is a bright arc-like feature located in the pre-noon sector, and the second is a more diffuse "spot" of aurora which lies poleward of the general location of the main auroral oval, which may be related to different upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF orientations. Here we take up the suggestion that these emissions correspond to the cusp. However, direct precipitation of electrons in the cusp regions is not capable of producing significant UV aurora. We have therefore investigated the possibility that the observed UV emissions are associated with reconnection occurring at the dayside magnetopause, possibly pulsed, akin to flux transfer events seen at the Earth. We devise a conceptual model of pulsed reconnection at the low-latitude dayside magnetopause for the case of northwards IMF which will give rise to pulsed twin-vortical flows in the magnetosphere and ionosphere in the vicinity of the open-closed field-line boundary, and hence to bi-polar field-aligned currents centred in the vortical flows. During intervals of high-latitude lobe reconnection for southward IMF, we also expect to have pulsed twin-vortical flows and corresponding bi-polar field-aligned currents. The vortical flows in this case, however, are displaced poleward of the open-closed field line boundary, and are reversed in sense, such that the field-aligned currents are also reversed. For both cases of northward and southward IMF we have also for the first time included the effects associated with the IMF By effect. We also include the modulation introduced by the structured nature of the solar wind and IMF at Saturn's orbit by developing "slow" and "fast" flow models corresponding to intermediate and high strength IMF respectively. We then

  20. Investigation of plasma instabilities in the polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    During the last six months, considerable progress was made in studying the excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range by an anisotropic or gyrating electron beam. A paper entitled 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons' was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Another paper entitled 'Electron Beam Excitation of Upstream Waves in the Whistler Mode Frequency Range' was submitted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research. This paper is in collaboration with Dr. C. W. Smith at Bartol Research Institute. In this paper, it was shown that an anisotropic electron beam (or gyrating electron beam) is capable of generating both left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range. Our earlier paper 'Electromagnetic Components of Auroral Hiss and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Polar Magnetosphere' was accepted for publication in the AGU Chapman Conference on Micro and Meso Scale Phenomena in Space Plasmas. Electromagnetic waves in the lower hybrid and whistler waves regime were identified and a mechanism of how these waves are generated was suggested.

  1. Cusp-core transformations in dwarf galaxies: observational predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssier, Romain; Pontzen, Andrew; Dubois, Yohan; Read, Justin I.

    2013-03-01

    The presence of a dark matter core in the central kiloparsec of many dwarf galaxies has been a long-standing problem in galaxy formation theories based on the standard cold dark matter paradigm. Recent simulations, based on smooth particle hydrodynamics and rather strong feedback recipes, have shown that it was indeed possible to form extended dark matter cores using baryonic processes related to a more realistic treatment of the interstellar medium. Using adaptive mesh refinement, together with a new, stronger supernova feedback scheme that we have recently implemented in the RAMSES code, we show that it is also possible to form a prominent dark matter core within the well-controlled framework of an isolated, initially cuspy, 1010 M⊙ dark matter halo. Although our numerical experiment is idealized, it allows a clean and unambiguous identification of the dark matter core formation process. Our dark matter inner profile is well fitted by a pseudo-isothermal profile with a core radius of 800 pc. The core formation mechanism is consistent with the one proposed by Pontzen & Governato. We highlight two key observational predictions of all simulations that find cusp-core transformations: (i) a bursty star formation history with a peak-to-trough ratio of 5 to 10 and a duty cycle comparable to the local dynamical time and (ii) a stellar distribution that is hot with v/σ ˜ 1. We compare the observational properties of our model galaxy with recent measurements of the isolated dwarf Wolf-Lundmark-Mellote (WLM). We show that the spatial and kinematical distribution of stars and H I gas are in striking agreement with observations, supporting the fundamental role played by stellar feedback in shaping both the stellar and dark matter distribution.

  2. Cusp observation at Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, J M; Arridge, C S; Lamy, L; Leisner, J S; Thomsen, M F; Mitchell, D G; Coates, A J; Radioti, A; Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Grodent, D; Dougherty, M K; Waite, J H

    2014-03-16

    We report on the first analysis of magnetospheric cusp observations at Saturn by multiple in situ instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Using this we infer the process of reconnection was occurring at Saturn's magnetopause. This agrees with remote observations that showed the associated auroral signatures of reconnection. Cassini crossed the northern cusp around noon local time along a poleward trajectory. The spacecraft observed ion energy-latitude dispersions-a characteristic signature of the terrestrial cusp. This ion dispersion is "stepped," which shows that the reconnection is pulsed. The ion energy-pitch angle dispersions suggest that the field-aligned distance from the cusp to the reconnection site varies between ∼27 and 51 RS . An intensification of lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation emissions suggests the prior arrival of a solar wind shock front, compressing the magnetosphere and providing more favorable conditions for magnetopause reconnection. We observe evidence for reconnection in the cusp plasma at SaturnWe present evidence that the reconnection process can be pulsed at SaturnSaturn's cusp shows similar characteristics to the terrestrial cusp.

  3. IMF By-Related Cusp Currents Observed from the Ørsted Satellite and from Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, P.; Primdahl, Fritz; Watermann, J.

    2001-01-01

    from ground-based magnetic observations to define the structure and location of cusp currents and their dependencies on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Example cases illustrate the close relation between IMF B-gamma-related FAC and horizontal ionospheric currents in the cusp region. Our...... statistical analysis defines for the noon region the variations in FAC latitude with IMF B-Z. Comparisons with the statistical cusp location indicate that the more equatorward region of IMF B-gamma-while the more B related FAC is located on field lines closing at the dayside poleward FAC are on "open" field...

  4. Cusp observation at Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Lamy, L.; Leisner, J. S.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Coates, A. J.; Radioti, A.; Jones, G. H.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Grodent, D.; Dougherty, M. K.; Waite, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the first analysis of magnetospheric cusp observations at Saturn by multiple in situ instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Using this we infer the process of reconnection was occurring at Saturn's magnetopause. This agrees with remote observations that showed the associated auroral signatures of reconnection. Cassini crossed the northern cusp around noon local time along a poleward trajectory. The spacecraft observed ion energy-latitude dispersions—a characteristic signature of the terrestrial cusp. This ion dispersion is "stepped," which shows that the reconnection is pulsed. The ion energy-pitch angle dispersions suggest that the field-aligned distance from the cusp to the reconnection site varies between ˜27 and 51 RS. An intensification of lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation emissions suggests the prior arrival of a solar wind shock front, compressing the magnetosphere and providing more favorable conditions for magnetopause reconnection.

  5. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Morphology and Dynamics of the Polar Cusp

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Alv

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings are based upon introductory talks, research reports and discussions from the NATO Advanced Workshop on the "Morphology and Dynamics of the Polar Cusp", held at Lillehammer, Norway, 7-12 May, 1984. The upper atmosphere at high latitudes is called the "Earth's win­ dow to outer space". Through various electrodynamic coupling process­ es as well as through direct transfer of particles many geophysical effects displayed there are direct manifestations of phenomena occurring in the deep space. The high latitude ionosphere will also exert a feedback on the regions of the magnetosphere and atmosphere to which it is coupled, acting as a momentum and energy source and sink, and a source of particles. Of particular interest are the sections of the near space known as the Polar Cusp. A vast portion of the earth's magnetic field envelope is electrically connected to these regions. This geometry results in a spatial mapping of the magnetospheric pro­ cesses and a focusing on to the ionosphere. In the ...

  6. Field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region during northward IMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils

    2002-01-01

    [1] The field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region are examined using magnetic data from the low-altitude polar-orbiting satellite Orsted. The study is confined to cases where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a steady northward component and to a rather narrow region...... spanning similar to 4 hours around magnetic noon. We examine individual passes using a maximum variance analysis method, and we complement, for a single event, with ground-based data from the Greenland meridian chain of magnetometers. We suggest that when an east-west component B-y of the IMF exists...... for positive IMF B-z, the two NBZ (northward B-z) field-aligned currents that prevail over the polar region rotate to form the two field-aligned currents equatorward and poleward of the east-west flowing ionospheric DPY current in the dayside. The high accuracy of the Orsted data makes it possible to uncover...

  7. EISCAT observations of plasma patches at sub-auroral cusp latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of 3 patches of high-density (1012 m−3 cold plasma on a horizontal scale-size of 300–700 km was observed near magnetic noon by the EISCAT VHF radar above Svalbard on 17 December 2001. The patches followed a trajectory towards the cusp inflow region. The combination of radar and all-sky observations demonstrates that the patches must have been segmented equatorward of the cusp/cleft auroral display, and hence their properties had not yet been influenced by cusp particle showers and electrodynamics on open flux tubes. The last patch in the sequence was intersected by radio tomography observations, and was found to be located adjacent to a broader region of the same high electron density further south. The patches occurred under moderately active conditions (Kp=3 and the total electron content (TEC of the high-density plasma was 45 TEC units. The train of patches appeared as a segmentation of the tongue of ionization. The sequence of patches occurred in association with a sequence of flow bursts in the dusk cell return flow. It is proposed that reconnection driven pulsed convection is able to create sub-auroral patches in the region where high density mid-latitude plasma is diverted poleward toward the cusp. It is the downward Birkeland current sheet located at the equatorward boundary of the flow disturbance that represents the actual cutting mechanism.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Globular Clusters with Central Density Cusps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosin, Craig Anthony

    1997-07-01

    We use the Hubble Space Telescope to observe crowded fields in globular clusters with central density cusps, and use the observed stellar distributions to study the internal dynamics of clusters in advanced stages of evolution. We begin by discussing images of the cusp of NGC 6624. From the positions of individual stars, we measure the logarithmic slope of the central density cusp, but do not resolve the cluster core. We also detect a central population of blue stragglers, and compare the frequencies of such stars in several clusters. NGC 6397, as well as photometric techniques for use with diffraction-limited HST images. We measure logarithmic cusp slopes for various groups of main-sequence stars in each cluster; we also set upper limits on the core radii of M15 and M30, and measure a radius of ~5' for the NGC 6397 core. We compare mass functions (MFs) measured at several radii in each cluster, and find substantial mass segregation. In M30, the observed segregation is well matched by the predictions of a King-Michie model, but similar models of M15 and NGC 6397 predict more mass segregation than we observe. We then use the Jeans equation and our MFs to investigate the degree of equipartition of energy between stellar species in each cluster. We find that M30 is very close to equipartition over the observed radial range between the cusp and the envelope, while M15 and NGC 6397 are not. The difference between M30 and M15 might be explained by the difference in relaxation times at the observed radii, but this scenario fails to explain the NGC 6397 data. We discuss the possibility that post-collapse clusters remain subject to the Spitzer instability, and the possibility that the tidal shocks suffered by NGC 6397 have affected its degree of mass segregation. We also propose that the observed differences between the central cusps of the clusters could be due to gravothermal oscillations, to differences in binary populations, or to the presence of a ~103Msolar black hole

  9. Interaction between measurement time and observed Hugoniot cusp due to chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, S. D.; Brown, K. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Moore, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry occurring on picosecond timescales can be observed through ultrafast laser shock drive experiments that measure Hugoniot data and transient absorption. The shock stress needed to induce chemical reactions on picosecond time scales is significantly larger than the stress needed to induce reactions on nanosecond time scales typical of gas gun and explosively driven plate impact experiments. This discrepancy is consistent with the explanation that increased shock stress leads to increased temperature, which drives thermally activated processes at a faster rate. While the data are qualitatively consistent with the interpretation of thermally dominated reactions, they are not a critical test of this interpretation. In this paper, we review data from several shocked liquids that illustrate a Hugoniot cusp due to volume changing reactions that occurs at higher shock stress states in picosecond experiments than in nanosecond to microsecond experiments. We also correlate the observed Hugoniot cusp states with transient absorption changes that occur due to the buildup of reaction products.

  10. Wave particle interactions in the high-altitude polar cusp: a Cluster case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grison

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available On 23 March 2002, the four Cluster spacecraft crossed in close configuration (~100 km separation the high-altitude (10 RE cusp region. During a large part of the crossing, the STAFF and EFW instruments have detected strong electromagnetic wave activity at low frequencies, especially when intense field-aligned proton fluxes were detected by the CIS/HIA instrument. In all likelihood, such fluxes correspond to newly-reconnected field lines. A focus on one of these ion injection periods highlights the interaction between waves and protons. The wave activity has been investigated using the k-filtering technique. Experimental dispersion relations have been built in the plasma frame for the two most energetic wave modes. Results show that kinetic Alfvén waves dominate the electromagnetic wave spectrum up to 1 Hz (in the spacecraft frame. Above 0.8 Hz, intense Bernstein waves are also observed. The close simultaneity observed between the wave and particle events is discussed as an evidence for local wave generation. A mechanism based on current instabilities is consistent with the observations of the kinetic Alfvén waves. A weak ion heating along the recently-opened field lines is also suggested from the examination of the ion distribution functions. During an injection event, a large plasma convection motion, indicative of a reconnection site location, is shown to be consistent with the velocity perturbation induced by the large-scale Alfvén wave simultaneously detected.

  11. Cusp Ion Fountain Observations from the e-POP Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) with DMSP and RISR-N conjunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Howarth, A. D.; Yau, A. W.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Low-energy (regions are investigated using conjunctions of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite, the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N) and the DMSP satellites in June 2014. e-POP encountered the cusp/cleft ion fountain at 10-14 MLT and around 1000 km altitude during these experiments. Such intermediate-altitude observations of ion upflow have been sampled only rarely by previous satellite missions and ground-based radars. The Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) onboard e-POP measures two-dimensional ion distribution functions with a frame rate of 100 images per second, from which, high-precision energy and angle information of entering ions can be inferred. Large field-aligned ion bulk flow velocities (2.5 km/s) are estimated from the angle information with a resolution of the order of 25 m/s. The ion velocities were, in general, upward in the cusp region and downward in the polar cap region. The ion temperatures have been resolved by investigating the slop shape of the distribution function. It has been found that only weak perpendicular (to B) heating occurred during these events, which when combined with the simultaneous soft electron precipitation observed by the DMSP SSJ/4 instrument, suggests that ambipolar electric fields play a dominant role in accelerating ions upward at and below 1000 km. Also, structured DC field-aligned currents derived from the magnetic field instrument (MGF) onboard e-POP are found to be well-correlated with upflow velocities. In addition, ion composition information is available from e-POP's ion mass spectrometer (IRM). Oxygen ions (O+) were found to dominate (85%) in the identified events, accompanied by a small fraction (15%) of hydrogen ions (H+) and helium ions (He+). We will compare these in situ measurements with RISR-N observations in order to further our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for, and the three-dimensional structure of, the cusp ion fountain. Acknowledgement: This research is

  12. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  13. Origin of the turbulent spectra in the high-altitude cusp: Cluster spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution magnetic field data from Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM and the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF instruments are used to study turbulent magnetic field fluctuations during the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence whose power correlates with the field-aligned ion plasma flux. The magnetic field wave spectra shows power law behavior with both double and single slopes with break in the spectra usually occurring in the vicinity of the local ion cyclotron frequency. Strong peaks in the wave power close to local ion cyclotron frequency were sometimes observed, with secondary peaks at higher harmonics indicative of resonant processes between protons and the waves. We show that the observed spectral break point may be caused partly by damping of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén (KAW waves and partly by cyclotron damping of ion cyclotron waves.

  14. Cusp-shaped Structure of a Jet Observed By IRIS and SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzong; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    On 2014 August 29, the trigger and evolution of a cusp-shaped jet were captured in detail at 1330 Å by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. At first, two neighboring mini-prominences arose in turn from the low solar atmosphere and collided with a loop-like system over them. The collisions between the loop-like system and the mini-prominences lead to the blowout, and then a cusp-shaped jet formed with a spire and an arch-base. In the spire, many brightening blobs originating from the junction between the spire and the arch-base moved upward in a rotating manner and then in a straight line in the late phase of the jet. In the arch-base, dark and bright material simultaneously tracked in a fan-like structure, and the majority of the material moved along the fan's threads. At the later phase of the jet's evolution, bidirectional flows emptied the arch-base, while downflows emptied the spire, thus making the jet entirely vanish. The extremely detailed observations in this study shed new light on how magnetic reconnection alters the inner topological structure of a jet and provides a beneficial complement for understanding current jet models.

  15. Cusp-shaped structure of a jet observed by IRIS and SDO

    CERN Document Server

    Yuzong, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    On 29 August 2014, the trigger and evolution of a cusp-shaped jet were captured in detail at 1330 {\\AA} by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph.At first, two neighboring mini-prominences arose in turn from low solar atmosphere and collided with a loop-like system over them. The collisions between the loop-like system and the mini-prominences lead to the blowout and then a cusp-shaped jet formed with a spire and an arch-base. In the spire, many brightening blobs originating from the junction between the spire and the arch-base, moved upward in a rotating manner and then in a straight line in the late phase of the jet. In the arch-base, dark and bright material simultaneously tracked in a fan-like structure and the majority of the material moved along the fan's threads. At the later phase of the jet's evolution, bidirectional flows emptied the arch-base, while down-flows emptied the spire, thus making the jet entirely vanish. The extremely detailed observations in this study shed new light on how magnetic ...

  16. The temporal and spatial variations of low frequency geomagnetic pulsations at polar cusp and cap latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bitterly

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic field measurements at two Antarctic stations are compared during two weeks in the local summer (January 1-15, 1992. Low frequency (0.6-6 mHz pulsations are observed at each station near local magnetic noon. The same wave packets appear in some cases also at the other station, although with a significant attenuation, more clearly in the morning sector; the waves show a near noon reversal of the polarization sense from counter-clockwise in the morning to clockwise in the afternoon indicating a westward and an eastward propagation, respectively.

  17. Observations of ULF Waves at the Cusp Latitude in the two Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Huang, D.; Liu, J.; Hu, H.; He, F.

    2015-12-01

    ULF waves are highly associated with the structure of the magnetosphere and the plasma composition in space for both their generation and propagation, and they can act as an indicator of kinds of the physical processes occurring in the outer magnetosphere particularly near the high latitude boundary and magnetopause, which usually map to the cusp region. Three fluxgate magnetometers have been respectively deployed at the cusp latitudes in the both hemispheres, Zhongshan Station (69°S 76°E in GEO, same hereafter) in Antarctica, Yellow River Station (79°N 12°E) and KHO (78°N 16°E) in the Arctic. Another fluxgate magnetometer has been set at Karholl Base (66°N 17°W) in the Iceland, which is located under the radiation belt or near the auroral zone. These magnetometer record data in three orthogonal components with sample frequency at 25 Hz. Observational data have been accumulated since February 2013. Preliminary analysis show that two types of ULF wave activities appears frequency on the observation regions, one is the broadband wave, which can occur over a frequency range 0.5-10 Hz and above, and in three components or only in the transversal components, and the other is the narrowband waves, which are generally limited within a frequency range below 0.5 Hz, and usually associated with harmonic components, in 8, 9 and 10 Hz, and basically occur on the transversal x and y components. Detailed wave properties and conjugated characteristics are under investigated and on progress.

  18. Study and observation of the great solar event in July 2000 at cusp latitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇华; 刘瑞源; 胡红桥; 徐中华

    2001-01-01

    A series of solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) event occurred in July 2000, particularly the largest flare (X5.7/3B) with CME on 14th of July since 1989, which stimulated a great geomagnetic storm with Dst index reaching -300 nT. A number of data have been obtained from the Chinese Antarctic Zhongshan Station (ZHS, INT Lat. 74.5°, L≈14), which is located at cusp latitude, and from the ACE satellite. After analyzing these data we have got the results as follows: a lot of solar high energy particles penetrated into the polar ionosphere and ionized it, which significantly increased the cosmic noise absorption (CNA) and blanked the DPS-4 data for more than two days. The magnetic pulsation in Pc 3/5 frequency band on the ground has a high relation with the fluctuation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz, which shows the contribution of interplanetary magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves to the Pc 3/5 pulsation on the ground. The Pc 3/5 pulsation was intensified much during the great magnetic storm. The H component of the magnetic field at ZHS varied with the southern value of IMF Bz but lagged behind for about 8 10 h. While Dst index responded to the variation of the IMF Bz very quickly, which suggested that the magnetic storm occurred at low latitude firstly and then effected the ionospheric current at high latitude.

  19. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abe, M; Moore, T. E; Collier, M. R; Taguchi, S

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere...

  20. Plasma structure within poleward-moving cusp/cleft auroral transients: EISCAT Svalbard radar observations and an explanation in terms of large local time extent of events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution observations of the southward-IMF cusp/cleft ionosphere made on December 16th 1998 by the EISCAT (European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR, and compare them with observations of dayside auroral luminosity, as seen at a wavelength of 630 nm by a meridian scanning photometer at Ny Ålesund, and of plasma flows, as seen by the CUTLASS (co-operative UK twin location auroral sounding system Finland HF radar. The optical data reveal a series of poleward-moving transient red-line (630 nm enhancements, events that have been associated with bursts in the rate of magnetopause reconnection generating new open flux. The combined observations at this time have strong similarities to predictions of the effects of soft electron precipitation modulated by pulsed reconnection, as made by Davis and Lockwood (1996; however, the effects of rapid zonal flow in the ionosphere, caused by the magnetic curvature force on the newly opened field lines, are found to be a significant additional factor. In particular, it is shown how enhanced plasma loss rates induced by the rapid convection can explain two outstanding anomalies of the 630 nm transients, namely how minima in luminosity form between the poleward-moving events and how events can re-brighten as they move poleward. The observations show how cusp/cleft aurora and transient poleward-moving auroral forms appear in the ESR data and the conditions which cause enhanced 630 nm emission in the transients: they are an important first step in enabling the ESR to identify these features away from the winter solstice when supporting auroral observations are not available.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause; cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  1. An evaluation of International Reference Ionosphere electron density in the polar cap and cusp using EISCAT Svalbard radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merete Bjoland, Lindis; Belyey, Vasyl; Løvhaug, Unni Pia; La Hoz, Cesar

    2016-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar measurements are an important source for studies of ionospheric plasma parameters. In this paper the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) long-term database is used to evaluate the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. The ESR started operations in 1996, and the accumulated database up to 2012 thus covers 16 years, giving an overview of the ionosphere in the polar cap and cusp during more than one solar cycle. Data from ESR can be used to obtain information about primary plasma parameters: electron density, electron and ion temperature, and line-of-sight plasma velocity from an altitude of about 50 and up to 1600 km. Monthly averages of electron density and temperature and ion temperature and composition are also provided by the IRI model from an altitude of 50 to 2000 km. We have compared electron density data obtained from the ESR with the predicted electron density from the IRI-2016 model. Our results show that the IRI model in general fits the ESR data well around the F2 peak height. However, the model seems to underestimate the electron density at lower altitudes, particularly during winter months. During solar minimum the model is also less accurate at higher altitudes. The purpose of this study is to validate the IRI model at polar latitudes.

  2. Cluster observations of high-frequency waves in the exterior cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Khotyaintsev

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We study wave emissions, in the frequency range from above the lower hybrid frequency up to the plasma frequency, observed during one of the Cluster crossings of a high-beta exterior cusp region on 4 March 2003. Waves are localized near narrow current sheets with a thickness a few times the ion inertial length; currents are strong, of the order of 0.1-0.5μA/m2 (0.1-0.5mA/m2 when mapped to ionosphere. The high frequency part of the waves, frequencies above the electron-cyclotron frequency, is analyzed in more detail. These high frequency waves can be broad-band, can have spectral peaks at the plasma frequency or spectral peaks at frequencies below the plasma frequency. The strongest wave emissions usually have a spectral peak near the plasma frequency. The wave emission intensity and spectral character change on a very short time scale, of the order of 1s. The wave emissions with strong spectral peaks near the plasma frequency are usually seen on the edges of the narrow current sheets. The most probable generation mechanism of high frequency waves are electron beams via bump-on-tail or electron two-stream instability. Buneman and ion-acoustic instability can be excluded as a possible generation mechanism of waves. We suggest that high frequency waves are generated by electron beams propagating along the separatrices of the reconnection region.

  3. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  4. Cusps in the center of galaxies: a real conflict with observations or a numerical artefact of cosmological simulations?

    CERN Document Server

    Baushev, A N; Campusano, L E; Escala, A; Muñoz, R R; Palma, G A

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy observations and N-body cosmological simulations produce conflicting dark matter halo density profiles for galaxy central regions. While simulations suggest a cuspy and universal profile (UDP) of this region, the majority of observations favor variable profiles with a core in the center. In this paper, we investigate the convergency of standard N-body simulations, especially in the cusp region, following the approach proposed by (Baushev, 2015). We simulate the well known Hernquist model using the SPH code Gadget-3 and consider the full array of dynamical parameters of the particles. We find that, although the cuspy profile is stable, all integrals of motion characterizing individual particles suffer strong unphysical variations along the whole halo, revealing an effective interaction between the test bodies. This result casts doubts on the reliability of the velocity distribution function obtained in the simulations. Moreover, we find unphysical Fokker-Planck streams of particles in the cusp region. T...

  5. Analysis of the Interaction between Low-Frequency Waves and Ions in the High-Altitude Cusp Region Observed by Satellite Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Su-Ping; A. Balogh; M. Andre; LIU Zhen-Xing; CAO Jin-Bin; SHI Jian-Kui; LU Li; LI Zhong-Yuan; Q. G. Zong; H. Reme; N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin

    2006-01-01

    @@ The energy transfer between ions (protons) and low frequency waves (LFWs) in the frequency range f1 from 0.3to 10 Hz is observed by Cluster crossing the high-altitude polar cusp. The energy transfer between low frequency waves and ions has two means. One is that the energy is transferred from low frequency waves to ions and ions energy increases. The other is that the energy is transferred from ions to low frequency waves and the ion energy decreases. Ion gyratory motion plays an important role in the energy transfer processes. The electromagnetic field of f1 LFWs can accelerate or decelerate protons along the direction of ambient magneticfield and warm or refrigerate protons in the parallel and perpendicular directions of ambient magnetic field. The peak values of proton number densities have the corresponding peak values of electromagnetic energy of low-frequency waves.This implies that the kinetic Alfven waves and solitary kinetic Alfven waves possibly exist in the high-altitude cusp region.

  6. Observations of Multi - Component Ion Beams in the High-Altitude Cusp/Cleft Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, R.; Semkova, J.; Smirnov, V.; Fedorov, A.

    Both Solar wind and the Earth ionosphere serve as sources of magnetospheric plasma. Having entered (SW ions) or being ejected (ionospheric ions) into the magnetosphere, ions are involved in the magnetospheric circulation. The common idea is that ions, convected to the lobe region, due to the ExB drift, enter the region of the plasma sheet and get energized by different processes. Magnetospheric plasma flows have been widely investigated, using mainly energy-per-charge measurements. While this method successfully differentiates ion species, which have near - equal flow speed and low thermal velocities [e.g. Seki et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998], the ionic composition of hot magnetospheric flows could only be revealed in mass or mass-per-charge measurements. Recent plasma flows studies based on ion composition measurements [Lennartson, J. Geophys. Res., 2001] showed a great deal of similarity between the tailward drifts of the different ions, especially in the transition region between the central plasma sheet and the tail lobes, and evoked the idea of near-Earth mixing of the Solar wind and ionospheric ions. We present some experimental evidence on near-Earth mixing of magnetospheric ions of different origin. Used are data from the Low Energy Plasma Composition Experiment (AMEI-2) onboard the high-apogee INTERBALL-1 satellite. We present and discuss several cases of ion beams with energies above 3 keV, registered in the cusp/cleft region at distances from 5 to 9 Re, in which both He++ and O+ are present. The beams are observed on filed lines connected with different magnetospheric regions: the LLBL, the plasma mantle and the lobe. The energy/pitch angle behaviour of both He++ (Solar wind origin) and O+ (ionospheric origin) reveals great similarity, as if they are from one and the same source. Only the wider distributions of the He++ fluxes and the narrow ones of the O+ ions indicate their different origin. The distributions bare the signatures of various acceleration

  7. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  8. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of

  9. Cluster observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (22 vector/s magnetic field data from Cluster FGM instrument are presented for the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence for much of the crossing. Large-scale fluctuations show some correlation between spacecraft but the higher frequency fluctuations show no correlation, indicating that the length scales of these waves are smaller than the spacecraft separation (500km. In many intervals, there are clear peaks in the wave power around the ion cyclotron frequency (~1Hz, and there is some evidence for waves at the first harmonic of this frequency. Both left- and right-hand polarised waves are found, with angles of propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field that range from parallel to perpendicular. The regions of enhanced magnetic field fluctuations appear to be associated with plasma flows possibly originating from a lobe reconnection site. The most coherent, long lasting wave trains with frequencies close to local ion cyclotron frequency occur at a boundary between a sheared flow and a stagnant plasma.

  10. The dynamic cusp at low altitudes: A case study utilizing Viking, DMSP-F7 and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermann, J.; De La Beaujardiere, O.; Lummerzheim, D.; Woch, J.; Newell, P. T.; Potemra, T. A.; Rich, F. J.; Shapshak, M.

    1994-01-01

    Coincident multi-instrument magnetospheric and ionospheric observations have made it possible to determine the position of the ionospheric footprint of the magnetospheric cusp and to monitor its evolution over time. The data used include charged particle and magnetic field measurements from the Earth-orbiting Viking and DMSP-F7 satellites, electric field measurements from Viking, interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from IMP-8, and Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations of the ionospheric plasma density, temperature, and convection. Viking detected cusp precipitation poleward of 75.5 deg invariant latitude. The ionospheric response to the observed electron precipitation was simulated using an auroral model. It predicts enhanced plasma density and elevated electron temperature in the upper E- and F- regions. Sondrestrom radar observations are in agreement with the predictions. The radar detected a cusp signature on each of five consecutive antenna elevation scans covering 1.2h local time. The cusp appeared to be about 2 deg invariant latitude wide, and its ionospheric footprint shifted equatorward by nearly 2 deg during this time, possibly influenced by an overall decrease in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub z) component. The radar plasma drift data and the Viking magnetic and electric field data suggest that the cusp was associated with a continuous, rather than a patchy, merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field.

  11. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Steffen [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.

  12. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Steffen [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  13. Calibration of mixed-polarization interferometric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Conway, John; Zensus, Anton J

    2016-01-01

    Heterodyne receivers register the sky signal on either a circular polarization basis (where it is split into left-hand and right-hand circular polarization) or a linear polarization basis (where it is split into horizontal and vertical linear polarization). We study the problem of interferometric observations performed with telescopes that observe on different polarization bases, hence producing visibilities that we call "mixed basis" (i.e., linear in one telescope and circular in the other). We present novel algorithms for the proper calibration and treatment of such interferometric observations and test our algorithms with both simulations and real data. The use of our algorithms will be important for the optimum calibration of forthcoming observations with the Atacama Large mm/submm Array (ALMA) in very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) mode. Our algorithms will also allow us to optimally calibrate future VLBI observations at very high data rates (i.e., wide bandwidths), where linear-polarization feeds w...

  14. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  15. Long-term Multiwavelength Observations of Polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Joshua; Mason, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Polars are cataclysmic variables with the highest magnetic field strengths (10-250 MG). Matter is accreted after being funneled by the strong magnetic field of the white dwarf. We perform a meta-study of multi-wavelength data of polars. Many polars have been observed in surveys, such as SDSS, 2MASS, ROSAT, just to name a few. Some polars have now been detected by the JVLA, part of an expanding class of radio CVs. A large subset of polars have long-term optical light curves from CRTS and AAVSO. We suggest that the long term light curves of polars display a variety of signature behaviors and may be grouped accordingly. Additional characteristics such a binary period, magnetic field strengths, X-ray properties, and distance estimates are examined in context with long-term observations.

  16. Polarization observations of 20 millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wenming; van Straten, Willem; Reynolds, John; Hobbs, George; Wang, Na; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Champion, David; Coles, William; Hotan, Aidan; Khoo, Jonathan; Oslowski, Stefan; Sarkissian, John; Verbiest, Joris; Yardley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Polarization profiles are presented for 20 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. The observations used the Parkes multibeam receiver with a central frequency of 1369 MHz and the Parkes digital filterbank pulsar signal-processing system PDFB2. Because of the large total observing time, the summed polarization profiles have very high signal/noise ratios and show many previously undetected profile features. Thirteen of the 20 pulsars show emission over more than half of the pulse period. Polarization variations across the profiles are complex and the observed position angle variations are generally not in accord with the rotating-vector model for pulsar polarization. Never-the-less, the polarization properties are broadly similar to those of normal (non-millisecond) pulsars, suggesting that the basic radio emission mechanism is the same in both classes of pulsar. The results support the idea that radio emission from millisecond pulsars originates high in t...

  17. Broadband plasma waves observed in the polar cap boundary layer: Polar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Thorne, R. M.

    1998-08-01

    waves near the noon sector. These waves may thus be responsible for ion heating observed near the cusp region. Antisunward convection of these freshly accelerated oxygen ions over the polar cap during intense wave events (occurring during southward Bz events) might lead to enhanced plasma sheet O+ population. For magnetic storm intervals this mechanism would lead to a natural delay between the main phase onset and the appearance of oxygen ions in the ring-current.

  18. Cusp currents from ionospheric vorticity generated by gasdynamic and merging flow fields at the magnetopause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mie, Y. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crooker, N.U.; Siscoe, G.L. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Cusp currents that arise from ionospheric vorticity generated by the combined merging outflow and gasdynamic flow fields at the magnetopause are quantified and compared with those calculated from vorticity generated by mapping the solar wind electric field into a limited cusp region of the polar cap, as proposed in the synthesis view of Banks. The results are essentially identical for strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Y}, thus demonstrating equivalence between mechanical and electrical descriptions of reconnection-driven convection. For southward IMF, however, the mechanical description yields weak cusp currents with dawn-dusk bipolarity, as deduced from early observations by Iijima and Potemra, whereas the electrical description yields none. The bipolar currents arise from the diverging pattern of gasdynamic flow. The currents become unipolar as B{sub Y} increases and the asymmetry of the merging outflow dominates. Additional cusp currents in both models arise at kinks in the flow contours (additional ionospheric vorticity) around the border of the cusp region, owing to limiting the area of mapping from the magnetopause. The border currents form a bipolar pair that rotates around the circumference of the cusp as the IMF rotates in clock angle. They dominate the currents arising from vorticity within the cusp. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available From simultaneous observations of the European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR and the Cooperative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS Finland radar on 9 March 1999, we have derived the height distributions of the thermospheric heating rate at the F region height in association with electromagnetic energy inputs into the dayside polar cap/cusp region. The ESR and CUTLASS radar observations provide the ionospheric parameters with fine time-resolutions of a few minutes. Although the geomagnetic activity was rather moderate (Kp=3+~4, the electric field obtained from the ESR data sometimes shows values exceeding 40 mV/m. The estimated passive energy deposition rates are also larger than 150 W/kg in the upper thermosphere over the ESR site during the period of the enhanced electric field. In addition, enhancements of the Pedersen conductivity also contribute to heating the upper thermosphere, while there is only a small contribution for thermospheric heating from the direct particle heating due to soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap/cusp region. In the same period, the CUTLASS observations of the ion drift show the signature of poleward moving pulsed ionospheric flows with a recurrence rate of about 10–20 min. The estimated electromagnetic energy deposition rate shows the existence of the strong heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events.

  20. The ESA earth observation polar platform programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, M.; Readings, C. J.

    1991-08-01

    The overall scenario of ESA earth observation polar platform program is reviewed with particular attention given to instruments currently being considered for flight on the first European polar platforms. The major objectives of the mission include monitoring the earth's environment on various scales; management and monitoring of the earth's resources; improvement of the service provided to the worldwide operational meteorological community, investigation of the structure and dynamics of the earth's crust and interior. The program encompasses four main elements: an ERS-1 follow-on mission (ERS-2), a solid earth gravity mission (Aristoteles), a Meteosat Second Generation, and a series of polar orbit earth observation missions.

  1. Magnetosheath-cusp interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We advance the achievements of Interball-1 and other contemporary missions in exploration of the magnetosheath-cusp interface. Extensive discussion of published results is accompanied by presentation of new data from a case study and a comparison of those data within the broader context of three-year magnetopause (MP crossings by Interball-1. Multi-spacecraft boundary layer studies reveal that in ∼80% of the cases the interaction of the magnetosheath (MSH flow with the high latitude MP produces a layer containing strong nonlinear turbulence, called the turbulent boundary layer (TBL. The TBL contains wave trains with flows at approximately the Alfvén speed along field lines and "diamagnetic bubbles" with small magnetic fields inside. A comparison of the multi-point measurements obtained on 29 May 1996 with a global MHD model indicates that three types of populating processes should be operative:

    • large-scale (∼few RE anti-parallel merging at sites remote from the cusp;
    • medium-scale (few thousandkm local TBL-merging of fields that are anti-parallel on average;
    • small-scale (few hundredkm bursty reconnection of fluctuating magnetic fields, representing a continuous mechanism for MSH plasma inflow into the magnetosphere, which could dominate in quasi-steady cases.

    The lowest frequency (∼1–2mHz TBL fluctuations are traced throughout the magnetosheath from the post-bow shock region up to the inner magnetopause border. The resonance of these fluctuations with dayside flux tubes might provide an effective correlative link for the entire dayside region of the solar wind interaction with the magnetopause and cusp ionosphere. The TBL disturbances are characterized by kinked, double-sloped wave power spectra and, most probably, three-wave cascading. Both elliptical polarization and nearly Alfvénic phase velocities with characteristic dispersion indicate the

  2. Facial talon cusps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T

    1997-12-01

    This is a report of two patients with isolated facial talon cusps. One occurred on a permanent mandibular central incisor; the other on a permanent maxillary canine. The locations of these talon cusps suggests that the definition of a talon cusp include teeth in addition to the incisor group and be extended to include the facial aspect of teeth.

  3. The dependence of cusp ion signatures on the reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Morley

    Full Text Available The interpretation of structure in cusp ion dispersions is important for helping to understand the temporal and spatial structure of magnetopause reconnection. "Stepped" and "sawtooth" signatures have been shown to be caused by temporal variations in the reconnection rate under the same physical conditions for different satellite trajectories. The present paper shows that even for a single satellite path, a change in the amplitude of any reconnection pulses can alter the observed signature and even turn sawtooth into stepped forms and vice versa. On 20 August 1998, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP craft F-14 crossed the cusp just to the south of Longyearbyen, returning on the following orbit. The two passes by the DMSP F-14 satellites have very similar trajectories and the open-closed field line boundary (OCB crossings, as estimated from the SSJ/4 precipitating particle data and Polar UVI images, imply a similarly-shaped polar cap, yet the cusp ion dispersion signatures differ substantially. The cusp crossing at 08:54 UT displays a stepped ion dispersion previously considered to be typical of a meridional pass, whereas the crossing at 10:38 UT is a sawtooth form ion dispersion, previously considered typical of a satellite travelling longitudinally with respect to the OCB. It is shown that this change in dispersed ion signature is likely to be due to a change in the amplitude of the pulses in the reconnection rate, causing the stepped signature. Modelling of the low-energy ion cutoff under different conditions has reproduced the forms of signature observed.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating, magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  4. Polarization Observables for Kaon Photoproduction from Polarized Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Walford, Natalie K

    2013-01-01

    The search for undiscovered excited states of the nucleon continues to be a focus of experiments at Jefferson Lab.Recent LQCD calculations have confirmed long-standing quark-model predictions of many more states than have so far been identified.A large effort for the N-star program has been launched using the CLAS detector to provide the database that will allow nearly model-independent partial wave analyses to be carried out in the search for such states. Polarization observables play a crucial role in this effort, as they are essential in disentangling overlapping resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. In 2010, double-polarization data were taken at JLab using circularly polarized photons incident on a transversely polarized frozen-spin butanol target. Our current analysis yields preliminary data of the T and F asymmetries for kaon photoproduction final states, which are compared to predictions of recent multipole analyses. This work is the first of its kind and will significantly broaden the world database ...

  5. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Opgenoorth

    Full Text Available On 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern magnetospheric mantle in close conjunction to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and approached the post-noon dayside magnetopause over Green-land between 13:00 and 14:00 UT. During that interval, a sudden reorganisation of the high-latitude dayside convection pattern occurred after 13:20 UT, most likely caused by a direction change of the Solar wind magnetic field. The result was an eastward and poleward directed flow-channel, as monitored by the SuperDARN radar network and also by arrays of ground-based magnetometers in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Söndre Strömfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed by cusp-like precipitation with transient magnetic and electric field signatures. In addition, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar detected strong transient effects of the convection reorganisation, a poleward moving precipitation, and a fast ion flow-channel in association with the auroral structures that suddenly formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing for the first and quite unexpected encounter of the cusp by the Cluster spacecraft. Our findings illustrate the large amplitude of cusp dynamics even in response to moderate solar wind forcing. The global ground-based data proves to be an invaluable tool to monitor the dynamics and width of the affected magnetospheric regions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric cusp, ionosphere, reconnection, convection flow-channel, Cluster, ground-based observations

  6. Polarization observables in Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Luca

    2007-10-15

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) is an important reaction for understanding nucleon structure at low energies. By studying this process, the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon can be measured. These observables are a generalization of the already known polarizabilities and will permit theoretical models to be challenged on a new level. More specifically, there exist six generalized polarizabilities and in order to disentangle them all, a double polarization experiment must be performed. Within this work, the VCS reaction p(e,e'p){gamma} was measured at MAMI using the A1 Collaboration three spectrometer setup with Q{sup 2}=0.33 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Using the highly polarized MAMI beam and a recoil proton polarimeter, it was possible to measure both the VCS cross section and the double polarization observables. Already in 2000, the unpolarized VCS cross section was measured at MAMI. In this new experiment, we could confirm the old data and furthermore the double polarization observables were measured for the first time. The data were taken in five periods between 2005 and 2006. In this work, the data were analyzed to extract the cross section and the proton polarization. For the analysis, a maximum likelihood algorithm was developed together with the full simulation of all the analysis steps. The experiment is limited by the low statistics due mainly to the focal plane proton polarimeter efficiency. To overcome this problem, a new determination and parameterization of the carbon analyzing power was performed. The main result of the experiment is the extraction of a new combination of the generalized polarizabilities using the double polarization observables. (orig.)

  7. A Cusp Density Enhancement Study using e-POP Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, B.

    2015-12-01

    CHAMP satellite observations have confirmed neutral density enhancements which are localized to the high latitude polar cusp region. These small-scale density structures are consistently correlated with strong fine-scale field-aligned currents. A possible driver of these density enhancements is soft electron precipitation which, through processes associated with ion-outflow, results in a density enhancement in the cusp vicinity at the altitudes observed by CHAMP. We investigate this mechanism with recent observations from the CASSIOPE / e-POP satellite and numerical simulations. In-situ data for selected cusp transit events are presented. Numerical simulation predictions are discussed comparing two electron-precipitation models: a fine-scale ion-outflow model and a global-scale Joule heating / increased conductivity model (CMIT).

  8. Polar and Cluster observations of a dayside inverted-V during conjunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate particle and fields data during a conjunction of the Polar and Cluster spacecraft. This conjunction occurs near the dayside cusp boundary layer when a dayside inverted-V was observed in the particle data of both satellites. Electron, ion, electric field, and magnetic field data from each satellite confirm that the dayside inverted-V (DSIV structure is present at the location of both satellites and the electric fields persist from the altitude of the Polar (lower spacecraft to the altitude of the Cluster spacecraft. We observe accelerated, precipitating electrons and upward ions along the magnetic field. In addition, large amplitude electric fields perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field seen by Polar and by Cluster suggest significant parallel electric fields associated with these events. For similar DSIV events observed by the Polar spacecraft, plasma waves (identified as possible Alfvén waves have been observed to propagate in both directions along the magnetic field line. Future conjunctions will be necessary to confirm that DSIVs are associated with reconnection sites.

  9. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 1. Statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available Forty-five months of continuous spacecraft potential measurements from the Polar satellite are used to study the average electron density in the magnetosphere and its dependence on geomagnetic activity and season. These measurements offer a straightforward, passive method for monitoring the total electron density in the magnetosphere, with high time resolution and a density range that covers many orders of magnitude. Within its polar orbit with geocentric perigee and apogee of 1.8 and 9.0 RE, respectively, Polar encounters a number of key plasma regions of the magnetosphere, such as the polar cap, cusp, plasmapause, and auroral zone that are clearly identified in the statistical averages presented here. The polar cap density behaves quite systematically with season. At low distance (~2 RE, the density is an order of magnitude higher in summer than in winter; at high distance (>4 RE, the variation is somewhat smaller. Along a magnetic field line the density declines between these two altitudes by a factor of 10–20 in winter and by a factor of 200–1000 in summer. A likely explanation for the large gradient in the summer is a high density of heavy ions that are gravitationally bound in the low-altitude polar cap. The geomagnetic effects are also significant in the polar cap, with the average density being an order of magnitude larger for high Kp; for an individual case, the polar cap density may increase even more dramatically. The plasma density in the cusp is controlled primarily by the solar wind variables, but nevertheless, they can be characterized to some extent in terms of the Kp index. We also investigate the local time variation of the average density at the geosynchronous distance that appears to be in accordance with previous geostationary observations. The average density decreases with increasing Kp at all MLT sectors

  10. Polarization observables in ω photo-production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegna V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The total cross section of ω photo-production off proton shows several bumps in the incoming photon energy range 1.1–2.5 GeV, which can be ascribed to the contribution of intermediate proton excited states in the s-channel of the reaction. At the same time, differential cross sections show a diffractive behavior, which is interpreted in terms of t-channel exchange contributions. A complete understanding of the ω photo-production process requires a simultaneous investigation of both t-channel exchange terms and s-channel contributions. The measurement of the angular distributions of omega decay products allows to extract the values of the spin-density-matrix elements (SDME and to evaluate the contribution of natural/unnatural parity exchange terms. The use of polarized beam and/or target allows to measure polarization observables which can help to identify the intermediate proton excited states involved in the process. Results of SDME and polarization observables will be shown as an overview about ω photo-production.

  11. Sustaining observations in the polar oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, E P

    2014-09-28

    Polar oceans present a unique set of challenges to sustained observations. Sea ice cover restricts navigation for ships and autonomous measurement platforms alike, and icebergs present a hazard to instruments deployed in the upper ocean and in shelf seas. However, the important role of the poles in the global ocean circulation provides ample justification for sustained observations in these regions, both to monitor the rapid changes taking place, and to better understand climate processes in these traditionally poorly sampled areas. In the past, the vast majority of polar measurements took place in the summer. In recent years, novel techniques such as miniature CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) tags carried by seals have provided an explosion in year-round measurements in areas largely inaccessible to ships, and, as ice avoidance is added to autonomous profiling floats and gliders, these promise to provide further enhancements to observing systems. In addition, remote sensing provides vital information about changes taking place in sea ice cover at both poles. To make these observations sustainable into the future, improved international coordination and collaboration is necessary to gain optimum utilization of observing networks.

  12. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  13. Dependency of the Cusp Density Anomaly on the Variability of Forcing Inside and Outside the Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs largely determine the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to the combination of cusp particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp. While particle precipitation in the cusp is comparatively well constrained, the characteristics of the steady and fluctuating components of the electric field in the cusp are poorly constrained. Also, the significance of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in particular at lower altitudes has not been addressed as it relates to the cusp density anomaly. We address the response of the cusp region to a range electrodynamical forcing with our high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model. We take advantage of our model's high resolution and focus on a more typical cusp width of 2 degrees in latitude. Earlier simulations have also shown a significant contribution from soft particle precipitation. We simulate the atmospheric response to a range of realizable magnitudes of the fluctuating and steady components of the electric field to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly on a large range of observed characteristics of the electrodynamical forcing and examine, in particular, the importance of particle heating relative to Joule heating. In addition we investigate the role of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in determining the lower altitude cusp density and wind structure. We compare

  14. Polarization observables in low energy deuteron photodisintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glister, Jacqueline Fougere

    Electromagnetic probes of few nucleon systems, such the A = 2 deuteron, provide a useful testing ground for the nucleon-nucleon ( NN) interaction. At low excitation energies, there are now well-established meson-baryon model (MBM) calculations which successfully describe the NN interaction using effective hadron degrees of freedom (mesons exchanged by nucleons and excited nucleon states). At high enough energies, the NN interaction can be modeled using perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), where the degrees of freedom are current quarks exchanging gluons. In order to truly understand the transition between the MBM and QCD regimes, it is instructive to study the most basic electromagnetic interactions with two nucleon systems (photodisintegration of the deuteron, for instance) in an energy region approaching the upper end of the MBM range of applicability and using polarization observables sensitive to small dynamical effects. In this way, the MBM calculations can be calibrated and deficiencies revealed, such that the extreme limits of applicability of meson-baryon descriptions can be evaluated. While modern MBM calculations generally provide a good agreement for cross section and polarization measurements in deuteron photodisintegration, there has emerged a long-standing disagreement in the case of the induced recoil proton polarization (Py ) at theta cm = 90° between incident photon energies of 300 and 500 MeV. Motivated by this discrepancy between experiment and MBM calculations, high precision transferred and induced recoil proton polarization measurements in the d( g⃗,p⃗ )n reaction were performed in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for photon energies of 277--357 MeV (bin center) and thetacm = 20--120°. The new Py measurements, performed to verify the discrepancy, are found to deviate from theoretical predictions at an even lower energy than previous measurements. The transferred polarization measurements ( Pc'x and Pc

  15. Transients in oxygen outflow above the polar cap as observed by the Cluster spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, H.; Waara, M. [Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Marghitu, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Inst. for Space Sciences, Bucharest (RO)] (and others)

    2008-07-01

    Oxygen ion outflow associated with the cusp and cleft give rise to persistent oxygen ion beams which can be observed over the polar cap. For high altitude spacecraft such as Cluster these beams are often observed for several hours on each occasion. This allows for a study of typical temporal structures on the time scale of minutes. We have used 3 years of data from spring, January to May of years 2001 to 2003, for a study of the oxygen number flux variation in the polar cap ion outflow. The source of these oxygen ion beams is the cusp and cleft, and variations in ionospheric upflow on time scales of around 8 min have been reported from ground based studies using incoherent scatter radar. Such upflows typically do not reach escape velocity, and further energization above the ionosphere is required for outflow to occur. Our study shows that a typical time scale between sudden number flux enhancements observed by Cluster in a geocentric distance range of 5 R{sub E} to 12 R{sub E} is 5 to 10 min. A superposed epoch study does not reveal any significant convection velocity or temperature changes around the flux enhancement events. Sudden temperature enhancements occur with a typical time interval of about 4 min, A superposed epoch study does not reveal any number flux enhancements associated with the temperature enhancements. The clear modulation of the high altitude number flux in a manner which resembles the modulation of the ionospheric upflow indicates that this is the main limiting factor determining the total outflow. The process behind transient upflow events in the ionosphere is therefore important for the total ionospheric outflow. Subsequent h (orig.)

  16. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  17. On the occurrence of magnetic reconnection equatorward of the cusps at the Earth's magnetopause during northward IMF conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, K. J.; Thresher, S.; Trenchi, L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Petrinec, S. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Marcucci, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection changes the topology of magnetic field lines. This process is most readily observable with in situ instrumentation at the Earth's magnetopause as it creates open magnetic field lines to allow energy and momentum flux to flow from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Most models use the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to determine the location of these magnetopause entry points, known as reconnection lines. Dayside locations of magnetic reconnection equatorward of the cusps are generally found during sustained intervals of southward IMF, while high-latitude region regions poleward of the cusps are observed for northward IMF conditions. In this study we discuss Double Star magnetopause crossings and a conjunction with a Polar cusp crossing during northward IMF conditions with a dominant IMF BY component. During all seven dayside magnetopause crossings, Double Star detected switching ion beams, a known signature for the presence of reconnection lines. In addition, Polar observed a cusp ion-energy dispersion profile typical for a dayside equatorial reconnection line. Using the cutoff velocities for the precipitating and mirrored ion beams in the cusp, the distance to the reconnection site is calculated, and this distance is traced back to the magnetopause, to the vicinity of the Double Star satellite locations. Our analysis shows that, for this case, the predicted line of maximum magnetic shear also coincides with that dayside reconnection location.

  18. Cusped Wilson lines in symmetric representations

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Diego H; Trancanelli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    We study the cusped Wilson line operators and Bremsstrahlung functions associated to particles transforming in the rank-$k$ symmetric representation of the gauge group $U(N)$ for ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills. We find the holographic D3-brane description for Wilson loops with internal cusps in two different limits: small cusp angle and $k\\sqrt{\\lambda}\\gg N$. This allows for a non-trivial check of a conjectured relation between the Bremsstrahlung function and the expectation value of the 1/2 BPS circular loop in the case of a representation other than the fundamental. Moreover, we observe that in the limit of $k\\gg N$, the cusped Wilson line expectation value is simply given by the exponential of the 1-loop diagram. Using group theory arguments, this eikonal exponentiation is conjectured to take place for all Wilson loop operators in symmetric representations with large $k$, independently of the contour on which they are supported.

  19. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  20. HST observations of the limb polarization of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzon, Andreas; Buenzli, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Titan is an excellent test case for detailed studies of the scattering polarization from thick hazy atmospheres. We present the first limb polarization measurements of Titan, which are compared as a test to our limb polarization models. Previously unpublished imaging polarimetry from the HST archive is presented which resolves the disk of Titan. We determine flux-weighted averages of the limb polarization and radial limb polarization profiles, and investigate the degradation and cancelation effects in the polarization signal due to the limited spatial resolution of our observations. Taking this into account we derive corrected values for the limb polarization in Titan. The results are compared with limb polarization models, using atmosphere and haze scattering parameters from the literature. In the wavelength bands between 250 nm and 2000 nm a strong limb polarization of about 2-7 % is detected with a position angle perpendicular to the limb. The fractional polarization is highest around 1 micron. As a first ...

  1. Solar wind controls on Mercury's magnetospheric cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Heyner, Daniel; Zhong, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Mercury's magnetospheric cusp results from the interaction between the planetary intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind. In this study, we assemble 2848 orbits of MESSENGER data for a comprehensive assessment of solar wind control on Mercury's cusp. We propose and validate an IMF estimation approach for the cusp transit, and construct an index to measure the magnetic disturbance. The index maximizes within the cusp, more intense than in the adjacent magnetosphere by several orders of magnitude. We develop an empirical model of the index as a function of IMFvector and Mercury's solar orbital phase. The model is used to study the cusp activity under different conditions. Comparisons reveal the cusp activity is more intense and extends further in local time, under antisunward IMF (IMFx0), under southward IMF (IMFz0), and when Mercury orbits at its perihelion than at aphelion. Besides, the cusp shifts azimuthally towards dawn when IMF reverses from westward (IMFy0), and when Mercury approaches its perihelion. The IMFx dependence is consistent with existing observations and simulations which are ascribed to the asymmetry of dayside magnetospheric configuration between sunward and anti-sunward IMF conditions. We explain the IMFy and IMFz dependences in terms of component reconnection of the magnetospheric field merging with By-dominant and Bz-dominant IMF, respectively. The control of the Mercury solar orbit phase on the intensity and local time location of the disturbance peak are possibly arising from the modulations of the heliocentric distance on the solar wind ram pressure. The existence of significant IMF dependence suggests the IMF orientation plays a role in the convection configuration at Mercury. The IMFy-dependence at Mercury is opposite to that at Earth, suggesting that component reconnection at the dayside magnetopause is more important in the Hermean system than in the terrestrial one. This also implies that reconnection occurs at lower magnetic shear

  2. Scintillation and loss of signal lock from poleward moving auroral forms in the cusp ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Oksavik, K; Lorentzen, D A; Baddeley, L J; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    We present two examples from the cusp ionosphere over Svalbard,where poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are causing significant phase scintillation in signals from navigation satellites. The data were obtained using a combination of ground-based optical instruments and a newly installed multiconstellation navigation signal receiver at Longyearbyen. Both events affected signals from GPS and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). When one intense PMAF appeared, the signal from one GPS spacecraft also experienced a temporary loss of signal lock. Although several polar cap patches were also observed in the area as enhancements in total electron content, the most severe scintillation and loss of signal lock appear to be attributed to very intense PMAF activity. This shows that PMAFs are locations of strong ionospheric irregularities, which at times may cause more severe disturbances in the cusp ionosphere for navigation signals than polar cap patches.

  3. Numerical modelling of the thermospheric and ionospheric effects of magnetospheric processes in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available The thermospheric and ionospheric effects of the precipitating electron flux and field-aligned-current variations in the cusp have been modelled by the use of a new version of the global numerical model of the Earth's upper atmosphere developed for studies of polar phenomena. The responses of the electron concentration, ion, electron and neutral temperature, thermospheric wind velocity and electric-field potential to the variations of the precipitating 0.23-keV electron flux intensity and field-aligned current density in the cusp have been calculated by solving the corresponding continuity, momentum and heat balance equations. Features of the atmospheric gravity wave generation and propagation from the cusp region after the electron precipitation and field-aligned current-density increases have been found for the cases of the motionless and moving cusp region. The magnitudes of the disturbances are noticeably larger in the case of the moving region of the precipitation. The thermospheric disturbances are generated mainly by the thermospheric heating due to the soft electron precipitation and propagate to lower latitudes as large-scale atmospheric gravity waves with the mean horizontal velocity of about 690 m s–1. They reveal appreciable magnitudes at significant distances from the cusp region. The meridional-wind-velocity disturbance at 65° geomagnetic latitude is of the same order (100 m s–1 as the background wind due to the solar heating, but is oppositely directed. The ionospheric disturbances have appreciable magnitudes at the geomagnetic latitudes 70°–85°. The electron-concentration and -temperature disturbances are caused mainly by the ionization and heating processes due to the precipitation, whereas the ion-temperature disturbances are influence strongly by Joule heating of the ion gas due to the electric-field disturbances in the cusp. The latter strongly influence the

  4. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    with X ray observations by other spacecraft, have built up unprecedented albums of data from which astronomers can puzzle out the behaviour of these violent objects. After the termination of space operations, the IUE mission continues on the ground with the task of reprocessing all the raw data ever transmitted from the spacecraft, using the latest computational techniques. This will create the IUE archive of ultraviolet spectra, from which future generations of astronomers will continue to cull unique information on nearly 10,000 objects in the sky. Over the years, frequent international symposia have digested the results from IUE. At a special meeting of the European Astronomical Society next year November in Sevilla (Spain), astronomers will have the opportunity to put the latest findings in perspective, in relation to all the other observations since 1978. "When NASA decided last year to terminate its operations as the leading partner in IUE, we expanded our European operations at Villafranca" comments Roger Bonnet, ESA's Science Director. "Although we were unable to prolong the life of the spacecraft indefinitely, it is gratifying to see what excellent use the astronomers have made of this final phase of IUE's long career". An image illustrating IUE's last observations of the Jupiter Polar regions is available on request from ESA Public Relations, Paris (Tel : +33.1-53.69.7155 Fax : +33.1-53.69.76.90)

  5. Observer-dependent sign inversions of polarization singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Isaac

    2014-10-15

    We describe observer-dependent sign inversions of the topological charges of vector field polarization singularities: C points (points of circular polarization), L points (points of linear polarization), and two virtually unknown singularities we call γ(C) and α(L) points. In all cases, the sign of the charge seen by an observer can change as she changes the direction from which she views the singularity. Analytic formulas are given for all C and all L point sign inversions.

  6. Causes of Observed Long-Periodic Variations of the Polarization at Polar Regions of Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Shalygina, O S; Shalygin, E V; Marchenko, G P; Velikodsky, Y I; Akimov, L A; Starodubtseva, O M; Velikodsky, Yu. I.

    2006-01-01

    Data of 23-years of Jupiter polarimetric observations (1981- 2004) have been reprocessed using new improved technique. The data from other observers have been added to the analysis (1971-74). Anticorrelation between asymmetry of polarization and insolation has been found. The mechanism of influence of seasons changing (through temperature variations) on north-south asymmetry of polarization formation has been proposed. Also a possibility of existence of influence of solar cosmic rays flux on polarization value is noted.

  7. Xmm observations of polars from the sdss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Szkody

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos llevado a cabo observaciones XMM de 5 polares d ebiles descubiertas por el Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Los ujos de rayos X y los espectros presentan una variedad de reg menes de choque. El acrecentador m as bajo posee propiedades de rayos X consistentes con un origen en la estrella secundaria. Las curvas de luz de todos los sistemas presentan una alta variabilidad, con una de ellas mostrando un profundo eclipse, y en otras dos con evidencias de variaciones relacionadas con la orbita.

  8. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  9. The Nature of Jets Evidence from Circular Polarization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, J F C; Wardle, John F. C.; Homan, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    We review recent observations of circularly polarized radiation from AGN made with the VLBA and with the ATCA. We also discuss briefly the detections of the Galactic sources Sag A* and SS433. The origin of the circular polarization is still an open question in most cases, and we discuss four possible mechanisms. Detectable circular polarization is a common property of quasars, but not of radio galaxies, and is always associated with the compact core. There is growing evidence that the sign of the circular polarization stays the same over at least two or three decades in time, suggesting it is a fundamental property of the jet.

  10. Polar plumes dynamics observed during total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczynski, K.; Bělík, M.; Marková, E.

    2010-12-01

    Following the successful observation of significant activity in the polar plume during the total solar eclipse in 2006, the analysis of the Sun's polar regions was also carried out in the images obtained in multi-station observations of the eclipse of 2008. In this work polar plumes showing similar although much less significant manifestation of the dynamics have been identified. The dynamics evolution rates have been obtained from comparing the pictures taken at different times. The results are compared with the corresponding phenomena observed in X-rays from the HINODE satellite.

  11. Turbulence in a cusp Q device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    Spectral measurements are reported of plasma turbulence in the Cs plasma of a Q device, modified to a magnetic cusp geometry. The excitation mechanism for the fluctuations appears to be the centrifugal instability discussed by Chen. A transition from an f−5 to an f−3 power spectrum is observed...

  12. Strong IMF By-Related Plasma Convection in the Ionosphere and Cusp Field-Aligned Currents Under Northward IMF Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Lu, G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present in this paper an investigation of IMF-By related plasma convection and cusp field-aligned currents using FAST data and AMIE model during a prolonged interval with large positive IMF By and northward Bz conditions (By/Bz much greater than 1). Using the FAST single trajectory observations to validate the global convection patterns at key times and key locations, we have demonstrated that the AMIE procedure provides a reasonably good description of plasma circulations in the ionosphere during this interval. Our results show that the plasma convection in the ionosphere is consistent with the anti-parallel merging model. When the IMF has a strongly positive By component under northward conditions, we find that the global plasma convection forms two cells oriented nearly along the Sun-earth line in the ionosphere. In the northern hemisphere, the dayside cell has clockwise convection mainly circulating within the polar cap on open field lines. A second cell with counterclockwise convection is located in the nightside circulating across the polar cap boundary, The observed two-cell convection pattern appears to be driven by the reconnection along the anti-parallel merging lines poleward of the cusp extending toward the dusk side when IMF By/Bz much greater than 1. The magnetic tension force on the newly reconnected field lines drives the plasma to move from dusk to dawn in the polar cusp region near the polar cap boundary. The field-aligned currents in the cusp region flow downward into the ionosphere. The return field-aligned currents extend into the polar cap in the center of the dayside convection cell. The field-aligned currents are closed through the Peterson currents in the ionosphere, which flow poleward from the polar cap boundary along the electric field direction.

  13. An unusual geometry of the ionospheric signature of the cusp: implications for magnetopause merging sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    Full Text Available The HF radar Doppler spectral width boundary (SWB in the cusp represents a very good proxy for the equatorward edge of cusp ion precipitation in the dayside ionosphere. For intervals where the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF has a southward component (Bz < 0, the SWB is typically displaced poleward of the actual location of the open-closed field line boundary (or polar cap boundary, PCB. This is due to the poleward motion of newly-reconnected magnetic field lines during the cusp ion travel time from the reconnection X-line to the ionosphere. This paper presents observations of the dayside ionosphere from SuperDARN HF radars in Antarctica during an extended interval ( ~ 12 h of quasi-steady IMF conditions (By ~ Bz < 0. The observations show a quasi-stationary feature in the SWB in the morning sector close to magnetic local noon which takes the form of a 2° poleward distortion of the boundary. We suggest that two separate reconnection sites exist on the magnetopause at this time, as predicted by the anti-parallel merging hypothesis for these IMF conditions. The observed cusp geometry is a consequence of different ion travel times from the reconnection X-lines to the southern ionosphere on either side of magnetic local noon. These observations provide strong evidence to support the anti-parallel merging hypothesis. This work also shows that mesoscale and small-scale structure in the SWB cannot always be interpreted as reflecting structure in the dayside PCB. Localised variations in the convection flow across the merging gap, or in the ion travel time from the reconnection X-line to the ionosphere, can lead to localised variations in the offset of the SWB from the PCB. These caveats should also be considered when working with other proxies for the dayside PCB which are associated with cusp particle precipitation, such as the 630 nm cusp auroral emission.

    Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause

  14. Observations of polar patches generated by solar wind Alfvén wave coupling to the dayside magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    Full Text Available A long series of polar patches was observed by ionosondes and an all-sky imager during a disturbed period (Kp = 7- and IMF Bz < 0. The ionosondes measured electron densities of up to 9 × 1011 m-3 in the patch center, an increase above the density minimum between patches by a factor of sim4.5. Bands of F-region irregularities generated at the equatorward edge of the patches were tracked by HF radars. The backscatter bands were swept northward and eastward across the polar cap in a fan-like formation as the afternoon convection cell expanded due to the IMF By > 0. Near the north magnetic pole, an all-sky imager observed the 630-nm emission patches of a distinctly band-like shape drifting northeastward to eastward. The 630-nm emission patches were associated with the density patches and backscatter bands. The patches originated in, or near, the cusp footprint where they were formed by convection bursts (flow channel events, FCEs structuring the solar EUV-produced photoionization and the particle-produced auroral/cusp ionization by segmenting it into elongated patches. Just equatorward of the cusp footprint Pc5 field line resonances (FLRs were observed by magnetometers, riometers and VHF/HF radars. The AC electric field associated with the FLRs resulted in a poleward-progressing zonal flow pattern and backscatter bands. The VHF radar Doppler spectra indicated the presence of steep electron density gradients which, through the gradient drift instability, can lead to the generation of the ionospheric irregularities found in patches. The FLRs and FCEs were associated with poleward-progressing DPY currents (Hall currents modulated by the IMF By and riometer absorption enhancements. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the VHF backscatter and associated riometer absorptions closely resembled those of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs. In the solar

  15. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  16. Observations of solar scattering polarization at high spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Snik, F; Ichimoto, K; Fischer, C E; Keller, C U; Lites, B W

    2010-01-01

    The weak, turbulent magnetic fields that supposedly permeate most of the solar photosphere are difficult to observe, because the Zeeman effect is virtually blind to them. The Hanle effect, acting on the scattering polarization in suitable lines, can in principle be used as a diagnostic for these fields. However, the prediction that the majority of the weak, turbulent field resides in intergranular lanes also poses significant challenges to scattering polarization observations because high spatial resolution is usually difficult to attain. We aim to measure the difference in scattering polarization between granules and intergranules. We present the respective center-to-limb variations, which may serve as input for future models. We perform full Stokes filter polarimetry at different solar limb positions with the CN band filter of the Hinode-SOT Broadband Filter Imager, which represents the first scattering polarization observations with sufficient spatial resolution to discern the granulation. Hinode-SOT offer...

  17. Submillimeter polarization observation of the protoplanetary disk around HD 142527

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Momose, Munetake; Nagai, Hiroshi; Muto, Takayuki; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Pohl, Adriana; Fukagawa, Misato; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Murakawa, Koji

    2016-01-01

    We present the polarization observations toward the circumstellar disk around HD 142527 by using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at the frequency of 343 GHz. The beam size is $0.51 " \\times 0.44 "$, which corresponds to the spatial resolution of $\\sim$ 71 $\\times$ 62 AU. The polarized intensity displays a ring-like structure with a peak located on the east side with a polarization fraction of $P= 3.26 \\pm 0.02$ %, which is different from the peak of the continuum emission from the northeast region. The polarized intensity is significantly weaker at the peak of the continuum where $P= 0.220 \\pm 0.010$ %. The polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the main ring of the polarized intensity, while there are two regions outside at the northwest and northeast areas where the vectors are in the azimuthal direction. If the polarization vectors represent the magnetic field morphology, the polarization vectors indicate the toroidal magnetic field configuration on the main ring and the po...

  18. Least cost cusp concentrator design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, S.K.; Mullick, S.C.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    Cusp concentrators require larger reflector areas, but can be designed for larger acceptance angles, allowing large mirror tolerances. Design procedures are outlined to compute the optimum combination of acceptance angle and maximum mirror slope for any required concentration ratio, taking into account the material as well as fabrication costs. The cusps are compared with the parabola.

  19. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  20. The Association of Polar Faculae with Polar Magnetic Patches Examined with Hinode Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kaithakkal, Anjali John; Kubo, M; Shiota, D; Tsuneta, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the Sun's polar faculae are investigated with spectropolarimetric observations of the north polar region obtained by the Hinode satellite in 2007 September. Polar faculae are embedded in nearly all magnetic patches with fluxes greater than $10^{18}$ Mx, while magnetic patches without polar faculae dominate in the flux range below $10^{18}$ Mx. The faculae are considerably smaller than their parent patches, and single magnetic patches contain single or multiple faculae. The faculae in general have higher intrinsic magnetic field strengths than the surrounding regions within their parent patches. Less than 20% of the total magnetic flux contributed by the large (${\\ge}10^{18}$ Mx) concentrations, which are known to be modulated by the solar cycle, is accounted for by the associated polar faculae.

  1. Direct Observation of Ferromagnetic Spin Polarization in Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Y; Miura, T; Suzuki, M.; Kawamura, N.; Miyagawa, H; T. Nakamura; Kobayashi, K; Teranishi, T.; Hori, H.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first direct observation of ferromagnetic spin polarization of Au nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 1.9 nm using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Owing to the element selectivity of XMCD, only the gold magnetization is explored. Magnetization of gold atoms as estimated by XMCD shows a good agreement with results obtained by conventional magnetometry. This evidences intrinsic spin polarization in nanosized gold.

  2. Observation and optimization of 4He atomic polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Gong, Wei; Zhan, Yuanzhi; Lin, Zaisheng; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2013-03-15

    Polarization spectroscopy in (4)He around 1083 nm is observed and optimized with a distributed feedback fiber laser and is applied for frequency stabilization. In order to improve the accuracy and long-term stability of the frequency-locking performance, a power stabilization module is added, and the dependences of the peak-to-peak amplitude and frequency difference (width) of the polarization spectroscopy signal on various pump and probe powers are investigated.

  3. Experimental observation of polarization-dependent optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Srisuphaphon, S; Photia, T; Temnuch, W; Chiangga, S; Deachapunya, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of the induced polarization-dependent optical vortex beams. We use the Talbot configuration as a method to probe this effect. In particular, our simple experiment shows the direct measurement of this observation. Our experiment can exhibit clearly the combination between the polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light. This implementation might be useful for further studies in the quantum system or quantum information.

  4. Submillimeter Polarization Observation of the Protoplanetary Disk around HD 142527

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Nagai, Hiroshi; Muto, Takayuki; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Pohl, Adriana; Fukagawa, Misato; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Murakawa, Koji

    2016-11-01

    We present the polarization observations toward the circumstellar disk around HD 142527 by using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at the frequency of 343 GHz. The beam size is 0.″51 × 0.″44, which corresponds to the spatial resolution of ∼71 × 62 au. The polarized intensity displays a ring-like structure with a peak located on the east side with a polarization fraction of P = 3.26 ± 0.02%, which is different from the peak of the continuum emission from the northeast region. The polarized intensity is significantly weaker at the peak of the continuum where P = 0.220 ± 0.010%. The polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the main ring of the polarized intensity, while there are two regions outside at the northwest and northeast areas where the vectors are in the azimuthal direction. If the polarization vectors represent the magnetic field morphology, the polarization vectors indicate the toroidal magnetic field configuration on the main ring and the poloidal fields outside. On the other hand, the flip of the polarization vectors is predicted by the self-scattering of thermal dust emission due to the change of the direction of thermal radiation flux. Therefore, we conclude that self-scattering of thermal dust emission plays a major role in producing polarization at millimeter wavelengths in this protoplanetary disk. Also, this puts a constraint on the maximum grain size to be approximately 150 μm if we assume compact spherical dust grains.

  5. Cusp Alfven and Plasma Electrodynamics Rocket (CAPER) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch a single rocket from Andoya Rocket Range into an active cusp event. Observe electric and magnetic fields, HF waves, electron and ion distributions and...

  6. Mars: South Polar Spring Recession as observed by CRISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A.; Roush, T. L.; Wiseman, S.; McGuire, P.; Wolff, M.; Smith, M.

    2007-12-01

    We are creating a seasonal mosaic of CRISM multispectral data for each MSP (multispectral) image obtained in the south polar region (all regions poleward of 55 deg S) since the start of the MRO primary mission. This effort compliments high resolution targeted observations of the South Polar Cryptic Region (Titus et al., 2007) and OMEGA observations of the south polar cap during spring recession (Langevin et al., 2007). Langevin et al. presented similar maps at 1-10km/pixel - CRISM multispectral observations used here have a nominal resolution of 200m (Seelos, 2007). A similar CRISM multispectral mosaic has been constructed for the north polar region by Seelos et al. (Seelos et al., 2007). Science objectives of this investigation include: 1. High resolution (200m/pixel) multispectral observations of CO2 and H2O seasonal distribution, 2. Observing the point where Cap Recession Observations indicate CO2 has Ultimately Sublimated (CROCUS) line (Kieffer et al., 2000) as a function of solar longitude (ls), 3. Observations of changes in CO2 grain size linked to seasonal brightening of the polar high latitude areas (Langevin et al., 2007), and 200m/pixel observations of dust cover linked to cold jets in the Cyptic Region (Kieffer et al., 2000; Langevin et al., 2007), 4. Observations of small water ice patches in late southern spring (Langevin et al., 2007), 5. Development of climate-based atmospheric correction for use with multispectral data based on TES climatology and DISORT. We will report on the progress of our investigation and present high resolution multispectral mosaics of the south polar cap during spring recession and compare them to data from previous years. References Kieffer, H., et al., 2000. Mars south polar spring and summer behavior observed by TES: Seasonal cap evolution controlled by frost grain size. JGR 105, 9653-9700. Langevin, Y., et al., 2007. Observations of the south seasonal cap of Mars during recession in 2004-2006 by the OMEGA visible

  7. Observations that polar climate modelers use and want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, J. E.; de Boer, G.; Hunke, E. C.; Bailey, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Observations are essential for motivating and establishing improvement in the representation of polar processes within climate models. We believe that explicitly documenting the current methods used to develop and evaluate climate models with observations will help inform and improve collaborations between the observational and climate modeling communities. As such, we will present the current strategy of the Polar Climate Working Group (PCWG) to evaluate polar processes within Community Earth System Model (CESM) using observations. Our presentation will focus primarily on PCWG evaluation of atmospheric, sea ice, and surface oceanic processes. In the future, we hope to expand to include land surface, deep ocean, and biogeochemical observations. We hope our presentation, and a related working document developed by the PCWG (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zt0xParsFeMYhlihfxVJhS3D5nEcKb8A41JH0G1Ic-E/edit) inspires new and useful interactions that lead to improved climate model representation of polar processes relevant to polar climate.

  8. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opgenoorth, H.J.; Lockwood, M.; Alcayde, D.

    2001-01-01

    in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed...... formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing...

  9. Paramodular Cusp Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, Cris

    2009-01-01

    We classify Siegel modular cusp forms of weight two for the paramodular group K(p) for primes p< 600. We find that weight two Hecke eigenforms beyond the Gritsenko lifts correspond to certain abelian varieties defined over the rationals of conductor p. The arithmetic classification is in a companion article by A. Brumer and K. Kramer. The Paramodular Conjecture, supported by these computations and consistent with the Langlands philosophy and the work of H. Yoshida, is a partial extension to degree 2 of the Shimura-Taniyama Conjecture. These nonlift Hecke eigenforms share Euler factors with the corresponding abelian variety $A$ and satisfy congruences modulo \\ell with Gritsenko lifts, whenever $A$ has rational \\ell-torsion.

  10. Observing planar cell polarity in multiciliated mouse airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladar, Eszter K; Lee, Yin Loon; Stearns, Tim; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The concerted movement of cilia propels inhaled contaminants out of the lungs, safeguarding the respiratory system from toxins, pathogens, pollutants, and allergens. Motile cilia on the multiciliated cells (MCCs) of the airway epithelium are physically oriented along the tissue axis for directional motility, which depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway. The MCCs of the mouse respiratory epithelium have emerged as an important model for the study of motile ciliogenesis and the PCP signaling mechanism. Unlike other motile ciliated or planar polarized tissues, airway epithelial cells are relatively easily accessible and primary cultures faithfully model many of the essential features of the in vivo tissue. There is growing interest in understanding how cells acquire and polarize motile cilia due to the impact of mucociliary clearance on respiratory health. Here, we present methods for observing and quantifying the planar polarized orientation of motile cilia both in vivo and in primary culture airway epithelial cells. We describe how to acquire and evaluate electron and light microscopy images of ciliary ultrastructural features that reveal planar polarized orientation. Furthermore, we describe the immunofluorescence localization of PCP pathway components as a simple readout for airway epithelial planar polarization and ciliary orientation. These methods can be adapted to observe ciliary orientation in other multi- and monociliated cells and to detect PCP pathway activity in any tissue or cell type.

  11. Optical polarization observations in Hogg 22 and NGC 6204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, R.; Vergne, M. M.; Feinstein, C.

    2004-06-01

    We present new (UBVRI) multicolor linear polarimetric data for 22 of the brightest stars in the area of the open clusters Hogg 22 and NGC 6204 to study the properties of the ISM (interstellar medium) toward these clusters and between them. The new data were incorporated in our data set of previous observations (Waldhausen et al. \\cite{waldhausen}), resulting in 28 observed stars in the region. Our data yield for NGC 6204 a mean polarization percentage of Pλ_max˜1.8%, close to the polarization value produced by the ISM with normal efficiency (Pλ_max ˜ 5 EB-V) with a color excess of EB-V =0.51. Meanwhile for Hogg 22, located behind NGC 6204, the mean polarization is Pλ_max˜ 2.15%, lower than the expected value for the observed color excess of EB-V =0.68 (Forbes et al. 1996) and the average efficiency of polarization for the interstellar dust. The mean angle of the polarization vectors of Hogg 22 is θ=44.9 °, which agrees with the expected angle produce by dust particles aligned in the direction of the Galactic Plane (θ=48°), while for NGC 6204 a lower value, θ=33.7 °, was found. Therefore, we believe that Hogg 22 is depolarized by the same dust that is polarizing NGC 6204, due to different orientations of the dust particles (and magnetic fields) that polarize the starlight. Based on observations obtanined at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina.

  12. Cusp-like plasma in high altitudes: a statistical study of the width and location of the cusp from Magion-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mĕrka

    Full Text Available The width of the cusp region is an indicator of the strength of the merging process and the degree of opening of the magnetosphere. During three years, the Magion-4 satellite, as part of the Interball project, has collected a unique data set of cusp-like plasma observations in middle and high altitudes. For a comparison of high- and low-altitude cusp determination, we map our observations of cusp-like plasma along the magnetic field lines down to the Earth’s surface. We use the Tsyganenko and Stern 1996 model of the magnetospheric magnetic field for the mapping, taking actual solar wind and IMF parameters from the Wind observations. The footprint positions show substantial latitudinal dependence on the dipole tilt angle. We fit this dependence with a linear function and subtract this function from observed cusp position. This process allows us to study both statistical width and location of the inspected region as a function of the solar wind and IMF parameters. Our processing of the Magion-4 measurements shows that high-altitude regions occupied by the cusp-like plasma (cusp and cleft are projected onto a much broader area (in magnetic local time as well as in a latitude than that determined in low altitudes. The trends of the shift of the cusp position with changes in the IMF direction established by low-altitude observations have been confirmed.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layer; solar wind – magnetosphere interactions

  13. Cusp effects in meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in the pi0 pi0 invariant mass distribution of K+ --> pi0 pi0 pi+ decays. As originally pointed out by Cabibbo, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths to high precision. We present the non-relativistic effective field theory framework that permits to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner, including the effects of radiative corrections. Applications of the same formalism to other decay channels, in particular eta and eta' decays, are also discussed.

  14. Polar Magnetic Fields Observed During the Last Four Solar Minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Sun's polar fields during the current minimum are the weakest in at least four solar cycles. The field strengths are fairly symmetric, unlike at least the two previous minima. We compare data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to follow the polar field changes since 1976. The polar field is never observed well from Earth because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator, and each year the view of the north (south) is completely hidden for several months around March 7 (September 7). Analysis of the most favorably oriented MDI synoptic maps each year allows us to derive the fairly slowly evolving large-scale polar magnetic field pattern from 1996 to the present. We account for differential rotation and other geometric effects. The analysis allows us to provide a useful interpolated or extrapolated correction that can be smoothly incorporated into the global synoptic or synchronic maps above about 70 degrees latitude. The polar field is important in modeling the large-scale coronal and heliospheric field, particularly at minimum. Even though there has been extremely little solar activity over the last several months, at the current solar minimum the structure of the corona is much less equatorial than usual, in part because the polar fields are relatively weak.

  15. Do observations reveal accretion discs in intermediate polars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellier, C. (University Coll., London (UK). Mullard Space Science Lab.)

    1991-08-15

    It has been proposed that intermediate polars do not accrete through discs and that they may not possess discs. Observations of eclipses and emission lines provide strong evidence that discs are present in many intermediate polars, although it is less clear whether the accretion flows through these discs. An analysis of the EXOSAT database shows that many systems have orbital and beat period modulations which are small compared to the spin-pulses, suggesting disc accretion. There are, though, exceptions, notably TX Col where dominant orbital and beat period modulations indicate discless accretion. (author).

  16. Nuclear Structure Observable with Polarized Target and Polarized Real Photon Beam at Mainz Microtron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, Dilli

    2016-09-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, like the nucleon mass or charge. While the electric (αE 1) and magnetic (βM 1) scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract them using polarized photon beam and polarized target at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the double polarization observable ∑2 z which is sensitive to these polarizabilities. The ∑2 z is measured via a circularly polarized photon beam on a longitudinally polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). Together with constraints from αE 1 and βM 1, the forward spin polarizability (γ0) , and QCD based models, should allow us to extract all four spin polarizabilities. This presentation will be focused on the preliminary experimental results for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  17. Ground-based observations of the auroral zone and polar cap ionospheric responses to dayside transient reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available Observations from the EISCAT VHF incoherent scatter radar system in northern Norway, during a run of the common programme CP-4, reveal a series of poleward-propagating F-region electron density enhancements in the pre-noon sector on 23 November 1999. These plasma density features, which are observed under conditions of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, exhibit a recurrence rate of under 10 min and appear to emanate from the vicinity of the open/closed field-line boundary from where they travel into the polar cap; this is suggestive of their being an ionospheric response to transient reconnection at the day-side magnetopause (flux transfer events. Simultaneous with the density structures detected by the VHF radar, poleward-moving radar auroral forms (PMRAFs are observed by the Finland HF coherent scatter radar. It is thought that PM-RAFs, which are commonly observed near local noon by HF radars, are also related to flux transfer events, although the specific mechanism for the generation of the field-aligned irregularities within such features is not well understood. The HF observations suggest, that for much of their existence, the PMRAFs trace fossil signatures of transient reconnection rather than revealing the footprint of active reconnection itself; this is evidenced not least by the fact that the PMRAFs become narrower in spectral width as they evolve away from the region of more classical, broad cusp scatter in which they originate. Interpretation of the HF observations with reference to the plasma parameters diagnosed by the incoherent scatter radar suggests that as the PMRAFs migrate away from the reconnection site and across the polar cap, entrained in the ambient antisunward flow, the irregularities therein are generated by the presence of gradients in the electron density, with these gradients having been formed through structuring of the ionosphere in the cusp region in response to transient reconnection

  18. SOHO observations of the north polar solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Betta, R.; Orlando, S.; Reale, F.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.; Fineschi, S.; Romoli, M.; Brekke, P.; Fludra, A.; Gurman, J. B.; Lemaire, P.; Schuhle, U.

    1997-01-01

    The observations performed with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) are reported on. These observations concerned the Lyman alpha and O VI 1032 A and 1037 A lines and covered the heliocentric distance from 1.5 to 3.5 solar radii. The corresponding inner corona was observed with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS) and the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) in several chromospheric and coronal lines, including those observed with UVCS. The images provided an overall scenario of the polar coronal hole.

  19. Optical polarization observations in the Scorpius region: NGC 6124

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergne, M. Marcela; Feinstein, Carlos; Martínez, Ruben; Orsatti, Ana María; Alvarez, María Paula

    2010-04-01

    We have obtained optical multicolour (UBVRI) linear polarimetric data for 46 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 6124 in order to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) that lies along the line of sight towards the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization efficiency of PV/E(B - V) = 3.1 +/- 0.62, i.e. a value lower than the polarization produced by the ISM with normal efficiency for an average colour excess of E(B - V) = 0.80 as that found for NGC 6124. Besides, the polarization shows an orientation of which is not parallel to the Galactic disc, an effect that we think may be caused by the Lupus cloud. Our analysis also indicates that the observed visual extinction in NGC 6124 is caused by the presence of three different absorption sheets located between the Sun and NGC 6124. The values of the internal dispersion of the polarization (ΔPV ~ 1.3 per cent) and of the colour excess (ΔE(B - V) ~ 0.29 mag) for the members of NGC 6124 seem to be compatible with the presence of an intracluster dust component. Only six stars exhibit some evidence of intrinsic polarization. Our work also shows that polarimetry provides an excellent tool to distinguish between member and non-member stars of a cluster. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina. E-mail: cfeinstein@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar (CF)

  20. The Energetics of Cusp Destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Aaron J; Couchman, H M P

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytic estimate for the energy required to create a constant density core within a dark matter halo. Our new estimate, based on more realistic assumptions, leads to a required energy that is orders of magnitude lower than is claimed in earlier work. We define a core size based on the logarithmic slope of the dark matter density profile so that it is insensitive to the functional form used to fit observed data. The energy required to form a core depends sensitively on the radial scale over which dark matter within the cusp is redistributed within the halo. Simulations indicate that within a region of comparable size to the active star forming regions of the central galaxy that inhabits the halo, dark matter particles have their orbits radially increased by a factor of 2--3 during core formation. Thus the inner properties of the dark matter halo, such as halo concentration, and final core size, set the energy requirements. As a result, the energy cost increases slowly with halo mass as M$_{\\r...

  1. Optical polarization observations in the Scorpius region: NGC 6124

    CERN Document Server

    Vergne, M Marcela; Martinez, Ruben; Orsatti, Ana Maria; Alvarez, Maria Paula

    2010-01-01

    We have obtained optical multicolour (UBVRI) linear polarimetric data for 46 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 6124 in order to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) that lies along the line of sight toward the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization efficiency of $P_V/E_{B-V}=3.1\\pm$0.62, i.e., a value lower than the polarization produced by the ISM with normal efficiency for an average color excess of $E_{B-V}=0.80$ as that found for NGC 6124. Besides, the polarization shows an orientation of $\\theta \\sim 8^\\circ$.1 which is not parallel to the Galactic Disk,an effect that we think may be caused by the Lupus Cloud. Our analysis also indicates that the observed visual extinction in NGC 6124 is caused by the presence of three different absorption sheets located between the Sun and NGC 6124. The values of the internal dispersion of the polarization ($\\Delta P_V\\sim 1.3% $) and of the colour excess ($\\Delta E_{B-V}\\sim 0.29$ mag) for the members of NGC 6124 see...

  2. Fitting the Cusp Catastrophe in R: A cusp Package Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul P. P. P. Grasman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Of the seven elementary catastrophes in catastrophe theory, the “cusp” model is the most widely applied. Most applications are however qualitative. Quantitative techniques for catastrophe modeling have been developed, but so far the limited availability of flexible software has hindered quantitative assessment. We present a package that implements and extends the method of Cobb (Cobb and Watson 1980; Cobb, Koppstein, and Chen 1983, and makes it easy to quantitatively fit and compare different cusp catastrophe models in a statistically principled way. After a short introduction to the cusp catastrophe, we demonstrate the package with two instructive examples.

  3. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.-W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F.; Mende, S. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by Imager for Magnetopause-to- Aurora Global Exploration Far Ultra-Violet imager (IMAGE FUV) for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF By variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more energetic ions were detected over the equatonvard part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements showed a four-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP, and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  4. Radio polarization observations of large supernova remnants at 6cm

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L; Sun, X H; Reich, W; Xiao, L; Reich, P; Xu, J W; Shi, W B; Fuerst, E; Wielebinski, R

    2013-01-01

    We have observed 79 supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Urumqi 25m telescope at 6cm during the Sino-German 6cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. We measured flux densities of SNRs at 6cm, some of which are the first measurements or the data at highest frequencies, so that we can determine or improve spectra of SNRs. Our observations have ruled out the suggested spectral breaks or spectral flattening of a few SNRs, and confirmed the spectral break of S147. Combined our 6cm maps with 11cm and 21cm maps from the Effelsberg 100m telescope, we calculated the spectral index maps of several large SNRs. For many remnants, we obtained for the first time polarization images, which show the intrinsic magnetic field structures at 6 cm. We disapproved three "remnants", OA184, G192.8-1.1 and G16.8-1.1, which show a thermal spectrum and no polarization. We have discovered two large supernova remnant, G178.2-4.2 and G25.1-2.3, from the 6cm survey maps.

  5. Cassini ISS observation of Saturn's north polar vortex and comparison to the south polar vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2017-03-01

    We present analyses of Saturn's north pole using high-resolution images captured in late 2012 by the Cassini spacecraft's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) camera. The images reveal the presence of an intense cyclonic vortex centered at the north pole. In the red and green visible continuum wavelengths, the north polar region exhibits a cyclonically spiraling cloud morphology extending from the pole to 85°N planetocentric latitude, with a 4700 km radius. Images captured in the methane bands, which sense upper tropospheric haze, show an approximately circular hole in the haze extending up to 1.5° latitude away from the pole. The spiraling morphology and the "eye"-like hole at the center are reminiscent of a terrestrial tropical cyclone. In the System III reference frame (rotation period of 10h39m22.4s, Seidelmann et al. 2007; Archinal et al. 2011), the eastward wind speed increases to about 140 m s-1 at 89°N planetocentric latitude. The vorticity is (6.5± 1.5) × 10-4 s-1 at the pole, and decreases to (1.3± 1.2) × 10-4 s-1 at 89°N. In addition, we present an analysis of Saturn's south polar vortex using images captured in January 2007 to compare its cloud morphology to the north pole. The set of images captured in 2007 includes filters that have not been analyzed before. Images captured in the violet filter (400 nm) also reveal a bright polar cloud. The south polar morphology in 2007 was more smooth and lacked the small clouds apparent around the north pole in 2012. Saturn underwent equinox in August 2009. The 2007 observation captured the pre-equinox south pole, and the 2012 observation captured the post-equinox north pole. Thus, the observed differences between the poles are likely due to seasonal effects. If these differences indeed are caused by seasonal effects, continuing observations of the summer north pole by the Cassini mission should show a formation of a polar cloud that appears bright in short-wavelength filters.

  6. Kinematic Cusps: Determining the Missing Particle Mass at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Tao; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2009-01-01

    Neutral massive stable particles (dark matter candidates) are produced at colliders in pairs, due to an exact symmetry called a ``parity''. They escape from detection, rendering their mass measurement difficult. We consider the pair production of these stable particles associated with two observable particles, from a two-step cascade decay of a heavier particle with even parity, via an intermediate particle with odd parity. We observe kinematic cusp structures in the invariant mass and angular distributions of the observable particles. Knowing the parent mass from direct resonant decay into Standard Model particles, one can determine the missing particle mass as well as the intermediate particle mass by using the cusped peak and end point of the distributions. The shape of the cusp distribution does not depend on the spin correlation.

  7. Energetic particle sounding of the magnetospheric cusp with ISEE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Whitaker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations on 30 October 1978 show the ISEE-1 spacecraft passing though the high-altitude dayside northern magnetospheric cusp region from roughly 16:00 to 18:30 UT, during a slow solar wind period (~380 km/s. More than two orders of magnitude enhancements of the cusp energetic particle (CEP fluxes were observed along with a depressed and turbulent local magnetic field. The observed variations of the pitch angle distributions (PAD provide a unique opportunity to determine the structure of the cusp and the origin of the CEP. Through a boundary sounding technique, the location and orientation of the cusp poleward (or backside boundary was observed for almost 10 min during which time it appeared initially to be stationary in the GSM/GSE X-direction and then moved sunward about 0.12 Earth radii (RE. The orientation remained approximately perpendicular to the GSM/GSE X-axis until it was observed to rotate by 60 degrees in ~3 min before ISEE-1 was fully inside the cusp cavity. The cavity itself was filled with CEP fluxes displaying large anisotropies, indicative of their source being located below (Earthward of the satellite location. The spacecraft entered from the backside of the cusp, then traveled ~4 RE through the cavity, and exited through the "top" of the cavity leaving a region of energetic ions below. The PADs demonstrate that the bow shock cannot be the main source of the observed CEPs. The CEP fluxes were measured at about 8.5 h MLT when the IMF had both an 8–10 nT duskward and southward component.

  8. A comparison between ion characteristics observed by the POLAR and DMSP spacecraft in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Stubbs

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We study here the injection and transport of ions in the convection-dominated region of the Earth's magnetosphere. The total ion counts from the CAMMICE MICS instrument aboard the POLAR spacecraft are used to generate occurrence probability distributions of magnetospheric ion populations. MICS ion spectra are characterised by both the peak in the differential energy flux, and the average energy of ions striking the detector. The former permits a comparison with the Stubbs et al. (2001 survey of He2+ ions of solar wind origin within the magnetosphere. The latter can address the occurrences of various classifications of precipitating particle fluxes observed in the topside ionosphere by DMSP satellites (Newell and Meng, 1992. The peak energy occurrences are consistent with our earlier work, including the dawn-dusk asymmetry with enhanced occurrences on the dawn flank at low energies, switching to the dusk flank at higher energies. The differences in the ion energies observed in these two studies can be explained by drift orbit effects and acceleration processes at the magnetopause, and in the tail current sheet. Near noon at average ion energies of ≈1keV, the cusp and open LLBL occur further poleward here than in the Newell and Meng survey, probably due to convection- related time-of-flight effects. An important new result is that the pre-noon bias previously observed in the LLBL is most likely due to the component of this population on closed field lines, formed largely by low energy ions drifting earthward from the tail. There is no evidence here of mass and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the LLBL by non-reconnection coupling. At higher energies ≈2–20keV, we observe ions mapping to the auroral oval and can distinguish between the boundary and central plasma sheets. We show that ions at these energies relate to a transition from dawnward to duskward dominated flow, this is evidence of how ion drift orbits in the

  9. Deep 1.4-GHz observations of diffuse polarized emission

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Reich, W; Reich, P; Fürst, E; Bernardi, G; Cortiglioni, S; Sbarra, C

    2006-01-01

    Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of beta_E = -1.79 +/- 0.13 and beta_B = -1.74 +/- 0.12, respectively. Because of the very high Galactic latitude and the smooth emission, a weak Faraday rotation action is expected, which allows both a fair extrapolation to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) frequencies and an estimate of the contamination by Galactic synchrotron emission. We extrapolate the E-mode spectrum up to 32-GHz and confirm the possibility to safely detect the CMBP E-mode signal in the Ka band found in another low emission region (Carretti et a...

  10. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchem, Jean; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; hide

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines: the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF B(sub Z) component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF B(sub Z) is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF B(sub y) component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere. The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly

  11. The interaction between transpolar arcs and cusp spots

    CERN Document Server

    Fear, R C; Carter, J A; Maggiolo, R

    2016-01-01

    Transpolar arcs and cusp spots are both auroral phenomena which occur when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward. Transpolar arcs are associated with magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail, which closes magnetic flux and results in a "wedge" of closed flux which remains trapped, embedded in the magnetotail lobe. The cusp spot is an indicator of lobe reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause; in its simplest case, lobe reconnection redistributes open flux without resulting in any net change in the open flux content of the magnetosphere. We present observations of the two phenomena interacting--i.e., a transpolar arc intersecting a cusp spot during part of its lifetime. The significance of this observation is that lobe reconnection can have the effect of opening closed magnetotail flux. We argue that such events should not be rare.

  12. Multi-instrument observations and numerical modeling of intense ion upflows during stormtime polar cap expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Ozturk, D. S.; Ridley, A. J.; Jia, X.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's ionosphere plays an important role in supplying plasma into the magnetosphere through ion upflow/outflow, particularly during periods of strong solar wind driving. An intense ion upflow flux event during the June 1, 2013 geomagnetic storm has been studied using observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR) and GPS total electron content (TEC), as well as numerical simulations. After the IMF southward turning, the open-closed field line boundary (OCB) and convection cells in the high latitude Northern hemisphere, as observed by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars, expanded equatorward rapidly. When the cusp moved into the PFISR field-of-view, divergent ion fluxes were observed by the field-aligned beam of PFISR with intense ion upflow fluxes reaching 1.9 x1014 m-2s-1 at 600 km altitude. Both ion and electron temperatures increased significantly within the ion upflow and thus this upflow event was classified as Type-2 upflow. We discuss possible contributing factors for the formation of such intense ion upflow fluxes, including preconditioning by storm-enhanced density (SED) and temperature dependent chemistry. The global ionosphere thermosphere model (GITM) has been employed to quantitatively study the formation mechanisms of the upflows. During this event, the OCB and cusp were detected by DMSP between 15-16 MLTs, unusually duskward. Results from a global MHD simulation using the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) have been used to provide a global context for this event. The global simulation suggests that due to the very low solar wind Mach number ( 4), magnetopause reconnection occurred across a wide range of local times extending into the dusk sector where DMSP observed the cusp.

  13. Talon cusp on palatally erupted mesiodens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashalata Gannepalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is an accessory cusp-like structure or an extra cusp on an anterior tooth arising as a result of evagination on the surface of the crown before calcification has occurred. The cusp is composed of normal enamel and dentin containing varying extensions of pulp tissue. It is associated with few developmental anomalies such as peg laterals, dens invaginatus, and mesiodens. Mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth located in the premaxillary central incisor region which is supplemental or rudimentary type. Association of mesiodens with talon cusp is a rare occurrence with 25 cases reported. The presence of Talon cusp or a supernumerary tooth – mesiodens – leads to clinical implications such as poor esthetics, crowding, rotations, and also occlusal discrepancies. In this report, we present a case report of an 18-year-old male having a talon cusp on palatally erupted mesiodens.

  14. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  15. Double-cusp simulation during northward IMF using 3D PIC global code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Amin; Kalaee, Mohammad Javad

    2017-07-01

    The cusp has important effects on the transportation of particles and their energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and ionosphere, and high-altitude atmosphere. The cusp can be considered to be a part of the magnetospheric boundary layer with weaker magnetic fields. It has been studied since 1971 by different satellite observations. Despite many years of investigation, some problems, such as the boundaries, shapes, and method of construction, remain to be solved. The double cusp was first reported by Wing using the observation of the DMSP satellite. He also compared the results of observations with the results of a 2D MHD simulation. In this study, by performing simulations and analyzing the results, we report the observation of a V-shaped double-cusp structure under the northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). In our simulation, the double cusp was seen only for electrons, although a weak double cusp was observed for ions as well. We showed that this double cusp occurred because of electron precipitation from different sources of solar wind and magnetosphere with different magnetic field strengths. In previous studies of the double cusp, there were debates on its spatial structure or on its temporal behavior due to the cusp movement caused by the sharp solar wind effects on the magnetosphere shape. Here we report the spatial detection of the double cusp similar to the one observed by the DMSP satellite, but for the northward IMF case. Also, we investigate the asymmetry along the dawn-dusk side of the magnetosphere using our 3D PIC simulation code.

  16. X-ray and optical observations of four polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worpel, H.; Schwope, A. D.; Granzer, T.; Reinsch, K.; Schwarz, R.; Traulsen, I.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the temporal and spectral behaviour of four polar cataclysmic variables from the infrared to X-ray regimes, refine our knowledge of the physical parameters of these systems at different accretion rates, and search for a possible excess of soft X-ray photons. Methods: We obtained and analysed four XMM-Newton X-ray observations of three of the sources, two of them discovered with the SDSS and one in the RASS. The X-ray data were complemented by optical photometric and spectroscopic observations and, for two sources, archival Swift observations. Results: SDSSJ032855.00+052254.2 was X-ray bright in two XMM-Newton and two Swift observations, and shows transitions from high and low accretion states on a timescale of a few months. The source shows no significant soft excess. We measured the magnetic field strength at the main accreting pole to be 39 MG and the inclination to be 45° ≤ i ≤ 77°, and we refined the long-term ephemeris. SDSSJ133309.20+143706.9 was X-ray faint. We measured a faint phase X-ray flux and plasma temperature for this source, which seems to spend almost all of its time accreting at a low level. Its inclination is less than about 76°. 1RXSJ173006.4+033813 was X-ray bright in the XMM-Newton observation. Its spectrum contained a modest soft blackbody component, not luminous enough to be considered a significant soft excess. We inferred a magnetic field strength at the main accreting pole of 20 to 25 MG, and that the inclination is less than 77° and probably less than 63°. V808 Aur, also known as CSS081231:J071126+440405, was X-ray faint in the Swift observation, but there is nonetheless strong evidence for bright and faint phases in X-rays and perhaps in UV. Residual X-ray flux from the faint phase is difficult to explain by thermal emission from the white dwarf surface, or by accretion onto the second pole. We present a revised distance estimate of 250 pc. Conclusions: The three systems we were able to study in detail

  17. Cusp solitons and cusp-like singular solutions for nonlinear equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Zhijun [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas Pan-American, 1201 West University Drive, Edinburg, TX 78539 (United States) and Institute of Mathematics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: qiao@utpa.edu; Qiao, Xin Brian [Memorial High School, 101E Hackberry, McAllen TX 78501 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This paper gives two new families of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). One has cusp soliton solution while the other possesses the cusp-like singular traveling wave solution. A typical integrable system: Harry-Dym (HD) equation is able to be contained in both families and has cusp soliton solution as well as cusp-like singular traveling wave solution. We prove that the cusp solution of the HD equation is not stable and the cusp-like solution is not included in the parametric solutions of the HD equati0008.

  18. Observation and modeling of polarized light from scarab beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Sam; de Silva, Lakshman; Hodgkinson, Ian; Leader, John

    2007-08-01

    The light reflected from scarab beetles illuminated with unpolarized white light is analyzed ellipsometrically and displayed as the sum of an elliptically polarized spectrum Ip and an unpolarized spectrum Iu. A chirped stack of chiral resonators, each with a characteristic Bragg wavelength and partial realignment of birefringent material to a fixed axis, is proposed as a model for simulation of both reflection and polarization spectra. Possible mechanisms that effectively eliminate impedance mismatch at the air-elytron interface and allow some beetles to exhibit nearly perfect circularly polarized reflections are discussed. Results are presented for three representative beetles, Ischiosopha bifasciata, which is shown to be a narrowband left-circular polarizer; Chrysophora chrysochlora, a broadband left-circular polarizer; and Chrysina woodi, an elliptical polarizer. The methods that are developed are applicable to the more general problem of synthesis of reflectors with prescribed reflection and polarization spectra.

  19. Dual differential polarimetry. A technique to recover polarimetric information from dual polarization observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Muller, S

    2016-01-01

    Current mm/submm interferometers, like the Atacama Large mm/submm Array (ALMA), use receivers that register the sky signal in a linear polarization basis. In the case of observations performed in full-polarization mode (where the cross-correlations are computed among all the polarization channels) it is possible to reconstruct the full-polarization brightness distribution of the observed sources, as long as a proper calibration of delay offsets and leakage among polarization channels can be performed. Observations of calibrators, preferably with some linear polarization, with a good parallactic angle coverage are usually needed for such a calibration. In principle, dual-polarization observations only allow us to recover the Stokes $I$ intensity distribution of the sources, regardless of the parallactic angle coverage of the observations. In this paper, we present a novel technique of dual differential polarimetry that makes it possible to obtain information related to the full-polarization brightness distribu...

  20. MTA在前磨牙畸形中央尖预防性盖髓术中的疗效观察%Clinical observation of MTA applied to the preventive pulp capping of premolar abnormal central cusp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵献平; 徐芳

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察MTA在前磨牙畸形中央尖预防性盖髓术中的疗效。方法选择2011年7月~2013年7月在我科就诊的未感染前磨牙高陡畸形中央尖患者66例牙齿78颗,随机分为两组,分别用MTA和氢氧化钙进行预防性盖髓,术后3、6、12个月及2年后复查,观察疗效,评价疗效。结果术后3个月复查,MTA组成功率为97%,Dycal组成功率为95%,比较两组近期疗效,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),术后2年复查, MTA组成功率为95%,Dycal组为72%,比较两组之间远期疗效,MTA组明显高于Dycal组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论应用MTA行前磨牙畸形中央尖预防性盖髓术是一种较好的治疗方法。%Objective To observe the clinical effect of MTA applied to preventive pulp capping of prenmolar abnormal central cusp.Methods 78 unifected premolar steep abnormal central cusp teeth collected from 66 case were treated in our department of our hospital during June in 2011 to June in 2013.They were randomly divided into two groups .MTA was used in preventive pulp capping in the experimental group while Dycal was applied in the control group.At each (3、6、12months and two group),the teeth were assessed dimically to evaluate clinical effect.Results After three months ,the treatment success rate of the MTA group was 97% and the treatment success rate of the Dycal group was 95%.There was no statistically significant difference at the shot term clinical effect between the two groups(P>0.05).After two years ,the treatment success rate of the MTA group was 95% and the treatment success rate of the Dycal group was 72% ,The long term clinical effect of the treatment with MTA was better than Dycal in preventive pulp capping(P<0.05). Conclusion MTA applied to the preventive pulp capping of central cusp deformity is a better way.

  1. Nonlinear observer to estimate polarization phenomenon in membrane distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoukhi Billal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a bi-dimensional dynamic model of Direct Contact Membrane Desalination (DCMD process. Most of the MD configuration processes have been modeled as steady-state one-dimensional systems. Stationary two-dimensional MD models have been considered only in very few studies. In this work, a dynamic model of a DCMD process is developed. The model is implemented using Matlab/Simulink environment. Numerical simulations are conducted for different operational parameters at the module inlets such as the feed and permeate temperature or feed and permeate flow rate. The results are compared with experimental data published in the literature. The work presents also a feed forward control that compensates the possible decrease of the temperature gradient by increasing the flow rate. This work also deals with a development of nonlinear observer to estimate temperature polarization inside the membrane. The observer gives a good profile and longitudinal temperature estimations and shows a good prediction of pure water flux production.

  2. Observation of a tidal effect on the Polar Jet Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Best

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the Polar Jet Stream directly affect weather across Europe and North America (Francis et al., 2012. Jet Stream dynamics are governed by the development of planetary Rossby waves (Dickinson, 1978 driven by variation of the Coriolis force with latitude. Here we show that increasing atmospheric tides induce the development of Rossby waves, especially during winter months. This changes the flow and direction of the Jet Stream, as measured by the Arctic Oscillation (AO. Although horizontal tidal forces are tiny (107 smaller than gravity, they act over huge areas dragging the Jet Stream flow southwards in regular pulses as the earth rotates. This induces a changing Coriolis torque, which then distorts the Jet Stream flow. The data from eight recent winters are studied indicating that the AO is anti-correlated to the horizontal "tractional" component of tides acting between latitude 45 and 60° N. The observed 28 day cycle in Jet Stream flow and extent has a statistical significance > 99 %. A cross-correlation between all daily AO data since 1950 and the tractional tidal strength shows a significant anti-correlation with a lag time of ~ 5 days. The strongest correlation and largest excursions of the AO are observed during winter 2005/2006 – a maximum lunar standstill year. This declination dependence of tidal forces at high latitudes is the proposed cause of many previous reports of an 18.6 year dependence of continental rainfall and drought.

  3. CRISM south polar mapping: First Mars year of observations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; McGuire, Patrick C; Murchie, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    We report on mapping of the south polar region of Mars using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument. Our observations have led to the following discoveries: 1. Water ice is present in the form of pole-circling clouds originating from the circum-Hellas region, beginning prior to Ls=162 and diminishing markedly at Ls=200-204. 2. It has previously been inferred by temperature measurements(Titus et al., 2003) and CO2-H2O mixture spectral models (Langevin et al., 2007) that surface water ice was present in the Cryptic Region in the final stages of sublimation. The high resolution of CRISM has revealed regions where only water ice is present (not a CO2-H2O ice mixture). This water ice disappears completely by Ls=252 and may be the source of water vapor observed by CRISM in southern latitudes between Ls=240-260 (Smith, et al., this issue). 3. We have estimated surface CO2 ice grain size distributions for the South Pole Residual Cap (SPRC) and the seasonal CO2 ice cap th...

  4. Cusps in K --> 3 pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, G; Kubis, B; Rusetsky, A; Colangelo, Gilberto; Gasser, Juerg; Kubis, Bastian; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2006-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K --> 3 pi decays. As has recently been pointed out by Cabibbo and Isidori, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pi pi scattering lengths to high precision. Here, we present and illustrate an effective field theory framework that allows one to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner. The strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically.

  5. Earth scenes in polarized light observed from the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Victor S.; Coulson, Kinsell L.

    1989-01-01

    By means of a pair of boresighted and synchronized cameras fitted with orthogonally oriented polarizing filters and carried aboard the Space Shuttle, a large number of polarized images of the earth's surface have been obtained from orbital altitude. Selected pairs of images, both in color and in black and white, have been digitized and computer-processed to yield analogous images in each of the three Stokes parameters necessary for characterizing the state of linear polarization of the emergent light. Many of the images show surface properties more distinctly in degree and plane of polarization than in simple intensity alone. It is believed that these are the first, and certainly the most extensive, set of polarized images of the earth ever obtained from space. Selected pairs of the images are presented here along with some early results of analysis.

  6. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  7. Climatological features of electron density in the polar ionosphere from long-term observations of EISCAT/ESR radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, H.T.; Ma, S.Y.; Fan, Y. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronics Information; CNEM (France). Key Lab of Geospace Environmental and Geodesy; Liu, Y.C. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronics Information; Schlegel, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS), Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, climatological features of the polar F2-region electron density (N{sub e}) are investigated by means of statistical analysis using long-term observations from the European Incoherent Scatter UHF radar (called EISCAT in the following) and the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) during periods of quiet to moderate geomagnetic activity. Field-aligned measurements by the EISCAT and ESR radars operating in CP-1 and CP-2 modes are used in this study, covering the years 1988-1999 for EISCAT and 1999-2003 for ESR. The data are sorted by season (equinox, summer and winter) and solar cycle phase (maximum, minimum, rising and falling). Some novel and interesting results are presented as follows: (1) The well-known winter anomaly is evident during the solar maximum at EISCAT, but it dies out at the latitude of the ESR; (2) The daytime peaks of N{sub e} at EISCAT for all seasons during solar maximum lag about 1-2 h behind those at ESR, with altitudes about 10-30 km lower. (3) In addition to the daytime peak, it is revealed that there is another peak just before magnetic midnight at ESR around solar maximum, especially in winter and at equinox. The day-time ionization peak around magnetic noon observed by ESR can be attributed to soft particle precipitation in the cusp region, whereas the pre-midnight N{sub e} maximum seems likely to be closely related to substorm events which frequently break out during that time sector, in particular for the winter case. (4) Semiannual variations are found at EISCAT during solar minimum and the falling phase of the solar cycle; at the rising phase, however, the EISCAT observations show no obvious seasonal variations. (orig.)

  8. Optically Polarized Conduction-Band Electrons in Tungsten Observed by Spin-Polarized Photoemission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zürcher, P.; Meier, F.; Christensen, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Along the (100) direction of tungsten, interband transitions induced by circularly polarized light of energy 1.5 eV......Along the (100) direction of tungsten, interband transitions induced by circularly polarized light of energy 1.5 eV...

  9. Polarization-angle dependence of photoluminescence intensity of ordered GaInP{sub 2} layers: observation of polarization memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Brito-Orta, R. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    We compare measured and calculated polarization-angle dependencies of the intensity of the photoluminescence emission from MOVPE-grown GaInP{sub 2} layers with different ordering parameters. We measured the polarization-angle dependencies of the emission propagating along the [001],[110] and [1 anti 10] directions at room temperature. Symmetry considerations were used to calculate the dependence of the relative intensity of the PL emission which was linearly polarized along different directions and to estimate the value of the valence-band splitting by fitting the measured dependencies with calculated curves. An intriguing influence of the polarization of the exciting beam on the relative amount of the polarized PL emission was observed in the emission from the (110) plane. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  11. Polarization Observables in Deuteron Photodisintegration below 360 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Glister, J; Lee, B W; Gilman, R; Sarty, A J; Strauch, S; Higinbotham, D W; Piasetzky, E; Allada, K; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Beck, A; Benmokhtar, F; Berman, B L; Boeglin, W; Brash, E; Camsonne, A; Calarco, J; Chen, J P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E; Coman, L; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Dumas, J; Dutta, C; Feuerbach, R; Freyberger, A; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J -0; Holmstrom, T; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Ilieva, Y; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Kang, H; Kelleher, A; Khrosinkova, E; Kuchina, E; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Markowitz, P; Beck, S May-Tal; McCullough, E; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Norum, B E; Oh, Y; Olson, M; Paolone, M; Paschke, K; Perdrisat, C F; Potokar, M; Pomatsalyuk, R; Pomerantz, I; Puckett, A; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R; Reyhan, M; Roche, J; Rousseau, Y; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shneor, R; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Song, J; Sparks, R; Subedi, R; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Zhan, X; Zhu, X

    2010-01-01

    High precision measurements of induced and transferred recoil proton polarization in d(polarized gamma, polarized p})n have been performed for photon energies of 277--357 MeV and theta_cm = 20 degrees -- 120 degrees. The measurements were motivated by a longstanding discrepancy between meson-baryon model calculations and data at higher energies. At the low energies of this experiment, theory continues to fail to reproduce the data, indicating that either something is missing in the calculations and/or there is a problem with the accuracy of the nucleon-nucleon potential being used.

  12. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Pahl, P.; /Tel Aviv U. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Tennessee U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /DESY /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY, Zeuthen /Princeton U. /Durham U. /Daresbury

    2008-03-06

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter.

  13. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Walz, D.; Weidemann, A. W.

    2008-05-01

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  14. Observation of polarized positrons from an undulator-based source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G; Barley, J; Batygin, Y; Berridge, S; Bharadwaj, V; Bower, G; Bugg, W; Decker, F-J; Dollan, R; Efremenko, Y; Gharibyan, V; Hast, C; Iverson, R; Kolanoski, H; Kovermann, J; Laihem, K; Lohse, T; McDonald, K T; Mikhailichenko, A A; Moortgat-Pick, G A; Pahl, P; Pitthan, R; Pöschl, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riemann, S; Schälicke, A; Schüler, K P; Schweizer, T; Scott, D; Sheppard, J C; Stahl, A; Szalata, Z M; Walz, D; Weidemann, A W

    2008-05-30

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with GEANT4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  15. Feedbacks of Composition and Neutral Density Changes on the Structure of the Cusp Density Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs cause large wind and temperature changes in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown strongly enhanced density in the cusp region. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, showed a relative depletion. The atmospheric response in the cusp can be sensitive to composition and neutral density changes. In response to heating in the cusp, air of heavier mean molecular weight is brought up from lower altitudes significantly affecting pressure gradients. This opposes the effects of temperature change due to heating and in-turn affects the density and winds produced in the cusp. Also changes in neutral density change the interaction between precipitating particles and the atmosphere and thus change heating rates and ionization in the region affected by cusp precipitation. In this study we assess the sensitivity of the wind and neutral density structure in the cusp region to changes in the mean molecular weight induced by neutral dynamics, and the changes in particle heating rates and ionization which result from changes in neutral density. We use a high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model where inputs can be systematically altered. The resolution of the model allows us to examine the complete range of cusp widths. We compare the current simulations to observations by CHAMP and Streak. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by The Aerospace Corporation's Technical Investment program

  16. Multiple Linear Polarization Lidar with Improved Polarization Retrievals for Enhanced Atmospheric Observation in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, Robert; Neely, Ryan; Thayer, Jeffrey; O'Neill, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of orthogonal polarization planes from laser light scattered by clouds and aerosols is a common technique to classify cloud conditions or aerosol types using lidar. Increasingly, polarization measurements are evolving from qualitative assessments of liquid-to-ice phase transitions in clouds to more precise quantitative measurements of mixed phase clouds, cloud particle orientation, and aerosol type classifications. Viewing polarization retrievals in a more quantitative way can enhance the information content related to cloud or aerosol particles but requires a precise understanding of system and scattering effects. Herein, measurements of multiple, non-orthogonal, planes of linear polarization are implemented to advance the use of quantitative assessment of lidar polarization methods for cloud and aerosol studies. Results from the Clouds Aerosols Polarization and Backscatter (CAPABL) Lidar, located at Summit Camp, Greenland (72.35'N, 38.25'W), will be presented to examine the advantages of using multiple planes of linear polarization. The advantages demonstrated are enhanced signal dynamic range, reduced system effects due to signal saturation, ability to independently measure horizontal orientation of ice crystals, and self-calibration of retrievals. Data from the recently upgraded system will be presented to demonstrate these advantages, which allow CAPABL to adjust and increase signal dynamic range by approximately an order of magnitude while simplifying calibration and reducing systematic errors. These enhancements facilitate a more quantitative retrieval to describe mixed phase clouds and horizontally oriented ice crystals, both, of which, have important implications to Greenland's mass and energy budgets by modulating cloud scattering properties.

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF LINEAR POLARIZATION IN A SOLAR CORONAL LOOP PROMINENCE SYSTEM OBSERVED NEAR 6173 Å

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Hudson, Hugh S.; Krucker, Säm; Bain, Hazel [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schou, Jesper [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Couvidat, Sébastien, E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    White-light observations by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager of a loop-prominence system occurring in the aftermath of an X-class flare on 2013 May 13 near the eastern solar limb show a linearly polarized component, reaching up to ∼20% at an altitude of ∼33 Mm, about the maximum amount expected if the emission were due solely to Thomson scattering of photospheric light by the coronal material. The mass associated with the polarized component was 8.2 × 10{sup 14} g. At 15 Mm altitude, the brightest part of the loop was 3(±0.5)% linearly polarized, only about 20% of that expected from pure Thomson scattering, indicating the presence of an additional unpolarized component at wavelengths near Fe I (617.33 nm). We estimate the free electron density of the white-light loop system to possibly be as high as 1.8 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}.

  18. Observations of the Earth in polarized light from the US Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jean-Claude; Santer, Richard; Herman, M.; Deuze, J.-L.; Whitehead, V. C.

    1991-01-01

    During the four American Space Shuttle missions of year 1985, the crewmembers took pictures of the Earth in polarized light. Different problems were encountered in the quantitative use of the data: induced polarization by the shuttle window, lack of calibration correction of the window polarization and enveloped in flight calibration methods. The analysis of the selected data first confirmed the previous observation over snow and sand. A low polarization on these surfaces was observed. On the other hand, the measurements show the potentiability of the polarization for agricultural inventory. Contamination of the atmosphere is well characterized.

  19. Antiparallel magnetic merging signatures during IMF BY>>0: longitudinal and latitudinal cusp aurora bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Massetti

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A prominent dayside auroral event, occurred during an IMF BY-dominated time interval, and characterized by the contemporaneous longitudinal and latitudinal cusp bifurcations, is reported. The event was recorded the 19 December 2002, between about 09:30–10:45 UT, by the ITACA2 twin auroral monitors system, in the Greenland-Svalbard zone. The splitting of the ionospheric footprint of the geomagnetic cusp, traced by the dayside auroral activity, was recently identified with the signatures of antiparallel reconnection episodes ongoing at different magnetopause locations, during large IMF BY periods. The first part of the event showed a broad longitudinal bifurcation of the red-dominated cusp aurora, displaced in the prenoon and postnoon, with a separation up to ~1800 km, during northeast directed IMF (clock-angle rotating from 45° to 90°. This observation widens the range of IMF regimes that are known to drive a longitudinal bifurcation of the cusp, since previous case-studies reported these events to occur during southeast/southwest oriented IMF (clock-angle ≈135°. The second part of the event, developed when the IMF turned to a nearly horizontal orientation (BY>>0, BZ~0, clock-angle ~90°, and exhibited the simultaneous activation of the cusp auroras in three distinct areas: i two of them associated to the above-mentioned longitudinally bifurcated cusp (~73°–75° CGM latitude, type 1 cusp aurora, and linked to (nearantiparallel magnetic reconnection patches equatorward the northern and the southern cusp, ii the other one characterized by isolated high-latitude (~76°–77° CGM latitude, type 2 cusp aurora rayed arc(s with intense green emission, and triggered by (nearantiparallel merging at the northern lobe (usually observed during positive IMF BZ, poleward the local cusp. During this phase, the longitudinal separation of the low-latitude type~1 cusp aurora was about 1000 km wide, with a 500 km gap, while the latitudinal separation

  20. Dual differential polarimetry. A technique to recover polarimetric information from dual-polarization observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Muller, S.

    2016-09-01

    Current mm/submm interferometers, like the Atacama Large mm/submm Array (ALMA), use receivers that register the sky signal in a linear polarization basis. In the case of observations performed in full-polarization mode (where the cross-correlations are computed among all the polarization channels) it is possible to reconstruct the full-polarization brightness distribution of the observed sources, as long as a proper calibration of delay offsets and leakage among polarization channels can be performed. Observations of calibrators, preferably with some linear polarization, with a good parallactic angle coverage are usually needed for such a calibration. In principle, dual-polarization observations only allow us to recover the Stokes I intensity distribution of the sources, regardless of the parallactic angle coverage of the observations. In this paper, we present a novel technique of dual differential polarimetry that makes it possible to obtain information related to the full-polarization brightness distribution of the observed sources from dual-polarization observations. This technique is inspired in the Earth-rotation polarization synthesis and can be applied even to sources with complex structures.

  1. Are small-scale field-aligned currents and magneto sheath-like particle precipitation signatures of the same low-altitude cusp?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watermann, J.; Stauning, P.; Luhr, H.

    2009-01-01

    We examined some 75 observations from the low-altitude Earth orbiting DMSP, Orsted and CHAMP satellites which were taken in the region of the nominal cusp. Our objective was to determine whether the actually observed cusp locations as inferred from magnetosheath-like particle precipitation...... of the satellites were converted into AACGM coordinates, and the geomagnetic latitude of the cusp boundaries (as indicated by precipitating particles and small-scale field-aligned currents) set in relation to the IMF-B-z dependent latitude of the equatorward boundary of the statistical cusp. We find...... that intense small-scale field-aligned currents are generated in the cusp but also in the transition zone between the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and the cusp, probably within both regimes, the cusp and the open LLBL. The small-scale field-aligned currents are possibly a consequence of turbulence and...

  2. Development of dual-polarization LEKIDs for CMB observations

    CERN Document Server

    McCarrick, Heather; Ade, Peter A R; Barry, Peter; Bryan, Sean; Che, George; Day, Peter; Doyle, Simon; Flanigan, Daniel; Johnson, Bradley R; Jones, Glenn; LeDuc, Henry G; Limon, Michele; Mauskopf, Philip; Miller, Amber; Tucker, Carole; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the design considerations and initial measurements from arrays of dual-polarization, lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) nominally designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies. The detectors are horn-coupled, and each array element contains two single-polarization LEKIDs, which are made from thin-film aluminum and optimized for a single spectral band centered on 150 GHz. We are developing two array architectures, one based on 160 micron thick silicon wafers and the other based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers with a 30 micron thick device layer. The 20-element test arrays (40 LEKIDs) are characterized with both a linearly-polarized electronic millimeter wave source and a thermal source. We present initial measurements including the noise spectra, noise-equivalent temperature, and responsivity. We discuss future testing and further design optimizations to be implemented.

  3. The stellar cusp around the Milky Way’s central black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, R.; Gallego-Cano, E.; Amaro-Seoane, P.

    2017-05-01

    The existence of stellar cusps in dense clusters around massive black holes is a fundamental, decades-old prediction of theoretical stellar dynamics. Yet, observational evidence has been difficult to obtain. With a new, improved analysis of high-angular resolution images of the central parsecs of the Galactic Center, we are finally able to provide the first solid evidence for the existence of a stellar cusp around the Milky Way’s massive black hole. The existence of stellar cusps has a significant impact on predicted event rates of phenomena like tidal disruptions of stars and extreme mass ratio inspirals.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MASTER polarization observations (Pruzhinskaya+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzhinskaya, M. V.; Krushinsky, V. V.; Lipunova, G. V.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Denisenko, D. V.; Kornilov, V. G.; Tyurina, N. V.; Lipunov, V. M.; Tlatov, A. G.; Parkhomenko, A. V.; Budnev, N. M.; Yazev, S. A.; Ivanov, K. I.; Gress, O. A.; Yurkov, V. V.; Gabovich, A. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Sinyakov, E. V.

    2014-07-01

    We present results of optical polarization observations performed with the MASTER robotic net (Lipunov et al., 2004AN....325..580L, 2010, Advances in Astronomy, article id. 349171, 1; Kornilov et al., 2012, Exp. Astron., 33, p. 173) for three types of objects: gamma-ray bursts, supernovae, and blazars. For the Swift gamma-ray bursts GRB100906A, GRB110422A, GRB121011A, polarization observations were obtained during very early stages of optical emission. For GRB100906A it was the first prompt optical polarization observation in the world. Photometry in polarizers is presented for Type Ia Supernova 2012bh during 20 days, starting on March 27, 2012. We find that the linear polarization of SN 2012bh at the early stage of the envelope expansion was less than 3%. Polarization measurements for the blazars OC 457, 3C 454.3, QSO B1215+303, 87GB 165943.2+395846 at single nights are presented. We infer the degree of the linear polarization and polarization angle. The blazars OC 457 and 3C 454.3 were observed during their periods of activity. The results show that MASTER is able to measure substantially polarized light; at the same time it is not suitable for determining weak polarization (less than 5%) of dim objects (fainter than 16m). Polarimetric observations of the optical emission from gamma-ray bursts and supernovae are necessary to investigate the nature of these transient objects. (3 data files).

  5. The Polar Engineering Development Center (PEDC) for Coordinated Geospace Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, A. J.; Kim, H.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    The PEDC, housed at the New Jersey Institute, consists of a highly skilled group of collegiate professors, research scientists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and technicians that have decades of experience in instrument and hardware design for deployment at high latitude/polar regions. Now supported by NSF and reaching out to serve the broader astrophysical and geospace scientific communities conducting research in polar environments by providing support in the areas of: (a) sustainable "green" power generation in the 10-W to 500-W range, (b) power conditioning and control, (c) robust engineering for polar climates, (d) data acquisition techniques, units, and transmission services, and (e) general polar field support. The original group was formed in the 1980's as part of the NSF-supported Automatic Geophysical Observatory (AGO) program which operates to this day on projects active across the Antarctic ice shelf. In this paper we present the PEDC Antarctic geospace data portal, which was created in order to host and distribute data and quicklook plots from the instrumentation located at South Pole Station, McMurdo Station, and the Automated Geophysical Observatories in Antarctica. At this time, all fluxgate magnetometer data from all of the stations are posted for a time period covering the late 1990's to today's synoptic data. In the coming months, additional datasets (e.g., searchcoil magnetometers, photometers, and riometers) will be likewise posted. This data portal, linked through antarcticgeospace.org or directly via antarcticgeospace.njit.edu, is now open to community use.

  6. RXTE and XMM observations of intermediate polar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Butters, O W; Mukai, K; Tomsick, J A

    2010-01-01

    Aims. To determine the credentials of nine candidate intermediate polars in order to confirm whether or not they are magnetic cataclysmic variables. Methods. Frequency analysis of RXTE and XMM data was used to search for temporal variations which could be associated with the spin period of the magnetic white dwarf. X-ray spectral analysis was carried out to characterise the emission and absorption properties of each target. Results. The hard X-ray light curve of V2069 Cyg shows a pulse period of 743.2 s, and its spectrum is fit by an absorbed bremsstrahlung model with an iron line, confirming this to be a genuine intermediate polar. The hard X-ray light curve of the previously confirmed intermediate polar IGR J00234+6141 is shown to be consistent with the previous low energy X-ray detection of a 563.5 s pulse period. The likely polar IGR J14536-5522 shows no coherent modulation at the previously identified period of 3.1 hr, but does exhibit a clear signal at periods likely to be harmonically related to it. Wh...

  7. Receiver for 6-cm Polarization Observation Starts Working

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A 6-cm receiving system with a polarimeter, made by engineers of German MaxPlanck-Institute for Radioastronomy, has been installed to the 25 radio telescope in Urumqi, the capital of western China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. The new instrument for Sino-German cooperation on radio astronomy will enable Chinese astronomers to measure the polarization of radio sources for the first time.

  8. Directional Statistics for Polarization Observations of Individual Pulses from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2010-01-01

    Radio polarimetry is a three-dimensional statistical problem. The three-dimensional aspect of the problem arises from the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V, which completely describe the polarization of electromagnetic radiation and conceptually define the orientation of a polarization vector in the Poincar'e sphere. The statistical aspect of the problem arises from the random fluctuations in the source-intrinsic polarization and the instrumental noise. A simple model for the polarization of pulsar radio emission has been used to derive the three-dimensional statistics of radio polarimetry. The model is based upon the proposition that the observed polarization is due to the incoherent superposition of two, highly polarized, orthogonal modes. The directional statistics derived from the model follow the Bingham-Mardia and Fisher family of distributions. The model assumptions are supported by the qualitative agreement between the statistics derived from it and those measured with polarization observations of the ind...

  9. Source of the dayside cusp aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-08-01

    Monochromatic all-sky imagers at South Pole and other Antarctic stations of the Automatic Geophysical Observatory chain recorded the aurora in the region where the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites crossed the dayside magnetopause. In several cases the magnetic field lines threading the satellites when mapped to the atmosphere were inside the imagers' field of view. From the THEMIS magnetic field and the plasma density measurements, we were able to locate the position of the magnetopause crossings and map it to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko-96 field model. Field line mapping is reasonably accurate on the dayside subsolar region where the field is strong, almost dipolar even though compressed. From these coordinated observations, we were able to prove that the dayside cusp aurora of high 630 nm brightness is on open field lines, and it is therefore direct precipitation from the magnetosheath. The cusp aurora contained significant highly structured N2+ 427.8 nm emission. The THEMIS measurements of the magnetosheath particle energy and density taken just outside the magnetopause compared to the intensity of the structured N2+ 427.8 nm emissions showed that the precipitating magnetosheath particles had to be accelerated. The most likely electron acceleration mechanism is by dispersive Alfvén waves propagating along the field line. Wave-accelerated suprathermal electrons were seen by FAST and DMSP. The 427.8 nm wavelength channel also shows the presence of a lower latitude hard-electron precipitation zone originating inside the magnetosphere.

  10. Observation of polarization effects in Λc+ semileptonic decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schnidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Polarization of the Λ daughter baryon from Λc+ → Λl+vl decay has been measured for the first time using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II ɛ+ɛ- storage ring. Expressed in terms of the Λc+ semileptonic asymmetry parameter the result is αΛc= -0.91±0.49 for events in the mass region 1.85< M( Λl+)<2.20 GeV/ c2.

  11. 3C 286: a bright, compact, stable, and highly polarized calibrator for millimeter-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Agudo, Ivan; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Molina, Sol N; Casadio, Carolina; Gomez, Jose L; Emmanoulopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Context. A number of millimeter and submillimeter facilities with linear polarization observing capabilities have started operating during last years. These facilities, as well as other previous millimeter telescopes and interferometers, require bright and stable linear polarization calibrators to calibrate new instruments and to monitor their instrumental polarization. The current limited number of adequate calibrators implies difficulties in the acquisition of these calibration observations. Aims. Looking for additional linear polarization calibrators in the millimeter spectral range, in mid-2006 we started monitoring 3C 286, a standard and highly stable polarization calibrator for radio observations. Methods. Here we present the 3 and 1mm monitoring observations obtained between September 2006 and October 2011 with the XPOL polarimeter on the IRAM 30m Millimeter Telescope. Results. Our observations show that 3C 286 is a bright source of constant total flux with 3mm flux density S_3mm = (0.90 \\pm 0.02) Jy. ...

  12. Polarization observables for the reaction pp -> pp. pi. /sup 0/ at 800 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, P.J.; Bachman, M.; Hollas, C.L.; McNaughton, K.H.; Xu Shenwu; Bonner, B.E.; Van Dyck, O.B.; McGill, J.; McNaughton, M.W.; Peng, J.C.

    1987-10-22

    The Wolfenstein polarization observables D/sub NN/, D/sub S..cap omega../ and D/sub L..cap omega../, where ..cap omega.. denotes a mixture of S and L polarization components, the induced polarization P, and the analysing power A have been measured for the reaction pp -> pp..pi../sup 0/ at 800, 733, and 647 MeV. Comparisons are made to theoretical predictions of the model of Dubach, Kloet and Silbar.

  13. Cusp-core problem and strong gravitational lensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Li; Da-Ming Chen

    2009-01-01

    Cosmological numerical simulations of galaxy formation have led to the cuspy density profile of a pure cold dark matter halo toward the center,which is in sharp contradiction with the observations of the rotation curves of cold dark matter-dominated dwarf and low surface brightness disk galaxies,with the latter tending to favor mass profiles with a fiat central core.Many efforts have been devoted to resolving this cusp-core problem in recent years,among them,baryon-cold dark matter interactions are considered to be the main physical mechanisms erasing the cold dark matter (CDM) cusp into a flat core in the centers of all CDM halos.Clearly,baryon-cold dark matter interactions are not customized only for CDM-dominated disk galaxies,but for all types,including giant ellipticals.We first fit the most recent high resolution observations of rotation curves with the Burkert profile,then use the constrained core size-halo mass relation to calculate the lensing frequency,and compare the predicted results with strong lensing observations.Unfortunately,it turns out that the core size constrained from rotation curves ofdisk galaxies cannot be extrapolated to giant ellipticals.We conclude that,in the standard cosmological paradigm,baryon-cold dark matter interactions are not universal mechanisms for galaxy formation,and therefore,they cannot be true solutions to the cusp-core problem.

  14. Simulation of polarized optical speckle fields: effects of the observation scale on polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jan; Orlik, Xavier

    2016-05-16

    In this paper, we propose the simulation of polarized speckle fields using the Stokes formalism, which allows the description of partially polarized electromagnetic waves. We define a unique parameter which determines the partial decorrelation of the involved fields, allowing to simulate the polarized speckles produced by all types of scatterers, from simple to multiple scatterers. We validate this model by comparison with experimental measurements. We use that simulation model to study the impact of the imaging device parameters on polarimetric measurements: first we emphasize a limit of resolution on retardance measurements, then we study the spatial depolarization, which appears when an observer is measuring any space-variant polarization map.

  15. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both pos

  16. Observation of solar events using hard X-ray polarimeter POLAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Hualin; Marcinkowski, Radek

    2017-04-01

    The main purpose of the novel polarimeter POLAR is to study polarization of Gamma Ray Bursts in the hard X-rays energy regime. Several analyses have shown that it is also possible to conduct semi-permanent observation of the Sun and complete the long lasting goal of polarization measurements in solar flares in the non-thermal parts of the energy spectra. POLAR was developed by collaboration between Switzerland, China and Poland. The instrument is located onboard of the China Space Laboratory TG2 that was launched in September 2016. Despite of many past attempts, the key energy range of hard X-rays was only rarely explored and results were inconclusive. To large extend it was due to greater instrumental complications. Polarization data from POLAR measurements would shed light about mechanisms and processes leading to electron acceleration and photon production. POLAR was not only designed as a dedicated instrument for polarization studies but also underwent very careful calibration campaigns on-ground supplemented by precise modeling and tests. Orientation of the TG2 space laboratory as well as instrument pointing direction allow for precise measurements of polarization in solar flares. POLAR is currently in the commissioning phase lasting until April 2017. Already in this phase it was possible to detect several weak class flares the data from which is being currently analyzed. We will provide the instrument status and present first information on detected solar events in comparison with other solar observatories such as RHESSI.

  17. Global Observation of Substorm Growth Phase Processes in the Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, M.; OFillingim, M. O.; Chua, D.; Wilber, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Global images of the polar cap region during the substorm growth phase by the Polar Ultraviolet Imager reveals evidence of the processes which are not completely explained by current models. In particular, it was found that size of the polar cap region increases during the growth phase even if the interplanetary magnetic field has no southward component. Three phenomena were observed to produce an increase in the size of the polar cap: (1) motion of the auroral oval to lower latitude, (2) thinning of the auroral oval, and (3) reduction of intense aurora[ precipitation in the polar region. Correlation of image intensities with in situ particle measurements from the FAST satellite are being conducted to study the three growth phase phenomena; and to help identify the source regions of the particles, the mechanisms involved in producing the auroral structures and what may be reducing the polar cap precipitation during the substorm growth phase.

  18. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    an indirect cause of the observed Pc5 pulsations. During the same interval, two flux transfer events were also observed in the magnetosphere near the oscillating magnetopause. Their ground signatures were identified in the CANOPUS data. The time delays of the FTE signatures from the Polar spacecraft to the ground stations enable us to estimate that the longitudinal extent of the reconnection X-line at the magnetopause was ~43° or ~5.2 RE. The coordinated in-situ and ground-based observations suggest that FTEs are produced by transient reconnection taking place along a single extended X-line at the magnetopause, as suggested in the models by Scholer (1988 and Southwood et al. (1988. The observations from this study suggest that the reconnection occurred in two different forms simultaneously in the same general region at the dayside magnetopause: 1 continuous reconnection with a pulsed reconnection rate, and 2 transient reconnection as flux transfer events.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  19. Polarization Observables in the N->D(1232) Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvatore Frullani; James Kelly; Adam Sarty; Robert W. Lourie; Mark Jones; David Meekins; William Bertozzi; Zhengwei Chai; Shalev Gilad; Rikki Roche

    2003-12-01

    For the first time the simultaneous separation of many RFs with a recoil polarization technique has been applied for measurements covering a large fraction of the phase space, even if for a single Q{sup 2}, W setting. The technique has been proven valid and 14 RFs can be individually extracted within the same set of measurements with the additional information coming from two combinations of the other 4. Then, the technical aim has been already achieved. Multipole decomposition, the most model independent analysis that can be made, is still to be done. Its result should give the physical information about the size of the small resonant and non resonant contributions. This is the physics aim of the experiment and will define the sensitivity of the technique. From this result one will infer the suitability to perform measurements at other Q{sup 2}, W settings or/and for other reactions. The technique is applicable to leptoproduction experiments in higher energy regimes provided that models, supposed to describe hadronic systems in that regimes, offer the opportunity to test their predictions in terms of RFs.

  20. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) First Year Observations TE Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J; Barnes, C; Bennett, C L; Halpern, M; Hinshaw, G; Jarosik, N C; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Page, L; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are present in all WMAP frequency bands with similar amplitude from 23 to 94 GHz, and are consistent with a superposition of a CMB signal with a weak foreground. The fitted CMB component is robust against different data combinations and fitting techniques. On small angular scales theta 20 agree well with the signal predicted solely from the temperature power spectra, with no additional free parameters. We detect excess power on large angular scales (theta > 10 deg) compared to predictions based on the temperature power spectra alone. The excess power is well described by reionization at redshift 11 < z_r < 30 at 95% confidence, depending on the ionization history. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields ...

  1. Double-polarization observable G in neutral-pion photoproduction off the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Thiel, A; Lang, M; Afzal, F; Anisovich, A V; Bantes, B; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Bichow, M; Brinkmann, K -T; Böse, S; Crede, V; Dieterle, M; Dutz, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, St; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Goertz, St; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Gutz, E; Hammann, D; Hammann, Ch; Hannappel, J; Hartmann, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, Ph; Honisch, Ch; Jude, T; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kalischewski, F; Kammer, S; Keshelashvili, I; Klassen, P; Kleber, V; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Koop, K; Krusche, B; Kube, M; Lopatin, I; Mahlberg, Ph; Makonyi, K; Metag, V; Meyer, W; Müller, J; Müllers, J; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V; Piontek, D; Reeve, S; Reicherz, G; Runkel, S; Sarantsev, A; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Seifen, T; Sokhoyan, V; Spieker, K; Thoma, U; Urban, M; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Witthauer, L

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a measurement of the double-polarization observable G in $\\pi^0$ photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn. The observable G is determined from reactions of linearly-polarized photons with longitudinally-polarized protons. The polarized photons are produced by bremsstrahlung off a properly oriented diamond radiator. A frozen spin butanol target provides the polarized protons. The data cover the photon energy range from 617 to 1325 MeV and a wide angular range. The experimental results for G are compared to predictions by the Bonn-Gatchina (BnGa), J\\"ulich-Bonn (J\\"uBo), MAID and SAID partial wave analyses. Implications of the new data for the pion photoproduction multipoles are discussed.

  2. Double-polarization observable G in neutral-pion photoproduction off the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, A.; Lang, M.; Afzal, F.; Beck, R.; Boese, S.; Funke, C.; Gottschall, M.; Gruener, M.; Hammann, C.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hoffmeister, P.; Honisch, C.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Klassen, P.; Klempt, E.; Koop, K.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Mueller, J.; Muellers, J.; Piontek, D.; Schmidt, C.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Pee, H. van; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Winnebeck, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Eberhardt, H.; Bantes, B.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Frommberger, F.; Goertz, S.; Hammann, D.; Hillert, W.; Jude, T.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Reeve, S.; Runkel, S.; Schmieden, H. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Anisovich, A.V.; Bayadilov, D.; Nikonov, V.; Sarantsev, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Bichow, M.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T.; Gutz, E. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Crede, V. [Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Dieterle, M.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Witthauer, L. [Universitaet Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Friedrich, S.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Gridnev, A.; Lopatin, I. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Wilson, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Collaboration: The CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2017-01-15

    This paper reports on a measurement of the double-polarization observable G in π{sup 0} photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn. The observable G is determined from reactions of linearly polarized photons with longitudinally polarized protons. The polarized photons are produced by bremsstrahlung off a diamond radiator of well-defined orientation. A frozen spin butanol target provides the polarized protons. The data cover the photon energy range from 617 to 1325 MeV and a wide angular range. The experimental results for G are compared to predictions by the Bonn-Gatchina (BnGa), Juelich-Bonn (JueBo), MAID and SAID partial wave analyses. Implications of the new data for the pion photoproduction multipoles are discussed. (orig.)

  3. The First Observation of the Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum in a Low-AV Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell Ashton, Peter; Ade, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie; Klein, Jeffrey; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; nakamura, fumitaka; Barth Netterfield, Calvin; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan D.; Thomas, Nicholas; tucker, carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; BLASTPol

    2017-01-01

    Polarized emission from aligned interstellar dust is both a crucial tool for studies of magnetism in the interstellar medium and a troublesome contaminant in studies of the polarized cosmic microwave background. In each case, an understanding of the significance of the dust polarization signal requires well-calibrated models that accurately describe dust grains’ physical properties and interactions with their environment. Despite decades of progress in both theory and observation, polarized dust emission models remain largely underconstrained. During its 2012 flight, BLASTPol (the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry) obtained simultaneous broad-band polarimetric maps at 250, 350, and 500 μm of a several degree-scale region containing several low-AV molecular clouds. Combining these data with polarimetric observations from the Planck 850 μm band, we have produced a submillimeter polarization spectrum for one of these objects for the first time. We find the polarization degree to be largely constant across the four submillimeter bands. This result introduces a new observable with the potential to place strong empirical constraints on polarized dust models of the ISM in a density regime that has not been accessible to previous experiments. Comparing with the work of Draine & Fraisse (2009), our result is inconsistent with two of their four models. In particular, the two models for which all polarization arises from the aligned silicate component yield submillimeter polarization spectra that rise steeply with wavelength, in disagreement with our observations. This line of investigation will continue in the near future, as new experiments like The Next-Generation BLAST Polarimeter (BLAST-TNG) use their enhanced sensitivities to characterize polarized dust emission in even more diffuse environments.

  4. Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurorae observed by the Juno spacecraft during its first polar orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Adriani, Alberto; Allegrini, F.

    2017-01-01

    for Juno's passage over the poles and traverse of Jupiter's hazardous inner radiation belts. Juno's energetic particle and plasma detectors measured electrons precipitating in the polar regions, exciting intense aurorae, observed simultaneously by the ultraviolet and infrared imaging spectrographs. Juno...

  5. The Kamchatka-Aleutian Collision Zone: Mother of All Cusps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Kamchatka subduction zone represents a key to the understanding of volcanism, tectonics and mantle dynamics. The termination of the Pacific plate in the northern part of the Kamchatka slab is the prime location to investigate the cusp-ward shoaling of seismicity, the volumetrically spectacular production of magma with unusual geochemical signatures and slab edge ablation associated with mantle flow around the leading edge of the plate. In addition, the Kamchatka subduction zone is further complicated by the subduction of the aseismic ridge, the Meiji Seamounts. The three-dimensional structural configuration of the subducting pacific slab, the Komandorsky basin and the volcanic arc all suggest that absence of Pacific slab north of latitude. Tomographic analyses show a deep low velocity zone below Kliuchevskoi Volcano, suggesting a deep source near the crust-mantle interface. The intense volcanic production rates of the northern part of the Kamchatka Arc indicate that a prolific source feeds the surface expression of the cusp. Extensive heating at the exposed slab edge provides a source of heat for the Kliuchevskoi group. In this presentation I will review the critical observations and conclusions regarding cusp dynamics in Kamchatka and the Pacific Rim.

  6. Photoproduction of meson pairs: First measurement of the polarization observable I^s

    CERN Document Server

    Gutz, E; van Pee, H; Anisovich, A V; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, B; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Yu; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Frommberger, F; Fuchs, M; Funke, Ch; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, Ph; Horn, I; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Kleber, V; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Loehner, H; Lopatin, I; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L; Pfeiffer, M; Piontek, D; Roberts, W; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suele, A; Sumachev, V; Szczepanek, T; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2009-01-01

    The polarization observable I^s, a feature exclusive to the acoplanar kinematics of multi-meson final states produced via linearly polarized photons, has been measured for the first time. Results for the reaction g p -> p pi0 eta are presented for incoming photon energies between 970 MeV and 1650 MeV along with the beam asymmetry I^c. The comparably large asymmetries demonstrate a high sensitivity of I^s to the dynamics of the reaction. Fits using Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis demonstrate that the new polarization observables carry significant information on the contributing partial waves.

  7. Design of an Autonomous Polarized Raman Lidar for Arctic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, R. A.; Neely, R. R., III; O'Neill, M.; Thayer, J. P.; Hayman, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    A dearth of high-spatial and temporal resolution measurements of atmospheric state variables in the Arctic directly inhibits scientific understanding of radiative and precipitation impacts on the changing surface environment. More reliable and frequent measurements are needed to better understand Arctic weather processes and constrain model predictions. To partially address the lack of Artic observations, a new autonomous Raman lidar system, which will measure through the troposphere water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, extinction, and cloud phase profiles, is under development for deployment to Summit Camp, Greenland (72° 36'N, 38° 25'W, 3250m). This high-altitude Arctic field site has co-located ancillary equipment such as a Doppler millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers, depolarization lidars, ceiliometer, an infrared interferometer and twice-daily radiosondes which are part of the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) project and the Arctic Observing Network (AON). The current suite of instruments allows for a near comprehensive picture of the atmospheric state above Summit but increased spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor and temperature are needed to reveal detailed microphysical information. In this presentation, a system description will be provided with an emphasis on the features necessary for autonomous, full diurnal operation, and how the new system will help fill the observation gap within the already existing sensor suite.

  8. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Ulmer, S. [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit (Japan); Murtagh, D. J.; Gorp, S. Van [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Nagata, Y. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Diermaier, M. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Federmann, S. [CERN (Switzerland); Leali, M. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Mascagna, V. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Massiczek, O. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Michishio, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Mizutani, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Mohri, A. [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Sciences (Japan); Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Radics, B. [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); and others

    2015-11-15

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus (“cusp trap”) which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  9. Cusps in eta' --> eta pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Sebastian P

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the cusp effect in the decay K+ --> pi+ pi0 pi0 has spurred the search for other decay channels, where this phenomenon, which is generated by strong final-state interactions, should also occur. A very promising candidate is eta' --> eta pi0 pi0. The cusp effect offers an excellent opportunity to experimentally extract pi pi S-Wave scattering lengths. We adapt and generalize the non-relativistic effective field theory framework developed for K --> 3 pi decays to eta' --> eta pi pi. The cusp effect is predicted to have an effect of more than 8 % on the decay spectrum below the pi+ pi- threshold. We also show that with our current theoretical information about eta' --> eta pi pi decays, it is not possible to extract pi eta threshold parameters.

  10. Cusp geometry of fibered 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Futer, David

    2011-01-01

    Let F be a surface and suppose that \\phi: F -> F is a pseudo-Anosov homeomorphism fixing a puncture p of F. The mapping torus M = M_\\phi\\ is hyperbolic and contains a maximal cusp C about the puncture p. We show that the area and height of the cusp torus bounding C are equal, up to explicit multiplicative error, to the stable translation distance of \\phi\\ acting on the arc complex A(F,p). Our proofs rely on elementary facts about the hyperbolic geometry of pleated surfaces. In particular, we do not use any deep results in Teichmueller theory, Kleinian group theory, or the coarse geometry of A(F,p). A similar result holds for quasi-Fuchsian manifolds N = (F x R). In that setting, we prove a combinatorial estimate on the area and height of the cusp annulus in the convex core of N and give explicit multiplicative and additive errors.

  11. Polar tropospheric ozone depletion events observed in IGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Roscoe

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The Royal Society expedition to Antarctica established a base at Halley Bay, in support of the International Geophysical Year of 1957–1958. Surface ozone was measured during 1958 only, using a prototype Brewer-Mast sonde. The envelope of maximum ozone was an annual cycle from 10 ppbv in January to 22 ppbv in August. These values are 35% less at the start of the year and 15% less at the end than modern values from Neumayer, also a coastal site. This may reflect a general increase in surface ozone since 1958 and differences in summer at the less windy site of Halley, or it may reflect ozone loss on the inlet together with long-term conditioning. There were short periods in September when ozone values decreased rapidly to near-zero, and some in August when ozone values were rapidly halved. Such ozone-loss episodes, catalysed by bromine compounds, became well-known in the Artic in the 1980s, and were observed more recently in the Antarctic. In 1958, very small ozone values were recorded for a week in midwinter during clear weather with light winds. The absence of similar midwinter reductions at Neumayer, or at Halley in the few measurements during 1987, means we must remain suspicious of these small values, but we can find no obvious reason to discount them. The dark reaction of ozone and seawater ice observed in the laboratory may be fast enough to explain them if the salinity and surface area of the ice is sufficiently amplified by frost flowers.

  12. An Intrinsic Model for the Polarization Position Angle Swing Observed in QSO 1150+812

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Jie Qian; Xi-Zhen Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The rapid polarization position angle swing of ~ 180° observed in QSO 1150+812 at 2cm by Kochenov and Gabuzda is quite a regular event. One interesting property of the event is that, during the time of the swing the polarized flux density remained almost constant. We suggest that such an event can be explained in terms of a relativistic thin shock propagating through a uniform helical magnetic field, giving rise to relativistic aberration effects as the transverse field component rotates. The model may also be applicable to other similar events in which variations in polarization are not accompanied by variations in total flux density.

  13. A facial talon cusp on maxillary permanent central incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneelkumar Chinni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is a dental anomaly that occurs as an accessory cusp like structure, from the cingulum of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Lingual location is usually considered pathognomic. This case report discuss about the unusual appearance of talon cusp on the facial surface of the maxillary left permanent central incisor and a mild talon cusp on the facial surface of the maxillary right permanent central incisor.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of talon cusps in Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Guven

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the most comprehensive study of the prevalence of talon cusps in Turkish population using the largest sample size to date. Also, taurodontism associated with a talon cusp has been reported here for the 1 st time. Clinical complications associated with talon cusps need more investigations.

  16. Magnetic fields around evolved stars: further observations of H$_2$O maser polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Ferreira, M L; Kemball, A; Amiri, N

    2013-01-01

    We aim to detect the magnetic field and infer its properties around four AGB stars using H$_2$O maser observations. The sample we observed consists of the following sources: the semi-regular variable RT Vir and the Mira variables AP Lyn, IK Tau, and IRC+60370. We observed the 6$_{1,6}-5_{2,3}$ H$_2$O maser rotational transition, in full-polarization mode, to determine its linear and circular polarization. Based on the Zeeman effect, one can infer the properties of the magnetic field from the maser polarization analysis. We detected a total of 238 maser features, in three of the four observed sources. No masers were found toward AP Lyn. The observed masers are all located between 2.4 and 53.0 AU from the stars. Linear and circular polarization was found in 18 and 11 maser features, respectively. We more than doubled the number of AGB stars in which magnetic field has been detected from H$_2$O maser polarization, as our results confirm the presence of fields around IK Tau, RT Vir and IRC+60370. The strength of ...

  17. The ESA Polar Platform: A work-horse for future Earth Observation Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibaldi, G. G.; Cendral, J. L.

    1993-09-01

    In the frame of the European Space Agency (ESA) Long Term Plan, the Earth Observation Missions play a very important role in contributing to a better knowledge and monitoring of the Earth Environment. Within the range of future Earth Observation missions, the low altitude sun synchronous polar orbit is of special interest because it offers a repeated coverage of the complete surface of the Earth. For this type of mission, a large number of instruments having different technology and application objectives have been developed or are under development in Europe. To cope with those needs, ESA has initiated the development of the Polar Platform as part of its infrastructure to become the work-horse of future Earth Observation Missions in the Polar orbits. This spacecraft bus, through its design modularity, can cope with a wide range of payload complements and instrument requirements so that the future development emphasis in Europe can be placed on payload and observations rather than repeated satellite developments. The Polar Platform design makes maximum use of the SPOT and ERS programmes experience and design in order to reduce development risk and minimize costs. The modular design can cope with different payload accommodation, power and mass requirements as well as different orbit altitudes. The development is well advanced and is now well into the detailed design and development programme, with components and long lead hardware procurement already initiated. The development of the payload complement for the first mission has been initiated in parallel via the POEM-1 Programme. The Polar Platform will also make use of the other ESA's future infrastructure, such as the Ariane 5 Launcher as well as the Data Relay Satellite System in order to ensure global coverage of observations. The launch of the first ESA Polar Platform Mission carrying the POEM-1 Mission is planned for mid-1988. The performance requirements, design and status of development of the Polar Platform

  18. The Magnetospheric Cusps Structure and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Theodore A

    2005-01-01

    This collection of papers will address the question "What is the Magnetospheric Cusp?" and what is its role in the coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere as well as its role in the processes of particle transport and energization within the magnetosphere. The cusps have traditionally been described as narrow funnel-shaped regions that provide a focus of the Chapman-Ferraro currents that flow on the magnetopause, a boundary between the cavity dominated by the geomagnetic field (i.e., the magnetosphere) and the external region of the interplanetary medium. Measurements from a number of recent satellite programs have shown that the cusp is not confined to a narrow region near local noon but appears to encompass a large portion of the dayside high-latitude magnetosphere and it appears that the cusp is a major source region for the production of energetic charged particles for the magnetosphere. Audience: This book will be of interest to space science research organizations in governments and industries, ...

  19. Measurement of polarization observables of the associated strangeness production in proton proton interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenstein, F.; Borodina, E.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehrhardt, K.; Eyrich, W.; Gast, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Jowzaee, S.; Klaja, P.; Kober, L.; Kilian, K.; Krapp, M.; Mertens, M.; Moskal, P.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Röder, M.; Schroeder, W.; Sefzick, T.; Smyrski, J.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.

    2016-11-01

    The Λ polarization, the analyzing power, and the Λ spin transfer coefficient of the reaction pp → pK + Λ were measured at beam momenta of 2.70GeV/c and 2.95GeV/c corresponding to excess energies of 122MeV and 204MeV. While the analyzing power and the spin transfer coefficient do not change significantly with the excess energy, the Λ polarization varies strongly and changes its sign. As this is the first measurement of polarization observables below an excess energy of 200MeV, the change of the sign of the Λ polarization was not observed before. The high statistics of the data ( ≈ 200 k events for each momentum) enables detailed studies of the dependence of the Λ polarization and the analyzing power on the center-of-mass momentum of the particles. The results of the spin transfer coefficient are in qualitative agreement with the DISTO experiment. The Λ polarization data of 2.95GeV/c are only conform with the DISTO experiment, while both the 2.70GeV/c and 2.95GeV/c data differ strongly from all previous measurements, whether exclusive or inclusive.

  20. Measurement of polarization observables of the associated strangeness production in proton proton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Borodina, E; Clement, H; Doroshkevich, E; Dzhygadlo, R; Ehrhardt, K; Eyrich, W; Gast, W; Gillitzer, A; Grzonka, D; Jowzaee, S; Klaja, P; Kober, L; Kilian, K; Krapp, M; Mertens, M; Moskal, P; Ritman, J; Roderburg, E; Röder, M; Schroeder, W; Sefzick, T; Smyrski, J; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P

    2016-01-01

    The Lambda polarization, the analyzing power, and the Lambda spin transfer coefficient of the reaction pp -> p K+ Lambda were measured at beam momenta of 2.70 GeV/c and 2.95 GeV/c, corresponding to excess energies of 122 MeV and 204 MeV. While the analyzing power and the spin transfer coefficient do not change significantly with the excess energy, the Lambda polarization varies strongly and changes its sign. As this is the first measurement of polarization observables below an excess energy of 200 MeV, the change of the sign of the Lambda polarization was not observed before. The high statistics of the data (~200 k events for each momentum) enables detailed studies of the dependence of the Lambda polarization and the analyzing power on the center of mass momentum of the particles. The results of the spin transfer coefficient are in agreement with data from the DISTO experiment. No obvious agreement of the Lambda polarization can be found in comparison with data of high momentum measurements.

  1. Martian Polar Region Impact Craters: Geometric Properties From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.; Matias, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has so far observed approximately 100 impact landforms in the north polar latitudes (>60 degrees N) of Mars. Correlation of the topography with Viking Orbiter images indicate that many of these are near-center profiles, and for some of the most northern craters, multiple data passes have been acquired. The northern high latitudes of Mars may contain substantial ground ice and be topped with seasonal frost (largely CO2 with some water), forming each winter. We have analyzed various diagnostic crater topologic parameters for this high-latitude crater population with the objective of characterizing impact features in north polar terrains, and we explore whether there is evidence of interaction with ground ice, frost, dune movement, or other polar processes. We find that there are substantial topographic variations from the characteristics of midlatitude craters in the polar craters that are not readily apparent from prior images. The transition from small simple craters to large complex craters is not well defined, as was observed in the midlatitude MOLA data (transition at 7-8 km). Additionally, there appear to be additional topographic complexities such as anomalously large central structures in many polar latitude impact features. It is not yet clear if these are due to target-induced differences in the formation of the crater or post-formation modifications from polar processes.

  2. Observation of the effective linear polarization induced by the asymmetrical Raman gain of YVO4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fengjiang; Lin, Zhiyang; Zhu, Siqi

    2016-10-01

    We originally present a linearly polarized Raman radiation emitted from an actively Q-switched Nd:YAG/YVO4 laser. An 1175.25 nm Raman output was achieved using a uniaxial a-cut YVO4 crystal in a Z-shape laser cavity. The stable Raman power of 1.8 W was obtained, corresponding conversion efficiency of 8.8% from 1064 nm to 1175 nm. The Raman radiation with a polarization extinction ratio of 10.4-dB was observed for the first time. Our experimental results demonstrate that the asymmetrical Raman crystal gain can result in a uniform linear polarization and permit emitting orthogonal polarization radiation in a cascaded Raman laser.

  3. Analysis of polarization offsets observed for temperature-graded ferroelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Cheng, Taimin; Zheng, Hanlei; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-04-01

    A transverse Ising model in the framework of the mean field approximation is developed to analyze the polarization offsets phenomena in temperature-graded ferroelectric materials. A function of two-spin exchange interaction strength has been introduced to describe the ferroelectric distortion due to the distribution of temperature gradients in materials. Comparisons of the computational results with the experimental data reveal some fundamental factors in the formation of polarization offsets. It is shown that ferroelectric distortion has influenced much on polarization offsets in temperature-graded ferroelectric materials. When quantum fluctuation effect as well as ferroelectric distortion is considered, we have successfully reproduced the experimental observations qualitatively, especially for the indistinguishable polarization offsets from the background at small temperature gradients, which were not successfully reproduced in prior theoretical studies.

  4. Low frequency observations of linearly polarized structures in the interstellar medium near the south Galactic pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lenc, Emil; Sun, X H; Sadler, E M; Willis, A G; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, J S; Dwarkanath, K S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Jacobs, D C; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, H -S; Kratzenberg, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Murphy, T; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S K; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg^2 centered on RA=0 h, Dec=-27 deg. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. At these wavelengths, the compactness of the MWA baseline distribution provides excellent snapshot sensitivity to large-scale structure. The observations are sensitive to diffuse polarized emission at ~54' resolution with a sensitivity of 5.9 mJy beam^-1 and compact polarized sources at ~2.4' resolution with a sensitivity of 2.3 mJy beam^-1 for a subset (400 deg^2) of this field. The sensitivity allows the effect of ionospheric Faraday rotation to be spatially and temporally measured directly from the diffuse polarized background. Our observations reveal large-sca...

  5. High-resolution modeling of the cusp density anomaly: Response to particle and Joule heating under typical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Douglas G.; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Clemmons, James H.; Hecht, James. H.

    2016-03-01

    An established high-resolution dynamical model is employed to understand the behavior of the thermosphere beneath the Earth's magnetic cusps, with emphasis on the factors contributing to the density structures observed by the CHAMP and Streak satellite missions. In contrast to previous modeling efforts, this approach combines first principles dynamical modeling with the high spatial resolution needed to describe accurately mesoscale features such as the cusp. The resulting density structure is shown to be consistent with observations, including regions of both enhanced and diminished neutral density along the satellite track. This agreement is shown to be the result of a straightforward application of input conditions commonly found in the cusp rather than exaggerated or extreme conditions. It is found that the magnitude of the density change is sensitive to the width of the cusp region and that models that can resolve widths on the order of 2° of latitude are required to predict density variations that are consistent with the observations.

  6. Multi-spacecraft determination of wave characteristics near the proton gyrofrequency in high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sundkvist

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed study of waves with frequencies near the proton gyrofrequency in the high-altitude cusp for northward IMF as observed by the Cluster spacecraft. Waves in this regime can be important for energization of ions and electrons and for energy transfer between different plasma populations. These waves are present in the entire cusp with the highest amplitudes being associated with localized regions of downward precipitating ions, most probably originating from the reconnection site at the magnetopause. The Poynting flux carried by these waves is downward/upward at frequencies below/above the proton gyrofrequency, which is consistent with the waves being generated near the local proton gyrofrequency in an extended region along the flux tube. We suggest that the waves can be generated by the precipitating ions that show shell-like distributions. There is no clear polarization of the perpendicular wave components with respect to the background magnetic field, while the waves are polarized in a parallel-perpendicular plane. The coherence length is of the order of one ion-gyroradius in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and a few times larger or more in the parallel direction. The perpendicular phase velocity was found to be of the order of 100km/s, an order of magnitude lower than the local Alfvén speed. The perpendicular wavelength is of the order of a few proton gyroradius or less. Based on our multi-spacecraft observations we conclude that the waves cannot be ion-whistlers, while we suggest that the waves can belong to the kinetic Alfvén branch below the proton gyrofrequency fcp and be described as non-potential ion-cyclotron waves (electromagnetic ion-Bernstein waves above. Linear wave growth calculations using kinetic code show considerable wave growth of non-potential ion cyclotron waves at wavelengths agreeing with observations. Inhomogeneities in the plasma on the order of the ion

  7. PolarBase: a data base of high resolution spectropolarimetric stellar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, P; Théado, S; Paletou, F; Manset, N; Morin, J; Marsden, S C; Jeffers, S V

    2014-01-01

    PolarBase is an evolving data base that contains all stellar data collected with the ESPaDOnS and NARVAL high-resolution spectropolarimeters, in their reduced form, as soon as they become public. As of early 2014, observations of 2,000 stellar objects throughout the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram are available. Intensity spectra are available for all targets, and the majority of the observations also include simultaneous spectra in circular or linear polarization, with the majority of the polarimetric measurements being performed only in circularly polarized light (Stokes V). Observations are associated with a cross-correlation pseudo-line profile in all available Stokes parameters, greatly increasing the detectability of weak polarized signatures. Stokes V signatures are detected for more than 300 stars of all masses and evolutionary stages, and linear polarization is detected in 35 targets. The detection rate in Stokes V is found to be anti-correlated with the stellar effective temperature. This unique set of ...

  8. Conceptual Research of Lunar-based Earth Observation for Polar Glacier Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhixing; Liu, Guang; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    The ice flow velocity of glaciers is important for estimating the polar ice sheet mass balance, and it is of great significance for studies into rising sea level under the background of global warming. However so far the long-term and global measurements of these macro-scale motion processes of the polar glaciers have hardly been achieved by Earth Observation (EO) technique from the ground, aircraft or satellites in space. This paper, facing the demand for space technology for large-scale global environmental change observation,especially the changes of polar glaciers, and proposes a new concept involving setting up sensors on the lunar surface and using the Moon as a platform for Earth observation, transmitting the data back to Earth. Lunar-based Earth observation, which enables the Earth's large-scale, continuous, long-term dynamic motions to be measured, is expected to provide a new solution to the problems mentioned above. According to the pattern and characteristics of polar glaciers motion, we will propose a comprehensive investigation of Lunar-based Earth observation with synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Via theoretical modeling and experimental simulation inversion, intensive studies of Lunar-based Earth observation for the glacier motions in the polar regions will be implemented, including the InSAR basics theory, observation modes of InSAR and optimization methods of their key parameters. It will be of a great help to creatively expand the EO technique system from space. In addition, they will contribute to establishing the theoretical foundation for the realization of the global, long-term and continuous observation for the glacier motion phenomena in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

  9. Testing cosmological models with large-scale power modulation using microwave background polarization observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, Emory F; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2016-01-01

    We examine the degree to which observations of large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization can shed light on the puzzling large-scale power modulation in maps of CMB anisotropy. We consider a phenomenological model in which the observed anomaly is caused by modulation of large-scale primordial curvature perturbations, and calculate Fisher information and error forecasts for future polarization data, constrained by the existing CMB anisotropy data. Because a significant fraction of the available information is contained in correlations with the anomalous temperature data, it is essential to account for these constraints. We also present a systematic approach to finding a set of normal modes that maximize the available information, generalizing the well-known Karhunen-Loeve transformation to take account of the constraints from the temperature data. A polarization map covering at least $\\sim 60\\%$ of the sky should be able to provide a $3\\sigma$ detection of modulation at the level favored by the...

  10. Observation of Transverse $\\Lambda/\\bar{\\Lambda}$ Hyperon Polarization in $e^+e^-$ Annihilation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Arita, Y; Asner, D M; Aso, T; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Aziz, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Ban, Y; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Barrett, M; Bartel, W; Bay, A; Behera, P; Belhorn, M; Belous, K; Berger, M; Besson, D; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bloomfield, T; Blyth, S; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bookwalter, C; Boulahouache, C; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Breibeck, F; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Waheed, E; Červenkov, D; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, K -F; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Crnkovic, J; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Di Carlo, S; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Dossett, D; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dubey, S; Dutta, D; Dutta, K; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Frost, O; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Giordano, F; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Grygier, J; Grzymkowska, O; Guan, Y; Guo, H; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Han, Y L; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hasenbusch, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Heck, M; Hedges, M T; Heffernan, D; Heider, M; Heller, A; Higuchi, T; Himori, S; Hirose, S; Horiguchi, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hsu, C -L; Huschle, M; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Imamura, M; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itagaki, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwata, S; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Jeon, H B; Jin, Y; Joffe, D; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kakuno, H; Kaliyar, A B; Kang, J H; Kang, K H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Kato, E; Kato, Y; Katrenko, P; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Keck, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, B H; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, H -J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kleinwort, C; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Koblitz, S; Kodyš, P; Koga, Y; Korpar, S; Kotchetkov, D; Kouzes, R T; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kurihara, E; Kuroki, Y; Kuzmin, A; Kvasnička, P; Kwon, Y -J; Lai, Y -T; Lange, J S; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, S -H; Leitgab, M; Leitner, R; Levit, D; Lewis, P; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, J; Li, L; Li, X; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Limosani, A; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Louvot, R; Lubej, M; Lukin, P; Luo, T; MacNaughton, J; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Mikami, Y; Miyabayashi, K; Miyachi, Y; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Morii, T; Moser, H -G; Müller, T; Muramatsu, N; Mussa, R; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, K R; Nakano, E; Nakano, H; Nakano, T; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Negishi, K; Neichi, K; Ng, C; Niebuhr, C; Niiyama, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, Y; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Palka, H; Panzenböck, E; Park, C -S; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Paul, S; Peak, L S; Pedlar, T K; Peng, T; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Prasanth, K; Prim, M; Prothmann, K; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Reisert, B; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rorie, J; Rostomyan, A; Rozanska, M; Rummel, S; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sasaki, J; Sasao, N; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schönmeier, P; Schram, M; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwenker, B; Seidl, R; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shibuya, H; Shimizu, N; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Smerkol, P; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Soloviev, Y; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Strube, J F; Stypula, J; Sugihara, S; Sugiyama, A; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Z; Takeichi, H; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Tanida, K; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Tenchini, F; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Trusov, V; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uchida, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Uozumi, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Waheed, E; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wehle, S; White, E; Widmann, E; Wiechczynski, J; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamada, S; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yelton, J; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, L; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V; Ziegler, M; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of the polarization of $\\Lambda/\\bar{\\Lambda}$ hyperons transverse to its production plane in $e^+e^-$ annihilation. We observe a significant polarization that rises with the fractional energy carried by the hyperon as well as its transverse momentum. To define the production plane, we use the direction of the hyperon momentum together with either the thrust axis in the event or the momentum vector of a hadron in the opposite hemisphere. Furthermore, we investigate the contributions to the hyperon polarization from the feed-down from $\\Sigma^0/\\bar{\\Sigma}^0$ and $\\Lambda_c^{\\pm}$ decays. This measurement uses a dataset of 800.4\\~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the Belle experiment at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV.

  11. Predicting exoplanet observability in time, contrast, separation and polarization, in scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Schworer, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Polarimetry is one of the keys to enhanced direct imaging of exoplanets. Not only does it deliver a differential observable providing extra contrast, but when coupled with spectroscopy, it also reveals valuable information on the exoplanetary atmospheric composition. Nevertheless, angular separation and contrast ratio to the host-star make for extremely challenging observation. Producing detailed predictions for exactly how the expected signals should appear is of critical importance for the designs and observational strategies of tomorrow's telescopes. We aim at accurately determining the magnitudes and evolution of the main observational signatures for imaging an exoplanet: separation, contrast ratio to the host-star and polarization as a function of the orbital geometry and the reflectance parameters of the exoplanet. These parameters were used to construct polarized-reflectance model based on the input of orbital parameters and two albedo values. The model is able to calculate a variety of observational p...

  12. Observations of polarized seismoacoustic T waves at and beneath the seafloor in the abyssal Pacific ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rhett

    2006-12-01

    Combined seismic and hydrophone observations show that the traditional T wave propagates as a seismoacoustic polarized interface wave (Ti) coupled to the seafloor. Seismoacoustic Ti waves propagating at the sound speed of water are routinely observed over megameter distances at the deep (4979 m) seafloor Hawaii-2 Observatory (H2O) between Hawaii and California, even though the seafloor site is within a shadow zone for acoustic wave propagation. Ti has also been observed on seismometers 225 km SSW of Oahu at the OSN1 site at the seafloor and within an ODP borehole into the basalt basement. Analyses of timing, apparent velocity, energy, and polarization of these interface waves are presented. At low frequency (waves. At higher frequencies the observed Ti waves dominantly propagate acoustically with characteristics suggesting local scattering. The observation of Ti from an earthquake in Guatemala at OSN1, whose path is blocked by the Island of Hawaii, is consistent with scattering from the vicinity of the Cross Seamount.

  13. Predicting exoplanet observability in time, contrast, separation, and polarization, in scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schworer, Guillaume; Tuthill, Peter G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Polarimetry is one of the keys to enhanced direct imaging of exoplanets. Not only does it deliver a differential observable providing extra contrast, but when coupled with spectroscopy, it also reveals valuable information on the exoplanetary atmospheric composition. Nevertheless, angular separation and contrast ratio to the host-star make for extremely challenging observation. Producing detailed predictions for exactly how the expected signals should appear is of critical importance for the designs and observational strategies of tomorrow's telescopes. Aims: We aim at accurately determining the magnitudes and evolution of the main observational signatures for imaging an exoplanet: separation, contrast ratio to the host-star and polarization as a function of the orbital geometry and the reflectance parameters of the exoplanet. Methods: These parameters were used to construct a polarized-reflectance model based on the input of orbital parameters and two albedo values. The model is able to calculate a variety of observational predictions for exoplanets at any orbital time. Results: The inter-dependency of the three main observational criteria - angular separation, contrast ratio, polarization - result in a complex time-evolution of the system. They greatly affect the viability of planet observation by direct imaging. We introduce a new generic display of the main observational criteria, which enables an observer to determine whether an exoplanet is within detection limits: the Separation-POlarization-Contrast (SPOC) diagrams. Conclusions: We explore the complex effect of orbital and albedo parameters on the visibility of an exoplanet. The code we developed is available for public use and collaborative improvement on the python package index, together with its documentation. It is another step towards a full comprehensive simulation tool for predicting and interpreting the results of future observational exoplanetary discovery campaigns.

  14. Long-Wavelength Observations of Jets from Polar Regions of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.

    1999-10-01

    We report radio observations of enhanced emission associated with the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets from polar coronal hole regions of the Sun, with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH). We have estimated the brightness temperature, electron density and mass of the ejected material. These jets were not accompanied by nonthermal radio bursts, particularly Type III events.

  15. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 2. South polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David A.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the south polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking Orbiters over a 30-day period in 1977 during the Martian late southern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg S to the south pole at a spatial resolution of 1 deg of latitude, thus completing the initial thermal mapping of the entire planet. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere for a range of assumptions concerning dust optical properties and dust optical depths. The maps show that apparent thermal inertias of bare ground regions decrease systematically from 60 deg S to the south pole. In unfrosted regions close to the south pole, apparent thermal inertias are among the lowest observed anywhere on the planet. On the south residual cap, apparent thermal inertias are very high due to the presence of CO2 frost. In most other regions of Mars, best fit apparent albedos based on thermal emission measurements are generally in good agreement with actual surface albedos based on broadband solar reflectance measurements. The one-dimensional atmospheric model calculations also predict anomalously cold brightness temperatures close to the pole during late summer, and after considering a number of alternatives, it is concluded that the net surface cooling due to atmospheric dust is the best explanation for this phenomenon. The region of lowest apparent thermal inertia close to the pole, which includes the south polar layered deposits, is interpreted to be mantled by a continuous layer of aeolian material that must be at least a few millimeters thick. The low thermal inertias mapped in the south polar region imply an

  16. 3. Observing the Arctic from space: educational opportunities for an International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J.; Yanow, G.; Alexander, V.; Johnson, L.

    2003-04-01

    Recommendations for an International Polar Year (IPY) will require integrated circumpolar research projects using present and advanced technologies. The IPY will offer exceptional opportunities for participation by indigenous residents of the Arctic. Educational outreach will be an essential component of IPY programs, to improve science competence and citizen awareness through participation in IPY projects and utilization of educational products. An important and practical objective of IPY educational outreach is to recognize that the earth is a system and that it is best from space that we can acquire seasonal and secular atmospheric, terrestrial and oceanic environmental data. Acquisition of reliable ground truth data in support of remote sensing of geophysical and geochemical variables will be essential, especially with broad long-term coverage in the polar regions. It should be an essential element of the IPY program. In the United States NASA has developed a strategy for long-term monitoring of some key parameters needed to bring us closer to the answers we need regarding climate change in the Arctic and polar regions. Technology consists of a group of five polar satellites that make a suite of earth observations referred to as the "A-Train". Data from this group of satellites, as well as from the Orbital Carbon Observatory (OCO) and older Quikscat and new Seawinds radar missions, will provide focus for an education program based not only on the acquisition of polar data but also on how these data correlate with global observations. We recommend that an educational outreach secretariat be developed for each national program that will involve the indigenous people of the Arctic and elsewhere in acquisition of data relevant to satellite observations. The secretariat will provide for information transfer, coordination with scientific projects, opportunities for participation in project activities, communication of scientific results to the public, and greater

  17. Observing the Arctic From Space: Educational Opportunities for an International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. J.; Yanow, G.; Alexander, V.; Johnson, L.

    2003-12-01

    Recommendations for an International Polar Year (IPY) will require integrated circumpolar research projects using present and advanced technologies. The IPY will offer exceptional opportunities for participation by indigenous residents of the Arctic. Educational outreach will be an essential component of IPY programs, to improve science competence and citizen awareness through participation in IPY projects and utilization of educational products. An important and practical objective of IPY educational outreach is to recognize that the earth is a system and that it is best from space that we can acquire seasonal and secular atmospheric, terrestrial and oceanic environmental data. Acquisition of reliable ground truth data in support of remote sensing of geophysical and geochemical variables will be essential, especially with broad long-term coverage in the polar regions. It should be an essential element of the IPY program. In the United States NASA has developed a strategy for long-term monitoring of some key parameters needed to bring us closer to the answers we need regarding climate change in the Arctic and polar regions. Technology consists of a group of five polar satellites that make a suite of earth observations referred to as the "A-Train". Data from this group of satellites, as well as from the Orbital Carbon Observatory (OCO) and older Quikscat and new Seawinds radar missions, will provide focus for an education program based not only on the acquisition of polar data but also on how these data correlate with global observations. We recommend that an educational outreach secretariat be developed for each national program that will involve the indigenous people of the Arctic and elsewhere in acquisition of data relevant to satellite observations. The secretariat will provide for information transfer, coordination with scientific projects, opportunities for participation in project activities, communication of scientific results to the public, and greater

  18. Polarization Observables T and F in single π0- and η-Photoproduction off quasi-free Nucleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strub Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Single π0- and η-photoproduction off a transversally polarized d-butanol target has been measured with circularly polarized bremsstrahlung photons generated by the MAMI-C electron microtron. With the nearly 4π acceptance of the combined Crystal Ball/TAPS setup the double polarization observable F and the target asymmetry T can be extracted for the first time for polarized, quasi-free neutrons over a wide energy and angular range.

  19. Analysis of visibility simulation of three polar regions from lunar-based earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hanlin; Liu, Guang; Ren, Yuanzhen; Guo, Huadong; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    Global environment change has caught the attention of many scientists around the world. The Arctic, Antarctic and Tibet Plateau are known as the three polar regions. They are the world's largest storage of cold and carbon which are the sensitive regions of global environment change. These three regions have significant impacts on the global environment change. It is extremely obvious that the environment change of these three regions is one of the major factors of global environment change. The special geographical positions of these three regions have great influence on the local climate and ecological environment that caused the climate is very bad and few people can get there, so there is very little observation data exists. In addition, these three regions have large scale and long-term observation characteristics. Since the meaning of remote sensing technology came out, we have developed airborne and space-borne Earth observation system. However, when taking three polar regions for researching, we will have to face the problems of temporal coherence and spatial continuity in the global scale, which challenges the Earth observation on the satellite and airborne platform. Moon is the unique natural satellite of the Earth, which always has one side facing it, with the advantages of large coverage, long-life platform, stable geological structure and multi-spheres three-dimensional detecting, turning out to be the ideal platform for observing three polar regions. At present and in the near future, the study of Earth observation data from a lunar observatory would be difficult to carry out, so a simulation is used in this paper to analyze the visibility of three polar regions. At first, we discuss the motion pattern of the Sun-Earth-Moon system. Then we construct a simulation system with simulated optical sensors setting up at different places on the Moon, finding that sunlight has great influence on optical observation. The visible region of a lunar-based optical

  20. Talon Cusp Type I: Restorative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alberto dos Santos Maia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The teeth are formed during intrauterine life (i.e., gestation during the odontogenesis stage. During this period, the teeth move until they enter the oral cavity. This course covers various stages of dental development, namely, initiation, proliferation, histodifferentiation, morphodifferentiation, and apposition. The talon cusp is an anomaly that occurs during morphodifferentiation, and this anomaly may have numerous adverse clinical effects on oral health. The objective of this study was to report a case of “Talon Cusp Type I” and to discuss diagnostic methods, treatment options for this anomaly, and the importance of knowledge of this morphological change among dental professionals so that it is not confused with other morphological changes; such knowledge is required to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures, to perform treatments that prevent caries and malocclusions as well as enhancing aesthetics, and to improve the oral health and quality of life of the patient.

  1. Observation of high-order polarization-locked vector solitons in a fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D Y; Zhang, H; Zhao, L M; Wu, X

    2008-10-10

    We report on the experimental observation of a new type of polarization-locked vector soliton in a passively mode-locked fiber laser. The vector soliton is characterized by the fact that not only are the two orthogonally polarized soliton components phase-locked, but also one of the components has a double-humped intensity profile. Multiple phase-locked high-order vector solitons with identical soliton parameters and harmonic mode locking of the vector solitons were also obtained in the laser. Numerical simulations confirmed the existence of stable high-order vector solitons in the fiber laser.

  2. X-ray Observations of Coronal Rings Above Polar Crown Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibben, Patricia R.

    2007-05-01

    Coronal rings have been observed over both north and south polar crown prominences with the X-ray Telescope aboard the Hinode Observatory. These rings appear as dark bands surrounded by the brighter diffuse corona and can only be seen suspended above the solar limb. The properties of these coronal rings will be presented as well as a review of current polar crown prominence models. The US XRT team is supported by a contract from NASA to SAO. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  3. Semiclassical partition function for strings dual to Wilson loops with small cusps in ABJM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Damia, Jeremías; Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2015-03-01

    We compute the 1-loop partition function for strings in , whose worldsheets end along a line with small cusp angles in the boundary of AdS. We obtain these 1-loop results in terms of the vacuum energy for on-shell modes. Our results verify the proposal by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in arXiv:1312.5682 for the exact Bremsstrahlung function up to the next to leading order in the strong coupling expansion. The agreement is observed for cusps distorting either the 1/2 BPS or the 1/6 BPS Wilson line.

  4. Semiclassical partition function for strings dual to Wilson loops with small cusps in ABJM

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilera-Damia, Jeremias; Silva, Guillermo A

    2014-01-01

    We compute the 1-loop partition function for strings in $AdS_4\\times\\mathbb{CP}^3$, whose worldsheets end along a line with small cusp angles in the boundary of AdS. We obtain these 1-loop results in terms of the vacuum energy for on-shell modes. Our results verify the proposal by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in arXiv:1312.5682 for the exact Bremsstrahlung function up to the next to leading order in the strong coupling expansion. The agreement is observed for cusps distorting either the 1/2 BPS or the 1/6 BPS Wilson line.

  5. Systematic effects in polarizing Fourier transform spectrometers for cosmic microwave background observations

    CERN Document Server

    Nagler, Peter C; Kogut, Alan; Tucker, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing Fourier transform spectrometers, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS - emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects - and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  6. SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN POLARIZING FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan, E-mail: peter.c.nagler@nasa.gov [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 553, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  7. A Broadband W-band Orthomode Transducer for KVN Polarization Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Moon-Hee; Je, Do-Heung; Kim, Seung-Rae

    2013-12-01

    A W-band Orthomode Transducer (OMT) has been developed for Korean VLBI Network (KVN) polarization observation. The OMT design was based on E-plane split-block technique using septum structure. 3-dimensional electromagnetic simulation was fully employed to optimize the performance of the OMT. Measurements of the fabricated OMT show that the return losses for the vertically and horizontally polarized modes are better than -20 dB across 80 ~ 108 GHz and the insertion losses for the both modes are less than 0.47 dB. The cross-polarization level of the OMT is less than -30 dB. The bandwidth of the developed OMT is estimated as around 30%.

  8. First Cluster results of the magnetic field structure of the mid- and high-altitude cusps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available Magnetic field measurements from the four Cluster spacecraft from the mid- and high-altitude cusp are presented. Cluster underwent two encounters with the mid-altitude cusp during its commissioning phase (24 August 2000. Evidence for field-aligned currents (FACs was seen in the data from all three operating spacecraft from northern and southern cusps. The extent of the FACs was of the order of 1 RE in the X-direction, and at least 300 km in the Y-direction. However, fine-scale field structures with scales of the order of the spacecraft separation (300 km were observed within the FACs. In the northern crossing, two of the spacecraft appeared to lie along the same magnetic field line, and observed very well matched signals. However, the third spacecraft showed evidence for structuring transverse to the field on scales of a few hundred km. A crossing of the high-altitude cusp from 13 February 2001 is presented. It is revealed to be a highly dynamic structure with the boundaries moving with velocities ranging from a few km/s to tens of km/s, and having structure on timescales ranging from less than one minute up to several minutes. The cusp proper is associated with the presence of a very disordered magnetic field, which is entirely different from the magnetosheath turbulence.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers – Space plasma physics (discontinuities

  9. Recent observations of intraspecific predation and cannibalism among polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.; Smith, T.S.; Perham, C.; Thiemann, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    Intraspecific killing has been reported among polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus). Although cannibalism is one motivation for such killings, the ecological factors mediating such events are poorly understood. Between 24 January and 10 April 2004, we confirmed three instances of intraspecific predation and cannibalism in the Beaufort Sea. One of these, the first of this type ever reported for polar bears, was a parturient female killed at her maternal den. The predating bear was hunting in a known maternal denning area and apparently discovered the den by scent. A second predation event involved an adult female and cub recently emerged from their den, and the third involved a yearling male. During 24 years of research on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea region of northern Alaska and 34 years in northwestern Canada, we have not seen other incidents of polar bears stalking, killing, and eating other polar bears. We hypothesize that nutritional stresses related to the longer ice-free seasons that have occurred in the Beaufort Sea in recent years may have led to the cannibalism incidents we observed in 2004. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  10. Observations of Dissipation of Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Polar Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, G R

    2014-01-01

    We focus on polar coronal hole region to find any evidence of dissipation of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. We obtained time-distance and frequency-distance maps along plume structure in polar coronal hole. We also obtained Fourier power maps of polar coronal hole in different frequency ranges in 171 \\AA\\ and 193 \\AA\\ passbands. We performed intensity distribution statistics in time domain at several locations in polar coronal hole. We find presence of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves having temperature dependent propagation speeds. The wavelet analysis and Fourier power maps of polar coronal hole show that low-frequency waves are travelling longer distances (longer detection length) as compared to high-frequency waves. We found two distinct dissipation length scales of wave amplitude decay at two different height ranges (between 0-10 Mm and 10-70 Mm) along the observed plume structure. Dissipation length obtained at higher height range show some frequency dependence. Individual Fourier power...

  11. Halo Observations from the Ground and from Space: Further Checks on the Sprite Polarity Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E.; Kuo, C.; Bor, J.; Satori, G.; Newsome, R. T.; Boldi, R. A.; Downes, E.; Saba, M. M.; Taylor, M. J.; Chen, A. B.; Lyons, W. A.

    2009-12-01

    In continuing efforts to verify the hypothesis that halos produced by negative polarity ground flashes provide a resolution to the ‘sprite polarity paradox’ and are caused by the fast initial charge transfer in the lightning return stroke, additional halo observations are considered from the ground and from space. The ground-based observations include standard frame-rate video cameras, a high-time resolution (40 microsec)) photometer (called PIPER), the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and ELF charge moment observations from Nagycenk Observatory in Hungary. The space-based observations are measurements from the limb-viewing ISUAL satellite. The observations in support of the hypothesis are: (1) charge moments of the same magnitude required for sprites are evident for ‘negative’ halos, (2) negative halos outnumber positive halos in both ISUAL and PIPER observations, (3) short (working hypothesis are (1) ISUAL peak lightning brightnesses are no larger for negative than for positive halo-parent lightning flashes, (2) NLDN peak currents for brighter ‘positive’ halos are not notably larger than for dimmer ‘negative’ flashes, and (3) ELF measurements of charge moments for negative flashes tend to be greater than for positive flashes. An additional similarity between ground- and space-based observations is the tendency for halos to be produced by single-stroke negative flashes, a distinct departure from the statistics of stroke multiplicity for all negative flashes with large peak current. The reason for the polarity asymmetry in the parent lightning flash, at the origin of the sprite polarity asymmetry, remains an open question.

  12. Observational Characteristics of Radio Emission Related to Multi-polar Magnetic Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Rui-Xiang Xie; Chun Xu; Shuo-Biao Shi; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    We present a large complex radio burst and its associated fast time structures observed on 2001 April 10 in the frequency range of 0.65-7.6 GHz. The NoRH radio image observation shows very complex radio source structures which include preexisting, newly emerging, submerging/cancelling polarities and a biposuggests that the radio burst is generated from a very complicated loop structure.According to the spectral and image observations, we assume that the beginning connection structure. A composite of radio continuum and fast time structures is contained in this flare. The various fast radio emission phenomena include normal and reverse drifting type Ⅲ bursts, and slowly drifting and no-drift structures.ture, which is an important source of the various types of fast time structures.The two-loop reconnection model can lead simultaneously to electron acceleration and corona heating. We have also analyzed the behaviors of coronal magnetic polarities and the emission processes of different types radio emission qualitatively.Interactions of a bipolar or multi-polar loop are consistent with our observational results. Our observations favor the magnetic reconnection configurations of the lar).

  13. STEREO Observations of Quasi-Periodically Driven High Velocity Outflows in Polar Plumes

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Leamon, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Plumes are one of the most ubiquitous features seen at the limb in polar coronal holes and are considered to be a source of high density plasma streams to the fast solar wind. We analyze STEREO observations of plumes and aim to reinterpret and place observations with previous generations of EUV imagers within a new context that was recently developed from Hinode observations. We exploit the higher signal-to-noise, spatial and temporal resolution of the EUVI telescopes over that of SOHO/EIT to study the temporal variation of polar plumes in high detail. We employ recently developed insight from imaging (and spectral) diagnostics of active region, plage, and quiet Sun plasmas to identify the presence of apparent motions as high-speed upflows in magnetic regions as opposed to previous interpretations of propagating waves. In almost all polar plumes observed at the limb in these STEREO sequences, in all coronal passbands, we observe high speed jets of plasma traveling along the structures with a mean velocity of ...

  14. Observation of adsorption behavior of biomolecules on ferroelectric crystal surfaces with polarization domain patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomoaki; Isobe, Akiko; Ogino, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    Lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) is one of the ferroelectric crystals that exhibit spontaneous polarization domain patterns on its surface. We observed the polarization-dependent adsorption of avidin molecules, which are positively charged in a buffer solution at pH 7.0, on LiTaO3 surfaces caused by electrostatic interaction at an electrostatic double layer using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Avidin adsorption in the buffer solution was confirmed by scratching the substrate surfaces using the AFM cantilever, and the adsorption patterns were found to depend on the avidin concentration. When KCl was added to the buffer solution to weaken the electrostatic double layer interaction between avidin molecules and LiTaO3 surfaces, adsorption domain patterns disappeared. From the comparison between the adsorption and chemically etched domain patterns, it was found that avidin molecule adsorption is enhanced on negatively polarized domains, indicating that surface polarization should be taken into account in observing biomolecule behaviors on ferroelectric crystals.

  15. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Spjeldvik

    Full Text Available New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE/HIT instrument on the ISTP/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation belts. The latter attribute makes possible direct observations of nearly the full equatorial helium ion pitch angle distributions in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt region. Additionally, the spacecraft often re-encounters the same geomagnetic flux tube at a substantially off-equatorial location within a few tens of minutes prior to or after the equatorial crossing. This makes both the equatorial pitch angle distribution and an expanded view of the local off-equatorial pitch angle distribution observable. The orbit of POLAR also permitted observations to be made in conjugate magnetic local time sectors over the course of the same day, and this afforded direct comparison of observations on diametrically opposite locations in the Earth's radiation belt region at closely spaced times. Results from four helium ion data channels covering ion kinetic energies from 520 to 8200 KeV show that the distributions display trapped particle characteristics with angular flux peaks for equatorially mirroring particles as one might reasonably expect. However, the helium ion pitch angle distributions generally flattened out for equatorial pitch angles below about 45°. Significant and systematic helium ion anisotropy difference at conjugate magnetic local time were also observed, and we report quiet time azimuthal variations of the anisotropy index.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasmasphere

  16. Statistical characteristics of the polar ionospheric scale height around the peak height of F2 layer with observations of the ESR radar: Disturbed days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zheng; Yuan, Zhigang; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on observations of the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard Radar (ESR) between 1997 and 2008, we analyzed variations of HmF2, the ionospheric scale height around the peak height of F2 layer (hmF2) at high latitude with geomagnetic activities, as well as variations of the HmF2 with the local time (LT), season and solar activity under disturbed conditions (2 < Kp ≤ 5). We found that the HmF2 shows a significant increment with enhancements of geomagnetic activities. In addition, based on a linear regression, the correlation and fitting coefficients are shown, which quantitatively describe the correlations between polar HmF2 and geomagnetic activity index Kp. The HmF2 shows a diurnal variation with a maximum early in the morning and a minimum around noon in disturbed days (2 < Kp ≤ 5), which is more complex in comparison with that in quiet days. However, in summer and autumn, the HmF2 in disturbed days shows a bulge during 06:00-11:00 LT instead of the continuous decline under quiet condition. We consider that the ESR was under the cusp region during the period so that the bulge might be related to the high-energy particles precipitating into the ionosphere resulting in changes of the electron density profile. The HmF2 has the highest seasonal magnitude in summer and the lowest seasonal magnitude in winter generally. The seasonal magnitude of the HmF2 in autumn is lower than that in spring and larger than that in winter under low solar activity, while the HmF2 shows the same seasonal variations in spring and autumn under moderate and high solar activities.

  17. Detecting inter-cusp and inter-tooth wear patterns in rhinocerotids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy A Taylor

    Full Text Available Extant rhinos are the largest extant herbivores exhibiting dietary specialisations for both browse and grass. However, the adaptive value of the wear-induced tooth morphology in rhinos has not been widely studied, and data on individual cusp and tooth positions have rarely been published. We evaluated upper cheek dentition of browsing Diceros bicornis and Rhinoceros sondaicus, mixed-feeding R. unicornis and grazing Ceratotherium simum using an extended mesowear method adapted for rhinos. We included single cusp scoring (EM(R-S to investigate inter-cusp and inter-tooth wear patterns. In accordance with previous reports, general mesowear patterns in D. bicornis and R. sondaicus were attrition-dominated and C. simum abrasion-dominated, reflecting their respective diets. Mesowear patterns for R. unicornis were more attrition-dominated than anticipated by the grass-dominated diet, which may indicate a low intake of environmental abrasives. EM(R-S increased differentiation power compared to classical mesowear, with significant inter-cusp and inter-tooth differences detected. In D. bicornis, the anterior cusp was consistently more abrasion-dominated than the posterior. Wear differences in cusp position may relate to morphological adaptations to dietary regimes. Heterogeneous occlusal surfaces may facilitate the comminution of heterogeneous browse, whereas uniform, broad grinding surfaces may enhance the comminution of physically more homogeneous grass. A negative tooth wear gradient was found in D. bicornis, R. sondaicus and R. unicornis, with wear patterns becoming less abrasion-dominated from premolars to molars. No such gradients were evident in C. simum which displayed a uniform wear pattern. In browsers, premolars may be exposed to higher relative grit loads, which may result in the development of wear gradients. The second premolar may also have a role in food cropping. In grazers, high absolute amounts of ingested abrasives may override other

  18. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part I: Experimental apparatus and observations of vitrification, crystallization, and photoelasticity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    Cryomacroscopy is an effective means to observe physical events affecting cryopreservation success in large-size specimens. The current study aims at integrating polarized-light in the study of large-size cryopreservation, using the scanning cryomacroscope as a development platform. Results of this study demonstrate polarized light as a visualization enhancement means, including the following effects: contaminants in the CPA solution, crystallization, fracture formation, thermal contraction, and solute precipitation. In addition, photoelasticity effects are used to demonstrate the development of residual stresses and the potential for stress relaxation above the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, this study suggests that the ability to periodically switch between non-polarized light and polarized light is an essential feature of investigation. When using polarized light for example, a dark region may represent a free-of-stress and free-of-crystals material, or fully crystallized material, which may potentially experience mechanical stress; switching to a non-polarized light would help to distinguish between the different cases. The analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in cryopreservation is essentially based on four key elements: identification of physical events, knowledge of physical properties, thermal analysis of the specimen, and description of the mechanical behavior of the cryopreserved material (also known as the constitutive law). With the above knowledge, one can investigate the conditions to preserve structural integrity. While the current study aims at identification of physical events, critical knowledge on physical properties and mechanical behavior has already been developed in previous studies. The companion manuscript (Part II) aims at providing means for thermal analysis in the specimen, which will serve as the basis for a multi-scale analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in large-size specimens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Degeneracies of parametric lens model families near folds and cusps

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    We develop an approach to select families of lens models that can describe doubly and triply gravitationally lensed images near folds and cusps using the model-independent ratios of lensing-potential derivatives derived in Wagner & Bartelmann (2015). Models are selected by comparing these model-independent ratios of potential derivatives to (numerically determined) ratios of potential derivatives along critical curves for entire lens model families in a given range of parameter values. This comparison returns parameter ranges which lens model families can reproduce observation within, as well as sections of the critical curve where image sets of the observed type can appear. If the model-independent potential-derivative ratios inferred from the observation fall outside the range of these ratios derived for the lens model family, the entire family can be excluded as a feasible model in the given volume in parameter space. We employ this approach for the family of singular isothermal spheres with external s...

  20. Magnetic Field Effects on the Plume of a Diverging Cusped-Field Thruster

    KAUST Repository

    Matlock, Taylor

    2010-07-25

    The Diverging Cusped-Field Thruster (DCFT) uses three permanent ring magnets of alternating polarity to create a unique magnetic topology intended to reduce plasma losses to the discharge chamber surfaces. The magnetic field strength within the DCFT discharge chamber (up to 4 kG on axis) is much higher than in thrusters of similar geometry, which is believed to be a driving factor in the high measured anode efficiencies. The field strength in the near plume region is large as well, which may bear on the high beam divergences measured, with peaks in ion current found at angles of around 30-35 from the thruster axis. Characterization of the DCFT has heretofore involved only one magnetic topology. It is then the purpose of this study to investigate changes to the near-field plume caused by altering the shape and strength of the magnetic field. A thick magnetic collar, encircling the thruster body, is used to lower the field strength outside of the discharge chamber and thus lessen any effects caused by the external field. Changes in the thruster plume with field topology are monitored by the use of normal Langmuir and emissive probes interrogating the near-field plasma. Results are related to other observations that suggest a unified conceptual framework for the important near-exit region of the thruster.

  1. A Proposed Student Built and Operated Satellite: The Gamma Ray Burst Polarization Observer (PolOSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malphrus, Benjamin K.; Jernigan, J. G.; Bloom, J. S.; Boggs, S.; Butler, N. R.; Cominsky, L. R.; Doering, T. J.; Doty, J. P.; Erb, D. M.; Figer, D. F.; Hurley, K. C.; Kimel, K. W.; Lumpp, J. E.; Labov, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Polarization Observer (PolOSat) is small satellite mission whose goal is to measure the polarization of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A precise measurement of the polarization of GRBs will constrain the models of radiative mechanisms associated with GRBs as supermassive stars undergo collapse into black holes. The primary goal of PolOSat is the detection of strongly linearly polarized GRBs (≥20; %) and/or to set upper limits on polarization for a few GRBs (≤30; %). PolOSat is designed to have a sensitivity to polarization that exceeds all prior experiments. The primary scientific instrument, the Gamma-ray Polarization Monitor (GPM) is based on a CMOS hybrid array that is optimized for performance in the low energy gamma-ray band (20-200 keV). The GPM has two passive Beryllium (Be) scattering elements which provide signal gamma-rays within a large field of view (two 45 degree radius cones). Gamma-rays impinge on the Be scatterers and are then Compton scattered into the CZT arrays and detected. A bright GRB (occurring 5 times a year) will produce 100,000s of direct gamma-rays and 1000s of Compton scattered gamma-rays detected by the CZT array. The PolOSat satellite with the GPM is rotated ( 1 Hz) inducing a strong temporal component at twice the spin frequency that is proportional to the linear polarization in the GRB signal. The team includes the University of California, Berkeley, the Kentucky Space Program including the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation, the University of Kentucky, Morehead State University, Sonoma State University, the Rochester Institute of Technology, the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. PolOSat features significant participation by undergraduate and graduate students in all phases of development and operation of the spacecraft and instruments and in data analysis. PolOSat was initially proposed as a small complete NASA Mission of Opportunity and is currently seeking funding.

  2. Dispersion of Observed Angles of Submillimeter Polarization in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, G; Li, H

    2007-01-01

    We present submillimeter polarimetric observations of the Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) NGC 6334, obtained using the Hertz instrument at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea. We obtain constraints on GMC magnetic fields by interpreting these Hertz data together with (a) previously published larger-scale submillimeter polarization maps of the GMCs NGC 6334 and G333.6-0.2 obtained using the SPARO instrument at South Pole, and (b) simulated GMC polarization maps from published magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. The agreement between observations and simulations is good only when the ratio R(F:U) of fluctuating to uniform field amplitudes lies in the range 0.6 < R(F:U) < 2.0, and when the ratio R(T:K) of total magnetic energy (including both uniform and fluctuating components) to turbulent kinetic energy lies in the range 0.9 < R(T:K) < 1.8. We also compare our results with those obtained by other investigators.

  3. Determination of Net Martian Polar Dust Flux from MGS-TES Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Using atmospheric dust abundance and atmospheric temperature observation data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), the net flux of dust into and out of the Martian polar regions will be examined. Mars polar regions possess layered terrain , believed to be comprised of a mixture of ice and dust, with the different layers possibly representing different past climate regimes. These changes in climate may reflect changes in the deposition of dust and volatiles through impacts, volcanism, changes in resources of ice and dust, and response to Milankovitch type cycles (changes in eccentricity of orbit, obliquity and precession of axis). Understanding how rapidly such layers can be generated is an important element to understanding Mars climate history. This study uses the observed vertical temperature data and dust content measurements from TES to analyze the sign (gain or loss) of dust at high latitudes.

  4. Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) Observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Kowalewski, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) instruments designed for measuring stratospheric ozone profiles have proven to be robust tools for observing polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). These measurements are available for more than 30 years, and have been used to demonstrate the existence of long-term variations in PMC occurrence frequency and brightness. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the EOS Aura satellite provides new and improved capabilities for PMC characterization. OMI uses smaller pixels than previous BUV instruments, which increases its ability to identify PMCs and discern more spatial structure, and its wide cross-track viewing swath provides full polar coverage up to 90 latitude every day in both hemispheres. This cross-track coverage allows the evolution of PMC regions to be followed over several consecutive orbits. Localized PMC variations determined from OMI measurements are consistent with coincident SBUV/2 measurements. Nine seasons of PMC observations from OMI are now available, and clearly demonstrate the advantages of these measurements for PMC analysis.

  5. Wilson loops at strong coupling for curved contours with cusps

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, Harald

    2015-01-01

    We construct the minimal surface in AdS, relevant for the strong coupling behaviour of local supersymmetric Wilson loops in N=4 SYM for a closed contour formed out of segments of two intersecting circles. Its regularised area is calculated including all divergent parts and the finite renormalised term. Furthermore we prove, that for generic planar curved contours with cusps the cusp anomalous dimensions are functions of the respective cusp angles alone. They do not depend on other local data of the cusps.

  6. The exterior cusp and its boundary with the magnetosheath: Cluster multi-event analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lavraud

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the observation of three high-altitude cusp crossings by the Cluster spacecraft under steady northward IMF conditions. The focus of this study is on the exterior cusp and its boundaries. At the poleward edge of the cusp, large downward jets are present; they are characterized by a dawn-dusk component of the convection velocity opposite to the IMF By direction and a gradual evolution (velocity filter effect corresponding to an injection site located at the high-latitude magnetopause tailward of the cusp, with subsequent sunward convection. As one moves from the poleward edge into the exterior cusp proper, the plasma gradually becomes stagnant as the result of the mirroring and scattering of the aforementioned plasma flows. The existence of such a stagnant region (Stagnant Exterior Cusp: SEC is found in all events studied here even when the IMF By is large and the clock angle is ~90°. The SEC-magnetosheath boundary appears as a spatial structure that has a normal component of the magnetic field pointing inward, in accordance with a probable connection between the region and the magnetosheath (with northward field. This boundary generally has a deHoffmann-Teller velocity that is slow and oriented sunward and downward, compatible with a discontinuity propagating from a location near the high-latitude magnetopause. Although the tangential stress balance is not always satisfied, the SEC-magnetosheath boundary is possibly a rotational discontinuity. Just outside this boundary, there exists a clear sub-Alfvénic plasma depletion layer (PDL. These results are all consistent with the existence of a nearly steady reconnection site at the high-latitude magnetopause tailward of the cusp. We suggest that the stability of the external discontinuity (and of the whole region is maintained by the presence of the sub-Alfvénic PDL. However, examination of the electron data shows the presence of heated electrons

  7. Long term observations of polar mesospheric echoes at Andøya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Renkwitz, Toralf; Sommer, Svenja

    2016-04-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong enhancements of received signal power at very high radar frequencies occurring at altitudes between about 80 and 95 km at polar latitudes during summer. These echoes are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Thus the occurrence of PMSE contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapour content but also depends on the ionisation due to solar electromagnetic radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Continuous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) since 1994 using different VHF radars. The PMSE occurrence rate is positively correlated with the geomagnetic Ap index, however not correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation and shows a significant positive trend during the time interval from 1994 until 2012. VHF radar echoes have been observed also during winter times but in the mid mesosphere from about 55 to 85 km altitude. These so called polar mesosphere winter echoes (PMWE) have been observed continuously at Andøya since 2004 using the ALWIN VHF radar (until 2008) and the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System MAARSY (since 2011). Using the more sensitive MAARSY compared to the previous VHF radar systems operated at the site, results in more detections characterized by smaller volume reflectivity values down to 4 ṡ 10-18m-1. The end of the winter season is now hard to determine since mesospheric echoes have also been observed below altitudes of 80 km during non winter months, particularly around the end of May, i.e. the beginning of the polar mesospheric summer echo season. These observations indicate that the physical mechanism for creating the lower mesospheric echoes is present during the early summer months as well. We present results from long term observations of polar mesospheric

  8. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 1. North polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David A.; Bachman, Jennifer E.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the north polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking orbiters over a 50-day period in 1978 during the Martian early northern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg N to the north pole at a spatial resolution of 1/2 deg of latitude. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmospphere for a wide range of assumptions concerning aerosol optical properties and aerosol optical depths. The results of these calculations show that the effects of the Martian atmosphere on remote determinations of surface thermal inertia are more significant than have been indicated in previous studies. The maps of apparent thermal inertia and albedo show a great deal of spatial structure that is well correlated with surface features.

  9. Recoil polarization observables in the electroproduction of K mesons and Λ's from the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Oren V.

    2014-09-01

    A model developed previously to investigate the electromagnetic production of strangeness from the proton is used to investigate single and double recoil polarization observables in the reaction ep →e'K+Λ in the relativistic impulse approximation. The formalism is based on a tree-level, effective Lagrangian model, which incorporates a variety of baryon resonances with spins up to 5/2 and the two kaon resonances, K(892) and K1(1270). The parameters of the model were fit to a large pool of photoproduction data from the CLAS, GRAAL, SAPHIR, and LEPS collaborations and to CLAS data for the virtual photoproduction structure functions σU,σT,σL,σTT,σLT, and σLT'. Using two different versions of this model, results are presented for three recoil polarization asymmetries that have been measured recently at CLAS. A new fit is then presented which incorporates the new polarization data in the fitted data set. Results obtained with this new fit are presented for six recoil polarization asymmetries and compared with results from one of the previous fits.

  10. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  11. A Highly Circularly Polarized Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2006-04-01

    We report here the observation of a rare solar radio event at hectometric wavelengths that was characterized by essentially 100% circularly polarized radiation and that was observed continuously for about six days, from May 17 to 23, 2002. This was the first time that a solar source with significantly polarized radiation was detected by the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft. From May 19 to 22, the intense polarized radio emissions were characterized by quasi-periodic intensity variations with periods from one to two hours and with superposed drifting, narrowband, fine structures. The bandwidth of this radiation extended from about 400 kHz to 7 MHz, and the peak frequency of the frequency spectrum slowly decreased from 2 MHz to about 0.8 MHz over the course of four days. The radio source, at each frequency, was observed to slowly drift from east to west about the Sun, as viewed from the Earth and was estimated to lie between 26 and 82 R ⊙ ( R ⊙ = 696 000 km). We speculate that this unusual event may represent an interplanetary manifestation of a moving type IV burst and discuss possible radio emission mechanisms. The ISEE-3 spacecraft may possibly have detected a similar event some 26 years ago.

  12. On Alfvenic Waves and Stochastic Ion Heating with 1Re Observations of Strong Field-aligned Currents, Electric Fields, and O+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra

    2008-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling makes it a very dynamic region having similar fundamental processes to those within the auroral regions. With Polar passing through the cusp at 1 Re in the Spring of 1996, we observe a strong correlation between ion heating and broadband ELF (BBELF) emissions. This commonly observed relationship led to the study of the coupling of large field-aligned currents, burst electric fields, and the thermal O+ ions. We demonstrate the role of these measurements to Alfvenic waves and stochastic ion heating. Finally we will show the properties of the resulting density cavities.

  13. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the Northernmost MST Radar at Eureka (80 deg N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northern most geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80 deg N, 86 deg W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69 deg N, 16 deg E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  14. Observations of dissipation of slow magneto-acoustic waves in a polar coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We focus on a polar coronal hole region to find any evidence of dissipation of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. Methods: We obtained time-distance and frequency-distance maps along the plume structure in a polar coronal hole. We also obtained Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole in different frequency ranges in 171 Å and 193 Å passbands. We performed intensity distribution statistics in time domain at several locations in the polar coronal hole. Results: We find the presence of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves having temperature dependent propagation speeds. The wavelet analysis and Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole show that low-frequency waves are travelling longer distances (longer detection length) as compared to high-frequency waves. We found two distinct dissipation length scales of wave amplitude decay at two different height ranges (between 0-10 Mm and 10-70 Mm) along the observed plume structure. The dissipation lengths obtained at higher height range show some frequency dependence. Individual Fourier power spectrum at several locations show a power-law distribution with frequency whereas probability density function of intensity fluctuations in time show nearly Gaussian distributions. Conclusions: Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are getting heavily damped (small dissipation lengths) within the first 10 Mm distance. Beyond that waves are getting damped slowly with height. Frequency dependent dissipation lengths of wave propagation at higher heights may indicate the possibility of wave dissipation due to thermal conduction, however, the contribution from other dissipative parameters cannot be ruled out. Power-law distributed power spectra were also found at lower heights in the solar corona, which may provide viable information on the generation of longer period waves in the solar atmosphere.

  15. The Modulus of the Complex Correlation Coefficient Between Co-Polarized Channels for Oil Spill Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenouchi, H.; Smara, Y.; Migliaccio, M.; Nunziata, F.; Buono, A.

    2016-08-01

    Sea oil pollution is a matter of great concern since it affects both the environment and human health. Recent studies demonstrated that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) polarimetry is able to provide additional information useful for environmental applications, i. e., oil spill observation. In this context, different approaches based on polarimetric SARs were developed. In this study, a dual-polarimetric feature, namely the modulus of the complex correlation coefficient between the co-polarized channels, is used to discriminate between sea oil spill and weak-damping look-alikes.The proposed approach relies on the fact that high correlation between co-polarized channels is expected over sea surface and weak-damping look- alikes due to the dominant Bragg scattering, while significantly lower correlation is expected over strong-damping oil spills since they are characterized by a no-Bragg scattering behaviour. Experimental results show that the modulus of the complex correlation between the co-polarized chan- nels can be successfully exploited for both the observation of sea oil slicks and their discrimination from weak-damping look-alikes.

  16. Observation of room temperature saturated ferroelectric polarization in Dy substituted BiFeO3 ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuxia

    2012-04-06

    High quality Bi1− x Dy x FeO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) ceramics have been fabricated by sintering Dy-doped BiFeO3 (BFO) precursor powders at a low temperature of 780 °C. The magnetic properties of BFO were improved by the introduction of Dy on the Bi-site. More importantly, well saturated ferroelectric hysteresis loops and polarization switching currents have been observed at room temperature. A large remnant polarization (2P r) value of 62 μC/cm2 is achieved, which is the highest value reported so far for rare-earth-doped BFO ceramics. Moreover, mechanisms for improved multiferroic properties depending on chemical doping-caused structure evolutions have also been discussed.

  17. EUV Intensity Gradients and Polarization above the Limb as Observed by SERTS and by SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger J.

    1997-05-01

    Intensity gradients up to 0.4 R_sun above the solar limb were measured in a number of EUV lines at different times by the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), and by the CDS and SUMER instruments aboard the SOHO spacecraft mission. Observed emission lines include He I 584 Angstroms, He II 304 Angstroms, N V 1239 & 1243 Angstroms, O IV 555 Angstroms, O V 630 Angstroms, Mg IX 368 Angstroms, Mg X 610 & 625 Angstroms, Si II 1265 Angstroms, and Si XI 303 Angstroms, formed at temperatures that evenly cover the range from 4.1 sight and the solar center, a signature that would strongly confirm this interpretation. An attempt to measure polarization in EUV emission above the limb was recently made using the SOHO/CDS normal-incidence spectrometer, which has a polarization sensitivity of about 50% at these wavelengths.

  18. Effect of Beam Scanning on Target Polarization Scattering Matrix Observed by Fully Polarimetric Phased-array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mianquan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The polarization feature of a fully Polarimetric Phased-Array Radar (PPAR antenna varies according to the beam-scanning angle, thereby introducing two problems on the target Polarization Scattering Matrix (PSM measurement. First, the antenna polarization basis is defined within the vertical cross-section of an electromagnetic wave propagation direction, and the polarization basis of each beam direction angle is not identical, resulting in the PSM of a fixed-posture target observed by PPAR being not identical for different beam-scanning angles. Second, the cross polarization of the PPAR antenna increases with increasing beamscanning angle, resulting in a crosstalk among the elements of PSM observed by PPAR. This study focuses on the analysis of the abovementioned two aspects of the effect of beam scanning on target PSM observed by PPAR. The results will establish a more accurate observation of the equation for the precision PSM measurement of PPAR.

  19. Optical multicolor polarization observations in the region of the open cluster NGC 5749

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergne, M. M.; Feinstein, C.; Martínez, R.

    2007-02-01

    We present (UBVRI ) multicolor linear polarimetric data for 31 of the brightest stars in the area of the open cluster NGC 5749 considered to study the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) towards the cluster. Our data yield a mean polarization percentage of PV ˜ 1.7%, close to the polarization value produced by the ISM with normal efficiency (P(%)=3.5 {E(B-V)}0.8) for a mean color excess of EB-V=0.42. The mean angle of polarization vectors, θ=74°, agrees quite well with the expected angle produced by dust particles aligned in the direction of the galactic disk (and the magnetic field) in the region. Our analysis indicates that the visual absorption affecting the stars in NGC 5749 is partially produced by a dust layer located up to 300 pc from the Sun and also by a second layer of dust closer to the cluster (located at least at 700 pc). The observed photometry and our polarization data are consistent with the existence of dust within the cluster. We also show in this work how polarimetry could be an excellent technique for identifying nonmember stars. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under agreement between the CONICET and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan, Argentina. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/462/621

  20. Hierarchical Phased Array Antenna Focal Plane for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar-antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization, log-periodic antenna with a 5:1 bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. We propose to develop an hierarchical phased array of our basic pixel type that gives optimal mapping speed (sensitivity) over a much broader range of frequencies. The advantage of this combination of an intrinsically broadband pixel with hierarchical phase arraying include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands compared to focal-plane designs using conventional single-color pixels. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce cost and/or increase performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization, a wide frequency range of about 30 to 400 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. As an example, the multichroic architecture we propose could reduce the focal plane mass of the EPIC-IM CMB polarization mission study concept by a factor of 4, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR groundbased CMB polarization experiment which is now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna that gives excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. POLARBEAR recently succeeded in detecting gravitational lensing B-modes in the CMB polarization. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Pixels of this type are slated to be deployed on the ground in POLARBEAR and SPT-3G and proposed to be used on a balloon by EBEX

  1. A talon cusp mistaken for a mesiodens: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Marie-Lyne; Doyle, Tracy; MacLellan, Jennifer; Anderson, Ross D; Dyment, Heather

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of an 8-year-old boy with a talon cusp associated with a permanent maxillary central incisor that was mistaken for a supernumerary tooth. The importance of early and correct diagnosis of a talon cusp is stressed. Diagnosis and treatment planning strategies are discussed.

  2. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  3. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  4. X-rays from cusps of compact remnants near galactic centres

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S; Nayakshin, Sergei; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2006-01-01

    Compact remnants -- stellar mass black holes and neutron stars formed in the inner few parsec of galactic centres are predicted to sink into the central parsec due to dynamical friction on low mass stars, forming a high concentration cusp (Morris 1993). Same physical region may also contain very high density molecular clouds and accretion discs that are needed to fuel SMBH activity. Here we estimate gas capture rates onto the cusp of stellar remnants, and the resulting X-ray luminosity, as a function of the accretion disc mass. At low disc masses, most compact objects are too dim to be observable, whereas in the high disc case most of them are accreting at their Eddington rates. We find that for low accretion disc masses, compact remnant cusps may be more luminous than the central SMBHs. This ``diffuse'' emission may be of importance for local moderately bright AGN, especially Low Luminosity AGN. We also briefly discuss how this expected emission can be used to put constraints on the black hole cusp near our ...

  5. Prevalence of talon cusps in a Portuguese population: Forensic identification significance of a rare trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Ricardo Jorge; Cardoso, Hugo F.V.; Caldas, Inês Morais

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental techniques are frequently used in human identification; some of those include comparative analyses of dental features that, being rare or unique to an individual, can establish a positive identification. The usefulness of each feature depends on its population, frequency, and uniqueness. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of talon cusps in a Portuguese population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was performed. Three hundred and two patients were studied, and talon cusps presence was assessed. Statistical tests were carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 17 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical analysis relied primarily on descriptive statistics and crosstabs, with Chi-square analysis. Results: Results showed that talon cusps were observed in only 6.3% of patients. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most common teeth showing this feature (82.1% of all teeth). Conclusion: It can be concluded that talon cusps are an uncommon trait in these Portuguese population, and therefore, it is a feature that can be potentially very useful in forensic human identification, when antemortem dental records are available. PMID:24688559

  6. Prevalence of talon cusps in a Portuguese population: Forensic identification significance of a rare trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jorge Simões

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental techniques are frequently used in human identification; some of those include comparative analyses of dental features that, being rare or unique to an individual, can establish a positive identification. The usefulness of each feature depends on its population, frequency, and uniqueness. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of talon cusps in a Portuguese population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was performed. Three hundred and two patients were studied, and talon cusps presence was assessed. Statistical tests were carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 17 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Statistical analysis relied primarily on descriptive statistics and crosstabs, with Chi-square analysis. Results: Results showed that talon cusps were observed in only 6.3% of patients. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most common teeth showing this feature (82.1% of all teeth. Conclusion: It can be concluded that talon cusps are an uncommon trait in these Portuguese population, and therefore, it is a feature that can be potentially very useful in forensic human identification, when antemortem dental records are available.

  7. Polarization Observables in $\\gamma N\\to K\\overline{K}N$

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, W

    2004-01-01

    We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\overline{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\overline{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

  8. High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jaeyoung; Sieck, Paul E; Offermann, Dustin T; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high beta a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. The current experiment validates this theoretical conjecture for the first time and represents critical progress toward the Polywell fusion concept which combines a high beta cusp configuration with an electrostatic fusion for a compact, economical, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  9. Talon′s cusp: Report of four unusual cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulunoglu O

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is a developmental dental anomaly thought to arise as a result of evagination on the surface of a tooth crown before calcification has occurred. The etiology remains unknown. The incidence is 0.04-10%. Any tooth may have a talon cusp but most of the cases involve maxillary lateral incisors, with some instances of bilateral involvement. The anomaly has been reported to be rare in the mandible. This article reports four cases of talon cusp. The first and the second cases describe bilateral involvement of talon cusp on palatal surfaces of maxillary primary centrals; in the third case talon tubercle occurs on palatal surfaces of both maxillary permanent lateral incisors and the maxillary left central incisor and in the last case a talon cusp in the lingual surface of mandibular permanent lateral incisor.

  10. The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS): observations and CMB polarization foreground analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; McConnell, D; Bernardi, G; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Cortiglioni, S; Poppi, S

    2009-01-01

    [abridged] We present observations, maps, polarised emission properties study, and CMB foreground analysis of the Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS), a project to investigate the Galactic latitude behaviour of the polarized synchrotron emission at 2.3-GHz with the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey consists of a 5-deg wide strip along the Galactic meridian l=254-deg. We identify three zones distinguished by polarized emission properties: the disc, the halo, and a transition region connecting them. The halo section lies at latitudes |b|>40-deg and is characterised by weak and smooth polarized emission with steep angular power spectra of median slope $\\beta_{\\rm med} \\sim -2.6$. The disc region covers the latitudes |b|<20-deg and shows a brighter, more complex emission with inverted spectra of mean slope $\\bar{\\beta} = -1.8$. The transition region has steep spectra as in the halo, but the emission power increases toward the Galactic plane from halo to disc levels. The change at b ~ -20-deg is sudden, ind...

  11. Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations of linear polarization from a loop prominence system

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Oliveros, Juan-Carlos Martínez; Hudson, Hugh S; Krucker, Säm; Bain, Hazel; Couvidat, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    White-light observations by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager of a loop-prominence system occurring in the aftermath of an X-class flare on 2013 May 13 near the eastern solar limb show a linearly polarized component, reaching up to $\\sim$20% at an altitude of $\\sim$33 Mm, about the maximal amount expected if the emission were due solely to Thomson scattering of photospheric light by the coronal material. The mass associated with the polarized component was 8.2$\\times$10$^{14}$ g. At 15 Mm altitude, the brightest part of the loop was 3(+/-0.5)% linearly polarized, only about 20% of that expected from pure Thomson scattering, indicating the presence of an additional unpolarized component at wavelengths near Fe I (617.33 nm), probably thermal emission. We estimated the free electron density of the white-light loop system to possibly be as high as 1.8$\\times$10$^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$.

  12. Photoproduction of η mesons from the neutron: Cross sections and double polarization observable E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witthauer, L.; Dieterle, M.; Challand, T.; Kaeser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Rostomyan, T.; Walford, N.K.; Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Afzal, F.; Beck, R.; Boese, S.; Funke, C.; Gottschall, M.; Gruener, M.; Hammann, C.; Hartmann, J.; Hoffmeister, P.; Honisch, C.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Klassen, P.; Koop, K.; Lang, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Mueller, J.; Muellers, J.; Piontek, D.; Schmidt, C.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; Pee, H. van; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Winnebeck, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Anisovich, A.V.; Bayadilov, D.; Nikonov, V.; Sarantsev, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Bantes, B.; Dutz, H.; Eberhardt, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Frommberger, F.; Goertz, S.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Jude, T.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Schmieden, H. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bichow, M.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Bochum (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T.; Gutz, E. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Crede, V. [Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Friedrich, S.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Gridnev, A.; Lopatin, I. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Wilson, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Collaboration: The CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2017-03-15

    Results from measurements of the photoproduction of η mesons from quasifree protons and neutrons are summarized. The experiments were performed with the CBELSA/TAPS detector at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn using the η → 3π{sup 0} → 6γ decay. A liquid deuterium target was used for the measurement of total cross sections and angular distributions. The results confirm earlier measurements from Bonn and the MAMI facility in Mainz about the existence of a narrow structure in the excitation function of γn → nη. The current angular distributions show a forward-backward asymmetry, which was previously not seen, but was predicted by model calculations including an additional narrow P{sub 11} state. Furthermore, data obtained with a longitudinally polarized, deuterated butanol target and a circularly polarized photon beam were analyzed to determine the double polarization observable E. Both data sets together were also used to extract the helicity-dependent cross sections σ{sub 1/2} and σ{sub 3/2}. The narrow structure in the excitation function of γn → nη appears associated with the helicity-1/2 component of the reaction. (orig.)

  13. Ground-Based Observations of Saturn's North Polar Spot and Hexagon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Laques, P

    1993-04-16

    Ground-based observations of two conspicuous features near the north pole of Saturn, the polar vortex and the hexagonal wave structure, were made from July 1990 to October 1991, 10 years after their discovery. During this period the polar spot drifted in longitude, relative to system III, by -0.0353 degrees per day on average. Superimposed on this mean motion, the spot also underwent short-term rapid excursions in longitude of up to approximately 14 degrees at rates of up to approximately 1 degrees per day. The spot also exhibited irregular variations in its latitude location. A combination of these data together with those obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980 and 1981 shows that the spot drifted -0.0577 degrees per day for the 11-year interval from 1980 to 1991. The large lifetime of both features indicates that they are insensitive to the strong variations in the seasonal heating of the cloud layers in the upper polar atmosphere.

  14. Polar volatiles on Mars - Theory versus observation. [solid carbon dioxide in north residual cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Malin, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Synthesis of the results of the Mariner 9 mission, as they pertain to polar volatiles, and comparison of them with a description of the solid-vapor equilibrium relations believed to be presently active on Mars. The discovery by Mariner 9 of extensive volcanic deposits on portions of the Martian surface suggests that the total amount of CO2 liberated to the surface probably exceeds that now present in the atmosphere. Thus excess CO2 in the solid form is to be expected in the polar areas. Although the simplified model of Leighton and Murray (1966), which predicts a permanent CO2 cap, has significant deficiencies both theoretically and observationally, the seasonal caps are composed of CO2, as predicted, excess CO2 is quite likely, and a permanent deposit of solid CO2 evidently is in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. It is suggested that there must be a large reservoir of solid CO2 in gaseous equilibrium with the atmosphere, but buried immediately below the exposed residual water-ice cap. This reservoir is believed to be located near the north pole. The principal effect of such a reservoir is to average out annual and longer-term fluctuations in the polar heat balance.

  15. Observations of the north polar region of Mars from the Mars orbiter laser altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Afzal, R. S.; Aharonson, O.; Fishbaugh, K.; Ford, P. G.; Frey, H. V.; Garvin, J. B.; Head, J. W.; Ivanov, A. B.; Johnson, C. L.; Muhleman, D. O.; Neumann, G. A.; Pettengill, G. H.; Phillips, R. J.; Sun, X.; Zwally, H. J.; Banerdt, W. B.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    Elevations from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) have been used to construct a precise topographic map of the martian north polar region. The northern ice cap has a maximum elevation of 3 kilometers above its surroundings but lies within a 5-kilometer-deep hemispheric depression that is contiguous with the area into which most outflow channels emptied. Polar cap topography displays evidence of modification by ablation, flow, and wind and is consistent with a primarily H2O composition. Correlation of topography with images suggests that the cap was more spatially extensive in the past. The cap volume of 1.2 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(6) cubic kilometers is about half that of the Greenland ice cap. Clouds observed over the polar cap are likely composed of CO2 that condensed out of the atmosphere during northern hemisphere winter. Many clouds exhibit dynamical structure likely caused by the interaction of propagating wave fronts with surface topography.

  16. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars II: HiRISE photometric analysis of evolution of northern polar dunes in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Pommerol, Antoine; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present an overview of our analyses of HiRISE observations of spring evolution of selected dune areas of the north polar erg. The north polar erg is covered annually by seasonal volatile ice layer, a mixture of CO2 and H2O with mineral dust contamination. In spring, this layer sublimes creating visually enigmatic phenomena, e.g. dark and bright fan-shaped deposits, dark-bright-dark bandings, dark down-slope streaks, and seasonal polygonal cracks. Similar phenomena in southern polar areas are believed to be related to the specific process of solid-state greenhouse effect. In the north, it is currently unclear if the solid-state greenhouse effect is able to explain all the observed phenomena especially because the increased influence of H2O on the time scales of this process has not yet been quantified. HiRISE observations of our selected locations show that the ground exhibits a temporal behaviour similar to the one observed in the southern polar areas: a brightening phase starting close to the spring equinox with a subsequent darkening towards summer solstice. The resolution of HiRISE enabled us to study dunes and substrate individually and even distinguish between different developments on windward and slip face sides of single dunes. Differences in the seasonal evolution between steep slip faces and flatter substrate and windward sides of dunes have been identified and compared to CRISM data of CO2 and H2O distributions on dunes. We also observe small scale dark blotches that appear in early observations and tend to sustain a low reflectivity throughout the spring. These blotches can be regarded as the analogue of dark fan deposits in southern polar areas, leading us to the conclusion that both martian polar areas follow similar spring evolutions.

  17. The polarization observables T, P, and H and their impact on $\\gamma p \\to p\\pi^0$ multipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, J; Anisovich, A V; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Becker, M; Beloglazov, Y; Berlin, A; Bichow, M; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -Th; Crede, V; Dieterle, M; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, St; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Görtz, St; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hannappel, J; Hannen, V; Herick, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, Ph; Honisch, Ch; Jahn, O; Jude, T; Käser, A; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kalischewski, F; Klassen, P; Keshelashvili, I; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Koop, K; Krusche, B; Kube, M; Lang, M; Lopatin, I; Makonyi, K; Messi, F; Metag, V; Meyer, W; Müller, J; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Piontek, D; Reeve, S; Rosenbaum, Ch; Roth, B; Reicherz, G; Rostomyan, T; Runkel, St; Sarantsev, A; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Sokhoyan, V; Thämer, Ph; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; Urban, M; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Witthauer, L

    2015-01-01

    Data on the polarization observables T, P, and H for the reaction $\\gamma p\\to p\\pi^0$ are reported. Compared to earlier data from other experiments, our data are more precise and extend the covered range in energy and angle substantially. The results were extracted from azimuthal asymmetries measured using a transversely polarized target and linearly polarized photons. The data were taken at the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector. Within the Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis, the new polarization data lead to a significant narrowing of the error band for the multipoles for neutral-pion photoproduction.

  18. The polarization observables T, P, and H and their impact on γp→pπ0 multipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hartmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on the polarization observables T, P, and H for the reaction γp→pπ0 are reported. Compared to earlier data from other experiments, our data are more precise and extend the covered range in energy and angle substantially. The results were extracted from azimuthal asymmetries measured using a transversely polarized target and linearly polarized photons. The data were taken at the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector. Within the Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis, the new polarization data lead to a significant narrowing of the error band for the multipoles for neutral-pion photoproduction.

  19. Photoproduction of meson pairs : First measurement of the polarization observable I-s CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutz, E.; Sokhoyan, V.; van Pee, H.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Yu.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, Ch.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L.; Pfeiffer, M.; Piontek, D.; Roberts, W.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wendel, Ch.; Frommberger, D; Jägle, I.; Löhner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization observable 15, a feature exclusive to the acoplanar kinematics of multi-meson final states produced via linearly polarized photons, has been measured for the first time. Results for the reaction (gamma) over barp -> p pi(0)eta are presented for incoming photon energies between 970 M

  20. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, D., E-mail: dkaqua@kyudai.jp; Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Mozer, F. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cardoso, F. R. [School of Engineering - EEL, University of São Paulo, Lorena, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  1. Investigating Type I Polar Stratospheric Cloud Formation Mechanisms with POAM Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Drdla, K.; Fromm, M.; Hoppel, K.; Browell, E.; Hamill, P.; Dempsey, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Type Ia PSCs are believed to be composed of nitric acid hydrate particles. Recent results from the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign showed evidence that this type of PSC was composed of a small number of very large particles capable of sedimentary denitrification of regions of the stratosphere. It is unknown whether homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation is responsible for the formation of these PSCs. Arctic winters are tending to be colder in response to global tropospheric warming. The degree to which this influences ozone depletion will depend on the freezing mechanism of nitric acid hydrate particles. If nucleation is homogeneous it implies that the freezing process is an inherent property of the particle, while heterogeneous freezing means that the extent of PSCs will depend in part on the number of nuclei available. The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM)II and III satellites have been making observations of stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) since 1994. Recently, we have developed a technique that can discriminate between Type Ia and Ib PSCs using these observations. A statistical approach is employed to demonstrate the robustness of this approach and results are compared with lidar measurements. The technique is used to analyze observations from POAM II and II during Northern Hemisphere winters where significant PSC formation occurred with the objective of exploring Type I PSC formation mechanisms. The different PSCs identified using this method exhibit different growth curve as expressed as extinction versus temperature.

  2. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, D; Brizius, A; Buder, I; Chinone, Y; Cleary, K; Dumoulin, R N; Kusaka, A; Monsalve, R; Næss, S K; Newburgh, L B; Reeves, R; Wehus, I K; Zwart, J T L; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Church, S E; Dickinson, C; Eriksen, H K; Gaier, T; Gundersen, J O; Hasegawa, M; Hazumi, M; Huffenberger, K M; Ishidoshiro, K; Jones, M E; Kangaslahti, P; Kapner, D J; Kubik, D; Lawrence, C R; Limon, M; McMahon, J J; Miller, A D; Nagai, M; Nguyen, H; Nixon, G; Pearson, T J; Piccirillo, L; Radford, S J E; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Samtleben, D; Seiffert, M; Shepherd, M C; Smith, K M; Staggs, S T; Tajima, O; Thompson, K L; Vanderlinde, K; Williamson, R

    2012-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 uK sqrt(s). Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of ~1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12.8', allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-Cl (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-nu...

  3. End-to-End Study of the Transfer of Energy from Magnetosheath Ion Precipitation to the Ionospheric Cusp and Resulting Ion Outflow to the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra; Avanov, Levon

    2003-01-01

    We will show results from an end-to-end study of the energy transfer from injected magnetosheath plasmas to the near-Earth magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas and the resulting ion outflow to the magnetosphere. This study includes modeling of the evolution of the magnetosheath precipitation in the cusp using a kinetic code with a realistic magnetic field configuration. These evolved, highly non-Maxwellian distributions are used as input to a 2D PIC code to analyze the resulting wave generation. The wave analysis is used in the kinetic code as input to the cold ionospheric ions to study the transfer of energy to these ions and their outflow to the magnetosphere. Observations from the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and other instruments on the Polar Spacecraft will be compared to the modeling.

  4. Observation of spin-polarized bands and domain-dependent Fermi arcs in polar Weyl semimetal MoT e2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, M.; Bahramy, M. S.; Tsuji, H.; Araya, I.; Ikeura, K.; Sakai, H.; Ishiwata, S.; Yaji, K.; Kuroda, K.; Harasawa, A.; Shin, S.; Ishizaka, K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the surface electronic structures of polar 1 T'-MoT e2 , the Weyl semimetal candidate realized through the nonpolar-polar structural phase transition, by utilizing the laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations. Two kinds of domains with different surface band dispersions are observed from a single-crystalline sample. The spin-resolved measurements further reveal that the spin polarizations of the surface and the bulk-derived states show the different domain dependences, indicating the opposite bulk polarity. For both domains, some segmentlike band features resembling the Fermi arcs are clearly observed. The patterns of the arcs present the marked contrast between the two domains, respectively agreeing well with the slab calculation of (0 0 1) and (0 0 -1) surfaces. The present result strongly suggests that the Fermi arc connects the identical pair of Weyl nodes on one side of the polar crystal surface, whereas it connects between the different pairs of Weyl nodes on the other side.

  5. Properties of Solar Polar Coronal Hole Plasmas Observed above the Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Laming, J. M.; Schühle, U.; Wilhelm, K.

    2001-01-01

    We determine the line-of-sight emission measure distribution and nonthermal motions as a function of height above the limb in the north and south polar coronal holes. These quantities are derived from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra obtained from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The SUMER slit was oriented along the north-south direction for all the observations, and the spatial resolution is about 1". The spectra were obtained from a number of different types of observations in 1996. We select a group of emission lines for analysis for which, under the usual assumption of ionization equilibrium, the maximum emissivities span the temperature range from about 3×105 K up to about 1.1×106 K. We compare our results with recently published similar observations of a west limb quiet-Sun streamer region, with other coronal hole results based on SUMER spectra, and with earlier observations of the quiet Sun and coronal holes obtained from Skylab and rocket spectra. We find that the electron temperature in the polar holes increases with height above the limb, that the emission measure distribution of plasma located at line-of-sight heights less than about 60" peaks at a temperature of about 9×105 K, and that nonthermal motions sometimes, but not always, increase slightly with height above the limb. When observed, these increases level off above the limb at about 120". We speculate that the increases with height above the limb may be a manifestation of the fast solar wind. They may also be due to the reduction in transition region structures with increasing limb height. We also discuss wave heating as a cause of the line width increases.

  6. Observation and polarization measurements of B+/- -->phiK1 +/- and B +/- -->phiK2 *+/-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D S; Barlow, R J; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-10-17

    With the full BABAR data sample of 465 x 10(6) B(over)B pairs, we observe the decays B+/- -->phiK_(1)(1270) +/- and B +/- -->phiK*_(2)(1430)+/-. We measure the branching fractions (6.1+/-1.6+/-1.1) x 10(-6) and (8.4+/-1.8+/-1.0) x 10(-6) and the fractions of longitudinal polarization 0.46 (+0.12+0.06) _(-0.13-0.07) and 0.80(+0.09)_(-0.10)+/-0.03, respectively. We also report on the B+/- -->phiK*_(0)(1430)+/- decay branching fraction of (7.0+/-1.3+/-0.9) x 10(-6) and several parameters sensitive to CP violation and interference in the above three decays. Upper limits are placed on the B+/- decay rates to final states with phi and K_1(1400)+/-, K*(1410)+/-, K2(1770)+/-, or K_2(1820)+/-. Understanding the observed polarization pattern requires amplitude contributions from an uncertain source.

  7. Diagnostic Method of Early Urolithiasis by Observing Urinary Sediments under Polarizing Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; LI Yonglan; WANG Weimin

    2002-01-01

    Objectives The study has solved the problem of the early diagnosis of patients with the diameter of urolithiasis < 0. 3cm. Method Observed and compared urinary sediments of the 30 cases of recurrent and suspicious urolithiasis with 30 cases of nephritis, nephropyelitis and nephroma by polarizing microscope. Results The urolithiasis is diagnosed by symptoms and image. Under B ultrasound or image the diameter of stones is usually larger than 0.4cm. The disease may be certainly diagnosed but the most patients have not been able to excrete stones spontaneously. The authors observed that RBC ( erythrocytes) and casts have the characteristics of crystallization and sometime crystals formed some smaller stones( called microscope stone) in urinary sediments of the patients with recurrence stones under the polarizing microscope.Meanwhile, the sediments of suspicious patients who have symptoms of hematuria and renal colic pain and did not find stone by B ultrasound, were examined and found RBC and casts. The characteristics of crystallization were similar to those of the recurrence patients. Conclusion This method is a new way of diagnosis of early urolithiasis for preventing stone growth and treating urolithiasis as early as possible. It is very simple, convenient and reliable, and could be applied into clinic.

  8. Rankin Inlet PolarDARN radar observations of duskward moving Sun-aligned optical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koustov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available On 15 February 2007, several duskward moving sun-aligned (SA auroral forms have been observed by the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, Nunavut (Canada. Concurrent observations with the Rankin Inlet (RANK PolarDARN HF radar within the field-of-view of the camera showed signatures of moving auroral forms in all signal parameters with the most remarkable effects being the echo power drop and velocity reversal as the arc reached a specific radar beam/gate. Spatial and temporal variations of the velocity in the vicinity of the SA form are investigated. It is shown that the form-associated convection reversal was located poleward (duskward of the global-scale convection reversal associated with the dawn cell of the large-scale convection pattern. Thus, the RANK radar was monitoring the polar cap portion of the global-scale convection pattern and its transition from the IMF By<0 to the By>0 situation. Magnetic perturbations associated with the SA form passing the zenith of several magnetometers are investigated. It is shown that although magnetometer signatures of the moving form were clear, the convection pattern derivation from magnetometer records alone is not straightforward.

  9. Observations of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere from the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Valek, Phil; Bagenal, Fran; Bolton, Scott; Clark, George; Connerney, Jack; Ebert, Rob; Gladstone, Randy; Kim, Thomas; Kurth, William; Levin, Steve; Louarn, Philippe; Loeffler, Chad; Mauk, Barry; McComas, David; Pollock, Craig; Ranquist, Drake; Reno, Michelle; Szalay, Jamey; Thomsen, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The Juno mission employs a suite of instruments to perform the first-ever in situ measurements of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Observations of the plasma environment are performed by the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE). JADE measures the plasma using two nearly identical electron sensors and an ion sensor. The electron sensors (JADE-E) measure electron distributions in the range of 100 eV to 100 keV. The un-deflected field-of-view (FOV) of each electron sensor is in the spin plane of the spacecraft; approximately the plane which includes the spacecraft velocity direction and the local magnetic field. Around perijove, the JADE-E sensors use electrostatic deflection to track the local magnetic field in order to measure pitch angle distributions at 1 s time resolution. The JADE ion sensor (JADE-I) measures the energy per charge and time of flight (TOF) of incident ions (mass/q narrow beams and distributions with emptied loss cones. We present here in situ plasma observations of the Jovian polar magnetosphere made by the JADE instrument.

  10. Spitzer Space Telescope observations of magnetic cataclysmic variables: possibilities for the presence of dust in polars

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkworth, C S; Wachter, S; Howell, S B; Ciardi, D R; Szkody, P; Harrison, T E; van Belle, G T; Esin, A A; 10.1086/512797

    2009-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope photometry of six short-period polars, EF Eri, V347 Pav, VV Pup, V834 Cen, GG Leo, and MR Ser. We have combined the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (3.6 -8.0 microns) data with the 2MASS J, H, K_s photometry to construct the spectral energy distributions of these systems from the near- to mid-IR (1.235 - 8 microns). We find that five out of the six polars have flux densities in the mid-IR that are substantially in excess of the values expected from the stellar components alone. We have modeled the observed SEDs with a combination of contributions from the white dwarf, secondary star, and either cyclotron emission or a cool, circumbinary dust disk to fill in the long-wavelength excess. We find that a circumbinary dust disk is the most likely cause of the 8 micron excess in all cases, but we have been unable to rule out the specific (but unlikely) case of completely optically thin cyclotron emission as the source of the observed 8 micron flux density. While both model components...

  11. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  12. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  13. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad’s work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β. This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  14. Twilight Limb Observations of the Martian North Polar Hood by MAVEN IUVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Daniel; Yelle, Roger; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Clarke, John T.; Holsclaw, Gregory; Lefevre, Franck; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    In northern winter, a broad distribution of ice aerosols appears in the north polar atmosphere of Mars, commonly referred to as the North Polar Hood (NPH). The NPH is thought to be formed as a result of condensation from lowered temperatures associated with both seasonal and diurnal variations in solar heating. The spatial extent and density of the NPH is highly variable, with a maximum latitudinal extent spanning 30-80°N, and a maximum density at 10-30 km altitude.The NPH has been extensively observed by both ground-based telescopes and instruments in orbit around Mars. However, the majority of these observations are nadir-pointing. This observation geometry has two significant limitations. Firstly, they poorly probe the vertical structure of the NPH. Secondly, column densities are determined by monitoring the intensity of various spectral features associated with the ice composing the NPH, against a strong background with similar features from the frost that has condensed on the surface in the winter season, resulting in low sensitivities. Limb observations removes both limitations, allowing us to study the vertical distribution of the aerosols that make up the NPH at high sensitivities.We present new limb observations of the NPH by IUVS (Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph) on the MAVEN (Mars Atmospheric and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft. These observations represent the first ultraviolet limb observations of the NPH, opening a new window for understanding the structure and composition of the NPH. The observations are also of the twilight limb, with sunlight being scattered from the dayside into the nightside over large solar zenith angles. This illumination geometry allows us to avoid the high dayside intensities that would drown out the signal from the thinner sections of the NPH. We determine the latitudinal extent of the NPH to be 30-60°N. We also find that an exponential altitude distribution of aerosols is able to reproduce the observed intensities, with a

  15. On the {Sigma}N cusp in the pp {yields} pK{sup +}{Lambda} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Samad, S. [Atomic Energy Authority NRC Cairo, Cairo (Egypt); Borodina, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gast, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Roeder, M.; Sefzick, T.; Wintz, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Brinkmann, K.T. [Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Wagner, G.J. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Eyrich, W.; Krapp, M.; Schulte-Wissermann, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Freiesleben, H. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Hanhart, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Hauenstein, F.; Klaja, P.; Schroeder, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Wuestner, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: COSY-TOF Collaboration

    2013-03-15

    Measurements of the pp {yields} pK {sup +} {Lambda} reaction at T{sub p} = 2.28 GeV have been carried out at COSY-TOF. In addition to the {Lambda}p FSI and N {sup *} resonance excitation effects a pronounced narrow structure is observed in the Dalitz plot and in its projection on the p {Lambda} invariant mass. The strongly asymmetric structure appears at the pp {yields} NK {sup +} {Sigma} threshold and is interpreted as the {Sigma}N cusp effect. The observed width of about 20 MeV/c {sup 2} is substantially broader than anticipated from previous measurements as well as theoretical predictions. Angular distributions of this cusp structure are shown to be dissimilar to those in the residual pK {sup +} {Lambda} channel, but similar to those observed in the pK {sup +} {Sigma} {sup 0} channel. (orig.)

  16. On the SigmaN cusp in the pp -> pK+Lambda reaction

    CERN Document Server

    El-Samad, S Abd; Brinkmann, K -Th; Clement, H; Doroshkevich, E; Dzhygadlo, R; Ehrhardt, K; Erhardt, A; Eyrich, W; Freiesleben, H; Gast, W; Gillitzer, A; Grzonka, D; Hanhart, C; Hauenstein, F; Klja, P; Kilian, K; Krapp, M; Ritman, J; Roderburg, E; Roeder, M; Schulte-Wissermann, M; Schroeder, W; Sfzick, T; Wagner, G J; Wintz, P; Wuestner, P

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the $pp \\to pK^+\\Lambda$ reaction at $T_p$ = 2.28 GeV have been carried out at COSY-TOF. In addition to the $\\Lambda p$ FSI and $N^*$ resonance excitation effects a pronounced narrow structure is observed in the Dalitz plot and in its projection on the $p\\Lambda$-invariant mass. The structure appears at the $pp \\to $N$K^+\\Sigma$ threshold and is interpreted as $\\Sigma$N cusp effect. The observed width of 20 MeV/$c^2$ is substantially broader than anticipated from previous inclusive measurements. Angular distributions of this cusp structure are shown to be dissimilar to those in the residual $pK^+\\Lambda$ channel, but similar to those observed in the $pK^+\\Sigma^0$ channel.

  17. On the ΣN cusp in the pp → pK+Λ reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Samad, S.; Borodina, E.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Eyrich, W.; Freiesleben, H.; Gast, W.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Hanhart, C.; Hauenstein, F.; Klaja, P.; Kilian, K.; Krapp, M.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Röder, M.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Schroeder, W.; Sefzick, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of the pp → pK + Λ reaction at T p = 2.28 GeV have been carried out at COSY-TOF. In addition to the Λp FSI and N * resonance excitation effects a pronounced narrow structure is observed in the Dalitz plot and in its projection on the pΛ invariant mass. The strongly asymmetric structure appears at the pp → NK + Σ threshold and is interpreted as the ΣN cusp effect. The observed width of about 20 MeV/ c 2 is substantially broader than anticipated from previous measurements as well as theoretical predictions. Angular distributions of this cusp structure are shown to be dissimilar to those in the residual pK + Λ channel, but similar to those observed in the pK + Σ 0 channel.

  18. Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Christina; Bates, Elizabeth; Broughton, Elizabeth; Do, Nicholas T.; Fletcher, Zachary; Mahaney, Michael C.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies of primate diversity and evolution rely on dental morphology for insight into diet, behavior, and phylogenetic relationships. Consequently, variation in molar cusp size has increasingly become a phenotype of interest. In 2007 we published a quantitative genetic analysis of mandibular molar cusp size variation in baboons. Those results provided more questions than answers, as the pattern of genetic integration did not fit predictions from odontogenesis. To follow up, we expanded our study to include data from the maxillary molar cusps. Here we report on these later analyses, as well as inter-arch comparisons with the mandibular data. We analyzed variation in two-dimensional maxillary molar cusp size using data collected from a captive pedigreed breeding colony of baboons, Papio hamadryas, housed at the Southwest National Primate Research Center. These analyses show that variation in maxillary molar cusp size is heritable and sexually dimorphic. We also estimated additive genetic correlations between cusps on the same crown, homologous cusps along the tooth row, and maxillary and mandibular cusps. The pattern for maxillary molars yields genetic correlations of one between the paracone-metacone and protocone-hypocone. Bivariate analyses of cuspal homologues on adjacent teeth yield correlations that are high or not significantly different from one. Between dental arcades, the non-occluding cusps consistently yield high genetic correlations, especially the metaconid-paracone and metaconid-metacone. This pattern of genetic correlation does not immediately accord with the pattern of development and/or calcification, however these results do follow predictions that can be made from the evolutionary history of the tribosphenic molar. PMID:20034010

  19. Spatio-temporal variability of the polar middle atmosphere. Insights from over 30 years of research satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoz, W.A.; Orsolini, Y.J.; Manney, G.L.; Minschwaner, K.; Allen, D.R.; Errera, Q.; Jackson, D.R.; Lambert, A.; Lee, J.; Pumphrey, H.; Schwartz, M.; Wu, D.

    2012-07-01

    We discuss the insights that research satellite observations from the last 30 years have provided on the spatio-temporal variability of the polar middle atmosphere. Starting from the time of the NASA LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) and TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) instruments, both launched in 1978, we show how these observations have augmented our knowledge of the polar middle atmosphere, in particular how information on ozone and tracers has augmented our knowledge of: (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of the wintertime polar stratosphere and the summertime circulation; and (ii) the roles of chemistry and transport in determining the stratospheric ozone distribution. We address the increasing joint use of observations and models, in particular in data assimilation, in contributing to this understanding. Finally, we outline requirements to allow continuation of the wealth of information on the polar middle atmosphere provided by research satellites over the last 30 years.(Author)

  20. Using Spin Observables and Polarizations to Probe Top-Higgs FCNC Couplings at Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa

    2017-07-01

    We present how the polarized linear colliders can be used, complementary to the LHC, to fully determine the top-Higgs flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings by using produced asymmetries and top spin polarizations and correlations.

  1. Observation of spin-polarized photoconductivity in (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs heterojunction without magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hailong; Li, Yuan; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Jianhua; Chen, Yonghai

    2017-01-01

    In the absent of magnetic field, we have observed the anisotropic spin polarization degree of photoconduction (SPD-PC) in (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs heterojunction. We think three kinds of mechanisms contribute to the magnetic related signal, (i) (Ga,Mn)As self-producing due to the valence band polarization, (ii) unequal intensity of left and right circularly polarized light reaching to GaAs layer to excite unequal spin polarized carriers in GaAs layer, and (iii) (Ga,Mn)As as the spin filter layer for spin transport from GaAs to (Ga,Mn)As. Different from the previous experiments, the influence coming from the Zeeman splitting induced by an external magnetic field can be avoided here. While temperature dependence experiment indicates that the SPD-PC is mixed with the magnetic uncorrelated signals, which may come from current induced spin polarization. PMID:28084437

  2. Observations of a pulse driven cool polar jet by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Abhishek K

    2011-01-01

    Context. We observe a solar jet at north polar coronal hole (NPCH) using SDO AIA 304 {\\deg}A image data on 3 August 2010. The jet rises obliquely above the solar limb and then retraces its propagation path to fall back. Aims. We numerically model this observed solar jet by implementing a realistic (VAL-C) model of solar temperature. Methods. We solve two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically to simulate the observed solar jet. We consider a localized velocity pulse that is essentially parallel to the background magnetic field lines and initially launched at the top of the solar photosphere. The pulse steepens into a shock at higher altitudes, which triggers plasma perturbations that exhibit the observed features of the jet. The typical direction of the pulse also clearly exhibits the leading front of the moving jet. Results. Our numerical simulations reveal that a large amplitude initial velocity pulse launched at the top of the solar photosphere produces in general the observed properti...

  3. Multi-Frequency Observations of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Under Artificial Electron Heating at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Kosch, M.; Senior, A.; Pinedo, H.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M. T.; Häggström, I.

    2011-12-01

    In a unique experiment at EISCAT, located in northern Norway and executed in July 2011, Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed in the zenith at four different radar frequencies (933, 224, 56 and 7.9 MHz) simultaneously whilst artificially heating the electrons with high-frequency radio waves. Increasing the electron temperature reduces PMSE backscatter power at VHF but may increase it at HF, while the opposite may happen during the relaxation period following heater off. The PMSE backscatter power depends on many parameters, including dust size and charge, radar frequency and electron temperature. By observing the artificially modified PMSE at multiple radar frequencies, it may be possible to uniquely determine dust parameters as a function of altitude. Validation of PMSE theories and its behaviour under electron heating employing this unique set of observations are underway. In addition, high aspect angle observations of the PMSE were obtained at 224 MHz with 66 degrees zenith angle. These clearly show that PMSE can be observed at very high aspect angle, at least for VHF, contrary to results from earlier attempts to investigate PMSE's aspect sensitivity behaviour that has a bearing on the geometry of the electron density irregularities that cause the scattering. Preliminary results from the campaign are presented.

  4. A comparison of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo observations from locations in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Sato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Koji; Renkwitz, Toralf

    2017-04-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) are observed with 50-MHz VHF radars at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere for more than 20 years. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) from 1999 until 2009 using the ALWIN radar and since 2011 using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. In 2011 the PANSY radar - a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scattering (MST/IS) radar - was installed at Syowa Station, Antartica (69.0°S, 39.4°E) and continues observation of PMSE were started in the austral summer period 2013/2014. Since both MAARSY and PANSY are high-power-large aperture radars mesospheric echoes are observed almost continuously during the summer seasons in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere now. We present a first comparison of PMSE observations obtained at both radar sites during a period of 6 boreal summers (Andøya, NH) and 3 austral summers (Syowa, SH) and discuss similarities and differences of seasonal and diurnal variations of PMSE occurrence frequencies and echo intensity.

  5. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  6. Induced polarization dependence on pore space geometry: Empirical observations and mechanistic predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, A.; Slater, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an extensive database to compare empirical observations and previously proposed empirical models against recently developed mechanistic formulations for the induced polarization (IP) response in porous media as a function of pore space geometry and interfacial chemistry. These comparisons support the argument that the pore-volume normalized internal surface (Spor) is the most important geometric parameter influencing the polarization. The specific polarizability derived from the empirical relationship between imaginary conductivity σ″ and Spor is independent of the porosity. By contrast, equivalent specific polarizability terms in recently proposed mechanistic models are found to be significantly correlated with porosity, and thus do not appear to represent an interfacial chemistry factor independent of the pore space geometry. Furthermore, the database shows no evidence for a significant decrease in the counterion mobility of clayey materials relative to clay-free materials, as postulated in recent studies. On the contrary, a single value of cp is consistent with no significant differences in ionic mobility given that all samples were saturated with a NaCl solution close to a common salinity of about 100 mS/m.

  7. Observation of photon polarization in the b → sγ transition at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that the photons emitted in flavor-changing neutral current b to s gamma transitions are predominantly left-handed. However, the photon polarization has never been observed in a direct measurement and remains largely unexplored. Several extensions of the Standard Model predicting a significantly different photon polarization have not been yet ruled out by other measurements, such as the inclusive B to Xs gamma decay rate. This talk will focus on the recent study of the radiative B to K pi pi gamma decays performed using data collected in pp collisions with the LHCb detector at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies. The distribution of the angle of the photon direction with respect to the plane defined by the final-state hadrons in their rest frame is studied in intervals of K pi pi mass and the asymmetry between the number of signal events found on each side of the plane is presented. This approach is conceptually very similar to the historic Wu measurement of parity violation from...

  8. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Albert A; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization--suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  9. Linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium in the 3C 196 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, V.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Pandey, V. N.; Mevius, M.; Haverkorn, M.; Brentjens, M. A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Zaroubi, S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Iliev, I. T.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Patil, A. H.; Vedantham, H. K.; Yatawatta, S.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: This study aims to characterize linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the 3C 196 field, one of the primary fields of the LOFAR-Epoch of Reionization key science project. Methods: We have used the high band antennas (HBA) of LOFAR to image this region and rotation measure (RM) synthesis to unravel the distribution of polarized structures in Faraday depth. Results: The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is 5-15 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -3 to +8 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The most interesting morphological feature is a strikingly straight filament at a Faraday depth of +0.5 rad m-2 running from north to south, right through the centre of the field and parallel to the Galactic plane. There is also an interesting system of linear depolarization canals conspicuous in an image showing the peaks of Faraday spectra. We used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. For the first time, we see some common morphology in the RM cubes made at 150 and 350 MHz. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies and previous LOFAR observations. Based on our results, we determined physical parameters of the ISM and proposed a simple model that may explain the observed distribution of the intervening magneto-ionic medium. Conclusions: The mean line-of-sight magnetic field component, B∥, is determined to be 0.3 ± 0.1 μG and its spatial variation across the 3C 196 field is 0.1 μG. The filamentary structure is probably an ionized filament in the ISM, located somewhere within the Local Bubble. This filamentary structure shows an excess in thermal electron density (neB∥> 6.2 cm-3μG) compared to its surroundings. The RM cubes (FITS files) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  10. Polarization switching in vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers observed at constant active region temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Regalado, J.; Chilla, J. L. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Brusenbach, P.

    1997-06-01

    Polarization switching in gain-guided, vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers was studied as a function of the active region temperature. We show that polarization switching occurs even when the active region temperature is kept constant during fast pulse low duty cycle operation. This temperature independent polarization switching phenomenon is explained in terms of a recently developed model.

  11. Maxillary and Mandibular First Premolars Showing Three-Cusp Pattern: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anatomy is the study of morphology of various teeth in human dentitions. The application of dental anatomy in clinical practice is important, and dentist should have a thorough knowledge regarding the morphology of the teeth. At times as a result of genetic variation, environmental factors, diet of an individual and race, variations in the morphology of the teeth can be observed. These variations have been extensively studied by the researcher in the field of anthropology to define a particular race. The most commonly observed changes include peg-shaped laterals, shovel-shaped incisors, and extra cusp on molar. Common variations documented with regard to maxillary and mandibular first premolars are the variation in the number of roots. But the variations with respect to crown morphology are few. We report a first documented unusual presentation of maxillary and mandibular first premolars with three-cusps pattern in a female patient.

  12. Maxillary and mandibular first premolars showing three-cusp pattern: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ramakant; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi; Nayak, Aarati; Patil, Viraj; Kulkarni, Mayuri; Somannavar, Pradeep; Hosmani, Jagadish

    2013-01-01

    Dental anatomy is the study of morphology of various teeth in human dentitions. The application of dental anatomy in clinical practice is important, and dentist should have a thorough knowledge regarding the morphology of the teeth. At times as a result of genetic variation, environmental factors, diet of an individual and race, variations in the morphology of the teeth can be observed. These variations have been extensively studied by the researcher in the field of anthropology to define a particular race. The most commonly observed changes include peg-shaped laterals, shovel-shaped incisors, and extra cusp on molar. Common variations documented with regard to maxillary and mandibular first premolars are the variation in the number of roots. But the variations with respect to crown morphology are few. We report a first documented unusual presentation of maxillary and mandibular first premolars with three-cusps pattern in a female patient.

  13. Statistical Assessment of Shapes and Magnetic Field Orientations in Molecular Clouds through Polarization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, K; Hildebrand, R H; Kirby, L; Vaillancourt, J E

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel statistical analysis aimed at deriving the intrinsic shapes and magnetic field orientations of molecular clouds using dust emission and polarization observations by the Hertz polarimeter. Our observables are the aspect ratio of the projected plane-of-the-sky cloud image, and the angle between the mean direction of the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field and the short axis of the cloud image. To overcome projection effects due to the unknown orientation of the line-of-sight, we combine observations from 24 clouds, assuming that line-of-sight orientations are random and all are equally probable. Through a weighted least-squares analysis, we find that the best-fit intrinsic cloud shape describing our sample is an oblate disk with only small degrees of triaxiality. The best-fit intrinsic magnetic field orientation is close to the direction of the shortest cloud axis, with small (~24 deg) deviations toward the long/middle cloud axes. However, due to the small number of observed clou...

  14. A Serendipitous XMM-Newton Observation of the Intermediate Polar WX Pyx

    CERN Document Server

    Schlegel, E M

    2004-01-01

    We briefly describe a serendipitous observation of the little-studied intermediate polar WX Pyx using XMM-Newton. The X-ray spin period is 1557.3 sec, confirming the optical period published in 1996. An orbital period of approximately 5.54 hr is inferred from the separation of the spin-orbit sidelobe components. The soft and hard band spin-folded light curves are nearly sinusoidal in shape. The best-fit spectrum is consistent with a bremsstrahlung temperature of about 18 keV. An upper limit of approximately 300 eV is assigned to the presence of Fe line emission. WX Pyx lies near TX and TV Col in the P_spin-P_orb plane.

  15. Observing Jupiter's polar stratospheric haze with HST/STIS. An HST White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Grodent, Denis; Nichols, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this HST white paper is to demonstrate that it is possible to monitor Jupiter's polar haze with HST/STIS without breaking the ground screening limit for bright objects. This demonstration rests on a thorough simulation of STIS output from an existing image obtained with HST/WFPC2. It is shown that the STIS NUV-MAMA + F25CIII filter assembly provides a count rate per pixel ~11 times smaller than that obtained for one pixel of WFPC2 WF3 CCD + F218W corresponding filter. This ratio is sufficiently large to cope with the bright solar light scattered by Jupiter's atmosphere, which was a lesser concern for WFPC2 CCD safety. These STIS images would provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution observations of small-scale stratospheric aerosol structures, possibly associated with Jupiter's complex FUV aurora.

  16. Rational cuspidal curves with four cusps on Hirzebruch surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgunn Karoline Moe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to shed light on the question of how many and what kind of cusps a rational cuspidal curve on a Hirzebruch surface can have. Our main result is a list of rational cuspidal curves with four cusps, their type, cuspidal congurations and the surfaces they lie on. We use birational transformations to construct these curves. Moreover, we find a general expression for and compute the Euler characteristic of the logarithmic tangent sheaf in these cases. Additionally, we show that there exists a real rational cuspidal curve with four real cusps. Last, we show that for rational cuspidal curves with two or more cusps on a Hirzebruch surface, there is a lower bound on one of the multiplicities.

  17. Estimate of cusp loss width in multicusp negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, T.; Ogasawara, M.; Hatayama, A.

    1998-02-01

    Expression of cusp loss width derived by Bosch and Merlino is applied to JAERI's Kamaboko source. The width is related to the ambipolar diffusion coefficient across the cusp magnetic field. Electron-ion collision is found 1.2-7.4 times larger as compared with electron-neutral collision. Averaged cusp magnetic field in the diffusion coefficient is taken as a parameter in the simulation code for Kamaboko source. When the averaged magnetic field is 48 G, simulation results agree well with JAERI's experiment in a wide range of pressure and arc power variation. The value of 48 G is reasonable from the consideration of confining the equation of ion source plasma. The obtained width is about 10 times the value evaluated by two times ion Larmor radius on the surface of cusp magnet.

  18. Layered Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes Observed with the Tri-Static Eiscat VHF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Anyairo, C.; Häggström, I.; Tjulin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are strong radar echoes that are typically observed at 50 to 500 MHz. They are often discussed in the context of dusty plasma studies and linked to e.g. the existence of charged ice particles, neutral atmospheric turbulence and atmospheric stratification. The PMSE are observed at mesospheric temperature minimum when ice particles form, though the exact path of formation is still a topic for research. Mesospheric smoke particles that are assumed to form after or during the meteor ablation process possibly contribute to the formation of the ice particles. For understanding the formation of the radar echoes their variation with scattering angle is an important parameter. We analyze PMSE observations with the tri-static EISCAT VHF radar (224 MHz) during one day in June when PMSE were observed almost continuously from 7:00 to 13:00 UT. The radar signal was transmitted and received in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø. The receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. The altitude of the PMSE changed with time and the extension of the echoes in altitude was smaller toward the end of the observation. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. The observations suggest that the scattering process underlying the PMSE occurs over a broad range of scattering angles. Based on the observations we will show that the spectral width of the received echoes is most likely determined by the variations within the observed volume rather than by the scattering process. The observed frequency shifts suggest a layer structure and horizontal motions that vary with altitude. UHF (933 MHz) radar observations were carried out in parallel, they display predominantly incoherent scatter and an electron density typical for the altitude. Some other studies, have in

  19. EISCAT and Cluster observations in the vicinity of the dynamical polar cap boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the polar cap boundary and auroral oval in the nightside ionosphere are studied during late expansion and recovery of a substorm from the region between Tromsø (66.6° cgmLat and Longyearbyen (75.2° cgmLat on 27 February 2004 by using the coordinated EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, MIRACLE magnetometer and Cluster satellite measurements. During the late substorm expansion/early recovery phase, the polar cap boundary (PCB made zig-zag-type motion with amplitude of 2.5° cgmLat and period of about 30 min near magnetic midnight. We suggest that the poleward motions of the PCB were produced by bursts of enhanced reconnection at the near-Earth neutral line (NENL. The subsequent equatorward motions of the PCB would then represent the recovery of the merging line towards the equilibrium state (Cowley and Lockwood, 1992. The observed bursts of enhanced westward electrojet just equatorward of the polar cap boundary during poleward expansions were produced plausibly by particles accelerated in the vicinity of the neutral line and thus lend evidence to the Cowley-Lockwood paradigm.

    During the substorm recovery phase, the footpoints of the Cluster satellites at a geocentric distance of 4.4 RE mapped in the vicinity of EISCAT measurements. Cluster data indicate that outflow of H+ and O+ ions took place within the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL as noted in some earlier studies as well. We show that in this case the PSBL corresponded to a region of enhanced electron temperature in the ionospheric F region. It is suggested that the ion outflow originates from the F region as a result of increased ambipolar diffusion. At higher altitudes, the ions could be further energized by waves, which at Cluster altitudes were observed as BBELF (broad band extra low frequency fluctuations.

    The four-satellite configuration of Cluster revealed a sudden poleward expansion of the PSBL by 2° during

  20. Polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole in 1990: Lidar observations and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, R.L.; Bowman, K.P.; Gardner, C.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States))

    1993-01-20

    In December 1989 a Rayleigh/sodium lidar (589 nm) was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station, and was used to measure stratospheric aerosol, temperature, and mesospheric sodium profiles through October 1990. Observations of stratospheric aerosol and temperature are presented in this paper. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were first observed in late May at about 20 km. As the lower stratosphere cooled further, PSCs were observed throughout the 12-27 km altitude region, and remained there from mid-June until late August. Observations in early September detected no PSCs above 21 km. An isolated cloud was observed in mid-October. Throughout the winter the clouds had small backscatter ratios (< 10). Observations made at two wavelengths in July show that the clouds are predominately composed of nitric acid trihydrate with associated Angstrom coefficients between 0.2 and 3.7. Comparison of the lidar data and balloon borne frost point measurements in late August indicate that the nitric acid mixing ratio was less than 1.5 ppbv. Observations over periods of several hours show downward motions in the cloud layers similar to the phase progressions of upwardly-propagating gravity waves. The vertical phase velocities of these features ([approx] 4 cm/s) are significantly faster than the expected settling velocities of the cloud particles. Both the backscatter ratio profiles and the radiosonde horizontal wind profiles show 1-4 km vertical structures. This suggests that the kilometer-scale vertical structure of the PSCs is maintained by low frequency gravity waves propagating through the cloud layers. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Soft X-ray Observation of electronic contribution to ferroelectric polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    Multiferroic materials open up new interesting possibilities for devices by enabling the switching of an electric state by magnetic field or vice-versa. In addition to this functionality, multiferroics are intriguing from a fundamental physics perspective, raising interesting questions concerning coupling of the electric and magnetic order parameters. To date, most coupling mechanisms are understood to occur due to distortions in the crystal lattice. Here we present experimental evidence that in the multiferroics RMn2O5 (where R is a rare earth) there exists a new, purely electronic contribution to the ferroelectric polarization, which can exist in the absence of any lattice distortions. This contribution arises due to spin-dependent hybridization of O 2p and Mn 3d states and was observed through soft x-ray resonant scattering, which has proved to be a very useful tool in the study of the magnetic structure of multiferroics[1]. Through resonant x-ray scattering at the oxygen K-edge, we find that such spin dependent hybridization occurs in both TbMn2O5[2] and YMn2O5[3]. Remarkably, in YMn2O5 we find that the temperature dependence of the integrated intensity of the signal at the oxygen K-edge closely follows the macroscopic electric polarization [3], and hence is proportional to the ferroelectric order parameter. This is in contrast with the temperature dependence observed at the Mn L3 edge, which reflects the Mn magnetic order parameter. Work performed at BNL was supported by the US Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science, under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. [4pt] [1] S.B. Wilkins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 207602 (2009)[0pt] [2] T.A.W. Beale, S. B. Wilkins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 087203 (2010)[0pt] [3] S. Partzsch, S. B. Wilkins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 057201 (2011)

  2. Intercomparison of polar ozone profiles by IASI/MetOp sounder with 2010 Concordiasi ozonesonde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gazeaux

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Validation of ozone profiles measured from a nadir looking satellite instrument over Antarctica is a challenging task due to differences in their height sensitivity with ozonesonde measurements. In this paper we compare the ozone observations provided by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI instrument onboard the polar-orbiting satellite MetOp with ozone profiles collected between August and October 2010 at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the Concordiasi campaign. This campaign was aimed at satellite data validation and up to 20 zero-pressure sounding balloons carrying ozonesondes were launched during this period when the MetOp satellite was passing above McMurdo. This makes the dataset relevant for comparison, especially because those balloons covered the entire altitude range of IASI profiles. The validation methodology and the collocation criteria differ according to the availability of Global Positioning System auxiliary data with each Electro-Chemical Cell ozonesonde observation. We show that the relative mean difference depends on the altitude range investigated. The analysis shows a good agreement in the troposphere (below 10 km and middle stratosphere (25–40 km, where the differences are lower than 10%. However a significant positive bias of about 10–26% is estimated in the lower stratosphere at 10–25 km, depending on altitude. The positive bias in the 10–25 km range is consistent with previously reported studies comparing in-situ data with thermal infrared satellite measurements. This study allows a better characterization of the IASI products over the polar region when ozone depletion/recovery is occurring.

  3. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  4. Measurement of double polarization observables in meson photoproduction off the proton with the CBELSA/TAPS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    One of the remaining problems within the standard model is to gain a good understanding of the low energy regime of QCD, where perturbative methods fail. One key towards a better understanding is baryon spectroscopy. Unfortunately, in the past most baryon spectroscopy data have been obtained only using $\\pi$ N scattering. To gain access to resonances with small $\\pi$ N partial width, photoproduction experiments, investigating various final states, provide essential information. In order to extract the contributing resonances, partial wave analyses need to be performed. Here, the complete experiment is required to unambiguously determine the contributing amplitudes. This involves the measurement of carefully chosen single and double polarization observables. The Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment with a longitudinally or transversely polarized target and an energy tagged, linearly or circularly polarized photon beam allows the measurement of a large set of polarization observables. Due to its good energy resolutio...

  5. The cusp effect in eta' --> eta pi pi decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Strong final-state interactions create a pronounced cusp in eta' --> eta pi0 pi0 decays. We adapt and generalize the non-relativistic effective field theory framework developed for the extraction of pi pi scattering lengths from K --> 3 pi decays to this case. The cusp effect is predicted to have an effect of more than 8% on the decay spectrum below the pi+ pi- threshold.

  6. A Rare Bilateral Presentation of Multiple Dens Invaginatus, Shovel-Shaped Incisor and Talon Cusp With Mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, S; Jain, M; Shubha, A B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a unique and unusual case of concomitant appearance of morphological dental anomalies in the maxillary anterior region, along with its management in a patient with no systemic abnormality. This case report describes the clinical and radiographic features of talon cusp, dens invaginatus, shovel-shaped incisors and a supernumerary tooth occurring in a single patient, which is a rare presentation. All 4 permanent maxillary incisors had dens invaginatus, the permanent maxillary canines showed the presence of talon cusps, the permanent maxillary central incisors were shovel-shaped and an erupted mesiodens was also observed. Treatment included restorative, surgical and orthodontic approaches.

  7. Comparison of radiance and polarization values observed in the Mediterranean Sea and simulated in a Monte Carlo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, J.T.; Aas, E.; Højerslev, N.K.;

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the radiance and degree of polarization made in 1971 in the Mediterranean Sea are presented along with the simulation of all observed quantities by a Monte Carlo technique. It is shown that our independent scattering treatment utilizing a Stokes vector formalism to describe...... the polarization state of the light field produces remarkably good agreement with those values measured in situ. (C) 2002 Optical Society of America...

  8. Erasing Dark Matter Cusps in Cosmological Galactic Halos with Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Hoffman, Yehuda; Heller, Clayton

    2008-01-01

    We study the central dark matter (DM) cusp evolution in cosmological galactic halos. Models with and without baryons (baryons+DM, hereafter BDM model, and pure DM, PDM model, respectively) are advanced from identical initial conditions. The DM cusp properties are contrasted by a direct comparison of pure DM and baryonic models. We find a divergent evolution between the PDM and BDM models within the inner ~10 kpc region. The PDM model forms a R^{-1} cusp as expected, while the DM in the BDM model forms a larger isothermal cusp R^{-2} instead. The isothermal cusp is stable until z~1 when it gradually levels off. This leveling proceeds from inside out and the final density slope is shallower than -1 within the central 3 kpc (i.e., expected size of the R^{-1} cusp), tending to a flat core within ~2 kpc. This effect cannot be explained by a finite resolution of our code which produces only a 5% difference between the gravitationally softened force and the exact Newtonian force of point masses at 1 kpc from the cen...

  9. A new, unique signature of the true cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Keith

    Full Text Available The "cusp proper" is generally understood to be the region enclosed by the outermost magnetospheric field lines as they map to low altitudes. It is therefore a weak-field region with continuous contact with magnetosheath plasma. Data from the recent Astrid-2 Swedish microsatellite are presented which show a new, unique signature (dubbed the "true cusp" during cusp crossings that can now be shown to be consistently present and with which one can redefine the physical meaning and topology of the cusp. Similar crossings made by the DE-2, UARS and DMSP-F10 satellites also show this same, unique signature although in most cases the spatial resolution was much less than that of the Astrid-2 MEDUSA spectrometer. The presence of concurrent features of the same scale size as the plasma in the energetic particle, field and wave power data shows that this is a real structural feature and not a coincidental structure among plasma instruments. The persistence of this feature may lend new insight into the dynamics of the cusp and magnetospheric particle entry.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, arid boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  10. Polar cap arcs from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere: kinetic modelling and observations by Cluster and TIMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available On 1 April 2004 the GUVI imager onboard the TIMED spacecraft spots an isolated and elongated polar cap arc. About 20 min later, the Cluster satellites detect an isolated upflowing ion beam above the polar cap. Cluster observations show that the ions are accelerated upward by a quasi-stationary electric field. The field-aligned potential drop is estimated to about 700 V and the upflowing ions are accompanied by a tenuous population of isotropic protons with a temperature of about 500 eV.

    The magnetic footpoints of the ion outflows observed by Cluster are situated in the prolongation of the polar cap arc observed by TIMED GUVI. The upflowing ion beam and the polar cap arc may be different signatures of the same phenomenon, as suggested by a recent statistical study of polar cap ion beams using Cluster data.

    We use Cluster observations at high altitude as input to a quasi-stationary magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI coupling model. Using a Knight-type current-voltage relationship and the current continuity at the topside ionosphere, the model computes the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons at the top of the ionosphere corresponding to the generator electric field observed by Cluster. The MI coupling model provides a field-aligned potential drop in agreement with Cluster observations of upflowing ions and a spatial scale of the polar cap arc consistent with the optical observations by TIMED. The computed energy spectrum of the precipitating electrons is used as input to the Trans4 ionospheric transport code. This 1-D model, based on Boltzmann's kinetic formalism, takes into account ionospheric processes such as photoionization and electron/proton precipitation, and computes the optical and UV emissions due to precipitating electrons. The emission rates provided by the Trans4 code are compared to the optical observations by TIMED. They are similar in size and intensity. Data and modelling results are consistent with the

  11. Wavefields Near Transverse Cusp Caustics Produced by Reflecting Ultrasonic Transients and Tone Bursts from Curved Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Carl King

    Ultrasonic wavefields reflected from curved surfaces were studied in the vicinity of caustics. Acoustical and optical transverse cusp diffraction catastrophes produced by reflections from a curved metal surface in water were imaged by displaying the amplitude or intensity in an observation plane transverse to the general direction of propagation. The optical image was used to locate the cusp point in the observation plane. Acoustical diffraction patterns for sine waves, described by the Pearcey function, were calculated with the parameters determined by the experimental setup leaving no adjustable scaling parameters. The calculated and experimental acoustical diffraction patterns showed good agreement near the cusp point. The acoustical diffraction pattern showed the expected mirror symmetry about an axis. The pattern was shown to scale properly with frequency. The transverse cusp caustic separates space into a region with three rays and a region with one ray. Inside the caustic there are three rays, on the curve two of the rays merge and disappear leaving one ray outside. Transient signals reflected from curved surfaces exhibited the merging and disappearance of rays on the caustic. Relative arrival times for signals in calculated and recorded time traces agree well. The relation to the wavefront parameters of the temporal orientation of the travel time surface is discussed. The general shape of the travel time surface is that of the swallow tail caustic surface. The temporal shape of the transient echoes was seen to be generally that of the incident signal or of its Hilbert transform. The Hilbert transform shape identifies the signals that have touched the caustic. The observed arrival sequence of the transient signals was shh inside the caustic and one h outside, where s stands for a signal with the general shape of the incident signal and h for its Hilbert transform. The relation between the surface and wavefront parameters and the arrival sequence is given.

  12. Bidirectional electron anisotropies in the distant tail - ISEE 3 observations of polar rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed observational treatment of bidirectional electrons (50 approx. 500 eV) in the distant magnetotail (or greater than or equal to 100 R sub E) is presented. It is found that electrons in this energy range commonly exhibit strong, field aligned anisotropies in the tail lobes. Because of large tail motions, the ISEE-3 data provide extensive sampling of both the north and south lobes in rapid succession, demonstrating directly the strong asymetries that exist between the north and south lobes at any one time. The bidirectional fluxes are found to occur predominantly in the lobe directy connected to the sunward IMF in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Electron anisotropy and magnetic field data are presented which show the transition from unidirectional (sheath) electron populations to bidirectional (lobe) populations. Taken together, the present evidence suggests that the bidirectional electrons that we observe in the distant tail are closely related to the Polar rain electrons observed previously at lower altitudes. Furthermore, these data provide strong evidence that the distant tail is comprised largely of open magnetic field lines in contra distinction to some recently advanced models.

  13. Bidirectional electron anisotropies in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of polar rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.; Slavin, J.A.; Smith, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed observational treatment of bidirectional electrons (50 approx.500 eV) in the distant magnetotail (r greater than or equal to 100 R/sub E/) is presented. It is found that electrons in this energy range commonly exhibit strong, field-aligned anisotropies in the tail lobes. Because of large tail motions, the ISEE-3 data provide extensive sampling of both the north and south lobes in rapid succession, demonstrating directly the strong asymmetries that exist between the north and south lobes at any one time. The bidirectional fluxes are found to occur predominantly in the lobe directly connected to the sunward IMF in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Electron anisotropy and magnetic field data are presented which show the transition from unidirectional (sheath) electron populations to bidirectional (lobe) populations. Taken together, the present evidence suggests that the bidirectional electrons that we observe in the distant tail are closely related to the polar rain electrons observed previously at lower altitudes. Furthermore, these data provide strong evidence that the distant tail is comprised largely of open magnetic field lines in contradistinction to some recently advanced models.

  14. The dynamical background of polar mesosphere winter echoes from simultaneous EISCAT and ESRAD observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available On 30 October 2004 during a strong solar proton event, layers of enhanced backscatter from altitudes between 55 and 75km have been observed by both ESRAD (52MHz and the EISCAT VHF (224MHz radars. These echoes have earlier been termed Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes, PMWE. After considering the morphology of the layers and their relation to observed atmospheric waves, we conclude that the radars have likely seen the same phenomenon even though the radars' scattering volumes are located about 220km apart and that the most long-lasting layer is likely associated with wind-shear in an inertio-gravity wave. An ion-chemistry model is used to determine parameters necessary to relate wind-shear induced turbulent energy dissipation rates to radar backscatter. The model is verified by comparison with electron density profiles measured by the EISCAT VHF radar. Observed radar signal strengths are found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude stronger than the maximum which can be expected from neutral turbulence alone, assuming that previously published results relating radar signal scatter to turbulence parameters, and turbulence parameters to wind shear, are correct. The possibility remains that some additional or alternative mechanism may be involved in producing PMWE, such as layers of charged dust/smoke particles or large cluster ions.

  15. First SuperDARN polar mesosphere summer echoes observed at SANAE IV, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjobi, Olakunle; Sivakumar, Venkataraman; Judy; Stephenson, A. E.

    For over 3 decades studies on Polar mesosphere summer echo (PMSE) is ongoing. Its causative mechanism in the Antarctic and Arctic mesopause altitude is yet to be completely understood and is partly due to few observations from Antarctica. Also important were the varied influencing factors across the observable locations. For the first time, we report the PMSE occurrence probability rates over South African National Antarctic Expedition IV (SANAE IV). A comparison is made with observation from SANAE IV magnetic conjugate vicinity, Goose Bay in Arctic region. Here, a new matching coincidence method allowing filtration of possible contaminating echoes is described and implemented for extraction of PMSE during the 2005-2007 summers. In this method, Riometer and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) measurements from SANAE IV location are matched to obtain PMSE occurrence probability rate. Whereas the seasonal and diurnal variations followed the known features of PMSE, the percentage difference in probability occurrence rate is found to be remarkable. The SANAE IV probability rate is found to be high for the summer months reaching about 50% peak around the summer solstice. When the coincidence algorithm is relaxed, we found a substantial 30% increase in PMSE occurrence rate at SANAE IV. At this time, about 100% peak is found for Goose Bay. The contribution from the ionospheric D region electron density enhancements to SuperDARN PMSE occurrence rates at locations under auroral regions will be presented.

  16. Simultaneous observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes at two different latitudes in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE at Wasa and Davis in Antarctica have been compared. Data with simultaneous observations were obtained for 16 days between 18 January and 5 February 2007. Wasa is at a higher geographic latitude than Davis, but at lower geomagnetic latitude. PMSE strength and occurrence frequency were significantly higher at Wasa. The variation of daily PMSE occurrence over the measurement period was in agreement with temperature and frost-point estimates from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura spacecraft for both Wasa and Davis. The diurnal variation of PMSE strength and occurrence frequency as well as the shape of the altitude profiles of average PMSE strength and occurrence frequency were similar for the two sites. The deepest part of the evening minimum in PMSE occurrence frequency occurred for the same magnetic local time at the two sites rather than for the same local solar time. The study indicates that PMSE strength and occurrence increase between 68.6° and 73° geographic latitude, consistent with observed differences in mesospheric temperatures and water vapor content. The average altitude distribution of PMSE varies relatively little with latitude in the same hemisphere.

  17. First observation of natural circular dichroism spectra in the extreme ultraviolet region using a polarizing undulator-based optical system and its polarization characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahito; Yagi-Watanabe, Kazutoshi; Kaneko, Fusae; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2009-07-01

    Natural circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region down to a wavelength of 80 nm have been observed for the first time, using an alanine thin film deposited on sodium salicylate coated glass as a sample. Calibrated EUV-CD spectra of L-alanine exhibited a large negative peak at around 120 nm and a positive CD signal below 90 nm, which were roughly predicted by theoretical calculations. A CD measurement system with an Onuki-type polarizing undulator was used to obtain the EUV-CD spectra. This CD system, the development of which took five years, can be used to observe even weak natural CD spectra. The polarization characteristics of this system were also evaluated in order to calibrate the recorded CD spectra.

  18. In situ measurements of plasma irregularity growth in the cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksavik, K.; Moen, J.; Lester, M.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Bekkeng, J. K.

    2012-11-01

    The Investigation of Cusp Irregularities (ICI-2) sounding rocket was launched on 5 December 2008 from Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. The high-resolution rocket data are combined with data from an all-sky camera, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar, and the SuperDARN Hankasalmi radar. These data sets are used to characterize the spatial structure of F region irregularities in the dayside cusp region. We use the data set to test two key mechanisms for irregularity growth; the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and gradient drift (GD) instabilities. Except for a promising interval of 4-6 km irregularities, the KH growth rate was found to be too slow to explain the observed plasma irregularities. The time history of the plasma gives further support that structured particle precipitation could be an important source of kilometer- to hectometer-scale “seed” irregularities, which are then efficiently broken down into decameter-scale irregularities by the GD mechanism.

  19. A solution of the cusp problem in relaxed halos of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mikheeva, E; Lukash, V

    2007-01-01

    We propose a solution of the cusp problem in framework of the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. To do this we describe the linear and nonlinear periods of halo formation by the entropy function of dark matter particles. This approach allows us to take into account together the impact of both the processes of nonlinear relaxation of compressed matter and the small scale initial velocity perturbations in collapsed halos. We show that such random velocities lead to the random variations of the density profile of relaxed halos. As a rule, they suppress the formation of cusp--like halos and favor the creation of core--like ones. This approach allows us to reproduce observed rotation curves, to explain their random scatter and deviations from simulated ones.

  20. Seasonal effects in the ionosphere-thermosphere response to the precipitation and field-aligned current variations in the cusp region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available The seasonal effects in the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to the precipitating electron flux and field-aligned current variations, of the order of an hour in duration, in the summer and winter cusp regions have been investigated using the global numerical model of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Two variants of the calculations have been performed both for the IMF By < 0. In the first variant, the model input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken as geomagnetically symmetric and equal to those used earlier in the calculations for the equinoctial conditions. It has been found that both ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances are more intensive in the winter cusp region due to the lower conductivity of the winter polar cap ionosphere and correspondingly larger electric field variations leading to the larger Joule heating effects in the ion and neutral gas temperature, ion drag effects in the thermospheric winds and ion drift effects in the F2-region electron concentration. In the second variant, the calculations have been performed for the events of 28–29 January, 1992 when precipitations were weaker but the magnetospheric convection was stronger than in the first variant. Geomagnetically asymmetric input data for the summer and winter precipitating fluxes and field-aligned currents have been taken from the patterns derived by combining data obtained from the satellite, radar and ground magnetometer observations for these events. Calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection and thermospheric circulation have been compared with observations and it has been established that calculated patterns of the ionospheric convection for both winter and summer hemispheres are in a good agreement with the observations. Calculated patterns of the thermospheric circulation are in a good agreement with the average circulation for the Southern (summer Hemisphere obtained

  1. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  2. Estimating Allee dynamics before they can be observed: polar bears as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter K Molnár

    Full Text Available Allee effects are an important component in the population dynamics of numerous species. Accounting for these Allee effects in population viability analyses generally requires estimates of low-density population growth rates, but such data are unavailable for most species and particularly difficult to obtain for large mammals. Here, we present a mechanistic modeling framework that allows estimating the expected low-density growth rates under a mate-finding Allee effect before the Allee effect occurs or can be observed. The approach relies on representing the mechanisms causing the Allee effect in a process-based model, which can be parameterized and validated from data on the mechanisms rather than data on population growth. We illustrate the approach using polar bears (Ursus maritimus, and estimate their expected low-density growth by linking a mating dynamics model to a matrix projection model. The Allee threshold, defined as the population density below which growth becomes negative, is shown to depend on age-structure, sex ratio, and the life history parameters determining reproduction and survival. The Allee threshold is thus both density- and frequency-dependent. Sensitivity analyses of the Allee threshold show that different combinations of the parameters determining reproduction and survival can lead to differing Allee thresholds, even if these differing combinations imply the same stable-stage population growth rate. The approach further shows how mate-limitation can induce long transient dynamics, even in populations that eventually grow to carrying capacity. Applying the models to the overharvested low-density polar bear population of Viscount Melville Sound, Canada, shows that a mate-finding Allee effect is a plausible mechanism for slow recovery of this population. Our approach is generalizable to any mating system and life cycle, and could aid proactive management and conservation strategies, for example, by providing a priori

  3. A Polarization Sensitive Bolometric Detector for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, W C; Bock, J J; Lange, A E

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a bolometric detector that is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization which is optimized for making measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The receiver consists of a pair of co-located silicon nitride micromesh absorbers which couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~ 30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~ 60 to 600 GHz. Since both linear polarizations traverse identical optical paths from the sky to the point of detection, the susceptibility to systematic effects is minimized. The amount of uncorrelated noise between the two polarization senses is limited to the quantum limit of thermal and photon shot noise, while drifts in the relative responsivity to orthogonal polarizations are limited to the effect of non-uniformity in the thin film deposition of the leads and the intrinsic thermistor ...

  4. Solar Cycle Variation of Microwave Polar Brightening and EUV Coronal Hole Observed by Nobeyama Radioheliograph and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Park, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Yeon-Han

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the solar cycle variation of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) intensity in latitude to compare microwave polar brightening (MPB) with the EUV polar coronal hole (CH). For this study, we used the full-sun images observed in 17 GHz of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph from 1992 July to 2016 November and in two EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å and 171 Å on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) from 2011 January to 2016 November. As a result, we found that the polar intensity in EUV is anti-correlated with the polar intensity in microwave. Since the depression of EUV intensity in the pole is mostly owing to the CH appearance and continuation there, the anti-correlation in the intensity implies the intimate association between the polar CH and the MPB. Considering the report of tet{gopal99} that the enhanced microwave brightness in the CH is seen above the enhanced photospheric magnetic field, we suggest that the pole area during the solar minimum has a stronger magnetic field than the quiet sun level and such a strong field in the pole results in the formation of the polar CH. The emission mechanism of the MPB and the physical link with the polar CH are not still fully understood. It is necessary to investigate the MPB using high resolution microwave imaging data, which can be obtained by the high performance large-array radio observatories such as the ALMA project.

  5. Ion-dispersion and rapid electron fluctuations in the cusp: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lunde

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results from co-ordinated measurements with the low altitude REIMEI satellite and the ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar, together with other ground-based instruments carried out in February 2006. The results mainly relate to the dayside cusp where clear signatures of so-called ion-dispersion are seen in the satellite data. The cusp ion-dispersion is important for helping to understand the temporal and spatial structure of magnetopause reconnection. Whenever a satellite crosses boundaries of flux tubes or convection cells, cusp structures such as ion-dispersion will always be encountered. In our case we observed 3 distinct steps in the ion energy, but it includes at least 2 more steps as well, which we interpret as temporal features in relation to pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause. In addition, fast variations of the electron flux and energy occurring during these events have been studied in detail. The variations of the electron population, if interpreted as structures crossed by the REIMEI satellite, would map near the magnetopause to similar features as observed previously with the Cluster satellites. These were explained as Alfvén waves originating from an X-line of magnetic reconnection.

  6. Statistical study of ICME effects on Mercury's magnetospheric boundaries and northern cusp region from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol S.; Lugaz, Noé; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. We study the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, quantify the magnetospheric compression, and characterize the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the northern cusp region and the plasma precipitation to the surface. During ICMEs, the magnetopause was substantially compressed, as the subsolar standoff distance from the center of the planet was reduced by ˜15% compared with the value during nominal solar wind conditions, and the magnetopause reached the surface of the planet ˜30% of the time. On the other hand, the bow shock under ICME conditions was located farther from the planet than for nominal solar wind conditions. The cusp was observed to extend ˜10° farther equatorward and 2 h wider in local time. In addition, the average plasma pressure in the cusp was more than double that determined under nominal conditions. For the most extreme cases, the particle precipitation to the surface was an order of magnitude higher than on average. The solar wind ram pressure and the Alfvén Mach number are found to be the dominant factors affecting these changes in the magnetosphere, with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction and the IMF magnetic pressure playing a small but likely nonnegligible role.

  7. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  8. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE: Review of observations and current understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE are very strong radar echoes primarily studied in the VHF wavelength range from altitudes close to the polar summer mesopause. Radar waves are scattered at irregularities in the radar refractive index which at mesopause altitudes is effectively determined by the electron number density. For efficient scatter, the electron number density must reveal structures at the radar half wavelength (Bragg condition for monostatic radars; ~3 m for typical VHF radars. The question how such small scale electron number density structures are created in the mesopause region has been a longstanding open scientific question for almost 30 years. This paper reviews experimental and theoretical milestones on the way to an advanced understanding of PMSE. Based on new experimental results from in situ observations with sounding rockets, ground based observations with radars and lidars, numerical simulations with microphysical models of the life cycle of mesospheric aerosol particles, and theoretical considerations regarding the diffusivity of electrons in the ice loaded complex plasma of the mesopause region, a consistent explanation for the generation of these radar echoes has been developed. The main idea is that mesospheric neutral air turbulence in combination with a significantly reduced electron diffusivity due to the presence of heavy charged ice aerosol particles (radii ~5–50 nm leads to the creation of structures at spatial scales significantly smaller than the inner scale of the neutral gas turbulent velocity field itself. Importantly, owing to their very low diffusivity, the plasma structures acquire a very long lifetime, i.e., 10 min to hours in the presence of particles with radii between 10 and 50 nm. This leads to a temporal decoupling of active neutral air turbulence and the existence of small scale plasma structures and PMSE and thus readily explains observations proving the absence of neutral air turbulence at

  9. Observation of a cusp-like structure in the $\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ invariant mass distribution from $K^{+-} \\to \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay and determination of the $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J Richard; Arcidiacono, R; Baldini, W; Balev, S; Behler, M; Biino, C; Bizzeti, A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, Nicola; Calvetti, M; Cartiglia, N; Ceccucci, A; Celeghini, E; Cenci, P; Cerri, C; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; Clemencic, M; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Coward, D; Cundy, Donald C; Dabrowski, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Di Lella, Luigi; Dibon, Heinz; Doble, Niels T; Eppard, K; Falaleev, V; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Maria; Fiorini, L; Fiorini, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Frabetti, P L; Gatignon, L; Gianoli, A; Giudici, Sergio; Gonidec, A; Goudzovski, E; Goy-Lopez, S; Holder, M; Iacopini, E; Imbergamo, E; Jeitler, Manfred; Kekelidze, V D; Khristov, P Z; Kleinknecht, K; Kozhuharov, V; Kubischta, Werner; Lamanna, G; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Lenti, M; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Maier, A; Mannelli, I; Marchetto, F; Marel, Gérard; Marinova, E; Markytan, Manfred; Marouelli, P; Martelli, F; Martini, M; Masetti, L; Mazzucato, E; Michetti, A; Mikulec, I; Molokanova, N A; Monnier, E; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Munday, D J; Neuhofer, G; Norton, A; Patel, M; Pepé, M; Peters, A; Petrucci, F; Petrucci, M C; Peyaud, B; Piccini, M; Pierazzini, G M; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Raggi, M; Renk, B; Rubin, P; Ruggiero, G; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Shieh, M; Slater, M W; Sozzi, M; Stoynev, S; Swallow, E; Szleper, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Vallage, B; Velasco, M; Veltri, M; Wache, M; Wahl, H; Walker, A; Wanke, R; Widhalm, L; Winhart, A; Winston, R; Wood, M D; Wotton, S A; Zinchenko, A I; Ziolkowski, M

    2006-01-01

    We report the results from a study of ~23 Million K+- ==> pi+- pizero pizero decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, showing an anomaly in the pizero pizero invariant mass distribution in the region around 2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. This anomaly, never observed in previous experiments, can be interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process pi+ pi- ==> pizero pizero in K+- ==> pi+- pi+ pi- decay. It provides a precise determination of a0 - a2, the difference between the pi-pi scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states.

  10. XMM-Newton and optical observations of the eclipsing polar CSS081231:071126+440405

    CERN Document Server

    Worpel, H

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the temporal and spectral behaviour of the eclipsing polar CSS081231:071126+440405 from the infrared to the X-ray regime. Methods: We obtained phase-resolved XMM-Newton X-ray observations on two occasions in 2012 and 2013 in different states of accretion. In 2013 the XMM-Newton X-ray and UV data were complemented by optical photometric and spectroscopic observations. Results: CSS081231 displays two-pole accretion in the high state. The magnetic fields of the two poles are 36 and 69 MG, indicating a non-dipolar field geometry. The X-ray spectrum of the main accreting pole with the lower field comprises a hot thermal component from the cooling accretion plasma, $kT_{plas}$ of a few tens of keV, and a blackbody-like component from the accretion area with $kT_{rm bb} \\sim$ 50-100\\,eV. The high-field pole which was located opposite to the mass-donating star accretes at a low rate and has a plasma temperature of about 4\\,keV. At both occasions the X-ray eclipse midpoint precedes the optical ec...

  11. STEREO/SECCHI Stereoscopic Observations Constraining the Initiation of Polar Coronal Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Patsourakos, S; Vourlidas, A; Antiochos, S K; Wuelser, J P

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first stereoscopic observations of polar coronal jets made by the EUVI/SECCHI imagers on board the twin STEREO spacecraft. The significantly separated viewpoints ($\\sim$ 11$^\\circ$) allowed us to infer the 3D dynamics and morphology of a well-defined EUV coronal jet for the first time. Triangulations of the jet's location in simultaneous image pairs led to the true 3D position and thereby its kinematics. Initially the jet ascends slowly at $\\approx$10-20 $\\mathrm{{km} {s}^{-1}}$ and then, after an apparent 'jump' takes place, it accelerates impulsively to velocities exceeding 300 $\\mathrm{{km} {s}^{-1}}$ with accelerations exceeding the solar gravity. Helical structure is the most important geometrical feature of the jet which shows evidence of untwisting. The jet structure appears strikingly different from each of the two STEREO viewpoints: face-on in the one viewpoint and edge-on in the other. This provides conclusive evidence that the observed helical structure is real and is not resulting...

  12. Exploring the Top-Higgs FCNC Couplings at Polarized Linear Colliders with Top Spin Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Melić, Blaženka

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the $t\\bar{t}$ production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that it couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine the chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t $\\rightarrow$ qH in $t\\bar{t}$ production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the coupli...

  13. Exploring the top-Higgs FCNC couplings at polarized linear colliders with top spin observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melić, Blaženka; Patra, Monalisa

    2017-01-01

    We study the nature of flavor changing neutral couplings of the top quark with the Higgs boson and the up/charm quark in the toverline{t} production at linear colliders. There are previous bounds on such tqH couplings at both, linear and hadronic colliders, with the assumption that the top couples equally to the left and the right handed fermions. In this paper we examine chirality of the tqH coupling and construct different observables which will be sensitive to it. The kinematics of the emitted q from t → qH in toverline{t} production is discussed and it was found that the polar angle distribution of q is sensitive to the chiral nature of tqH couplings. The observables in the context of top-antitop spin correlations, which are sensitive to new physics in the top decay are considered using different spin-quantization bases. It was found that in particular the off-diagonal basis can be useful to distinguish among the chiral tqH couplings. The sensitivity of the unpolarized ILC in probing the couplings at the 3 σ level at √{s}=500 GeV and ℒ = 500 fb-1 is also studied, resulting in predicted BR( t → qH) left handed electrons and right handed positrons.

  14. XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray soft polar QS Telescopii

    CERN Document Server

    Traulsen, I; Schwope, A D; Burwitz, V; Dreizler, S; Schwarz, R; Walter, F M

    2011-01-01

    Context. On the basis of XMM-Newton observations, we investigate the energy balance of selected magnetic cataclysmic variables, which have shown an extreme soft-to-hard X-ray flux ratio in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Aims. We intend to establish the X-ray properties of the system components, their flux contributions, and the accretion geometry of the X-ray soft polar QS Tel. In the context of high-resolution X-ray analyses of magnetic cataclysmic variables, this study will contribute to better understanding the accretion processes on magnetic white dwarfs. Methods. During an intermediate high state of accretion of QS Tel, we have obtained 20 ks of XMM-Newton data, corresponding to more than two orbital periods, accompanied by simultaneous optical photometry and phase-resolved spectroscopy. We analyze the multi-wavelength spectra and light curves and compare them to former high- and low-state observations. Results. Soft emission at energies below 2 keV dominates the X-ray light curves. The complex double-peaked ...

  15. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  16. Multi-frequency observations of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes and their aspect sensitivity at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, Cesar; Rietveld, Michael; Havnes, Ove; Senior, Andrew; Haggstrom, Ingemar; Kosch, Michael; Pinedo, Henry

    2012-07-01

    In a unique experiment at EISCAT in northern Norway, executed in July 2011, Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed in the zenith at four different radar frequencies (933, 224, 56 and 7.9 MHz) simultaneously whilst artificially heating the electrons with high-frequency radio waves. In addition, measurements of the scattering layers were also made for the first time by the EISCAT_3D demonstrator array at 224 MHz located in Kiruna, Sweden, which is 234 km away from the transmitting site and obtains measurements at an aspect angle of 69 degrees. Strong scattering was observed over prolonged periods on several days by the demonstrator array. These measurements are at variance with previous aspect angle measurements that have reported aspect angles no greater than about 15 degrees. These results indicate that the turbulent irregularities that produce the scattering have a high degree of isotropy, which is more in line with Kolmogorov'a hypothesis of a universal scaling of turbulence based precisely on the assumption of homogeneity and isotropy in the inertial regime of turbulence which applies also, naturally, to the Batchelor regime due to large Schmidt numbers which is believed to be the case for PMSE. An interseting question arises, namely, what is the mechanism or process that controls the level of isotropy of the turbulent irregularities in the small scale regime, i.e., inertial or Batchelor, that the radars detect?

  17. Observation of polarized hard X-ray emission from the Crab by the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Iyudin, A.; Arimoto, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Mizuno, T.; Ryde, F.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, T.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured the linear polarization of hard X-ray emission from the Crab in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The introduction of two new observational parameters, the polarization fraction and angle stands to disentangle geometrical and physical effects, thereby providing information on the pulsar wind geometry and magnetic field environment. Measurements are conducted using the PoGOLite Pathfinder - a balloon-borne polarimeter. Polarization is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an anticoincidence well. The polarimetric response has been characterized prior to flight using both polarized and unpolarized calibration sources. We address possible systematic effects through observations of a background field. The measured polarization fraction for the integrated Crab light curve is 18.4^{+9.8}_{-10.6} per cent, corresponding to an upper limit (99 per cent credibility) of 42.4 per cent, for a polarization angle of (149.2 ± 16.0)°.

  18. Observation and Modeling of Anomalous CN Polarization Profiles Produced by the Molecular Paschen-Back Effect in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Collados, M.

    2005-04-01

    We report novel spectropolarimetric observations of sunspots carried out with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in a near-IR spectral region around 15410 Å, which is known to contain two groups of prominent OH lines that show circular polarization signals of opposite polarity. Surrounding these well-known OH lines, we have discovered the presence of CN lines of the Δv=1 band that show anomalous polarization profiles. Although the Stokes V signals of the OH lines are antisymmetric and of a sizable amplitude, the CN lines show almost negligible circular polarization. On the contrary, the linear polarization signals turn out to be much stronger in the CN lines than in the OH lines. Interestingly, these CN lines present striking antisymmetric linear polarization profiles, which we are able to explain and model via the Paschen-Back effect theory for diatomic molecules. The presence of such peculiar CN lines in the same spectral region of the OH lines may be useful to improve our empirical knowledge of solar magnetic fields via the simultaneous observation and modeling of the transverse and longitudinal Zeeman effects in two different molecular species.

  19. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in $\\vec{e}p$ elastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Meziane, M; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-01-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton form factor ratio $G_{Ep}/G_{Mp}$ obtained from cross section and polarization measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange contribution. We report the results of the JLab Hall C $GEp2\\gamma$ experiment, which measured the kinematical dependence of polarization transfer observables in elastic electron-proton scattering at $Q^2=2.5$ GeV$^2$, in search of effects beyond the Born approximation. For a wide range of values of the kinematic factor $\\epsilon$ ($\\epsilon=$0.15, 0.63, and 0.77), the proton polarization component ratio and the longitudinal polarization transfer component were measured with statistical uncertainties of $\\pm$0.01 and $\\pm$0.006 and systematic uncertainties of 0.013 and 0.01, respectively.

  20. Polar-Region Distributions of Poynting Flux: Global Models Compared With Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, P. D.; Lotko, W.; Murr, D.; Gagne, J. R.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Low-altitude distributions of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry global simulation model of the magnetosphere are compared with distributions derived from SuperDARN, the Iridium satellite constellation, and the Weimer 2005 empirical model for a one-hour interval (1400-1500 UT) on 23 November 1999 during which the interplanetary magnetic field was steady and southward. Synthetic measurements along a pseudo-satellite track are also obtained from each distribution and compared with measurements from the DMSP F13 satellite. Previous studies of the event are supplemented here with updated simulation results for the electric potential and field-aligned currents, new simulation diagnostics for the Poynting flux incident on the ionosphere, and comparisons of observational and simulation results with the Weimer empirical model. The location and extent of the simulated Poynting fluxes that occur in the afternoon sector, between the Region-1 and 2 currents, are consistent with the observed and empirically modeled locations, but the magnitudes exhibit significant differences (locally up to ~100% both higher and lower). Elsewhere, the distribution of simulated fluxes more closely resembles the empirically modeled values than the observed ones and in general is greater in magnitude by about 100%. Additionally, the fraction of simulated Poynting flux that flow into the polar cap region (above 75 deg) is about one third of the total flowing into the ionosphere above 60 deg; a similar value is found for both the observed and the empirically modeled fluxes. The effect of including the parallel potential drop in the self-consistent mapping of electric potential between the ionosphere and inner boundary of the simulation domain is also examined. Globally the effect is small (< 5%); however, in regions where the field-aligned potential drop is appreciable, local changes of 100% or more are found in the magnitude of the

  1. New Insight into Polar Stratospheric Cloud Processes from A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.

    2016-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play essential roles in the chemical depletion of stratospheric ozone at high latitudes. Heterogeneous reactions occurring on PSC particles, primarily supercooled ternary (H2SO4-H2O-HNO3) solution (STS) droplets, convert stable chlorine reservoir species to highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Also, sedimentation and evaporation of large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles irreversibly redistributes odd nitrogen and prolongs ozone depletion by slowing the reformation of stable chlorine reservoirs. Even after three decades of research, significant gaps in our understanding of PSC processes still exist, particularly concerning NAT nucleation and the extent to which chlorine is activated on cold background aerosol prior to PSC formation. These uncertainties limit our ability to represent PSCs accurately in global models and call into question predictions of ozone recovery in a changing climate. PSC observations from the A-Train satellite constellation have stimulated a number of new research activities that have both extended and challenged our knowledge of PSC processes and modeling capabilities. Specifically, the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite is providing information on PSC morphology and composition in unprecedented detail, while the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite is providing nearly coincident measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and H2O, the major constituents of all PSC particles. The combined analyses of these datasets enable better PSC composition discrimination and provide valuable new insight into processes such as PSC-catalyzed chlorine activation and PSC particle growth kinetics. The more than ten years of CALIOP and MLS measurements have uniquely captured the primary aspects of the seasonal and multi-year variability of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic and are enabling the

  2. Polarization data from SCIAMACHY limb backscatter observations compared to vector radiative transfer model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Liebing

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available SCIAMACHY is a passive imaging spectrometer onboard ENVISAT, designed to obtain trace gas abundances from measured radiances and irradiances in the UV to SWIR range in nadir, limb and occultation viewing modes. Its grating spectrometer introduces a substantial sensitivity to the polarization of the incoming light with nonnegligible effects on the radiometric calibration. To be able to correct for the polarization sensitivity, SCIAMACHY utilizes broadband Polarization Measurement Devices (PMDs. While for the nadir viewing mode the measured atmospheric polarization has been validated against POLDER data (Tilstra and Stammes, 2007, 2010, a similar validation study regarding the limb viewing mode has not yet been performed. This paper aims at an assessment of the quality of the SCIAMACHY limb polarization data. Since limb polarization measurements by other air- or spaceborne instruments in the spectral range of SCIAMACHY are not available, a comparison with radiative transfer simulations by SCIATRAN V3.1(Rozanov et al., 2012 using a wide range of atmospheric parameters is performed. SCIATRAN is a vector radiative transfer model (VRTM capable of performing calculations of the multiply scattered radiance in a~spherically symmetric atmosphere.

    The study shows that the limb polarization data exhibit a large systematic bias which is decreasing with wavelength. The most likely reason for this bias is an instrumental phase shift which changes the relative contributions of different Stokes vector components to the PMD signal as compared to on-ground calibration measurements. It is also shown that it is in principle feasible to recalibrate the polarization sensitivity using the in-flight data and the VRTM simulations, enabling also the monitoring of its degradation. Together with an optimization of the algorithm used to calculate the in-flight polarization data an improved polarization correction can increase the radiometric accuracy of SCIAMACHY

  3. Four point measurements of electrons using PEACE in the high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. G. T. Taylor

    Full Text Available We present examples of electron measurements from the PEACE instruments on the Cluster spacecraft in the high-latitude, high-altitude region of the Earth’s magnetosphere. Using electron density and energy spectra measurements, we examine two cases where the orbit of the Cluster tetrahedron is outbound over the northern hemisphere, in the afternoon sector approaching the magnetopause. Data from the magnetometer is also used to pinpoint the position of the spacecraft with respect to magnetospheric boundaries. This preliminary work specifically highlights the benefit of the multipoint measurement capability of the Cluster mission. In the first case, we observe a small-scale spatial structure within the magnetopause boundary layer. The Cluster spacecraft initially straddle a boundary, characterised by a discontinuous change in the plasma population, with a pair of spacecraft on either side. This is followed by a complete crossing of the boundary by all four spacecraft. In the second case, Cluster encounters an isolated region of higher energy electrons within the cusp. The characteristics of this region are consistent with a trapped boundary layer plasma sheet population on closed magnetospheric field lines. However, a boundary motion study indicates that this region convects past Cluster, a characteristic more consistent with open field lines. An interpretation of this event in terms of the motion of the cusp boundary region is presented.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  4. Observation of photon polarization in the $b \\to s\\gamma$ transition

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; 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Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents a study of the flavor-changing neutral current radiative $B^{\\pm} \\to K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}\\gamma$ decays performed using data collected in proton-proton collisions with the LHCb detector at $7$ and $8\\,$TeV center-of-mass energies. In this sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3\\,\\text{fb}^{-1}$, nearly $14\\,000$ signal events are reconstructed and selected, containing all possible intermediate resonances with a $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ final state in the $[1.1, 1.9]\\,$GeV/$c^{2}$ mass range. The distribution of the angle of the photon direction with respect to the plane defined by the final-state hadrons in their rest frame is studied in intervals of $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ mass and the asymmetry between the number of signal events found on each side of the plane is obtained. The first direct observation of the photon polarization in the $b \\to s\\gamma$ transition is reported with a significance of $5.2\\,\\sigma$.

  5. Suzaku Observations of the North Polar Spur: Evidence for Nitrogen Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Eric D; Bautz, Mark W; McCammon, Dan; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Hughes, John P; Katsuda, Satoru; Kokubun, Motohide; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Porter, F Scott; Takei, Yoh; Tsuboi, Yohko; Yamasaki, Noriko Y

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of the North Polar Spur (NPS) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) aboard the Suzaku X-ray satellite. The NPS is a large region of enhanced soft X-ray and radio emission projected above the plane of the Galaxy, likely produced by a series of supernovae and stellar winds from the nearby Sco-Cen OB association. The exceptional sensitivity and spectral resolution of the XIS below 1 keV allow unprecedented probing of low-energy spectral lines, including CVI (0.37 keV) and NVII (0.50 keV), and we have detected highly-ionized nitrogen toward the NPS for the first time. For this single pointing toward the brightest 3/4 keV emission (l = 26.8 deg, b = +22.0 deg), the best-fit NPS emission model implies a hot (kT ~ 0.3 keV), collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma with depleted C, O, Ne, Mg, and Fe abundances of less than 0.5 solar, but an enhanced N abundance, with N/O = 4.0 +0.4,-0.5 times solar. The temperature and total thermal energy of the gas suggest heating by one or more ...

  6. OBSERVATIONS ON DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBERS BY POLARIZING OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-fa Xiao; Yu-feng Zhang

    2000-01-01

    By means of polarizing optical microscopy (POM), deformation behavior of four kinds of fibers, i.e. ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) fiber, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber,and wholly aromatic (p-hydroxybenzoic acid/2-hydroxy-6-naphthoic acid) copolyester [P(HBA/HNA)]/PET (ACPET blend) fiber, in axial compression, axial impacting, and bending was observed. In compression, kink bands formed at an angle of 55~60° to the fiber axis in 10-times-drawn UHMW-PE fiber, 75~80° in 40-times-drawn sample, 80° in PVA fiber, and 90°in the ACPET blend fiber. In impacting and bending, band angles of UHMW-PE, PVA and PET fibers are nearly the same as those formed in compression, indicating that slip systems do not change. For any of the four kinds of fiber, band spacing exhibits great differences in compression, in impacting, and in bending, which may be attributed to the differences in the degrees of strain or stress concentration.

  7. Polarization leakage in Epoch of Reionization windows: I. LOFAR observations of the 3C196 field

    CERN Document Server

    Asad, Khan M B; Jelić, Vibor; Pandey, V N; Ghosh, Abhik; Abdalla, F B; Bernardi, G; Brentjens, M A; de Bruyn, A G; Bus, S; Ciardi, B; Chapman, E; Daiboo, S; Fernandez, E R; Harker, G; Iliev, I T; Jensen, H; Martinez-Rubi, O; Mellema, G; Mevius, M; Offringa, A R; Patil, A H; Schaye, J; Thomas, R M; van der Tol, S; Vedantham, H K; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the cosmological 21-cm signal coming from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is challenging in the presence of astrophysical foregrounds and direction (in)dependent systematic errors of the instrument. Even after removing the foregrounds, the residual Stokes I maps contain, in addition to the system noise, the polarized foreground leaked from Stokes Q, U due to systematic and random errors which can mimic the EoR signal. Here we discuss the systematic errors, especially the primary beam, of LOFAR and present realistic simulations of the leakages caused by them. We made a Stokes Q, U sky model of the Galactic diffuse emission based on the LOFAR observations of the 3C196 field, simulated the full-Stokes visibilities that would be produced by LOFAR in the presence of its nominal model beam, created RM-cubes and the cylindrically and spherically averaged 3D power spectra (PS), and compared them with the PS of a simulated EoR signal. From the spherical PS, we found that at 134-166 MHz, within the central...

  8. Observation of photon polarization in the b→sγ transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Caponio, F; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Esen, S; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B

    2014-04-25

    This Letter presents a study of the flavor-changing neutral current radiative B±→K±π∓π±γ decays performed using data collected in proton-proton collisions with the LHCb detector at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies. In this sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb-1, nearly 14 000 signal events are reconstructed and selected, containing all possible intermediate resonances with a K±π∓π± final state in the [1.1,1.9]  GeV/c2 mass range. The distribution of the angle of the photon direction with respect to the plane defined by the final-state hadrons in their rest frame is studied in intervals of K±π∓π± mass and the asymmetry between the number of signal events found on each side of the plane is obtained. The first direct observation of the photon polarization in the b→sγ transition is reported with a significance of 5.2σ.

  9. Observation and modeling of anomalous CN polarization profiles produced by the molecular Paschen-Back effect in sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A A; Collados, M

    2005-01-01

    We report novel spectropolarimetric observations of sunspots carried out with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) in a near-IR spectral region around 15410 A, which is known to contain two groups of prominent OH lines that show circular polarization signals of opposite polarity. Surrounding these well-known OH lines, we have discovered the presence of CN lines of the $\\Delta v=1$ band which show anomalous polarization profiles. Although the Stokes V signals of the OH lines are antisymmetric and with a sizable amplitude, the CN lines show almost negligible circular polarization. On the contrary, the linear polarization signals turn out to be much stronger in the CN lines than in the OH lines. Interestingly, these CN lines present striking antisymmetric linear polarization profiles, which we are able to explain and model via the Paschen-Back effect theory for diatomic molecules. The presence of such peculiar CN lines in the same spectral region of the OH lines may be useful to improve our empirical knowledg...

  10. Dual-Polarization Observations of Precipitation: State of the Art in Operational and Research Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, C. V.; Moisseev, D. N.; Baldini, L.; Bechini, R.; Cremonini, R.; Wolff, D. B.; Petersen, W. A.; Junyent, F.; Chen, H.; Beauchamp, R.

    2016-12-01

    Dual-polarization weather radars have been widely used for rainfall measurement applications and studies of the microphysical characteristics of precipitation. Ground-based, dual-polarization radar systems form the cornerstones of national severe weather warning and forecasting infrastructure in many developed countries. As a result of the improved performance of dual-polarization radars for these applications, large scale dual-polarization upgrades are being planned for India and China. In addition to national forecast and warning operations, dual-polarization radars have also been used for satellite ground validation activities. The operational Dual-Polarization radars in the US are mostly S band systems whereas in Europe are mostly C band systems. In addition a third class of systems is emerging in urban regions where networks of X band systems are being deployed operationally. There are successful networks planned or already deployed in big cities such as Dallas Fort Worth, Tokyo or Beijing. These X band networks are developing their own operational domain. In summary a large infrastructure in terms of user specified products and dual use of operational research applications are also emerging in these systems. This paper will discuss some of the innovative uses of the operational dual-polarization radar networks for research purposes, with references to calibration, hydrometeor classification and quantitative precipitation estimation. Additional application to the study of precipitation processes will also be discussed.

  11. Locating the Polar Cap Boundary of Postnoon Sector from Observations of 630.0 nm Auroral Emission at Zhongshan Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the ground observations of 630. 0 nm auroral emission at Zhongshan Station to de-termine the polar cap boundary with the latitudinal profile of emission intensity. The open-closed field lineboundary is assumed to lie at the boundary between polar rain and plasma sheet precipitation. We assumethat nonprecipitation-dependent sources of 630. 0 nm emission cause a spatially uniform luminosity in thepolar cap and that auroral zone luminosity is also spatially uniform. Therefore we determine the locationof the polar cap boundary of postnoon sector from the auroral emission data each time by finding the bestfit of the observations to a step function in latitude and we produce a time series of the location of the polarcap boundary. The average error of the practice in the paper is less than 0. 8 degree.

  12. The behaviour of curvature functions at cusps and inflection points

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, Shohei

    2011-01-01

    At a 3/2-cusp of a given plane curve $\\gamma(t)$, both of the Euclidean curvature $\\kappa_g$ and the affine curvature $\\kappa_A$ diverge. In this paper, we show that each of $\\sqrt{|s_g|}\\kappa_g$ and $(s_A)^2 \\kappa_A$ (called the Euclidean and affine normalized curvature, respectively) at a 3/2-cusp is a smooth function of the variable $t$, where $s_g$ (resp. $s_A$) is the Euclidean (resp. affine) arclength parameter of the curve corresponding to the 3/2-cusp $s_g=0$ (resp. $s_A=0$). Moreover, we give a characterization of the behaviour of the curvature functions $\\kappa_g$ and $\\kappa_A$ at 3/2-cusps. On the other hand, inflection points are also singular points of curves in affine geometry. We give a similar characterization of affine curvature functions near generic inflection points. As an application, new affine invariants of 3/2-cusps and generic inflection points are given.

  13. Gauss images of hyperbolic cusps with convex polyhedral boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Fillastre, François

    2009-01-01

    We prove that a 3--dimensional hyperbolic cusp with convex polyhedral boundary is uniquely determined by its Gauss image. Furthermore, any spherical metric on the torus with cone singularities of negative curvature and all closed contractible geodesics of length greater than $2\\pi$ is the metric of the Gauss image of some convex polyhedral cusp. This result is an analog of the Rivin-Hodgson theorem characterizing compact convex hyperbolic polyhedra in terms of their Gauss images. The proof uses a variational method. Namely, a cusp with a given Gauss image is identified with a critical point of a functional on the space of cusps with cone-type singularities along a family of half-lines. The functional is shown to be concave and to attain maximum at an interior point of its domain. As a byproduct, we prove rigidity statements with respect to the Gauss image for cusps with or without cone-type singularities. In a special case, our theorem is equivalent to existence of a circle pattern on the torus, with prescrib...

  14. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  15. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Elson, L.S.; Fishbein, E.F.; Zurek, R.W. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (United States)); Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A. (Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents initial data analysis of ozone distributions in the southern polar vortex region during the winter of 1992. The data comes from the microwave limb sounder on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The data provides never before available coverage of the polar stratosphere, and reveals the development of an ozone hole from column ozone data, changes in ozone mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere consistent with ozone destruction processes in the stratosphere, and evidence to support the transport of ozone toward the pole by tidal wave activity in the stratosphere. The ozone measurements are compared with the development of the polar vortex derived from national meteorological center data.

  16. VHF radar observations of turbulent structures in the polar mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czechowsky

    Full Text Available The mobile SOUSY VHF Radar was operated in the summer of 1987 during the MAC/SINE campaign in northern Norway to study the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. Measurements of the spectral width indicate that two types of structures occur. In general mesospheric layers are bifurcated exhibiting a narrow spectral width and a well-defined aspect sensitivity. However, for about 10% of the observation time cells of enhanced turbulence characterized by extremely broad spectral widths appear predominantly in the upper sublayer above 86 km. Identification and separation of beam and shear broadening allows a determination of the turbulence-induced component of the spectral width. This case study reveals that during several events these cloud-like structures of enhanced turbulence move with an apparent velocity of several tens of meters per second which is almost identical with the phase trace velocity of simultaneously observed waves. Since, at that time, the Richardson number was less than a quarter, it was concluded that these turbulent cells were generated by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The horizontal extent of these structures was calculated to be less than 40 km. A general relation between spectral width and echo power was not detected. The turbulent component of the spectral width was used to calculate typical values of the energy dissipation rate at times where narrow spectral width dominates and during periods of enhanced turbulence. In addition, the outer scale of the inertial subrange (buoyancy scale was estimated. For the first time the occurrence and motion of this type of structures of enhanced spectral width is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  17. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in $\\vec{e}p$ elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J.R.; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbothan, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnick, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, $G_{E}/G_{M}$, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange (TPEX) contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic $H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{p})$ reaction for three different beam energies at a fixed squared momentum transfer $Q^2 = 2.5$ GeV$^2$, spanning a wide range of the virtual photon polarization parameter, $\\epsilon$. From these measured polarization observables, we have obtained separately the ratio $R$, which equals $\\mu_p G_{E}/G_{M}$ in the Born approximation, and the longitudinal polarization transfer component $P_\\ell$, with statistical and systematic uncertainties of $\\Delta R \\approx \\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(stat)} \\pm 0.013 \\mbox{(syst)}$ and $\\Delta P_\\ell/P^{Born}_{\\ell} \\approx \\pm 0.006 \\mbox{(stat)}\\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(syst)}$. The ratio $R$ is found to be independent of $\\epsilon$ at the 1.5% level, while the $\\epsilon$ dependence of $P_\\ell$ shows an enhancement of $(2.3 \\pm 0.6) %$ relative to the Born approximation at large $\\epsilon$.

  18. Introduction to the fifth Mars Polar Science special issue: key questions, needed observations, and recommended investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Stephen M.; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Byrne, Shane; Durham, William; Fisher, David; Forget, Francois; Hecht, Michael; Smith, Peter; Tamppari, Leslie; Titus, Timothy; Zurek, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Fifth International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration – which was held from September 12–16, 2011, at the Pike’s Waterfront Lodge in Fairbanks, Alaska – is the latest in a continuing series of meetings that are intended to promote the exchange of knowledge and ideas between planetary and terrestrial scientists interested in Mars polar and climate research (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/polar2011/polar20113rd.html). The conference was sponsored by the Lunar and Planetary Institute, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA’s Mars Program Office, University of Alaska Fairbanks, International Association of Cryospheric Sciences and the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Sciences at York University.

  19. Cusp-core transformations in dwarf galaxies: observational predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Teyssier, Romain; Dubois, Yohan; Read, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The presence of a dark matter core in the central kiloparsec of many dwarf galaxies has been a long standing problem in galaxy formation theories based on the standard cold dark matter paradigm. Recent cosmological simulations, based on Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and rather strong feedback recipes have shown that it was indeed possible to form extended dark matter cores using baryonic processes related to a more realistic treatment of the interstellar medium. Using adaptive mesh refinement, together with a new, stronger supernovae feedback scheme that we have recently implemented in the RAMSES code, we show that it is also possible to form a prominent dark matter core within the well-controlled framework of an isolated, initially cuspy, 10 billion solar masses dark matter halo. Although our numerical experiment is idealized, it allows a clean and unambiguous identification of the dark matter core formation process. Our dark matter inner profile is well fitted by a pseudo-isothermal profile with a core radi...

  20. Observation of the Decay B0->rho+rho- and Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Abe, T; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borean, C; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandt, T; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brigljevic, V; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chao, M; Charles, E; Chauveau, J; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Cochran, J; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colberg, T; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cote-Ahern, D; Cottingham, W N; Coupal, D P; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Crosetti, G; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Buono, L; Del Gamba, V; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Falciai, D; Farbin, A; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K; Ford, W T; Forti, A C; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabriel, T A; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; George, S; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Green, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Hodgkinson, M C; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hu, T; Hufnagel, D; Höcker, A; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, F; Jackson, P D; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kay, M; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knowles, D J; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kral, J F; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kukartsev, G; Kurup, A; Kutter, P E; Kuznetsova, N; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Langer, M; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Clerc, C; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, S J; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Levi, M E; Levy, S L; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; MacKay, C; Macri, M; Mallik, U; Maly, E; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marker, C E; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKemey, A K; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nicholson, H; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Penny, R C; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roy, J; Ryd, A; Röthel, W; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sanders, P; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schmitz, R E; Schmücker, H; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Shorthouse, H W; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Stark, J; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strother, P; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Swain, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tanaka E W; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Turri, M; Vaitsas, G; Van Hoek, W C; Varnes, H A; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vidal, P B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Von, J H; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walkowiak, W; Walsh, J; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weatherall, J H; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, J; Xella, S M; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Ye, S; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T

    2003-01-01

    We have observed the rare decay B0->rho+rho- in a sample of 89 million BBbar pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. We measure the branching fraction B(B0->rho+rho-)=(27+7-6+5-7)10^-6 and determine the longitudinal polarization fraction Gamma_L/Gamma=0.99+0.01-0.07+-0.03.

  1. Observation of polarization in diffractive dissociation p. -->. lambda. /sup 0/ + K/sup +/ at the CERN-ISR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhan, S.; Hayes, K.; Smith, A.M.; Meritet, L.; Reyrolle, M.; Vazeille, F.; Bonino, R.; Castellina, A.; Medinnis, M.; Schlein, P.E.

    1984-07-18

    A polarization of -(36.1 +- 4.5)% is observed for ..lambda../sup 0/'s produced in diffractive dissociation, pp ..-->.. (..lambda../sup 0/ + K/sup +/)p, with ..sqrt..s = 63 GeV at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings.

  2. Talon Cusp On Permanent Maxillary Canine: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Chandan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available teeth are varied. One such rare anomaly affecting the shape of anterior teeth is taloncusp. It is an accessory cusp-like projection found on lingual or labial surfaces of theupper or lower incisors, unilaterally or bilaterally in both dentitions. It is composed ofnormal enamel and dentine, with or without pulp. It is thought to develop as a result ofevagination on the surface of a tooth during morphodifferentiation stage. Reportedincidence is 0.04-10%, with higher prevalence in males. It is more common inpermanent dentition with a predilection for maxillary lateral incisors (55%, followed bycentral incisors (36% and canines (9%. Talon cusp may cause problems like irritationof tongue during speech and mastication, occlusal interference, caries susceptibility anddisplacement of the affected tooth, and esthetics. Its treatment ranges from applicationof sealant to gradual reduction to root canal therapy. Early diagnosis of talon cusp andits treatment can avoid complications related to this anomaly.

  3. Cusped light-like Wilson loops in gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Cherednikov, I O; Van der Veken, F F

    2012-01-01

    We propose and discuss a new approach to the analysis of the correlation functions which contain light-like Wilson lines or loops, the latter being cusped in addition. The objects of interest are therefore the light-like Wilson null-polygons, the soft factors of the parton distribution and fragmentation functions, high-energy scattering amplitudes in the eikonal approximation, gravitational Wilson lines, etc. Our method is based on a generalization of the universal quantum dynamical principle by J. Schwinger and allows one to take care of extra singularities emerging due to light-like or semi-light-like cusps. We show that such Wilson loops obey a differential equation which connects the area variations and renormalization group behavior of those objects and discuss the possible relation between geometrical structure of the loop space and area evolution of the light-like cusped Wilson loops.

  4. Observation of mesospheric air inside the arctic stratospheric polar vortex in early 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Engel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During several balloon flights inside the Arctic polar vortex in early 2003, unusual trace gas distributions were observed, which indicate a strong influence of mesospheric air in the stratosphere. The tuneable diode laser (TDL instrument SPIRALE (Spectroscopie Infra-Rouge par Absorption de Lasers Embarqués measured unusually high CO values (up to 600 ppb on 27 January at about 30 km altitude. The cryosampler BONBON sampled air masses with very high molecular Hydrogen, extremely low SF6 and enhanced CO values on 6 March at about 25 km altitude. Finally, the MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR spectrometer showed NOy values which are significantly higher than NOy* (the NOy derived from a correlation between N2O and NOy under undisturbed conditions, on 21 and 22 March in a layer centred at 22 km altitude. Thus, the mesospheric air seems to have been present in a layer descending from about 30 km in late January to 25 km altitude in early March and about 22 km altitude on 20 March. We present corroborating evidence from a model study using the KASIMA (KArlsruhe SImulation model of the Middle Atmosphere model that also shows a layer of mesospheric air, which descended into the stratosphere in November and early December 2002, before the minor warming which occurred in late December 2002 lead to a descent of upper stratospheric air, cutting off a layer in which mesospheric air is present. This layer then descended inside the vortex over the course of the winter. The same feature is found in trajectory calculations, based on a large number of trajectories started in the vicinity of the observations on 6 March. Based on the difference between the mean age derived from SF6 (which has an irreversible mesospheric loss and from CO2 (whose mesospheric loss is much smaller and reversible we estimate that the fraction of mesospheric air in the layer observed on 6 March, must have been

  5. Similarities and differences in polar mesosphere summer echoes observed in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Latteck

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE have been observed in the high latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere for several years using VHF radars located at Andenes/Norway (69° N, 16° E, Resolute Bay/Canada (75° N, 95° W, and Davis/Antarctica (69° S, 78° E. The VHF radars at the three sites were calibrated using the same methods (noise source and delayed transmitting signal and identical equipment. Volume reflectivity was derived from the calibrated echo power and the characteristics of the seasonal variation of PMSE were estimated at the sites for the years 2004 to 2007. The largest peak volume reflectivity of about 2×10−9 m−1 was observed at Andenes compared with their counterparts at Davis (~4×10−11 m−1 and Resolute Bay (~6×10−12 m−1. The peak of the PMSE height distribution is 85.6 km at Davis which is about 1 km higher than at Andenes. At Resolute Bay the height distribution peaks at about 85 km but only a few layers were found below 84 km. The mean PMSE occurrence rate is 83% at Andenes, 38% at Davis with larger variability and only 18% at Resolute Bay (in late summer. The duration of the PMSE season varies at Andenes from 104 to 113 days and at Davis from 88 to 93 days. In general the PMSE seasons starts about 5 days later at Davis and ends about 10 days earlier compared to Andenes. In all three seasons the PMSE occurrence suddenly drops to a much lower level at Davis about 32 days after solstice whereas the PMSE season decays smoothly at Andenes. The duration of the PMSE season at Andenes and Davis is highly correlated with the presence of equatorward directed winds, the observed differences in PMSE occurrence are related to the mesospheric temperatures at both sites.

  6. New Observations and Studies of Saturn's Long-Lived North Polar SPOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Rojas, Jose Félix; Acarreta, Juan Ramón; Lecacheux, Jean; Colas, François; Sada, Pedro V.

    1997-08-01

    We report on a new series of ground-based CCD observations at visual wavelengths, covering a period of 1255 days between May 1992 and November 1995, of the longest-lived asymmetric feature known in Saturn's atmosphere: the north polar spot (NPS). This completes our previous analysis of this feature during the period 1990-1991 (A. Sanchez-Lavega, J. Lecacheux, F. Colas, and P. Lagues, 1993,Science260,329-332). Longitude measurements of the NPS indicate an averaged longitudinal drift of -0.030 deg/day for the whole period 1990-1995 corresponding to a zonal velocity of 0.11 msec-1. These data, when combined with previous and new measurements of the NPS position on Voyager 1 and 2 images obtained in 1980 and 1981, indicate a long-term drift in longitude of the NPS with a constant angular acceleration of 1.1 × 10-5deg/(day)2. High-resolution Voyager 2 violet, blue, green, and orange images were used to measure the size and reflectivity of the NPS. Its structure is characterized by a bright elliptical core surrounded by a dark ring and a large uniform area. The contrast between all these features changes appreciably from violet to orange: the spot is dark in violet but bright in orange relative to its surroundings. The spot is embedded within a region seeded by a “field of bright clouds” with characteristic size 1000 km reminiscent of a cellular convection pattern. The NPS's east-west apparent size is shorter at violet-blue (about 7000 km as limited by a dark ring at these wavelengths) than at green-orange (about 11,000 km corresponding to the large uniform area). Green processed images show apparent spiral patterns within the NPS consistent with anticyclonic vorticity. The results of ground-based photometry of the north polar region (NPR) and the NPS in the red methane absorption bands and their adjacent continuum are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the cloud vertical structure consisting of a clear gas layer, a haze layer, and a semi-infinite cloud

  7. Descriptive Analysis of In Vitro Cutting of Swine Mitral Cusps: Comparison of High-Power Laser and Scalpel Blade Cutting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nathali Cordeiro; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Deana, Alessandro; Zezell, Denise; Benetti, Carolina; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Lopes, Luciana Almeida; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli; Chavantes, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    The most common injury to the heart valve with rheumatic involvement is mitral stenosis, which is the reason for a big number of cardiac operations in Brazil. Commissurotomy is the traditional technique that is still widely used for this condition, although late postoperative restenosis is concerning. This study's purpose was to compare the histological findings of porcine cusp mitral valves treated in vitro with commissurotomy with a scalpel blade to those treated with high-power laser (HPL) cutting, using appropriate staining techniques. Five mitral valves from healthy swine were randomly divided into two groups: Cusp group (G1), cut with a scalpel blade (n = 5), and Cusp group (G2), cut with a laser (n = 5). G2 cusps were treated using a diode laser (λ = 980 nm, power = 9.0 W, time = 12 sec, irradiance = 5625 W/cm(2), and energy = 108 J). In G1, no histological change was observed in tissue. A hyaline basophilic aspect was focally observed in G2, along with a dark red color on the edges and areas of lower birefringence, when stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sirius red. Further, the mean distances from the cutting edge in cusps submitted to laser application and stained with Masson's trichrome and Sirius red were 416.7 and 778.6 μm, respectively, never overcoming 1 mm in length. Thermal changes were unique in the group submitted to HPL and not observed in the cusp group cut with a scalpel blade. The mean distance of the cusps' collagen injury from the cutting edge was less than 1 mm with laser treatment. Additional studies are needed to establish the histological evolution of the laser cutting and to answer whether laser cutting may avoid valvular restenosis better than blade cutting.

  8. Probing the Boundaries of the Heliosphere Using Observations of the Polar ENA Flux from IBEX and Cassini/INCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Janzen, P. H.; Bzowski, M.; Dialynas, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Sokol, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The IBEX Mission has been collecting ENAs from the outer heliosphere for nearly eight years, or three-quarters of a solar cycle. In that time, we have observed clear evidence of the imprint of the solar cycle in the time variation in the ENA flux. The most detailed of such studies has focused on the polar ENA flux observed by IBEX-Hi, as the IBEX spacecraft attitude allows for continuous coverage of the ENA flux incident from the ecliptic poles (Reisenfeld et al. 2012, 2016). By time correlating the ENA-derived heliosheath pressure to the observed 1 AU dynamic pressure, we can estimate the distance to the ENA source region. We can further derive the thickness of the ENA-producing region (presumably the inner heliosheath) by assuming pressure balance at the termination shock (TS). This requires using the 1 AU observations to derive the dynamic pressure at the TS shock by use of a mass-loaded solar wind propagation model (Schwadron et al. 2011), and by integrating ENA observations across all energies that significantly contribute to the heliosheath pressure. This means including polar ENA observations from not only IBEX-Hi, but from IBEX-Lo and Cassini/INCA, spanning an energy range of 15 eV to 40 keV. We will present our latest polar ENA observations and estimates for the distance to the TS and the thickness of the heliosheath.

  9. Interpretation of Polarization Features in Ground-Based Microwave Observations as Caused by Horizontally Aligned Oblate Raindrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Harald; Crewell, Susanne; Simmer, Clemens; Thiele, Ariane; Hornbostel, Achim; Schroth, Arno

    2001-11-01

    Based on a comparison of ground-based radiometer measurements with microwave radiative transfer calculations, it is shown that raindrops with an oblate shape and a preferred horizontal orientation have a significant effect on microwave polarization signals when compared with spherical particle shape. Measurements with a dual-polarized 19-GHz radiometer reveal a polarization difference of as much as 18 K in the downwelling microwave radiation at 30° elevation angle. Averaging all rain observations within 19 months leads to a signal of 6 K. Model calculations covering roughly the same range of weather conditions as that inferred from the meteorological data recorded with the radiometer measurements were carried out with spherical raindrop shape and an oblate particle shape with a fixed horizontal alignment. From the model results, positive polarization difference is expected for spherical particles. This signal was never observed in the recorded data. For oblate drops, the averaged model results lead to a polarization difference of 8 K, which is in reasonable agreement with the long-term averaged observations. Case studies that compare isolated rain events usually lead to a better match of model and observations. However, there are some major discrepancies in some cases. Possible reasons for the remaining differences are the short-term variations in the cloud microphysics for which the model does not correctly account, such as variations in the melting layer, drop oscillations, or variations in the drop size distribution or angular distribution of the drop alignment. Three-dimensional effects are also important when observing small-scale heavy precipitation. Despite remaining small uncertainties, the comparison presents strong evidence that the oblate raindrop shape, with fixed horizontal alignment, is by far the better choice for accurate radiative transfer calculations than is the spherical shape. The omission of this shape effect can cause significant errors when

  10. Around the cusp singularity and the breaking of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tejerina-Risso, J

    2012-01-01

    We record the breaking of water waves focusing at the Huygens Cusp of a parabolic wave maker using a fast video camera at a rate of 2000 images per second. The movie shows the very early time of the water tongue plunging ahead of the wave crest. Soon after, some capillarity wavelets are clearly visible. The image analysis of these space time data permits the measurement of the expected 3/2 power of time law as dictated by the cusp singular geometry given by the Catastrophe Theory. To our knowledge this is the first time that this scaling law is measured from fluid dynamics videos.

  11. Right-hand polarized 4fce auroral roar emissions: 1. Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A receiving system installed at Sondrestrom, Greenland, was used to monitor all detectable auroral radio emissions at the fourth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency (called 4fce roar emissions) between May 2015 and March 2016. Of 88 events detected, 86 occurred during daylit conditions and were left-hand polarized. Two occurred during darkness conditions and were right-hand polarized. The left-hand and right-hand polarized events had entirely different frequency distributions. One of the right-hand polarized 4fce emissions occurred at the same time as and at exactly twice the frequency of a second harmonic emission (2fce roar). The occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during premidnight hours under daylit conditions at Sondrestrom is 5%, comparable to previously reported occurrence rates of 2fce roar in darkness conditions at optimum latitudes of occurrence, but the occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during dark conditions is much lower, suggesting that if the right-hand polarized events arise from coalescence of 2fce waves, only for a small fraction of nighttime 2fce roar emissions does such a process yield 4fce emissions detectable at ground level.

  12. Multiwavelength polarization observations of the γ-ray bright quasar PKS 0420-014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitskiy I.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze total and polarized intensity images of the quasar PKS 0420-014 obtained monthly with the VLBA at 43 GHz during 2008–2012 along with γ-ray data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and multi-color photometric and polarimetric measurements collected by different optical telescopes. During this period the quasar underwent a number of optical flares, which were accompanied by rapid rotation of polarization angle, an increase of activity in γ-rays, and the appearance of new superluminal knots in the parsec-scale jet. We investigate the fine structure of the flares at different wavelengths and in polarized light, and determine kinematic parameters of the knots. We compare the rapid evolution of the optical polarization with the polarization of the VLBI core and knots. We interpret the multi-wavelength behavior within a model that places the blazar “dissipation zone” at the millimeter-wave core of the parsec-scale jet.

  13. On the contribution of thermal excitation to the total 630.0 nm emissions in the northern cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwagala, Norah Kaggwa; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Johnsen, Magnar G.

    2017-01-01

    Direct impact excitation by precipitating electrons is believed to be the main source of 630.0 nm emissions in the cusp ionosphere. However, this paper investigates a different source, 630.0 emissions caused by thermally excited atomic oxygen O(1D) when high electron temperature prevail in the cusp. On 22 January 2012 and 14 January 2013, the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT) radar on Svalbard measured electron temperature enhancements exceeding 3000 K near magnetic noon in the cusp ionosphere over Svalbard. The electron temperature enhancements corresponded to electron density enhancements exceeding 1011 m-3 accompanied by intense 630.0 nm emissions in a field of view common to both the EISCAT Svalbard radar and a meridian scanning photometer. This offered an excellent opportunity to investigate the role of thermally excited O(1D) 630.0 nm emissions in the cusp ionosphere. The thermal component was derived from the EISCAT Radar measurements and compared with optical data. For both events the calculated thermal component had a correlation coefficient greater than 0.8 to the total observed 630.0 nm intensity which contains both thermal and particle impact components. Despite fairly constant solar wind, the calculated thermal component intensity fluctuated possibly due to dayside transients in the aurora.

  14. Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusps and Cross-Tail Current Sheet: Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Gang Kai

    Mercury has proven to be a unique natural laboratory for space plasma processes. Mercury's magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between its intrinsic planetary magnetic field and the supersonic solar wind. The structure of Mercury's magnetosphere is very similar to Earth's; yet the results from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury have shown that the spatial and temporal scales of magnetospheric processes are very different at Mercury. In this thesis, we analyze in situ observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft to characterize and understand the dynamic physical plasma processes occurring in Mercury's magnetosphere. We identified and analyzed 345 plasma filaments in Mercury's northern magnetospheric cusp to determine their physical properties. Cusp plasma filaments are magnetic structures that are identified on the basis of their characteristic 2-3 seconds long decrease in magnetic field intensity. Our analysis indicates that these cusp filaments are cylindrical flux tubes filled with plasma, which causes a diamagnetic decrease in the magnetic field inside the flux tube. MESSENGER observations of flux transfer events (FTEs) and cusp filament suggests that cusp filaments properties are the low-altitude extension of FTEs formed at Mercury's dayside magnetopause. We examined 319 central plasma sheet crossings observed by MESSENGER. Using a Harris model, we determined the physical properties of Mercury's cross-tail current sheet. Analysis of BZ in the current sheet indicated that MESSENGER usually crossed the current sheet sunward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line. Magnetohydrodynamics-based analysis using the MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements suggests that heavy planetary ions and/or ion temperature anisotropy may be important in maintaining radial stress balance within Mercury's central plasma sheet. We report the observation of significant dawn-dusk variation in Mercury's cross-tail current sheet with thicker, lower plasma beta dawn side current

  15. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  16. DE-1 observations of polar O(+) stream bulk parameters and comparison with a model of the centrifugally-accelerated polar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. Wing; Horwitz, J. L.

    A survey of bulk parameters of analyzable O(+) outward streams in the mid-altitude (3-4.7 R(sub E) geocentric distance) polar cap magnetosphere is obtained from measurements by the Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) aboard the Dynamics Explorer-1 (DE-1) spacecraft. There is wide scatter in the obtained densities, but they do display discernible trends: the average O(+) density in these streams decreases from about 60 ions/cc at 3.5 R(sub E) to about 1 ion/cc at 4.6 R(sub E). The streaming velocities are somewhat more defined, and their average increases from about 8 km/s at 3.5 R(sub E) to about 12 km/s at 4.6 R(sub E). The densities and bulk velocities are inversely correlated. We have further compared these observational trends with model profiles for the centrifugally-accelerated polar wind as recently described by Horwitz et al. (1994). The large outflow velocities observed can be understood in part as centrifugally-driven by convection with ionospheric electric field magnitudes of the order 50-70 mV/m, perhaps including plasma expansion effects.

  17. Improving constraints on sources and distributions of sea salt aerosols in polar regions with in situ and CALIOP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Jaegle, L.

    2016-12-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are generated via air bubble bursting at the ocean surface, as well as by wind mobilization of saline snow and frost flowers over sea-ice covered areas. However, the relative magnitude of these sources remains poorly constrained in polar regions. We implement a blowing snow and a frost flower emission scheme in the GEOS-Chem global 3D chemical transport model, which we constrain with in situ observations of SSA mass concentrations at 5 polar sites. We find that the observed SSA concentrations are often overestimated during summer, when the polar ocean is characterized by cold sea surface temperatures and low salinities. We also find that inclusion of blowing snow or frost flower emissions increases the simulated SSA mass concentrations by factors of 2-10 during winter, which is necessary to simulate the observed wintertime SSA levels. The inclusion of blowing snow (frost flowers) increases submicron SSA emissions by a factor of 2-3 (by 20-50%) in polar regions. We find that SSA emissions from blowing snow are largest in regions where persistent strong winds occur over sea ice (East of Greenland, central Arctic, offshore of northern Alaska, the Ross Sea and the Weddell Sea), while emissions from frost flowers are largest where cold air temperatures, open leads and mild winds are co-located (Canadian Arctic Archipelago and coastal regions of Siberia, the Weddell Sea and the Ross Sea). Given the expected different locations of these two sea ice source types, we will use in situ and CALIOP observations of aerosol extinction over the Arctic and Antarctic to further constrain relative contributions of blowing snow and frost flowers, as well as to optimize the parameterization of SSA emissions over the cold waters of polar oceans.

  18. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  19. Polarization observables in the e{sup +}e{sup -} → anti ΛΛ reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeldt, Goeran [Uppsala University, Department of physics and astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    Cross-section, vector-polarization, and tensor-polarization distributions are calculated for the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -}→ anti pp and e{sup +}e{sup -}→ anti ΛΛ. Each reaction requires six characteristic functions that are bilinear in the, possibly complex, electromagnetic form factors, denoted G{sub E}(P{sup 2}) and G{sub M}(P{sup 2}), of p and Λ. For the hyperon reaction also the joint-decay distributions of Λ and anti Λ are calculated. Their knowledge allows a complete determination of the hyperon electromagnetic form factors, without measuring hyperon spins. We explain how this is done in practice. For some tensor-polarization components our results are in conflict with previously repeatedly published distributions. (orig.)

  20. Relationship between partial wave amplitudes and polarization observables in pp --> dπ+ and πd --> πd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankleider, B.; Afnan, I. R.

    1985-04-01

    The polarization observables of the reactions parrow parrow --> π+d, parrowp --> darrowπ+, and πdarrow --> πdarrow are investigated. Expressions relating these observables directly to (LSJ) partial wave amplitudes are derived and tabulations of the partial wave contributions are given for some of the observables. Examples are given of how such tabulations can be useful for optimizing the connection between theory and experiment and in suggesting possible new experiments. All observables are also calculated numerically using a unitary few-body model of the NN-πNN system to generate the amplitudes. Sensitivity to the choice of P11 interaction is investigated.

  1. Relationship between partial wave amplitudes and polarization observables in pp. -->. d. pi. /sup +/ and. pi. d. -->. pi. d

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankleider, B.; Afnan, I.R.

    1985-04-01

    The polarization observables of the reactions parrow parrow ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/d, parrowp ..-->.. darrow..pi../sup +/, and ..pi..darrow ..-->.. ..pi..darrow are investigated. Expressions relating these observables directly to (LSJ) partial wave amplitudes are derived and tabulations of the partial wave contributions are given for some of the observables. Examples are given of how such tabulations can be useful for optimizing the connection between theory and experiment and in suggesting possible new experiments. All observables are also calculated numerically using a unitary few-body model of the NN-..pi..NN system to generate the amplitudes. Sensitivity to the choice of P/sub 11/ interaction is investigated.

  2. Towards improved understanding of cloud influence on polar surface energy budgets using CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, J. E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; McIlhattan, E.; Chepfer, H.; Morrison, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spaceborne radar CloudSat and the spaceborne lidar platform Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) have provided nearly a decade of groundbreaking observations of polar cloud and precipitation processes. Specifically relevant to this AGU session, the CloudSat 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR product (hereafter, 2BFLX) is an observationally constrained radiative flux and heating rate calculation that leverages constraints from A-train observations, including CloudSat+CALIPSO. The surface radiative fluxes calculated within 2BFLX represent an important advance because unlike top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, surface radiative fluxes cannot be directly measured by satellite, yet directly impact surface heating, sea ice melt, and ice sheet mass balance. In this presentation, we will highlight the influence of supercooled liquid on polar surface radiation budgets constrained within 2BFLX data. We will also use 2BFLX data in concert with the fully attenuated signal and cloud phase information from CALIPSO as an observational constraint on polar cloud-climate feedbacks in the Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  3. A rare report of mandibular facial talon cusp and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is an uncommon dental anomaly showing morphologically well delineated, accessory cusp-like structure projecting from cingulum to the incisal edge of anterior teeth. This anomaly is rare in the mandibular dentition and rarer on the facial aspect. A case of this infrequent entity of mandibular facial talon cusp and its management is reported here.

  4. Studies of $\\Lambda n$ interaction through polarization observables for final-state interactions in exclusive $\\Lambda$ photoproduction off the deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Yordanka [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Cao, Tongtong [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Zachariou, Nicholas [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical studies suggest that experimental observables for hyperon production reactions can place stringent constraints on the free parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials, which are critical for the understanding of hypernuclear matter and neutron stars. Here we present preliminary experimental results for the polarization observables S, Py, Ox, Oz, Cx, and Cz for final-state interactions (FSI) in exclusive L photoproduction off the deuteron. The observables were obtained from data collected during the E06-103 (g13) experiment with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The g13 experiment ran with unpolarized deuteron target and circularly- and linearly-polarized photon beams with energies between 0.5 GeV and 2.5 GeV and collected about 51010 events with multiple charged particles in the final state. To select the reaction of interest, the K+ and the L decay products, a proton and a negative pion, were detected in the CLAS. The missing-mass technique was used to identify exclusive hyperon photoproduction events. Final-state interaction events were selected by requesting that the reconstructed neutron has a momentum larger than 200 MeV/c. The large statistics of E06-103 provided statistically meaningful FSI event samples, which allow for the extraction of one- and two-fold differential single- and double-polarization observables. Here we present preliminary results for a set of six observables for photon energies between 0.9 GeV and 2.3 GeV and for several kinematic variables in the Ln center-of-mass frame. Our results are the very first estimates of polarization observables for FSI in hyperon photoproduction and will be used to constrain the free parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials.

  5. Polar mesosphere summer echoes: a comparison of simultaneous observations at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On 5 July 2005, simultaneous observations of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE were made using the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz and UHF (933 MHz radars located near Tromsø, Norway and the ALWIN VHF radar (53.5 MHz situated on Andøya, 120 km SW of the EISCAT site. During the short interval from 12:20 UT until 12:26 UT strong echoes at about 84 km altitude were detected with all three radars. The radar volume reflectivities were found to be 4×10−13 m−1, 1.5×10−14 m−1 and 1.5×10−18 m−1 for the ALWIN, EISCAT-VHF and UHF radars, respectively. We have calculated the reflectivity ratios for each pair of radars and have compared them to ratios obtained from the turbulence-theory model proposed by Hill (1978a. We have tested different values of the turbulent energy dissipation rate ε and Schmidt number Sc, which are free parameters in the model, to try to fit theoretical reflectivity ratios to the experimental ones. No single combination of the parameters ε and Sc could be found to give a good fit. Spectral widths for the EISCAT radars were estimated from the spectra computed from the autocorrelation functions obtained in the experiment. After correction for beam-width broadening, the spectral widths are about 4 m/s for the EISCAT-VHF and 1.5–2 m/s for the UHF radar. However, according to the turbulence theory, the spectral widths in m/s should be the same for both radars. We also tested an incoherent scatter (IS model developed by Cho et al. (1998, which takes into account the presence of charged aerosols/dust at the summer mesopause. It required very different sizes of particles for the EISCAT-VHF and UHF cases, to be able to fit the experimental spectra with model spectra. This implies that the IS model cannot explain PMSE spectra, at least not for monodisperse distributions of particles.

  6. Observation of Significant Quantum Efficiency Enhancement from a Polarized Photocathode with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Chen, Yiqiao [SVT Associates, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States); Moy, Aaron [SVT Associates, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Polarized photocathodes with higher Quantum efficiency (QE) would help to reduce the technological challenge associated with producing polarized beams at milliampere levels, because less laser light would be required, which simplifies photocathode cooling requirements. And for a given amount of available laser power, higher QE would extend the photogun operating lifetime. The distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) concept was proposed to enhance the QE of strained-superlattice photocathodes by increasing the absorption of the incident photons using a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between the front surface of the photocathode and the substrate that includes a DBR, without compromising electron polarization. Here we present recent results showing QE enhancement of a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode made with a DBR structure. Typically, a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode without DBR provides a QE of 1%, at a laser wavelength corresponding to peak polarization. In comparison, the GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathodes with DBR exhibited an enhancement of over 2 when the incident laser wavelength was tuned to meet the resonant condition for the Fabry-Perot resonator.

  7. Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge exchange or ISM absorption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-10-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O vii and Ne ix forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O viii Lyβ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) component with a temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of 0.4-0.8 solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O viii Lyα line. The ionized absorber is characterized by a balance temperature of 0.17-0.20 keV and a column density of 3-5 × 1019 cm-2. Based on the derived abundances and absorption, we speculate that the North Polar Spur is a structure in the Galactic halo, so that the emission is mostly absorbed by the Galactic interstellar medium in the line of sight.

  8. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one half of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been discovered to have a shallow decay phase by the {\\em Swift} satellite, whose origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase, relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly-rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we here investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle changes its direction by $90^\\circ$ abruptly. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows, no matter whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, ...

  9. On cusped solitary waves in finite water depth

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that the Camassa-Holm (CH) equation admits both of the peaked and cusped solitary waves in shallow water. However, it was an open question whether or not the exact wave equations can admit them in finite water depth. Besides, it was traditionally believed that cusped solitary waves, whose 1st-derivative tends to infinity at crest, are essentially different from peaked solitary ones with finite 1st-derivative. Currently, based on the symmetry and the exact water wave equations, Liao [1] proposed a unified wave model (UWM) for progressive gravity waves in finite water depth. The UWM admits not only all traditional smooth progressive waves but also the peaked solitary waves in finite water depth: in other words, the peaked solitary progressive waves are consistent with the traditional smooth ones. In this paper, in the frame of the linearized UWM, we further give, for the first time, the cusped solitary waves in finite water depth, and besides reveal a close relationship between the cusped and p...

  10. Cusp expression of protostylid in deciduous and permanent molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Sandra; Reyes, María Paula; Moreno, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The present article is a case report on the cusp expression of protostylid in the deciduous inferior molars and in the first permanent inferior molar, in which the correspondence and bilateral symmetry of the mentioned expression can be evidenced, as well as the their relation with the foramen cecum of the mesiobuccal furrows of the deciduous and of the permanent inferior molars. PMID:28123270

  11. Simulation of cusp formation in mode II delamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, L.J.; Van der Meer, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    On the microlevel, cusps are formed during delamination crack growth under mode II loading conditions. In this work, two different approaches to simulate this process are presented. Firstly a cohesive zone method where cohesive segments are introduced between a pair of neighbouring elements when the

  12. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  13. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle event of 20 January 2005 on polar stratospheric aerosols: direct observational evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Mironova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energetic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization of the low-middle atmosphere, leading to associated changes in atmospheric properties. Via the hypothetical influence of ionization on aerosol growth and facilitated formation of clouds, this may be an important indirect link relating solar variability to climate. This effect is highly debated, however, since the proposed theoretical mechanisms still remain illusive and qualitative, and observational evidence is inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, important questions regarding the existence and magnitude of the effect, and particularly the fraction of aerosol particles that can form and grow, are still open. Here we present empirical evidence of the possible effect caused by cosmic rays upon polar stratospheric aerosols, based on a case study of an extreme solar energetic particle (SEP event of 20 January 2005. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from different satellites with optical instruments that were operating during January 2005, such as the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III, and Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS, we found a significant simultaneous change in aerosol properties in both the Southern and Northern Polar regions in temporal association with the SEP event. We speculate that ionization of the atmosphere, which was abnormally high in the lower stratosphere during the extreme SEP event, might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles in the polar stratospheric region. However, a detailed interpretation of the effect is left for subsequent studies. This is the first time high vertical resolution measurements have been used to discuss possible production of stratospheric aerosols under the influence of cosmic ray induced ionization. The observed effect is marginally detectable for the analyzed severe SEP event and can be undetectable for the majority of weak

  14. Near infrared spectral and polarization imaging observation of coronal emission lines during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 total solar eclipse, the coronal emission lines were observed by using optical fibre spectrometric and polarization imaging system in near infrared waveband. The profiles of the coronal emission lines including Fe XIII 10747 , 10798  and He I 10830  were obtained with dispersion of 0.5 /pix. The intensity of Fe XIII 10747  remained unchanged in the two different coronal regions while the intensity of He I 10830  varied considerably in the two coronal locations no matter whether the prominence appeared or not. The coronal polarization images were observed at Fe XI 7892  with a bandpass of 30  in a series of exposure times.

  15. Determining the dominant partial wave contributions from angular distributions of single- and double-polarization observables in pseudoscalar meson photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Wunderlich, Y; Thiel, A; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a simple method to determine the significant partial wave contributions to experimentally determined observables in pseudoscalar meson photoproduction. First, fits to angular distributions are presented and the maximum orbital angular momentum $\\text{L}_{\\mathrm{max}}$ needed to achieve a good fit is determined. Then, recent polarization measurements for $\\gamma p \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} p$ from ELSA, GRAAL, JLab and MAMI are investigated according to the proposed method. This method allows us to project high-spin partial wave contributions to any observable as long as the measurement has the necessary statistical accuracy. We show, that high precision and large angular coverage in the polarization data are needed in order to be sensitive to high-spin resonance-states and thereby also for the finding of small resonance contributions. This task can be achieved via interference of these resonances with the well-known states. For the channel $\\gamma p \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} p$, those are the $N(1680)...

  16. Near infrared spectral and polarization imaging observation of coronal emission lines during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO XingMing; WANG XiaoFan; ZHANG ZhiYong; DENG Jian; HU KeLiang; XUAN WeiJia; LIU YangBing; ZHANG HongQi; DENG YuanYong; WANG DongGuang

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 total solar eclipse, the coronal emission lines were observed by using optical fibre spectrometric and polarization imaging system in near infrared waveband. The profiles of the coronal emission lines Including Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A, 10798 A and He 1 10830 A were obtained with dispersion of 0.5 A/pix. The intensity of Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A remained unchanged In the two different coronal regions while the intensity of He I 10830 A varied considerably in the two coronal locations no matter whether the prominence appeared or not. The coronal polarization images were observed at Fe XI 7892 A with a bandpass of 30 A in a series of exposure times.

  17. The correlations of ions density with geomagnetic activity and solar dynamic pressure in cusp region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianGuang; SHI JianKui; ZHANG TieLong; LIU ZhenXing; A. FAZAKERLEY; H. R(E)ME; Ⅰ. DANDOURAS; E. LUCEK

    2007-01-01

    A statistical study of the properties of ions (O+, He+ and H+) measured by the Cluster-Ⅱ in cusp region as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure and geomagnetic index Kp respectively was made during the summer and fall of 2001 -2003. The main results are that: (1) O+ ion density responds in a significant way to geomagnetic index Kp, and He+ ion density is not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp,both of them have a significant positive correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure; (2) H+ ion density is also observed to increase with solar wind dynamic pressure, and not correlated with geomagnetic index Kp.

  18. Polarization observables in πd-->πd and pp-->πd and the NN-πNN equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; McLeod, R. J.

    1985-05-01

    Here we compare the results from the NN-πNN equation with some of the available data on pp-->πd and πd-->πd polarization observables. In particular, we investigate some of the uncertainties in the theoretical results due to variations in the input to the calculation. We find no major discrepancy between theory and experiment that warrants the introduction of new degrees of freedom such as dibaryons.

  19. Polarization observables in. pi. d. --> pi. d and pp. --> pi. d and the NN-. pi. NN equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; McLeod, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Here we compare the results from the NN-..pi..NN equation with some of the available data on pp..--> pi..d and ..pi..d..--> pi..d polarization observables. In particular, we investigate some of the uncertainties in the theoretical results due to variations in the input to the calculation. We find no major discrepancy between theory and experiment that warrants the introduction of new degrees of freedom such as dibaryons.

  20. Final State Interactions and Polarization Observables in the Reaction pp → pKΛ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high quality hyperon beams, final state interactions in hyperon production reactions are a compelling tool to study hyperon-nucleon interactions. The COSY-TOF experiment has recently been upgraded in order to reconstruct the pK+Λ final state with sufficient precision to determine the spin triplet pΛ scattering length with a polarized proton beam. We find an unexpected behavior of the K+ analyzing power which prevents the extraction method to be used with the available statistics. A theoretical explanation is pending. Furthermore, the polarized beam together with the self analyzing decay of the Λ allows us to determine the Λ depolarization. This is especially sensitive to K+ and π exchange in the production mechanism. Our finding verifies, to a large extent, the result from DISTO [2] that has so far been the only measurement close to the production threshold.

  1. LHCb Observation of photon polarization in the $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ transition

    CERN Multimedia

    Veneziano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) predicts that the photon emitted in $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ transitions is predominantly left-handed. While the measured inclusive $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ rate agrees with the SM calculations, no direct evidence exists for a nonzero photon polarization $\\lambda_\\gamma$ in this type of decays. Several extensions of the SM, compatible with all current measurements, predict that the photon acquires a significant right-handed component.

  2. Polarization observables in dp backward elastic scattering at high and intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tanifuji, M; Iseri, Y

    1998-01-01

    The tensor analyzing power $T_{20}$ and the polarization transfer coefficients $\\kappa_0 (= 3/2 K_y^y)$ and $K_{xz}^y$ are investigated for dp backward elastic scattering by the invariant-amplitude method. Discrepancies between the conventional calculations and the experimental data on $T_{20}$ and imaginary parts in the amplitudes. The quantity $K_{xz}^y$ is shown to be useful in criticizing nuclear force assumptions.

  3. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Olakunle Ogunjobi; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Judy Ann Elizabeth Stephenson; and William Tafon Sivla

    2015-01-01

    We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition) IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds...

  4. Unusual Case of a Talon Cusp on a Supernumerary Tooth in Association with a Mesiodens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Babaji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is an accessory cusp similar to a projection, extending from the cingulum or cemento-enamel junction to the incisal edge. It occurs on labial or palatal surfaces of primary or permanent anterior teeth in both arches. This accessory cusp can occur as an isolated entity or in association with other dental anomalies. Occurrence of a talon cusp on supernumerary teeth is rare and uncommon. This paper reports an unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with mesiodens.

  5. Unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with a mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaji, Prashant; Sanadi, Firoza; Melkundi, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Talon cusp is an accessory cusp similar to a projection, extending from the cingulum or cemento-enamel junction to the incisal edge. It occurs on labial or palatal surfaces of primary or permanent anterior teeth in both arches. This accessory cusp can occur as an isolated entity or in association with other dental anomalies. Occurrence of a talon cusp on supernu-merary teeth is rare and uncommon. This paper reports an unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with mesiodens.

  6. Further insights into the syndrome of prolapsing non-coronary aortic cusp and ventricular septal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhlaque N Bhat

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular septal defect ( VSD with prolapse of the right coronary cusp and aortic regurgitation can be managed surgically with the anatomical correction technique . However when the VSD is located underneath the non coronary cusp surgical management differs due to anatomical constraints and secondary pathological changes seen in the non coronary cusp. It is therefore important that the location of the VSD and the morphology of prolapsing cusp be characterised preoperatively in order to plan appropriate surgical repair. We present a case study in which we discuss the salient differences in the surgical management of the prolapsing right and the prolapsing non coronary cusps.

  7. Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge Exchange or ISM Absorption?

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O VII and Ne IX forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O VIII Ly$\\beta$ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase CIE component with temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of $0.4-0.8$ solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O VIII Ly$\\alpha$ line. The ionized absorber is characteri...

  8. Continuous observation of polarization effects in thin SC-CVD diamond detector designed for heavy ion microbeam measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-machi, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Iwamoto, Naoya [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Jakšić, Milko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Continuous irradiation effects on a thin-film diamond detector were investigated for the utilization of these films as a detector for heavy ion microbeams. Temporal signal degradation in the energy spectrum was frequently observed during the focused heavy ion microbeam irradiation. To measure the temporal response to the each ion incidents, focused heavy ion microbeam with different beam fluence rates were irradiated to a single crystal (SC)-CVD diamond film detector with thickness of 50 μm. The responses to each ion were continuously observed and characterized by ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurement system. Heavy ions with short penetration path in diamond generate the large difference in mean path of electrons and holes, which is inverted by changing bias polarity. Signal degradation condition was relied on the bias polarity under the irradiation of heavy ions with short penetration length in the diamond. The continuous observation of IBIC signals revealed that temporal degradation in pulse height of signals, so called polarization effects, seems to be mainly caused by the hole trapping in this diamond crystal.

  9. Interhemispheric Comparison of Dipole Tilt Angle Effects on Latitude of Mid-Altitude Cusp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian-Guang; SHI Jian-Kui; ZHANG Tie-Long; LIU Zhen-Xing

    2008-01-01

    A statistical study of interhemispheric comparison of dipole tilt angle effect on the latitude of the mid-altitude cusp is preformed by a data set of the Cluster cusp crossings over a 5-year period.The result shows that the dipole tilt angle has a clear control of the cusp latitudinal location.When the dipole tilts sunwards,the cusp is shifted poleward.The northern cusp moves 1° ILAT for every 15.4° increase in the dipole tilt angle,while the southern cusp moves 1° ILAT for every 20.8° increase in the dipole tilt angle. This suggests that an interhemispheric difference appears in the dependence of cusp latitudinal location on the dipole tilt angle.

  10. Observation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes using the northernmost MST radar at Eureka (80°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W.; Janches, D.; Drummond, J.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate long-term Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) observations conducted by the northernmost geographically located MST radar at Eureka (80°N, 86°W). While PMSEs are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, previous calibrated studies at Resolute Bay and Eureka using 51.5 MHz and 33 MHz radars respectively, showed that PMSE backscatter signal strengths are relatively weak in the polar cap sites, compared to the auroral zone sites (Swarnalingam et al., 2009b; Singer et al., 2010). Complications arise with PMSEs in which the echo strength is controlled by the electrons, which are, in turn, influenced by heavily charged ice particles as well as the variability in the D-region plasma. In recent years, PMSE experiments were conducted inside the polar cap utilizing a 51 MHz radar located at Eureka. In this paper, we investigate calibrated observations, conducted during 2009-2015. Seasonal and diurnal variations of the backscatter signal strengths are discussed and compared to previously published results from the ALOMAR radar, which is a radar of similar design located in the auroral zone at Andenes, Norway (69°N, 16°E). At Eureka, while PMSEs are present with a daily occurrence rate which is comparable to the rate observed at the auroral zone site for at least two seasons, they show a great level of inter-annual variability. The occurrence rate for the strong echoes tends to be low. Furthermore, comparison of the absolute backscatter signal strengths at these two sites clearly indicates that the PMSE backscatter signal strength at Eureka is weak. Although this difference could be caused by several factors, we investigate the intensity of the neutral air turbulence at Eureka from the measurements of the Doppler spectrum of the PMSE backscatter signals. We found that the level of the turbulence intensity at Eureka is weak relative to previously reported results from three high latitude sites.

  11. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lühr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4− but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124. Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00–18:00 MLT. In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  12. Observation of a strong interplanar electric field in a dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, V. L.; Fedorov, V. V.; Lapin, E. G.; Leushkin, E. K.; Rumiantsev, V. L.; Sumbaev, O. I.; Voronin, V. V.

    1989-11-01

    The first experimental study of the Schwinger interaction of polarized neutrons with an electric field of a noncentrosymmetric perfect crystal (α-quartz) was made for two wave dynamical diffraction. Phase shifts of Pendellösung fringes for two different spin to crystal field orientations were measured. The theory of the effect is given. The calculated value of SiO2 (11 overline20) interplanar electr field, seen by the diffracted neutron, is 2.1 × 10 8 V/cm. This is in good agreement with the experimental result: (1.8 ± 0.3) × 10 8 V/cm.

  13. Direct observation of spin-forbidden transitions through the use of suitably polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Camille; Peláez, Daniel; Köppel, Horst; Taïeb, Richard

    2014-06-13

    The study of excited triplet states of a molecular system is a difficult task because accessing them involves forbidden transitions from the singlet ground state. Nevertheless, absorption spectra of many molecules present, at low energies, the weak fingerprint of these triplet states. At higher energies this information is usually masked by the intense signal of the singlet states. Here we show, for the specific case of the sulphur dioxide molecule, that the combined use of polarized light and molecular alignment can enhance the triplet part of the spectrum, even making it the only absorption process.

  14. Period-doubling bifurcation cascade observed in a ferromagnetic nanoparticle under the action of a spin-polarized current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horley, Paul P., E-mail: paul.horley@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Chihuahua/Monterrey, 120 Avenida Miguel de Cervantes, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Kushnir, Mykola Ya. [Yuri Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynsky str., 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Morales-Meza, Mishel [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Chihuahua/Monterrey, 120 Avenida Miguel de Cervantes, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Sukhov, Alexander [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rusyn, Volodymyr [Yuri Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynsky str., 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2016-04-01

    We report on complex magnetization dynamics in a forced spin valve oscillator subjected to a varying magnetic field and a constant spin-polarized current. The transition from periodic to chaotic magnetic motion was illustrated with bifurcation diagrams and Hausdorff dimension – the methods developed for dissipative self-organizing systems. It was shown that bifurcation cascades can be obtained either by tuning the injected spin-polarized current or by changing the magnitude of applied magnetic field. The order–chaos transition in magnetization dynamics can be also directly observed from the hysteresis curves. The resulting complex oscillations are useful for development of spin-valve devices operating in harmonic and chaotic modes.

  15. The Canadian Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP Mission: Current Status and Planned Observations and Data Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A W Yau

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP is a Canadian small-satellite mission dedicated to the study of polar ion outflows and related magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes in the topside ionosphere. Scheduled for launch in 2009, it will carry eight scientific instruments, including imaging plasma and neutral particle sensors, magnetometers, dual-frequency GPS receivers, CCD cameras, a radio wave receiver and a beacon transmitter, for in-situ particle, field, and current measurements and auroral imaging and radio measurements. We present an overview of the e-POP mission, its current status and plan of observations and data distribution during the operation phase of the mission.

  16. Stratospheric background aerosol and polar cloud observations by laser backscattersonde within the framework of the European project "Stratospheric Regular Sounding"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adriani

    Full Text Available The Stratospheric Regular Sounding project was planned to measure regularly the vertical profiles of several tracers like ozone, water vapor, NOx, ClOx and BrOx radicals, aerosol, pressure and temperature, at three latitudes, to discriminate between the transport and photochemical terms which control their distribution. As part of this project, the "Istituto di Fisica dell'Atmosfera" launched nine laser backscattersondes (LABS on board stratospheric balloons to make observations of background aerosol and PSCs. LABS was launched with an optical particle counter operated by the University of Wyoming. Observations have been performed in the arctic, mid-latitudes and tropical regions in different seasons. Polar stratospheric clouds have been observed in areas inside and outside the polar vortex edge. A background aerosol was observed both in mid-latitudes and in arctic regions with a backscattering ratio of 1.2 at 692 nm. Very stratified aerosol layers, possibly transported into the lower stratosphere by deep convective systems, have been observed in the lower stratosphere between 20 and 29 km in the tropics in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; instruments and techniques

  17. A solution to the problems of cusps and rotation curves in dark matter halos in the cosmological standard model

    OpenAIRE

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Lukash, V. N.; Mikheeva, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss various aspects of the inner structure formation in virialized dark matter (DM) halos that form as primordial density inhomogeneities evolve in the cosmological standard model. The main focus is on the study of central cusps/cores and of the profiles of DM halo rotation curves, problems that reveal disagreements among the theory, numerical simulations, and observations. A method that was developed by the authors to describe equilibrium DM systems is presented, which allows investig...

  18. Cusps in $\\K_{L}\\to$3$\\pi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bissegger, M; Gasser, J; Kubis, B; Rusetsky, A

    2008-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K --> 3 pi decays, the strength of which is related to the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths. We apply an effective field theory framework developed earlier to evaluate the amplitudes for K_L --> 3 pi decays in a systematic manner, where the strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically. The amplitudes for the decay eta --> 3 pi are also given.

  19. Second order average estimates on local data of cusp forms

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We specify sufficient conditions for the square modulus of the local parameters of a family of GL(n) cusp forms to be bounded on average. These conditions are global in nature and are at present satisfied for n less than or equal to 4. As an application, we show that Rankin-Selberg L-functions on GL(m) x GL(n), when m and n are less than or equal to 4, satisfy the standard convexity bound.

  20. Scheme for adding electron-nucleus cusps to Gaussian orbitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, A.; Towler, M. D.; Drummond, N. D.; Needs, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    A simple scheme is described for introducing the correct cusps at nuclei into orbitals obtained from Gaussian basis set electronic structure calculations. The scheme is tested with all-electron variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods for the Ne atom, the H2 molecule, and 55 molecules from a standard benchmark set. It greatly reduces the variance of the local energy in all cases and slightly improves the variational energy. This scheme yields a gen...

  1. Hodge cohomology of some foliated boundary and foliated cusp metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Gell-Redman, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    For fibred boundary and fibred cusp metrics, Hausel, Hunsicker, and Mazzeo identified the space of L^2 harmonic forms of fixed degree with the images of maps between intersection cohomology groups of an associated stratified space obtained by collapsing the fibres of the fibration at infinity onto its base. In the present paper, we obtain a generalization of this result to situations where the fibration at infinity is replaced by a foliation with compact leaves admitting a resolution by a fibration.

  2. Spatiotemporal change of sky polarization during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey: polarization patterns of the eclipsed sky observed by full-sky imaging polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipocz, Brigitta; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-12-01

    Using 180 degrees field-of-view (full-sky) imaging polarimetry, we measured the spatiotemporal change of the polarization of skylight during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey. We present our observations here on the temporal variation of the celestial patterns of the degree p and angle alpha of linear polarization of the eclipsed sky measured in the red (650 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) parts of the spectrum. We also report on the temporal and spectral change of the positions of neutral (unpolarized, p = 0) points, and points with local minima or maxima of p of the eclipsed sky. Our results are compared with the observations performed by the same polarimetric technique during the total solar eclipse on 11 August 1999 in Hungary. Practically the same characteristics of celestial polarization were encountered during both eclipses. This shows that the observed polarization phenomena of the eclipsed sky may be general.

  3. The importance of ice particle shape on UV measurements of polar mesospheric clouds: SBUV/2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Thomas, Gary E.

    2006-01-01

    We present calculations of scattering of solar UV radiation from polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) for the wavelengths and scattering angles appropriate to the SBUV/2 series of satellite experiments. Our model includes for the first time the effects of non-sphericity of ice particles whose evidence has been recently gained from lidar depolarization experiments. Our results apply to the scattering cross section averaged over a particle size ensemble which spans the mean size and size ranges expected for PMC. We demonstrate that for the size range 20 100 nm (effective spherical particle radius), the wavelength range 252 292 nm, and the scattering angle range 100 140, non-spherical particles cause only moderate (Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, to appear, doi: 10.1016/j.astp.2005.08.006]. In particular, attention must also be paid to the scattering angle dependence of the measurements, and the range of scattering angles involved in compiling average spectra of PMC.

  4. Correlated Observations of Epithermal Neutrons and Polar Illumination for Orbital Neutron Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Livengood, T.; Milikh, G. M.; Namkung, M.; Nandikotkur, G.; Neumann, G.; Smith, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. G.; Starr, R. D.; Trombka, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We correlate Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer's (LPNS) orbital epithermal neutron maps of the Lunar high-latitudes with co-registered illumination maps derived from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography. Epithermal neutron count rate maps were derived from the LEND: 1) Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, CSETNI-4 2) Uncollimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, SETN and the Uncollimated Lunar Prospector: 3) Low-altitude and 4) High-altitude mapping phases. In this abstract we illustrate 1) and 3) and include 2) and 4) in our presentation. The correlative study provides unique perspectives on the regional epithermal neutron fluences from the Lunar polar regions under different detector and altitude configurations.

  5. Direct observation of ClO from chlorine nitrate photolysis. [as mechanism of polar ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Moore, Teresa A.; Okumura, Mitchio

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine nitrate photolysis has been investigated with the use of a molecular beam technique. Excitation at both 248 and 193 nanometers led to photodissociation by two pathways, ClONO2 yields ClO + NO2 and ClONO2 yields Cl + NO3, with comparable yields. This experiment provides a direct measurement of the ClO product channel and consequently raises the possibility of an analogous channel in ClO dimer photolysis. Photodissociation of the ClO dimer is a critical step in the catalytic cycle that is presumed to dominate polar stratospheric ozone destruction. A substantial yield of ClO would reduce the efficiency of this cycle.

  6. 偏振雷达观测强对流雹暴云%Polarization Radar Observations on Hailstorms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸿发; 郄秀书; 王致君; 张义军

    2001-01-01

    Detailed echo information of horizontal reflectivity ZH and differential reflectivity ZiDR were obtained by C-band dual linear polarization weather radar observations of four hailstorms in evolution process in August 1990. And based on polarization radar principles, we have analysed these echo parameters and polarization characteristic in their different evolution stages, and found ZoR echo column is a distinct echo signature for discriminating fallhails. We have also used ZH and ZoR dual parameters technique to identify hails from mixed rains and hails, and analysic the results.%根据偏振雷达原理,用C波段双线偏振天气雷达观测得到4例强对流雹暴演变过程的水平反射率ZH(dBZ)和差分反射率ZDR(dB)垂直剖面RHI定量回波资料,分析了这些雹云不同演变阶段的回波参量和偏振特性的关系,说明ZH、ZDR双参量对判别降雹有着明显优势,用雨滴谱的ZH-ZDR分布边界关系对这些雹云回波进行判别降雹分析,给出我国用偏振雷达观测和识别冰雹的研究结果。

  7. Search for effects beyond the born approximation in polarization transfer observables in e(over→)p elastic scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Gilman, R; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Širca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G(E)/G(M), obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic H(e[over →],e(')p[over →]) reaction for three different beam energies at a Q(2)=2.5  GeV(2), spanning a wide range of the kinematic parameter ε. The ratio R, which equals μ(p)G(E)/G(M) in the Born approximation, is found to be independent of ε at the 1.5% level. The ε dependence of the longitudinal polarization transfer component P(ℓ) shows an enhancement of (2.3±0.6)% relative to the Born approximation at large ε.

  8. Dental management of a talon cusp on a primary incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard K; Chussid, Steven

    2007-01-01

    There are many treatment options for the pediatric patient with a talon cusp (TC). The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a TC involving a primary maxillary right central incisor in a 14-month-old male causing displacement of the affected tooth. The etiology of a TC is thought to be a disturbance during the morphodifferentiation stage of tooth development. Clinical problems include: (1) occlusal interferences; (2) esthetic disturbances; (3) accidental cusp fracture; (4) tongue irritation; (5) nursing difficulty; (6) caries; and (7) displacement of the affected tooth. The TC affecting the central incisor was reduced over a period of 4 visits, followed by immediate placement of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish at the conclusion of each reduction visit. Restoration of esthetics and function was evident within 1 month following complete cusp reduction. There were no clinical signs of any problems related to the reduction, and the prognosis was considered to be guarded. The pediatric patient was placed on a 6-month oral hygiene maintenance follow-up.

  9. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Livesey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same airmass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozone sonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian Trajectory Diagnostic (LTD support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie and the degree to which the PV of an airmass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change on these timescales is negligible, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K. This study exemplifies the insights into

  10. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude). As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This

  11. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Livesey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at

  12. Muons for spintronics: Photo-induced conduction electron polarization in n-type GaAs observed by the muonium method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K., E-mail: koji.yokoyama@email.ucr.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Nagamine, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Atomic Physics Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0191 (Japan); Shimomura, K. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tom, H.W.K.; Kawakami, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Bakule, P.; Matsuda, Y. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0191 (Japan); Pratt, F.L. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Torikai, E. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kohu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    The spin-dependent exchange scattering between the muonium (Mu) electron and polarized conduction electrons excited by circularly polarized 831 nm laser light was observed in n-type GaAs with 3.6x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} Si doping at low temperature by measuring a change in the polarization of Mu against the conduction electron polarization (CEP) direction. Correct signal response was confirmed with respect to the laser power. These results are encouraging for the Mu technique to be applied to probe CEP in various spintronics material systems.

  13. Simultaneous high- and low-latitude reconnection: ESR and DMSP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pitout

    Full Text Available We present EISCAT Svalbard Radar and DMSP observations of a double cusp during an interval of predominantly northward IMF on 26 November 2000. In the cusp region, the ESR dish, pointing northward, recorded sun-ward ionospheric flow at high latitudes (above 82° GL, indicating reconnection occuring in the magnetospheric lobe. Meanwhile, the same dish also recorded bursts of poleward flow, indicative of bursty reconnection at the subsolar magnetopause. Within this time interval, the DMSP F13 satellite passed in the close vicinity of the Svalbard archipelago. The particle measurement on board exhibited a double cusp structure in which two oppositely oriented ion dispersions are recorded. We interpret this set of data in terms of simultaneous merging at low- and high-latitude magnetopause. We discuss the conditions for which such simultaneous high-latitude and low-latitude reconnection can be anticipated. We also discuss the consequences of the presence of two X-lines in the dayside polar ionosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere; plasma convection

  14. Interannual observations and quantification of summertime H2O ice deposition on the Martian CO2 ice south polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Titus, Timothy N.

    2014-01-01

    The spectral signature of water ice was observed on Martian south polar cap in 2004 by the Observatoire pour l'Mineralogie, l'Eau les Glaces et l'Activite (OMEGA) ( Bibring et al., 2004). Three years later, the OMEGA instrument was used to discover water ice deposited during southern summer on the polar cap ( Langevin et al., 2007). However, temporal and spatial variations of these water ice signatures have remained unexplored, and the origins of these water deposits remains an important scientific question. To investigate this question, we have used observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft of the southern cap during austral summer over four Martian years to search for variations in the amount of water ice. We report below that for each year we have observed the cap, the magnitude of the H2O ice signature on the southern cap has risen steadily throughout summer, particularly on the west end of the cap. The spatial extent of deposition is in disagreement with the current best simulations of deposition of water ice on the south polar cap (Montmessin et al., 2007). This increase in water ice signatures is most likely caused by deposition of atmospheric H2O ice and a set of unusual conditions makes the quantification of this transport flux using CRISM close to ideal. We calculate a ‘minimum apparent‘ amount of deposition corresponding to a thin H2O ice layer of 0.2 mm (with 70% porosity). This amount of H2O ice deposition is 0.6–6% of the total Martian atmospheric water budget. We compare our ‘minimum apparent’ quantification with previous estimates. This deposition process may also have implications for the formation and stability of the southern CO2 ice cap, and therefore play a significant role in the climate budget of modern day Mars.

  15. A solution to the problems of cusps and rotation curves in dark matter halos in the cosmological standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G; Mikheeva, E V; 10.3367/UFNr.0182.201201a.0003

    2012-01-01

    We discuss various aspects of the inner structure formation in virialized dark matter (DM) halos that form as primordial density inhomogeneities evolve in the cosmological standard model. The main focus is on the study of central cusps/cores and of the profiles of DM halo rotation curves, problems that reveal disagreements among the theory, numerical simulations, and observations. A method that was developed by the authors to describe equilibrium DM systems is presented, which allows investigating these complex nonlinear structures analytically and relating density distribution profiles within a halo both to the parameters of the initial small-scale inhomogeneity field and to the nonlinear relaxation characteristics of gravitationally compressed matter. It is shown that cosmological random motions of matter `heat up' the DM particles in collapsing halos, suppressing cusp-like density profiles within developing halos, facilitating the formation of DM cores in galaxies, and providing an explanation for the diff...

  16. Polarization observables in the process d + p {yields} d+ X and electromagnetic form factors of N {yields} N* transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-12-31

    We analyze the properties of the inclusive d + p-reactions, with particular interest in the domain of nucleonic resonances excitation. The calculated cross section and polarization observables show that it is possible to disentangle the different reaction mechanisms ({omega}-,{sigma}-, n- exchange) and bring new information about the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron as well as of the nucleonic resonances excitation. Existing data on the tensor analyzing power are in agreement with the predictions based on the {omega}-exchange model. (authors). 18 refs.

  17. Parity violation constraints using cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from 2006 and 2007 observations by the QUaD polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E Y S; Ade, P; Bock, J; Bowden, M; Brown, M L; Cahill, G; Castro, P G; Church, S; Culverhouse, T; Friedman, R B; Ganga, K; Gear, W K; Gupta, S; Hinderks, J; Kovac, J; Lange, A E; Leitch, E; Melhuish, S J; Memari, Y; Murphy, J A; Orlando, A; Piccirillo, L; Pryke, C; Rajguru, N; Rusholme, B; Schwarz, R; O'Sullivan, C; Taylor, A N; Thompson, K L; Turner, A H; Zemcov, M

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 degrees +/-0.82 degrees (random) +/-0.5 degrees (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200Lorentz-violating interactions to violation on cosmological scales.

  18. CLOUD AND HAZE IN THE WINTER POLAR REGION OF TITAN OBSERVED WITH VISUAL AND INFRARED MAPPING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD CASSINI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rannou, P. [GSMA, UMR CNRS 7331, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (France); Le Mouelic, S. [LPGN, UMR CNRS 6112, Universite de Nantes (France); Sotin, C. [JPL, California Institute of Technology, PA (United States); Brown, R. H., E-mail: pascal.rannou@univ-reims.fr [LPL, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-03-20

    A large cloud in the north polar region of Titan was first observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2005 and then in 2006. This cloud, confined beyond the latitude 62 Degree-Sign N, is surrounded by a mixture of aerosol and mist probably lying in the low stratosphere and troposphere. Subsequent images of this region of Titan show a gradual vanishing of this cloud which was reported previously. In this paper, we characterize the physical properties of this cloud, haze, and mist as well as their time evolutions. We note several details on the images such as a secondary cloud above the main cloud and latitudes beyond 70 Degree-Sign N. We also show that the cloud disappearance leaves the polar region poorly loaded in aerosols, yielding an annular zone of aerosols between 50 Degree-Sign N and 65 Degree-Sign N. Our analysis suggests that this structure observed by VIMS in the near-IR is an annular structure observed by ISS on board Voyager one Titan year ago in 1980.

  19. Interannual observations and quantification of summertime H2O ice deposition on the Martian CO2 ice south polar cap

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Titus, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    The spectral signature of water ice was observed on Martian south polar cap in 2004 by the Observatoire pour l'Mineralogie, l'Eau les Glaces et l'Activite (OMEGA) (Bibring et al., 2004). Three years later, the OMEGA instrument was used to discover water ice deposited during southern summer on the polar cap (Langevin et al., 2007). However, temporal and spatial variations of these water ice signatures have remained unexplored, and the origins of these water deposits remains an important scientific question. To investigate this question, we have used observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft of the southern cap during austral summer over four Martian years to search for variations in the amount of water ice. We report below that for each year we have observed the cap, the magnitude of the H2O ice signature on the southern cap has risen steadily throughout summer, particularly on the west end of the cap. The s...

  20. Infrasound observations at Syowa Station, East Antarctica: Implications for detecting the surface environmental variations in the polar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Ishihara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic infrasound waves observed at Antarctic stations demonstrate physical interaction involving environmental changes in the Antarctic continent and the surrounding oceans. A Chaparral-type infrasound sensor was installed at Syowa Station (SYO; 39°E, 69°S, East Antarctica, as one of the projects of the International Polar Year (IPY2007‒2008. Data continuously recorded during the three seasons in 2008–2010 clearly indicate a contamination of the background oceanic signals (microbaroms with peaks between 4 and 10 s observed during a whole season. The peak amplitudes of the microbaroms have relatively lower values during austral winters, caused by a larger amount of sea-ice extending around the Lützow-Holm Bay near SYO, with decreasing ocean wave loading effects. Microbaroms measurements are useful tool for characterizing ocean wave climate, complementing other oceanographic and geophysical data. A continuous monitoring by infrasound sensors in the Antarctic firmly contributes to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT in the southern high latitude, together with the Pan-Antarctic Observations System (PAntOS under the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR. Detailed measurements of the infrasound waves in Antarctica, consequently, could be a new proxy for monitoring regional environmental change as well as the temporal climate variations in the polar regions.

  1. Streptococcus agalactiae infective endocarditis complicated by large vegetations at aortic valve cusps along with intracoronary extension: An autopsy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae infective endocarditis is a rare condition with high mortality owing to complications of large vegetations and systemic emboli. A 49-year-old man was found dead in his house. He had a history of hepatic cirrhosis and had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 2years previously. He had presented with a high fever 10days before his death. An autopsy revealed 50mL of purulent pericardial effusion, and S. agalactiae was detected from the culture of this pericardial effusion. Two slender rope-like vegetations were present at the right aortic valve cusp and noncoronary aortic valve cusp. The vegetation at the right aortic valve cusp extended into the right coronary artery. The right coronary artery was broadly occluded by white rod-like material. The mitral valves were also affected, and the posterior papillary muscle was ruptured. Myocardial infarction was not observed. Systemic microscopic Gram-positive bacterial masses were observed in several organs. The death was attributed to acute myocardial ischemia caused by occlusive intracoronary extension of the vegetation at the proximal right coronary artery.

  2. 3-D mesoscale MHD simulations of magnetospheric cusp-like configurations: cusp diamagnetic cavities and boundary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present results from mesoscale simulations of the magnetospheric cusp region for both strongly northward and strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. Simulation results indicate an extended region of depressed magnetic field and strongly enhanced plasma β which exhibits a strong dependence on IMF orientation. These structures correspond to the Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities (CDC's. The typical features of these CDC's are generally well reproduced by the simulation. The inner boundaries between the CDC and the magnetosphere are gradual transitions which form a clear funnel shape, regardless of IMF orientation. The outer CDC/magnetosheath boundary exhibits a clear indentation in both the x-z and y-z planes for southward IMF, while it is only indented in the x-z plane for northward, with a convex geometry in the y-z plane. The outer boundary represents an Alfvénic transition, mostly consistent with a slow-shock, indicating that reconnection plays an important role in structuring the high-altitude cusp region.

  3. A Sublimation Model for the Martian Polar Swiss-Cheese Features. Observational and Modeling Studies of the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shane; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    In their pioneering work Leighton and Murray argued that the Mars atmosphere, which is 95 percent CO2 today, is controlled by vapor equilibrium with a much larger polar reservoir of solid CO2. Here we argue that the polar reservoir is small and cannot function as a long-term buffer to the more massive atmosphere. Our work is based on modeling the circular depressions (Swiss-cheese features) in the south polar cap. We argue that a solid CO2 layer approximately 8 meters thick is being etched away to reveal water ice underneath. Preliminary results from the THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) instrument seem to confirm our model.

  4. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds are studied and presented in this paper. The occurrence probability of SuperDARN-PMSE on the day-to-day scale show, predominantly, diurnal variation, with a broader peak between 12 - 14 LT and distinct minimum of 22 LT. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate is high in the summer solstice. Seasonal variations show a connection between the SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate and mesospheric temperature from SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry. The seasonal trend for both meridional and zonal winds is very stable year-to-year. Analysis of the neutral wind variations indicates the importance of pole-to-pole circulations in SuperDARN-PMSE generation.

  5. How chameleons core dwarfs with cusps

    CERN Document Server

    Lombriser, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a scalar field that couples nonminimally and universally to matter can enhance gravitational forces on cosmological scales while restoring general relativity in the Solar neighborhood. In the intermediate regime, kinematically inferred masses experience an additional radial dependence with respect to the underlying distribution of matter, which is caused by the increment of gravitational forces with increasing distance from the Milky Way center. The same effect can influence the internal kinematics of subhalos and cause cuspy matter distributions to appear core-like. Specializing to the chameleon model as a worked example, we demonstrate this effect by tracing the scalar field from the outskirts of the Milky Way halo to its interior, simultaneously fitting observed velocity dispersions of chemo-dynamically discriminated red giant populations in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. Whereas in standard gravity these observations suggest that the matter distribution of the dwarfs is cored, ...

  6. The Stellar Cusp in the Galactic Center: Three-Dimensional Orbits of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Samantha; Ghez, Andrea M.; Boehle, Anna; Yelda, Sylvana; Sitarski, Breann; Witzel, Gunther; Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark; Becklin, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    We present new findings from our long term study of the nuclear star cluster around the Galaxy's central supermassive blackhole (SMBH). Measurements where made using speckle and laser guided adaptive optics imaging and integral field spectroscopy on the Keck telescopes. We report 13 new measurable accelerating sources around the SMBH, down to ~17 mag in K band, only 4 of which are known to be young stars, the rest are either known to be old stars or have yet to be spectral typed. Thus we more than double the number of measured accelerations for the known old stars and unknown spectral type population (increasing the number from 6 to 15). Previous observations suggest a flat density profile of late-type stars, contrary to the theorized Bahcall-Wolf cusp (Bahcall & Wolf 1976, 1977; Buchholz et al. 2009; Do et al. 2009; Bartko et al. 2010). With three-dimensional orbits of significantly accelerating sources, we will be able to better characterize the stellar cusp in the Galactic center, including the slope of the stellar density profile.

  7. Research on traffic flow forecasting model based on cusp catastrophe theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚平; 裴玉龙

    2004-01-01

    This paper intends to describe the relationship between traffic parameters by using cusp catastrophe theory and to deduce highway capacity and corresponding speed forecasting value through suitable transformation of catastrophe model. The five properties of a catastrophe system are outlined briefly, and then the data collected on freeways of Zhujiang River Delta, Guangdong province, China are examined to ascertain whether they exhibit qualitative properties and attributes of the catastrophe model. The forecasting value of speed and capacity for freeway segments are given based on the catastrophe model. Furthermore, speed-flow curve on freeway is drawn by plotting out congested and uncongested traffic flow and the capacity value for the same freeway segment is also obtained from speed-flow curve to test the feasibility of the application of cusp catastrophe theory in traffic flow analysis. The calculating results of catastrophe model coincide with those of traditional traffic flow models regressed from field observed data, which indicates that the deficiency of traditional analysis of relationship between speed, flow and occupancy in two-dimension can be compensated by analysis of the relationship among speed, flow and occupancy based on catastrophe model in three-dimension. Finally, the prospects and problems of its application in traffic flow research in China are discussed.

  8. The integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System (iAOOS: an AOSB-CliC Observing Plan for the International Polar Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Dickson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The debate on the climatic impact of Arctic changeis currently focused on the fate of the perennial sea-ice andthe climatic and social effects of its disappearance. Developmentsin our observing techniques mean that we are in prospect of beingtechnically able to describe the ocean-atmosphere-cryospheresystem of high northern latitudes operating as a complete systemfor the first time. Understanding this system and improving itspredictability in models seems to be our most direct way of extendingthe ability of society to mitigate for or adapt to its changes,including global change. The integrated Arctic OceanObserving System (iAOOS, described here, is a means of piecingtogether the available PIs, gear, ships and funding on the pan-Arcticscale that seems necessary to making the attempt, and the InternationalPolar Year (2007-2009 provides the necessary stimulus for doingso.

  9. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) north polar springtime recession mapping: First Three Mars years of observations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Murchie, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    We report on mapping of the north polar region of Mars using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument. We have observed three Mars Years (28-30) of late-winter and spring recessions (Ls=304{\\deg}-92{\\deg}). Our investigations have led to the following observations: 1. We classify the retreat of the north polar seasonal cap into 'pre-sublimation', 'early spring', 'asymmetric' and 'stable' periods according to the prevalent H2O ice grain size distributions. 2. During the early spring, the signatures of CO2 ice at the edge of the cap are obscured by H2O ice, which increases the apparent size of the H2O ice annulus around the seasonal CO2 cap at this time. At around Ls=25{\\deg}, this process changes into an asymmetrical distribution of H2O deposition, covering CO2 signatures more rapidly in the longitude range from 90-210{\\deg}E. 3. We detect signatures of 'pure' CO2 ice in extremely limited locations (in Lomonosov Crater) even in mid winter. H2O ice signatures appear ...

  10. Labial Talon Cusp on Maxillary Central Incisors: A Rare Developmental Dental Anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Glavina, Domagoj; Škrinjarić, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Labial talon cusp, or dens evaginatus is a very rare dental anomaly of unclear etiology and significance. It can occur as an isolated finding or be associated with other dental anomalies or some syndromes. The present report describes two Caucasian males with labial talon cusp on maxillary permanent left central incisors. In both cases accessory cusp caused plaque accumulation and marginal gingivitis. One case displayed affected tooth to be in cross bite position causing occlusal trauma. No o...

  11. Ionospheric cusp flows pulsed by solar wind Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    Full Text Available Pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs in the cusp foot-print have been observed by the SuperDARN radars with periods between a few minutes and several tens of minutes. PIFs are believed to be a consequence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF reconnection with the magnetospheric magnetic field on the dayside magnetopause, ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs. The quasiperiodic PIFs are correlated with Alfvénic fluctuations observed in the upstream solar wind. It is concluded that on these occasions, the FTEs were driven by Alfvén waves coupling to the day-side magnetosphere. Case studies are presented in which the dawn-dusk component of the Alfvén wave electric field modulates the reconnection rate as evidenced by the radar observations of the ionospheric cusp flows. The arrival of the IMF southward turning at the magnetopause is determined from multipoint solar wind magnetic field and/or plasma measurements, assuming plane phase fronts in solar wind. The cross-correlation lag between the solar wind data and ground magnetograms that were obtained near the cusp footprint exceeded the estimated spacecraft-to-magnetopause propagation time by up to several minutes. The difference can account for and/or exceeds the Alfvén propagation time between the magnetopause and ionosphere. For the case of short period ( < 13 min PIFs, the onset times of the flow transients appear to be further delayed by at most a few more minutes after the IMF southward turning arrived at the magnetopause. For the case of long period (30 – 40 min PIFs, the observed additional delays were 10–20 min. We interpret the excess delay in terms of an intrinsic time scale for reconnection (Russell et al., 1997 which can be explained by the surface-wave induced magnetic reconnection mechanism (Uberoi et al., 1999. Here, surface waves with wavelengths larger than the thickness of the neutral layer induce a tearing-mode instability whose rise time explains the

  12. Fine Scale Structure observed in the Total Electron Content above the Sub-Auroral, Auroral, and Polar Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Vierinen, J.; Rideout, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper details recent improvements in TEC observations made in the sub-auroral, auroral, and polar regions. The goal is high-resolution measurements of both medium and fine-scale TEC-gradients. To achieve this, the number of GNSS receivers processed was more than doubled, due to agreements made with multiple government and commercial agencies, such as those involved with highway transportation and precision farming. Following the increase in GNSS observations, additional improvements were made in the MIT Haystack GNSS data processing algorithms, allowing for finer grid spacing of the output TEC data. Merging data sets also increased sensitivity. Scintillation data from several GNSS receivers have been overlaid on top of all-sky camera images showing evidence of aurora. These data sets have been merged with the measured background TEC to monitor the development both medium and fine-scale TEC gradients. Data from multiple geomagnetic storms and auroral events in this solar cycle will be presented.

  13. Modeling the Scattering