WorldWideScience

Sample records for current standard care

  1. Current Standards of Care and Long Term Outcomes for Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonat, Satheesh; Quinn, Charles T

    2017-01-01

    Thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD) are disorders of hemoglobin that affect millions of people worldwide. The carrier states for these diseases arose as common, balanced polymorphisms during human history because they afforded protection against severe forms of malaria. These complex, multisystem diseases are reviewed here with a focus on current standards of clinical management and recent research findings. The importance of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and lifelong system of care is also emphasized.

  2. Delivery of care consistent with the psychosocial standards in pediatric cancer: Current practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Michele A; Canter, Kimberly S; Chen, Fang Fang; Kolb, E Anders; Sandler, Eric; Wiener, Lori; Kazak, Anne E

    2018-03-01

    With published evidence-based Standards for Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and their Families, it is important to know the current status of their implementation. This paper presents data on delivery of psychosocial care related to the Standards in the United States. Pediatric oncologists, psychosocial leaders, and administrators in pediatric oncology from 144 programs completed an online survey. Participants reported on the extent to which psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was implemented and was comprehensive and state of the art. They also reported on specific practices and services for each Standard and the extent to which psychosocial care was integrated into broader medical care. Participants indicated that psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was usually or always provided at their center for most of the Standards. However, only half of the oncologists (55.6%) and psychosocial leaders (45.6%) agreed or strongly agreed that their psychosocial care was comprehensive and state of the art. Types of psychosocial care provided included evidence-based and less established approaches but were most often provided when problems were identified, rather than proactively. The perception of state of the art care was associated with practices indicative of integrated psychosocial care and the extent to which the Standards are currently implemented. Many oncologists and psychosocial leaders perceive that the delivery of psychosocial care at their center is consistent with the Standards. However, care is quite variable, with evidence for the value of more integrated models of psychosocial services. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials, and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. Tumor type and clinical course are often correlated with age at presentation and anatomic site. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon age at presentation, tumor type, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of 'standard' radiation therapy and evolving chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of precision radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are fundamental to current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary and projected

  4. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon tumor type and site, age at presentation, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of 3-dimensional radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are important components of current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary cooperative group trials will be presented as well as the background data re surgical, radiotherapeutic, and

  5. Dengue: Moving from Current Standard of Care to State-of-the-Art Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Victor C

    Treatment of dengue remains supportive in the absence of targeted antiviral therapy or approved vaccines. Responsive fluid management is key to preventing progression to shock or other severe manifestations. The dynamic natural history of dengue infection and its influence on hemodynamic homeostasis needs to be carefully considered in the planning of individualized therapy. Though largely self-limiting, the sheer burden of dengue disease on the global population will result in atypical manifestations especially in children, older adults, and comorbid patients. Management of these has not yet been systematized. The failure of recent randomized controlled trials to show utility for antiviral and immunomodulatory agents in dengue is disappointing. Vaccine candidates hold promise, but growing outbreaks require more robust, evidence-based management guidelines to inform clinicians, especially in novel epidemic situations.

  6. The Elusive Standard of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K; Worsham, Elizabeth; Reisfield, Gary M

    2017-09-01

    In medical negligence cases, the forensic expert must explain to a trier of fact what a defendant physician should have done, or not done, in a specific set of circumstances and whether the physician's conduct constitutes a breach of duty. The parameters of the duty are delineated by the standard of care. Many facets of the standard of care have been well explored in the literature, but gaps remain in a complete understanding of this concept. We examine the standard of care, its origins, and who determines the prevailing standard, beginning with an overview of the historical roots of the standard of care and, using case law, tracing its evolution from the 19th century through the early 21st century. We then analyze the locality rule and consider local, state, and national standards of care. The locality rule requires a defendant physician to provide the same degree of skill and care that is required of a physician practicing in the same or similar community. This rule remains alive in some jurisdictions in the United States. Last, we address the relationship between the standard of care and clinical practice guidelines. © 2017 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  7. Nuclear standards: current issues and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of the important issues that currently face the nuclear standards field is presented and a discussion of how each of these issues is being resolved is given. The economic benefits that properly developed standards produce are listed

  8. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  9. [Transsexuality--standards of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, W

    1995-01-01

    After the description of transsexualism as a nosological entity by Harry Benjamin standards of care emerged which are useful and protective for patients and doctors involved in treatment. The diagnosis is established by the finding of an irreversibly transposed gender identity. This has to be confirmed by an expert who is competent in counselling gender identity problems. He will give his written opinion which is the indication for the hormonal treatment to be done at least for half a year prior to operation and which leads to virilization or effeminization and which is the preparation for genital surgery. Standards of female-to-male surgery are: 1. Breast-transformation 2. Colpohysterectomy with adnexectomy, possibly by the vaginal route. Surrogates for testes and phalloplasties are only in the experimental stage and not standard. Standards of male-to-female surgery are: 1. Castration by extirpation of testes. 2. Resection of penis shaft with total resection of the spongy bodies. 3. Neovagina by inverted penis-skin technique. 4. Plasty of labia majora and minora and a clitoris. 5. In case of insufficient gynecomastia breast-augmentation. After the operation, follow-up examinations are necessary by the surgeon until complete healing. A supportive psychological care by the expert who has evaluated the transposition of gender identity would be useful. It could be done also by the gynecologist who makes the follow-up examinations in male to female transsexuals. He is also competent for the life-long hormonal substitution.

  10. A review of the quantum current standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Nobu-Hisa; Nakamura, Shuji; Okazaki, Yuma

    2016-01-01

    The electric current, voltage, and resistance standards are the most important standards related to electricity and magnetism. Of these three standards, only the ampere, which is the unit of electric current, is an International System of Units (SI) base unit. However, even with modern technology, relatively large uncertainty exists regarding the generation and measurement of current. As a result of various innovative techniques based on nanotechnology and novel materials, new types of junctions for quantum current generation and single-electron current sources have recently been proposed. These newly developed methods are also being used to investigate the consistency of the three quantum electrical effects, i.e. the Josephson, quantum Hall, and single-electron tunneling effects, which are also known as ‘the quantum metrology triangle’. This article describes recent research and related developments regarding current standards and quantum-metrology-triangle experiments. (topical review)

  11. Current and future neutron radiography standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenizer, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Only two organizations are actively producing standards which are used in neutron radiology (NR): the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Six ASTM standards exist that address the neutron radiography method. Two of the ASTM standards have been extensively used world-wide. ISO has a working group which is developing three standards that also address the neutron radiography method. Two of these are currently making their way through the ISO approval system. No ASTM or ISO standards exist for the neutron radioscopic method. Future ASTM standards will address the neutron radioscopic method and neutron radiologic system characterization. It is expected that similar efforts will be undertaken in ISO. Given the relatively small community providing neutron radiologic services, international cooperation and the need for ISO standards will most likely continue to grow.(author)

  12. Open radical cystectomy in England: the current standard of care - an analysis of the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) cystectomy audit and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Edward R; Cresswell, Joanne; McGrath, John S; Miller, Catherine; Hounsome, Luke; Fowler, Sarah; Rowe, Edward W

    2018-01-23

    To establish the current standard for open radical cystectomy (ORC) in England, as data entry by surgeons performing RC to the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) database was mandated in 2013 and combining this with Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data has allowed comprehensive outcome analysis for the first time. All patients were included in this analysis if they were uploaded to the BAUS data registry and reported to have been performed in the 2 years between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015 in England (from mandate onwards) and had been documented as being performed in an open fashion (not laparoscopic, robot assisted or the technique field left blank). The HES data were accessed via the HES website. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys Classification of Surgical Operations and Procedures version 4 (OPCS-4) Code M34 was searched during the same 2-year time frame (not including M34.4 for simple cystectomy or with additional minimal access codes Y75.1-9 documenting a laparoscopic or robotic approach was used) to assess data capture. A total of 2 537 ORCs were recorded in the BAUS registry and 3 043 in the HES data. This indicates a capture rate of 83.4% of all cases. The median operative time was 5 h, harvesting a median of 11-20 lymph nodes, with a median blood loss of 500-1 000 mL, and a transfusion rate of 21.8%. The median length of stay was 11 days, with a 30-day mortality rate of 1.58%. This is the largest, contemporary cohort of ORCs in England, encompassing >80% of all performed operations. We now know the current standard for ORC in England. This provides the basis for individual surgeons and units to compare their outcomes and a standard with which future techniques and modifications can be compared. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 3D mathematical modeling of glioblastoma suggests that transdifferentiated vascular endothelial cells mediate resistance to current standard-of-care therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaming; Romero-López, Mónica; Benitez, Lesly I.; Di, Kaijun; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.; Bota, Daniela A.; Lowengrub, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive brain tumor in human patients, is decidedly heterogeneous and highly vascularized. Glioma stem/initiating cells (GSC) are found to play a crucial role by increasing cancer aggressiveness and promoting resistance to therapy. Recently, crosstalk between GSC and vascular endothelial cells has been shown to significantly promote GSC self-renewal and tumor progression. Further, GSC also transdifferentiate into bona-fide vascular endothelial cells (GEC), which inherit mutations present in GSC and are resistant to traditional anti-angiogenic therapies. Here we use 3D mathematical modeling to investigate GBM progression and response to therapy. The model predicted that GSC drive invasive fingering and that GEC spontaneously form a network within the hypoxic core, consistent with published experimental findings. Standard-of-care treatments using DNA-targeted therapy (radiation/chemo) together with anti-angiogenic therapies, reduced GBM tumor size but increased invasiveness. Anti-GEC treatments blocked the GEC support of GSC and reduced tumor size but led to increased invasiveness. Anti-GSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduced tumor invasiveness and size, but were ultimately limited in reducing tumor size because GEC maintain GSC. Our study suggests that a combinatorial regimen targeting the vasculature, GSC, and GEC, using drugs already approved by the FDA, can reduce both tumor size and invasiveness and could lead to tumor eradication. PMID:28536277

  14. European union standards for tuberculosis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, G B; Zellweger, J P; Abubakar, I; Ibraim, E; Caminero, J A; De Vries, G; D'Ambrosio, L; Centis, R; Sotgiu, G; Menegale, O; Kliiman, K; Aksamit, T; Cirillo, D M; Danilovits, M; Dara, M; Dheda, K; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Kluge, H; Lange, C; Leimane, V; Loddenkemper, R; Nicod, L P; Raviglione, M C; Spanevello, A; Thomsen, V Ø; Villar, M; Wanlin, M; Wedzicha, J A; Zumla, A; Blasi, F; Huitric, E; Sandgren, A; Manissero, D

    2012-04-01

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) jointly developed European Union Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ESTC) aimed at providing European Union (EU)-tailored standards for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of tuberculosis (TB). The International Standards for TB Care (ISTC) were developed in the global context and are not always adapted to the EU setting and practices. The majority of EU countries have the resources and capacity to implement higher standards to further secure quality TB diagnosis, treatment and prevention. On this basis, the ESTC were developed as standards specifically tailored to the EU setting. A panel of 30 international experts, led by a writing group and the ERS and ECDC, identified and developed the 21 ESTC in the areas of diagnosis, treatment, HIV and comorbid conditions, and public health and prevention. The ISTCs formed the basis for the 21 standards, upon which additional EU adaptations and supplements were developed. These patient-centred standards are targeted to clinicians and public health workers, providing an easy-to-use resource, guiding through all required activities to ensure optimal diagnosis, treatment and prevention of TB. These will support EU health programmes to identify and develop optimal procedures for TB care, control and elimination.

  15. Standard guidelines for electrosurgery with radiofrequency current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutalik Sharad

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Radiofrequency (RF induces thermal destruction of the targeted tissue by an electrical current at a frequency of 0.5 MHz (RF. As the electrode tip is not heated, there is minimal thermal damage to the surrounding tissues, producing good esthetic results. Therefore, RF ablation is also known as cold ablation or "coblation." Modality: It has three modes of operation: (a Cut, (b cut and coagulate and (c coagulate. Therefore, it can be used for various purposes like incision, ablation, fulguration, shave excision and coagulation. Because of the coagulation facility, hemostasis can be achieved and operation becomes easier and faster. Indications: It is effective in treating various skin conditions like dermatosis papulosa nigra, warts, molluscum contagiosum, colloid milia, acquired junctional, compound and dermal melanocytic nevi, seborrheic keratosis, skin tags, granuloma pyogenicum, verrucous epidermal nevi, xanthelesma, rhinophyma, superficial basal cell carcinoma and telangiectasia. It can also be used for cosmetic indications such as resurfacing, earlobe repair and blepharoplasty. Anesthesia: The procedure is accomplished either under topical anesthesia eutactic mixture of local anesthetics or local injectable anesthesia, under all aseptic precautions. Procedure: While operating, only the tip of the electrode should come in contact with the tissue. Actual contact of the electrode with the tissue should be very brief in order to prevent excessive damage to the deeper tissues. This can be accomplished by moving the electrode quickly. Complications: Complications are uncommon and mainly occur due to an improper technique. The treating physician should be aware of the contraindications of the procedure as listed in these guidelines. Physician qualification: RF surgery may be performed by a dermatologist who has acquired adequate training during post-graduation or through recognized fellowships and workshops dedicated to RF surgery. He

  16. Standard of care: the legal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Arthur W; Peltier, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care is a legal construct, a line defined by juries, based on expert testimony, marking a point where treatment failed to meet expectations for what a reasonable professional would have done. There is no before-the-fact objective definition of this standard, except for cases of law and regulation, such as the Occupational Safety and Health Admintration (OSHA). Practitioners must use their judgment in determining what would be acceptable should a case come to trial. Professional codes of conduct and acting in the patient's best interests are helpful guides to practicing within the standard of care. Continuing education credit is available for this and the following article together online at www.dentalethics.org for those who wish to complete the quiz and exercises associated with them (see Course 22).

  17. Pediatric psycho-oncology care: standards, guidelines, and consensus reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Lori; Viola, Adrienne; Koretski, Julia; Perper, Emily Diana; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify existing guidelines, standards, or consensus-based reports for psychosocial care of children with cancer and their families. Psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer can systematize the approach to care and create a replicable model that can be utilized in pediatric hospitals around the world. Determining gaps in existing standards in pediatric psycho-oncology can guide development of useful evidence-based and consensus-based standards. The MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched by investigators at two major pediatric oncology centers for existing guidelines, consensus-based reports, or standards for psychosocial care of patients with pediatric cancer and their families published in peer-reviewed journals in English between 1980 and 2013. We located 27 articles about psychosocial care that met inclusion criteria: 5 set forth standards, 19 were guidelines, and 3 were consensus-based reports. None was sufficiently up to date, comprehensive, specific enough, or evidence- or consensus-based to serve as a current standard for psychosocial care for children with cancer and their families. Despite calls by a number of international pediatric oncology and psycho-oncology professional organizations about the urgency of addressing the psychosocial needs of the child with cancer to reduce suffering, there remains a need for development of a widely acceptable, evidence-based and consensus-based, comprehensive standard of care to guide provision of essential psychosocial services to all patients with pediatric cancer. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  19. Eddy current standards - Cracks versus notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemaier, D. J.; Collingwood, M. R.; Nguyen, K. H.

    1992-10-01

    Eddy current tests aimed at evaluating cracks and electron-discharge machined (EDM) notches in 7075-T6 aluminum specimens are described. A comparison of the shape and amplitude of recordings made from both transverse and longitudinal scans of small EDM notches and fatigue cracks showd almost identical results. The signal amplitude and phase angle increased with an increase of EDM notch and crak size. It is concluded that equivalent eddy current results obtained from similar-size surface cracks and notches in aluminum can be used to establish a desired sensitivity level for inspection.

  20. Reforming health care in Canada: current issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Enis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the current health care reform issues in Canada. The provincial health insurance plans of the 1960s and 1970s had the untoward effects of limiting the federal government's clout for cost control and of promoting a system centered on inpatient and medical care. Recently, several provincial commissions reported that the current governance structures and management processes are outmoded in light of new knowledge, new fiscal realities and the evolution of power among stake-holders. They recommend decentralized governance and restructuring for better management and more citizen participation. Although Canada's health care system remains committed to safeguarding its guiding principles, the balance of power may be shifting from providers to citizens and "technocrats". Also, all provinces are likely to increase their pressure on physicians by means of salary caps, by exploring payment methods such as capitation, limiting access to costly technology, and by demanding practice changes based on evidence of cost-effectiveness.

  1. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  2. Pharmacotherapy of erectile dysfunction: Current standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew-Kim Chew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy is currently the therapeutic option of choice for erectile dysfunction. Comprising mainly intracavernosal injection therapy using alprostadil or alprostadil combined with phentolamine and/or papaverine and oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, it is safe and effective if appropriately prescribed and administered. The medications in current use produce satisfactory erectile responses by enhancing cavernosal vasodilatation mainly through their ability to promote relaxation of the smooth muscle cells in the corpora cavernosa involving the synthesis and activity of nitric oxide via the cyclic guanosine monophosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate biochemical pathways. The main side-effects and complications of intracavernosal injections are postinjection pain, prolonged erections, priapism and penile fibrosis. There may be a variety of side-effects with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition but these are usually inconsequential. Recent serious ill health and the need for ongoing long-acting nitrate therapy or frequent use of short-acting nitrates for angina are absolute contraindications to the use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Caution has to be exercised in prescribing phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for patients with impaired renal or hepatic functions or receiving multi-drug therapy for any systemic disease. All patients presenting with erectile dysfunction should be investigated and treated for cardiovascular risk factors. They should also be counseled regarding lifestyle factors particularly healthy balanced diet, regular physical exercise and inappropriate social habits.

  3. Current Care and Investigational Therapies in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Sheila; Bonafé, Luisa; Gouze, Elvire

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this review is to evaluate the management options for achondroplasia, the most common non-lethal skeletal dysplasia. This disease is characterized by short stature and a variety of complications, some of which can be quite severe. Despite several attempts to standardize care, there is still no widely accepted consensus. This is in part due to absence of concrete data on the incidence of sudden unexplained death in infants with achondroplasia and the best investigation for ascertaining which individuals could benefit from foramen magnum decompression surgery. In this review, we identify the different options of care and management for the various orthopedic, neurologic, and respiratory complications. In parallel, several innovative or drug repositioning therapies are being investigated that would restore bone growth but may also prevent complications. Achondroplasia is the most common non-lethal skeletal dysplasia. It is characterized by short stature and a variety of complications, some of which can be quite severe. Despite several attempts to standardize care, there is still no widely accepted consensus. This is in part due to absence of concrete data on the incidence of sudden unexplained death in infants with achondroplasia and the best investigation for ascertaining which individuals could benefit from foramen magnum decompression surgery. In this review, we identify the different options of care and management for the various orthopedic, neurologic, and respiratory complications. In parallel, several innovative or drug repositioning therapies are being investigated that would restore bone growth but may also prevent complications.

  4. Current standards for infection control: audit assures compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Pauline

    Having robust policies and procedures in place for infection control is fundamentally important. However, each organization has to go a step beyond this; evidence has to be provided that these policies and procedures are followed. As of 1 April 2009, with the introduction of the Care Quality Commission and The Health and Social Care Act 2008 Code of Practice for the NHS on the Prevention and Control of Healthcare-Associated Infections and Related Guidance, the assurance of robust infection control measures within any UK provider of health care became an even higher priority. Also, the commissioning of any service by the NHS must provide evidence that the provider has in place robust procedures for infection control. This article demonstrates how the clinical audit team at the Douglas Macmillan Hospice in North Staffordshire, UK, have used audit to assure high rates of compliance with the current national standards for infection control. Prior to the audit, hospice staff had assumed that the rates of compliance for infection control approached 100%. This article shows that a good quality audit tool can be used to identify areas of shortfall in infection control and the effectiveness of putting in place an action plan followed by re-audit.

  5. Music therapy in palliative care: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian

    2002-03-01

    As the music therapy profession has developed internationally over the last 25 years, so has its role in palliative care. Music is a highly versatile and dynamic therapeutic modality, lending itself to a variety of music therapy techniques used to benefit both those living with life-threatening illnesses and their family members and caregivers. This article will give a broad overview of the historical roots of music therapy and introduce the techniques that are employed in current practice. By combining a review of mainstream music therapy practice involving musical improvisation, song-writing and receptive/recreational techniques with case material from my own experience, this article aims to highlight the potential music therapy holds as an effective holistic practice for palliative care, whatever the care setting.

  6. The quest to standardize hemodialysis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegbrant, Jörgen; Gentile, Giorgio; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2011-01-01

    A large global dialysis provider's core activities include providing dialysis care with excellent quality, ensuring a low variability across the clinic network and ensuring strong focus on patient safety. In this article, we summarize the pertinent components of the quality assurance and safety program of the Diaverum Renal Services Group. Concerning medical performance, the key components of a successful quality program are setting treatment targets; implementing evidence-based guidelines and clinical protocols; consistently, regularly, prospectively and accurately collecting data from all clinics in the network; processing collected data to provide feedback to clinics in a timely manner, incorporating information on interclinic and intercountry variations; and revising targets, guidelines and clinical protocols based on sound scientific data. The key activities for ensuring patient safety include a standardized approach to education, i.e. a uniform education program including control of theoretical knowledge and clinical competencies; implementation of clinical policies and procedures in the organization in order to reduce variability and potential defects in clinic practice; and auditing of clinical practice on a regular basis. By applying a standardized and systematic continuous quality improvement approach throughout the entire organization, it has been possible for Diaverum to progressively improve medical performance and ensure patient safety. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Fibrinolysis standards: a review of the current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwell, C

    2010-07-01

    Biological standards are used to calibrate measurements of components of the fibrinolytic system, either for assigning potency values to therapeutic products, or to determine levels in human plasma as an indicator of thrombotic risk. Traditionally WHO International Standards are calibrated in International Units based on consensus values from collaborative studies. The International Unit is defined by the response activity of a given amount of the standard in a bioassay, independent of the method used. Assay validity is based on the assumption that both standard and test preparation contain the same analyte, and the response in an assay is a true function of this analyte. This principle is reflected in the diversity of source materials used to prepare fibrinolysis standards, which has depended on the contemporary preparations they were employed to measure. With advancing recombinant technology, and improved analytical techniques, a reference system based on reference materials and associated reference methods has been recommended for future fibrinolysis standards. Careful consideration and scientific judgement must however be applied when deciding on an approach to develop a new standard, with decisions based on the suitability of a standard to serve its purpose, and not just to satisfy a metrological ideal. 2010 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Scrutinising the duty of care and standard of care in English medical negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromek-Broc, Katarzyna

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the difficulties that claimants encounter in civil law action in English medical negligence cases. It argues that the current legal framework, in particular in relation to the existence of the duty of care and the assessment of standard of care, is haphazard and flawed. It suggests that the law should provide the boundaries that would encompass a moral obligation to rescue and to treat. In conclusion it discusses some timid attempts to reform the law in order to facilitate redress and compensation.

  9. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leakage from 'open to air' system or breakage of glass bottle (with associated risk to ... and an air-leak detection system. It is connected to a ... need to add water. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard therapy – a randomised controlled trial. CHARL COOPER, M.B. CH.B. TIMOTHY HARDCASTLE ...

  10. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part one describes conceptual issues underlying the development of South African standards for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Mental health care standards seek to describe what is an acceptable and adequate quality of mental health care for service users. A focus on service quality is especially crucial in ...

  11. Hair transplantation: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Narendra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair transplantation is a surgical method of hair restoration. Physician qualification : The physician performing hair transplantation should have completed post graduation training in dermatology; he should have adequate background training in dermatosurgery at a centre that provides education training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, he should obtain specific hair transplantation training or experience at the surgical table(hands on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced hair transplant surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Hair transplantation can be performed safely in an outpatient day case dermatosurgical facility. The day case theatre should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place and all nursing staff should be familiar with the emergency plan. It is preferable, but not mandatory to have a standby anesthetist. Indication for hair transplantation is pattern hair loss in males and also in females. In female pattern hair loss, investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair loss such as anemia and thyroid deficiency should be carried out. Hair transplantation can also be performed in selected cases of scarring alopecia, eyebrows and eye lashes, by experienced surgeons. Preoperative counseling and informed consent :Detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and if more procedures are needed for proper results, it should be clearly mentioned. Patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, computer presentations, and personal discussions. Need for concomitant medical therapy should be emphasized. Patients should understand

  12. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  13. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  14. Care pathways for dementia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsi K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kritika Samsi, Jill ManthorpeSocial Care Workforce Research Unit, King’s College London, London, UKAbstract: Uncertainty appears to typify the experience of living with dementia. With an uncertain illness trajectory and unpredictable levels of deterioration and stability in symptoms, people with a diagnosis of dementia may live with uncertainty and anxiety and find it hard to make plans or decisions for their future. People with memory problems and caregivers seeking a diagnosis of dementia may also potentially find themselves navigating a labyrinth-like maze of services, practitioners, assessments, and memory tests, with limited understanding of test scores and little information about what support is available. In this context of uncertainty, the apparent clarity and certainty of a “dementia care pathway” may be attractive. However, the term “dementia care pathway” has multiple and overlapping meanings, which can potentially give rise to further confusion if these are ill-defined or a false consensus is presumed. This review distinguishes four meanings: 1 a mechanism for the management and containment of uncertainty and confusion, useful for the professional as well as the person with dementia; 2 a manual for sequencing care activities; 3 a guide to consumers, indicating eligibility for care activities, or a guide to self-management for dementia dyads, indicating the appropriateness of care activities; and 4 a manual for “walking with” the person. Examples of these approaches are presented from UK dementia services with illustrations of existing care pathways and associated time points, specifically focusing on: 1 early symptom identification and first service encounters, 2 assessment process, 3 diagnostic disclosure, 4 postdiagnostic support, and 5 appropriate interventions. We review the evidence around these themes, as well as discuss service pathways and referral routes used by some services in England and internationally. We

  15. Yoga versus non-standard care for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Julie; Crumlish, Niall; Waugh, Alice; Vancampfort, Davy

    2017-09-28

    Yoga is an ancient spiritual practice that originated in India and is currently accepted in the Western world as a form of relaxation and exercise. It has been of interest for people with schizophrenia as an alternative or adjunctive treatment. To systematically assess the effects of yoga versus non-standard care for people with schizophrenia. The Information Specialist of the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group searched their specialised Trials Register (latest 30 March 2017), which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials. We searched the references of all included studies. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in the register. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including people with schizophrenia and comparing yoga with non-standard care. We included trials that met our selection criteria and reported useable data. The review team independently selected studies, assessed quality, and extracted data. For binary outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we estimated the mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% CI. We employed a fixed-effect models for analyses. We examined data for heterogeneity (I 2 technique), assessed risk of bias for included studies, and created a 'Summary of findings' table for seven main outcomes of interest using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). We were able to include six studies (586 participants). Non-standard care consisted solely of another type of exercise programme. All outcomes were short term (less than six months). There was a clear difference in the outcome leaving the study early (6 RCTs, n=586, RR 0.64 CI 0.49 to 0.83, medium quality evidence) in favour of the yoga group. There were no clear differences between groups for the remaining outcomes

  16. Yoga as part of a package of care versus standard care for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Julie; Vancampfort, Davy

    2017-09-29

    Yoga is an ancient spiritual practice that originated in India and is currently accepted in the Western world as a form of relaxation and exercise. It has been of interest for people with schizophrenia to determine the efficacy of yoga delivered as a package of care versus standard care. To examine the effects of yoga as a package of care versus standard care. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (latest 30 March 2017) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSS, AMED, PsychINFO, and registries of clinical trials. We searched the references of all included studies. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in the register. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including people with schizophrenia comparing yoga as a package of care with standard-care control. The review authors independently selected studies, quality rated these, and extracted data. For binary outcomes, we calculated risk difference (RD) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis. For continuous data, we estimated the mean difference (MD) between groups and its CI. We employed mixed-effect and fixed-effect models for analysis. We examined heterogeneity (I 2 technique), assessed risk of bias for included studies, and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Three studies are included in this review. All outcomes were short term (less than eight weeks). Useable data were reported for two outcomes only; leaving the study early and quality of life. None of the participants left the studies early and there was some evidence in favour of the yoga package for quality of life endpoint scores (1 RCT, n=80, MD 22.93 CI 19.74 to 26.12, low-quality evidence). Leaving the study early data were equivocal between the treatment groups (3 RCTs, n=193, RD 0.06 CI -0.01 to 0.13, medium

  17. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful ...... to indicators of health, the role of CF Centres, regional networks, national health policy, and international data registration and comparisons.......Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful...... therapies, approaches to care and indeed data recording. The quality of care for individuals with CF has become a focus at several levels: patient, centre, regional, national and international. This paper reviews the quality management and improvement issues at each of these levels with particular reference...

  18. Standard guidelines of care for vitiligo surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsad Davinder

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo surgery is an effective method of treatment for selected, resistant vitiligo patches in patients with vitiligo. Physician′s qualifications: The physician performing vitiligo surgery should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology which included training in vitiligo surgery. If the center for postgraduation does not provide education and training in cutaneous surgery, the training may be obtained at the surgical table (hands-on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced dermatosurgeon at a center that routinely performs the procedure. Training may also be obtained in dedicated workshops. In addition to the surgical techniques, training should include local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility: Vitiligo surgery can be performed safely in an outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place, with which all nursing staff should be familiar. Vitiligo grafting for extensive areas may need general anesthesia and full operation theater facility in a hospital setting and the presence of an anesthetist is recommended in such cases. Indications for vitiligo surgery : Surgery is indicated for stable vitiligo that does not respond to medical treatment. While there is no consensus on definitive parameters for stability, the Task Force suggests the absence of progression of disease for the past one year as a definition of stability. Test grafting may be performed in doubtful cases to detect stability. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent: A detailed consent form elaborating the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The patient should be informed of the nature of the disease and that the determination of stability is only a vague guide. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure

  19. Standards of care and quality indicators for multidisciplinary care models for psoriatic arthritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacós, Jordi; Luelmo, Jesús; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Marco, Teresa Navío; de la Cueva, Pablo; Busquets, Manel Pujol; Font, Mercè García; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Vega, Jose Luis Alvarez; Álvarez, Antonio Javier Chaves; Parera, Ricardo Sánchez; Carrascosa, Jose Carlos Ruiz; Martínez, Fernando José Rodríguez; Sánchez, José Pardo; Olmos, Carlos Feced; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Barrio, Silvia Pérez; Arana, Ana Urruticoechea; Hergueta, Mercedes; Coto, Pablo; Queiro, Rubén

    2018-06-01

    To define and give priority to standards of care and quality indicators of multidisciplinary care for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A systematic literature review on PsA standards of care and quality indicators was performed. An expert panel of rheumatologists and dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care was established. In a consensus meeting group, the experts discussed and developed the standards of care and quality indicators and graded their priority, agreement and also the feasibility (only for quality indicators) following qualitative methodology and a Delphi process. Afterwards, these results were discussed with 2 focus groups, 1 with patients, another with health managers. A descriptive analysis is presented. We obtained 25 standards of care (9 of structure, 9 of process, 7 of results) and 24 quality indicators (2 of structure, 5 of process, 17 of results). Standards of care include relevant aspects in the multidisciplinary care of PsA patients like an appropriate physical infrastructure and technical equipment, the access to nursing care, labs and imaging techniques, other health professionals and treatments, or the development of care plans. Regarding quality indicators, the definition of multidisciplinary care model objectives and referral criteria, the establishment of responsibilities and coordination among professionals and the active evaluation of patients and data collection were given a high priority. Patients considered all of them as important. This set of standards of care and quality indicators for the multidisciplinary care of patients with PsA should help improve quality of care in these patients.

  20. UV dose-effect relationships and current protection exposure standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we have attempted to quantify the health effects in man of uv-radiation exposure of wavelengths from 240 nm to 320 nm. Exposure to uv in this region could result in the formation of skin cancer or premature aging in man. The induction of cancer by uv radiation results from changes in genetic material. We have used the DNA action spectrum coupled with the uv skin cancer data available in the literature to derive the dose-effect relationships. The results are compared against the current uv protection standards

  1. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Tumescent liposuction: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Definition : Tumescent liposuction is a technique for the removal of subcutaneous fat under a special form of local anesthesia called tumescent anesthesia. Physician′s qualifications : The physician performing liposuction should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology or a surgical specialty and should have had adequate training in dermatosurgery at a center that provides training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, the physician should obtain specific liposuction training or experience at the surgical table ("hands on" under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced liposuction surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in fluid and electrolyte balance, potential complications of liposuction, tumescent and other forms of anesthesia as well as emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Liposuction can be performed safely in an outpatient day care surgical facility, or a hospital operating room. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place with which all nursing staff should be familiar. A physician trained in emergency medical care and acute cardiac emergencies should be available in the premises. It is recommended but not mandatory, that an anesthetist be asked to stand by. Indications: Liposuction is recommended for all localized deposits of fat. Novices should restrict themselves to the abdomen, thighs, buttocks and male breasts. Arms, the medial side of the thigh and the female breast need more experience and are recommended for experienced surgeons. Liposuction may be performed for non-cosmetic indications such as hyperhidrosis of axillae after adequate experience has been acquired, but is not recommended for the treatment of obesity. Preoperative evaluation : Detailed history is to be taken with respect to any previous disease, drug intake and prior surgical

  3. Tumescent liposuction: standard guidelines of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram

    2008-01-01

    Tumescent liposuction is a technique for the removal of subcutaneous fat under a special form of local anesthesia called tumescent anesthesia. PHYSICIAN'S QUALIFICATIONS: The physician performing liposuction should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology or a surgical specialty and should have had adequate training in dermatosurgery at a center that provides training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, the physician should obtain specific liposuction training or experience at the surgical table ("hands on") under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced liposuction surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in fluid and electrolyte balance, potential complications of liposuction, tumescent and other forms of anesthesia as well as emergency resuscitation and care. Liposuction can be performed safely in an outpatient day care surgical facility, or a hospital operating room. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place with which all nursing staff should be familiar. A physician trained in emergency medical care and acute cardiac emergencies should be available in the premises. It is recommended but not mandatory, that an anesthetist be asked to stand by. Liposuction is recommended for all localized deposits of fat. Novices should restrict themselves to the abdomen, thighs, buttocks and male breasts. Arms, the medial side of the thigh and the female breast need more experience and are recommended for experienced surgeons. Liposuction may be performed for non-cosmetic indications such as hyperhidrosis of axillae after adequate experience has been acquired, but is not recommended for the treatment of obesity. Detailed history is to be taken with respect to any previous disease, drug intake and prior surgical procedures. Liposuction is contraindicated in patients with severe cardiovascular disease

  4. Standard guidelines of care for chemical peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical peeling is the application of a chemical agent to the skin, which causes controlled destruction of a part of or the entire epidermis, with or without the dermis, leading to exfoliation and removal of superficial lesions, followed by regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissues. Indications for chemical peeling include pigmentary disorders, superficial acne scars, ageing skin changes, and benign epidermal growths. Contraindications include patients with active bacterial, viral or fungal infection, tendency to keloid formation, facial dermatitis, taking photosensitizing medications and unrealistic expectations. Physicians′ qualifications : The physician performing chemical peeling should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology. The training for chemical peeling may be acquired during post graduation or later at a center that provides education and training in cutaneous surgery or in focused workshops providing such training. The physician should have adequate knowledge of the different peeling agents used, the process of wound healing, the technique as well as the identification and management of complications. Facility : Chemical peeling can be performed safely in any clinic/outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent : A detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and should clearly mention if more procedures are needed for proper results. The patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, presentations, and personal discussions. The need for postoperative medical therapy should be emphasized. Superficial peels are considered safe in Indian patients. Medium depth peels should be performed with great caution, especially in dark skinned patients. Deep peels are not recommended for

  5. Recurrent glioblastoma: Current patterns of care in an Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sagun; Thursfield, Vicky; Cher, Lawrence; Dally, Michael; Drummond, Katharine; Murphy, Michael; Rosenthal, Mark A; Gan, Hui K

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective population-based survey examined current patterns of care for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) who had previously undergone surgery and post-operative therapy at original diagnosis. The patients were identified from the Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR) from 2006 to 2008. Patient demographics, tumour characteristics and oncological management were extracted using a standardised survey by the treating clinicians/VCR staff and results analysed by the VCR. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) at diagnosis and progression were calculated. A total of 95 patients (48%) received treatment for first recurrence; craniotomy and post-operative treatment (38), craniotomy only (34) and non-surgical treatment (23). Patients receiving treatment at first progression had a higher median OS than those who did not (7 versus 3 months, ppattern of care survey of treatment for rGBM in an era where post-operative "Stupp" chemo-radiation is standard. First and second line therapy for rGBM is common and associated with significant benefit. Treatment generally includes re-resection and/or systemic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. International comparison of AC-DC current transfer standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, G.; Garcocz, M.; Waldmann, W.

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of the international comparison of ac-dc current transfer standards identified as EURAMET.EM-K12 started in June 2012 and were completed in December 2014. Twenty NMIs in the EURAMET region and one NMI in the AFRIMET region took part: BEV (Austria), CMI (Czech Republic), PTB (Germany), METAS (Switzerland), JV (Norway), UME (Turkey), GUM (Poland), IPQ (Portugal), CEM (Spain), INRIM (Italy), SP (Sweden), DANIAmet-MI-Trescal (Denmark), BIM (Bulgaria), MKEH (Hungary), SIQ (Slovenia), LNE (France), NSAI NML (Ireland), VSL (The Netherlands), NPL (United Kingdom), Metrosert (Estonia), NIS (Egypt). The comparison was proposed to link the National Metrology Institutes organised in EURAMET to the key comparison CCEM-K12. The ac-dc current transfer difference of each travelling standard had been measured at its nominal current 10 mA and 5 A at the following frequencies: 10 Hz, 55 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 50 kHz, 100 kHz. The test points were selected to link the results with the equivalent CCEM Key Comparison (CCEM-K12), through five NMIs participating in both EURAMET and CCEM key comparisons (PTB, JV, NPL, SP and BEV). The report shows the degree of equivalence in the EURAMET region and also the degree of equivalence with the corresponding CCEM reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Nursing competency standards in primary health care: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an integrative review of the literature on nursing competency standards for nurses working in primary health care and, in particular, general practice. Internationally, there is growing emphasis on building a strong primary health care nursing workforce to meet the challenges of rising chronic and complex disease. However, there has been limited emphasis on examining the nursing workforce in this setting. Integrative review. A comprehensive search of relevant electronic databases using keywords (e.g. 'competencies', 'competen*' and 'primary health care', 'general practice' and 'nurs*') was combined with searching of the Internet using the Google scholar search engine. Experts were approached to identify relevant grey literature. Key websites were also searched and the reference lists of retrieved sources were followed up. The search focussed on English language literature published since 2000. Limited published literature reports on competency standards for nurses working in general practice and primary health care. Of the literature that is available, there are differences in the reporting of how the competency standards were developed. A number of common themes were identified across the included competency standards, including clinical practice, communication, professionalism and health promotion. Many competency standards also included teamwork, education, research/evaluation, information technology and the primary health care environment. Given the potential value of competency standards, further work is required to develop and test robust standards that can communicate the skills and knowledge required of nurses working in primary health care settings to policy makers, employers, other health professionals and consumers. Competency standards are important tools for communicating the role of nurses to consumers and other health professionals, as well as defining this role for employers, policy makers and educators. Understanding the content

  8. Standard guidelines for care: Sclerotherapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niti Khunger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Sclerotherapy is defined as the targeted elimination of small vessels, varicose veins and vascular anomalies by the injection of a sclerosant. The aim of sclerotherapy is to damage the vessel wall and transform it into a fibrous cord that cannot be recanalized. It is a simple, cost-effective, efficacious and esthetically acceptable modality for both therapeutic and esthetic purposes. Indications: Therapeutic indications include varicose veins and vascular malformations. Esthetic indications include telangiectasias and reticular veins. In the management of varicose veins, it may need to be combined with other surgical methods of treatment, such as ligation of the saphenofemoral junction, stab ligation of perforators and stripping. A surgical opinion may be necessary. Methodology: A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the venous system of the legs, basic principles of venous insufficiency, methods of diagnosis and, in addition, uses, mechanisms of action and complications of sclerosing agents and proper compression techniques are important pre-requisites to successful sclerotherapy. Although various sclerosing agents are available, polidoconal and sodium tetradecyl sulfate are most commonly used. More recently, these sclerosants have been used in microfoam form for increased efficacy. The basic principle of a successful sclerotherapy technique is the use of an optimal volume and concentration of the sclerosant according to the size of the vessel. The sclerosant is injected carefully into the vessel and compression is applied. Contraindications: Contraindications include superficial and deep venous thrombosis, sapheno-femoral junction incompetence, pregnancy, myocardial decompensation, migraine, hypercoagulable state, serious systemic illness, dependency edema, immobility, arterial disease, diabetes mellitus and allergic reactions to sclerosants. Complications: While sclerotherapy is usually a safe procedure

  9. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  10. Standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2000-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department (CRP) is an advanced and modern facility that encompasses two essential components: radioisotope research, and radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing. Radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program is not only quite unique, but also an essential component of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC) in providing quality patient care for the population of the Kingdom. Accurate diagnosis and therapy with medical imaging equipment requires quality radiopharmaceuticals that are available readily and with reliability. The CRP Department provides that quality and reliability. Research activities of the CRP Department are focused on developing new radiotracers with potential usefulness in biomedical research and clinical applications. Research projects consist of: developing cyclotron targetry for radioisotope production; developing synthesis methods for radiolabeling biomolecules; and developing analytical methods for quality control. The CRP Department operates a semi-commercial radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program that supplies the diagnostic radioactive products to several hospitals in the Kingdom and neighboring countries. These products for clinical applications are produced according to the international standards of Good Manufacturing Practices of quality and efficacy. At the heart of the radioisotope program is a medium energy cyclotron capable of accelerating a number of particles for transformation of non-radioactive atoms into radionuclides that are the primary sources for research and development activities, and for preparing radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to having the only cyclotron facility in the region, KFSH and RC also has the only Positron Emission Tomography Center (PET) in this part of the world. This combination of cyclotron and the ultra modern PET facility translates into advanced and specialized care for the patients at KFSH and RC

  11. Views of surgery program directors on the current ACGME and proposed IOM duty-hour standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ross E; Coverdill, James E; Mellinger, John D; Collins, J Craig; Potts, John R; Dent, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the experiences of surgery program directors with the current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour standards and views of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) proposed duty-hour recommendations. A total of 118 program directors (47.6% of all surgery programs in the US) responded to the survey. Results showed that the current duty-hour standards have hindered clinical education opportunities by reducing or eliminating rotations on many services, didactic teaching conferences, and clinical bedside teaching opportunities. Additionally, patient safety has been compromised by frequent hand offs of care. Most IOM recommendations were perceived as extremely difficult or impossible to implement, with the exception of the moonlighting recommendation. The results indicated that adopting the IOM recommendations is not feasible given current workforce limitations, and most program directors supported maintaining the current duty-hour standards until such time as there is evidence-based outcomes research to direct change. The conclusion was that the current ACGME duty-hour standards have reduced teaching opportunities and narrowed the scope of training.

  12. Current Status of Multidisciplinary Care in Psoriatic Arthritis in Spain: NEXUS 2.0 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Narváez Moreno, Basilio; Rodriguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea-Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Merce; López Montilla, M Dolores; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Maceiras, Francisco; Rodríguez Pazos, Laura; Rubio Romero, Esteban; Rodríguez Fernandez Freire, Lourdes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-02-26

    1) To analyze the implementation of multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, 2) To define minimum and excellent standards of care. A survey was sent to clinicians who already performed multidisciplinary care or were in the process of undertaking it, asking: 1) Type of multidisciplinary care model implemented; 2) Degree, priority and feasibility of the implementation of quality standards in the structure, process and result for care. In 6 regional meetings the results of the survey were presented and discussed, and the ultimate priority of quality standards for care was defined. At a nominal meeting group, 11 experts (rheumatologists and dermatologists) analyzed the results of the survey and the regional meetings. With this information, they defined which standards of care are currently considered as minimum and which are excellent. The simultaneous and parallel models of multidisciplinary care are those most widely implemented, but the implementation of quality standards is highly variable. In terms of structure it ranges from 22% to 74%, in those related to process from 17% to 54% and in the results from 2% to 28%. Of the 25 original quality standards for care, 9 were considered only minimum, 4 were excellent and 12 defined criteria for minimum level and others for excellence. The definition of minimum and excellent quality standards for care will help achieve the goal of multidisciplinary care for patients with PAs, which is the best healthcare possible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. Open Source, Open Standards, and Health Care Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy. PMID:21447469

  14. Rationing critical care medicine: recent studies and current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nicholas S

    2005-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the rationing of critical care resources. Although much has been written about the concept of rationing, there have been few scientific studies as to its prevalence. A recent meta-analysis reviewed all previously published studies on rationing access to intensive care units but little is known about practices within the intensive care unit. Much literature in the past few years has focused on the growing use of critical care resources and projections for the future. Several authors suggest there may be a crisis in financial or personnel resources if some rationing does not take place. Other papers have argued that the methods of rationing critical care previously proposed, such as limiting the care of dying patients or using cost-effectiveness analysis to determine care, may not be effective or viewed as ethical by some. Finally, several recent papers review how critical care is practiced and allocated in India and Asian countries that already practice open rationing in their health care systems. There is currently no published evidence that overt rationing is taking place in critical care medicine. There is growing evidence that in the future, the need for critical care may outstrip financial resources unless some form of rationing takes place. It is also clear from the literature that choosing how to ration critical care will be a difficult task.

  15. Current Allergic Rhinitis Experiences Survey (CARES): Health-care practitioners' awareness, attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S; Fromer, Leonard M; Jacob-Nara, Juby A; Long, Randall M; Mannion, Karen M; Lauersen, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common health problem in the United States, with significant comorbidities and impairment of quality of life despite the availability of many prescription (Rx) and over-the-counter (OTC) medications. The health-care practitioners (HCPs) arm of the Current Allergic Rhinitis Experiences Survey (CARES) assessed HCPs' perceptions about the current management of AR. This U.S.-based national survey included 375 primary care physicians and 375 nurse practitioners/physician assistants. Participants were screened to ensure that they treat ≥15 AR sufferers per month during allergy season. The majority of HCPs (86%) agreed that AR patients can easily recognize allergy symptoms after diagnosis and that 57% of their patients come to them self-recognizing their symptoms. A total of 82% strongly agreed that AR sufferers are primarily diagnosed via history and physical and do not typically undergo diagnostic testing until after pharmacologic intervention. HCPs reported that 63-77% of AR sufferers can easily manage AR once treatment is established. According to surveyed HCPs, OTC medication should precede an Rx medication for AR management. A total of 82% HCPs considered intranasal steroids (INSs) to be the gold standard AR treatment and have minimal safety concerns about INS use. HCPs perceive that patients can easily recognize and self-manage their AR symptoms. Patient history/symptoms and physical examination are the primary methods of AR diagnosis. INSs are considered the gold standard for treatment of AR. However, most HCPs feel OTC medication should be tried before Rx medication for AR management.

  16. Current National Approach to Healthcare ICT Standardization: Focus on Progress in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Taek; Atalag, Koray

    2015-07-01

    Many countries try to efficiently deliver high quality healthcare services at lower and manageable costs where healthcare information and communication technologies (ICT) standardisation may play an important role. New Zealand provides a good model of healthcare ICT standardisation. The purpose of this study was to review the current healthcare ICT standardisation and progress in New Zealand. This study reviewed the reports regarding the healthcare ICT standardisation in New Zealand. We also investigated relevant websites related with the healthcare ICT standards, most of which were run by the government. Then, we summarised the governance structure, standardisation processes, and their output regarding the current healthcare ICT standards status of New Zealand. New Zealand government bodies have established a set of healthcare ICT standards and clear guidelines and procedures for healthcare ICT standardisation. Government has actively participated in various enactments of healthcare ICT standards from the inception of ideas to their eventual retirement. Great achievements in eHealth have already been realized, and various standards are currently utilised at all levels of healthcare regionally and nationally. Standard clinical terminologies, such as International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT) have been adopted and Health Level Seven (HL7) standards are actively used in health information exchanges. The government to New Zealand has well organised ICT institutions, guidelines, and regulations, as well as various programs, such as e-Medications and integrated care services. Local district health boards directly running hospitals have effectively adopted various new ICT standards. They might already be benefiting from improved efficiency resulting from healthcare ICT standardisation.

  17. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazak, Anne E.; Abrams, Annah N.; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K.; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family

  18. Identification of Standards for Pharmaceutical Care in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study is to identify practice standards that can be effectively ... Pharmaceutical care evolved from clinical ... The specific objectives ..... The pharmacist should regularly run reports on their patients to see if they are ... Each pharmacist shall procure a certain amount of hours of continuing education on topics to.

  19. Medical teams and the standard of care in negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappideen, Carolyn

    2015-09-01

    Medical teams are essential to the delivery of modern, patient-centred health care in hospitals. A collective model of responsibility envisaged by team care is inconsistent with common law tort liability which focuses on the individual rather than the team. There is no basis upon which a team can be liable as a collective at common law. Nor does the common law'countenance liability for the conduct of other team members absent some form of agency, vicarious liability or non-delegable duty. Despite the barriers to the adoption of a team standard of care in negligence, there is scope for team factors to have a role in determining the standard of care so that being a team player is part and parcel of what it is to be a competent professional. If this is the case, the skill set, and the standard of care expected of the individual professional, includes skills based on team models of communication, cross-monitoring and trust.

  20. Anesthesia for day-care surgeries: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Day-care surgery has become a popular modality of surgical intervention throughout the globe. Numerous factors including the economic and financial issues are driving this therapeutic modality to a widespread acceptance among surgeons and anesthesiologists. Advancements in anesthesia and surgical techniques as well as availability of newer drugs are largely responsible for the progress of day-care surgeries. Numerous challenges are still faced by anesthesiologists and surgeons in carrying out day-care surgeries, especially in spite of these advancements, at resource-limited setups. The first right step in successfully delivering the day-care surgical services includes proper selection of the patients. The preanesthetic evaluation is highly essential in determining the suitability of the patient for day-care anesthesia and surgery as well as the formulation of various anesthetic plans and strategies. The current review is intended to highlight inherent challenges and probable solutions to them for this rapidly progressing anesthesia.

  1. Current Status of Standardization of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Li, Gui Lan

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of traditional medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is widely spread and applied in more than 100 countries across the world. The standardization of TCM is very important for the international application of Chinese medicine. In this paper, we have explained and analyzed the standardization situations of TCM in China with the purpose of providing reference for standardization and international development of TCM. PMID:27110268

  2. Current Status of Standardization of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of traditional medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is widely spread and applied in more than 100 countries across the world. The standardization of TCM is very important for the international application of Chinese medicine. In this paper, we have explained and analyzed the standardization situations of TCM in China with the purpose of providing reference for standardization and international development of TCM.

  3. Current and future impact of osteoarthritis on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, A; Petersson, I F; Björk, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the current and future (to year 2032) impact of osteoarthritis (OA) health care seeking. METHOD: Population-based study with prospectively ascertained data from the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR), Sweden, encompassing more than 15 million person-years of primary and specia......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the current and future (to year 2032) impact of osteoarthritis (OA) health care seeking. METHOD: Population-based study with prospectively ascertained data from the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR), Sweden, encompassing more than 15 million person-years of primary...

  4. Development of indicators for patient care and monitoring standards for secondary health care services of Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Seema S; D'Souza, Roshni Cynthia; Pashte, Pramod Mukund; Satoskar, Smita Manohar; D'Souza, Remilda Joyce

    2015-01-01

    The Qualitative aspect of health care delivery is one of the major factors in reducing morbidity and mortality in a health care setup. The expanding suburban secondary health care delivery facilities of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai are an important part of the healthcare backbone of Mumbai and therefore the quality of care delivered here needed standardization. The project was completed over a period of one year from Jan to Dec, 2013 and implemented in three phases. The framework with components and sub-components were developed and formats for data collection were standardized. The benchmarks were based on past performance in the same hospital and probability was used for development of normal range. An Excel spreadsheet was developed to facilitate data analysis. The indicators comprise of 3 components--Statutory Requirements, Patient care & Cure and Administrative efficiency. The measurements made, pointed to the broad areas needing attention. The Indicators for patient care and monitoring standards can be used as a self assessment tool for health care setups for standardization and improvement of delivery of health care services.

  5. ANS-10 standards - current status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetschat, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    The ANS-10 Standards Subcommittee is sponsored by the Mathematics and Computation Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The scope of ANS-10 activities includes the development of standards that will promote effective utilization of and enhance the reliability of computer programs throughout the nuclear community. The application of ANS-10 standards during the computer program development process creates coding and documentation for the program product that promotes effective use and enhances reliability. The end product is a program package that contains adequate documentation, includes verification and validation results, is easy to use and maintain, and is easy to transfer from one hardware-software system to another

  6. Technical standardization of oil well abandonment: a review of current standards and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P.; Pessoa, Laudemar; Paiva, Maria [Halliburton Energy Services (HES), Duncan, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a new methodology for well abandonment. This practice is becoming more and more important because of the increasing number of production fields being abandoned. We strongly recommend a study of cement slurries properties for specific use in temporary and permanent abandonment plugs based on the estimation of the cement slurry hardened when placed in the well. By using specific additives, it is possible to achieve very stable slurries. For example, when permeability is reduced, formation fluid migration can be blocked and chemical reactions between the fluid and the slurry may be inhibited. With this objective, we present a laboratory investigation model and an example of slurry testing recommendation. During the abandonment operation, all records of the well characteristics should be maintained to include the reason for the abandonment, and location of fresh water, brine, and hydrocarbon zones that may exist. This documentation will also allow the analysis of solutions for the problems that originally caused the abandonment of the well. This data could be important for future use by environmental protection commissions to reopen or to drill an adjacent well. Given the high price of oil, it may now be economically feasible to reopen the well, if the reason for abandonment was low productivity. This way, a critical analysis of the current conditions of well and field abandonment in the country is presented. Based on this information, a review of the current standards is suggested. (author)

  7. Telemedicine compared with standard care in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, O. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: For patients with T2DM does telemedicine, compared with standard care, provide equivalent clinical outcomes? Methods: Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus allocated from October 2011 until July 2012 randomized to either treatment at home by video conferences only or the standard...... outpatient treatment. Primary outcomes were HbA1c and blood glucose levels and secondary outcomes were 24-h blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and albuminuria. The videotelephone was installed and serviced by the telephone company, TDC, Denmark, as a broadband solution. Results: The improvements in the two...

  8. Oncologic prevention and suggested working standards in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the ground of the available data, this paper presents the problem of malignant diseases in Central Serbia, and most common carcinogens. Division of carcinogens, cancerogenesis and natural history of disease, early detection of cancer and palliative management are explained. The role and capacities of primary health care doctors in treatment of patients with suspect malignant disease are presented. Authors are suggesting standards for medical tasks and contemporary principles in approach to patients with malignant diseases in everyday practice.

  9. Current status of the MPEG-4 standardization effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Dimitris

    1994-09-01

    The Moving Pictures Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standardization Organization has initiated a standardization effort, known as MPEG-4, addressing generic audiovisual coding at very low bit-rates (up to 64 kbits/s) with applications in videotelephony, mobile audiovisual communications, video database retrieval, computer games, video over Internet, remote sensing, etc. This paper gives a survey of the status of MPEG-4, including its planned schedule, and initial ideas about requirements and applications. A significant part of this paper is summarizing an incomplete draft version of a `requirements document' which presents specifications of desirable features on the video, audio, and system level of the forthcoming standard. Very low bit-rate coding algorithms are not described, because no endorsement of any particular algorithm, or class of algorithms, has yet been made by MPEG-4, and several seminars held concurrently with MPEG-4 meetings have not so far provided evidence that such high performance coding schemes are achievable.

  10. Standardizing the care of detox patients to achieve quality outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kathy; Semrow, Sue

    2006-03-01

    Providing appropriate treatment for detoxification patients is both challenging and difficult because alcohol abuse and dependence are largely underestimated in the acute hospital setting. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is treated not only by addictionologists on chemical dependency units, but also by primary care physicians in acute inpatient settings. The need for consistent inpatient treatment through the use of identified protocols can help provide safe and effective care. The need for consistent, inpatient medical-surgical detoxification treatment in our organization became apparent with the staff's identification of patient care concerns. Using an organizational approach, a multidisciplinary team was created to standardize the care of detoxification patients, beginning with patient admission and ending with discharge and referral for outpatient management. Standardization would ensure consistent assessment and intervention, and improve communication among the clinical team members. A protocol was developed for both the emergency department and the inpatient units. The goals of the team were to decrease the adverse events related to detoxification, such as seizures and aggression, and provide a consistent method of treatment for staff to follow.

  11. [The costs of new drugs compared to current standard treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, Mariam; Schlegel, Claudia; Gundert-Remy, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Until AMNOG came into effect Germany had free pricing of new drugs. Our exemplary work investigates the costs of new drugs that were licensed in the two years prior to AMNOG, and compares them to the costs of standard treatment that has been used in pivotal trials. Also, the important components of pharmaceutical prices will be illustrated. We retrospectively analysed the European Public Assessment Reports of proprietary medicinal products that the European Medicinal Agency initially approved in 2009 and 2010 and that were tested against an active control in at least one pivotal trial. If the standard treatment was a generic, the average pharmacy retail price of new drugs was 7.4 times (median 7.1) higher than that of standard treatment. If the standard treatment was an originator drug the average price was 1.4 times (median 1.2) higher than that of the new drug. There was no clear correlation of an increase in costs for new drugs and their "grade of innovation" as rated according to the criteria of Fricke. Our study shows that prices of new drugs must be linked to the evidence of comparative benefit; since German drug pricing is complex, cost saving effects obtained thereby will depend on a range of other rules and decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. The Cuban health care system and factors currently undermining it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, K

    1995-08-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of health and health care in Cuba during a period of severe crisis by placing it within its economic, social, and political context using a comparative historical approach. It outlines Cuban achievements in health care as a consequence of the socialist transformations since 1959, noting the full commitment by the Cuban state, the planned economy, mass participation, and a self-critical, working class perspective as crucial factors. The roles of two external factors, the U.S. economic embargo and the Council of Mutual Economic Cooperation (CMEA), are explored in shaping the Cuban society and economy, including its health care system. It is argued that the former has hindered health efforts in Cuba. The role of the latter is more complex. While the CMEA was an important source for economic growth, Cuban relations with the Soviet bloc had a damaging effect on the development of socialism in Cuba. The adoption of the Soviet model of economic development fostered bureaucracy and demoralization of Cuban workers. As such, it contributed to two internal factors that have undermined further social progress including in health care: low productivity of labor and the growth of bureaucracy. While the health care system is still consistently supported by public policy and its structure is sound, economic crisis undermines its material and moral foundations and threatens its achievements. The future of the current Cuban health care system is intertwined with the potentials for its socialist development.

  13. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...... ward within 24 h of emergency abdominal surgery. Participants were randomized to either intermediate care or standard surgical ward care after surgery. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In total, 286 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The trial...... was terminated after the interim analysis owing to slow recruitment and a lower than expected mortality rate. Eleven (7·6 per cent) of 144 patients assigned to intermediate care and 12 (8·5 per cent) of 142 patients assigned to ward care died within 30 days of surgery (odds ratio 0·91, 95 per cent c.i. 0·38 to 2...

  14. Health care in small prisons: incorporating high-quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Jean-Pierre; Casillas, Alejandra; Mary, Gérard; Secretan, Anne-Dominique; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Wolff, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In the past, health management in Geneva's six post-trial prisons had been variable and inconsistent. In 2008, the unit of penitentiary medicine of the Geneva University Hospitals was mandated to re-organize and provide health care at all six prison facilities. The specific aim of this paper is to outline the example as a practical solution to some of the common challenges in unifying the structure and process of health services across multiple small facilities, while meeting European prison health and local quality standards. Geneva's post-trial prisons are small and close to one another in geographical proximity - ideal conditions for the construction of a health mobile team (HMT). This multidisciplinary mobile team operated like a community ambulatory care model; it was progressively launched in all prison facilities in Geneva. The authors incorporated an implementation strategy where health providers partnered with prison and community stakeholders in the health delivery model's development and adaption process. The model's strategic initiatives are described along the following areas, in light of other international prison health activity and prior care models: access to a health care professional, equivalence of care, patient consent, confidentiality, humanitarian interventions, and professional competence and independence. From the perspective of the HMT members, the authors provide the "lessons learned" through this experience, especially to providers who are working on prison health services reform and coordination improvement. The paper particularly stresses the importance of partnering with community health stakeholders and prison staff, a key component to the approach.

  15. Current issues on a standard for surrogate pregnancy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Jung-Ok

    2012-01-01

    While Korea does not have any legal statement on surrogacy, treatments are carried out in practice. As a result, every Institutional Review Board (IRB) of each fertility clinic faces an ethical predicament in reviewing each case. There is a need to arrange the institutions' own standards of surrogate pregnancy procedures before the establishment of national or professional regulation. This article examines the legal, social, and medical issues of surrogacy to help IRBs to judge their cases.

  16. Current issues on a standard for surrogate pregnancy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Ok

    2012-12-01

    While Korea does not have any legal statement on surrogacy, treatments are carried out in practice. As a result, every Institutional Review Board (IRB) of each fertility clinic faces an ethical predicament in reviewing each case. There is a need to arrange the institutions' own standards of surrogate pregnancy procedures before the establishment of national or professional regulation. This article examines the legal, social, and medical issues of surrogacy to help IRBs to judge their cases.

  17. Review of Current Standard Model Results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk highlights results selected from the Standard Model research programme of the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider. Results using data from $p-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7,8$~TeV in LHC Run-1 as well as results using data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in LHC Run-2 are covered. The status of cross section measurements from soft QCD processes and jet production as well as photon production are presented. The presentation extends to vector boson production with associated jets. Precision measurements of the production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons, including a first measurement of the mass of the $W$ bosons, $m_W$, are discussed. The programme to measure electroweak processes with di-boson and tri-boson final states is outlined. All presented measurements are compatible with Standard Model descriptions and allow to further constrain it. In addition they allow to probe new physics which would manifest through extra gauge couplings, or Standard Model gauge couplings deviating from their predicted value.

  18. Current Standards in the Management of Cerebral Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Goetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last 30 years have seen major changes in attitude toward patients with cerebral metastases. This paper aims to outline the major landmarks in this transition and the therapeutic strategies currently used. The controversies surrounding control of brain disease are discussed, and two emerging management trends are reviewed: tumor bed radiosurgery and salvage radiation.

  19. The standardization debate: A conflation trap in critical care electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marcus C; Gaspard, Nicolas; Cole, Andrew J; Hoch, Daniel B; Cash, Sydney S; Bianchi, Matt; O'Rourke, Deirdre A; Rosenthal, Eric S; Chu, Catherine J; Westover, M Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Persistent uncertainty over the clinical significance of various pathological continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) findings in the intensive care unit (ICU) has prompted efforts to standardize ICU cEEG terminology and an ensuing debate. We set out to understand the reasons for, and a satisfactory resolution to, this debate. We review the positions for and against standardization, and examine their deeper philosophical basis. We find that the positions for and against standardization are not fundamentally irreconcilable. Rather, both positions stem from conflating the three cardinal steps in the classic approach to EEG, which we term "description", "interpretation", and "prescription". Using real-world examples we show how this conflation yields muddled clinical reasoning and unproductive debate among electroencephalographers that is translated into confusion among treating clinicians. We propose a middle way that judiciously uses both standardized terminology and clinical reasoning to disentangle these critical steps and apply them in proper sequence. The systematic approach to ICU cEEG findings presented herein not only resolves the standardization debate but also clarifies clinical reasoning by helping electroencephalographers assign appropriate weights to cEEG findings in the face of uncertainty. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Physiotherapeutic care marketing research: current state-of-the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    Successful introduction of modern technologies into the national health care systems strongly depends on the current pharmaceutical market situation. The present article is focused on the peculiarities of marketing research with special reference to physiotherapeutic services and commodities. Analysis of the structure and sequence of marketing research processes is described along with the methods applied for the purpose including their support by the use of Internet resources and technologies.

  1. Radiation cancer, safety standards and current levels of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Cancer can be induced by radiation in any tissue where cancer occurs naturally. The observation that antenatal diagnostic radiography causes a small but definite increase in childhood cancer is as good evidence as could be expected in support of the scientific expectation that there would be no threshold of dose for carcinogenesis. A linear relation between radiation dose and frequency of induced cancer is a necessary assumption for a system of radiological protection but is not necessarily a reasonable basis for realistic assessments of cancer risk. Indeed there are radiobiological and epidemiological reasons to the contrary. If the linear hypothesis is accepted then at the present time in the UK the routine practice of medicine is of about 2 orders of magnitude more important in causing cancer than environmental pollution by discharge of radio-activity. The acceptability of radiation safety standards for occupational exposure may be justified by comparison of radiation cancer risks with risks from fatal accidents in the safer industries. The acceptability of the corresponding standards for members of the public seems to require more public discussion of the concept of negligible risk. Emotional reactions to uncontrolled releases of radio-activity are based at least in part on a failure to appreciate the hypothesis of linearity

  2. Current End-of-Life Care Needs and Care Practices in Acute Care Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Thurston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive-comparative study was undertaken to examine current end-of-life care needs and practices in hospital. A chart review for all 1,018 persons who died from August 1, 2008 through July 31, 2009 in two full-service Canadian hospitals was conducted. Most decedents were elderly (73.8% and urbanite (79.5%, and cancer was the most common diagnosis (36.2%. Only 13.8% had CPR performed at some point during this hospitalization and 8.8% had CPR immediately preceding death, with 87.5% having a DNR order and 30.8% providing an advance directive. Most (97.3% had one or more life-sustaining technologies in use at the time of death. These figures indicate, when compared to those in a similar mid-1990s Canadian study, that impending death is more often openly recognized and addressed. Technologies continue to be routinely but controversially used. The increased rate of end-stage CPR from 2.9% to 8.8% could reflect a 1994+ shift of expected deaths out of hospital.

  3. Current situation of International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee 249 international standards of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Qi; Wang, Yue-Xi; Shi, Nan-Nan; Han, Xue-Jie; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2017-05-01

    To review the current situation and progress of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) international standards, standard projects and proposals in International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/ technical committee (TC) 249. ISO/TC 249 standards and standard projects on the ISO website were searched and new standard proposals information were collected from ISO/TC 249 National Mirror Committee in China. Then all the available data were summarized in 5 closely related items, including proposed time, proposed country, assigned working group (WG), current stage and classifification. In ISO/TC 249, there were 2 international standards, 18 standard projects and 24 new standard proposals proposed in 2014. These 44 standard subjects increased year by year since 2011. Twenty-nine of them were proposed by China, 15 were assigned to WG 4, 36 were in preliminary and preparatory stage and 8 were categorized into 4 fifields, 7 groups and sub-groups based on International Classifification Standards. A rapid and steady development of international standardization in TCM can be observed in ISO/TC 249.

  4. Telemedicine compared with standard care in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, O. W.; Lauszus, Finn F; Loekke, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Good metabolic control is important in type 2 diabetes mellitus to improve quality of life, work ability and life expectancy, and the use of telemedicine has proved efficient as an add-on to the usual treatment. However, few studies in type 2 diabetes patients have directly compared...... telemedicine with conventional outpatient treatment, and we wanted to evaluate whether telemedicine, compared with standard care, provides equivalent clinical outcomes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus allocated from October 2011-July 2012 were randomized to either treatment at home...... by video conferences only or standard outpatient treatment. Primary outcomes were HbA1c and blood glucose levels and secondary outcomes were 24-hour blood pressure, cholesterol levels and albuminuria. The video-telephone was a broadband solution installed and serviced by the Danish Telephone Company (TDC...

  5. Standardizing communication from acute care providers to primary care providers on critically ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kerri A; Connolly, Ann; Hosseinnezhad, Alireza; Lilly, Craig M

    2015-11-01

    To increase the frequency of communication of patient information between acute and primary care providers. A secondary objective was to determine whether higher rates of communication were associated with lower rates of hospital readmission 30 days after discharge. A validated instrument was used for telephone surveys before and after an intervention designed to increase the frequency of communication among acute care and primary care providers. The communication intervention was implemented in 3 adult intensive care units from 2 campuses of an academic medical center. The frequency of communication among acute care and primary care providers, the perceived usefulness of the intervention, and its association with 30-day readmission rates were assessed for 202 adult intensive care episodes before and 100 episodes after a communication intervention. The frequency of documented communication increased significantly (5/202 or 2% before to 72/100 or 72% after the intervention; P communication was considered useful by every participating primary care provider. Rates of rehospitalization at 30 days were lower for the intervention group than the preintervention group, but the difference was not statistically significant (41/202 or 23% vs 16/88 or 18% of discharged patients; P = .45; power 0.112 at P = .05). The frequency of communication episodes that provide value can be increased through standardized processes. The key aspects of this effective intervention were setting the expectation that communication should occur, documenting when communication has occurred, and reviewing that documentation during multiprofessional rounds. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Standardized nomenclatures: keys to continuity of care, nursing accountability and nursing effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G; Aquilino, M L

    1998-01-01

    Standardized nursing nomenclatures must be included in clinical documentation systems to generate data that more accurately represent nursing practice than outcomes-related measures currently used to support important policy decisions. NANDA, NIC, and NOC--comprehensive nomenclatures for the needed variables of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes--are described. Added benefits of using NANDA, NIC, and NOC in everyday practice are outlined, including facilitation of the continuity of care of patients in integrated health systems.

  7. [Current situation of the standardization of acupuncture and moxibustion in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li-Jia; Cui, Rui; Zhan, Bi-Yu; Liao, Cai-Yan; Cao, Qi-Hua; Li, Gui-Lan; Guo, Yi

    2012-09-01

    The current situation of the standardization of acupuncture and moxibustion in the Taiwan region is introduced in this paper from the three aspects, named the development state of standard of acupuncture and moxibustion in Taiwan, the implementation of Taiwan district standard and the standardization of acupuncture and moxibustion in Taiwan. At present, the relevant standards of acupuncture and moxibustion in Taiwan just include the standard operation procedure of acupuncture and moxibustion, the reference guideline of the safe operation in the medical service centers of traditional Chinese medicine, and the faculty standard of Chinese medicine hospital, etc. It is concluded that the current situation of the standardization of acupuncture and moxibusiton presented the weak awareness of the standardization of acupuncture and moxibustion in the industry, insufficient enterprise standard, less-quantity of the implemented standards and narrow coverage.

  8. Early goal-directed nutrition versus standard of care in adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Wiis, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the effects of early goal-directed nutrition (EGDN) vs. standard nutritional care in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods: We randomised acutely admitted, mechanically ventilated ICU patients expected to stay longer than 3 days in the ICU. In the EGDN group we...... estimated nutritional requirements by indirect calorimetry and 24-h urinary urea aiming at covering 100% of requirements from the first full trial day using enteral and parenteral nutrition. In the standard of care group we aimed at providing 25 kcal/kg/day by enteral nutrition. If this was not met by day 7......, patients were supplemented with parenteral nutrition. The primary outcome was physical component summary (PCS) score of SF-36 at 6 months. We performed multiple imputation for data of the non-responders. Results: We randomised 203 patients and included 199 in the intention-to-treat analyses; baseline...

  9. Digital scrapbooking as a standard of care in neonatal intensive care units: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Muhammad T; Kanwal, Ifrah

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a digital photo scrapbooking project as a standard of care for the parents of infants admitted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Photographs were taken from birth until discharge or expiry at special moments during the infant's hospitalization and used to create a digital scrapbook with daily notes by the parents. The scrapbook and original photos were provided on a CD at discharge or at expiry. Parents and their families unanimously appreciated the photos and the opportunity to record their thoughts, and considered the CDs as a lifetime treasure. Digital photo journaling could be implemented as a standard of care at other institutions with a commitment from the nursing and ancillary staff of the NICU and labor and delivery department, with possible support from volunteers.

  10. The current implementation status of the integration of sports and physical activity into Dutch rehabilitation care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Hettinga, Florentina J; Alingh, Rolinde A; Duijf, Marjo; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V; van der Schans, Cees P

    2017-01-01

    To describe the current status of the nationwide implementation process of a sports and physical activity stimulation programme to gain insight into how sports and physical activity were integrated into Dutch rehabilitation care. The current implementation status of a sports and physical activity stimulation programme in 12 rehabilitation centres and 5 hospitals with a rehabilitation department was described by scoring fidelity and satisfaction. Seventy-one rehabilitation professionals filled out a questionnaire on how sports and physical activity, including stimulation activities, were implemented into rehabilitation care. Total fidelity scores (in %) were calculated for each organization. Professionals' satisfaction was rated on a scale from 1 to 10. In most organizations sports and physical activity were to some extent integrated during and after rehabilitation (fidelity scores: median = 54%, IQR = 23%). Physical activity stimulation was not always embedded as standard component of a rehabilitation treatment. Professionals' satisfaction rated a median value of 8.0 (IQR = 0.0) indicating high satisfaction rates. The fidelity outcome showed that activities to stimulate sports and physical activity during and after rehabilitation were integrated into rehabilitation care, but not always delivered as standardized component. These findings have emphasized the importance to focus on integrating these activities into routines of organizations. Implications for Rehabilitation Components of an evidence-based programme to stimulate sports and physical activity during and after rehabilitation can be used to measure the current status of the integration of sports and physical activity in rehabilitation care in a structural and effective way. The method described in the current study can be used to compare the content of the rehabilitation care regarding the integration of sports and physical activity among organizations both on a national and international level

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of 1-Year Treatment with Golimumab/Standard Care and Standard Care Alone for Ulcerative Colitis in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Stawowczyk

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of induction and maintenance treatment up to 1 year of ulcerative colitis with golimumab/standard care and standard care alone in Poland.A Markov model was used to estimate the expected costs and effects of golimumab/standard care and a standard care alone. For each treatment option the costs and quality adjusted life years were calculated to estimate the incremental cost-utility ratio. The analysis was performed from the perspective of the Polish public payer and society over a 30-years time horizon. The clinical parameters were derived mainly from the PURSUIT-SC and PURSUIT-M clinical trials. Different direct and indirect costs and utility values were assigned to the various model health states.The treatment of ulcerative colitis patients with golimumab/standard care instead of a standard care alone resulted in 0.122 additional years of life with full health. The treatment with golimumab/standard care was found to be more expensive than treatment with the standard care alone from the public payer perspective and from social perspective. The incremental cost-utility ratio of golimumab/standard care compared to the standard care alone is estimated to be 391,252 PLN/QALY gained (93,155 €/QALYG from public payer perspective and 374,377 PLN/QALY gained (89,137 €/QALYG from social perspective.The biologic treatment of ulcerative colitis patients with golimumab/standard care is more effective but also more costly compared with standard care alone.

  12. Current models of care for disorders of sex development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakou, Andreas; Dessens, Arianne; Bryce, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To explore the current models of practice in centres delivering specialist care for children with disorders of sex development (DSD), an international survey of 124 clinicians, identified through DSDnet and the I-DSD Registry, was performed in the last quarter of 2014. RESULTS: A total...... by 14 (19 %) centres. In addition to complex biochemistry and molecular genetic investigations, 40 clinicians (51 %) also had access to next generation sequencing. A genetic test was reported to be more preferable than biochemical tests for diagnosing 5-alpha reductase deficiency and 17-beta...

  13. Trainers’ Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mäkinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers’ attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D, Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N=185 focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree. Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse’s Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student’s t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p<0.01. Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p<0.01 were less confident about their Nurse’s Role (p<0.01 and Nontechnical Skills (p<0.01. Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  14. Silk garments plus standard care compared with standard care for treating eczema in children: A randomised, controlled, observer-blind, pragmatic trial (CLOTHES Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S Thomas

    2017-04-01

    , respectively. Even if the small observed treatment effect was genuine, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year was £56,811 in the base case analysis from a National Health Service perspective, suggesting that silk garments are unlikely to be cost-effective using currently accepted thresholds. The main limitation of the study is that use of an objective primary outcome, whilst minimising detection bias, may have underestimated treatment effects.Silk clothing is unlikely to provide additional benefit over standard care in children with moderate to severe eczema.Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77261365.

  15. Therapeutic bronchoscopy vs. standard of care in acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekjaer, K L; Meyhoff, T S; Møller, M H

    2017-01-01

    ) according to the Cochrane Handbook and GRADE methodology, including a predefined protocol (PROSPERO no. CRD42016046235). We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing therapeutic bronchoscopy to standard of care in critically ill patients with ARF. Two reviewers independently assessed trials...... for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by conventional meta-analysis. The risk of random errors was assessed by TSA. Exclusively patient-important outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS: We included five trials (n = 212); all were....... A shorter duration of mechanical ventilation was suggested by conventional meta-analysis, however TSA highlighted that only 42% of the required information size had been accrued, indicating high risk of random errors. No trials reported data on adverse events, hospital length of stay, quality of life...

  16. Colon trauma: primary repair evolving as the standard of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffoletto, J. P.; Tate, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    This study reviewed the management of colon injuries treated at the trauma surgical service, University of Nevada Medical Center between 1987 and 1992. Sixty-six patients sustained either blunt or penetrating colon injuries during the study period. The patients were divided into two groups: patients who underwent diverting colostomies and patients who underwent primary repair. Both groups were equally matched in terms of colon injury severity as well as trauma scores. The results indicated that primary colon repair was as safe if not safer than colostomy with less complications and at lower costs. The authors conclude that primary repair should be reevaluated in a critical manner as an evolving standard of care. PMID:8855649

  17. [From idea to standard care-a field report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberz, Chantal; Steidl, Ralph; Werner, Pascal; Hagen, Julia

    2018-03-01

    Digital health products and services have started to fundamentally change healthcare and prevention. Products intended for a medical use require CE-marking and potentially certification (ISO 13485) of the company. Startups play an important role in the development of new digital products and services. Two startups share their experience with these processes. Becoming a part of standard care and hence being reimbursed is a challenge for startups. For this reason, startups pursue alternative sources of income, too. The statutory health insurance's procedures for assessing new products and services are perceived as long. Startups are required to provide evidence of the benefit of their product at an early stage in the procedure. This requires time-consuming and costly studies. Startups would therefore appreciate support in generating this evidence, e. g. through adequate procedures for testing.

  18. Creation of minimum standard tool for palliative care in India and self-evaluation of palliative care programs using it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to ensure that minimum standards for palliative care based on available resources are clearly defined and achieved. Aims: (1 Creation of minimum National Standards for Palliative Care for India. (2 Development of a tool for self-evaluation of palliative care organizations. (3 Evaluation of the tool in India. In 2006, Pallium India assembled a working group at the national level to develop minimum standards. The standards were to be evaluated by palliative care services in the country. Materials and Methods: The working group prepared a "standards" document, which had two parts - the first composed of eight "essential" components and the second, 22 "desirable" components. The working group sent the document to 86 hospice and palliative care providers nationwide, requesting them to self-evaluate their palliative care services based on the standards document, on a modified Likert scale. Results: Forty-nine (57% palliative care organizations responded, and their self-evaluation of services based on the standards tool was analyzed. The majority of the palliative care providers met most of the standards identified as essential by the working group. A variable percentage of organizations had satisfied the desirable components of the standards. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the "standards tool" could be applied effectively in practice for self-evaluation of quality of palliative care services.

  19. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  20. Improving the quality of maternal and neonatal care: the role of standard based participatory assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tamburlini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gaps in quality of care are seriously affecting maternal and neonatal health globally but reports of successful quality improvement cycles implemented at large scale are scanty. We report the results of a nation-wide program to improve quality of maternal and neonatal hospital care in a lower-middle income country focusing on the role played by standard-based participatory assessments. METHODS: Improvements in the quality of maternal and neonatal care following an action-oriented participatory assessment of 19 areas covering the whole continuum from admission to discharge were measured after an average period of 10 months in four busy referral maternity hospitals in Uzbekistan. Information was collected by a multidisciplinary national team with international supervision through visit to hospital services, examination of medical records, direct observation of cases and interviews with staff and mothers. Scores (range 0 to 3 attributed to over 400 items and combined in average scores for each area were compared with the baseline assessment. RESULTS: Between the first and the second assessment, all four hospitals improved their overall score by an average 0.7 points out of 3 (range 0.4 to 1, i.e. by 22%. The improvements occurred in all main areas of care and were greater in the care of normal labor and delivery (+0.9, monitoring, infection control and mother and baby friendly care (+0.8 the role of the participatory action-oriented approach in determining the observed changes was estimated crucial in 6 out of 19 areas and contributory in other 8. Ongoing implementation of referral system and new classification of neonatal deaths impede the improved process of care to be reflected in current statistics. CONCLUSIONS: Important improvements in the quality of hospital care provided to mothers and newborn babies can be achieved through a standard-based action-oriented and participatory assessment and reassessment process.

  1. Design and evaluation of a 10-mA DC current reference standard

    CERN Document Server

    Fernqvist, G; Pickering, J; Power, F

    2003-01-01

    A new DC current reference standard has been developed for high- current power converter calibration in the large hadron collider (LHC) project at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This standard provides a near ideal 10-mA DC current with long-term drift of one part in 10/sup 6/ per year. The paper describes the requirements and the detailed design and evaluation of the unit. Since similar 10-V standards are commercially available, the paper concentrates on the unique current output capability of this device. (4 refs).

  2. Evaluation of a new 10 mA DC current reference standard

    CERN Document Server

    Fernqvist, G; Power, F

    2002-01-01

    A new DC current reference standard has been developed as a component in a Current calibration hierarchy in the LHC project at CERN. The standard provides 10 mA DC current with an accuracy less than 0.5 ppm, drift less than 2 ppm/year and compliance error less than 0.1 ppm for 0-10 V. The paper gives the results from two years evaluation of a series of 5 units.

  3. The impact of managed care and current governmental policies on an urban academic health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J L; Peterson, D J; Muehlstedt, S G; Zera, R T; West, M A; Bubrick, M P

    2001-10-01

    Managed care and governmental policies have restructured hospital reimbursement. We examined reimbursement trends in trauma care to assess the impact of this market driven change on an urban academic health center. Patients injured between January 1997 and December 1999 were analyzed for Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of hospital stay, hospital cost, payer, and reimbursement. Between 1997 and 1999, the volume of patients with an ISS less than 9 increased and length of stay decreased. In addition, overall cost, payment, and profit margin increased. Commercially insured patients accounted for this margin increase, because the margins of managed care and government insured patients experienced double-digit decreases. Patients with ISS of 9 or greater also experienced a volume increase and a reduction in length of stay; however, costs within this group increased greater than payments, thereby reducing profit margin. Whereas commercially insured patients maintained their margin, managed care and government insured patients did not (double- and triple-digit decreases). Managed care and current governmental policies have a negative impact on urban academic health center reimbursement. Commercial insurers subsidize not only the uninsured but also the government insured and managed care patients as well. National awareness of this issue and policy action are paramount to urban academic health centers and may also benefit commercial insurers.

  4. The Future of Glioblastoma Therapy: Synergism of Standard of Care and Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Mira A.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Li, Gordon; Lim, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The current standard of care for glioblastoma (GBM) is maximal surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). As the 5-year survival with GBM remains at a dismal <10%, novel therapies are needed. Immunotherapies such as the dendritic cell (DC) vaccine, heat shock protein vaccines, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) vaccines have shown encouraging results in clinical trials, and have demonstrated synergistic effects with conventional therapeutics resulting in ongoing phase III trials. Chemoradiation has been shown to have synergistic effects when used in combination with immunotherapy. Cytotoxic ionizing radiation is known to trigger pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and immune activation secondary to cell death, which can then be exploited by immunotherapies. The future of GBM therapeutics will involve finding the place for immunotherapy in the current treatment regimen with a focus on developing strategies. Here, we review current GBM therapy and the evidence for combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors, DC and peptide vaccines with the current standard of care

  5. The Future of Glioblastoma Therapy: Synergism of Standard of Care and Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Mira A.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Ruzevick, Jacob [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Li, Gordon [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 1201 Welch Rd., P309 MSLS, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lim, Michael, E-mail: mlim3@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-09-29

    The current standard of care for glioblastoma (GBM) is maximal surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). As the 5-year survival with GBM remains at a dismal <10%, novel therapies are needed. Immunotherapies such as the dendritic cell (DC) vaccine, heat shock protein vaccines, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) vaccines have shown encouraging results in clinical trials, and have demonstrated synergistic effects with conventional therapeutics resulting in ongoing phase III trials. Chemoradiation has been shown to have synergistic effects when used in combination with immunotherapy. Cytotoxic ionizing radiation is known to trigger pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and immune activation secondary to cell death, which can then be exploited by immunotherapies. The future of GBM therapeutics will involve finding the place for immunotherapy in the current treatment regimen with a focus on developing strategies. Here, we review current GBM therapy and the evidence for combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors, DC and peptide vaccines with the current standard of care.

  6. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in the indigent population: a deviation of standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, John S; Sandulache, Vlad C; Alapat, Philip M; Takashima, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Comprehensive management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) typically is managed best via a multidisciplinary approach, involving otolaryngologists, sleep psychologists/psychiatrists, pulmonologists, neurologists, oral surgeons, and sleep trained dentists. By utilizing these resources, one could fashion a treatment individualized to the patient, giving rise to the holistic phrase of "personalized medicine." Unfortunately, in situations and environments with limited resources, the treatment options in an otolaryngologist's armamentarium are restricted--typically to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) versus sleep surgery. However, a recent patient encounter highlighted here shows how a hospital's reimbursement policy effectively dictated a patient's medical management to sleep surgery. This occurred although the current gold standard for the initial treatment of OSA is CPAP. Changing the course of medical/surgical management by selectively restricting funding is a cause of concern, especially when it promotes patients to choose a treatment option that is not considered the current standard of care.

  7. Current state of knowledge about nutritional care of pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barretto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy involves a significant anabolic activity that leads to increased nutritional needs relative to the preconception period. This paper aims to review the current understanding of the energy needs of macro and micronutrients during pregnancy as well as guidelines to address common gastrointestinal disorders during pregnancy, the issue of pica and anthropometric assessment to ensure an optimum weight gain. With the exception of iron, most of the nutrients needed by the pregnancy can be provided by a complete and balanced diet. Currently the scientific evidence shows that routine supplementation with iron and folic acid during pregnancy is a practice that prevents iron deficiency anemia, neural tube disorders and preterm births. Intermittent iron supplementation can also be an appropriated intervention. If the diet does not guarantee and adequate support, iodine, vitamin B12 and vitamin D supplements should also be necessaries. The anthropometric assessment by the pattern of weight gain should be present at each prenatal care visit to prevent maternal and fetal complications. In situations where the mother’s weight cannot be assessed, arm muscle circumference is possible to make an overall assessment as it correlates with maternal weight gain alternative. Measurements of biceps, triceps and subscapular skinfolds are another alternative that is useful to evaluate the fatty deposits and their location, in a complementary way to gain weight.

  8. Antenatal care among currently married women in Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Chauhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the utilization of antenatal care (ANC services among currently married women in Rajasthan. Methods: The data have been extracted from District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS-3 which was conducted during 2007-2008, all over India. A total of 12 458 currently married women in the age group of 15-49 were taken as the sample for the study. Cross tabulation and binary logistic regression method were applied to determine the factors influencing ANC. Results: Out of 12 458 respondents, 43.4 percent women not received even a single ANC during their pregnancy period. 45.1 percent of the women not received tetanus toxoid injection and 13.0 percent of the women not received Iron folic acid tablets during their pregnancy period. Only 6.6 percent of women fulfilled the minimum recommendation with regard ANC services. Conclusions: The study points to the avenues through which policy makers can formulate and implement policies on a realistic basis by identifying critical variables and target groups for effective utilisation of ANC.

  9. Battlefield Tourniquets: Lessons Learned in Moving Current Care Toward Best Care in an Army Medical Department at War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, John F; Dubick, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding prevention and control by tourniquet use by out-of-hospital caregivers is a major breakthrough in military medicine of current wars. The present review documents developments in tourniquet practices since 2001 among the US military services for aid in improving doctrine, policy, and especially care in wars to come. Tourniquets are an adjunct for resuscitation in self-care and buddy aid and today are issued to all military servicepersons who deploy into a combat zone. In the US Army, virtually every Soldier is trained in first aid tourniquet use; since 2009 they are instructed early and often to use them early and often. Despite substantial knowledge gains among the services in tourniquet use and resulting improvements in casualty survival, current evidence shows persistent difficulties in achieving best care with tourniquet use for individual trauma patients. Nevertheless, contemporary tourniquet use incorporates key lessons learned over the last 14 years of war that include: (1) tourniquet use reliably stops bleeding from limb wounds and prevents mortality in prehospital settings; and (2) brief tourniquet use appears to be safe. These 2 lessons have become so evident that civilian emergency medical systems have begun using them, albeit unevenly. Collection and interpretation of data of casualties with tourniquet use have showed that such intervention has lifesaving benefit through 2 mechanisms: control of both ongoing hemorrhage and shock severity. The next generation of interventions in bleeding control involves developing the skill sets, education, and standards of tourniquet users which may improve hemorrhage control in wars to come.

  10. A programmable quantum current standard from the Josephson and the quantum Hall effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, W., E-mail: wilfrid.poirier@lne.fr; Lafont, F.; Djordjevic, S.; Schopfer, F.; Devoille, L. [Quantum metrology group, Laboratoire National de métrologie et d' Essais, 29 avenue Roger Hennequin, 78197 Trappes (France)

    2014-01-28

    We propose a way to realize a programmable quantum current standard (PQCS) from the Josephson voltage standard and the quantum Hall resistance standard (QHR) exploiting the multiple connection technique provided by the quantum Hall effect (QHE) and the exactness of the cryogenic current comparator. The PQCS could lead to breakthroughs in electrical metrology like the realization of a programmable quantum current source, a quantum ampere-meter, and a simplified closure of the quantum metrological triangle. Moreover, very accurate universality tests of the QHE could be performed by comparing PQCS based on different QHRs.

  11. Across-province standardization and comparative analysis of time-to-care intervals for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Zoann

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A set of consistent, standardized definitions of intervals and populations on which to report across provinces is needed to inform the Provincial/Territorial Deputy Ministries of Health on progress of the Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care. The objectives of this project were to: 1 identify a set of criteria and variables needed to create comparable measures of important time-to-cancer-care intervals that could be applied across provinces and 2 use the measures to compare time-to-care across participating provinces for lung and colorectal cancer patients diagnosed in 2004. Methods A broad-based group of stakeholders from each of the three participating cancer agencies was assembled to identify criteria for time-to-care intervals to standardize, evaluate possible intervals and their corresponding start and end time points, and finalize the selection of intervals to pursue. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified for the patient population and the selected time points to reduce potential selection bias. The provincial 2004 colorectal and lung cancer data were used to illustrate across-province comparisons for the selected time-to-care intervals. Results Criteria identified as critical for time-to-care intervals and corresponding start and end points were: 1 relevant to patients, 2 relevant to clinical care, 3 unequivocally defined, and 4 currently captured consistently across cancer agencies. Time from diagnosis to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment and the smaller components, time from diagnosis to first consult with an oncologist and time from first consult to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment, were the only intervals that met all four criteria. Timeliness of care for the intervals evaluated was similar between the provinces for lung cancer patients but significant differences were found for colorectal cancer patients. Conclusion We identified criteria important for selecting time-to-care intervals

  12. Requirements for a minimum standard of care for phenylketonuria: the patients’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, ORPHA716) is an inherited disorder that affects about one in every 10,000 children born in Europe. Early and continuous application of a modified diet is largely successful in preventing the devastating brain damage associated with untreated PKU. The management of PKU is inconsistent: there are few national guidelines, and these tend to be incomplete and implemented sporadically. In this article, the first-ever pan- European patient/carer perspective on optimal PKU care, the European Society for Phenylketonuria and Allied Disorders (E.S.PKU) proposes recommendations for a minimum standard of care for PKU, to underpin the development of new pan-European guideline for the management of PKU. New standards of best practice should guarantee equal access to screening, treatment and monitoring throughout Europe. Screening protocols and interpretation of screening results should be standardised. Experienced Centres of Expertise are required, in line with current European Union policy, to guarantee a defined standard of multidisciplinary treatment and care for all medical and social aspects of PKU. Women of childbearing age require especially intensive management, due to the risk of severe risks to the foetus conferred by uncontrolled PKU. All aspects of treatment should be reimbursed to ensure uniform access across Europe to guideline-driven, evidence-based care. The E.S.PKU urges PKU healthcare professionals caring for people with PKU to take the lead in developing evidence based guidelines on PKU, while continuing to play an active role in serving as the voice of patients and their families, whose lives are affected by the condition. PMID:24341788

  13. Maintenance standards, care and control of the radiation protection material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasesco, L.

    2004-01-01

    The present protocol in Radiology, Tomography, surgical block and intensive care unit in the Britanic Hospital from Uruguay.Between their topics find care procedures in protective clothes, periodic and control methods, material record,and staff assigned

  14. Enhanced recovery after elective colorectal surgery: now the standard of care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2011-09-01

    Enhanced recovery programmes have been studied in randomised trials with evidence of quicker recovery of gut function, reduced morbidity, mortality and hospital stay and improved physiological and nutritional outcomes. They aim to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of surgery and consequently the uncontrolled stress response. The key elements, reduced pre-operative fasting, intravenous fluid restriction and early feeding after surgery, are in conflict with traditional management plans but are supported by strong clinical evidence. Given the strength of the current data enhanced recovery should now be the standard of care.

  15. Current Status of the IAU Working Group for Numerical Standards of Fundamental Astronomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luzum, B; Capitaine, N; Fienga, A; Folkner, W; Fukushima, T; Hilton, J; Hohenkerk, C; Krasinsky, G; Petit, G; Pitjeva, E; Soffel, M; Wallace, P

    2007-01-01

    ...) for Numerical Standards of Fundamental Astronomy. The goal of the WG are to update "IAU Current Best Estimates" conforming with IAU Resolutions, the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS...

  16. Evaluation of uncertainties in femtoampere current measurement for the number concentration standard of aerosol nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hiromu; Ehara, Kensei

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated uncertainties in current measurement by the electrometer at the current level on the order of femtoamperes. The electrometer was the one used in the Faraday-cup aerosol electrometer of the Japanese national standard for number concentration of aerosol nanoparticles in which the accuracy of the absolute current is not required, but the net current which is obtained as the difference in currents under two different conditions must be measured accurately. The evaluation was done experimentally at the current level of 20 fA, which was much smaller than the intervals between the electrometer's calibration points at +1, +0.5, −0.5 and −1 pA. The slope of the response curve for the relationship between the 'true' and measured current, which is crucial in the above measurement, was evaluated locally at many different points within the ±1 pA range for deviation from the slope determined by a linear regression of the calibration data. The sum of the current induced by a flow of charged particles and a bias current from a current-source instrument was measured by the electrometer while the particle current was toggled on and off. The net particle current was obtained as the difference in the measured currents between the toggling, while at the same time the current was estimated from the particle concentration read by a condensation particle counter. The local slope was calculated as the ratio of the measured to estimated currents at each bias current setting. The standard deviation of the local slope values observed at varied bias currents was about 0.003, which was calculated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the treatment of the bias current. The combined standard uncertainty of the slope, which was calculated from the uncertainty of the slope by linear regression and the variability of the slope, was calculated to be about 0.004

  17. Comparison of the Standard of Air Leakage in Current Metal Duct Systems in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Yuhui; Wang, Jiqian; Feng, Lu; Li, Xingwu; Hu, Chunlin; Shi, Junshe; Xu, Qingsong; Qiao, Leilei

    2018-01-01

    Based on the requirements of air leakage of metal ducts in Chinese design standards, technical measures and construction standards, this paper compares the development history, the classification of air pressure levels and the air tightness levels of air leakage standards of current Chinese and international metal ducts, sums up the differences, finds shortage by investigating the design and construction status and access to information, and makes recommendations, hoping to help the majority of engineering and technical personnel.

  18. Risk assessment based on current release standards for radioactive surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1993-09-01

    Standards for uncontrolled releases of radioactive surface contamination have been in existence in the United States for about two decades. Such standards have been issued by various agencies, including the US Department of Energy. This paper reviews the technical basis of published standards, identifies areas in need of revision, provides risk interpretations based on current technical knowledge and the regulatory environment, and offers suggestions for improvements

  19. An integrated health care standard for the management and prevention of obesity in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, J.C.; Halberstadt, J.; Noordam, H.; Niemer, S.I.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Partnership Overweight Netherlands (PON) is a collaboration between 18 partners, which are national organizations of health care providers, health insurance companies and patient organizations. The PON published an integrated health care standard for obesity in November 2010.The integrated

  20. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology's standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities' attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand.

  1. Palliative care in India: Current progress and future needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its limited coverage, palliative care has been present in India for about 20 years. Obstacles in the growth of palliative care in India are too many and not only include factors like population density, poverty, geographical diversity, restrictive policies regarding opioid prescription, workforce development at base level, but also limited national palliative care policy and lack of institutional interest in palliative care. Nonetheless we have reasons to be proud in that we have overcome several hurdles and last two decades have seen palpable changes in the mindset of health care providers and policy makers with respect to need of palliative care in India. Systematic and continuous education for medical staff is mandatory, and a major break-through for achieving this purpose would be to increase the number of courses and faculties in palliative medicine at most universities.

  2. Defining a caring hospital by using currently implemented survey tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Nancy

    2010-09-01

    Health care organizations are constantly striving to provide a more cost-effective and higher quality treatment within a caring environment. However, balancing the demands of regulatory agencies with the holistic needs of the patient is challenging. Further challenging is how to define those hospitals that provide an exceptional caring environment for their patients. By using survey tools that are already being administered in hospital settings, the opportunity exists to analyze the results obtained from these tools to define a hospital as a caring organization without the added burden of separate data collection.

  3. A framework for current public mental health care practice in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse Van Rensburg, A B

    2007-11-01

    One of the main aims of the new Mental Health Care Act, Act No. 17 of 2002 (MHCA) is to promote the human rights of people with mental disabilities in South Africa. However, the upholding of these rights seems to be subject to the availability of resources. Chapter 2 of the MHCA clarifies the responsibility of the State to provide infrastructure and systems. Chapters 5, 6 and 7 of the Act define and regulate the different categories of mental health care users, clarify the procedures around these categories and spell out mental health practitioners' roles and responsibilities in this regard. Also according to the National Health Act No. 61 of 2003, the State remains the key role player in mental health care provision, being responsible for adequate mental health infrastructure and resource allocation. Due to "limited resources" practitioners however often work in environments where staff ratios may be fractional of what should be expected and in units of which the physical structure and security is totally inadequate. The interface between professional responsibility of clinical workers versus the inadequacy of clinical interventions resulting from infrastructure and staffing constraints needs to be defined. This paper considered recent legislation currently relevant to mental health care practice in order to delineate the legal, ethical and labour framework in which public sector mental health practitioners operate as state employees. These included the Mental Health Care Act, No.17 of 2002; the National Health Act, No. 61 of 2003 and the proposed Traditional Health Practitioners Act, No. 35 of 2004. Formal legal review of and advice on this legislation as it pertains to public sector mental health practitioners as state employees, is necessary and should form the basis of the principles and standards for care endorsed by organized mental health care practitioner groups such as the South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP).

  4. Implementing the psychosocial standards in pediatric cancer: Current staffing and services available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Michele A; Canter, Kimberly S; Chen, Fang Fang; Kolb, E Anders; Sandler, Eric; Wiener, Lori; Kazak, Anne E

    2017-11-01

    Fifteen evidence-based Standards for Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families (Standards) were published in 2015. The Standards cover a broad range of topics and circumstances and require qualified multidisciplinary staff to be implemented. This paper presents data on the availability of psychosocial staff and existing practices at pediatric oncology programs in the United States, providing data that can be used to advocate for expanded services and prepare for implementation of the Standards. Up to three healthcare professionals from 144 programs (72% response rate) participated in an online survey conducted June-December 2016. There were 99 pediatric oncologists with clinical leadership responsibility (Medical Director/Clinical Director), 132 psychosocial leaders in pediatric oncology (Director of Psychosocial Services/Manager/most senior staff member), and 58 administrators in pediatric oncology (Administrative Director/Business Administrator/Director of Operations). The primary outcomes were number and type of psychosocial staff, psychosocial practices, and identified challenges in the delivery of psychosocial care. Over 90% of programs have social workers and child life specialists who provide care to children with cancer and their families. Fewer programs have psychologists (60%), neuropsychologists (31%), or psychiatrists (19%). Challenges in psychosocial care are primarily based on pragmatic issues related to funding and reimbursement. Most participating pediatric oncology programs appear to have at least the basic level of staffing necessary to implement of some of the Standards. However, the lack of a more comprehensive multidisciplinary team is a likely barrier in the implementation of the full set of Standards. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. PALLIATIVE CARE IN GERIATRICS: CURRENT ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Рonomareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to identify the main problems and prospects of development of palliative care in geriatrics at the present stage. Method of research was to analyze the printed and electronic databases that meet the stated issues. The results of the study highlight the problems of the development of palliative care in geriatric practice: the lack of a developed procedure of rendering palliative care and adequate elderly patient selection criteria, the lack of trained professional staff. The main prospects-association of palliative practices and concepts of modern geriatrics required specialized geriatric assessment and the provision of clinical, medical, social and socio-psychological geriatric syndromes. While promising option for the development of palliative care geriatrics is the integration into the existing health care system, acceptance of the fact that it is a part of the specialized geriatric care. This requires the involvement and training of not only specialists with medical education, but also persons without medical training from among social workers and volunteers working in palliative care. Therefore, the obtained data allowed to conclude that topical is the development of palliative care in geriatrics, taking into account not only clinical but medico-social, socio-psychological features.

  6. Current use and possibilities of robots in care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Robots are seen as one of the possibilities to provide care to older people, especially when care by humans becomes scarce and too expensive. In the past sixty years, however, robots have diversified into many different types with a very broad range of functionalities. Despite this large

  7. Mental health care in Nepal: current situation and challenges for development of a district mental health care plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitel, Nagendra P; Jordans, Mark Jd; Adhikari, Anup; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Hanlon, Charlotte; Lund, Crick; Komproe, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    Globally mental health problems are a serious public health concern. Currently four out of five people with severe mental illness in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) receive no effective treatment. There is an urgent need to address this enormous treatment gap. Changing the focus of specialist mental health workers (psychiatrists and psychologists) from only service delivery to also designing and managing mental health services; building clinical capacity of the primary health care (PHC) workers, and providing supervision and quality assurance of mental health services may help in scaling up mental health services in LMICs. Little is known however, about the mental health policy and services context for these strategies in fragile-state settings, such as Nepal. A standard situation analysis tool was developed by the PRogramme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME) consortium to systematically analyze and describe the current gaps in mental health care in Nepal, in order to inform the development of a district level mental health care plan (MHCP). It comprised six sections; general information (e.g. population, socio-economic conditions); mental health policies and plans; mental health treatment coverage; district health services; and community services. Data was obtained from secondary sources, including scientific publications, reports, project documents and hospital records. Mental health policy exists in Nepal, having been adopted in 1997, but implementation of the policy framework has yet to begin. In common with other LMICs, the budget allocated for mental health is minimal. Mental health services are concentrated in the big cities, with 0.22 psychiatrists and 0.06 psychologists per 100,000 population. The key challenges experienced in developing a district level MHCP included, overburdened health workers, lack of psychotropic medicines in the PHC, lack of mental health supervision in the existing system, and lack of a coordinating body in the Ministry

  8. Team working in intensive care: current evidence and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joanne; West, Michael A; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2010-12-01

    It has recently been argued that the future of intensive care medicine will rely on high quality management and teamwork. Therefore, this review takes an organizational psychology perspective to examine the most recent research on the relationship between teamwork, care processes, and patient outcomes in intensive care. Interdisciplinary communication within a team is crucial for the development of negotiated shared treatment goals and short-team patient outcomes. Interventions for maximizing team communication have received substantial interest in recent literature. Intensive care coordination is not a linear process, and intensive care teams often fail to discuss how to implement goals, trigger and align activities, or reflect on their performance. Despite a move toward interdisciplinary team working, clinical decision-making is still problematic and continues to be perceived as a top-down and authoritative process. The topic of team leadership in intensive care is underexplored and requires further research. Based on findings from the most recent research evidence in medicine and management, four principles are identified for improving the effectiveness of team working in intensive care: engender professional efficacy, create stable teams and leaders, develop trust and participative safety, and enable frequent team reflexivity.

  9. Deliberative democracy in health care: current challenges and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    There is a vast body of literature on deliberative, participative, or engaged democracy. In the area of health care there is a rapidly expanding literature on deliberative democracy as embodied in various notions of public engagement, shared decision-making (SDM), patient-centered care, and patient/care provider autonomy over the past few decades. It is useful to review such literature to get a sense of the challenges and prospects of introducing deliberative democracy in health care. This paper reviews the key literature on deliberative democracy and SDM in health care settings with a focus on identifying the main challenges of promoting this approach in health care, and recognizing its progress so far for mapping out its future prospects in the context of advanced countries. Several databases were searched to identify the literature pertinent to the subject of this study. A total of 56 key studies in English were identified and reviewed carefully for indications and evidence of challenges and/or promising avenues of promoting deliberative democracy in health care. Time pressure, lack of financial motivation, entrenched professional interests, informational imbalance, practical feasibility, cost, diversity of decisions, and contextual factors are noted as the main challenges. As for the prospects, greater clarity on conception of public engagement and policy objectives, real commitment of the authorities to public input, documenting evidence of the effectiveness of public involvement, development of patient decision supports, training of health professionals in SDM, and use of multiple and flexible methods of engagement leadership suited to specific contexts are the main findings in the reviewed literature. Seeking deliberative democracy in health care is both challenging and rewarding. The challenges have been more or less identified. However, its prospects are potentially significant. Such prospects are more likely to materialize if deliberative democracy is

  10. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    health policy, human rights and rehabilitation. .... Health Policy staff covering Psycho-social rehabilitation ... They outline the essential aspects of care for the treatment and ..... within the criminal justice system (e.g. prisons and Places of Safety).

  11. Pain management in primary carecurrent perspectives | Meyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to a 1998 World Health Organization Survey of 26 000 primary care ... in pain medicine and continue to follow the biomedical approach, which ... The modern paradigm of pain management has moved from this biomedical to the ...

  12. The myth of standardized workflow in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, G Talley; Beasley, John W; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Stone, Jamie A; Smith, Paul D; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2016-01-01

    Primary care efficiency and quality are essential for the nation's health. The demands on primary care physicians (PCPs) are increasing as healthcare becomes more complex. A more complete understanding of PCP workflow variation is needed to guide future healthcare redesigns. This analysis evaluates workflow variation in terms of the sequence of tasks performed during patient visits. Two patient visits from 10 PCPs from 10 different United States Midwestern primary care clinics were analyzed to determine physician workflow. Tasks and the progressive sequence of those tasks were observed, documented, and coded by task category using a PCP task list. Variations in the sequence and prevalence of tasks at each stage of the primary care visit were assessed considering the physician, the patient, the visit's progression, and the presence of an electronic health record (EHR) at the clinic. PCP workflow during patient visits varies significantly, even for an individual physician, with no single or even common workflow pattern being present. The prevalence of specific tasks shifts significantly as primary care visits progress to their conclusion but, notably, PCPs collect patient information throughout the visit. PCP workflows were unpredictable during face-to-face patient visits. Workflow emerges as the result of a "dance" between physician and patient as their separate agendas are addressed, a side effect of patient-centered practice. Future healthcare redesigns should support a wide variety of task sequences to deliver high-quality primary care. The development of tools such as electronic health records must be based on the realities of primary care visits if they are to successfully support a PCP's mental and physical work, resulting in effective, safe, and efficient primary care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Transresistance calibrations and temperature dependence evaluation of a magnetic bridge current sensor with shunt standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Kon, S; Tadatsu, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a magnetic bridge current sensor for dc current measurements and a calibration system developed for the current sensor. The current sensor forms a magnetic bridge structure with a magnetic fluid core. The calibration system has been developed by using standard shunts for a test current range of 1 mA to 100 A and establishing a comparison method with a switching/sampling system. In the calibration system, the transresistances of the current sensor are measured and the uncertainties of the system are estimated for the input test current range. Also, the temperature dependence on the transresistances is investigated for temperatures ranging from −40 to 100 °C

  14. National BTS bronchiectasis audit 2012: is the quality standard being adhered to in adult secondary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adam T; Routh, Chris; Welham, Sally

    2014-03-01

    A significant step towards improving care of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis was the creation of the British Thoracic Society (BTS) national guidelines and the quality standard. A BTS bronchiectasis audit was conducted between 1 October and 30 November 2012, in adult patients with bronchiectasis attending secondary care, against the BTS quality standard. Ninety-eight institutions took part, submitting a total of 3147 patient records. The audit highlighted the variable adoption of the quality standard. It will allow the host institutions to benchmark against UK figures and drive quality improvement programmes to promote the quality standard and improve patient care.

  15. Monitoring the standard of care of diabetes mellitus type 2 in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complying of diabetic patients with the standard administered medical care at primary health care units is an important issue. Revealing the rates of compliance provide important information that can be used both by the medical staff to evaluate the administered medical care and by the patients to evaluate ...

  16. A survey of current and anticipated use of standard and specialist equipment by UK optometrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabasia, Priya L; Edgar, David F; Garway-Heath, David F; Lawrenson, John G

    2014-09-01

    To investigate current and anticipated use of equipment and information technology (IT) in community optometric practice in the UK, and to elicit optometrists' views on adoption of specialist equipment and IT. An anonymous online questionnaire was developed, covering use of standard and specialist diagnostic equipment, and IT. The survey was distributed to a random sample of 1300 UK College of Optometrists members. Four hundred and thirty-two responses were received (response rate = 35%). Enhanced (locally commissioned) or additional/separately contracted services were provided by 73% of respondents. Services included glaucoma repeat measures (30% of respondents), glaucoma referral refinement (22%), fast-track referral for wet age-related macular degeneration (48%), and direct cataract referral (40%). Most respondents (88%) reported using non-contact/pneumo tonometry for intra-ocular pressure measurement, with 81% using Goldmann or Perkins tonometry. The most widely used item of specialist equipment was the fundus camera (74% of respondents). Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was used by 15% of respondents, up from 2% in 2007. Notably, 43% of those anticipating purchasing specialist equipment in the next 12 months planned to buy an OCT. 'Paperless' records were used by 39% of respondents, and almost 80% of practices used an electronic patient record/practice management system. Variations in responses between parts of the UK reflect differences in the provision of the General Ophthalmic Services contract or community enhanced services. There was general agreement that specialised equipment enhances clinical care, permits increased involvement in enhanced services, promotes the practice and can be used as a defence in clinico-legal cases, but initial costs and ongoing maintenance can be a financial burden. Respondents generally agreed that IT facilitates administrative flow and secure exchange of health information, and promotes a state-of-the-art practice image

  17. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  18. Constraints on Non-Standard Contributions to the Charged-Current Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Seiji

    1998-01-01

    The success of the quantum level predictions of the Standard Model on the $Z$ boson properties, on $\\mw$ and on $\\mt$, which makes use of the muon lifetime as an input, implies a stringent constraint on new physics contributions to the $V-A$ charged-current interactions among leptons. Observed unitarity of the CKM matrix elements then implies constraints on non-standard contributions to the lepton-quark charged-current interactions. By using the recent electroweak data as inputs, we find the 95% CL limits for the corresponding contact interactions: $\\Lambda_{CC,+}^{\\ell\\ell}>7.5$ TeV and the lepton-quark contact interactions.

  19. A New International Standard for "Actions from Waves and Currents on Coastal Structures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørum, Alf; Burcharth, Hans F.; Goda, Yoshimi

    2007-01-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is going to issue a new standard concerning "Actions from Waves and Currents on Coastal Structures," which becomes the first international standard in coastal engineering. It is composed of a normative part (29 pages), an informative part (80...... pages) and Bibliography ( 17 pages). The normative part describes what is considered as the norm of the matters in concern, while the informative part provides the information on recommended practice. The paper introduces the main points of the normative part and discusses the influence of the new...

  20. Deliberative democracy in health care: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaei J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jalil Safaei Department of Economics, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, CanadaBackground: There is a vast body of literature on deliberative, participative, or engaged democracy. In the area of health care there is a rapidly expanding literature on deliberative democracy as embodied in various notions of public engagement, shared decision-making (SDM, patient-centered care, and patient/care provider autonomy over the past few decades. It is useful to review such literature to get a sense of the challenges and prospects of introducing deliberative democracy in health care.Objective: This paper reviews the key literature on deliberative democracy and SDM in health care settings with a focus on identifying the main challenges of promoting this approach in health care, and recognizing its progress so far for mapping out its future prospects in the context of advanced countries.Method: Several databases were searched to identify the literature pertinent to the subject of this study. A total of 56 key studies in English were identified and reviewed carefully for indications and evidence of challenges and/or promising avenues of promoting deliberative democracy in health care.Results: Time pressure, lack of financial motivation, entrenched professional interests, informational imbalance, practical feasibility, cost, diversity of decisions, and contextual factors are noted as the main challenges. As for the prospects, greater clarity on conception of public engagement and policy objectives, real commitment of the authorities to public input, documenting evidence of the effectiveness of public involvement, development of patient decision supports, training of health professionals in SDM, and use of multiple and flexible methods of engagement leadership suited to specific contexts are the main findings in the reviewed literature.Conclusion: Seeking deliberative democracy in health care is both challenging and rewarding. The

  1. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area.

  2. From guidelines to standards of care for open tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, R W; Rahman, S; Page, P; Pallister, I

    2015-09-01

    The standards for the management of open fractures of the lower limb published by the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic surgeons (BAPRAS) and British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) were introduced to improve the treatment received by patients after open injury to the lower limb. These Standards were released after BAPRAS/BOA published Guidelines for the management of open tibial fractures. We wished to determine the impact of these Standards upon the surgical management of open tibial fractures by comparing patients admitted to an orthoplastic centre in the 45 months concluding December 2009 (the Guidelines era) with those admitted during 2011 (the Standards era). Surgical procedures required during the first 30 days and 12 months after injury were determined. Cases were divided into 'directly admitted patients' (DAP) and 'transferred patients' (TP). Standards-era patients were divided further into those who had surgery exclusively at the orthoplastic centre (orthoplastic patients (OPP)) and those transferred after surgery (TASP). The number of TP trebled in frequency in the Standards era, 25% of whom were transferred before surgery. Significantly fewer surgical procedures were required for DAP and OPP groups compared with TP (and TASP) groups in both eras (Mann-Whitney U-test, p=0.05). DAP and OPP groups during the Standards era underwent the fewest procedures, with the vast majority of cases treated with two or fewer procedures in the first 12 months (88% and 80%, respectively, compared with 61% in the Guidelines era). In the Guidelines era, 44% of TP cases and in the Standards era 39% of TP and 29% of TASP groups underwent two or fewer procedures. Approximately two-thirds of open tibial fractures managed in our orthoplastic centre were patients transferred after surgery. The greatest impact of the Standards was evident for those who underwent surgery exclusively in the orthoplastic centre, reflecting a more deliberate combined strategy

  3. Preconception care of women with diabetes: a review of current guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM continues to rise worldwide. More women from developing countries who are in the reproductive age group have diabetes resulting in more pregnancies complicated by T2DM, and placing both mother and foetus at higher risk. Management of these risks is best achieved through comprehensive preconception care and glycaemic control, both prior to, and during pregnancy. The aim of this review was to compare the quality and content of current guidelines concerned with the preconception care of women with diabetes and to develop a summary of recommendations to assist in the management of diabetic women contemplating pregnancy. Methods Relevant clinical guidelines were identified through a search of several databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS and The Cochrane Library and relevant websites. Five guidelines were identified. Each guideline was assessed for quality using the AGREE instrument. Guideline recommendations were extracted, compared and contrasted. Results All guidelines were assessed as being of high quality and strongly recommended for use in practice. All were consistent in counselling about the risk of congenital malformation related to uncontrolled blood sugar preconceptionally, ensuring adequate contraception until glycaemic control is achieved, use of HBA1C to monitor metabolic control, when to commence insulin and switching from ACE inhibitors to other antihypertensives. Major differences were in the targets recommended for optimal metabolic control and opinion regarding the usage of metformin as an adjunct or alternative treatment before or during pregnancy. Conclusions International guidelines for the care of women with diabetes who are contemplating pregnancy are consistent in their recommendations; however some are more comprehensive than others. Having established current standards for the preconception care of diabetic women, there is now a need to focus on guideline

  4. standards of diabetic care - successes and failures of a patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical care provided for adult diabetic patients in primary ... An analysis of the prevalences of obesity, ... managed elsewhere were selected for the study. ..... Levitt NS, Bradshaw D, Zwarenstein MF, Bawa AA, Maphumolo S. Audit of public sector ... sis, Meta. - embryo. Neuroen cycle; Sp implanta. Prostagla. Part 11: C.

  5. Evaluation of 2 new optical biometry devices and comparison with the current gold standard biometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-An; Hirnschall, Nino; Findl, Oliver

    2011-03-01

    To compare 2 new optical biometry devices with the present gold standard biometer. Vienna Institute for Research in Ocular Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria. Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. In patients scheduled for cataract surgery, measurements performed with the current gold standard optical biometer (IOLMaster) were compared with those of 2 new optical biometers, the Lenstar LS 900 (optical low-coherence reflectometry [OLCR] device; substudy 1) and the IOLMaster 500 (partial coherence interferometry [PCI] device; substudy 2). The duration of patient data entry and of the actual measurement process and the time from intraocular lens power calculation to printout were calculated. The mean difference in axial length measurements was 0.01 mm ± 0.05 (SD) between the gold standard device and the new OLCR device and 0.01 ± 0.02 mm between the gold standard device and the new PCI device (P=.12 and P gold standard device (mean difference 209 ± 127 seconds), and measurements with the gold standard device took significantly longer than with the new PCI device (mean difference 82 ± 46 seconds) (both P gold standard device. Measurements with the new OLCR device took twice as long as those with the gold standard device. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Audit, guidelines and standards: clinical governance for hip fracture care in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Colin T; Hutchison, James D

    To report on experience of national-level audit, guidelines and standards for hip fracture care in Scotland. Scottish Hip Fracture Audit (from 1993) documents case-mix, process and outcomes of hip fracture care in Scotland. Evidence-based national guidelines on hip fracture care are available (1997, updated 2002). Hip fracture serves as a tracer condition by the health quality assurance authority for its work on older people, which reported in 2004. Audit data are used locally to document care and support and monitor service developments. Synergy between the guidelines and the audit provides a means of improving care locally and monitoring care nationally. External review by the quality assurance body shows to what extent guideline-based standards relating to A&E care, pre-operative delay, multidisciplinary care and audit participation are met. Three national-level initiatives on hip fracture care have delivered: Reliable and large-scale comparative information on case-mix, care and outcomes; evidence-based recommendations on care; and nationally accountable standards inspected and reported by the national health quality assurance authority. These developments are linked and synergistic, and enjoy both clinical and managerial support. They provide an evolving framework for clinical governance, with casemix-adjusted outcome assessment for hip fracture care as a next step.

  7. Simplified tools for measuring retention in care in antiretroviral treatment program in Ethiopia: cohort and current retention in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Yibeltal; Worku, Alemayehu; Wouters, Edwin; Koole, Olivier; Haile Mariam, Damen; Van Damme, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Patient retention in care is a critical challenge for antiretroviral treatment programs. This is mainly because retention in care is related to adherence to treatment and patient survival. It is therefore imperative that health facilities and programs measure patient retention in care. However, the currently available tools, such as Kaplan Meier, for measuring retention in care have a lot of practical limitations. The objective of this study was to develop simplified tools for measuring retention in care. Retrospective cohort data were collected from patient registers in nine health facilities in Ethiopia. Retention in care was the primary outcome for the study. Tools were developed to measure "current retention" in care during a specific period of time for a specific "ART-age group" and "cohort retention" in care among patients who were followed for the last "Y" number of years on ART. "Probability of retention" based on the tool for "cohort retention" in care was compared with "probability of retention" based on Kaplan Meier. We found that the new tools enable to measure "current retention" and "cohort retention" in care. We also found that the tools were easy to use and did not require advanced statistical skills. Both "current retention" and "cohort retention" are lower among patients in the first two "ART-age groups" and "ART-age cohorts" than in subsequent "ART-age groups" and "ART-age cohorts". The "probability of retention" based on the new tools were found to be similar to the "probability of retention" based on Kaplan Meier. The simplified tools for "current retention" and "cohort retention" will enable practitioners and program managers to measure and monitor rates of retention in care easily and appropriately. We therefore recommend that health facilities and programs start to use these tools in their efforts to improve retention in care and patient outcomes.

  8. Simplified tools for measuring retention in care in antiretroviral treatment program in Ethiopia: cohort and current retention in care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibeltal Assefa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patient retention in care is a critical challenge for antiretroviral treatment programs. This is mainly because retention in care is related to adherence to treatment and patient survival. It is therefore imperative that health facilities and programs measure patient retention in care. However, the currently available tools, such as Kaplan Meier, for measuring retention in care have a lot of practical limitations. The objective of this study was to develop simplified tools for measuring retention in care. METHODS: Retrospective cohort data were collected from patient registers in nine health facilities in Ethiopia. Retention in care was the primary outcome for the study. Tools were developed to measure "current retention" in care during a specific period of time for a specific "ART-age group" and "cohort retention" in care among patients who were followed for the last "Y" number of years on ART. "Probability of retention" based on the tool for "cohort retention" in care was compared with "probability of retention" based on Kaplan Meier. RESULTS: We found that the new tools enable to measure "current retention" and "cohort retention" in care. We also found that the tools were easy to use and did not require advanced statistical skills. Both "current retention" and "cohort retention" are lower among patients in the first two "ART-age groups" and "ART-age cohorts" than in subsequent "ART-age groups" and "ART-age cohorts". The "probability of retention" based on the new tools were found to be similar to the "probability of retention" based on Kaplan Meier. CONCLUSION: The simplified tools for "current retention" and "cohort retention" will enable practitioners and program managers to measure and monitor rates of retention in care easily and appropriately. We therefore recommend that health facilities and programs start to use these tools in their efforts to improve retention in care and patient outcomes.

  9. Standards of care issues with anticoagulation in real-world populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend anticoagulants for reducing the risk of stroke in appropriate patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the prevention of recurrent VTE. Warfarin is the standard of care for both NVAF and VTE, yet International Normalized Ratio (INR) control remains suboptimal, even in the clinical trial setting. Maintaining INR within the recommended therapeutic range is associated with better outcomes in these distinct populations. In VTE, high rates of recurrence have been reported during the first few weeks of treatment, emphasizing the importance of surveillance during this time and of early optimization of anticoagulation therapy. The NVAF population tends to have more comorbidities and requires longer-term therapy. It is important to keep in mind that real-world patient populations are more complex than those in controlled studies. Patients with multiple comorbidities are particularly challenging, and physicians may focus on clinically urgent issues rather than anticoagulation optimization. Despite the many complexities associated with the use of warfarin, it remains a mainstay of anticoagulation therapy. Aligning financial incentives and improving care coordination are important factors in moving toward better outcomes for patients who need anticoagulation therapy. The increased focus on value-based care and evolving approaches to patient treatment could lead more physicians and payers to consider alternatives to warfarin, including the use of novel oral anticoagulants.

  10. Advance Care Planning Documentation in Electronic Health Records: Current Challenges and Recommendations for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Daniela; Panariello, Natalie; Henrich, Natalie; Hammes, Bernard; Hanson, Laura C; Meier, Diane E; Guinn, Nancy; Corrigan, Janet; Hubber, Sean; Luetke-Stahlman, Hannah; Block, Susan

    2018-04-01

    To develop a set of clinically relevant recommendations to improve the state of advance care planning (ACP) documentation in the electronic health record (EHR). Advance care planning (ACP) is a key process that supports goal-concordant care. For preferences to be honored, clinicians must be able to reliably record, find, and use ACP documentation. However, there are no standards to guide ACP documentation in the electronic health record (EHR). We interviewed 21 key informants to understand the strengths and weaknesses of EHR documentation systems for ACP and identify best practices. We analyzed these interviews using a qualitative content analysis approach and subsequently developed a preliminary set of recommendations. These recommendations were vetted and refined in a second round of input from a national panel of content experts. Informants identified six themes regarding current inadequacies in documentation and accessibility of ACP information and opportunities for improvement. We offer a set of concise, clinically relevant recommendations, informed by expert opinion, to improve the state of ACP documentation in the EHR.

  11. [International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC)--comments from the German point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, S; Bauer, T; Diel, R; Hedrich, A; Magdorf, K; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Schaberg, T; Loddenkemper, R

    2012-04-01

    The "International Standards for Tuberculosis Care" (ISTC) were developed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and others to provide internationally agreed and, if possible, evidence-based standards for tuberculosis care including the care by private providers who are not part of national tuberculosis programmes or health-care systems. Hence, the ISTC primarily address resource-restrained countries with high tuberculosis prevalence. In this article, the German translation of the 21 standards from 2009 is presented - addressing diagnostic and therapeutic standards, co-infection (especially with HIV) and public-health issues. The accompanying comments show how these standards have to be modified for Germany due to the medical resources available here and country-specific characteristics respectively. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. [FRC measurement in intensive care patients. A definition of standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauer, H J; Lorenz, B A; Kox, W J

    1998-10-01

    Determination of Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) can be performed through washout methods, indicator gas dilution or bodyplethysmography. Some of these techniques have been adapted for use in intensive care patients whilst being mechanically ventilated. However, most measurement setups are bulky, cumbersome to use and their running costs are high. Hence FRC measurement has not become a routine method in intensive care although it offers considerable advantages in the management of ventilated patients such as the determination of "best PEEP", the detection of progressive alveolar collapse in the course of acute lung injury and during weaning from mechanical ventilation. Up to now most efforts to improve and simplify FRC measurement were made at the expense of accuracy. An ideal method ought to be accurate, easy to handle and cost-effective. It should supply not only FRC data but also information about intrapulmonary gas distribution and dead space. These demands can be met using modern data acquisition software. The pros and cons of all methods available for FRC measurement are discussed in view of their suitability for intensive care patients. A conventional nitrogen washout using emission spectroscopy for measurement of nitrogen concentration gives satisfying exact values for the determination of the parameters mentioned above. The measurement error can be lowered under 5% by special corrections for flow and nitrogen signal (delay and rise times, changes of gas viscosity). For flow measurement a normal pneumotachograph can be used. Using a laptop computer for data acquisition the bed-side monitor fulfills most of the demands in intensive care. It is then also possible to measure indices of intrapulmonary gas distribution such as Alveolar Mixing Efficiency and Lung Clearance Index.

  13. The 2004 Fitts Lecture: Current Perspective on Combat Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    deliver this lecture, I actually wondered whether he had called the wrong number. Dr. Basil Pruitt described Dr. William P. Fitts in his 1992 Fitts Lecture...in our ability to care for injured casualties in a deployed setting. Dr. Basil Pruitt eloquently described the interaction between the AAST and...ation ( ABA ) verified burn centers (Fig. 3) in proximity to the USAF hubs.11 We anticipated between 500 and 2,500 burn casualties and created a

  14. Electromagnetic field standards in Central and Eastern European countries: current state and stipulations for international harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajsek, P; Pakhomov, A G; Klauenberg, B J

    2002-04-01

    Electromagnetic field standards in the West are based on well-established acute biological effects that could be considered as signaling a potentially adverse health effect. The specific absorption rate, which is proportional to the tissue heating (thermal effects), represents the basic restriction of exposure to Radio-Frequency (RF) fields. On the other hand, Eastern European standards are designed to protect from potential non-thermal effects that might be caused by chronic exposure to very low intensities, where a so-called "power load" (a product of field intensity and duration of exposure) represents the basic limitation. Thus, electromagnetic field standards in Eastern European countries differ considerably from those which are proposed by the International Commission of Non-ionizing Radiation Protection and the Standards Coordinating Committee 28 of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. In the present paper, the strategies for development of exposure limit values in electromagnetic fields standards currently in force in Eastern and Central European countries are discussed. Some differences as well as similarities of the national health and safety standards and the main obstacles to harmonization of these standards with those being established by Western national and international organizations and agencies are presented.

  15. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!. We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the ?Standards? also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States ?to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes?. Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  16. Current state of standardization in the field of dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartscher, Markus; Härtig, Frank; Neuschaefer-Rube, Ulrich; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-established non-destructive testing (NDT) technology and has been in use for decades. Moreover, CT has also started to become an important technology for dimensional metrology. But the requirements on dimensional CTs, i.e., on performing coordinate measurements with CT, are different from NDT. For dimensional measurements, the position of interfaces or surfaces is of importance, while this is often less critical in NDT. Standardization plays an important role here as it can create trust in new measurement technologies as is the case for dimensional CT. At the international standardization level, the ISO TC 213 WG 10 is working on specifications for dimensional CT. This paper highlights the demands on international standards in the field of dimensional CT and describes the current developments from the viewpoint of representatives of national and international standardization committees. Key aspects of the discussion are the material influence on the length measurement error E and how E can best be measured. A respective study was performed on hole plates as new reference standards for error testing of length measurements incorporating the material influence. We performed corresponding measurement data analysis and present a further elaborated hole plate design. The authors also comment on different approaches currently pursued and give an outlook on upcoming developments as far as they can be foreseen. (paper)

  17. Glioblastoma: background, standard treatment paradigms, and supportive care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellor, Susan V; Pagano-Young, Teri Ann; Avgeropoulos, Nicholas G

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a brain tumor condition marked by rapid neurological and clinical demise, resulting in disproportionate disability for those affected. Caring for this group of patients is complex, intense, multidisciplinary in nature, and fraught with the need for expensive treatments, surveillance imaging, physician follow-up, and rehabilitative, psychological, and social support interventions. Few of these patients return to the workforce for any meaningful time frame, and because of the enormity of the financial burden that patients, their caregivers, and society face, utilization reviews become the focus of ethical scrutiny. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  18. submitter Flavour-changing neutral currents making and breaking the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Archilli, F; Owen, P; Petridis, K A

    2017-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics is our best description yet of fundamental particles and their interactions, but it is known to be incomplete. As yet undiscovered particles and interactions might exist. One of the most powerful ways to search for new particles is by studying processes known as flavour-changing neutral current decays, whereby a quark changes its flavour without altering its electric charge. One example of such a transition is the decay of a beauty quark into a strange quark. Here we review some intriguing anomalies in these decays, which have revealed potential cracks in the standard model—hinting at the existence of new phenomena.

  19. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Zor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Such complications can preventable or treatable. In this respect, preventive management in the first step burn treatment had very importantly in burn cases. Skin is a barrier which protects evaporative heat loss. In cases of acute burn, hypothermia occurs related to skin loss. For these cases, care must be taken to keep the patient warm. In addition fluid resuscitation is very important in these cases. Furthermore, the damaged tissues are highly susceptible to infection in burned patients. Burn care and rehabilitation includes challenging and complex procedures. Briefly, treatments of burn cases require a multidisciplinary and meticulous approach.

  20. Community mental health care worldwide: current status and further developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Graham; Deb, Tanya; Henderson, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to give an overview of the key issues facing those who are in a position to influence the planning and provision of mental health systems, and who need to address questions of which staff, services and sectors to invest in, and for which patients. The paper considers in turn: a) definitions of community mental health care; b) a conceptual framework to use when evaluating the need for hospital and community mental health care; c) the potential for wider platforms, outside the health service, for mental health improvement, including schools and the workplace; d) data on how far community mental health services have been developed across different regions of the world; e) the need to develop in more detail models of community mental health services for low‐ and middle‐income countries which are directly based upon evidence for those countries; f) how to incorporate mental health practice within integrated models to identify and treat people with comorbid long‐term conditions; g) possible adverse effects of deinstitutionalization. We then present a series of ten recommendations for the future strengthening of health systems to support and treat people with mental illness. PMID:27717265

  1. Global surgery: current evidence for improving surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jennifer C; Shaye, David A

    2017-08-01

    The field of global surgery is undergoing rapid transformation, owing to several recent prominent reports positioning it as a cost-effective means of relieving global disease burden. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in the field of global surgery. Efforts to grow the global surgical workforce and procedural capacity have focused on innovative methods to increase surgeon training, enhance international collaboration, leverage technology, optimize existing health systems, and safely implement task-sharing. Computer modeling offers a novel means of informing policy to optimize timely access to care, equitably promote health and financial protection, and efficiently grow infrastructure. Tools and checklists have recently been developed to enhance data collection and ensure methodologically rigorous publications to inform planning, benchmark surgical systems, promote accurate modeling, track key health indicators, and promote safety. Creation of institutional partnerships and trainee exchanges can enrich training, stimulate commitment to humanitarian work, and promote the equal exchange of ideas and expertise. The recent body of work creates a strong foundation upon which work toward the goal of universal access to safe, affordable surgical care can be built; however, further collection and analysis of country-specific data is necessary for accurate modeling and outcomes research into the efficacy of policies such as task-sharing is greatly needed.

  2. An elective course on current concepts in adult ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ashley H; Weber, Zachary A

    2014-12-15

    To design and evaluate a doctor of pharmacy course exploring disease states commonly encountered in ambulatory care, while applying literature to clinical practice and promoting a continual learning mindset. This elective incorporated a learner-centered teaching approach. Each week, 2 groups of students were assigned a clinical trial to present to their peers. The focus was on clinical application and impact, rather than literature evaluation. A social networking group on Facebook was used to expose students to pharmacy information outside the classroom. Student grades were determined by multiple activities: presentations, participation and moderation of the Facebook group, class participation, quiz scores, and quiz question development. Course evaluations served as a qualitative assessment of student learning and perceptions, quizzes were the most objective assessment of student learning, and presentation evaluations were the most directed assessment of course goals. This elective was an innovative approach to teaching ambulatory care that effectively filled a curricular void. Successful attainment of the primary course goals and objectives was demonstrated through course evaluations, surveys, and quiz and presentation scores.

  3. My Daddy Takes Care of Me! Fathers as Care Providers. Current Population Reports. Household Economic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Lynne M.

    1997-01-01

    This report examines statistical data on fathers caring for their children during mothers' working hours and which types of fathers are the most likely to take care of their children. Data are taken from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, a longitudinal survey conducted at four-month intervals by the Census Bureau. Care by fathers is…

  4. Nursing Care Hour Standards Study. Part 2 thru Part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    2.5749 5.1498 7.7247 10.2996 15*4494 20.5992 (. 8583 ) 1 2 3 3 5 7 Measuring & Recording (3) (6) (9) (12) (24) (48) Output - Urine/Liquid 3.2631 6.5262...UnitP 0 __ __ __ _ __ _0 o.O S 0 Ohi a t~ C Sn,0,, ., 0 400-. o o iso U - 0 ,19 U 0No. Age -of Pain asC U hi - .oU . 6. C- 3 i- CRITICAL CARE...Intravenous 2 4 6 8 10 12 (6.0009) Measuring and Recording (1) (3) (6) (9) (12) (24) Intake . 8583 2.5749 5.1498 7.7247 10.2996 20.5992 I (. 8583 ) .5 1 2 3 3

  5. Analysis of the Current Technical Issues on ASME Code and Standard for Nuclear Mechanical Design(2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, B. S.; Yoo, S. H.

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the analysis on the current revision movement related to the mechanical design issues of the U.S ASME nuclear code and standard. ASME nuclear mechanical design in this report is composed of the nuclear material, primary system, secondary system and high temperature reactor. This report includes the countermeasures based on the ASME Code meeting for current issues of each major field. KAMC(ASME Mirror Committee) of this project is willing to reflect a standpoint of the domestic nuclear industry on ASME nuclear mechanical design and play a technical bridge role for the domestic nuclear industry in ASME Codes application

  6. Current Methods Applied to Biomaterials - Characterization Approaches, Safety Assessment and Biological International Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Justine P R; Ortiz, H Ivan Melendez; Bucio, Emilio; Alves, Patricia Terra; Lima, Mayara Ingrid Sousa; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Mathor, Monica B; Varca, Gustavo H C; Lugao, Ademar B

    2018-04-10

    Safety and biocompatibility assessment of biomaterials are themes of constant concern as advanced materials enter the market as well as products manufactured by new techniques emerge. Within this context, this review provides an up-to-date approach on current methods for the characterization and safety assessment of biomaterials and biomedical devices from a physicalchemical to a biological perspective, including a description of the alternative methods in accordance with current and established international standards. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Report on the Current Technical Issues on ASME Nuclear Code and Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, B. S.; Yoo, S. H.

    2008-11-01

    This report describes the analysis on the current revision movement related to the mechanical design issues of the U.S ASME nuclear code and standard. ASME nuclear mechanical design in this report is composed of the nuclear material, primary system, secondary system and high temperature reactor. This report includes the countermeasures based on the ASME Code meeting for current issues of each major field. KAMC(ASME Mirror Committee) of this project is willing to reflect a standpoint of the domestic nuclear industry on ASME nuclear mechanical design and play a technical bridge role for the domestic nuclear industry in ASME Codes application

  8. Analysis of the Current Technical Issues on ASME Code and Standard for Nuclear Mechanical Design(2009)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, B. S.; Yoo, S. H.

    2009-11-15

    This report describes the analysis on the current revision movement related to the mechanical design issues of the U.S ASME nuclear code and standard. ASME nuclear mechanical design in this report is composed of the nuclear material, primary system, secondary system and high temperature reactor. This report includes the countermeasures based on the ASME Code meeting for current issues of each major field. KAMC(ASME Mirror Committee) of this project is willing to reflect a standpoint of the domestic nuclear industry on ASME nuclear mechanical design and play a technical bridge role for the domestic nuclear industry in ASME Codes application

  9. Standard practice for examination of welds using the alternating current field measurement technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during alternating current field measurement examination of welds for baseline and service-induced surface breaking discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on welds in any metallic material. 1.3 This practice does not establish weld acceptance criteria. 1.4 The values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system might not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Measurement of the depth of narrow slotted sections in eddy current reference standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Young-gil; Ahn, Bongyoung; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2007-02-01

    The dimensions of the slots in eddy current (EC) reference standards are too narrow to be measured by general depth measurement methods such as the optical (laser) or stylus methods. However, measurement of the dimensions of the machined slots is a prerequisite to using the blocks as references. The present paper suggests a measurement method for the slotted section using an ultrasonic test. The width and depth of the slots measured in our study are roughly 0.1 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The time of flight (TOF) of the ultrasonic wave was measured precisely. The ultrasonic velocity in the material of the EC reference standard was calculated with the measured values of the TOF and its thickness. Reflected waves from the tip of the slot and the bottom surface of the EC standard were successfully classified. Using this method we have successfully determined the depth of the slotted section.

  11. 78 FR 12833 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral \\8\\ and vision... Act uses the terms ``dental'' and ``oral'' interchangeably when referring to the pediatric dental care... Parts 147, 155, and 156 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential...

  12. Current management of diabetes mellitus and future directions in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    The last 90 years have seen considerable advances in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prof MacLean of Guy's Hospital wrote in the Postgraduate Medical Journal in 1926 about the numerous challenges that faced patients and their healthcare professionals in delivering safe and effective diabetes care at that time. The discovery of insulin in 1922 heralded a new age in enabling long-term glycaemic control, which reduced morbidity and mortality. Thirty years later, the first oral agents for diabetes, the biguanides and sulfonylureas, appeared and freed type 2 patients from having to inject insulin following diagnosis. Improvements in insulin formulations over the decades, including rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogues that more closely mimic physiological insulin secretion, have increased the flexibility and efficacy of type 1 diabetes management. The last two decades have seen major advances in technology, which has manifested in more accurate glucose monitoring systems and insulin delivery devices ('insulin pump'). Increased understanding of the pathophysiological deficits underlying type 2 diabetes has led to the development of targeted therapeutic approaches such as on the small intestine (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor analogues and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitors) and kidneys (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). A patient-centred approach delivered by a multidisciplinary team is now advocated. Glycaemic targets are set according to individual circumstances, taking into account factors such as weight, hypoglycaemia risk and patient preference. Stepwise treatment guidelines devised by international diabetes organisations standardise and rationalise management. Structured education programmes and psychological support are now well-established as essential for improving patient motivation and self-empowerment. Large multicentre randomised trials have confirmed the effectiveness of intensive glycaemic control on microvascular

  13. Current practice and views of neurologists on the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoui, Maryam; Wolfson, Christina

    2012-12-01

    To describe the current practice and views of neurologists on transitioning patients from pediatric to adult care, a cross-sectional study of all pediatric and adult neurologists in the province of Quebec, Canada, was conducted. The response rate was 73% for pediatric and 49% for adult neurologists. Most pediatric neurologists do not have a patient transition program or policy in place. Although a transfer summary is commonly provided, critical information is often lacking. Nearly half of neurologists believed that patients experience a gap in care during the transition process, and most agreed that the transition process is often poorly coordinated, highlighting patient, family, and health care factors. Current practice does not follow existing consensus statements for transition of care with respect to timing, communication, and preparation, and many pediatric neurologists experience difficulty in finding an appropriate adult health care provider for their patients. Neurologists reported many challenges in the current transition of care process.

  14. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template.

  15. Guidelines on radiology standards for primary dental care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A Joint Working Party (JWP) on patient dose reduction in diagnostic radiology was established between the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) and the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) towards the end of 1988. JWP identified a large potential for patient dose reduction on a national scale, and a report of its findings was published in 1990. This guidance was only generally applicable to dental radiology and in 1992 a further joint venture between RCR and NRPB resulted in the formation of a Working Party (WP) to consider all aspects of dental radiology applicable to primary dental care. Dental radiology is one of the largest single groups of radiographic examination performed, although the effective dose per radiograph is small. This means that individual risks from dental radiology are low, but WP has identified a significant potential for reduction in the collective dose and for improvements in the diagnostic quality of radiographs. The WP recommendations cover all aspects of dental radiology: training and examination regimes for dentists and staff, patient selection and clinical justification for radiography, diagnostic interpretation, equipment and procedural aspects, and finally the question of quality assurance in dental radiology. The economic impact of the many recommendations by WP has been considered in some detail. The benefits and cost of each recommendation either have been assigned a monetary value or have been assessed more qualitatively. The conclusion is that there is a strong economic justification for implementation of the full package of recommendations. (Author)

  16. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients.

  17. Multidisciplinary Cleft Palate Program at BC Children's Hospital: Are We Meeting the Standards of Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Anita; Courtemanche, Rebecca; Courtemanche, Douglas J

    2018-05-01

    To characterize current Cleft Palate Program (CPP) practices and evaluate the timeliness of appointments with respect to patient age and diagnosis based on American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) population guidelines and CPP patient-specific recommendations. A retrospective review of CPP patient appointments from November 6, 2012, to March 31, 2015, was done. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The study was conducted using data from the CPP at BC Children's Hospital. A total of 1214 appointments were considered in the analysis, including syndromic and nonsyndromic patients of 0 to 27 years of age. Percentage of patients meeting follow-up targets by ACPA standards and CPP team recommendations. Our results showed patients 5 years and younger or nonsyndromic were more likely to be seen on time ( P meeting ACPA guidelines for timeliness and 32% of all appointments meeting CPP recommendations. Timely care for the cleft/craniofacial patient populations represents a challenge for the CPP. Although half of patients may meet the general ACPA guidelines, only 32% of patients are meeting the CPP patient-specific recommendations. To provide better patient care, future adjustments are needed, which may include improved resource allotment and program support.

  18. 77 FR 11001 - Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ..., and (3) within a specific small business definition or size standard established by the SBA... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG30 Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY...

  19. [Surgical intensive care medicine. Current therapy concepts for septic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederbichler, A D; Ipaktchi, K; Jokuszies, A; Hirsch, T; Altintas, M A; Handschin, A E; Busch, K H; Gellert, M; Steinau, H-U; Vogt, P M; Steinsträsser, L

    2009-10-01

    The clinical appearance of septic disorders is characterized by an enormous dynamic. The sepsis-induced dysbalance of the immune system necessitates immediate and aggressive therapeutic interventions to prevent further damage progression of the disease to septic shock and multiple organ failure. This includes supportive therapy to normalize and maintain organ and tissue perfusion as well as the identification of the infection focus. In cases where an infectious focus is identified, surgical source control frequently is a key element of the treatment strategy besides pharmacologic and supportive measures. The integrative approach of the management of septic patients requires rapid communication between the involved medical disciplines and the nursing personnel. Therefore, this article outlines current therapeutic concepts of septic diseases as well as central nursing aspects.

  20. Effectiveness of integrating individualized and generic complementary medicine treatments with standard care versus standard care alone for reducing preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Samuel; Keinan Boker, Lital; Arnon, Zahi; Ben-Arye, Eran; Bar'am, Ayala; Sroka, Gideon; Matter, Ibrahim; Somri, Mostafa; Schiff, Elad

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative anxiety is commonly reported by people undergoing surgery. A significant number of studies have found a correlation between preoperative anxiety and post-operative morbidity. Various methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) were found to be effective in alleviating preoperative anxiety. This study examined the relative effectiveness of various individual and generic CAM methods combined with standard treatment (ST) in relieving preoperative anxiety, in comparison with ST alone. Randomized controlled trial. Holding room area Three hundred sixty patients. Patients were randomly divided into 6 equal-sized groups. Group 1 received the standard treatment (ST) for anxiety alleviation with anxiolytics. The five other groups received the following, together with ST (anxiolytics): Compact Disk Recording of Guided Imagery (CDRGI); acupuncture; individual guided imagery; reflexology; and individual guided imagery combined with reflexology, based on medical staff availability. Assessment of anxiety was taken upon entering the holding room area (surgery preparation room) ('pre-treatment assessment'), and following the treatment, shortly before transfer to the operating room ('post-treatment assessment'), based on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) questionnaire. Data processing included comparison of VAS averages in the 'pre' and 'post' stages among the various groups. Preoperatively, CAM treatments were associated with significant reduction of anxiety level (5.54-2.32, peffective than individualized CAM (Peffective than generic CDRGI. In light of the scope of preoperative anxiety and its implications for public health, integration of CAM therapies with ST should be considered for reducing preoperative anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Current surgical practices in cleft care: cleft palate repair techniques and postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Basile, Patrick; Koltz, Peter F; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Girotto, John A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively report practices commonly used in cleft palate repair in the United States. This study investigates current surgical techniques, postoperative care, and complication rates for cleft palate repair surgery. All 803 surgeon members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association were sent online and/or paper surveys inquiring about their management of cleft palate patients. Three-hundred six surveys were received, a 38 percent response rate. This represented responses of surgeons from 100 percent of American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association registered cleft teams. Ninety-six percent of respondents perform a one-stage repair. Eighty-five percent of surgeons perform palate surgery when the patient is between 6 and 12 months of age. The most common one-stage repair techniques are the Bardach style (two flaps) with intravelar veloplasty and the Furlow palatoplasty. After surgery, 39 percent of surgeons discharge patients within 24 hours. Another 43 percent discharge patients within 48 hours. During postoperative management, 92 percent of respondents implement feeding restrictions. Eighty-five percent of physicians use arm restraints. Surgeons' self-reported complications rates are minimal: 54 percent report a fistula in less than 5 percent of cases. The reported need for secondary speech surgery varies widely. The majority of respondents repair clefts in one stage. The most frequently used repair techniques are the Furlow palatoplasty and the Bardach style with intravelar veloplasty. After surgery, the majority of surgeons discharge patients in 1 or 2 days, and nearly all surgeons implement feeding restrictions and the use of arm restraints. The varying feeding protocols are reviewed in this article.

  2. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care Contract...

  3. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the

  4. Punica granatum L. Hydrogel for Wound Care Treatment: From Case Study to Phytomedicine Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Aline; Cabral, Patrik F G; Vieira, Felipe F M; Pinheiro, Deo A; Pereira, Carlos R; Santos, Wilson C; Machado, Thelma B

    2016-08-22

    The pharmacological activities of many Punica granatum L. components suggest a wide range of clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of diseases where chronic inflammation is believed to play an essential etiologic role. The current work reports a case study analyzing the effect produced by a magistral formulation of ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum peels on a non-healing chronic ulcer. The complete closure of the chronic ulcer that was initially not responsive to standard medical care was observed. A 2% (w/w) P. granatum peels ethanolic extract hydrogel-based formulation (PGHF) was standardized and subjected to physicochemical studies to establish the quality control parameters using, among others, assessment criteria such as optimum appearance, pH range, viscosity and hydrogel disintegration. The stability and quantitative chromatographic data was assessed in storage for six months under two temperature regimes. An efficient HPLC-DAD method was established distinguishing the biomarkers punicalin and punicalagin simultaneously in a single 8 min run. PGHF presented suitable sensorial and physicochemical performance, showing that punicalagin was not significantly affected by storage (p > 0.05). Formulations containing extracts with not less than 0.49% (w/w) total punicalagin might find good use in wound healing therapy.

  5. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease and evaluation of standard of care in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungby, Jorgen; Schou, Morten; Warrer, Per

    2017-01-01

    -density lipoprotein cholesterol was 2.0 mmol/l. Conclusion: In a nationwide database survey in primary care, the prevalence of CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes was high (21.4%). Standard of care was largely in accordance with national guidelines. Identification of eligible patients is possible with existing......Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) complicates type 2 diabetes. Empagliflozin and liraglutide have demonstrated improved survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and established CVD. We assessed prevalence and standard of care of patients with type 2 diabetes and established CVD managed.......6% were women. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 68.2 ml/min, and 22.2% had microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. Standard of care was fair: mean glycated hemoglobin was 52.3 mmol/mol (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial=6.9%), mean blood pressure was 131.4/75.7 mmHg, and mean low...

  6. Palliative Care and Human Rights: A Decade of Evolution in Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Tamar; Lohman, Diederik; de Luca, Gabriela B

    2018-02-01

    Human rights standards to address palliative care have developed over the last decade. This article aims to examine key milestones in the evolution of human rights standards to address palliative care, relevant advocacy efforts, and areas for further growth. The article provides an analysis of human rights standards in the context of palliative care through the lens of the right to health, freedom from torture and ill treatment, and the rights of older persons and children. Significant developments include the following: 1) the first human rights treaty to explicitly recognize the right to palliative care, the Inter-American Convention on the Rights of Older Persons; 2) the first World Health Assembly resolution on palliative care; 3) a report by the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture with a focus on denial of pain treatment; 4) addressing the availability of controlled medicines at the UN General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem. Development of human rights standards in relation to palliative care has been most notable in the context of the right to health, freedom from torture and ill treatment, and the rights of older persons. More work is needed in the context of the rights of children, and human rights treaty bodies are still not consistently addressing state obligations with regards to palliative care. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do Women With Breast Cancer Who Choose Adjunctive Integrative Oncology Care Receive Different Standard Oncologic Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Leanna J; Dowd, Fred; Sweet, Erin; Dale, Linda; Andersen, M Robyn

    2018-04-01

    To determine if women with breast cancer who choose adjunctive naturopathic oncology (NO) specialty care receive different standard oncologic treatment when compared with breast cancer patients who receive only standard care. Women with breast cancer stages 0 to 4, aged 18+ who spoke English and sought care from outpatient naturopathic doctor clinics were enrolled in an observational study of clinical and quality of life outcomes. Women who sought NO care 2 or more times within the first 2 years postdiagnosis were identified as NO cases. A matched comparison group of breast cancer patients were identified using the Western Washington Cancer Surveillance System(CSS). A longitudinal cohort design. In addition to self-report data, the CSS provided data on demographics, stage at the time of diagnosis, and initial treatment. Oncology medical records were abstracted in order to provide additional information on standard oncologic treatment for all participants. Cohorts were well matched with regard to demographic, histologic, and prognostic indicators at the time of diagnosis. Approximately 70% of women in both cohorts received standard oncologic care that met the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. There were no statistically significant differences between the cohorts in treatment received. Fewer women in the NO cohort with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer appear to have received antiestrogen therapy. Women in both cohorts appear to receive guideline-concordant care. However, women who receive adjunctive NO care may be less likely to receive antiestrogen therapy.

  8. Standard guidelines of care: Lasers for tattoos and pigmented lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurangabadkar Sanjeev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers have revolutionized the treatment of pigmentary disorders and have become the mainstay of therapy for many of them. Machines: Though different laser machines are used, Quality-switched (QS lasers are considered as the gold standard for treatment of pigmented lesions. Proper knowledge of the physics of laser machine, methodology, dosage schedules, etc., is mandatory. Physician Qualification: Laser may be administered by a dermatologist, who has received adequate background training in lasers during postgraduation or later at a center that provides education and training in lasers, or in focused workshops which provide such trainings. He should have adequate knowledge of the machines, parameters, cooling systems, and aftercare. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s minor procedure room. Indications: Epidermal lesions: Cafι au lait macules (CALM, lentigines, freckles, solar lentigo, nevus spilus, pigmented seborrheic keratosis, dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN. Dermal lesions: Nevus of Ota, Blue nevus, Hori′s nevus (acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules. Tattoos: Amateur, professional, cosmetic, medicinal, and traumatic. Mixed epidermal and dermal lesions: Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, nevus spilus, periorbital and perioral pigmentation, acquired melanocytic nevi (moles, melasma and Becker′s Nevus. Contraindications: Absolute: Active local infection, photo-aggravated skin diseases and medical conditions, tattoo granuloma, allergic reactions to tattoo pigment, unstable vitiligo and psoriasis. Relative: Keloid and keloidal tendencies, patient on isotretinoin, history of herpes simplex, patient who is not co-operative or has unrealistic expectation. Patient selection: Proper patient selection is important. Investigations to identify any underlying cause for pigmentation are important; concurrent topical and systemic drug therapy may be needed. History of scarring, response to previous

  9. What is the scope of the operator's standard of care in wellsite operations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petch, J.

    1999-01-01

    Joint ownership is a standard operating procedure for many oil and gas companies and has led to the development of standardized operating agreements. Under the terms of these agreements, one party assumes responsibility for operating and developing the joint interests for the benefit of all working parties. The standard of care imposed upon an operator towards non-operators regarding jointly owned oil and gas operations, is discussed, with an emphasis on whether such an operator is liable to fellow participants for acts fo gross negligence or wilful misconduct. The starting point in the analysis is the proposition that the standard of care for an operation of joint interests may be specified and agreed to by the joint owners in their contracts governing their relationship. A discussion is included of two different standards of care by the courts, whether Alberta courts are finding the gross negligence or wilful standard applicable, and the need for more fundamental change to the industry standard form agreement before the gross negligence/wilful misconduct standard will be applied by Alberta courts. The examination is conducted for the most part with reference to the standard forms of joint operating proceedures in widespread use, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Landman forms of Operating Procedure

  10. A cost-utility analysis of a comprehensive orthogeriatric care for hip fracture patients, compared with standard of care treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Adunsky, Abraham; Rasooly, Iris

    2013-01-01

    The economic burden associated with hip fractures calls for the investigation of innovative new cost-utility forms of organisation and integration of services for these patients. To carry out a cost-utility analysis integrating epidemiological and economic aspects for hip fracture patients treated within a comprehensive orthogeriatric model (COGM) of care, as compared with standard of care model (SOCM). A demonstration study conducted in a major tertiary medical centre, operating both a COGM ward and standard orthopaedic and rehabilitation wards. Data was collected on the clinical outcomes and health care costs of the two different treatment modalities, in order to calculate the absolute cost and disability-adjusted life years (DALY) ratio. The COGM model used 23% fewer resources per patient ($14,919 vs. $19,363) than the SOCM model and to avert 0.226 additional DALY per patient, mainly as a result of lower 1-year mortality rates among COGM patients (14.8% vs. 17.3%). A comprehensive ortho-geriatric care modality is more cost-effective, providing additional quality-adjusted life years (QALY) while using fewer resources compared with standard of care approach. The results should assist health policy-makers in optimising healthcare use and healthcare planning.

  11. ERS/ECDC Statement: European Union standards for tuberculosis care, 2017 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Bothamley, Graham; Caminero, Jose Antonio; Cirillo, Daniela Maria; Dara, Masoud; de Vries, Gerard; Aliberti, Stefano; Dinh-Xuan, Anh Tuan; Duarte, Raquel; Midulla, Fabio; Solovic, Ivan; Subotic, Dragan R; Amicosante, Massimo; Correia, Ana Maria; Cirule, Andra; Gualano, Gina; Kunst, Heinke; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Riekstina, Vija; Tiberi, Simon; Verduin, Remi; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2018-05-01

    The International Standards for Tuberculosis Care define the essential level of care for managing patients who have or are presumed to have tuberculosis, or are at increased risk of developing the disease. The resources and capacity in the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area permit higher standards of care to secure quality and timely TB diagnosis, prevention and treatment. On this basis, the European Union Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ESTC) were published in 2012 as standards specifically tailored to the EU setting. Since the publication of the ESTC, new scientific evidence has become available and, therefore, the standards were reviewed and updated.A panel of international experts, led by a writing group from the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), updated the ESTC on the basis of new published evidence. The underlying principles of these patient-centred standards remain unchanged. The second edition of the ESTC includes 21 standards in the areas of diagnosis, treatment, HIV and comorbidities, and public health and prevention.The ESTC target clinicians and public health workers, provide an easy-to-use resource and act as a guide through all the required activities to ensure optimal diagnosis, treatment and prevention of TB. The content of this work is copyright of the authors or their employers. Design and branding are copyright ©ERS 2018.

  12. The Use of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring As Standard of Care in Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Caitlin G.; Miyashita, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a significant global health problem, responsible for 7.5 million deaths each year worldwide. The prevalence of HTN is increasing in the pediatric population likely attributed to the increase in childhood obesity. Recent work has also shown that blood pressure (BP) tends to track from childhood to adulthood including BP-related target organ damage. In the last 25–30 years, pediatric use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has been expanding mainly in the setting of initial elevated BP measurement evaluation, HTN therapy efficacy follow-up, and renal disease. However, there are many clinical areas where ABPM could potentially be used but is currently underutilized. This review summarizes the current knowledge and the uses of pediatric ABPM and explores clinical areas where it can be very useful both to detect HTN and its longitudinal follow-up. And thus, ABPM could serve as a critical tool to potentially prevent early cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in wide variety of populations. With solid data to support ABPM’s superiority over clinic BP measurements and these clinical areas for its expansion, ABPM should now be part of standard of care in BP evaluation and management in pediatrics. PMID:28713799

  13. Determination of death after circulatory arrest by intensive care physicians: A survey of current practice in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Jentina; van Mook, Walther N K A; Dhanani, Sonny; van Heurn, Ernest W L

    2016-02-01

    Determination of death is an essential part of donation after circulatory death (DCD). We studied the current practices of determination of death after circulatory arrest by intensive care physicians in the Netherlands, the availability of guidelines, and the occurrence of the phenomenon of autoresuscitation. The Determination of Cardiac Death Practices in Intensive Care Survey was sent to all intensive care physicians. Fifty-five percent of 568 Dutch intensive care physicians responded. Most respondents learned death determination from clinical practice. The most commonly used tests for death determination were flat arterial line tracing, flat electrocardiogram (standard 3-lead electrocardiogram), and fixed and dilated pupils. Rarely used tests were absence pulse by echo Doppler, absent blood pressure by noninvasive monitoring, and unresponsiveness to painful stimulus. No diagnostic test or procedure was uniformly performed, but 80% of respondents perceived a need for standardization of death determination. Autoresuscitation was witnessed by 37%, after withdrawal of treatment or after unsuccessful resuscitation. Extensive variability in the practice of determining death after circulatory arrest exists, and a need for guidelines and standardization, especially if organ donation follows death, is reported. Autoresuscitation is reported; this observation requires attention in further prospective observational studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ion transport and loss in the earth's quiet ring current. I - Data and standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the transport and loss of ions in the earth's quiet time ring current, in which the standard radial diffusion model developed for the high-energy radiation belt particles is compared with the measurements of the lower-energy ring current ions, is presented. The data set provides ionic composition information in an energy range that includes the bulk of the ring current energy density, 1-300 keV/e. Protons are found to dominate the quiet time energy density at all altitudes, peaking near L of about 4 at 60 keV/cu cm, with much smaller contributions from O(+) (1-10 percent), He(+) (1-5 percent), and He(2+) (less than 1 percent). A minimization procedure is used to fit the amplitudes of the standard electric radial diffusion coefficient, yielding 5.8 x 10 exp -11 R(E-squared)/s. Fluctuation ionospheric electric fields are suggested as the source of the additional diffusion detected.

  15. Is it time to reassess current safety standards for glyphosate-based herbicides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Blumberg, Bruce; Antoniou, Michael N; Benbrook, Charles M; Carroll, Lynn; Colborn, Theo; Everett, Lorne G; Hansen, Michael; Landrigan, Philip J; Lanphear, Bruce P; Mesnage, Robin; Vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Myers, John Peterson

    2017-06-01

    Use of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) increased ∼100-fold from 1974 to 2014. Additional increases are expected due to widespread emergence of glyphosate-resistant weeds, increased application of GBHs, and preharvest uses of GBHs as desiccants. Current safety assessments rely heavily on studies conducted over 30 years ago. We have considered information on GBH use, exposures, mechanisms of action, toxicity and epidemiology. Human exposures to glyphosate are rising, and a number of in vitro and in vivo studies challenge the basis for the current safety assessment of glyphosate and GBHs. We conclude that current safety standards for GBHs are outdated and may fail to protect public health or the environment. To improve safety standards, the following are urgently needed: (1) human biomonitoring for glyphosate and its metabolites; (2) prioritisation of glyphosate and GBHs for hazard assessments, including toxicological studies that use state-of-the-art approaches; (3) epidemiological studies, especially of occupationally exposed agricultural workers, pregnant women and their children and (4) evaluations of GBHs in commercially used formulations, recognising that herbicide mixtures likely have effects that are not predicted by studying glyphosate alone. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Current status of palliative care--clinical implementation, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; Elk, Ronit; Ferrell, Betty; Morrison, R Sean; von Gunten, Charles F

    2009-01-01

    Palliative and end-of-life care is changing in the United States. This dynamic field is improving care for patients with serious and life-threatening cancer through creation of national guidelines for quality care, multidisciplinary educational offerings, research endeavors, and resources made available to clinicians. Barriers to implementing quality palliative care across cancer populations include a rapidly expanding population of older adults who will need cancer care and a decrease in the workforce available to give care. Methods of integrating current palliative care knowledge into care of patients include multidisciplinary national education and research endeavors, and clinician resources. Acceptance of palliative care as a recognized medical specialty provides a valuable resource for improvement of care. Although compilation of evidence for the importance of palliative care specialities is in its initial stages, national research grants have provided support to build the knowledge necessary for appropriate palliative care. Opportunities are available to clinicians for understanding and applying appropriate palliative and end-of-life care to patients with serious and life-threatening cancers. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  17. Human factors and ergonomics in home care: Current concerns and future considerations for health information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Calvin K.L.; Valdez, Rupa S.; Casper, Gail R.; Carayon, Pascale; Burke, Laura J.; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-01-01

    Sicker patients with greater care needs are being discharged to their homes to assume responsibility for their own care with fewer nurses available to aid them. This situation brings with it a host of human factors and ergonomic (HFE) concerns, both for the home care nurse and the home dwelling patient, that can affect quality of care and patient safety. Many of these concerns are related to the critical home care tasks of information access, communication, and patient self-monitoring and self-management. Currently, a variety of health information technologies (HITs) are being promoted as possible solutions to those problems, but those same technologies bring with them a new set of HFE concerns. This paper reviews the HFE considerations for information access, communication, and patients self-monitoring and self-management, discusses how HIT can potentially mitigate current problems, and explains how the design and implementation of HIT itself requires careful HFE attention. PMID:19713630

  18. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  19. Improving the safety and quality of nursing care through standardized operating procedures in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Rakic, Severin; Novo, Ahmed; Dropic, Emira; Fisekovic, Eldin; Sredic, Ana; Van Malderen, Greet

    2016-06-01

    We explored how selected 'positive deviant' healthcare facilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina approach the continuous development, adaptation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of nursing-related standard operating procedures. Standardized nursing care is internationally recognized as a critical element of safe, high-quality health care; yet very little research has examined one of its key instruments: nursing-related standard operating procedures. Despite variability in Bosnia and Herzegovina's healthcare and nursing care quality, we assumed that some healthcare facilities would have developed effective strategies to elevate nursing quality and safety through the use of standard operating procedures. Guided by the 'positive deviance' approach, we used a multiple-case study design to examine a criterion sample of four facilities (two primary healthcare centres and two hospitals), collecting data via focus groups and individual interviews. In each studied facility, certification/accreditation processes were crucial to the initiation of continuous development, adaptation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of nursing-related SOPs. In one hospital and one primary healthcare centre, nurses working in advanced roles (i.e. quality coordinators) were responsible for developing and implementing nursing-related standard operating procedures. Across the four studied institutions, we identified a consistent approach to standard operating procedures-related processes. The certification/accreditation process is enabling necessary changes in institutions' organizational cultures, empowering nurses to take on advanced roles in improving the safety and quality of nursing care. Standardizing nursing procedures is key to improve the safety and quality of nursing care. Nursing and Health Policy are needed in Bosnia and Herzegovina to establish a functioning institutional framework, including regulatory bodies, educational systems for developing nurses' capacities or the

  20. ASME nuclear codes and standards: Scope of coverage and current initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to address the broad scope of coverage of nuclear codes, standards and guides produced and administered by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Background information is provided regarding the evolution of the present activities. Details are provided on current initiatives intended to permit ASME to meet the needs of a changing nuclear industry on a worldwide scale. During the early years of commercial nuclear power, ASME produced a code for the construction of nuclear vessels used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary, containment and auxiliary systems. In response to industry growth, ASME Code coverage soon broadened to include rules for construction of other nuclear components, and inservice inspection of nuclear reactor coolant systems. In the years following this, the scope of ASME nuclear codes, standards and guides has been broadened significantly to include air cleaning activities for nuclear power reactors, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, quality assurance programs, cranes for nuclear facilities, qualification of mechanical equipment, and concrete reactor vessels and containments. ASME focuses on globalization of its codes, standards and guides by encouraging and promoting their use in the international community and by actively seeking participation of international members on its technical and supervisory committees and in accreditation activities. Details are provided on current international representation. Initiatives are underway to separate the technical requirements from administrative and enforcement requirements, to convert to hard metric units, to provide for non-U. S. materials, and to provide for translations into non-English languages. ASME activity as an accredited ISO 9000 registrar for suppliers of mechanical equipment is described. Rules are being developed for construction of containment systems for nuclear spent fuel and high-level waste transport packagings. Intensive

  1. Current practice of preconception care by primary caregivers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F. van Voorst (Sabine); S. Plasschaert (Sophie); L.C. de Jong-Potjer (L.); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); S. Denktaş (Semiha)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Over the past decade the value of preconception care (PCC) consultations has been acknowledged. Investments have been made to promote delivery and uptake of PCC consultations in the Dutch primary care setting. We assessed current activities, perceptions and prerequisites for

  2. The stage-value model: Implications for the changing standards of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Daniel Patrik; Commons, Michael Lamport

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care is a legal and professional notion against which doctors and other medical personnel are held liable. The standard of care changes as new scientific findings and technological innovations within medicine, pharmacology, nursing and public health are developed and adopted. This study consists of four parts. Part 1 describes the problem and gives concrete examples of its occurrence. The second part discusses the application of the Model of Hierarchical Complexity on the field, giving examples of how standards of care are understood at different behavioral developmental stage. It presents the solution to the problem of standards of care at a Paradigmatic Stage 14. The solution at this stage is a deliberative, communicative process based around why certain norms should or should not apply in each specific case, by the use of "meta-norms". Part 3 proposes a Cross-Paradigmatic Stage 15 view of how the problem of changing standards of care can be solved. The proposed solution is to found the legal procedure in each case on well-established behavioral laws. We maintain that such a behavioristic, scientifically based justice would be much more proficient at effecting restorative legal interventions that create desired behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV, Mayorov AY. 8th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan I. Dedov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues! We are glad to present the 8th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2017, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2017, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012, 2015. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, SAVOR, TECOS, LEADER, EMPA-REG OUTCOME, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM in the world increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 415 million patients by the end of 2015. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 642 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2040. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution on Diabetes 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006, and in 2011 - UN Political Declaration, addressed to national health systems, calling for the establishment of multidisciplinary strategy in the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases, where special attention is drawn to the problem of diabetes as one of the leading causes of disability and mortality. Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian Federal Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.35 million patients with DM in this

  4. Medication management policy, practice and research in Australian residential aged care: Current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluggett, Janet K; Ilomäki, Jenni; Seaman, Karla L; Corlis, Megan; Bell, J Simon

    2017-02-01

    Eight percent of Australians aged 65 years and over receive residential aged care each year. Residents are increasingly older, frailer and have complex care needs on entry to residential aged care. Up to 63% of Australian residents of aged care facilities take nine or more medications regularly. Together, these factors place residents at high risk of adverse drug events. This paper reviews medication-related policies, practices and research in Australian residential aged care. Complex processes underpin prescribing, supply and administration of medications in aged care facilities. A broad range of policies and resources are available to assist health professionals, aged care facilities and residents to optimise medication management. These include national guiding principles, a standardised national medication chart, clinical medication reviews and facility accreditation standards. Recent Australian interventions have improved medication use in residential aged care facilities. Generating evidence for prescribing and deprescribing that is specific to residential aged care, health workforce reform, medication-related quality indicators and inter-professional education in aged care are important steps toward optimising medication use in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization study of antidiabetic agents in a teaching hospital of Sikkim and adherence to current standard treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Sushrut Varun; Datta, Supratim; Upreti, Binu

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has gradually emerged as one of the most serious public health problems in our country. This underlines the need for timely disease detection and decisive therapeutic intervention. This prospective cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antidiabetic agents in a remote North-East Indian tertiary care teaching hospital in the perspective of current standard treatment guidelines. Diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic medication, both as outpatients and inpatients in our hospital over a period of 12 months (May 2013-May 2014), were included in this study. The data obtained were sorted and analyzed on the basis of gender, type of therapy, and hospital setting. A total of 310 patients were included in the study. Metformin was the single most frequently prescribed antidiabetic agent (66.8%) followed by the sulfonylureas group (37.4%). Insulin was prescribed in 23.2% of the patients. Combination antidiabetic drug therapy (65.1%) was used more frequently than monotherapy (34.8%). The use of biguanides (P standard treatment guidelines. Increased use of generic drugs is an area with scope for improvement.

  6. [Current Status of Home Visit Programs: Activities and Barriers of Home Care Nursing Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eui Geum; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Yukyung; Sung, Ji Hyun; Park, Young Su; Yoo, Jae Yong; Woo, Soohee

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of home care nursing services provided by community health nurses and to identify barriers to the services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with three types of community health care nurses. Participants were 257 nurses, 46 of whom were hospital based home care nurses, 176 were community based visiting nurses, and 35 were long term care insurance based visiting nurses. A structured questionnaire on 7 domains of home care nursing services with a 4-point Likert scale was used to measure activities and barriers to care. Data were analyzed using SPSS WIN 21.0 program. Hospital based home care nurses showed a high level of service performance activity in the domain of clinical laboratory tests, medications and injections, therapeutic nursing, and education. Community based visiting nurses had a high level of service performance in the reference domain. Long term care insurance based visiting nurses showed a high level of performance in the service domains of fundamental nursing and counseling. The results show that although health care service provided by the three types of community health nurse overlapped, the focus of the service is differentiated. Therefore, these results suggest that existing home care services will need to be utilized efficiently in the development of a new nursing care service for patients living in the community after hospital discharge.

  7. STANDARD PRECAUTIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF AWARENESS AMONG HEALTH CARE PERSONNEL IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL, SOUTH INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Standard precautions ar e crucial in the prevention and transmission of Healthcare associated infections ( HAI and transmission of blood - borne pathogens like Hepatitis B, Human Immunodeficiency Virus & Hepatitis C. They are not well u nderstood or implemented by health care practitioners. Hence this study was taken up to determine and compare knowledge, attitude of standard precautions among health care personnel at a teaching hospital, Bangalore. OBJECTIVE : To assess knowledge, attitud e, practices and compliance of Standard precautions among health care workers at a teaching hospital. METHODOLOGY : One hundred and fifty seven health care personnel participated in this study. A pretest and post test was administered to the study group. A pre - structured questionnaire on standard precautions was prepared which included knowledge, attitude and practices. RESULTS : 116 ( 73.88% nurses had knowledge about hand hygiene, but only 82 ( 52.2% nurses practiced hand hygiene before and after patient care. Knowledge about PPE measures like gloves, face mask & goggles, gowns were known to 101(64.33%, 56 ( 35.66% & 69 ( 43.94% nurses respectively. 117 ( 74.52% nurses discarded needles & sharps in correct puncture proof containers, but their correct knowled ge regarding colour coding of hospital waste segregation was comparatively less i.e. 104 ( 66.24%. 119 ( 75.79% of the nurses had practice of recapping the needles after use. CONCLUSION : There was significant improvement in the knowledge and practice of stan dard precautions in the present study after incorporating good training practices

  8. [Reimbursement of intensive care services in the German DRG system : Current problems and possible solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riessen, R; Hermes, C; Bodmann, K-F; Janssens, U; Markewitz, A

    2018-02-01

    The reimbursement of intensive care and nursing services in the German health system is based on the diagnosis-related groups (G-DRG) system. Due to the lack of a central hospital planning, the G‑DRG system has become the most important influence on the development of the German health system. Compared to other countries, intensive care in Germany is characterized by a high number of intensive care beds, a low nurse-to-patient ratio, no official definition of the level of care, and a minimal available data set from intensive care units (ICUs). Under the given circumstances, a shortage of qualified intensive care nurses and physicians is currently the largest threat for intensive care in Germany. To address these deficiencies, we suggest the following measures: (1) Integration of ICUs into the levels of care which are currently developed for emergency centers at hospitals. (2) Mandatory collection of structured data sets from all ICUs including quality criteria. (3) A reform of intensive care and nursing reimbursement under consideration of adequate staffing in the individual ICU. (4) Actions to improve ICU staffing and qualification.

  9. The current implementation status of the integration of sports and physical activity into Dutch rehabilitation care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Hettinga, Florentina J; Alingh, Rolinde A; Duijf, Marjo; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H V; van der Schans, Cees P

    PURPOSE: To describe the current status of the nationwide implementation process of a sports and physical activity stimulation programme to gain insight into how sports and physical activity were integrated into Dutch rehabilitation care. METHODS: The current implementation status of a sports and

  10. Legal standard of care: a shift from the traditional Bolam test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Ash; Samanta, Jo

    2003-01-01

    An essential component of an action in negligence against a doctor is proof that the doctor failed to provide the required standard of care under the circumstances. Traditionally the standard of care in law has been determined according to the Bolam test. This is based on the principle that a doctor does not breach the legal standard of care, and is therefore not negligent, if the practice is supported by a responsible body of similar professionals. The Bolam principle, however, has been perceived as being excessively reliant upon medical testimony supporting the defendant. The judgment given by the House of Lords in the recent case of Bolitho imposes a requirement that the standard proclaimed must be justified on a logical basis and must have considered the risks and benefits of competing options. The effect of Bolitho is that the court will take a more enquiring stance to test the medical evidence offered by both parties in litigation, in order to reach its own conclusions. Recent case law shows how the court has applied the Bolitho approach in determining the standard of care in cases of clinical negligence. An understanding of this approach and of the shift from the traditional Bolam test is relevant to all medical practitioners, particularly in a climate that is increasingly litigious.

  11. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Making Sense of Varying Standards of Care: The Experiences of Staff Working in Residential Care Environments for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence reveals that adults with learning disabilities who live in residential care facilities are being exposed to considerable variation in the standards of care they receive. High profile cases of substandard care have also raised concerns regarding the appropriateness of existing care provisions and practices. While attempts have…

  13. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  14. Health care justice and its implications for current policy of a mandatory waiting period for elective tubal sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddab, Amirhossein; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A; Fox, Karin A; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Salmanian, Bahram; Raine, Susan P; Shamshirsaz, Alireza A

    2015-06-01

    Tubal sterilization during the immediate postpartum period is 1 of the most common forms of contraception in the United States. This time of the procedure has the advantage of 1-time hospitalization, which results in ease and convenience for the woman. The US Collaborative Review of Sterilization Study indicates the high efficacy and effectiveness of postpartum tubal sterilization. Oral and written informed consent is the ethical and legal standard for the performance of elective tubal sterilization for permanent contraception for all patients, regardless of source of payment. Current health care policy and practice regarding elective tubal sterilization for Medicaid beneficiaries places a unique requirement on these patients and their obstetricians: a mandatory waiting period. This requirement originates in decades-old legislation, which we briefly describe. We then introduce the concept of health care justice in professional obstetric ethics and explain how it originates in the ethical concepts of medicine as a profession and of being a patient and its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. We next identify the implications of health care justice for the current policy of a mandatory 30-day waiting period. We conclude that Medicaid policy allocates access to elective tubal sterilization differently, based on source of payment and gender, which violates health care justice in both its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. Obstetricians should invoke health care justice in women's health care as the basis for advocacy for needed change in law and health policy, to eliminate health care injustice in women's access to elective tubal sterilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond the standard of care: a new model to judge medical negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lawrence H; Brenner, Alison Tytell; Awerbuch, Eric J; Horwitz, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The term "standard of care" has been used in law and medicine to determine whether medical care is negligent. However, the precise meaning of this concept is often unclear for both medical and legal professionals. Our purposes are to (1) examine the limitations of using standard of care as a measure of negligence, (2) propose the use of the legal concepts of justification and excuse in developing a new model of examining medical conduct, and (3) outline the framework of this model. We applied the principles of tort liability set forth in the clinical and legal literature to describe the difficulty in applying standard of care in medical negligence cases. Using the concepts of justification and excuse, we propose a judicial model that may promote fair and just jury verdicts in medical negligence cases. Contrary to conventional understanding, medical negligence is not simply nonconformity to norms. Two additional concepts of legal liability, ie, justification and excuse, must also be considered to properly judge medical conduct. Medical conduct is justified when the benefits outweigh the risks; the law sanctions the conduct and encourages future conduct under similar circumstances. Excuse, on the other hand, relieves a doctor of legal liability under specific circumstances even though his/her conduct was not justified. Standard of care is an inaccurate measure of medical negligence because it is premised on the faulty notion of conformity to norms. An alternative judicial model to determine medical negligence would (1) eliminate standard of care in medical malpractice law, (2) reframe the court instruction to jurors, and (3) establish an ongoing consensus committee on orthopaedic principles of negligence.

  16. The current state of Lean implementation in health care: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poksinska, Bozena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the current state of implementation of Lean production in health care. The study focuses on the definition of Lean in health care and implementation process, barriers, challenges, enablers, and outcomes of implementing Lean production methods in health care. A comprehensive search of the literature concerning the implementation of Lean production in health care was used to generate a synthesis of the literature around the chosen research questions. Lean production in health care is mostly used as a process improvement approach and focuses on 3 main areas: (1) defining value from the patient point of view, (2) mapping value streams, and (3) eliminating waste in an attempt to create continuous flow. Value stream mapping is the most frequently applied Lean tool in health care. The usual implementation steps include conducting Lean training, initiating pilot projects, and implementing improvements using interdisciplinary teams. One of the barriers is lack of educators and consultants who have their roots in the health care sector and can provide support by sharing experience and giving examples from real-life applications of Lean in health care. The enablers of Lean in health care seem not to be different from the enablers of any other change initiative. The outcomes can be divided into 2 broad areas: the performance of the health care system and the development of employees and work environment.

  17. End-of-Life Care in Nunavik, Quebec: Inuit Experiences, Current Realities, and Ways Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordyk, Shawn Renee; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Brassard, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Increasing longevity for Inuit living in Nunavik, northern Quebec, has resulted in heightened rates of cancers and chronic diseases necessitating complex treatments. Consequently, end-of-life (EOL) care, once the domain of Inuit families and communities, has come to include professionalized healthcare providers with varying degrees of awareness of factors to consider in providing care to Inuit populations. To better understand the factors shaping EOL care in Nunavik to support the development of a sustainable model of care. Using focused ethnography, we conducted participant observations and informal and semistructured interviews with 103 participants (community members, healthcare practitioners, and administrators) across Nunavik and in Montreal, the affiliated tertiary care center. Data domains included the following: care trajectories; patient and family experiences receiving and providing EOL care; local and urban resources and challenges; and ways forward. Sociocultural, historical, and geographic factors shape EOL care in Nunavik, presenting a complex set of challenges for Inuit patients, families, and healthcare providers. A sustainable model of EOL care requires building on shared initiatives, capitalizing on the existing strengths in communities, and attending to the multiple bereavement needs in the region. Building a sustainable model of EOL care requires respectful collaboration among governing structures, healthcare institutions, and community members. It must centrally value local knowledge and initiatives. To ensure Inuit families and patients are supported throughout the dying process, future initiatives must centrally include local stakeholders in both the design and evaluation of any changes to the current healthcare system.

  18. "Holistic" care for stroke in the context of the current health care bureaucracy and economic reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The target paper by Sharon Kaufman argues that modern Western health care delivery is characterized by "the coexistence of two conflicting conceptual frameworks," namely a "holistic" approach that attempts to take into account the cultural and personal needs of the individual stroke patient and "medicalization" that attempts to reduce people and their illnesses to biological processes which can then be treated through "evidence-based" biomedical approaches. Although it is true that these 2 approaches often coexist and are sometimes in conflict, it would be misleading to see these as totally dichotomous. Patients want holistic approaches less than we give them credit for, and physicians are less mechanical than such a dichotomy would suggest. In fact, more often than not, patients and their health care providers combine to engender unrealistic expectations about what modern medicine is actually able to accomplish. When the system breaks down, as it often does in stroke (with a patient who is still left with a significant impairment an disability as well as unresolved concerns and issues related to his or her often catastrophic loss of function), there is a certain inevitable backlash. However, this tension between holistic expectations and the medical response is overshadowed by institutional constraints on clinical decision making that are designed to manage or balance expectations of both patients and health care professionals with economic realities and, in doing so, often run rough-shod over the "holistic" needs of patients and their families as well as health care providers' attempts to manage disease and disability within a medical framework.

  19. [Current evidence on the motivational interview in the approach to health care problems in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bóveda Fontán, Julia; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Campiñez Navarro, Manuel; Bosch Fontcuberta, Josep M; Barragán Brun, Nieves; Prados Castillejo, Jose Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The motivational interview has been widely used as a clinical method to promote behavioural changes in patients, helping them to resolve their ambivalence to obtain their own motivations. In the present article, a review is made of the main meta-analyses and systematic and narrative reviews on the efficacy of the motivational interview in the primary health care environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Standard and biological treatment in large vessel vasculitis: guidelines and current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Francesco; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are the two major forms of idiopathic large vessel vasculitis. High doses of glucocorticoids are effective in inducing remission in both conditions, but relapses and recurrences are common, requiring prolonged glucocorticoid treatment with the risk of the related adverse events. Areas covered: In this article, we will review the standard and biological treatment strategies in large vessel vasculitis, and we will focus on the current approaches to these diseases. Expert commentary: The results of treatment trials with conventional immunosuppressive agents such as methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclophosphamide have overall been disappointing. TNF-α blockers are ineffective in giant cell arteritis, while observational evidence and a phase 2 randomized trial support the use of tocilizumab in relapsing giant cell arteritis. Observational evidence strongly supports the use of anti-TNF-α agents and tocilizumab in Takayasu patients with relapsing disease. However biological agents are not curative, and relapses remain common.

  1. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the ?Standards? also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals. Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States "to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes". Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national population

  2. Family Medicine Maternity Care Call to Action: Moving Toward National Standards for Training and Competency Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Susanna R; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Leeman, Larry; Tuggy, Michael; Kim, Thomas O; Nothnagle, Melissa; Breuner, Joseph; Loafman, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Maternity care is an integral part of family medicine, and the quality and cost-effectiveness of maternity care provided by family physicians is well documented. Considering the population health perspective, increasing the number of family physicians competent to provide maternity care is imperative, as is working to overcome the barriers discouraging maternity care practice. A standard that clearly defines maternity care competency and a systematic set of tools to assess competency levels could help overcome these barriers. National discussions between 2012 and 2014 revealed that tools for competency assessment varied widely. These discussions resulted in the formation of a workgroup, culminating in a Family Medicine Maternity Care Summit in October 2014. This summit allowed for expert consensus to describe three scopes of maternity practice, draft procedural and competency assessment tools for each scope, and then revise the tools, guided by the Family Medicine and OB/GYN Milestones documents from the respective residency review committees. The summit group proposed that achievement of a specified number of procedures completed should not determine competency; instead, a standardized competency assessment should take place after a minimum number is performed. The traditionally held required numbers for core procedures were reassessed at the summit, and the resulting consensus opinion is proposed here. Several ways in which these evaluation tools can be disseminated and refined through the creation of a learning collaborative across residency programs is described. The summit group believed that standardization in training will more clearly define the competencies of family medicine maternity care providers and begin to reduce one of the barriers that may discourage family physicians from providing maternity care.

  3. Low power fast settling multi-standard current reusing CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lou Wenfeng; Feng Peng; Wang Haiyong; Wu Nanjian

    2012-01-01

    A low power fast settling multi-standard CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer is proposed.The current reusing and frequency presetting techniques are adopted to realize the low power fast settling multi-standard fractional-N frequency synthesizer.An auxiliary non-volatile memory (NVM) is embedded to avoid the repetitive calibration process and to save power in practical application.This PLL is implemented in a 0.18μm technology.The frequency range is 0.3 to 2.54 GHz and the settling time is less than 5μs over the entire frequency range.The LC-VCO with the stacked divide-by-2 has a good figure of merit of-193.5 dBc/Hz.The measured phase noise of frequency synthesizer is about -115 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset when the carrier frequency is 2.4 GHz and the reference spurs are less than -52 dBc.The whole frequency synthesizer consumes only 4.35 mA @ 1.8 V.

  4. Low power fast settling multi-standard current reusing CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Wenfeng; Feng Peng; Wang Haiyong; Wu Nanjian

    2012-01-01

    A low power fast settling multi-standard CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer is proposed. The current reusing and frequency presetting techniques are adopted to realize the low power fast settling multi-standard fractional-N frequency synthesizer. An auxiliary non-volatile memory (NVM) is embedded to avoid the repetitive calibration process and to save power in practical application. This PLL is implemented in a 0.18 μm technology. The frequency range is 0.3 to 2.54 GHz and the settling time is less than 5 μs over the entire frequency range. The LC-VCO with the stacked divide-by-2 has a good figure of merit of −193.5 dBc/Hz. The measured phase noise of frequency synthesizer is about −115 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset when the carrier frequency is 2.4 GHz and the reference spurs are less than −52 dBc. The whole frequency synthesizer consumes only 4.35 mA and 1.8 V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  5. A meta-analysis of hypnosis for chronic pain problems: a comparison between hypnosis, standard care, and other psychological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Tomonori; Fujino, Haruo; Nakae, Aya; Mashimo, Takashi; Sasaki, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hypnosis is regarded as an effective treatment for psychological and physical ailments. However, its efficacy as a strategy for managing chronic pain has not been assessed through meta-analytical methods. The objective of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of hypnosis for managing chronic pain. When compared with standard care, hypnosis provided moderate treatment benefit. Hypnosis also showed a moderate superior effect as compared to other psychological interventions for a nonheadache group. The results suggest that hypnosis is efficacious for managing chronic pain. Given that large heterogeneity among the included studies was identified, the nature of hypnosis treatment is further discussed.

  6. The importance of standardized observations to evaluate nutritional care quality in the survey process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F; Bertrand, Rosanna; Hurd, Donna; White, Alan; Squires, David; Feuerberg, Marvin; Hickey, Kelly; Simmons, Sandra F

    2009-10-01

    Guidelines written for government surveyors who assess nursing home (NH) compliance with federal standards contain instructions to observe the quality of mealtime assistance. However, these instructions are vague and no protocol is provided for surveyors to record observational data. This study compared government survey staff observations of mealtime assistance quality to observations by research staff using a standardized protocol that met basic standards for accurate behavioral measurement. Survey staff used either the observation instructions in the standard survey process or those written for the revised Quality Improvement Survey (QIS). Trained research staff observed mealtime care in 20 NHs in 5 states during the same time period that survey staff evaluated care in the same facilities, although it could not be determined if survey and research staff observed the same residents during the same meals. Ten NHs were evaluated by government surveyors using the QIS survey instructions and 10 NHs were evaluated by surveyors using the standard survey instructions. Research staff observations using a standardized observation protocol identified a higher proportion of residents receiving inadequate feeding assistance during meals relative to survey staff using either the standard or QIS survey instructions. For example, more than 50% of the residents who ate less than half of their meals based on research staff observation were not offered an alternative to the served meal, and the lack of alternatives, or meal substitutions, was common in all 20 NHs. In comparison, the QIS survey teams documented only 2 instances when meal substitutes were not offered in 10 NHs and the standard survey teams documented no instances in 10 NHs. Standardized mealtime observations by research staff revealed feeding assistance care quality issues in all 20 study NHs. Surveyors following the instructions in either the standard or revised QIS surveys did not detect most of these care quality

  7. Association of State Access Standards With Accessibility to Specialists for Medicaid Managed Care Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Cohen, Michael S; Cleary, Paul D

    2017-10-01

    Medicaid recipients have consistently reported less timely access to specialists than patients with other types of coverage. By 2018, state Medicaid agencies will be required by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to enact time and distance standards for managed care organizations to ensure an adequate supply of specialist physicians for enrollees; however, there have been no published studies of whether these policies have significant effects on access to specialty care. To compare ratings of access to specialists for adult Medicaid and commercial enrollees before and after the implementation of specialty access standards. We used Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data to conduct a quasiexperimental difference-in-differences (DID) analysis of 20 163 nonelderly adult Medicaid managed care (MMC) enrollees and 54 465 commercially insured enrollees in 5 states adopting access standards, and 37 290 MMC enrollees in 5 matched states that previously adopted access standards. Reported access to specialty care in the previous 6 months. Seven thousand six hundred ninety-eight (69%) Medicaid enrollees and 28 423 (75%) commercial enrollees reported that it was always or usually easy to get an appointment with a specialist before the policy implementation (or at baseline) compared with 11 889 (67%) of Medicaid enrollees in states that had previously implemented access standards. Overall, there was no significant improvement in timely access to specialty services for MMC enrollees in the period following implementation of standard(s) (adjusted difference-in-differences, -1.2 percentage points; 95% CI, -2.7 to 0.1), nor was there any impact of access standards on insurance-based disparities in access (0.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -4.3 to 5.4). There was heterogeneity across states, with 1 state that implemented both time and distance standards demonstrating significant improvements in access and reductions in disparities

  8. European AIDS Clinical Society Second Standard of Care Meeting, Brussels 16-17 November 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Wit, S; Battegay, M; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2018-01-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) organized a second meeting on Standard of Care in Europe on November 16-17 th, 2016. The aims of the meeting were to discuss and propose actions on three topics, namely: Adherence to guidelines for treatment initiation, treatment monitoring and outcomes, ...

  9. International standards for tuberculosis care: Relevance and implications for laboratory professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On World Tuberculosis (TB Day 2006, the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC was officially released and widely endorsed by several agencies and organizations. The ISTC release was the culmination of a year long global effort to develop and set internationally acceptable, evidence-based standards for tuberculosis care. The ISTC describes a widely endorsed level of care that all practitioners, public and private, should seek to achieve in managing individuals who have or are suspected of having, TB and is intended to facilitate the effective engagement of all healthcare providers in delivering high quality care for patients of all ages, including those with smear-positive, smear-negative and extra-pulmonary TB, TB caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and TB/HIV coinfection. In this article, we present the ISTC, with a special focus on the diagnostic standards and describe their implications and relevance for laboratory professionals in India and worldwide. Laboratory professionals play a critical role in ensuring that all the standards are actually met by providing high quality laboratory services for smear microscopy, culture and drug susceptibility testing and other services such as testing for HIV infection. In fact, if the ISTC is widely followed, it can be expected that there will be a greater need and demand for quality assured laboratory services and this will have obvious implications for all laboratories in terms of work load, requirement for resources and trained personnel and organization of quality assurance systems.

  10. Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender-Nonconforming People, Version 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, E.; Bockting, W.; Botzer, M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; DeCuypere, G.; Feldman, J.; Fraser, L.; Green, J.; Knudson, G.; Meyer, W.J.; Monstrey, S.; Adler, R.K.; Brown, G.R.; Devor, A.H.; Ehrbar, R.; Ettner, R.; Eyler, E.; Garofalo, R.; Karasic, D.H.; Lev, A.I.; Mayer, G.; Meyer-Bahlburg, H.; Hall, B.P.; Pfaefflin, F.; Rachlin, K.; Robinson, B.; Schechter, L.S.; Tangpricha, V.; van Trotsenburg, M.A.A.; Vitale, A.; Winter, S.; Whittle, S.; Wylie, K.R.; Zucker, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Standards of Care (SOC) for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender Nonconforming People is a publication of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). The overall goal of the SOC is to provide clinical guidance for health professionals to assist transsexual,

  11. Workflow standardization of a novel team care model to improve chronic care: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panattoni, Laura; Hurlimann, Lily; Wilson, Caroline; Durbin, Meg; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2017-04-19

    Team-based chronic care models have not been widely adopted in community settings, partly due to their varying effectiveness in randomized control trials, implementation challenges, and concerns about physician acceptance. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation designed and implemented "Champion," a novel team-based model that includes new standard work (e.g. proactive patient outreach, pre-visit schedule grooming, depression screening, care planning, health coaching) to support patients' self-management of hypertension and diabetes. We investigated whether Champion improved clinical outcomes. We conducted a quasi-experimental study comparing the Champion clinic-level intervention (n = 38 physicians) with a usual care clinic (n = 37 physicians) in Northern California. The primary outcomes, blood pressure and glycohemoglobin (A1c), were analyzed using a piecewise linear growth curve model for patients exposed to a Champion physician visit (n = 3156) or usual care visit (n = 8034) in the two years prior and one year post implementation. Secondary outcomes were provider experience, compared at baseline and 12 months in both the intervention and usual care clinics using multi-level ordered logistic modeling, and electronic health record based fidelity measures. Compared to usual care, in the first 6 months after a Champion physician visit, diabetes patients aged 18-75 experienced an additional -1.13 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.23 to -0.04) decline in diastolic blood pressure and -0.47 (95% CI: -0.61 to -0.33) decline in A1c. There were no additional improvements in blood pressure or A1c 6 to 12 months post physician visit. At 12 months, Champion physicians reported improved experience with managing chronic care patients in 6 of 7 survey items (p work was uneven; depression screening was the most commonly documented element (85% of patients), while care plans were the least (30.8% of patients). Champion standard work improved glycemic control over the first 6

  12. The development and current status of Intensive Care Unit management of prospective organ donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kathleen Menzel Ellis

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Management of deceased organ donors should focus first on maintaining adequate perfusion to all organ systems through adherence to standard critical care guidelines, early referral to OPOs, and family support. Furthermore, several specific DMGs and strategies have been recently shown to improve both the rates and outcomes of organ transplantation.

  13. Air Emissions Damages from Municipal Drinking Water Treatment Under Current and Proposed Regulatory Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-09-19

    Water treatment processes present intersectoral and cross-media risk trade-offs that are not presently considered in Safe Drinking Water Act regulatory analyses. This paper develops a method for assessing the air emission implications of common municipal water treatment processes used to comply with recently promulgated and proposed regulatory standards, including concentration limits for, lead and copper, disinfection byproducts, chromium(VI), strontium, and PFOA/PFOS. Life-cycle models of electricity and chemical consumption for individual drinking water unit processes are used to estimate embedded NO x , SO 2 , PM 2.5 , and CO 2 emissions on a cubic meter basis. We estimate air emission damages from currently installed treatment processes at U.S. drinking water facilities to be on the order of $500 million USD annually. Fully complying with six promulgated and proposed rules would increase baseline air emission damages by approximately 50%, with three-quarters of these damages originating from chemical manufacturing. Despite the magnitude of these air emission damages, the net benefit of currently implemented rules remains positive. For some proposed rules, however, the promise of net benefits remains contingent on technology choice.

  14. Standardization and Scaling of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Janet; Kamal, Arif H; Harker, Matthew; Taylor, Donald H; Bonsignore, Lindsay; Morris, John; Massie, Lisa; Singh Bhullar, Parampal; Howell, Mary; Hendrix, Mark; Bennett, Deeana; Abernethy, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Although limited, the descriptions of Community-Based Palliative Care (CBPC) demonstrates variability in team structures, eligibility, and standardization across care settings. In 2014, Four Seasons Compassion for Life, a nonprofit hospice and palliative care (PC) organization in Western North Carolina (WNC), was awarded a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Innovation (CMMI) Award to expand upon their existing innovative model to implement, evaluate, and demonstrate CBPC in the United States. The objective of this article is to describe the processes and challenges of scaling and standardizing the CBPC model. Four Season's CBPC model serves patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings using an interdisciplinary team to address symptom management, psychosocial/spiritual care, advance care planning, and patient/family education. Medicare beneficiaries who are ≥65 years of age with a life-limiting illness were eligible for the CMMI project. The CBPC model was scaled across numerous counties in WNC and Upstate South Carolina. Over the first two years of the project, scaling occurred into 21 counties with the addition of 2 large hospitals, 52 nursing facilities, and 2 new clinics. To improve efficiency and effectiveness, a PC screening referral guide and a risk stratification approach were developed and implemented. Care processes, including patient referral and initial visit, were mapped. This article describes an interdisciplinary CBPC model in all care settings to individuals with life-limiting illness and offers guidance for risk stratification assessments and mapping care processes that may help PC programs as they develop and work to improve efficiencies.

  15. Creation of a synthetic indicator of quality of care as a clinical management standard in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coma, Ermengol; Ferran, Manel; Méndez, Leonardo; Iglesias, Begoña; Fina, Francesc; Medina, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    The development of electronic medical records has allowed the creation of new quality indicators in healthcare. Among them, synthetic indicators facilitate global interpretation of results and comparisons between professionals. A healthcare quality standard (EQA, the Catalan acronym for Estàndard de Qualitat Assistencial) was constructed to serve as a synthetic indicator to measure the quality of care provided by primary care professionals in Catalonia (Spain). The project phases were to establish the reference population; select health problems to be included; define, select and deliberate about subindicators; and construct and publish the EQA. Construction of the EQA involved 107 healthcare professionals, and 91 health problems were included. In addition, 133 experts were consulted, who proposed a total of 339 indicators. After systematic paired comparison, 61 indicators were selected to create the synthetic indicator. The EQA is now calculated on a monthly basis for more than 8000 healthcare professionals using an automated process that extracts data from electronic medical records; results are published on a follow-up website. Along with the use of the online EQA results tool, there has been an ongoing improvement in most of the quality of care indicators. Creation of the EQA has proven to be useful for the measurement of the quality of care of primary care services. Also an improvement trend over 5 years is shown across most of the measured indicators. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2193-1801-2-51) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  16. Current pulse: can a production system reduce medical errors in health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printezis, Antonios; Gopalakrishnan, Mohan

    2007-01-01

    One of the reasons for rising health care costs is medical errors, a majority of which result from faulty systems and processes. Health care in the past has used process-based initiatives such as Total Quality Management, Continuous Quality Improvement, and Six Sigma to reduce errors. These initiatives to redesign health care, reduce errors, and improve overall efficiency and customer satisfaction have had moderate success. Current trend is to apply the successful Toyota Production System (TPS) to health care since its organizing principles have led to tremendous improvement in productivity and quality for Toyota and other businesses that have adapted them. This article presents insights on the effectiveness of TPS principles in health care and the challenges that lie ahead in successfully integrating this approach with other quality initiatives.

  17. Current funding and financing issues in the Australian hospice and palliative care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Eagar, Kathy; Currow, David; Green, Janette

    2009-07-01

    This article overviews current funding and financing issues in the Australian hospice and palliative care sector. Within Australia, the major responsibilities for managing the health care system are shared between two levels of government. Funding arrangements vary according to the type of care. The delivery of palliative care services is a State/Territory responsibility. Recently, almost all States/Territories have developed overarching frameworks to guide the development of palliative care policies, including funding and service delivery structures. Palliative care services in Australia comprise a mix of specialist providers, generalist providers, and support services in the public, nongovernment, and private sectors. The National Palliative Care Strategy is a joint strategy of the Commonwealth and States that commenced in 2002 and includes a number of major issues. Following a national study in 1996, the Australian National Subacute and Nonacute Patient (AN-SNAP) system was endorsed as the national casemix classification for subacute and nonacute care. Funding for palliative care services varies depending on the type of service and the setting in which it is provided. There is no national model for funding inpatient or community services, which is a State/Territory responsibility. A summary of funding arrangements is provided in this article. Palliative care continues to evolve at a rapid rate in Australia. Increasingly flexible evidence-based models of care delivery are emerging. This article argues that it will be critical for equally flexible funding and financing models to be developed. Furthermore, it is critical that palliative care patients can be identified, classified, and costed. Casemix classifications such as AN-SNAP represent an important starting point but further work is required.

  18. Non-destructive testing. The current state of standards and qualification and certification for leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Domestic standards of the leak testing are enacted as one of Japan Industrial Standards. The conformity is advanced between these domestic standards and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standard. ISO9712 (Non-destructive testing-Qualification and certification of personnel) was revised to include the leak testing of qualification and certification in 2005. The preparation working group of qualification and certification for leak testing is planning start aiming at the system in one and a half years. (author)

  19. Proposal on ''standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparman, Ibon

    2000-01-01

    The Center for the Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals - National Nuclear Energy Agency (P2RR-BATAN) has one Cyclotron type CS-30 with maximum 30 MeV proton energy. It is used since 1990 for 201 Tl production. The main use of 201 Tl in Indonesia is for diagnosis and assessment of myocardial ischaemia, especially diagnosis of coronary artery disease, viability of the heart muscle and forecasting the outcome for patients with coronary disease. The Cyclotron facility is supported with a solid target station, two hot cells and the chemical equipment for electroplating. The yield of 201 Tl production currently achieved around 40-50%. The irradiation technique and chemical separation should be improved. We are also very interested in the development of the production of 103 Pd via 103 Rh (p,n) 103 Pd reaction. The objective of this proposal will support the main program of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) in enhancement of health care and in providing Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals for hospitals

  20. Revision of the Euratom basic safety standards directive-current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundig, S.

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission is currently developing a revised Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS) Directive covering two major objectives: the consolidation of existing Euratom Radiation Protection legislation and the revision of the Euratom BSS. The consolidation will merge the following five Directives into one single Directive: the BSS Directive, the Medical Exposures Directive, the Public Information Directive, the Outside Workers Directive and the Directive on the Control of high-activity sealed radioactive sources and orphan sources. The revision of the Euratom BSS will take account of the latest recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and shall improve clarity of the requirements where appropriate. It is planned to introduce more binding requirements on natural radiation sources, on criteria for exemption and clearance, and on the cooperation between Member States for emergency planning and response. The provisions for regulatory control of planned exposure situations foresee a graded approach commensurate to the magnitude and likelihood of exposures from a practice. Finally, the new BSS shall take account of recent scientific developments. One additional goal is to achieve greater harmonisation between the Euratom BSS and the international BSS. While the requirements on the protection of workers, apprentices and students remain nearly unchanged, the revised BSS will clarify the roles and responsibilities of services and experts involved in technical and practical aspects of radiation protection, such as the occupational health services, the dosimetry services, the radiation protection expert and the medical physics expert. The requirements in the BSS on individual monitoring of category A workers remain unchanged, but the existing guidance on individual monitoring was revised and updated-the technical recommendations for monitoring individuals occupationally exposed to external radiation are published by the European

  1. Process Evaluation: Standard, Effectiveness, Efficiency and Sustainability of Maternity Nursing Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laili Rahayuwati

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although globally there is a change in the trend of epidemiology from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, the prevalence and incidence of infectious diseases as well as MMR (Maternal Mortality Rate and IMR (infant mortality rate in Indonesia is still high. In year 2000, Faculty of Nursing of the Universitas Padjadjaran in collaboration with Hasan Sadikin Hospital built a model of treatment room, which was affiliated with obstetric gynecology room for improving integrated quality of health care services and education. The model built in this room aimed to : 1 Improve the quality of health care service; 2 to develop the student’s experiences with patients; 3 Provide quality nurse education to support students; 4 encourage students to improve the results of clinical prctice. The objective of process evaluation in this study was to give an insight to an appropriate model for maternity nursing service. This results showed on the one hand , there are some records not yet achieved an ideal standard , lack of effectiveness and efficiency of care delivery, namely: 1 the ratio of midwives and patients are not ideal ; 2 No one consultant obstetrician gynecologist and one doctor for every room . As well as challenges to sustainability care that meets the standards of maternity care. Conclusion: this study recommends to take a comprehensive strategic planning for improving nursing and midwifery services that involve all relevant stakeholders in the government, civil society, service delivery, education, and professional organizations.

  2. Preconception Care: A New Standard of Care within Maternal Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Genuis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging research suggests that much pediatric affliction has origins in the vulnerable phase of fetal development. Prenatal factors including deficiency of various nutrients and exposure to assorted toxicants are major etiological determinants of myriad obstetrical complications, pediatric chronic diseases, and perhaps some genetic mutations. With recent recognition that modifiable environmental determinants, rather than genetic predestination, are the etiological source of most chronic illness, modification of environmental factors prior to conception offers the possibility of precluding various mental and physical health conditions. Environmental and lifestyle modification through informed patient choice is possible but evidence confirms that, with little to no training in clinical nutrition, toxicology, or environmental exposures, most clinicians are ill-equipped to counsel patients about this important area. With the totality of available scientific evidence that now exists on the potential to modify disease-causing gestational determinants, failure to take necessary precautionary action may render members of the medical community collectively and individually culpable for preventable illness in children. We advocate for environmental health education of maternity health professionals and the widespread adoption and implementation of preconception care. This will necessitate the translation of emerging knowledge from recent research literature, to health professionals, to reproductive-aged women, and to society at large.

  3. Updating the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care. Entering the era of molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Philip C; Fair, Elizabeth L; Uplekar, Mukund

    2014-03-01

    The International Standards for Tuberculosis Care, first published in 2006 (Lancet Infect Dis 2006;6:710-725.) with a second edition in 2009 ( www.currytbcenter.ucsf.edu/international/istc_report ), was produced by an international coalition of organizations funded by the United States Agency for International Development. Development of the document was led jointly by the World Health Organization and the American Thoracic Society, with the aim of promoting engagement of all care providers, especially those in the private sector in low- and middle-income countries, in delivering high-quality services for tuberculosis. In keeping with World Health Organization recommendations regarding rapid molecular testing, as well as other pertinent new recommendations, the third edition of the Standards has been developed. After decades of dormancy, the technology available for tuberculosis care and control is now rapidly evolving. In particular, rapid molecular testing, using devices with excellent performance characteristics for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampin resistance, and that are practical and affordable for use in decentralized facilities in low-resource settings, is being widely deployed globally. Used appropriately, both within tuberculosis control programs and in private laboratories, these devices have the potential to revolutionize tuberculosis care and control, providing a confirmed diagnosis and a determination of rifampin resistance within a few hours, enabling appropriate treatment to be initiated promptly. Major changes have been made in the standards for diagnosis. Additional important changes include: emphasis on the recognition of groups at increased risk of tuberculosis; updating the standard on antiretroviral treatment in persons with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection; and revising the standard on treating multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  4. [The International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC): what is the importance for Japan?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Paula I

    2008-07-01

    In 2005, the World Health Assembly resolved that all Member States should ensure that all persons with tuberculosis (TB) "have access to the universal standard of care based on proper diagnosis, treatment and reporting consistent with the DOTS strategy..." The purpose of the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC) is to define the widely accepted level of care of persons either suspected of, or diagnosed with, TB by all health practitioners, especially those in the private sector, who often lack guidance and systematic evaluation of outcomes provided by government programs. Since their publication in 2006 on World TB Day, the standards have been endorsed by the major international health organizations as well as many country-level professional societies. The intention is to complement local and national control polices consistent with those of the World Health Organization: they are not intended to replace local guidelines, but are written to accommodate local differences in practice. The ISTC comprise seventeen evidence-based standards on tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment, as well as the responsibility of the public health sector. These are based on the basic principles of TB care: prompt and accurate diagnosis, standardized treatment regimens of proven efficacy, appropriate treatment support and supervision, monitoring of response to treatment and the carrying out of essential public health responsibilities. The relevance of the ISTC to the Japanese context is highlighted, in terms of when persons should be suspected of TB; the appropriate diagnostic modalities, including the use of chest radiographs; the advantages of fixed dose combinations; the importance of follow-up laboratory tests to document response to treatment, the importance of recordkeeping and reporting to public health authorities, the value of HIV testing of TB patients and the use of anti-retrovirals for those dually infected; and the assessment of drug resistance and the

  5. Management of Pediatric Delirium in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients: An International Survey of Current Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Pickler, Rita H; Lin, Li; Shaw, Richard J; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Redington, Andrew; Curley, Martha A Q

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians assess and manage delirium in patients following cardiac surgery. Descriptive self-report survey. A web-based survey of pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians who are members of the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society. Pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians (physicians and nurses). None. One-hundred seventy-three clinicians practicing in 71 different institutions located in 13 countries completed the survey. Respondents described their clinical impression of the occurrence of delirium to be approximately 25%. Most respondents (75%) reported that their ICU does not routinely screen for delirium. Over half of the respondents (61%) have never attended a lecture on delirium. The majority of respondents (86%) were not satisfied with current delirium screening, diagnosis, and management practices. Promotion of day/night cycle, exposure to natural light, deintensification of care, sleep hygiene, and reorientation to prevent or manage delirium were among nonpharmacologic interventions reported along with the use of anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and medications for insomnia. Clinicians responding to the survey reported a range of delirium assessment and management practices in postoperative pediatric cardiac surgery patients. Study results highlight the need for improvement in delirium education for pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians as well as the need for systematic evaluation of current delirium assessment and management practices.

  6. Early Appropriate Care: A Protocol to Standardize Resuscitation Assessment and to Expedite Fracture Care Reduces Hospital Stay and Enhances Revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Heather A; Dolenc, Andrea J; Moore, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that a standardized protocol for fracture care would enhance revenue by reducing complications and length of stay. Prospective consecutive series. Level 1 trauma center. Two hundread and fifty-three adult patients with a mean age of 40.7 years and mean Injury Severity Score of 26.0. Femur, pelvis, or spine fractures treated surgically. Hospital and professional charges and collections were analyzed. Fixation was defined as early (<36 hours) or delayed. Complications and hospital stay were recorded. Mean charges were US $180,145 with a mean of US $66,871 collected (37%). The revenue multiplier was US $59,882/$6989 (8.57), indicating hospital collection of US $8.57 for every professional dollar, less than half of which went to orthopaedic surgeons. Delayed fracture care was associated with more intensive care unit (4.5 vs. 9.4) and total hospital days (9.4 vs. 15.3), with mean loss of actual revenue US $6380/patient delayed (n = 47), because of the costs of longer length of stay. Complications were associated with the highest expenses: mean of US $291,846 charges and US $101,005 collections, with facility collections decreased by 5.1%. An uncomplicated course of care was associated with the most favorable total collections: (US $60,017/$158,454 = 38%) and the shortest mean stay (8.7 days). Facility collections were nearly 9 times more than professional collections. Delayed fixation was associated with more complications, and facility collections decreased 5% with a complication. Furthermore, delayed fixation was associated with longer hospital stay, accounting for US $300K more in actual costs during the study. A standardized protocol to expedite definitive fixation enhances the profitability of the trauma service line. Economic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Military Housing: Status of the Services' Implementation of the Current Barracks Design Standard

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... In November 1995, DOD adopted a new barracks construction standard, referred to as the 1+1 design standard, that called for more space and increased privacy in new barracks for service members permanently assigned to an installation...

  8. ICU nurses' oral-care practices and the current best evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKeyser Ganz, Freda; Fink, Naomi Farkash; Raanan, Ofra; Asher, Miriam; Bruttin, Madeline; Nun, Maureen Ben; Benbinishty, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the oral-care practices of ICU nurses, to compare those practices with current evidence-based practice, and to determine if the use of evidence-based practice was associated with personal demographic or professional characteristics. A national survey of oral-care practices of ICU nurses was conducted using a convenience sample of 218 practicing ICU nurses in 2004-05. The survey instrument included questions about demographic and professional characteristics and a checklist of oral-care practices. Nurses rated their perceived level of priority concerning oral care on a scale from 0 to 100. A score was computed representing the sum of 14 items related to equipment, solutions, assessments, and techniques associated with the current best evidence. This score was then statistically analyzed using ANOVA to determine differences of EBP based on demographic and professional characteristics. The most commonly used equipment was gauze pads (84%), followed by tongue depressors (55%), and toothbrushes (34%). Chlorhexidine was the most common solution used (75%). Less than half (44%) reported brushing their patients' teeth. The majority performed an oral assessment before beginning oral care (71%); however, none could describe what assessment tool was used. Only 57% of nurses reported documenting their oral care. Nurses rated oral care of intubated patients with a priority of 67+/-27.1. Wide variations were noted within and between units in terms of which techniques, equipment, and solutions were used. No significant relationships were found between the use of an evidence-based protocol and demographic and professional characteristics or with the priority given to oral care. While nurses ranked oral care a high priority, many did not implement the latest evidence into their current practice. The level of research utilization was not related to personal or professional characteristics. Therefore attempts should be made to encourage all

  9. Mapping the route to medication therapy management documentation and billing standardization and interoperabilility within the health care system: meeting proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millonig, Marsha K

    2009-01-01

    To convene a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss medication therapy management (MTM) documentation and billing standardization and its interoperability within the health care system. More than 70 stakeholders from pharmacy, health information systems, insurers/payers, quality, and standard-setting organizations met on October 7-8, 2008, in Bethesda, MD. The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) organized the invitational conference to facilitate discussion on strategic directions for meeting current market need for MTM documentation and billing interoperability and future market needs for MTM integration into electronic health records (EHRs). APhA recently adopted policy that specifically addresses technology barriers and encourages the use and development of standardized systems for the documentation and billing of MTM services. Day 1 of the conference featured six foundational presentations on health information technology (HIT) trends, perspectives on MTM from the profession and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, health care quality and medication-related outcome measures, integrating MTM workflow in EHRs, and the current state of MTM operalization in practice. After hearing presentations on day 1 and having the opportunity to pose questions to each speaker, conference participants were divided into three breakout groups on day 2. Each group met three times for 60 minutes each and discussed five questions from the perspective of a patient, provider, or payer. Three facilitators met with each of the groups and led discussion from one perspective (i.e., patient, provider, payer). Participants then reconvened as a complete group to participate in a discussion on next steps. HIT is expected to assist in delivering safe, effective, efficient, coordinated care as health professionals strive to improve the quality of care and outcomes for individual patients. The pharmacy profession is actively contributing to quality patient care through MTM services

  10. XBRL Standard for Financial Reporting in Croatia: Current State and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gostimir Dejan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harmonization and standardization is becoming important among regulators and business community. XBRL has entered the global stage as a financial reporting standard. Its mission was to standardize the financial reporting, lower the reporting costs and make the reporting as transparent as possible.

  11. Will NOACs become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Oktay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the general population, with a prevalence of 1–3%, which increases with age, reaching 15% in elderly people. Prophylaxis of ischemic stroke with warfarin was the gold standard of medical management for many years. On the other hand heparin and warfarin was the main pharmacologic agents for the prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism. In the last 5 years warfarin is getting replaced by non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants at least partly. In this article it is attempted to foresee whether new oral anticoagulants will become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy.

  12. Left atrial appendage occlusion versus standard medical care in patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Wester, Per

    2017-01-01

    -VASc and HAS-BLED scores). The standard care patients were identified from the Danish Stroke Registry among 787 patients with AF and ICH. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality, ischaemic stroke and major bleeding. Patients with AF and a prior ICH treated with LAAO had a lower risk...... countries with AF and previous ICH who underwent LAAO using the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug or the AMPLATZER AMULET were compared to a propensity score-matched group of 151 patients receiving standard medical therapy. The two groups were matched so that their risks for stroke and bleeding were similar (CHA2DS2...

  13. In-vitro diagnostic devices introduction to current point-of-care diagnostic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Addressing the origin, current status, and future development of point-of-care diagnostics, and serving to integrate knowledge and tools from Analytical Chemistry, Bioengineering, Biomaterials, and Nanotechnology, this book focusses on addressing the collective and combined needs of industry and academia (including medical schools) to effectively conduct interdisciplinary research. In addition to summarizing and detailing developed diagnostic devices, this book will attempt to point out the possible future trends of development for point-of-care diagnostics using both scientifically based research and practical engineering needs with the aim to help novices comprehensively understand the development of point-of-care diagnostics. This includes demonstrating several common but critical principles and mechanisms used in point-of-care diagnostics that address practical needs (e.g., disease or healthcare monitoring) using two well-developed examples so far: 1) blood glucose meters (via electrochemistry); and, 2) p...

  14. NODC Standard Format Current Meter (Components) (F015) Data (1962-1992) (NODC Accession 0066358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series measurements of ocean currents. These data are obtained from current meter moorings and represent the Eulerian method of current...

  15. Negligence and the legal standard of care: what is 'reasonable' conduct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, José

    Medical negligence has become a big issue for medical practitioners. Fear of the law, and of litigation, has led to claims of defensive medical practice among doctors and nurses. At the heart of this lies the legal definition of the standard of care, where the law seeks to determine when conduct is 'reasonable' (and thus not negligent), or 'unreasonable' (and thus a breach of the legal duty of care and potentially negligent). In this article the author clarifies what the law means by 'reasonableness' with respect to nurses, drawing on both the law and the NMC Code. Furthermore, the article shall demonstrate that the law is not something to be fearful of but, rather, demands a standard no higher than that of the NMC.

  16. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  17. Improving adherence to Standard Precautions for the control of health care-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralejo, Donna; El Dib, Regina; Prata, Rafaela A; Barretti, Pasqual; Corrêa, Ione

    2018-02-26

    'Standard Precautions' refers to a system of actions, such as using personal protective equipment or adhering to safe handling of needles, that healthcare workers take to reduce the spread of germs in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes. To assess the effectiveness of interventions that target healthcare workers to improve adherence to Standard Precautions in patient care. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS, two other databases, and two trials registers. We applied no language restrictions. The date of the most recent search was 14 February 2017. We included randomised trials of individuals, cluster-randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time-series studies that evaluated any intervention to improve adherence to Standard Precautions by any healthcare worker with responsibility for patient care in any hospital, long-term care or community setting, or artificial setting, such as a classroom or a learning laboratory. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data from eligible trials, and assessed risk of bias for each included study, using standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Because of substantial heterogeneity among interventions and outcome measures, meta-analysis was not warranted. We used the GRADE approach to assess certainty of evidence and have presented results narratively in 'Summary of findings' tables. We included eight studies with a total of 673 participants; three studies were conducted in Asia, two in Europe, two in North America, and one in Australia. Five studies were randomised trials, two were cluster-randomised trials, and one was a non-randomised trial. Three studies compared different educational approaches versus no education, one study compared education with visualisation of respiratory particle dispersion versus education alone, two studies compared education with additional infection control support versus

  18. Development of Australian clinical practice outcome standards for graduates of critical care nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Fenella J; Leslie, Gavin D; Grech, Carol; Boldy, Duncan; Latour, Jos M

    2015-02-01

    To develop critical care nurse education practice standards. Critical care specialist education for registered nurses in Australia is provided at graduate level. Considerable variation exists across courses with no framework to guide practice outcomes or evidence supporting the level of qualification. An eDelphi technique involved the iterative process of a national expert panel responding to three survey rounds. For the first round, 84 statements, organised within six domains, were developed from earlier phases of the study that included a literature review, analysis of critical care courses and input from health consumers. The panel, which represented the perspectives of four stakeholder groups, responded to two rating scales: level of importance and level of practice. Of 105 experts who agreed to participate, 92 (88%) completed survey round I; 85 (92%) round II; and 73 (86%) round III. Of the 98 statements, 75 were rated as having a high level of importance - median 7 (IQR 6-7); 14 were rated as having a moderate level of importance - median 6 (IQR 5-7); and nine were rated as having a low level of importance - median 4 (IQR 4-6)-6 (IQR 4-6). The majority of the panel rated graduate level of practice as 'demonstrates independently' or 'teaches or supervises others' for 80 statements. For 18 statements, there was no category selected by 50% or more of the panel. The process resulted in the development of 98 practice standards, categorised into three levels, indicating a practice outcome level by the practitioner who can independently provide nursing care for a variety of critically ill patients in most contexts, using a patient- and family-focused approach. The graduate practice outcomes provide a critical care qualification definition for nursing workforce standards and can be used by course providers to achieve consistent practice outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Implementation of standardized follow-up care significantly reduces peritonitis in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Alicia M; Richardson, Troy; Lawlor, John; Stuart, Jayne; Newland, Jason; McAfee, Nancy; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-06-01

    The Standardizing Care to improve Outcomes in Pediatric End stage renal disease (SCOPE) Collaborative aims to reduce peritonitis rates in pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis patients by increasing implementation of standardized care practices. To assess this, monthly care bundle compliance and annualized monthly peritonitis rates were evaluated from 24 SCOPE centers that were participating at collaborative launch and that provided peritonitis rates for the 13 months prior to launch. Changes in bundle compliance were assessed using either a logistic regression model or a generalized linear mixed model. Changes in average annualized peritonitis rates over time were illustrated using the latter model. In the first 36 months of the collaborative, 644 patients with 7977 follow-up encounters were included. The likelihood of compliance with follow-up care practices increased significantly (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.10, 1.19). Mean monthly peritonitis rates significantly decreased from 0.63 episodes per patient year (95% confidence interval 0.43, 0.92) prelaunch to 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.31, 0.57) at 36 months postlaunch. A sensitivity analysis confirmed that as mean follow-up compliance increased, peritonitis rates decreased, reaching statistical significance at 80% at which point the prelaunch rate was 42% higher than the rate in the months following achievement of 80% compliance. In its first 3 years, the SCOPE Collaborative has increased the implementation of standardized follow-up care and demonstrated a significant reduction in average monthly peritonitis rates. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Using standardized insulin orders to improve patient safety in a tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Mary-Anne; Brez, Sharon; Sicoli, Silvana; De Sousa, Filomena; Keely, Erin; Malcom, Janine C

    2014-04-01

    To standardize insulin prescribing practices for inpatients, improve management of hypoglycemia, reduce reliance on sliding scales, increase use of basal-bolus insulin and improve patient safety. Patients with diabetes were admitted to 2 pilot inpatient units followed by corporate spread to all insulin-treated patients on noncritical care units in a Canadian tertiary care multicampus teaching hospital. Standardized preprinted insulin and hypoglycemia management orders, decision support tools and multidisciplinary education strategies were developed, tested and implemented by way of the Model for Improvement and The Ottawa Model for Research Process. Clinical and balance measures were evaluated through statistical process control. Patient safety was improved through a reduction in hypoglycemia and decreased dependence on correctional scales. Utilization of the preprinted orders approached the target of 70% at the end of the test period and was sustained at 89% corporately 3 years post-implementation. The implementation of a standardized, preprinted insulin order set facilitates best practices for insulin therapy, improves patient safety and is highly supported by treating practitioners. The utilization of formal quality-improvement methodology promoted efficiency, enhanced sustainability, increased support among clinicians and senior administrators, and was effective in instituting sustained practice change in a complex care centre. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A systems approach to accepted standards of care: Shifting the blame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Glance

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In healthcare, from a legal perspective, the standard ofacceptable practice has been generally set by the courts anddefined as healthcare professionals acting in a manner thatis widely accepted by their peers as meeting an acceptablestandard of care. This view, however, reflects the state ofhow practice “is” rather than what it “ought to be”. What isought to be depends on whether you take a “person” or“system” oriented approach to practice.The increasing pressures of lack of money and resources,and an ever-increasing need for care are bringing pressureon the health services to move to a system approach andthis is gaining acceptance both with clinicians and thuseventually the courts.A systems-type approach to healthcare will, by necessity,embrace clinical protocols and guidelines supported byclinical information systems. It will also see blame for errorsshifting from clinicians to the organisations that employthem.This paper argues that a continued use of a person-basedapproach to healthcare, developed through an historicalrecord of practice by individual clinicians, is no longeradequate defence in a case of supposed negligence.When the healthcare system has codified clinical guidelinesand digital data gathered across thousands of clinicians andtheir patients, it is possible to compute adequate levels ofcare and expect clinicians and the healthcare system ingeneral to meet these minimum standards.Future negligence decisions will rely on a systems-basedbest practice standard of care determined through evidencerather than opinion

  2. MO-G-9A-01: Imaging Refresher for Standard of Care Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labby, Z [The University of Michigan Hospital ' Health Sys, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sensakovic, W [Florida Hospital, Orlando, FL (United States); Hipp, E [NYULMC Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Altman, M [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Imaging techniques and technology which were previously the domain of diagnostic medicine are becoming increasingly integrated and utilized in radiation therapy (RT) clinical practice. As such, there are a number of specific imaging topics that are highly applicable to modern radiation therapy physics. As imaging becomes more widely integrated into standard clinical radiation oncology practice, the impetus is on RT physicists to be informed and up-to-date on those imaging modalities relevant to the design and delivery of therapeutic radiation treatments. For example, knowing that, for a given situation, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image set is most likely what the physician would like to import and contour is helpful, but may not be sufficient to providing the best quality of care. Understanding the physics of how that pulse sequence works and why it is used could help assess its utility and determine if it is the optimal sequence for aiding in that specific clinical situation. It is thus important that clinical medical physicists be able to understand and explain the physics behind the imaging techniques used in all aspects of clinical radiation oncology practice. This session will provide the basic physics for a variety of imaging modalities for applications that are highly relevant to radiation oncology practice: computed tomography (CT) (including kV, MV, cone beam CT [CBCT], and 4DCT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging specific to brachytherapy (including ultrasound and some brachytherapy specific topics in MR). For each unique modality, the image formation process will be reviewed, trade-offs between image quality and other factors (e.g. imaging time or radiation dose) will be clarified, and typically used cases for each modality will be introduced. The current and near-future uses of these modalities and techniques in radiation oncology clinical practice will also be discussed. Learning

  3. Tuberculosis detection and the challenges of integrated care in rural China: A cross-sectional standardized patient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Sean; Xue, Hao; Zhou, Chengchao; Shi, Yaojiang; Yi, Hongmei; Zhou, Huan; Rozelle, Scott; Pai, Madhukar; Das, Jishnu

    2017-10-01

    Despite recent reductions in prevalence, China still faces a substantial tuberculosis (TB) burden, with future progress dependent on the ability of rural providers to appropriately detect and refer TB patients for further care. This study (a) provides a baseline assessment of the ability of rural providers to correctly manage presumptive TB cases; (b) measures the gap between provider knowledge and practice and; (c) evaluates how ongoing reforms of China's health system-characterized by a movement toward "integrated care" and promotion of initial contact with grassroots providers-will affect the care of TB patients. Unannounced standardized patients (SPs) presenting with classic pulmonary TB symptoms were deployed in 3 provinces of China in July 2015. The SPs successfully completed 274 interactions across all 3 tiers of China's rural health system, interacting with providers in 46 village clinics, 207 township health centers, and 21 county hospitals. Interactions between providers and standardized patients were assessed against international and national standards of TB care. Using a lenient definition of correct management as at least a referral, chest X-ray or sputum test, 41% (111 of 274) SPs were correctly managed. Although there were no cases of empirical anti-TB treatment, antibiotics unrelated to the treatment of TB were prescribed in 168 of 274 interactions or 61.3% (95% CI: 55%-67%). Correct management proportions significantly higher at county hospitals compared to township health centers (OR 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01-0.25, p system, where patients can choose to bypass any level of care, simulations suggest that a system of managed referral with gatekeeping at the level of village clinics would reduce proportions of correct management from 41% to 16%, while gatekeeping at the level of the township hospital would retain correct management close to current levels at 37%. The main limitations of the study are 2-fold. First, we evaluate the management of a one

  4. Microbicides Development Programme: Engaging the community in the standard of care debate in a vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soteli Selephina

    2009-10-01

    as HIV positive during the trial. This obligation includes ensuring sustainable, post-trial access to these services. Post-trial access to an effective vaginal microbicide was also felt to be a moral imperative. Conclusion Participatory methodologies enabled effective partnerships between researchers, participant representatives and community stakeholders to be developed and facilitated local dialogue and consensus on what constitutes a locally-appropriate standard of care in the context of a vaginal microbicide trial in this setting. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64716212

  5. Microbicides Development Programme: Engaging the community in the standard of care debate in a vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Andrew; Shagi, Charles; Lees, Shelley; Shapiro, Katherine; Masanja, Joseph; Nikolau, Lawi; Kazimoto, Johari; Soteli, Selephina; Moffat, Claire; Changalucha, John; McCormack, Sheena; Hayes, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    the trial. This obligation includes ensuring sustainable, post-trial access to these services. Post-trial access to an effective vaginal microbicide was also felt to be a moral imperative. Conclusion Participatory methodologies enabled effective partnerships between researchers, participant representatives and community stakeholders to be developed and facilitated local dialogue and consensus on what constitutes a locally-appropriate standard of care in the context of a vaginal microbicide trial in this setting. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64716212 PMID:19814830

  6. Altered Mental Status: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Sanello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with an acute change in mental status and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the State of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with altered mental status (AMS and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the AMS protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were patient assessment, point-of-care tests, supplemental oxygen, use of standardized scoring, evaluating for causes of AMS, blood glucose evaluation, toxicological treatment, and pediatric evaluation and management. Results: Protocols across 33 EMS agencies in California varied widely. All protocols call for a blood glucose check, 21 (64% suggest treating adults at <60mg/dL, and half allow for the use of dextrose 10%. All the protocols recommend naloxone for signs of opioid overdose, but only 13 (39% give specific parameters. Half the agencies (52% recommend considering other toxicological causes of AMS, often by using the mnemonic AEIOU TIPS. Eight (24% recommend a 12-lead electrocardiogram; others simply suggest cardiac monitoring. Fourteen (42% advise supplemental oxygen as needed; only seven (21% give specific parameters. In terms of considering various etiologies of AMS, 25 (76% give instructions to consider trauma, 20 (61% to consider stroke, and 18 (55% to consider seizure. Twenty-three (70% of the agencies have separate pediatric AMS protocols; others include pediatric considerations within the adult protocol. Conclusion: Protocols

  7. Current standards of neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Viola Lara; Äikiä, Marja; Del Barrio, Antonio; Boon, Paul; Borbély, Csaba; Bran, Ema; Braun, Kees; Carette, Evelien; Clark, Maria; Cross, Judith Helen; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Francione, Stefano; Gersamia, Anna; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Guekht, Alla; Harrison, Sue; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Heminghyt, Einar; Hirsch, Edouard; Javurkova, Alena; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Kavan, Nicole; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Kirschner, Margarita; Kleitz, Catherine; Kobulashvili, Teia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Kurtish, Selin Yagci; Lesourd, Mathieu; Ljunggren, Sofia; Lossius, Morten Ingvar; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiené, Ruta; Martin-Sanfilippo, Patricia; Marusic, Petr; Miatton, Marijke; Özkara, Çiğdem; Pelle, Federica; Rubboli, Guido; Rudebeck, Sarah; Ryvlin, Philippe; van Schooneveld, Monique; Schmid, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Pia-Magdalena; Seeck, Margitta; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Viggedal, Gerd; Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    We explored the current practice with respect to the neuropsychological assessment of surgical epilepsy patients in European epilepsy centers, with the aim of harmonizing and establishing common standards. Twenty-six epilepsy centers and members of "E-PILEPSY" (a European pilot network of reference centers in refractory epilepsy and epilepsy surgery), were asked to report the status of neuropsychological assessment in adults and children via two different surveys. There was a consensus among these centers regarding the role of neuropsychology in the presurgical workup. Strong agreement was found on indications (localization, epileptic dysfunctions, adverse drugs effects, and postoperative monitoring) and the domains to be evaluated (memory, attention, executive functions, language, visuospatial skills, intelligence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life). Although 186 different tests are in use throughout these European centers, a core group of tests reflecting a moderate level of agreement could be discerned. Variability exists with regard to indications, protocols, and paradigms for the assessment of hemispheric language dominance. For the tests in use, little published evidence of clinical validity in epilepsy was provided. Participants in the survey reported a need for improvement concerning the validity of the tests, tools for the assessment of everyday functioning and accelerated forgetting, national norms, and test co-normalization. Based on the present survey, we documented a consensus regarding the indications and principles of neuropsychological testing. Despite the variety of tests in use, the survey indicated that there may be a core set of tests chosen based on experience, as well as on published evidence. By combining these findings with the results of an ongoing systematic literature review, we aim for a battery that can be recommended for the use across epilepsy surgical centers in Europe. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League

  8. Standardized cardiovascular data for clinical research, registries, and patient care: a report from the Data Standards Workgroup of the National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H Vernon; Weintraub, William S; Radford, Martha J; Kremers, Mark S; Roe, Matthew T; Shaw, Richard E; Pinchotti, Dana M; Tcheng, James E

    2013-05-07

    Relatively little attention has been focused on standardization of data exchange in clinical research studies and patient care activities. Both are usually managed locally using separate and generally incompatible data systems at individual hospitals or clinics. In the past decade there have been nascent efforts to create data standards for clinical research and patient care data, and to some extent these are helpful in providing a degree of uniformity. Nonetheless, these data standards generally have not been converted into accepted computer-based language structures that could permit reliable data exchange across computer networks. The National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure (NCRI) project was initiated with a major objective of creating a model framework for standard data exchange in all clinical research, clinical registry, and patient care environments, including all electronic health records. The goal is complete syntactic and semantic interoperability. A Data Standards Workgroup was established to create or identify and then harmonize clinical definitions for a base set of standardized cardiovascular data elements that could be used in this network infrastructure. Recognizing the need for continuity with prior efforts, the Workgroup examined existing data standards sources. A basic set of 353 elements was selected. The NCRI staff then collaborated with the 2 major technical standards organizations in health care, the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium and Health Level Seven International, as well as with staff from the National Cancer Institute Enterprise Vocabulary Services. Modeling and mapping were performed to represent (instantiate) the data elements in appropriate technical computer language structures for endorsement as an accepted data standard for public access and use. Fully implemented, these elements will facilitate clinical research, registry reporting, administrative reporting and regulatory compliance, and patient care

  9. Long-term care over an uncertain future: what can current retirees expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter; Komisar, Harriet L; Alecxih, Lisa

    The leading edge of the baby boom generation is nearing retirement and facing uncertainty about its need for long-term care (LTC). Using a microsimulation model, this analysis projected that people currently turning age 65 will need LTC for three years on average. An important share of needed care will be covered by public programs and some private insurance, but much of the care will be an uninsured private responsibility of individuals and their families--a responsibility that will be distributed unequally. While over a third of those now turning 65 are projected to never receive family care, three out of 10 will rely on family care for more than two years. Similarly, half of people turning 65 will have no private out-of-pocket expenditures for LTC, while more than one in 20 are projected to spend $100,000 or more of their own money (in present discounted value). Policy debate that focuses only on income security and acute care--and the corresponding Social Security and Medicare programs--misses the third, largely private, risk that retirees face: that of needing LTC.

  10. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrar, Mu?taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patie...

  11. NODC Standard Product: Ocean current drifter data (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These CD-ROMs hold over 4 million surface current observations, almost all obtained by the ship drift method. Date, data source, position, and current direction and...

  12. Beyond communication: the role of standardized protocols in a changing health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaman, James M; Cornell, Paul; Gondo, Maria B; Amis, John M; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Thetford, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Communication errors have grave consequences in health care settings. The situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) protocol has been theorized to improve communication by creating a common language between nurses and physicians in acute care situations. This practice is gaining acceptance across the health care field. However, as yet, there has been little investigation of the ways in which SBAR may have an impact on how health care professionals operate beyond the creation of a common language. The purposes of the study were to explore the implementation of the SBAR protocol and investigate the potential impact of SBAR on the day-to-day experiences of nurses. We performed a qualitative case study of 2 hospitals that were implementing the SBAR protocol. We collected data from 80 semistructured interviews with nurses, nurse manager, and physicians; observation of nursing and other hospital activities; and documents that pertained to the implementation of the SBAR protocol. Data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Our analysis revealed 4 dimensions of impact that SBAR has beyond its use as a communication tool: schema formation, development of legitimacy, development of social capital, and reinforcement of dominant logics. The results indicate that SBAR may function as more than a tool to standardize communication among nurses and physicians. Rather, the findings indicate that SBAR may aid in schema development that allows rapid decision making by nurses, provide social capital and legitimacy for less-tenured nurses, and reinforce a move toward standardization in the nursing profession. Our findings further suggest that standardized protocols such as SBAR may be a cost-effective method for hospital managers and administrators to accelerate the socialization of nurses, particularly new hires.

  13. Qualitative ergonomics/human factors research in health care: Current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Rupa Sheth; McGuire, Kerry Margaret; Rivera, A Joy

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to understand the current state of Ergonomics/Human Factors (E/HF) qualitative research in health care and to draw implications for future efforts. This systematic review identified 98 qualitative research papers published between January 2005 and August 2015 in the seven journals endorsed by the International Ergonomics Association with an impact factor over 1.0. The majority of the studies were conducted in hospitals and outpatient clinics, were focused on the work of formal health care professionals, and were classified as cognitive or organizational ergonomics. Interviews, focus groups, and observations were the most prevalent forms of data collection. Triangulation and data archiving were the dominant approaches to ensuring rigor. Few studies employed a formal approach to qualitative inquiry. Significant opportunities remain to enhance the use of qualitative research to advance systems thinking within health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Educating Medical Laboratory Technologists: Revisiting Our Assumptions in the Current Economic and Health-Care Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Linder

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stakeholders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships.

  15. A standardized procedure for eddy-current testing of stainless steel, thin-walled nuclear fuel element cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.; Raj, B.; Bhattacharya, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Thin-walled nuclear fuel cladding tubes made of AISI 316 stainless steel have been examined by eddy-current testing. Standardization of the procedures has required investigations on optimizing the test frequency, finding a method to locate a defect with respect to the probe reference end, and the use of standard defects and sequential metallography of natural defects detected by eddy-current testing, to understand the influence of the nature of defects on the impedance output signals. Test frequency and method of locating the defect were optimized by the use of standard defects made by machining in reference cladding tubes. Subsequent metallography of natural defects detected by eddy-current testing revealed mainly clusters of inclusions but also other types of defects. The effect of the distribution of inclusions along the length of the tube on the impedance output is discussed. (author)

  16. Standardized procedure for eddy-current testing of stainless steel, thin-walled nuclear fuel element cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, P; Raj, B; Bhattacharya, D K [Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam (India)

    1982-10-01

    Thin-walled nuclear fuel cladding tubes made of AISI 316 stainless steel have been examined by eddy-current testing. Standardization of the procedures has required investigations on optimizing the test frequency, finding a method to locate a defect with respect to the probe reference end, and the use of standard defects and sequential metallography of natural defects detected by eddy-current testing, to understand the influence of the nature of defects on the impedance output signals. Test frequency and method of locating the defect were optimized by the use of standard defects made by machining in reference cladding tubes. Subsequent metallography of natural defects detected by eddy-current testing revealed mainly clusters of inclusions but also other types of defects. The effect of the distribution of inclusions along the length of the tube on the impedance output is discussed.

  17. Acute care patient portals: a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah A; Rozenblum, Ronen; Leung, Wai Yin; Morrison, Constance Rc; Stade, Diana L; McNally, Kelly; Bourie, Patricia Q; Massaro, Anthony; Bokser, Seth; Dwyer, Cindy; Greysen, Ryan S; Agarwal, Priyanka; Thornton, Kevin; Dalal, Anuj K

    2017-04-01

    To describe current practices and stakeholder perspectives of patient portals in the acute care setting. We aimed to: (1) identify key features, (2) recognize challenges, (3) understand current practices for design, configuration, and use, and (4) propose new directions for investigation and innovation. Mixed methods including surveys, interviews, focus groups, and site visits with stakeholders at leading academic medical centers. Thematic analyses to inform development of an explanatory model and recommendations. Site surveys were administered to 5 institutions. Thirty interviews/focus groups were conducted at 4 site visits that included a total of 84 participants. Ten themes regarding content and functionality, engagement and culture, and access and security were identified, from which an explanatory model of current practices was developed. Key features included clinical data, messaging, glossary, patient education, patient personalization and family engagement tools, and tiered displays. Four actionable recommendations were identified by group consensus. Design, development, and implementation of acute care patient portals should consider: (1) providing a single integrated experience across care settings, (2) humanizing the patient-clinician relationship via personalization tools, (3) providing equitable access, and (4) creating a clear organizational mission and strategy to achieve outcomes of interest. Portals should provide a single integrated experience across the inpatient and ambulatory settings. Core functionality includes tools that facilitate communication, personalize the patient, and deliver education to advance safe, coordinated, and dignified patient-centered care. Our findings can be used to inform a "road map" for future work related to acute care patient portals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Cholesterol Point-of-Care Testing for Community Pharmacies: A Review of the Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Lauren; Tran, Deanna

    2017-08-01

    To summarize the literature on cholesterol point-of-care tests (POCTs). This article would serve as a resource to assist community pharmacists in developing cholesterol point-of-care (POC) pharmacy services. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE Ovid, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane database using the following medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: point-of-care test, cholesterol, blood chemical analysis, rapid testing, collaborative practice, community pharmacy, and ambulatory care. Additional resources including device manufacturer web sites were summarized to supplement the current literature. All human research articles, review articles, meta-analyses, and abstracts published in English through September 1, 2014, were considered. A total of 36 articles were applicable for review. Information was divided into the following categories to be summarized: devices, pharmacists' impact, and operational cost for the pharmacy. The current literature suggests that POCTs in community pharmacies assist with patient outcomes by providing screenings and referring patients with dyslipidemia for further evaluation. The majority of studies on cholesterol POC devices focused on accuracy, revealing the need for further studies to develop best practices and practice models with successful reimbursement. Accuracy, device specifications, required supplies, and patient preference should be considered when selecting a POC device for purchase.

  19. Information technology-based standardized patient education in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Minna; Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to describe nurses' experiences of information technology-based standardized patient education in inpatient psychiatric care. Serious mental health problems are an increasing global concern. Emerging evidence supports the implementation of practices that are conducive to patient self-management and improved patient outcomes among chronically ill patients with mental health problems. In contrast, the attitude of staff towards information technology has been reported to be contradictory in mental health care. After 1 year of using an Internet-based portal (Mieli.Net) developed for patients with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis, all 89 participating nurses were asked to complete questionnaires about their experiences. The data were collected in 2006. Fifty-six participants (63%) returned completed questionnaires and the data were analysed using content analysis. Nurses' experiences of the information technology-based standardized patient education were categorized into two major categories describing the advantages and obstacles in using information technology. Nurses thought that it brought the patients and nurses closer to each other and helped nurses to provide individual support for their patients. However, the education was time-consuming. Systematic patient education using information technology is a promising method of patient-centred care which supports nurses in their daily work. However, it must fit in with clinical activities, and nurses need some guidance in understanding its benefits. The study data can be used in policy-making when developing methods to improve the transparency of information provision in psychiatric nursing.

  20. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Malekzadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7 to 17.0 (1.8 (P < 0.001. Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care.

  1. Effective treatment options for musculoskeletal pain in primary care: A systematic overview of current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan C.; Foster, Nadine E.; Protheroe, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Musculoskeletal pain, the most common cause of disability globally, is most frequently managed in primary care. People with musculoskeletal pain in different body regions share similar characteristics, prognosis, and may respond to similar treatments. This overview aims to summarise current best evidence on currently available treatment options for the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations (back, neck, shoulder, knee and multi-site pain) in primary care. Methods A systematic search was conducted. Initial searches identified clinical guidelines, clinical pathways and systematic reviews. Additional searches found recently published trials and those addressing gaps in the evidence base. Data on study populations, interventions, and outcomes of intervention on pain and function were extracted. Quality of systematic reviews was assessed using AMSTAR, and strength of evidence rated using a modified GRADE approach. Results Moderate to strong evidence suggests that exercise therapy and psychosocial interventions are effective for relieving pain and improving function for musculoskeletal pain. NSAIDs and opioids reduce pain in the short-term, but the effect size is modest and the potential for adverse effects need careful consideration. Corticosteroid injections were found to be beneficial for short-term pain relief among patients with knee and shoulder pain. However, current evidence remains equivocal on optimal dose, intensity and frequency, or mode of application for most treatment options. Conclusion This review presents a comprehensive summary and critical assessment of current evidence for the treatment of pain presentations in primary care. The evidence synthesis of interventions for common musculoskeletal pain presentations shows moderate-strong evidence for exercise therapy and psychosocial interventions, with short-term benefits only from pharmacological treatments. Future research into optimal dose and application of the most

  2. STATEWIDE DATA STANDARDS TO SUPPORT CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC PUBLIC TRANSIT INVESTMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in reporting and using public transit service data. With the creation and widespread use of the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data standard, there has been a significant increase in the f...

  3. Standardization of spedalized medical care to patients with shin fractures in multifield city hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was development of science-based recommendations for increasing efficiency of operative treatment of adult patients with shin fractures in multiprofile city hospital. Investigation was made in Saint-Petersburg Alexandrovskiy City Hospital. Clinical material was presented by official hospital reports, individual medical documentation and results of direct survey of patients treated in this hospital in period 1999-2010 years. All patients had follow up treatment in outpatient department of this hospital. Information was completed following federal and local laws. Recommendations for standardization of modern specialized medical care of patients with shin fractures, based on methods of internal fixation, were performed. We took into consideration possibilities of conventional and minimally invasive fixation of closed and open fractures including politrauma injuries. Models of patients with shin fractures depending on method of internal fixation and list of basic diagnostic procedures and treatment were formed. Operations classifier of internal shin fractures fixation was developed. This classifier includes calculation of hospital costs in process of specialized medical care considering actual correction coefficients. Calculation of each surgical procedure component was performed. List and composition of instrument sets and expense materials for such operations were formed. Analisis of organizational, medico-technological, economica aspect and expert evaluation of clinical results of different methods of long bones fractures fixation have provided conceptual approach to treatment standardization. On this base we have developed medico-economical standards of long bones fractures treatment in city multiprofile hospital.

  4. Analysis and specification of an open platform for outpatient care in consideration of actual standard solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosales Saurer, Bruno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of ambulatory nursing is rapidly growing due to rising health care costs and the demographic development. Today there are approximately 2 million persons in Germany who need outpatient care. Experts predict that there will be more than twice as much by 2050. Ambulatory care nurses must quickly and efficiently assess their patients’ condition and needs. Against this background, the VitaBIT project started in July 2007 with the objective of reorganizing ambulatory care in order to improve quality while at the same time increasing efficiency and saving costs. VitaBIT is promoted by the German federal ministry of economy and technology (BMWi. VitaBIT runs up to the end of 2009, partners of the project are CAS Software AG, PTV Planung Transport Verkehr AG, FZI Forschungszentrum Informatik, Sozial- und Diakoniestation Weinstadt e.V. und Wibu-Systems AG. VitaBIT aims to design an ICT platform for the safe application of mobile information services in ambulatory nursing. Communication and secure information exchange between all parties involved in the care process will also be guaranteed. The article explains the project’s current approach to develop a user-oriented solution by integrating already existing components and services.

  5. [Out-of-hours primary care in Germany: general practitioners' views on the current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenhauser-Mannuß, J; Goetz, K; Scheuer, M; Szescenyi, J; Leutgeb, R

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore views, experiences und perspectives of German GPs related to current out-of-hours service provision covering both urban and rural settings. In the context of the international project EurOOHnet (European Research Network for Out-of-Hours Primary Health Care) the German members (of EurOOHnet) developed a questionnaire about organisational structures, infrastructure requirements and the procedures of information flow between regular care and out-of-hours care in 2011. This questionnaire was adopted in every participating country. A comprehensive postal questionnaire was sent to 410 feneral practice cooperatives in Germany. Qualitative content analysis and an inductive reasoning process, supported by the use of Atlas.ti, were used to identify key themes from responses to open-ended questions in the survey. Results were grouped into 3 overarching categories and each of these were grouped into 3 sub-categories. The questionnaire response rate was 44% (181/410). The analysis identified organisational issues (e. g., financing) and infrastructure barriers (e. g., lack of motivated GPs for out-of-hours care) as key themes. Significantly, different priorities between rural and urban GPs were identified. In particular, rural GPs highlighted shortages of GPs and distance between the GP practice and patients' residence as concerning factors impacting on out-of-hours care. Based on reported views from survey respondents, urban and rural primary care service needs vary significantly and, therefore, different solutions are needed to improve out-of-hours primary care and optimise service quality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Current state of information technology use in a US primary care practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James E; Pearce, Kevin A; Sydney, Carey; Ireson, Carol; Love, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    To examine the current levels of information technology (IT) use in a primary care practice-based research network (PBRN) in order to inform future development of its infrastructure. Every primary care practitioner who is a member of the Kentucky Ambulatory Network (KAN),as well as the office managers of each practice. Practitioners included family practitioners, general practitioners, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A cross-sectional study using two survey instruments: one for office managers and one for practitioners. The office manager survey included questions related to the current state of IT within the practice, plans for enhancement and general IT issues from the perspective of managing a practice. The practitioner survey was designed to measure current IT use and attitudes of primary care practitioners. Response rates for the surveys were 46% (n = 68) for the office managers and 51% (n = 116) for practitioners. All but one practice had internet access; however, 43% had only dial-up service. Only 21% of practitioners use an electronic medical record (EMR), with dollar cost being the barrier reported most frequently (58%). More than half of the office managers were either 'somewhat interested' (45%) or 'very interested' (17%) in a low-cost, standardised EMR that was, at the time, to be sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians. For practitioners, 71% were either 'somewhat' or 'very' interested in such a system. Responses to other IT issues are reported. While interest in enabling information technologies was high in KAN, adoption was variable, with use of several key technologies reported as low.The results suggest that research in this network that would be dependent on or enhanced by IT might be impeded and, generally, greater attention should be given to enhancing the IT infrastructure in primary care.

  7. Combining clinical judgment with guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes: overall standards of comprehensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Tamer G

    2014-05-01

    The rising toll of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on patients and society has resulted in a wide variety of guidelines and therapies to address the need to combat this trend. Given the heterogeneity of T2DM and the different responses patients have to therapies, as well as the continued need for patients to institute lifestyle changes, guidelines published by the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology have in recent years increased the focus on personalized and patient-centered care. How to best assimilate the overall standards of care for T2DM into clinical practice remains a challenge. The 4 pillars of effective diabetes management are a unifying framework and approach to clinical practice that can be integrated with the latest diabetes guidelines. These 4 pillars are lifestyle modifications involving (1) diet, (2) exercise, (3) a system to monitor preprandial and postprandial blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels, and (4) pharmacologic intervention when required. This article reviews the overall standards of care for T2DM, focusing on the first 3 nonpharmacologic pillars, and provides suggestions for integrating this approach with the current American Diabetes Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology guidelines. Barriers to effective implementation of exercise programs, diets, and monitoring of blood glucose levels are discussed along with clinical strategies to overcome these barriers and achieve effective glycemic control and lifestyle changes for patients with T2DM. Personalized approaches to the management of T2DM are also reviewed.

  8. THE CURRENT STATE OF APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL REPORTING STANDARDS IN UKRAINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zasadnyi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzed the process of reforming the system of accounting and reporting in Ukraine in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. The main results of the tasks of the Strategy of application IFRS in Ukraine approved by the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine in 2007 are identified. The results of analysis showed that only 1% of the total number of enterprises form the financial statements in accordance with IFRS, the others apply national standards of accounting. The proportion of small enterprises is 95% that do not have the financial capacity, qualified staff and the necessary motivation for the formation of financial statements in accordance with IFRS. As a result, one of the main objectives of the reform of the accounting and reporting is to improve the legislation on accounting for small enterprises and develop national accounting standards of the simplified procedure for accounting of assets, liabilities, equity and financial results of the calculation for small enterprises.

  9. [Pain care in Austrian health care centers: Questionnaire study on the current status of Austrian pain clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, I-S; Bornemann-Cimenti, H; Messerer, B; Vittinghoff, M; Sandner-Kiesling, A

    2015-12-01

    Pain clinics provide interdisciplinary therapy to treat chronic pain patients and to increase the return-to-work rate. In recent years and due to increased economic pressure in health care, a change in the management of pain in Austrian health care centers has been observed. For the analysis of the current situation, two surveys addressing all Austrian pain clinics were performed. In total, 133 heads of Austrian Anesthesia Departments were interviewed online and personally. The data from the first interview were confirmed by an additional telephone survey that was performed by one anesthetist per Austrian state (n = 9). Currently, 44 Austrian pain clinics are active. During the last 5 years, 9 pain clinics closed. Adding the current active pain clinics together, they represent a total of 17.5 full-time-operated clinics. The most common reasons for closing the pain clinics were lack of personnel (47%), lack of time resources (26%), lack of space resources (11%), and financial difficulties (11%). A reduction of >50% of operating hours during the last 3 years was reported by 9 hospitals. The reasons for not running a pain clinic were lack of personnel (36%), lack of time (25%) and department too small (16%). Estimates between actual and required clinics indicate that 49.5 full-time-operating pain clinics are lacking in Austria, resulting in 74% of the Austrian chronic pain patients not receiving interdisciplinary pain management. Our survey confirmed the closure of 9 pain clinics during the last 5 years due to lack of personnel and time. Pain clinics appear to provide the simplest economic saving potential. This development is a major concern. Although running a pain clinic seems to be expensive at the first sight, it reduces pain, sick leave, complications, and potential legal issues against health care centers, while simultaneously increasing the hospital's competitiveness. Our results show that 74% of Austrian chronic pain patients do not have access to an

  10. Standards of care for students with type 1 diabetes: Ensuring safety, health and inclusion in school

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Genevie

    2005-01-01

    Parents of children with type 1 diabetes commonly worry about the ability of school personnel to respond to their child’s diabetes needs, and may feel anxious about the health, safety and inclusion of their child in school. Physicians may be confronted by parents’ fears, anxieties and apprehension, and need to know how to make recommendations based on current best practice. The present article describes the school standards from the position paper of the Canadian Diabetes Association titled, ...

  11. The INTERGROWTH-21st fetal growth standards: toward the global integration of pregnancy and pediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorghiou, Aris T; Kennedy, Stephen H; Salomon, Laurent J; Altman, Douglas G; Ohuma, Eric O; Stones, William; Gravett, Michael G; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar; Purwar, Manorama; Jaffer, Yasmin; Noble, Julia A; Bertino, Enrico; Pang, Ruyan; Cheikh Ismail, Leila; Lambert, Ann; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Villar, José

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the INTERGROWTH-21 st project was to develop international, prescriptive standards for fetal growth assessed by ultrasound and fundal height, preterm postnatal growth, newborn size and body composition, maternal weight gain, and infant development at the age of 2 years. Hence, we have produced, based on World Health Organization recommendations, the first comprehensive set of international standards of optimal fetal and newborn growth that perfectly match the existing World Health Organization child growth standards. Uniquely, the same population was followed up longitudinally from 9 weeks of fetal life to 2 years of age, with growth, health, and nutritional status assessment at 2 years supporting the appropriateness of the population for construction of growth standards. The resulting package of clinical tools allows, for the first time, growth and development to be monitored from early pregnancy to infancy. The INTERGROWTH-21 st fetal growth standards, which are based on observing >4500 healthy pregnancies, nested in a study of >59,000 pregnancies from populations with low rates of adverse perinatal outcomes, show how fetuses should grow-rather than the more limited objective of past references, which describe how they have grown at specific times and locations. Our work has confirmed the fundamental biological principle that variation in human growth across different populations is mostly dependent on environmental, nutritional, and socioeconomic factors. We found that when mothers' nutritional and health needs are met and there are few environmental constraints on growth, st newborn size standards. We suggest that misclassification of these infants by using local charts could affect the delivery of optimal health care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Struggles of Professionalism and Emotional Labour in Standardized Mental Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article points out how recent public sector reforms under headings as New Public Management, Lean and Quality Reforms entail different forms for standardization, and examines how this development instigates a transformation of interdisciplinary and highly skilled emotional labor in mental healthcare. It is based on an ethnographic study of a Danish child psychiatric unit, which ‘produces’ diagnoses and treatment/therapy for children and their families. We illustrate how the enforcement of standardization upsets the balance between the humanistic and medical aspects of psychiatry as a discipline and field of practice, and show how this development challenges professional identities, interdisciplinary collaboration and hierarchical relations. The development is however negotiated, reformulated, and opposed, in teams of mental health professionals. In this context of increasing standardization, highly skilled emotional labor unfolds. We point out how acceleration and leaning of work procedures increases the emotional labor in relation to clients, partners, and colleagues. But paradoxically, at the same time, emotional labor becomes still more invisible as it is excluded from the standardized schemes. The study illustrates the crucial role of emotional labor in mental care work and points out how it is left to the professionals to negotiate paradoxes and make ends meet.

  13. Quality management standards for facility services in the Italian health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarotti, Vittorio; Di Silvio, Bruna

    2006-01-01

    Health care, one of the most dynamic sectors in Italy, is studied with a particular focus on outsourcing non-core activities such as facility management (FM) services. The project's goals are to define national standards to balance and control facility service evolution, and to drive FM services towards organisational excellence. The authors, in cooperation with a pool of facility service providers and hospitals managers, studied cleaning services--one of the most critical areas. This article describes the research steps and findings following definition and publication of the Italian standard and its application to an international benchmarking process. The method chosen for developing the Italian standard was to merge technical, strategic and organisational aspects with the goal of standardising the contracting system, giving service providers the chance to improve efficiency and quality, while helping healthcare organisations gain from a better, more reliable and less expensive service. The Italian standard not only improved services but also provided adequate control systems for outsourcing organisations. In this win-win context, it is hoped to continually drive FM services towards organisational excellence. This study is specific to the Italian national healthcare system. However, the strategic dynamics described are common to many other contexts. A systematic method for improving hospital FM services is presented. The authors believe that lessons learned from their Italian case study can be used to better understand and drive similar services in other countries or in other FM service outsourcing sectors.

  14. Chapter 7. Critical care triage. Recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit and hospital preparations for an influenza epidemic or mass disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christian, Michael D.; Joynt, Gavin M.; Hick, John L.; Colvin, John; Danis, Marion; Sprung, Charles L.; Christian, Micahel D.; Camargo, Ruben; Ceraso, Daniel; Azoulay, Elie; Duguet, Alexandre; Guery, Benoit; Reinhart, Konrad; Adini, Bruria; Barlavie, Yaron; Benin-Goren, Odeda; Cohen, Robert; Klein, Motti; Leoniv, Yuval; Margalit, Gila; Rubinovitch, Bina; Sonnenblick, Moshe; Steinberg, Avraham; Weissman, Charles; Wolff, Donna; Kesecioglu, Jozef; de Jong, Menno; Moreno, Rui; An, Youzhong; Du, Bin; Loo, Shi; Richards, Guy; Artigas, Antonio; Pugin, Jerome; Amundson, Dennis; Devereaux, Asha; Beigel, John; Farmer, Chris; Maki, Dennis; Masur, Henry; Rubinson, Lewis; Sandrock, Christian; Talmor, Daniel; Truog, Robert; Zimmerman, Janice; Brett, Steve; Montgomery, Hugh; Rhodes, Andrew; Sanderson, Frances; Taylor, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    To provide recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital preparations for an influenza pandemic or mass disaster with a specific focus on critical care triage. Based on a literature review and expert opinion, a Delphi process was used to define the

  15. Historical Development of NATO Stanag 6001 Language Standards and Common European Framework (CEF) and the Comparison of Their Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article is to shed light on the historical development of language studies in military and social context and to compare the current status of NATO Stanag (Standard Agreement) 6001 language scale with Common European Framework (CEF). Language studies in military context date back to World War II and the emergence of Army Specialized…

  16. [Changes in clinical standards and the need for adjusting legal standards of care from the point of view of civil law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The legal standard of medical care is laid down in Sect. 276 of the German Civil Code (principle of due diligence). It applies to both contractual and tortious liability and likewise to the treatment of patients insured under the statutory health insurance scheme and self-payers. The legal standard of care conforms to the clinical standards because medical liability means medical professional liability. Liability law does not distinguish between different standards of care in the treatment of patients insured under the statutory health insurance scheme on the one hand and privately insured patients on the other. Changes in clinical standards immediately affect liability law without the need for formal adaptation of the legal standard of care. Liability law cannot claim more diligence than that owed from a medical point of view. Legislative changes that result in a lowering of medical standards (reduction in the quality of treatment) will have to be accepted by liability law, even if these are regulations pertaining to Social Law (SGB V, Book 5 of the German Social Code). In this respect, the principle of legal unity applies. In consideration of this kind of changes the due diligence requirements for the treatment of patients insured under the statutory health insurance scheme and privately insured patients remain basically equal. If these changes lead to an increase of risk for the patient, the resulting liabilities are not to be attributed to the therapist. What remains to be seen is whether there will be an increased attempt to minimise risk by "additionally purchasing health care services".

  17. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Primary Standards Documents from Current Review - Federal Register Notices

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA develops and publishes a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding the review of the SO2 national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). A public comment period follows. Taking into account comments received on the proposed rule, EPA issues a final rule.

  18. Standard Terminology for Phenotypic Variations: The Elements of Morphology Project, Its Current Progress, and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, John C.; Allanson, Judith E.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the authors of this article formed an international working group to develop standardized definitions and terms to describe the physical variations used in human phenotypic analyses. This project, which came to be known as the Elements of Morphology, resulted in six articles proposing

  19. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standards of care, current clinical trials, and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldwein, Joel W.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the course are to evaluate the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. Areas where the role is evolving will be identified, and the results of clinical trials which been mounted to clarify radiotherapy's role will be reviewed. Brain tumors are the second most common malignancy of childhood after leukemias and lymphomas. However, they remain the most common group of childhood tumors to require radiation therapy. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these tumors, and the appropriate role of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy is critical. Issues surrounding the management of sequelae are no less important. The role of radiotherapy for the treatment of these tumors is far different from that for adults. These differences relate to the profound potential for sequelae from therapy, the higher overall cure rates, and the utility of multimodality therapies. In addition, the rarity of childhood brain tumors compared with adults' makes them more difficult to study. In this session, the following issues will be reviewed; 1. Incidence of pediatric brain tumors, 2. General issues regarding symptoms, diagnosis, diagnostic tests and evaluation, 3. Importance of a team approach, 4. General issues regarding treatment sequelae, 5. Specific tumor types/entities; a. Cerebellar Astrocytomas b. Benign and malignant Gliomas including brainstem and chiasmatic lesions c. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors (PNET) and Medulloblastoma d. Ependymomas e. Craniopharyngiomas f. Germ cell tumors g. Miscellaneous and rare pediatric brain tumors 6. Management of sequelae 7. New and future directions a. Treatment of infants b. The expanding role of chemotherapy c. Advances in radiotherapy. The attendees will complete the course with a better understanding of the role that radiation therapy plays in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. They will be knowledgeable in the foundation for that role, and the changes which are likely to take place in the future

  20. Integration of Community Pharmacists in Transition of Care (TOC) Services: Current Trends and Pharmacist Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznikar, Elizabeth A; Kroehl, Miranda E; Perica, Katharine M; Thompson, Angela M; Trinkley, Katy E

    2017-01-01

    Barriers exist for patients transitioning from one health-care setting to another, or to home, and health-care systems are falling short of meeting patient needs during this time. Community pharmacist incorporation poses a solution to the current communication breakdown and high rates of medication errors during transitions of care (TOC). The purpose of this study was to determine community pharmacists' involvement in and perceptions of TOC services. Cross-sectional study using electronic surveys nationwide to pharmacists employed by a community pharmacy chain. Of 7236 pharmacists surveyed, 546 (7.5%) responded. Only 33 (6%) pharmacists reported their pharmacy participates in TOC services. Most pharmacists (81.5%) reported receiving discharge medication lists. The most common reported barrier to TOC participation is lack of electronic integration with surrounding hospitals (51.1%). Most pharmacists agreed that (1) it is valuable to receive discharge medication lists (83.3%), (2) receiving discharge medication lists is beneficial for patients' health (89.1%), (3) discharge medication list receipt improves medication safety (88.8%). Most pharmacists reported receiving discharge medication lists and reported discharge medication lists are beneficial, but less than half purposefully used medication lists. To close TOC gaps, health-care providers must collaborate to overcome barriers for successful TOC services.

  1. Current State and Model for Development of Technology-Based Care for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Steven J.; Calub, Catrina A.; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Care (i.e., evaluation and intervention) delivered through technology is used in many areas of mental health services, including for persons with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Technology can facilitate care for individuals with ADHD, their parents, and their care providers. The adoption of technological tools for ADHD care requires evidence-based studies to support the transition from development to integration into use in the home, school, or work for persons with the disorder. The initial phase, which is development of technological tools, has begun in earnest; however, the evidence base for many of these tools is lacking. In some instances, the uptake of a piece of technology into home use or clinical practice may be further along than the research to support its use. Methods: In this study, we review the current evidence regarding technology for ADHD and also propose a model to evaluate the support for other tools that have yet to be tested. Results: We propose using the Research Domain Criteria as a framework for evaluating the tools' relationships to dimensions related to ADHD. Conclusion: This article concludes with recommendations for testing new tools that may have promise in improving the evaluation or treatment of persons with ADHD. PMID:26985703

  2. Smartphone apps and the nutrition care process: Current perspectives and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Gemming, Luke; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    To provide dietitians with practical guidance on incorporating smartphone applications (apps) in the nutrition care process (NCP) to optimize patient education and counseling. The current evidence-base for mobile health (mHealth) apps was searched using PubMed and Google Scholar. Where and how apps could be implemented by dietitians across the four steps of the NCP is discussed. With functionality to automatically convert patient dietary records into nutrient components, nutrition assessment can be streamlined using nutrition apps, allowing more time for dietitians to deliver education and nutrition counseling. Dietitians could prescribe apps to provide patients with education on nutrition skills and in counseling for better adherence to behavior change. Improved patient-provider communication is also made possible through the opportunity for real-time monitoring and evaluation of patient progress via apps. A practical framework termed the 'Mobile Nutrition Care Process Grid' provides dietitians with best-practice guidance on how to use apps. Including apps into dietetic practice could enhance the efficiency and quality of nutrition care and counseling delivered by dietitians. Apps should be considered an adjunct to enable dietetic counseling and care, rather than to replace the expertise, social support and accountability provided by dietitians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The health care system for female workers and its current status in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, M; Kagawa, J

    2000-11-01

    In this paper we describe female workers' health care, the women's and maternal protection system within the Japanese legal system, the current status of female workers in Japan, and problems regarding methods of advancing health care and the women's or maternal protection system. Motherhood is respected in the workplace in Japan, and in order to provide an environment in which women can work and still bear and rear children with a sense of security, laws concerning maternal protection of female workers, and revisions in terms of the system have been made, and a new system has been in effect since the fiscal year of 1998. Nevertheless, gender discrimination against women and the disparagement of women, rooted in gender role stereotypes concerning the division of labor, remain firmly planted in the social environment and in long-established custom.

  4. Current Trends in Discharge Disposition and Post-discharge Care After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarity, T David; Swall, Marion M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to review published literature over the last 5 years to assess recent trends and influencing factors regarding discharge disposition and post-discharge care following total joint arthroplasty. We evaluated instruments proposed to predict a patient's discharge disposition and summarize reports investigating the safety in sending more patients home by reviewing complications and readmission rates. Current literature supports decreased length of hospital stay and increased discharge to home with cost savings and stable readmission rates. Surgeons with defined clinical pathways and those who shape patient expectations may more effectively control costs than those without defined pathways. Further research is needed analyzing best practices in care coordination, managing patient expectations, and cost-effective analysis of home discharge while at the same time ensuring patient outcomes are optimized following total joint arthroplasty.

  5. Treating an Established Episode of Delirium in Palliative Care: Expert Opinion and Review of the Current Evidence Base With Recommendations for Future Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José L.; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Currow, David C.; Meagher, David; Rabheru, Kiran; Wright, David; Bruera, Eduardo; Hartwick, Michael; Gagnon, Pierre R.; Gagnon, Bruno; Breitbart, William; Regnier, Laura; Lawlor, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium is a highly prevalent complication in patients in palliative care settings, especially in the end-of-life context. Objectives To review the current evidence base for treating episodes of delirium in palliative care settings and propose a framework for future development. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other purposely selected stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. This was supplemented by a literature search of multiple databases and relevant reference lists to identify studies regarding therapeutic interventions for delirium. Results The context of delirium management in palliative care is highly variable. The standard management of a delirium episode includes the investigation of precipitating and aggravating factors followed by symptomatic treatment with drug therapy. However, the intensity of this management depends on illness trajectory and goals of care in addition to the local availability of both investigative modalities and therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologically, haloperidol remains the practice standard by consensus for symptomatic control. Dosing schedules are derived from expert opinion and various clinical practice guidelines as evidence-based data from palliative care settings are limited. The commonly used pharmacologic interventions for delirium in this population warrant evaluation in clinical trials to examine dosing and titration regimens, different routes of administration, and safety and efficacy compared with placebo. Conclusion Delirium treatment is multidimensional and includes the identification of precipitating and aggravating factors. For symptomatic management, haloperidol remains the practice standard. Further high-quality collaborative research investigating the appropriate treatment of this complex syndrome is needed. PMID:24480529

  6. Tuberculosis detection and the challenges of integrated care in rural China: A cross-sectional standardized patient study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Sylvia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent reductions in prevalence, China still faces a substantial tuberculosis (TB burden, with future progress dependent on the ability of rural providers to appropriately detect and refer TB patients for further care. This study (a provides a baseline assessment of the ability of rural providers to correctly manage presumptive TB cases; (b measures the gap between provider knowledge and practice and; (c evaluates how ongoing reforms of China's health system-characterized by a movement toward "integrated care" and promotion of initial contact with grassroots providers-will affect the care of TB patients.Unannounced standardized patients (SPs presenting with classic pulmonary TB symptoms were deployed in 3 provinces of China in July 2015. The SPs successfully completed 274 interactions across all 3 tiers of China's rural health system, interacting with providers in 46 village clinics, 207 township health centers, and 21 county hospitals. Interactions between providers and standardized patients were assessed against international and national standards of TB care. Using a lenient definition of correct management as at least a referral, chest X-ray or sputum test, 41% (111 of 274 SPs were correctly managed. Although there were no cases of empirical anti-TB treatment, antibiotics unrelated to the treatment of TB were prescribed in 168 of 274 interactions or 61.3% (95% CI: 55%-67%. Correct management proportions significantly higher at county hospitals compared to township health centers (OR 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01-0.25, p < 0.001 and village clinics (OR 0.02, 95% CI: 0.0-0.17, p < 0.001. Correct management in tests of knowledge administered to the same 274 physicians for the same case was 45 percentage points (95% CI: 37%-53% higher with 24 percentage points (95% CI: -33% to -15% fewer antibiotic prescriptions. Relative to the current system, where patients can choose to bypass any level of care, simulations suggest that a system of managed

  7. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Care in Iran: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Vandad; Mojtabai, Ramin; Shahrivar, Zahra; Alaghband-Rad, Javad; Zarafshan, Hadi; Wissow, Lawrence

    2016-11-01

    The need for mental health care among children and adolescents in Iran, as in other low and middle income countries (LAMIC) remains mostly unmet. In this paper, we sought to provide an overview of the extent of unmet need and mental health services in Iran. We also aimed to propose approaches to address this gap. We reviewed the published epidemiologic studies of child and adolescent mental and behavioral health problems in Iran. We also examined the current status of child mental health services and the gaps between current needs and available services based on published literature that included papers published in scientific journals, as well as governmental and other administrative reports. The contextual issues relevant to child mental health care were also explored, as well as the possibilities to introduce new or scale up promising services. Child and adolescent mental and behavioral health problems are highly prevalent in Iran. Different studies have estimated that 16.7% to 36.4% of children and adolescents suffer from one or more mental health problems. However, there is a serious scarcity of resources to meet this need. Available services are delivered by independent public organizations (e.g., Ministry of Health, Welfare Organization, and Ministry of Education) or private sector with inefficient communication and collaboration among them and no mandatory national mental health policy. Available specialized child and adolescent services are mostly confined to small inpatient units and university outpatient facilities in larger cities, and there is a scarce evidence for  the effectiveness of the available services. Expansion of primary care's role in timely detection and management of child and adolescent mental health problems, implementation of task-shifting and -sharing initiatives, as well as improved collaboration among responsible governmental and non-governmental sectors are some of the most promising future venues to improve mental health care for

  8. First Results of the “Carbonaceous Aerosol in Rome and Environs (CARE” Experiment: Beyond Current Standards for PM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Costabile

    2017-12-01

    future research directions. First, we found that BC and EC mass concentration in Rome are larger than those measured in similar urban areas across Europe (the urban background mass concentration of eBC in Rome in winter being on average 2.6 ± 2.5 μ g · m − 3 , mean eBC at the peak level hour being 5.2 (95% CI = 5.0–5.5 μ g · m − 3 . Then, we discussed significant variations of carbonaceous aerosol properties occurring with time scales of minutes, and questioned on the data averaging period used in current air quality standard for PM 10 (24-h. Third, we showed that the oxidative potential induced by aerosol depends on particle size and composition, the effects of toxicity being higher with lower mass concentrations and smaller particle size. Albeit this is a preliminary analysis, findings reinforce the need for an urgent update of existing air quality standards for PM 10 and PM 2.5 with regard to particle composition and size distribution, and data averaging period. Our results reinforce existing concerns about the toxicity of carbonaceous aerosols, support the existing evidence indicating that particle size distribution and composition may play a role in the generation of this toxicity, and remark the need to consider a shorter averaging period (<1 h in these new standards.

  9. Day care PNL using 'Santosh-PGI hemostatic seal' versus standard PNL: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Shivanshu; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of tubeless day care PNL using hemostatic seal in the access tract versus standard PNL. It was a prospective randomized controlled study. Cases were randomized to either the day care group with hemostatic seal (DCS) or the control group where patients were admitted and a nephrostomy tube was placed at the conclusion of surgery. A total of 180 cases were screened and out of these, 113 were included in the final analysis. The stone clearance rates were comparable in both the groups. The mean drop in hemoglobin was significantly lower in DCS group than the control group (1.05 ±0.68 vs. 1.30 ±0.58 gm/dl, p = 0.038).Mean postoperative pain score, analgesic requirement (paracetamol) and duration of hospital stay were also significantly lower in the DCS group (3.79 ±1.23 vs. 6.12 ±0.96, 1.48 ±0.50 vs. 4.09 ±1.11 grams and 0.48 ±0.26 vs. 4.74 ±1.53 days respectively; p PNL with composite hemostatic tract seal is considered safe. It resulted in a significant reduction of blood loss and analgesic requirement with significantly reduced hospital stay, nephrostomy tube site morbidity and time required to resume normal activity when compared to the standard PNL. However, patients must be compliant with the given instructions and should have access to a health care facility, as few of them may need re-admission.

  10. The Current Landscape of Transitions of Care Practice Models: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester-Eyeguokan, Charmaine D; Pincus, Kathleen J; Patel, Roshni S; Reitz, Shirley J

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) are a set of actions to ensure patient coordination and continuity of care as patients transfer between different locations or levels. During transitions associated with chronic or acute illness, vulnerable patients may be placed at risk with fragmented systems compromising their health and safety. In addition, poor care transitions also have an enormous impact on health care spending. The primary objective of this scoping review is to summarize the current landscape of practice models that deliver TOC services in the United States. The secondary objective is to use the information to characterize the current state of best practice models. A search of the PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S. National Library of Medicine, and Cochrane Library databases (January 1, 2000-April 13, 2015) for articles pertaining to TOC models, limited to U.S. studies published in the English language with human subjects, gleaned 1362 articles. An additional 26 articles were added from the gray literature. Articles meeting inclusion criteria underwent a second review and were categorized into four groups: background information, original TOC research articles not evaluating practice model interventions, original TOC research articles describing practice models, and systematic or Cochrane reviews. The reviewers met weekly to discuss the challenges and resolve disagreements regarding literature reviews with consensus before progressing. A total of 188 articles describing TOC practice models met the inclusion criteria. Despite the strengths of several quality TOC models, none satisfied all the components recommended by leading experts. Multimodal interventions by multidisciplinary teams appear to represent a best practice model for TOC to improve patient outcomes and reduce readmissions, but one size does not fit all

  11. Development and pilot of an internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management in European primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecsenyi Joachim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care can play an important role in providing cardiovascular risk management in patients with established Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD, patients with a known high risk of developing CVD, and potentially for individuals with a low risk of developing CVD, but who have unhealthy lifestyles. To describe and compare cardiovascular risk management, internationally valid quality indicators and standardized measures are needed. As part of a large project in 9 European countries (EPA-Cardio, we have developed and tested a set of standardized measures, linked to previously developed quality indicators. Methods A structured stepwise procedure was followed to develop measures. First, the research team allocated 106 validated quality indicators to one of the three target populations (established CVD, at high risk, at low risk and to different data-collection methods (data abstraction from the medical records, a patient survey, an interview with lead practice GP/a practice survey. Secondly, we selected a number of other validated measures to enrich the assessment. A pilot study was performed to test the feasibility. Finally, we revised the measures based on the findings. Results The EPA-Cardio measures consisted of abstraction forms from the medical-records data of established Coronary Heart Disease (CHD-patients - and high-risk groups, a patient questionnaire for each of the 3 groups, an interview questionnaire for the lead GP and a questionnaire for practice teams. The measures were feasible and accepted by general practices from different countries. Conclusions An internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management, linked to validated quality indicators and tested for feasibility in general practice, is now available. Careful development and pilot testing of the measures are crucial in international studies of quality of healthcare.

  12. Current applications and future directions for the CDISC Operational Data Model standard: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Sam; Aerts, Jozef; Sarnikar, Surendra; Huser, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    In order to further advance research and development on the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM) standard, the existing research must be well understood. This paper presents a methodological review of the ODM literature. Specifically, it develops a classification schema to categorize the ODM literature according to how the standard has been applied within the clinical research data lifecycle. This paper suggests areas for future research and development that address ODM's limitations and capitalize on its strengths to support new trends in clinical research informatics. A systematic scan of the following databases was performed: (1) ABI/Inform, (2) ACM Digital, (3) AIS eLibrary, (4) Europe Central PubMed, (5) Google Scholar, (5) IEEE Xplore, (7) PubMed, and (8) ScienceDirect. A Web of Science citation analysis was also performed. The search term used on all databases was "CDISC ODM." The two primary inclusion criteria were: (1) the research must examine the use of ODM as an information system solution component, or (2) the research must critically evaluate ODM against a stated solution usage scenario. Out of 2686 articles identified, 266 were included in a title level review, resulting in 183 articles. An abstract review followed, resulting in 121 remaining articles; and after a full text scan 69 articles met the inclusion criteria. As the demand for interoperability has increased, ODM has shown remarkable flexibility and has been extended to cover a broad range of data and metadata requirements that reach well beyond ODM's original use cases. This flexibility has yielded research literature that covers a diverse array of topic areas. A classification schema reflecting the use of ODM within the clinical research data lifecycle was created to provide a categorized and consolidated view of the ODM literature. The elements of the framework include: (1) EDC (Electronic Data Capture) and EHR (Electronic Health Record

  13. 41 CFR 301-2.3 - What standard of care must I use in incurring travel expenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-GENERAL... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What standard of care... same care in incurring expenses that a prudent person would exercise if traveling on personal business. ...

  14. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2017 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Diabetes Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia; Ross, Tamara; Castor, Chimene

    2018-05-01

    There are 30.3 million people with diabetes and 86 million with prediabetes in the United States, underscoring the growing need for comprehensive diabetes care and nutrition for the management of diabetes and diabetes-related conditions. Management of diabetes is also critical for the prevention of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular and renal disease. The Diabetes Care and Education Dietetic Practice Group along with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee have updated the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Diabetes Care. The SOP and SOPP for RDNs in Diabetes Care provide indicators that describe three levels of practice: competent, proficient, and expert. The SOP utilizes the Nutrition Care Process and clinical workflow elements for care and management of those with diabetes and prediabetes. The SOPP describes six domains that focus on professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Specific indicators outlined in the SOP and SOPP depict how these standards apply to practice. The SOP and SOPP are complementary resources for RDNs caring for individuals with diabetes or specializing in diabetes care or practicing in other diabetes-related areas, including research. The SOP and SOPP are intended to be used for RDN self-evaluation for ensuring competent practice and for determining potential education and training needs for advancement to a higher practice level in a variety of settings. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Standardization of calibration of clinic dosemeters using electric currents and charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Marcos Antonio de Lima

    1999-09-01

    Clinical dosimeters used in radiotherapy are calibrated in Latin American countries, including Brazil, as a complete 'system, i.e., ionization chamber and electrometer together. Some countries, as European ones, and USA calibrate them by component, i.e., ionisation chamber apart from electrometer. This method is more advantageous than the previous one, since it makes possible the automation of the calibration process, allowing the acquisition of data related to the chamber and the electrometer measurements independently, as well as the substitution of one of the components, in case of failure. This work proposes a method for standardisation of low intensity electric charge and currents in order to implement electric calibration of electrometers. This will make possible the implementation of a by components calibration technique, by components, of clinical dosimeters in Brazil. The results obtained with the calibration by components prove that the proposed method of standardisation of low electric charges and currents is viable. The difficulties found for the generation and measurement of low intensity electric charges and currents and the procedures adopted for the calibration by components are presented. Additionally, a current source was built to yield reference electric charges that will make possible the quality control clinical dosimeters. This source will also allow the user to identify the defective components of the dosimeters, through a simple verification test. (author)

  16. American National Standard: for facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear-power-plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those persons on-site who are overexposed to penetrating radiation (irradiated). It also provides guidance for medical care of persons contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides who may also be irradiated or injured as a result of an accident at a nuclear power plant. It provides recommendations for facilities, supplies, equipment, and the extent of care both on-site where first aid and initial care may be provided and off-site at a local hospital where further medical and surgical care may be provided. This initial care continues until either the patient is released or admitted, or referred to another, possibly distant, medical center for definitive care. Recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. Recommendations for specialized care are considered to be beyond the scope of this standard on emergency medical care; however, since emergency and specialized care are related, a brief discussion of specialized care is provided in the Appendix

  17. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Pediatric Cardiac Population: In Search of a Standard of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Javier J; Jain, Parag; Raymond, Tia T; Minard, Charles G; Topjian, Alexis; Nadkarni, Vinay; Gaies, Michael; Bembea, Melania; Checchia, Paul A; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Thiagarajan, Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Although clinical and pharmacologic guidelines exist for the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children (Pediatric Advanced Life Support), the practice of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pediatric cardiac patients remains without universally accepted standards. We aim to explore variation in extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures by surveying clinicians who care for this high-risk patient population. A 28-item cross-sectional survey was distributed via a web-based platform to clinicians focusing on cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation team dynamics immediately prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation. Pediatric hospitals providing extracorporeal mechanical support services to patients with congenital and/or acquired heart disease. Critical care/cardiology specialist physicians, cardiothoracic surgeons, advanced practice nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation specialists. None. Survey web links were distributed over a 2-month period with critical care and/or cardiology physicians comprising the majority of respondents (75%). Nearly all respondents practice at academic/teaching institutions (97%), 89% were from U.S./Canadian institutions and 56% reported less than 10 years of clinical experience. During extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a majority of respondents reported adherence to guideline recommendations for epinephrine bolus dosing (64%). Conversely, 19% reported using only one to three epinephrine bolus doses regardless of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. Inotropic support is held after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation "most of the time" by 58% of respondents and 94% report using afterload reducing/antihypertensive agents "some" to "most of the time" after achieving full extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Interruptions in chest compressions are common

  18. Labeling programs and efficiency standards to control the energy consumption of household appliances: current situation, main results and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menanteau, Ph.

    2000-09-01

    To control the rise in electricity consumption for specific uses, the industrialized countries started by introducing special programs aimed at improving energy efficiency. Among the different instruments available, labeling programs and minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) have proved to be very effective. The first part of this document presents the current situation, the main results and recommendations concerning the labeling programs and efficiency standards to control the energy consumption of household appliances. This analyze is done for each country in details providing the name of the program or measure, the date of implementation, the objective and the main characteristics of the program, the impacts and evaluation. (A.L.B.)

  19. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13- cis -retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords "isotretinoin," "safety," "scarring," "keloids," "hypertrophic scarring," and "pigmentation." The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  20. Including alternative resources in state renewable portfolio standards: Current design and implementation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeter, Jenny; Bird, Lori

    2013-01-01

    As of October 2012, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. Increasingly, new RPS polices have included alternative resources. Alternative resources have included energy efficiency, thermal resources, and, to a lesser extent, non-renewables. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation. - Highlights: • Increasingly, new RPS policies have included alternative resources. • Nearly all states provide a separate tier or cap on the quantity of eligible alternative resources. • Where allowed, non-renewables and energy efficiency are being heavily utilized

  1. The Social and Consumer Standards and Guarantees in Ukraine: the Current Structural and Dynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesov Oleksandr S.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to generalize the theoretical approaches to the social guarantees and standards as economic categories. The classification of social guarantees is provided. The dynamic parameters for development of the social and consumer standards adopted in Ukraine were considered. An evaluation of the real poverty level under the system of criteria was carried out. The inconsistency of methods for the poverty evaluation adopted by the Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine and contradiction of its individual indicators has been indicated. The structural characteristics of the population’s income have been determined. The relevance of the existing social guarantees to their real value in today’s economic conditions have been analyzed. Tendencies of falling of the welfare level of population, resulting in a decline in the consumer demand and a narrowing of the domestic market for goods and services, have been identified. The need to take measures to stimulate small businesses, to overcome corruption, and to deregulate the economy has been indicated.

  2. Implementation of an Evidence-Based and Content Validated Standardized Ostomy Algorithm Tool in Home Care: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare, Kimberly; Drain, Jerri; Timko-Progar, Monica; Stallings, Bobbie; Smith, Kimberly; Ward, Naomi; Wright, Sandra

    Many nurses have limited experience with ostomy management. We sought to provide a standardized approach to ostomy education and management to support nurses in early identification of stomal and peristomal complications, pouching problems, and provide standardized solutions for managing ostomy care in general while improving utilization of formulary products. This article describes development and testing of an ostomy algorithm tool.

  3. Clinical outcomes in endometrial cancer care when the standard of care shifts from open surgery to robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Zhun Wei; Yong, Eu Leong; Low, Jeffrey Jen Hui; Ng, Joseph Soon Yau

    2012-06-01

    In Singapore, the standard of care for endometrial cancer staging remains laparotomy. Since the introduction of gynecologic robotic surgery, there have been more data comparing robotic surgery to laparoscopy in the management of endometrial cancer. This study reviewed clinical outcomes in endometrial cancer in a program that moved from laparotomy to robotic surgery. A retrospective review was performed on 124 consecutive endometrial cancer patients. Preoperative data and postoperative outcomes of 34 patients undergoing robotic surgical staging were compared with 90 patients who underwent open endometrial cancer staging during the same period and in the year before the introduction of robotics. There were no significant differences in the mean age, body mass index, rates of diabetes, hypertension, previous surgery, parity, medical conditions, size of specimens, histologic type, or stage of cancer between the robotic and the open surgery groups. The first 20 robotic-assisted cases had a mean (SD) operative time of 196 (60) minutes, and the next 14 cases had a mean time of 124 (64) minutes comparable to that for open surgery. The mean number of lymph nodes retrieved during robot-assisted staging was smaller than open laparotomy in the first 20 cases but not significantly different for the subsequent 14 cases. Robot-assisted surgery was associated with lower intraoperative blood loss (110 [24] vs 250 [83] mL, P robot-assisted endometrial cancer staging after a relatively small number of cases.

  4. Health care providers' perceived barriers to and need for the implementation of a national integrated health care standard on childhood obesity in the Netherlands - a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalkwijk, Annemarie A H; Nijpels, Giel; Bot, Sandra D M; Elders, Petra J M

    2016-03-08

    In 2010, a national integrated health care standard for (childhood) obesity was published and disseminated in the Netherlands. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the needs of health care providers and the barriers they face in terms of implementing this integrated health care standard. A mixed-methods approach was applied using focus groups, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews and an e-mail-based internet survey. The study's participants included: general practitioners (GPs) (focus groups); health care providers in different professions (face-to-face interviews) and health care providers, including GPs; youth health care workers; pediatricians; dieticians; psychologists and physiotherapists (survey). First, the transcripts from the focus groups were analyzed thematically. The themes identified in this process were then used to analyze the interviews. The results of the analysis of the qualitative data were used to construct the statements used in the e-mail-based internet survey. Responses to items were measured on a 5-point Likert scale and were categorized into three outcomes: 'agree' or 'important' (response categories 1 and 2), 'disagree' or 'not important'. Twenty-seven of the GPs that were invited (51 %) participated in four focus groups. Seven of the nine health care professionals that were invited (78 %) participated in the interviews and 222 questionnaires (17 %) were returned and included in the analysis. The following key barriers were identified with regard to the implementation of the integrated health care standard: reluctance to raise the subject; perceived lack of motivation and knowledge on the part of the parents; previous negative experiences with lifestyle programs; financial constraints and the lack of a structured multidisciplinary approach. The main needs identified were: increased knowledge and awareness on the part of both health care providers and parents/children; a social map of effective intervention; structural

  5. Parents’ Perception of Stepped Care and Standard Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Swaidan, Victoria R.; Torres, Angela Claudio; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Delivery systems other than in-office therapist-led treatments are needed to address treatment barriers such as accessibility, efficiency, costs, and parents wanting an active role in helping their child. To address these barriers, stepped care trauma focused-cognitive behavioral therapy (SC-TF-CBT) was developed as a parent-led, therapist-assisted therapy that occurs primarily at-home so that fewer in-office sessions are required. The current study examines caregivers’ perceptions of parent-led (SC-TF-CBT) and therapist-led (TF-CBT) treatment. Participants consisted of 52 parents/care-givers (25–68 years) of young trauma-exposed children (3–7 years) who were randomly assigned to SC-TF-CBT (n = 34) or to TF-CBT (n = 18). Data were collected at mid-and post-treatment via interviews inquiring about what participants liked, disliked, found most helpful, and found least helpful about the treatment. Results indicated that parents/caregivers favored relaxation skills, affect modulation and expression skills, the trauma narrative, and parenting skills across both conditions. The majority of parents/caregivers in SC-TF-CBT favored the at-home parent–child meetings and the workbook that guides the parent-led treatment, and there were suggestions for improving the workbook. Reported disliked and least helpful aspects of treatments were minimal across conditions, but themes that emerged that will need further exploration included the content and structure, and implementation difficulties for both conditions. Collectively, these results highlight the positive impact that a parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment could have in terms of providing caregivers with more tools to help their child after trauma and reduce barriers to treatment. PMID:26977133

  6. Parents' Perception of Stepped Care and Standard Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Swaidan, Victoria R; Torres, Angela Claudio; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Delivery systems other than in-office therapist-led treatments are needed to address treatment barriers such as accessibility, efficiency, costs, and parents wanting an active role in helping their child. To address these barriers, stepped care trauma focused-cognitive behavioral therapy (SC-TF-CBT) was developed as a parent-led, therapist-assisted therapy that occurs primarily at-home so that fewer in-office sessions are required. The current study examines caregivers' perceptions of parent-led (SC-TF-CBT) and therapist-led (TF-CBT) treatment. Participants consisted of 52 parents/care-givers (25-68 years) of young trauma-exposed children (3-7 years) who were randomly assigned to SC-TF-CBT (n = 34) or to TF-CBT (n = 18). Data were collected at mid-and post-treatment via interviews inquiring about what participants liked, disliked, found most helpful, and found least helpful about the treatment. Results indicated that parents/caregivers favored relaxation skills, affect modulation and expression skills, the trauma narrative, and parenting skills across both conditions. The majority of parents/caregivers in SC-TF-CBT favored the at-home parent-child meetings and the workbook that guides the parent-led treatment, and there were suggestions for improving the workbook. Reported disliked and least helpful aspects of treatments were minimal across conditions, but themes that emerged that will need further exploration included the content and structure, and implementation difficulties for both conditions. Collectively, these results highlight the positive impact that a parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment could have in terms of providing caregivers with more tools to help their child after trauma and reduce barriers to treatment.

  7. Co-occurring Mental Disorders in Substance Abuse Treatment: the Current Health Care Situation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Hanna; Braun, Barbara; Pfeiffer-Gerschel, Tim; Kraus, Ludwig; Pogarell, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the current health care situation for patients with co-occurring mental disorders in addiction treatment. Therefore, data from the German Substance Abuse Treatment System ( N  = 194,406) was analysed with regard to the prevalence of comorbid mental disorders, treatment characteristics and outcomes of patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnosis. In outpatient setting, the prevalence of comorbid diagnoses was considerably lower (4.6%) than in inpatient setting (50.7%), but mood and anxiety disorders were the most prevalent additional diagnoses in both settings. In the treatment of patients with these comorbid disorders, we found higher rates of complementary internal and external (psychiatric) treatment, more co-operations and referrals after treatment, and positive treatment process outcomes. Findings indicate that the knowledge of an additional diagnosis influences the health care provision of affected patients and can therefore be seen as the essential precondition for providing adequate and comprehensive treatment. This highlights the importance of a sufficient consideration and diagnostic assessment of mental disorders in addiction treatment to further improve the health care situation of comorbid patients.

  8. [Current status of costs and utilizations of hospital based home health nursing care in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hosihn

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the current status of utilization and costs of home health nursing care by the levels of medical institutes in Korea. A secondary analysis of existing data was used from the national electronic data information(EDI) of 148 home health agencies for 6 months from May to Oct 2005 in total. The 148 agencies had multiple services in cerebral infaction, essential hypertension, sequela of cerebrovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, etc.. The highest 10 rankings of 76 categories of home health nursing services were composed of 96.4% of the total services, such as simple treatment, inflammatory treatment, urethra & bladder irrigation, inserting indwelling catheter etc., in that order. The highest 20 rankings of 226 categories of home examination services were composed of 77.0% of the total home examination services. In addition, the average cost of home health care per visit was 46,088 Won ( approximately 48 $, 1 $=960 Won). The costs ranged from 74,523 Won ( approximately 78 $, loss of chronic kidney function, N18) to 32,270 Won ( approximately 34 $, other cerebrovascular diseases, I67). Results suggest that client characteristics of hospital based HHNC are not different from community based HHNC or visiting nursing services for elderly. The national results will contribute to baseline data used to establish a policy for the home health nursing care system and education.

  9. HYDROXYCARBAMINE: FROM AN OLD DRUG USED IN MALIGNANT HEMOPATHIES TO A CURRENT STANDARD IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cannas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While hydroxycarbamine (hydroxyurea, HU has less and less indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support of safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia, but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome.

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d -1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d -1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  11. Current medical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms/BPH: do we have a standard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, João; Silva, Carlos Martins; Cruz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is based on alpha-blockers and 5α-reductase inhibitors isolated or in combination. Silodosin, an alpha-1A specific alpha-blocker is the only innovation in these groups of agents. This classical paradigm is being challenged by antimuscarinics, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE5i) and β3-adrenoreceptor agonists. Silodosin is effective in reducing BPH/LUTS, including nocturia and shows little cardiovascular adverse events. Antimuscarinic drugs isolated or in combination with alpha-blockers improve storage symptoms without any harmful effect to the voiding function. PDE5i alone improve BPH/LUTS. Combination of PDE5i with alpha-blockers provides better symptomatic control than alpha-blockers alone. A recent head-to-head comparison of tadalafil 5 mg/day with tamsulosin 0.4 mg/day showed that these agents provided the same improvement in BPH/LUTS and, surprisingly, the same improvement in the urinary flow. In fact, previous studies with tadalafil had not shown any effect of tadalafil on flow. In addition, tadalafil but not tamsulosin improved sexual function. Mirabegron, the first β3-adrenoreceptor agonist, while improving BPH/LUTS in men with bladder outlet obstruction, do not decrease urinary flow or detrusor pressure. The standard medical treatment for BPH/LUTS is still based on alpha-blockers, 5ARIs or its combination. In the future, it is expected that BPH/LUTS treatment will become individualized, according to the type of symptoms, presence of sexual dysfunction and risk of BPH progression. This will challenge our concept of standard treatment for BPH/LUTS.

  12. A neuromuscular exercise programme versus standard care for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshoj, Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury and may have considerable impact on shoulder-related quality of life (QoL). If not warranted for initial stabilising surgery, patients are mostly left with little to no post-traumatic rehabilitation. This may be due to lack of evidence......-based exercise programmes. In similar, high-impact injuries (e.g. anterior cruciate ligament tears in the knee) neuromuscular exercise has shown large success in improving physical function and QoL. Thus, the objective of this trial is to compare a nonoperative neuromuscular exercise shoulder programme...... dislocations due to at least one traumatic event will be randomised to 12 weeks of either a standardised, individualised or physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular shoulder exercise programme or standard care (self-managed shoulder exercise programme). Patients will be stratified according to injury status...

  13. ENETS Consensus Recommendations for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U.; Capdevila, J.; Bartsch, D. K.

    2017-01-01

    and coming WHO classification and ENETS/UICC recommendations for TNM staging. The recommendations for follow-up in patients with thymic, bronchopulmonary and gastroenteropancreatic NEN are given in Table 1. However, it should be stressed that evidence-based studies for follow-up are largely missing.......ENETS consensus recommendations for the standards of care in neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) concerning follow-up and documentation are considered in this review. The documentation of patients with NEN should include the most relevant data characterizing an individual patient from the first contact...... with his/her physician/hospital until his/her last presentation during follow-up. It is advocated that follow-up occurs in specialized NEN centers with regular NEN tumor boards with expert panels. The follow-up should be in accordance with the ENETS consensus guidelines from 2011 and 2016, the present...

  14. [Management of quality in an Intensive Care Unit: implementation of ISO 9001:2008 international standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Torrent, R; Sánchez Palacios, M; Santana Cabrera, L; Cobian Martinez, J L; García del Rosario, C

    2010-10-01

    The Quality Management Systems make it possible to prioritize actions to maintain the safety and efficacy of health technologies. The Intensive Care Unit of our hospital has implemented a quality management plan, which has obtained accreditation as "Service Certificate that manages its activities according to UNE-EN ISO 9001:2008" standard. With the application of quality management system, it has been possible to detect the needs that the Service can cover in order to obtain the satisfaction of the patient, relative or health personnel of the other services of the hospital, to improve communications inside and outside of service, to secure greater understanding of the processes of the organization and control of risk, to delimit responsibilities clearly to all the personnel, to make better use of the time and resources and, finally, to improve the motivation of the personnel. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy: the new standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, M; Costa Moretti, T B; Emberton, M; Villers, A; Valerio, M

    2015-09-01

    The advent of multiparametric MRI has made it possible to change the way in which prostate biopsy is done, allowing to direct biopsies to suspicious lesions rather than randomly. The subject of this review relates to a computer-assisted strategy, the MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy, and to its performance compared to the other sampling methods. Different devices with different methods to register MR images to live TRUS are currently in use to allow software-based targeted biopsy. Main clinical indications of MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy are re-biopsy in men with persistent suspicious of prostate cancer after first negative standard biopsy and the follow-up of patients under active surveillance. Some studies have compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted versus standard biopsy. In men at risk with MRI-suspicious lesion, targeted biopsy consistently detects more men with clinically significant disease as compared to standard biopsy; some studies have also shown decreased detection of insignificant disease. Only two studies directly compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy with MRI/US fusion visual targeted biopsy, and the diagnostic ability seems to be in favor of the software approach. To date, no study comparing software-based targeted biopsy against in-bore MRI biopsy is available. The new software-based targeted approach seems to have the characteristics to be added in the standard pathway for achieving accurate risk stratification. Once reproducibility and cost-effectiveness will be verified, the actual issue will be to determine whether MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy represents anadd-on test or a replacement to standard TRUS biopsy.

  16. Online purchases of an expanded range of condom sizes in comparison to current dimensional requirements allowable by US national standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Michael; Warner, Lee; Siegler, Aaron J

    2013-11-01

    Across studies, 35-50% of men describe condoms as fitting poorly. Rates of condom use may be inhibited in part due to the inaccessibility of appropriately sized condoms. As regulated medical devices, condom sizes conform to national standards such as those developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) or international standards such as those developed by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). We describe the initial online sales experience of an expanded range of condom sizes and assess uptake in relation to the current required standard dimensions of condoms. Data regarding the initial 1000 sales of an expanded range of condom sizes in the United Kingdom were collected from late 2011 through to early 2012. Ninety-five condom sizes, comprising 14 lengths (83-238mm) and 12 widths (41-69mm), were available. For the first 1000 condom six-pack units that were sold, a total of 83 of the 95 unique sizes were purchased, including all 14 lengths and 12 widths, and both the smallest and largest condoms. Initial condom purchases were made by 572 individuals from 26 countries. Only 13.4% of consumer sales were in the ASTM's allowable range of sizes. These initial sales data suggest consumer interest in an expanded choice of condom sizes that fall outside the range currently allowable by national and international standards organisations.

  17. International pressure vessels and piping codes and standards. Volume 2: Current perspectives; PVP-Volume 313-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.; Asada, Yasuhide; Adams, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    The topics in this volume include: (1) Recent or imminent changes to Section 3 design sections; (2) Select perspectives of ASME Codes -- Section 3; (3) Select perspectives of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes -- an international outlook; (4) Select perspectives of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes -- ASME Code Sections 3, 8 and 11; (5) Codes and Standards Perspectives for Analysis; (6) Selected design perspectives on flow-accelerated corrosion and pressure vessel design and qualification; (7) Select Codes and Standards perspectives for design and operability; (8) Codes and Standards perspectives for operability; (9) What's new in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code?; (10) A look at ongoing activities of ASME Sections 2 and 3; (11) A look at current activities of ASME Section 11; (12) A look at current activities of ASME Codes and Standards; (13) Simplified design methodology and design allowable stresses -- 1 and 2; (14) Introduction to Power Boilers, Section 1 of the ASME Code -- Part 1 and 2. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the individual papers

  18. Imaging in syndrome complex diabetes mellitus. Current standards and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetterich, H.; Schafnitzel, A.; Bamberg, F.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent multisystemic disorder with numerous potential complications and substantial socioeconomic consequences. In many cases, the patient history, physical examination and laboratory tests are not sufficient for a comprehensive evaluation of complicating disorders. Imaging modalities, such as sonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are of major significance in the evaluation of complicating disorders of diabetes according to current guidelines. Examples include assessment of coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, stroke and diabetic foot syndrome. Technical developments allow a substantial reduction in radiation dose and scan time in CT and MRI, respectively and could therefore justify a broader application in this patient population. In the future CT and MRI could also be used for the early detection of diabetic complications. Furthermore, they could also be used for risk stratification, e.g. measurement of hepatic fat content and evaluation of atherosclerosis in whole body MRI. Prior to widespread application of advanced imaging techniques in this patient population, improved outcomes with respect to survival, quality of life and cost-effectiveness need to be demonstrated. Diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of the syndrome complex of diabetic disorders should be used according to the current guidelines but the use is predicted to increase given the high potential in this population. (orig.) [de

  19. SafeCare: An Innovative Approach for Improving Quality Through Standards, Benchmarking, and Improvement in Low- and Middle- Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael C; Schellekens, Onno; Stewart, Jacqui; van Ostenberg, Paul; de Wit, Tobias Rinke; Spieker, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), patients often have limited access to high-quality care because of a shortage of facilities and human resources, inefficiency of resource allocation, and limited health insurance. SafeCare was developed to provide innovative health care standards; surveyor training; a grading system for quality of care; a quality improvement process that is broken down into achievable, measurable steps to facilitate incremental improvement; and a private sector-supported health financing model. Three organizations-PharmAccess Foundation, Joint Commission International, and the Council for Health Service Accreditation of Southern Africa-launched SafeCare in 2011 as a formal partnership. Five SafeCare levels of improvement are allocated on the basis of an algorithm that incorporates both the overall score and weighted criteria, so that certain high-risk criteria need to be in place before a facility can move to the next SafeCare certification level. A customized quality improvement plan based on the SafeCare assessment results lists the specific, measurable activities that should be undertaken to address gaps in quality found during the initial assessment and to meet the nextlevel SafeCare certificate. The standards have been implemented in more than 800 primary and secondary facilities by qualified local surveyors, in partnership with various local public and private partner organizations, in six sub-Saharan African countries (Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Namibia, Tanzania, and Zambia). Expanding access to care and improving health care quality in LMICs will require a coordinated effort between institutions and other stakeholders. SafeCare's standards and assessment methodology can help build trust between stakeholders and lay the foundation for country-led quality monitoring systems.

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy versus standard wound care on quality of life: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A H J; Mommers, E H H; Notter, J; de Vries Reilingh, T S; Wegdam, J A

    2016-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a widely accepted treatment modality for open or infected wounds. Premature ending of NPWT occasionally occurs due to negative effects on the quality of life (QoL), however, the actual impact on QoL is unknown. The aim of this review is to analyse the effect of NPWT versus standard wound care (SWC) on QoL when used for the treatment of open or infected wounds. A systematic literature search in a range of databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science, Science Direct Freedom Collection, SwetsWise, PSYCArticles and Infrotrac Custom Journals) using the following search terms; 'standard wound care', 'wound dressing', 'dressing', 'treatment', OR 'negative pressure wound therapy [MESH]', OR 'vacuum assisted closure' AND 'quality of life [MESH]', 'patient-satisfaction', OR 'experiences' was performed. Methodological quality was assessed using the methodological index for non-randomised studies (MINORS) checklist. There were 42 studies identified, five matched the inclusion criteria: two randomised clinical trials (RCTs), one clinical comparative study, one exploratory prospective cohort study and one quasi experimental pilot study. Median MINORS-score was 75% (58%-96%). There were seven different questionnaires used to measure QoL or a subsidiary outcome. QoL in the NPWT group was lower in the first week, though no difference in QoL was observed thereafter. This systematic review observed that QoL improved at the end of therapy independent of which therapy was used. NPWT led to a lower QoL during the first week of treatment, possible due to aniexty, after which a similar or better QoL was reported when compared with SWC. It could be suggested that NPWT might be associated with increased anxiety. All authors of this publication have received no financial support or have personal interests conflicting with the objectivity of this manuscript.

  1. Adopting Ambulatory Breast Cancer Surgery as the Standard of Care in an Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ying Ru Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23 service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P<0.01, those undergoing wide local excision (P<0.01 and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P<0.01, were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  2. Neuropsychological screening as a standard of care during discharge from psychiatric hospitalization: the preliminary psychometrics of the CNS Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Boaz; Celen-Demirtas, Selda; Surguladze, Tinatin; Eranio, Sara; Ellison, James

    2014-03-30

    Cost-prohibitive factors currently prevent a warranted integration of neuropsychological screenings into routine psychiatric evaluations, as a standard of care. To overcome this challenge, the current study examined the psychometric properties of a new computerized measure-the CNS Screen. One hundred and twenty six psychiatric inpatients completed the CNS Screen, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated (QIDS-SR₁₆) on the day of hospital discharge. Statistical analysis established convergent validity with a moderate correlation between the self-administered CNS Screen and the clinician-administered MoCA (r=0.64). Discriminant validity was implicated by a non-significant correlation with the QIDS-SR₁₆. Concurrent validity was supported by a moderate, negative correlation with patients' age (r=-0.62). In addition, consistent with previous findings, patients with psychotic disorders exhibited significantly poorer performance on the CNS Screen than patients with a mood disorder. Similarly, patients with a formal disability status scored significantly lower than other patients. The CNS Screen was well tolerated by all patients. With further development, this type of measure may provide a cost-effective approach to expanding neuropsychological screenings on inpatient psychiatric units. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  4. Limiting the costs of renewable portfolio standards: A review and critique of current methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockmayer, Gabriella; Finch, Vanessa; Komor, Paul; Mignogna, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Over half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) mandating that a minimum percentage of electricity sold derives from renewable sources. State RPSs vary widely in how they attempt to control or limit the costs of these RPSs. Approaches utilized include alternative compliance payments, direct rate caps, and cost caps on resource acquisitions, while some states employ no specific limitation at all. This paper describes how states attempt to control RPS costs and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these various cost controls. There is no one best method; however the experience to date suggests that the most important factors in implementing an effective mechanism to curtail costs are clarity of the rule, consistency in application, and transparency for customers. - Highlights: ▶ We review states' RPS statutes and regulations for mechanisms that attempt to control overall compliance costs. ▶ We categorize the major cost curtailment mechanisms. ▶ For each mechanism, we describe policy designs that are or could be implemented by states. ▶ We identify strengths and weaknesses of the various designs for consideration by policymakers.

  5. Radiotherapy in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer: Current standards and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: The intent of this course is to review issues involved in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer and to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, the use of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with the radiation, the management of patients with regional metastases and recurrent disease following surgery and radiation. At the end of this course, participants should be able to fluently discuss management issues and strategies across the entire spectrum of non-metastatic prostate cancer. - Pre-treatment prognostic factors including clinical stage, grade, and pre-treatment PSA, will be presented and their relative value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. Strategies to be discussed include standard dose radiation, escalated dose radiation, particle radiation and the use of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy. - The process of simulation and field design will be presented, the value of CT-based treatment planning, beams-eye view design and the relative value of three-dimensional treatment planning will be discussed. - The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with this will also be presented so that what constitutes an adequate simulation and margin of treatment can be clarified. - The management of newly diagnosed patients, covering the range of low stage/low grade to locally advanced prostate cancer will be discussed. - The relative value of increasing dose, the relative value of using neo-adjuvant and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and the indications for escalated dose will be presented. - Strategies for managing post-prostatectomy patients will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant and therapeutic irradiation for biochemical failure will be presented and a strategy for management will be discussed. - How to deal with patients with residual disease post radiation will be discussed and the relative value of cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy or hormonal therapy will

  6. Current and Projected Characteristics and Unique Health Care Needs of the Patient Population Served by the Department of Veterans Affairs

    OpenAIRE

    Eibner, Christine; Krull, Heather; Brown, Kristine M.; Cefalu, Matthew; Mulcahy, Andrew W.; Pollard, Michael; Shetty, Kanaka; Adamson, David M.; Amaral, Ernesto F. L.; Armour, Philip; Beleche, Trinidad; Bogdan, Olena; Hastings, Jaime; Kapinos, Kandice; Kress, Amii

    2016-01-01

    The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the current and projected demographics and health care needs of patients served by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The number of U.S. veterans will continue to decline over the next...

  7. Current status of quality evaluation of nursing care through director review and reflection from the Nursing Quality Control Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xia; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The quality evaluation of nursing care is a key link in medical quality management. It is important and worth studying for the nursing supervisors to know the disadvantages during the process of quality evaluation of nursing care and then to improve the whole nursing quality. This study was to provide director insight on the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care from Nursing Quality Control Centers (NQCCs). Material and Methods: This qualitative study used a sample ...

  8. An evaluation of adherence to society of pharmacists’ standards care in pharmacy information systems in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Raeisi, Ahmadreza; Ehteshami, Asghar; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pharmacy information system (PIS) is a complex computerized system used for collecting, storing, and managing the medication therapy data in the course of patients’ care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of adherence to the standards established by the societies of pharmacists in the PISs employed in the hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: The present study was an applied, descriptive-analytical study conducted on the PISs of 19 teaching, private and social insurance hospitals in Isfahan in 2011. Study population consisted of the PISs available in the hospitals under study. Study sample was the same as the study population. The data collection instrument was a self-developed checklist based on the guidelines of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical Society of Australia, whose validity was assessed and confirmed by expert professors’ views. Having been collected by observation and interview methods, data were analyzed by SPSS 18 software using Mann–Whitney statistical test. Results: The findings of the study revealed that the highest rank in adherence to the standards of societies of pharmacists was obtained by social services hospitals (32.75%), while the private hospitals obtained the lowest rank (23.32%). Conclusions: Based on the findings, in the PISs in the hospitals under study, some standards of the society of pharmacists were ignored. Hence, prior to designing and implementing PIS, a needs analysis is required to increase its users’ motivation to identify the system potentialities and to allow the system development in compliance with the world technology advancement. PMID:25878380

  9. An evaluation of adherence to society of pharmacists' standards care in pharmacy information systems in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Raeisi, Ahmadreza; Ehteshami, Asghar; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy information system (PIS) is a complex computerized system used for collecting, storing, and managing the medication therapy data in the course of patients' care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of adherence to the standards established by the societies of pharmacists in the PISs employed in the hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The present study was an applied, descriptive-analytical study conducted on the PISs of 19 teaching, private and social insurance hospitals in Isfahan in 2011. Study population consisted of the PISs available in the hospitals under study. Study sample was the same as the study population. The data collection instrument was a self-developed checklist based on the guidelines of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical Society of Australia, whose validity was assessed and confirmed by expert professors' views. Having been collected by observation and interview methods, data were analyzed by SPSS 18 software using Mann-Whitney statistical test. The findings of the study revealed that the highest rank in adherence to the standards of societies of pharmacists was obtained by social services hospitals (32.75%), while the private hospitals obtained the lowest rank (23.32%). Based on the findings, in the PISs in the hospitals under study, some standards of the society of pharmacists were ignored. Hence, prior to designing and implementing PIS, a needs analysis is required to increase its users' motivation to identify the system potentialities and to allow the system development in compliance with the world technology advancement.

  10. Current and emerging occupational safety and health (OSH) issues in the healthcare sector, including home and community care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, T. de; Bos, E.; Pawlowska-Cyprysiak, K.; Hildt-Ciupinska, K.; Malinska, M.; Nicolescu, G.; Trifu, A.

    2014-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the current and emerging OSH issues for health- and social care workers and how these affect their safety and health at work and influence the quality of care they provide. It combines a literature review and the responses received to a questionnaire sent to OSH

  11. Sexuality Education and Implications for Quality of Care for Individuals with Adult Onset Disability: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglseder, Kate; Webb, Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the need for sexuality education for individuals with adult onset physical disabilities as it relates to quality of life and to identify current trends in the provision of sexuality education by health care providers relating to quality of care. Data Sources: Literature review from January 1986 to December 2016. Study…

  12. Current global standards for chemical protective clothing: how to choose the right protection for the right job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN WELY, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The first standards for chemical protective clothing (CPC) emerged mid to late 1980’s and have evolved since as most standards are revisited every 5 yr. Over the past years, we have also seen a strengthening of the chemical and worker protection legislation around the globe (various forms of REACH) but also protection of workers. The most prevalent standards originate under the auspices of the International Standards Organisation (ISO), European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) or under various US standards organisations (e.g. NFPA, ASTM). Protective clothing against hazardous materials is required in many of the professional and non-professional activities of everyday life. Effective and adequate protection is important in many scenarios from household (e.g. cleaning agents, peroxides, acids and bases, paints), to agricultural (e.g. fuel, pesticides), to medical (e.g. pharmaceuticals and active ingredients), to industrial production (e.g. petro-chemicals, chemicals, paints, adhesive and coatings) but also manufacturing of many products (e.g. light bulbs, cars, semi-conductors), during various emergency activities (e.g. boat, rail or road accidents as well as fire-fighting in an urban and industrial setting), and finally, military operations or response to incidents of terrorism. Nevertheless, CPC must remain the last line of defence whenever possible through a preference for less hazardous chemicals, less dangerous processes and handling operations, and by engineering controls to reduce and minimise human contact with the chemicals. This article provides information about the selection, use, care and maintenance (SUCAM) of protective clothing against chemical and microbiological hazards. PMID:29046493

  13. Psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer and their families: A national survey of pediatric oncology social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Currin-Mcculloch, Jennifer; Pelletier, Wendy; Sardi-Brown, Vicki; Brown, Peter; Wiener, Lori

    2018-04-01

    In 2015, an interdisciplinary group of psychosocial experts developed The Standards of Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and Their Families. This paper presents data from a national survey of pediatric oncology social workers and their experiences in delivering psychosocial care to children and families. In total, 107 social workers from 81 cancer institutions participated in a 25-item online survey that mirrored the 15 Standards for Psychosocial Care. Both closed and open-ended questions were included. Social work participants reported that psychosocial support is being provided at most cancer centers surveyed, primarily by social workers and child life specialists, addressing adaptation to the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and transitions into survivorship or end-of-life care and bereavement. While social workers reported offering comprehensive services throughout the cancer trajectory, many of the 2015 Standards are not being systematically implemented. Areas for improvement include funding for psychosocial support staff and programs, incorporation of standardized assessment measures, assessment for financial burden throughout treatment and beyond, consistent access to psychology and psychiatry, integrated care for parents and siblings, and more inclusion of palliative care services from time of diagnosis.

  14. A medical-legal review regarding the standard of care for epidural injections, with particular reference to a closed case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Standiford; Glaser, Scott; Falco, Frank; Henry, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Interventional pain management is an evolving field, with a primary focus on the safety of the patient. One major source of risk to patients is intraarterial or intraneural injections. Interventional pain physicians have considerable interest in identifying techniques which avoid these complications. A recent article has reviewed complications associated with interventional procedures and concluded that the complications were due to deviation from a specific prescribed protocol. One of the cases reviewed went to jury trial and the record of that case is in the public domain. Two of the authors of the recent review were expert witnesses in the trial. They provided conflicting testimony as to alleged violations of the standard of care. Their criticisms also differed from a third criticism contained in the article as well as the protocol being advocated in the article, thus contravening the claim that there is one prescribed protocol which must be followed. The definition of standard of care varies amongst jurisdictions, but is generally defined as either that care which a reasonably well-trained physician in that specialty would provide under similar circumstances or as what would constitute reasonable medical care under the circumstances presented. Analysis of the case which went to trial indicates that there is not one prescribed protocol which must be followed; the definition of standard of care is broader than that. Interventional pain management is an evolving field and the standard of care is broadly defined.

  15. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H.; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M.; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. PMID:29491653

  16. Standard guidelines of care: Performing procedures in patients on or recently administered with isotretinoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued.The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  17. Treatment Options for Paediatric Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL: Current Standard and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Prokoph

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL, remains one of the most curable cancers in the paediatric setting; multi-agent chemotherapy cures approximately 65–90% of patients. Over the last two decades, major efforts have focused on improving the survival rate by intensification of combination chemotherapy regimens and employing stem cell transplantation for chemotherapy-resistant patients. More recently, several new and ‘renewed’ agents have offered the opportunity for a change in the paradigm for the management of both chemo-sensitive and chemo-resistant forms of ALCL. The development of ALK inhibitors following the identification of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC has opened new possibilities for ALK-positive ALCL. The uniform expression of CD30 on the cell surface of ALCL has given the opportunity for anti-CD30 antibody therapy. The re-evaluation of vinblastine, which has shown remarkable activity as a single agent even in the face of relapsed disease, has led to the consideration of a revised approach to frontline therapy. The advent of immune therapies such as checkpoint inhibition has provided another option for the treatment of ALCL. In fact, the number of potential new agents now presents a real challenge to the clinical community that must prioritise those thought to offer the most promise for the future. In this review, we will focus on the current status of paediatric ALCL therapy, explore how new and ‘renewed’ agents are re-shaping the therapeutic landscape for ALCL, and identify the strategies being employed in the next generation of clinical trials.

  18. Identifying and acting on potentially inappropriate care? Inadequacy of current hospital coding for this task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P David; Smart, David R

    2017-06-01

    Recent Australian attempts to facilitate disinvestment in healthcare, by identifying instances of 'inappropriate' care from large Government datasets, are subject to significant methodological flaws. Amongst other criticisms has been the fact that the Government datasets utilized for this purpose correlate poorly with datasets collected by relevant professional bodies. Government data derive from official hospital coding, collected retrospectively by clerical personnel, whilst professional body data derive from unit-specific databases, collected contemporaneously with care by clinical personnel. Assessment of accuracy of official hospital coding data for hyperbaric services in a tertiary referral hospital. All official hyperbaric-relevant coding data submitted to the relevant Australian Government agencies by the Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmania, Australia for financial year 2010-2011 were reviewed and compared against actual hyperbaric unit activity as determined by reference to original source documents. Hospital coding data contained one or more errors in diagnoses and/or procedures in 70% of patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen that year. Multiple discrete error types were identified, including (but not limited to): missing patients; missing treatments; 'additional' treatments; 'additional' patients; incorrect procedure codes and incorrect diagnostic codes. Incidental observations of errors in surgical, anaesthetic and intensive care coding within this cohort suggest that the problems are not restricted to the specialty of hyperbaric medicine alone. Publications from other centres indicate that these problems are not unique to this institution or State. Current Government datasets are irretrievably compromised and not fit for purpose. Attempting to inform the healthcare policy debate by reference to these datasets is inappropriate. Urgent clinical engagement with hospital coding departments is warranted.

  19. Pediatric Renal Transplantation: Focus on Current Transition Care and Proposal of the "RISE to Transition" Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Rupesh; Wang, Joseph; Krishnappa, Vinod; Ferris, Maria

    2018-01-16

    The transition from pediatric to adult medical services is an important time in the life of an adolescent or young adult with a renal transplant. Failure of proper transition can lead to medical non-adherence and subsequent loss of graft and/or return to dialysis. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and survey to assess the challenges and existing practices in transition of renal transplant recipient children to adult services, and to develop a transition protocol. We conducted a literature review and performed a survey of pediatric nephrologists across the United States to examine the current state of transition care. A structured transition protocol was developed based on these results. Our literature review revealed that a transition program has a positive impact on decline in renal function and acute rejection episodes, and may improve long-term graft outcomes in pediatric kidney transplant patients. With a response rate of 40% (60/150) from nephrologists in 56% (49/87) of centers, our survey shows inconsistent use of validated tools despite their availability, inefficient communication between teams, and lack of use of dedicated clinics. To address these issues, we developed the "RISE to Transition" protocol, which relies on 4 competency areas: Recognition, Insight, Self-reliance, and Establishment of healthy habits. The transition program decreases acute graft rejection episodes, and the main challenges in transition care are the communication gap between health care providers and inconsistent use of transition tools. Our RISE to transition protocol incorporates transition tools, defines personnel, and aims to improve communication between teams.

  20. TRAK App Suite: A Web-Based Intervention for Delivering Standard Care for the Rehabilitation of Knee Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasić, Irena; Button, Kate; Divoli, Anna; Gupta, Satyam; Pataky, Tamas; Pizzocaro, Diego; Preece, Alun; van Deursen, Robert; Wilson, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Standard care for the rehabilitation of knee conditions involves exercise programs and information provision. Current methods of rehabilitation delivery struggle to keep up with large volumes of patients and the length of treatment required to maximize the recovery. Therefore, the development of novel interventions to support self-management is strongly recommended. Such interventions need to include information provision, goal setting, monitoring, feedback, and support groups, but the most effective methods of their delivery are poorly understood. The Internet provides a medium for intervention delivery with considerable potential for meeting these needs. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a Web-based app and to conduct a preliminary review of its practicability as part of a complex medical intervention in the rehabilitation of knee disorders. This paper describes the development, implementation, and usability of such an app. An interdisciplinary team of health care professionals and researchers, computer scientists, and app developers developed the TRAK app suite. The key functionality of the app includes information provision, a three-step exercise program based on a standard care for the rehabilitation of knee conditions, self-monitoring with visual feedback, and a virtual support group. There were two types of stakeholders (patients and physiotherapists) that were recruited for the usability study. The usability questionnaire was used to collect both qualitative and quantitative information on computer and Internet usage, task completion, and subjective user preferences. A total of 16 patients and 15 physiotherapists participated in the usability study. Based on the System Usability Scale, the TRAK app has higher perceived usability than 70% of systems. Both patients and physiotherapists agreed that the given Web-based approach would facilitate communication, provide information, help recall information, improve understanding

  1. Current status of epilepsy treatment and efficacy of standard phenobarbital therapy in rural areas of Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinbei; Luo, Nan; Wang, Zan; Lin, Weihong

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the current status of epilepsy treatment and the efficacy and adverse effects of phenobarbital therapy in rural areas of Northern China. A total of 2192 patients diagnosed with convulsive epilepsy were recruited from seven different rural regions in Jilin Province, China to investigate the current status of epilepsy treatment, and 1379 of them were enrolled in a standard phenobarbital therapy trial. Patients were selected according to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, and medical records for all patients were collected and analyzed before the standard treatment was started. Patients were followed up monthly, and efficacy in 1218 patients was analyzed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. More patients had the initial seizure in juveniles than in adults, and 40.72% of the 2192 patients were not receiving any treatment before the treatment trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital increased and adverse effects decreased within the treatment period. Among the 349 patients who were followed up for 12 months from the beginning of the phenobarbital treatment, seizures were decreased by more than 75% in 71.3% of patients using a low-to-medium dose of phenobarbital. Major adverse effects of phenobarbital included mild exhaustion, drowsiness, dizziness and headache. Standardized long-term and regular administration of phenobarbital at a low-to-medium dose can be used as an effective, economic and safe treatment against epilepsy in rural areas.

  2. Decreased suicide rate after induced abortion, after the Current Care Guidelines in Finland 1987-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissler, Mika; Karalis, Elina; Ulander, Veli-Matti

    2015-02-01

    Women with a recent induced abortion have a 3-fold risk for suicide, compared to non-pregnant women. The increased risk was recognised in unofficial guidelines (1996) and Current Care Guidelines (2001) on abortion treatment, highlighting the importance of a check-up 2 - 3 weeks after the termination, to monitor for mental health disorders. We studied the suicide trends after induced abortion in 1987 - 2012 in Finland. We linked the Register on Induced Abortions (N = 284,751) and Cause-of-Death Register (N = 3798 suicides) to identify women who had committed suicide within 1 year after an induced abortion (N = 79). The abortion rates per 100,000 person-years were calculated for 1987 - 1996 (period with no guidelines), 1997 - 2001 (with unofficial guidelines) and 2002 - 2012 (with Current Care Guidelines). The suicide rate after induced abortion declined by 24%, from 32.4/100,000 in 1987 - 1996 to 24.3/100,000 in 1997 - 2001 and then 24.8/100,000 in 2002 - 2012. The age-adjusted suicide rate among women aged 15 - 49 decreased by 13%; from 11.4/100,000 to 10.4/100,000 and 9.9/100,000, respectively. After induced abortions, the suicide rate increased by 30% among teenagers (to 25/100,000), stagnated for women aged 20 - 24 (at 32/100,000), but decreased by 43% (to 21/100,000) for women aged 25 - 49. The excess risk for suicide after induced abortion decreased, but the change was not statistically significant. Women with a recent induced abortion still have a 2-fold suicide risk. A mandatory check-up may decrease this risk. The causes for the increased suicide risk, including mental health prior to pregnancy and the social circumstances, should be investigated further. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Quantification of the islet product: presentation of a standardized current good manufacturing practices compliant system with minimal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Andrew S; Brandhorst, Heide; Buchwald, Peter; Goto, Masafumi; Ricordi, Camillo; Brandhorst, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle

    2011-03-27

    Accurate islet quantification has proven difficult to standardize in a good manufacturing practices (GMP) approved manner. The influence of assessment variables from both manual and computer-assisted digital image analysis (DIA) methods were compared using calibrated, standardized microspheres or islets alone. Additionally, a mixture of microspheres and exocrine tissue was used to evaluate the variability of both the current, internationally recognized, manual method and a novel GMP-friendly purity- and volume-based method (PV) evaluated by DIA in a semiclosed, culture bag system. Computer-assisted DIA recorded known microsphere size distribution and quantities accurately. By using DIA to evaluate islets, the interindividual manually evaluated percent coefficients of variation (CV%; n=14) were reduced by almost half for both islet equivalents (IEs; 31% vs. 17%, P=0.002) and purity (20% vs. 13%, P=0.033). The microsphere pool mixed with exocrine tissue did not differ from expected IE with either method. However, manual IE resulted in a total CV% of 44.3% and a range spanning 258 k IE, whereas PV resulted in CV% of 10.7% and range of 60 k IE. Purity CV% for each method were similar approximating 10.5% and differed from expected by +7% for the manual method and +3% for PV. The variability of standard counting methods for islet samples and clinical quantities of microspheres mixed with exocrine tissue were reduced with DIA. They were reduced even further by use of a semiclosed bag system compared with standard manual counting, thereby facilitating the standardization of islet evaluation according to GMP standards.

  4. A Summary of Proposed Changes to the Current ICARTT Format Standards and their Implications to Future Airborne Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, E. A.; Kusterer, J.; Quam, B.; Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Beach, A. L., III

    2015-12-01

    The current ICARTT file format standards were developed for the purpose of fulfilling the data management needs for the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign in 2004. The goal of the ICARTT file format was to establish a common and simple to use data file format to promote data exchange and collaboration among science teams with similar science objectives. ICARTT has been the NASA standard since 2010, and is widely used by NOAA, NSF, and international partners (DLR, FAAM). Despite its level of acceptance, there are a number of issues with the current ICARTT format, especially concerning the machine readability. To enhance usability, the ICARTT Refresh Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) was established to enable a platform for atmospheric science data producers, users (e.g. modelers) and data managers to collaborate on developing criteria for this file format. Ultimately, this is a cross agency effort to improve and aggregate the metadata records being produced. After conducting a survey to identify deficiencies in the current format, we determined which are considered most important to the various communities. Numerous recommendations were made to improve upon the file format while maintaining backward compatibility. The recommendations made to date and their advantages and limitations will be discussed.

  5. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu'taman; Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-10-20

    Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme "1 Care for 1 Malaysia" in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia.

  6. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  7. Perioperative strategy in colonic surgery; LAparoscopy and/or FAst track multimodal management versus standard care (LAFA trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swart Annemiek

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in large bowel surgery are the introduction of laparoscopic surgery and the implementation of multimodal fast track recovery programs. Both focus on a faster recovery and shorter hospital stay. The randomized controlled multicenter LAFA-trial (LAparoscopy and/or FAst track multimodal management versus standard care was conceived to determine whether laparoscopic surgery, fast track perioperative care or a combination of both is to be preferred over open surgery with standard care in patients having segmental colectomy for malignant disease. Methods/design The LAFA-trial is a double blinded, multicenter trial with a 2 × 2 balanced factorial design. Patients eligible for segmental colectomy for malignant colorectal disease i.e. right and left colectomy and anterior resection will be randomized to either open or laparoscopic colectomy, and to either standard care or the fast track program. This factorial design produces four treatment groups; open colectomy with standard care (a, open colectomy with fast track program (b, laparoscopic colectomy with standard care (c, and laparoscopic surgery with fast track program (d. Primary outcome parameter is postoperative hospital length of stay including readmission within 30 days. Secondary outcome parameters are quality of life two and four weeks after surgery, overall hospital costs, morbidity, patient satisfaction and readmission rate. Based on a mean postoperative hospital stay of 9 +/- 2.5 days a group size of 400 patients (100 each arm can reliably detect a minimum difference of 1 day between the four arms (alfa = 0.95, beta = 0.8. With 100 patients in each arm a difference of 10% in subscales of the Short Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire and social functioning can be detected. Discussion The LAFA-trial is a randomized controlled multicenter trial that will provide evidence on the merits of fast track perioperative care and laparoscopic colorectal surgery in

  8. Standard precautions: occupational exposure and behavior of health care workers in Ethiopia.

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    Ayalu A Reda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to blood and body fluids is a serious concern for health care workers, and presents a major risk for the transmission of infections such as HIV and hepatitis viruses. The objective of this study was to investigate occupational exposures and behavior of health care workers (HCWs in eastern Ethiopia.We surveyed 475 HCWs working in 10 hospitals and 20 health centers in eastern Ethiopia using a structured questionnaire with a response rate of 84.4%. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis using logistic regression were performed.Life time risks of needle stick (30.5%; 95% CI 26.4-34.6% and sharps injuries (25.7%; 95% CI 21.8-29.6% were high. The one year prevalence of needle stick and sharps injury were 17.5% (95% CI 14.1-20.9% and 13.5% (95% CI 10.4-16.6% respectively. There was a high prevalence of life time (28.8%; 95% CI = 24.7-32.9% and one year (20.2%; 95% CI = 16.6-23.8% exposures to blood and body fluids. Two hundred thirteen (44.8% HCWs reported that they were dissatisfied by the supply of infection prevention materials. HCWs had sub-optimal practices and unfavorable attitudes related to standard precautions such as needle recapping (46.9% and discriminatory attitudes (30.5% toward HIV/AIDS patients.There was a high level of exposure to blood and body fluids among HCWs. We detected suboptimal practices and behavior that put both patients and HCWs at significant risk of acquiring occupational infections. Health authorities in the study area need to improve the training of HCWs and provision of infection prevention equipment. In addition, regular reporting and assessment of occupational exposures need to be implemented.

  9. Evaluation of current operating standards for chlorine dioxide in disinfection of dump tank and flume for fresh tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Callejas, Alejandro; López-Velasco, Gabriela; Valadez, Angela M; Sbodio, Adrian; Artés-Hernández, Francisco; Danyluk, Michelle D; Suslow, Trevor V

    2012-02-01

    Standard postharvest unit operations that rely on copious water contact, such as fruit unloading and washing, approach the criteria for a true critical control point in fresh tomato production. Performance data for approved sanitizers that reflect commercial systems are needed to set standards for audit compliance. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) for water disinfection as an objective assessment of recent industry-adopted standards for dump tank and flume management in fresh tomato packing operations. On-site assessments were conducted during eight temporally distinct shifts in two Florida packinghouses and one California packinghouse. Microbiological analyses of incoming and washed fruit and dump and flume system water were evaluated. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, conductivity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) were monitored. Reduction in populations of mesophilic and coliform bacteria on fruit was not significant, and populations were significantly higher (P Turbidity and conductivity increased with loads of incoming tomatoes. Water temperature varied during daily operations, but pH and ORP mostly remained constant. The industry standard positive temperature differential of 5.5°C between water and fruit pulp was not maintained in tanks during the full daily operation. ORP values were significantly higher in the flume than in the dump tank. A positive correlation was found between ORP and temperature, and negative correlations were found between ORP and turbidity, total mesophilic bacteria, and coliforms. This study provides in-plant data indicating that ClO(2) can be an effective sanitizer in flume and spray-wash systems, but current operational limitations restrict its performance in dump tanks. Under current conditions, ClO(2) alone is unlikely to allow the fresh tomato industry to meet its microbiological quality goals under typical commercial conditions.

  10. One World, One Standard for Burn Care: Nursing's Role in Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl A Ramstad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1978, a landmark United Nations conference in Alma-Ata declared the goal of health for all by the year 2000 (WHO, 1978. Yet, today significant disparities exist between the health care afforded individuals in resource-limited countries and those in the industrialized world. Nursing, as a global profession, can become a powerful force for change so that better health is universally achieved. Problem/Background: This project started with a partnership between a burn center in the United States and a pediatric burn center (Burn Center in Peru, a country in which it is estimated that 15,000 children endure burn injuries each year (Huby-Vidaurre, 2016. Most are under the age of five, and suffer scald burns from pots with hot liquids left to cool on the floors of their homes. Pressure garment therapy (PGT is a major treatment to reduce scarring for pediatric burn survivors in the United States since the early 1970s, but is unavailable in Peru. Strategy: The Doctor of Nursing Practice project leader worked with the Burn Center team to develop a plan to use PGT as an intervention to address disfiguring scarring among pediatric burn survivors, utilizing the twinning approach. Methods: This quality improvement project involved interdisciplinary collaboration and international partnerships between resource-rich and resource-challenged nations. Obtaining supplies needed to promote PGT in Peru required cultivating relationships with many people in the United States, including translators and interpreters to assist in overcoming language barriers among the participants, manufacturers and distributors of pressure garments to donate fabrics, and people regularly traveling to Peru who transported the donated PGT materials. It also involved working closely with the Burn Center team on developing a culture conducive to conforming to an international standard of practice. Results: Resources were successfully leveraged to build a sustainable PGT program for all

  11. The evolution of parental care in insects: A test of current hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James D J; Manica, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Which sex should care for offspring is a fundamental question in evolution. Invertebrates, and insects in particular, show some of the most diverse kinds of parental care of all animals, but to date there has been no broad comparative study of the evolution of parental care in this group. Here, we test existing hypotheses of insect parental care evolution using a literature-compiled phylogeny of over 2000 species. To address substantial uncertainty in the insect phylogeny, we use a brute force approach based on multiple random resolutions of uncertain nodes. The main transitions were between no care (the probable ancestral state) and female care. Male care evolved exclusively from no care, supporting models where mating opportunity costs for caring males are reduced-for example, by caring for multiple broods-but rejecting the "enhanced fecundity" hypothesis that male care is favored because it allows females to avoid care costs. Biparental care largely arose by males joining caring females, and was more labile in Holometabola than in Hemimetabola. Insect care evolution most closely resembled amphibian care in general trajectory. Integrating these findings with the wealth of life history and ecological data in insects will allow testing of a rich vein of existing hypotheses. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. The evolution of parental care in insects: A test of current hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James D J; Manica, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Which sex should care for offspring is a fundamental question in evolution. Invertebrates, and insects in particular, show some of the most diverse kinds of parental care of all animals, but to date there has been no broad comparative study of the evolution of parental care in this group. Here, we test existing hypotheses of insect parental care evolution using a literature-compiled phylogeny of over 2000 species. To address substantial uncertainty in the insect phylogeny, we use a brute force approach based on multiple random resolutions of uncertain nodes. The main transitions were between no care (the probable ancestral state) and female care. Male care evolved exclusively from no care, supporting models where mating opportunity costs for caring males are reduced—for example, by caring for multiple broods—but rejecting the “enhanced fecundity” hypothesis that male care is favored because it allows females to avoid care costs. Biparental care largely arose by males joining caring females, and was more labile in Holometabola than in Hemimetabola. Insect care evolution most closely resembled amphibian care in general trajectory. Integrating these findings with the wealth of life history and ecological data in insects will allow testing of a rich vein of existing hypotheses. PMID:25825047

  13. Point-of-care testing in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers: current technology and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody Z; Markar, Sheraz R; Hanna, George B

    2015-04-14

    Point-of-care (POC) tests enable rapid results and are well established in medical practice. Recent advances in analytical techniques have led to a new generation of POC devices that will alter gastrointestinal diagnostic pathways. This review aims to identify current and new technologies for the POC diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. A structured search of the Embase and Medline databases was performed. Papers reporting diagnostic tests for gastrointestinal cancer available as a POC device or containing a description of feasibility for POC application were included. Studies recovered were heterogeneous and therefore results are presented as a narrative review. Six diagnostic methods were identified (fecal occult blood, fecal proteins, volatile organic compounds, pyruvate kinase isoenzyme type M2, tumour markers and DNA analysis). Fecal occult blood testing has a reported sensitivity of 66%-85% and specificity greater than 95%. The others are at a range of development and clinical application. POC devices have a proven role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. Barriers to their implementation exist and the transition from experimental to clinical medicine is currently slow. New technologies demonstrate potential to provide accurate POC tests and an ability to diagnose gastrointestinal cancer at an early stage with improved clinical outcome and survival.

  14. Clinical decision support systems in hospital care using ubiquitous devices: Current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Moqeem, Aasia A; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Supporting clinicians in decision making using advanced technologies has been an active research area in biomedical engineering during the past years. Among a wide range of ubiquitous systems, smartphone applications have been increasingly developed in healthcare settings to help clinicians as well as patients. Today, many smartphone applications, from basic data analysis to advanced patient monitoring, are available to clinicians and patients. Such applications are now increasingly integrating into healthcare for clinical decision support, and therefore, concerns around accuracy, stability, and dependency of these applications are rising. In addition, lack of attention to the clinicians' acceptability, as well as the low impact on the medical professionals' decision making, are posing more serious issues on the acceptability of smartphone applications. This article reviews smartphone-based decision support applications, focusing on hospital care settings and their overall impact of these applications on the wider clinical workflow. Additionally, key challenges and barriers of the current ubiquitous device-based healthcare applications are identified. Finally, this article addresses current challenges, future directions, and the adoption of mobile healthcare applications.

  15. Self-reported interoceptive awareness in primary care patients with past or current low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehling WE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wolf E Mehling,1,2 Jennifer Daubenmier,1,3 Cynthia J Price,5 Mike Acree,1 Elizabeth Bartmess,1 Anita L Stewart41Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Nursing, Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, 5School of Nursing, Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USABackground: Mind–body interactions play a major role in the prognosis of chronic pain, and mind–body therapies such as meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais presumably provide benefits for pain patients. The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA scales, designed to measure key aspects of mind–body interaction, were developed and validated with individuals practicing mind–body therapies, but have never been used in pain patients.Methods: We administered the MAIA to primary care patients with past or current low back pain and explored differences in the performance of the MAIA scales between this and the original validation sample. We compared scale means, exploratory item cluster and confirmatory factor analyses, scale–scale correlations, and internal-consistency reliability between the two samples and explored correlations with validity measures.Results: Responses were analyzed from 435 patients, of whom 40% reported current pain. Cross-sectional comparison between the two groups showed marked differences in eight aspects of interoceptive awareness. Factor and cluster analyses generally confirmed the conceptual model with its eight dimensions in a pain population. Correlations with validity measures were in the expected direction. Internal-consistency reliability was good for six of eight MAIA scales. We provided specific suggestions for their further development.Conclusion: Self-reported aspects of interoceptive awareness differ between primary care patients with past or current

  16. Impact of a standardized nurse observation protocol including MEWS after Intensive Care Unit discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, K; Das, T; Hellemans, K; Verbrugghe, W; Jorens, P G; Verpooten, G A; Van Bogaert, P

    2013-02-01

    Analysis of in-hospital mortality after serious adverse events (SAE's) in our hospital showed the need for more frequent observation in medical and surgical wards. We hypothesized that the incidence of SAE's could be decreased by introducing a standard nurse observation protocol. To investigate the effect of a standard nurse observation protocol implementing the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) and a color graphic observation chart. Pre- and post-intervention study by analysis of patients records for a 5-day period after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge to 14 medical and surgical wards before (n=530) and after (n=509) the intervention. For the total study population the mean Patient Observation Frequency Per Nursing Shift (POFPNS) during the 5-day period after ICU discharge increased from .9993 (95% C.I. .9637-1.0350) in the pre-intervention period to 1.0732 (95% C.I. 1.0362-1.1101) (p=.005) in the post-intervention period. There was an increased risk of a SAE in patients with MEWS 4 or higher in the present nursing shift (HR 8.25; 95% C.I. 2.88-23.62) and the previous nursing shift (HR 12.83;95% C.I. 4.45-36.99). There was an absolute risk reduction for SAE's within 120h after ICU discharge of 2.2% (95% C.I. -0.4-4.67%) from 5.7% to 3.5%. The intervention had a positive impact on the observation frequency. MEWS had a predictive value for SAE's in patients after ICU discharge. The drop in SAE's was substantial but did not reach statistical significance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Standard guidelines of care: CO2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupashankar, D S

    2008-01-01

    Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. MACHINES: Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. INDICATIONS FOR CO 2 LASER: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. AESTHETIC INDICATIONS: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. PHYSICIANS' QUALIFICATIONS: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD) may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer's facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist's minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be discussed with the patient. The patient should be provided brochures to study and

  18. Standard guidelines of care: CO 2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupashankar D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. Machines : Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. Indications for CO 2 laser: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. Aesthetic indications: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. Physicians′ qualifications: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer′s facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. Facility: CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be

  19. Time standards of nursing in Primary Health Care: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Bonfim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To determine time standards for interventions and activities conducted by nursing professionals in Family Health Units (FHU in Brazil to substantiate the calculation of work force. METHOD This was an observational study carried out in 27 FHU, in 12 municipalities in 10 states, in 2013. In each unit, nursing professionals were observed every 10 minutes, for eight work hours, on five consecutive days via the work sampling technique. RESULTS A total of 32,613 observations were made, involving 47 nurses and 93 nursing technicians/assistants. Appointments were the main intervention carried out by nurses, with a mean time of 25.3 minutes, followed by record-keeping, which corresponded to 9.7%. On average, nursing technicians/assistants spent 6.3% of their time keeping records and 30.6 intervention minutes on immunization/vaccination control. CONCLUSION The study resulted in standard times of interventions carried out by the FHU nursing team, which can underpin the determination of nursing staff size and human resource policies. Furthermore, the study showed the panorama of interventions currently employed, allowing for the work process to be reviewed and optimized.

  20. Current trends of antimicrobial susceptibility of typhoidal salmonellae isolated at tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehra, N.M.; Irfan, F.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the current trend of antimicrobial susceptibility of typhoidal Salmonellae. Study Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from January 2014 to December 2015. Methodology: Blood culture samples received from the wards and outpatient departments were included. Isolates of Salmonella were dealt with standard microbiological procedures. The antimicrobial sensitivity against the typhoidal Salmonellae was determined using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method as per the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (2013). Results: A total of 460 typhoidal Salmonellae were isolated; out of which 270 were Salmonella typhi and 190 were Salmonella paratyphiA. The percentage of MDR isolates of S. typhi was 57% and that of S. paratyphiA was 42%. None of the isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, while sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (07% and 0% for S. typhiand S. paratyphiA, respectively) was very low. Conclusion: There is high percentage of MDR isolates of typhoidal Salmonellae in our region. The antimicrobial sensitivity of typhoidal Salmonellae to conventional agent has not improved enough to recommend their empirical use. There is almost complete resistance to fluoroquinolones as well, leaving very limited available treatment options. (author)

  1. Current and emerging practice of end-of-life care in British prisons: findings from an online survey of prison nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Irena; Lay, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    There are concerns about prisoners and detainees not having equal access to end-of-life care while in prison. There is a lack of existing literature about the standards of end-of-life care in UK prisons. The aim of this study was to investigate the views of current and former prison nurses with regard to the end-of-life care being provided in UK prisons. Prison nurses were invited to participate in an online survey and asked about their role in the prison, prisoners' access to healthcare facilities, and any barriers and good practices to end-of-life care. The survey included open-ended and closed questions. The closed questions were analysed using descriptive statistics. The open-ended responses were coded and grouped into themes. 31 (N=31) prison nurses responded to the survey. The reported barriers to end-of-life care included some prison regimes, lack of appropriate care and visiting facilities, lack of privacy and inadequate visiting hours. Respondents also reported examples of good practice, including having access to specialist palliative care and specialist equipment, and being able to receive visits from family and friends. The findings suggest that there is considerable variability in the end-of-life care provided to prisoners in the UK. Further research is needed in order to reduce the health inequalities and improve the quality of end-of-life care experienced by prisoners in the UK. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Factors related to intention to stay in the current workplace among long-term care nurses: A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltaybani, Sameh; Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Igarashi, Ayumi; Saito, Yumiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2018-04-01

    Keeping long-term care nurses employed is necessary to sustain the current and future demand for high-quality long-term care services. Understanding the factors relating to intention to stay among long-term care nurses is limited by the scarcity of studies in long-term care settings, lack of investigation of multiple factors, and the weakness of existing explanatory models. To identify the factors associated with long-term care nurses' intention to stay in their current workplace. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Two hundred and fifty-seven hospitals with long-term care wards across Japan. A total of 3128 staff nurses and 257 nurse managers from the long-term care wards of the participating hospitals. The questionnaire assessed nurses' intention to continue working in the current workplace as well as potential related factors, including individual factors (demographic data, reason for choosing current workplace, burnout, work engagement, somatic symptom burden) and unit factors (unit size, nurse-manager-related data, patients' medical acuity, average number of overtime hours, recreational activities, social support, perceived quality of care process, educational opportunities, feeling of loneliness, and ability to request days off). Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to determine which variables best explained nurses' intention to stay in their workplace. Only 40.1% of the respondents reported wanting to continue working at their current workplace. The regression analysis revealed that long-term care nurses' intention to stay was positively associated with nurses' age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.02 [1.01-1.03]), work engagement (1.24 [1.14-1.35]), getting appropriate support from nurse managers (2.78 [1.60-4.82]), perceived quality of care process (1.04 [1.01-1.06]), educational opportunities (1.06 [1.0-1.13]), and various specific reasons for choosing their workplace (e.g., a good workplace atmosphere, being interested in

  3. Improving standard of care through introduction of laparoscopy for the surgical management of gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Cromi, Antonella; Serati, Maurizio; Di Naro, Edoardo; Casarin, Jvan; Pinelli, Ciro; Candeloro, Ilario; Sturla, Davide; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact on perioperative and medium-term oncologic outcomes of the implementation of laparoscopy into a preexisting oncologic setting. Data from consecutive 736 patients undergoing surgery for apparent early stage gynecological malignancies (endometrial, cervical, and adnexal cancers) between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. Complications were graded per the Accordion classification. Survival outcomes within the first 5 years were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method. Overall, 493 (67%), 162 (22%), and 81 (11%) had surgery for apparent early stage endometrial, cervical, and adnexal cancer. We assisted at an increase of the number of patients undergoing surgery via laparoscopy through the years (from 10% in the years 2000-2003 to 82% in years 2008-2011; P 0.05). The introduction of laparoscopy did not adversely affect medium-term (within 5 years) survival outcomes of patients undergoing surgery for apparent early stage cancers of the endometrium, uterine cervix, and adnexa (P > 0.05 log-rank test). The introduction of laparoscopy into a preexisting oncologic service allows an improvement of standard of care due to a gain in perioperative results, without detriments of medium-term oncologic outcomes.

  4. Out of hospital point of care ultrasound: current use models and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B P; Sanghvi, A

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound has evolved from a modality that was once exclusively reserved to certain specialities of its current state, in which its portability and durability lend to its broadly increasing applications. This review describes portable ultrasound in the hospital setting and its comparison to gold standard imaging modalities. Also, this review summarizes current literature describing portable ultrasound use in prehospital, austere and remote environments, highlighting successes and barriers to use in these environments. Prehospital ultrasound has the ability to increase diagnostic ability and allow for therapeutic intervention in the field. In austere environments, ultrasound may be the only available imaging modality and thus can guide diagnosis, therapeutics and determine which patients may need emergent transfer to a healthcare facility. The most cutting edge applications of portable ultrasound employ telemedicine to obtain and transmit ultrasound images. This technology and ability to transmit images via satellite and cellular transmission can allow for even novice users to obtain interpretable images in austere environments. Portable ultrasound uses have steadily grown and will continue to do so with the introduction of more portable and durable technologies. As applications continue to grow, certain technologic considerations and future directions are explored.

  5. Chronic disease management: a review of current performance across quality of care domains and opportunities for improving osteoarthritis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Bohensky, Megan A; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic joint disease worldwide. The incidence and prevalence are increasing as the population ages and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity increase. There are several evidence-based clinical practice guidelines available to guide clinician decision making, but there is evidence that care provided is suboptimal across all domains of quality: effectiveness, safety, timeliness and appropriateness, patient-centered care, and efficiency. System, clinician, and patient barriers to optimizing care need to be addressed. Innovative models designed to meet patient needs and those that harness social networks must be developed, especially to support those with mild to moderate disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Internet-based technologies to improve cancer care coordination: current use and attitudes among cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Anne; Ferrua, Marie; Lalloué, Benoît; Sicotte, Claude; Fourcade, Aude; Yatim, Fatima; Hébert, Guillaume; Di Palma, Mario; Minvielle, Etienne

    2015-03-01

    The uses of internet-based technologies (e.g. patient portals, websites and applications) by cancer patients could be strong drive for change in cancer care coordination practices. The goal of this study was to assess the current utilisation of internet-based technologies (IBT) among cancer patients, and their willingness to use them for their health, as well as analyse the influence of socio-demographics on both aspects. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted in June 2013, over seven non-consecutive days within seven outpatient departments of Gustave Roussy, a comprehensive cancer centre (≈160,000 consultations yearly), located just outside Paris. We computed descriptive statistics and performed correlation analysis to investigate patients' usage and attitudes in correspondence with age, gender, socioeconomic status, social isolation, and place of living. We then conducted multinomial logistic regressions using R. The participation level was 85% (n=1371). The median age was 53.4. 71% used a mobile phone everyday and 93% had access to Internet from home. Age and socioeconomic status were negatively associated with the use of IBT (p<0.001). Regarding patients' expected benefits, a wide majority valued its use in health care, and especially, the possibility to enhance communication with providers. 84% of patients reported feeling comfortable with the use of such technologies but age and socioeconomic status had a significant influence. Most patients used IBTs every day. Overall, patients advocated for an extended use of IBT in oncology. Differences in perceived ease of use corresponding to age and socioeconomic status have to be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Current and Projected Characteristics and Unique Health Care Needs of the Patient Population Served by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibner, Christine; Krull, Heather; Brown, Kristine M; Cefalu, Matthew; Mulcahy, Andrew W; Pollard, Michael; Shetty, Kanaka; Adamson, David M; Amaral, Ernesto F L; Armour, Philip; Beleche, Trinidad; Bogdan, Olena; Hastings, Jaime; Kapinos, Kandice; Kress, Amii; Mendelsohn, Joshua; Ross, Rachel; Rutter, Carolyn M; Weinick, Robin M; Woods, Dulani; Hosek, Susan D; Farmer, Carrie M

    2016-05-09

    The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the current and projected demographics and health care needs of patients served by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The number of U.S. veterans will continue to decline over the next decade, and the demographic mix and geographic locations of these veterans will change. While the number of veterans using VA health care has increased over time, demand will level off in the coming years. Veterans have more favorable economic circumstances than non-veterans, but they are also older and more likely to be diagnosed with many health conditions. Not all veterans are eligible for or use VA health care. Whether and to what extent an eligible veteran uses VA health care depends on a number of factors, including access to other sources of health care. Veterans who rely on VA health care are older and less healthy than veterans who do not, and the prevalence of costly conditions in this population is projected to increase. Potential changes to VA policy and the context for VA health care, including effects of the Affordable Care Act, could affect demand. Analysis of a range of data sources provided insight into how the veteran population is likely to change in the next decade.

  8. Current and Projected Characteristics and Unique Health Care Needs of the Patient Population Served by the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibner, Christine; Krull, Heather; Brown, Kristine M.; Cefalu, Matthew; Mulcahy, Andrew W.; Pollard, Michael; Shetty, Kanaka; Adamson, David M.; Amaral, Ernesto F. L.; Armour, Philip; Beleche, Trinidad; Bogdan, Olena; Hastings, Jaime; Kapinos, Kandice; Kress, Amii; Mendelsohn, Joshua; Ross, Rachel; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Weinick, Robin M.; Woods, Dulani; Hosek, Susan D.; Farmer, Carrie M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the current and projected demographics and health care needs of patients served by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The number of U.S. veterans will continue to decline over the next decade, and the demographic mix and geographic locations of these veterans will change. While the number of veterans using VA health care has increased over time, demand will level off in the coming years. Veterans have more favorable economic circumstances than non-veterans, but they are also older and more likely to be diagnosed with many health conditions. Not all veterans are eligible for or use VA health care. Whether and to what extent an eligible veteran uses VA health care depends on a number of factors, including access to other sources of health care. Veterans who rely on VA health care are older and less healthy than veterans who do not, and the prevalence of costly conditions in this population is projected to increase. Potential changes to VA policy and the context for VA health care, including effects of the Affordable Care Act, could affect demand. Analysis of a range of data sources provided insight into how the veteran population is likely to change in the next decade. PMID:28083423

  9. The emergence of international food safety standards and guidelines: understanding the current landscape through a historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Brigit

    2014-07-01

    Following the Second World War, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) teamed up to construct an International Codex Alimentarius (or 'food code') which emerged in 1963. The Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH) was charged with the task of developing microbial hygiene standards, although it found itself embroiled in debate with the WHO over the nature these standards should take. The WHO was increasingly relying upon the input of biometricians and especially the International Commission on Microbial Specifications for Foods (ICMSF) which had developed statistical sampling plans for determining the microbial counts in the final end products. The CCFH, however, was initially more focused on a qualitative approach which looked at the entire food production system and developed codes of practice as well as more descriptive end-product specifications which the WHO argued were 'not scientifically correct'. Drawing upon historical archival material (correspondence and reports) from the WHO and FAO, this article examines this debate over microbial hygiene standards and suggests that there are many lessons from history which could shed light upon current debates and efforts in international food safety management systems and approaches.

  10. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; exchange and insurance market standards for 2015 and beyond. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-27

    This final rule addresses various requirements applicable to health insurance issuers, Affordable Insurance Exchanges (``Exchanges''), Navigators, non-Navigator assistance personnel, and other entities under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). Specifically, the rule establishes standards related to product discontinuation and renewal, quality reporting, non-discrimination standards, minimum certification standards and responsibilities of qualified health plan (QHP) issuers, the Small Business Health Options Program, and enforcement remedies in Federally-facilitated Exchanges. It also finalizes: A modification of HHS's allocation of reinsurance collections if those collections do not meet our projections; certain changes to allowable administrative expenses in the risk corridors calculation; modifications to the way we calculate the annual limit on cost sharing so that we round this parameter down to the nearest $50 increment; an approach to index the required contribution used to determine eligibility for an exemption from the shared responsibility payment under section 5000A of the Internal Revenue Code; grounds for imposing civil money penalties on persons who provide false or fraudulent information to the Exchange and on persons who improperly use or disclose information; updated standards for the consumer assistance programs; standards related to the opt-out provisions for self-funded, non-Federal governmental plans and related to the individual market provisions under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 including excepted benefits; standards regarding how enrollees may request access to non-formulary drugs under exigent circumstances; amendments to Exchange appeals standards and coverage enrollment and termination standards; and time-limited adjustments to the standards relating to the medical loss ratio

  11. Monitoring the standard of care of diabetes mellitus type 2 in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nadiah A. Alshaheen

    2011-09-26

    Sep 26, 2011 ... a Al-Yarmouk Primary Clinic, Primary Health Care, Ministry of Health, Kuwait .... tem and on families, and the World Health Organization. (WHO) in its recent .... recommendations for a changing environment. Am J Manag Care.

  12. Ibrutinib versus previous standard of care: an adjusted comparison in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Lotta; Asklid, Anna; Diels, Joris; Eketorp-Sylvan, Sandra; Repits, Johanna; Søltoft, Frans; Jäger, Ulrich; Österborg, Anders

    2017-10-01

    This study explored the relative efficacy of ibrutinib versus previous standard-of-care treatments in relapsed/refractory patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), using multivariate regression modelling to adjust for baseline prognostic factors. Individual patient data were collected from an observational Stockholm cohort of consecutive patients (n = 144) diagnosed with CLL between 2002 and 2013 who had received at least second-line treatment. Data were compared with results of the RESONATE clinical trial. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was used which estimated the hazard ratio (HR) of ibrutinib versus previous standard of care. The adjusted HR of ibrutinib versus the previous standard-of-care cohort was 0.15 (p ibrutinib in the RESONATE study were significantly longer than with previous standard-of-care regimens used in second or later lines in routine healthcare. The approach used, which must be interpreted with caution, compares patient-level data from a clinical trial with outcomes observed in a daily clinical practice and may complement results from randomised trials or provide preliminary wider comparative information until phase 3 data exist.

  13. Treatment of Pancreatic and Periampullary Cancers at a Community Hospital: Successful Application of Tertiary Care Treatment Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesinger, Robert C.; Davis, Jan W.; Hill, Britani; Johnston, W. Cory; Gray, Carl; Johnson, Harold; Ingersoll, Leslye; Whipple, Gary; Reilly, Mark; Harris, Robert; Hansen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Background. The treatment of pancreatic cancer and other periampullary neoplasms is complex and challenging. Major high-volume cancer centers can provide excellent multidisciplinary care of these patients but almost two-thirds of pancreatic cancer patients are treated at low volume centers. There is very little published data from low volume community cancer programs in regards to the treatment of periampullary cancer. In this study, a review of comprehensive periampullary cancer care at two low volume hospitals with comparison to national standards is presented. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 70 consecutive patients with periampullary neoplasms who underwent surgery over a 5-year period (2006–2010) at two community hospitals. Results. There were 51 successful resections of 70 explorations (73%) including 34 Whipple procedures. Mortality rate was 2.9%. Comparison of these patients to national standards was made in terms of operative mortality, resectability rate, administration of adjuvant therapy, clinical trial participation and overall survival. The results in these patients were comparable to national standards. Conclusions. With adequate commitment of resources and experienced surgical and oncologic practitioners, community cancer centers can meet national tertiary care standards in terms of pancreatic and periampullary cancer care. PMID:22312532

  14. Compliance with the standards for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia by nurses in the intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiede Masomeh Tabaeian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common infection in the intensive care unit, and has many side effects such as increased mortality, increased length of hospital stay, and increased health costs. This study aimed to evaluate the compliance with the standards for prevention of VAP by nurses in the intensive care units. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 120 nurses in 11 intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Isfahan university of Medical Sciences, Iran, were assessed for 4 months from July to October 2014. The implementation of all measures for the prevention of VAP was investigated through observation and using a checklist. Results: The mean compliance with the standards for the prevention of VAP in the intensive care unit by the nurses was 56.32%; analysis of variance test showed significant difference between the hospitals (P < 0.001. Disposable ventilator circuit was performed for all patients; however, reviewing the patient readiness for separation from the ventilator was not conducted on a daily basis. Conclusions: Compliance with the standards for the prevention of VAP in the intensive care units was relatively acceptable; however, it still requires serious attention by the officials with training and sensitization of nurses in implementing preventive measures, especially through the provision of clinical guidelines and related protocols.

  15. Radiation in pediatric health care: current situation and challenges in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, Maria Gladys R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation exposure to human health has been the topic of much research to date, focusing particularly on children as they are especially vulnerable and have longer life span to develop log term health effects. Taking into account the higher vulnerability of children, prevention of unnecessary radiation exposure is critical in pediatric patients. Issues such as pediatric patient receive a higher dose than necessary has been identified because adult computed tomography (CT) settings are used for children. Assessment of population exposures resulting from medical use of radiation is mainly available in industrialized countries, while in developing countries such as the Philippines, data are scarce. This information is very much scarce in the field of pediatric medical exposures and appropriate national surveys including frequency of pediatric procedures and children doses are still lacking. A broader and more effective participation of the regulatory authorities in such surveys could contribute to children risk assessment. The presentation explains the current situation, approach and challenges in the Philippines in dealing with radiation in pediatric health care. (author)

  16. [Current status and future of telemonitoring : Scenarios for telemedical care in 2025].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel-Schultz, Bettina; Schultz, Carsten; Helms, Thomas M

    2017-09-01

    Telemonitoring is an already realized implementation of digital transformation in the healthcare system. It has the potential to support and secure a sustainable and comprehensive provision of healthcare for a rising number of chronically ill patients, e. g. patients with chronic heart failure. Remote regions in particular can profit from the benefits of telemonitoring; however, so far telemonitoring services have not become truly established in the German healthcare market. Together with experts from politics, science and practice, a scenario analysis "Health Care System 2025 - A Place for Telemonitoring?" was carried out with the aim to examine the future development of the healthcare market and to draw conclusions for providers of telemonitoring services or devices. The scenario analysis contained two workshops and an expert survey and was supported by a scenario software. The current drivers and barriers of the diffusion of telemonitoring were identified and the most relevant factors that influence the future development of the healthcare market were discussed. Based on those influencing factors, three different scenarios were determined: (1) administrating rather than shaping, (2) safely into the future and (3) interconnected and digital world. In the subsequent consequence analysis activities were defined, which describe the necessary infrastructure, software instruments, organizational structures and provision of services and discuss possible activities, which prepare telemonitoring solutions for the future.

  17. A wearable point-of-care system for home use that incorporates plug-and-play and wireless standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu; Schmitz, Ryan; Warren, Steve

    2005-09-01

    A point-of-care system for continuous health monitoring should be wearable, easy to use, and affordable to promote patient independence and facilitate acceptance of new home healthcare technology. Reconfigurability, interoperability, and scalability are important. Standardization supports these requirements, and encourages an open market where lower product prices result from vendor competition. This paper first discusses candidate standards for wireless communication, plug-and-play device interoperability, and medical information exchange in point-of-care systems. It then addresses the design and implementation of a wearable, plug-and-play system for home care which adopts the IEEE 1073 Medical Information Bus (MIB) standards, and uses Bluetooth as the wireless communication protocol. This standards-based system maximizes user mobility by incorporating a three-level architecture populated by base stations, wearable data loggers, and wearable sensors. Design issues include the implementation of the MIB standards on microcontroller-driven embedded devices, low power consumption, wireless data exchange, and data storage and transmission in a reconfigurable body-area network.

  18. Standard of care of erectile dysfunction in U.S. Air Force aircrew and active duty not on flying status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Justin B

    2014-11-01

    In 2011, over 3,000 active duty U.S. Air Force (USAF) members were prescribed a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI). PDEIs are first-line therapy for treating erectile dysfunction and can have significant side effects that could impact aircrew performance. In total, 200 eligible subject records were randomly sampled from the active duty USAF population of those males filling a prescription for a PDEI in June 2011; 100 of those records were from aviators. The electronic records were reviewed and scored to determine if USAF aeromedical standards for prescribing PDEIs were followed, with a minimum score of 0 for no standards met and a maximum of 3 for all standards met. The average score for both groups was 1, with no significant difference between the group scores. A proper aeromedical disposition was documented in 67% of the aviator records. Although there was no significant difference in standard of care for aviators and nonaviators, the overall documented standard of care was poor. Lack of documentation was the primary reason for the low scores and the low percentage of properly rendered aeromedical dispositions. Proper medical record documentation is important for evaluating quality of care and ensuring compliance with regulations in an Air Force aviator population. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. A before and after study of medical students' and house staff members' knowledge of ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards on an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Samantha P; Cohen, Victor; Nelson, Marcia; Likourezos, Antonios; Goldman, William; Paris, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) comprehensive set of quality assessment tools for ill older persons is a standard designed to measure overall care delivered to vulnerable elders (ie, those aged > or =65 years) at the level of a health care system or plan. The goal of this research was to quantify the pretest and posttest results of medical students and house staff participating in a pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention that focused on the ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards. This was a before and after study assessing the knowledge ofACOVE standards following exposure to an educational intervention led by a pharmacotherapist. It was conducted at the 29-bed Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit of Maimonides Medical Center, a 705-bed, independent teaching hospital located in Brooklyn, New York. Participants included all medical students and house staff completing a rotation on the ACE unit from August 2004 through May 2005 who completed both the pre-and posttests. A pharmacotherapist provided a 1-hour active learning session reviewing the evidence supporting the quality indicators and reviewed case-based questions with the medical students and house staff. Educational interventions also occurred daily through pharmacotherapeutic consultations and during work rounds. Medical students and house staff were administered the same 15-question, patient-specific, case-based, multiple-choice pre-and posttest to assess knowledge of the standards before and after receiving the intervention. A total of 54 medical students and house staff (median age, 28.58 years; 40 men, 14 women) completed the study. Significantly higher median scores were achieved on the multiple-choice test after the intervention than before (median scores, 14/15 [93.3%] vs 12/15 [80.0%], respectively; P = 0.001). A pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention improved the scores of medical students and house staff on a test evaluating knowledge of evidence

  20. Sublingual misoprostol versus standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in five sub-Saharan African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shochet Tara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low-resource settings, where abortion is highly restricted and self-induced abortions are common, access to post-abortion care (PAC services, especially treatment of incomplete terminations, is a priority. Standard post-abortion care has involved surgical intervention but can be hard to access in these areas. Misoprostol provides an alternative to surgical intervention that could increase access to abortion care. We sought to gather additional evidence regarding the efficacy of 400 mcg of sublingual misoprostol vs. standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in the environments where need for economical non-surgical treatments may be most useful. Methods A total of 860 women received either sublingual misoprostol or standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in a multi-site randomized trial. Women with confirmed incomplete abortion, defined as past or present history of vaginal bleeding during pregnancy and an open cervical os, were eligible to participate. Participants returned for follow-up one week later to confirm clinical status. If abortion was incomplete at that time, women were offered an additional follow-up visit or immediate surgical evacuation. Results Both misoprostol and surgical evacuation are highly effective treatments for incomplete abortion (misoprostol: 94.4%, surgical: 100.0%. Misoprostol treatment resulted in a somewhat lower chance of success than standard surgical practice (RR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.89-0.92. Both tolerability of side effects and women’s satisfaction were similar in the two study arms. Conclusion Misoprostol, much easier to provide than surgery in low-resource environments, can be used safely, successfully, and satisfactorily for treatment of incomplete abortion. Focus should shift to program implementation, including task-shifting the provision of post-abortion care to mid- and low- level providers, training and assurance of drug availability. Trial

  1. Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care in Singapore: Current Challenges and Future Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiley Wei-Jen Loh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a relatively young nation, Singapore has established itself as a leading multifaceted medical hub, both regionally and globally. Although Singapore continues to pursue excellence in oncology care, cancer supportive care and survivorship care remain in the infancy stage. In an effort to advance this important aspect of oncology care in Singapore, the first cancer supportive and survivorship care forum was held in December 2016, involving 74 oncology practitioners. The primary goals of this forum were to raise awareness of the importance of cancer supportive and survivorship care and to provide a platform for oncology practitioners of diverse backgrounds to converge and address the challenges associated with the delivery of cancer supportive and survivorship care in Singapore. Key challenges identified during this forum included, but were not limited to, care fragmentation in an oncologist-centric model of care, poor integration of allied health and rehabilitation services, passive engagement of community partners, lack of specialized skill sets and knowledge in supportive and survivorship care, and patient-related barriers such as poor health literacy. The survivorship care model commonly used in Singapore places an imbalanced emphasis on surveillance for cancer recurrence and second primary cancers, with little attention given to the supportive and survivorship needs of the survivors. In summary, these challenges set the stage for the development and use of a more survivor-centric model, one that focuses not only on cancer surveillance, but also on the broad and unique physical and psychosocial needs of survivors of cancer in Singapore.

  2. Cost Utility of Omalizumab Compared with Standard of Care for the Treatment of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jonathan; McBride, Doreen; Stull, Donald; Halliday, Anna; Alexopoulos, Stamatia Theodora; Balp, Maria-Magdalena; Griffiths, Matthew; Agirrezabal, Ion; Zuberbier, Torsten; Brennan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) negatively impacts patient quality of life and productivity and is associated with considerable indirect costs to society. The aim of this study was to assess the cost utility of add-on omalizumab treatment compared with standard of care (SOC) in moderate or severe CSU patients with inadequate response to SOC, from the UK societal perspective. A Markov model was developed, consisting of health states based on Urticaria Activity Score over 7 days (UAS7) and additional states for relapse, spontaneous remission and death. Model cycle length was 4 weeks, and total model time horizon was 20 years in the base case. The model considered early discontinuation of non-responders (response: UAS7 ≤6) and retreatment upon relapse (relapse: UAS7 ≥16) for responders. Clinical and cost inputs were derived from omalizumab trials and published sources, and cost utility was expressed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Scenario analyses included no early discontinuation of non-responders and an altered definition of response (UAS7 omalizumab was associated with increased costs and benefits relative to SOC. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis supported this result. Productivity inputs were key model drivers, and individual scenarios without early discontinuation of non-responders and adjusted response definitions had little impact on results. ICERs were generally robust to changes in key model parameters and inputs. In this, the first economic evaluation of omalizumab in CSU from a UK societal perspective, omalizumab consistently represented a treatment option with societal benefit for CSU in the UK across a range of scenarios.

  3. Severe neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus successfully treated with rituximab: an alternative to standard of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chessa E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Elisabetta Chessa, Matteo Piga, Alberto Floris, Alessandro Mathieu, Alberto Cauli Rheumatology Unit, University Clinic AOU of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: Demyelinating syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (DS-SLE is a rare encephalomyelitis burden with a high risk of disability and death. We report on a 49-year-old Caucasian woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE complicated by severe cognitive dysfunction, brainstem disease, cranial nerve palsies, weakness and numbness in limbs and multiple discrete magnetic resonance imaging (MRI areas of damage within the white matter of semioval centers, temporal lobe, external capsule, claustrum, subinsular regions and midbrain. She also had multiple mononeuritis diagnosed through sensory and motor nerve conduction study. She was diagnosed with severe DS-SLE prominently involving the brain and was treated with 500 mg methylprednisolone (PRE pulses for 3 consecutive days, followed by one single pulse of 500 mg cyclophosphamide, and 1 g rituximab, which was then repeated 14 days later. PRE 25 mg/day, rapidly tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 6 months, and mycophenolate mofetil 1 g/day were prescribed as maintenance therapy. She had progressive and sustained improvement in neurological symptoms with almost complete resolution of brain MRI lesions after 1 year. B-cell depleting therapy could be considered as a possible alternative to standard of care in the management of severe inflammatory neuropsychiatric SLE but it should be associated with a conventional immunosuppressant as maintenance treatment to reduce the risk of flare and reduce corticosteroids dose. Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus, neuropsychiatric lupus, rituximab, demyelinating syndrome, brain MRI

  4. Paediatric end-of-life care needs in Switzerland: current practices, and perspectives from parents and professionals. A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstraesser, Eva; Zimmermann, Karin; Eskola, Katri; Luck, Patricia; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Cignacco, Eva

    2015-08-01

    To present a protocol for a multi-phase study about the current practice of end-of-life care in paediatric settings in Switzerland. In Switzerland, paediatric palliative care is usually provided by teams, who may not necessarily have specific training. There is a lack of systematic data about specific aspects of care at the end of a child's life, such as symptom management, involvement of parents in decision-making and family-centred care and experiences and needs of parents, and perspectives of healthcare professionals. This retrospective nationwide multicentre study, Paediatric End-of-LIfe CAre Needs in Switzerland (PELICAN), combines quantitative and qualitative methods of enquiry. The PELICAN study consists of three observational parts, PELICAN I describes practices of end-of-life care (defined as the last 4 weeks of life) in the hospital and home care setting of children (0-18 years) who died in the years 2011-2012 due to a cardiac, neurological or oncological disease, or who died in the neonatal period. PELICAN II assesses the experiences and needs of parents during the end-of-life phase of their child. PELICAN III focuses on healthcare professionals and explores their perspectives concerning the provision of end-of-life care. This first study across Switzerland will provide comprehensive insight into the current end-of-life care in children with distinct diagnoses and the perspectives of affected parents and health professionals. The results may facilitate the development and implementation of programmes for end-of-life care in children across Switzerland, building on real experiences and needs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01983852. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieleninik, Łucja; Geretsegger, Monika; Mössler, Karin; Assmus, Jörg; Thompson, Grace; Gattino, Gustavo; Elefant, Cochavit; Gottfried, Tali; Igliozzi, Roberta; Muratori, Filippo; Suvini, Ferdinando; Kim, Jinah; Crawford, Mike J.; Odell-Miller, Helen; Oldfield, Amelia; Casey, Órla; Finnemann, Johanna; Carpente, John; Park, A-La; Grossi, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Importance Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. Objective To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Design, Setting, and Participants Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Interventions Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents’ concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child’s focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Results Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14

  6. [LONG-TERM SURVIVAL OF DUAL DISORDERS PATIENTS AFTER MIXED CARE IN DUAL DISORDERS AND STANDARD WARDS VERSUS CARE ONLY IN DUAL DISORDERS WARD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelfarb, Yuri; Wolf, Aviva; Ben-Tzarfati, Mashit

    2017-01-01

    Dual disorders (co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders in the same person) are extremely common among patients receiving mental health services. Integrated treatment has been proposed as the standard of care and it describes a flexible combination of treatments from the mental health and addiction fields that are blended together in the therapy. Scientific evidence for survival of dual disorders patients (DDPs), who had integrated dual disorders inpatient care, is lacking. To determine the long term survival rates following integrated care (Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment Ward [IDDTW] only) versus mixed care (IDDTW and psychiatric wards) during the life-time of DDPs. The charts of 333 subjects admitted to IDDTW during the period January 2002 - June 2006 were assessed at least 8 years after the first admission. Psychiatric diagnoses have been established and grouped according to international classification of diseases and health-related problems -10th edition (ICD-10). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the cumulative survival rates in all the subpopulations, and the predictive values of different variables were assessed by Cox proportional-hazards regression model. The total all-cause 12-year, unadjusted mortality was 21.1% in integrated care versus 24.6% in mixed care (pintegrated care as a predictive factor for all-cause mortality. The findings showed that there was no consistent evidence to support integrated inpatient care over mixed care, as measured by long-term survival. More studies are required in order to address the challenges posed in the treatment of DDPs.

  7. Current prevention and control of health care-associated infections in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Naoko; Sakon, Naomi; Komano, Jun; Tomono, Kazunori; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2018-05-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly are vulnerable to health care-associated infections. However, compared to medical institutions, long-term care facilities for the elderly lag behind in health care-associated infection control and prevention. We conducted a epidemiologic study to clarify the current status of infection control in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Japan. A questionnaire survey on the aspects of infection prevention and control was developed according to SHEA/APIC guidelines and was distributed to 617 long-term care facilities for the elderly in the province of Osaka during November 2016 and January 2017. The response rate was 16.9%. The incidence rates of health care-associated infection outbreaks and residents with health care-associated infections were 23.4 per 100 facility-years and 0.18 per 1,000 resident-days, respectively. Influenza and acute gastroenteritis were reported most frequently. Active surveillance to identify the carrier of multiple drug-resistant organisms was not common. The overall compliance with 21 items selected from the SHEA/APIC guidelines was approximately 79.2%. All facilities had infection control manuals and an assigned infection control professional. The economic burdens of infection control were approximately US$ 182.6 per resident-year during fiscal year 2015. Importantly, these data implied that physicians and nurses were actively contributed to higher SHEA/APIC guideline compliance rates and the advancement of infection control measures in long-term care facilities for the elderly. Key factors are discussed to further improve the infection control in long-term care facilities for the elderly, particularly from economic and social structural standpoints. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic Modeling in Pathologic N1 Breast Cancer Without Elective Nodal Irradiation After Current Standard Systemic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won Ho; Im, Young-Hyuck; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Cho, Eun Yoon

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to establish a prognostic model in patients with pathologic N1 (pN1) breast cancer who have not undergone elective nodal irradiation (ENI) under the current standard management and to suggest possible indications for ENI. We performed a retrospective study with patients with pN1 breast cancer who received the standard local and preferred adjuvant chemotherapy treatment without neoadjuvant chemotherapy and ENI from January 2005 to June 2011. Most of the indicated patients received endocrine and trastuzumab therapy. In 735 enrolled patients, the median follow-up period was 58.4 months (range, 7.2-111.3 months). Overall, 55 recurrences (7.4%) developed, and locoregional recurrence was present in 27 patients (3.8%). Recurrence-free survival was significantly related to lymphovascular invasion (P = .04, hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.88), histologic grade (P = .03, HR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.05-6.26), and nonluminal A subtype (P = .02, HR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.23-7.49) in multivariate analysis. The prognostic model was established by these 3 prognostic factors. Recurrence-free survival was less than 90% at 5 years in cases with 2 or 3 factors. The prognostic model has stratified risk groups in pN1 breast cancer without ENI. Patients with 2 or more factors should be considered for ENI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Palliative care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a review of current international guidelines and initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, Peter; Oliver, David; Stodart, James; van den Berg, Leonard; Simmons, Zachary; O Brannagáin, Doiminic; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Hardiman, Orla

    2011-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative condition. Optimal management requires a palliative approach from diagnosis with emphasis on patient autonomy, dignity and quality of life. To conduct a systematic analysis of the type, level and timing of specialist palliative care intervention in ALS. Despite an international consensus that ALS management should adopt a multidisciplinary approach, integration of palliative care into ALS management varies considerably across health care systems. Late referral to palliative services in ALS is not uncommon and may impact negatively on the quality of life of ALS patients and their caregivers. However, common themes and principles of engagement can be identified across different jurisdictions, and measurement systems have been established that can assess the impact of palliative care intervention. There is considerable evidence that palliative care intervention improves quality of life in patients and carers. International consensus guidelines would assist in the development of a framework for active palliative care engagement in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Paediatric cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Over recent decades, specialized paediatric cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, paediatric and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated paediatric cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for paediatric cardiac patients in mixed paediatric or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with paediatric cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy paediatric cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of paediatric intensive care or paediatric cardiac intensive care, any paediatric cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized paediatric intensive care unit'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical Process Improvement: Impact of a Standardized Care Model With Electronic Decision Support to Improve Compliance With SCIP Inf-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David J; Thompson, Jeffrey E; Suri, Rakesh; Prinsen, Sharon K

    2014-01-01

    The absence of standardization in surgical care process, exemplified in a "solution shop" model, can lead to unwarranted variation, increased cost, and reduced quality. A comprehensive effort was undertaken to improve quality of care around indwelling bladder catheter use following surgery by creating a "focused factory" model within the cardiac surgical practice. Baseline compliance with Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9, removal of urinary catheter by the end of surgical postoperative day 2, was determined. Comparison of baseline data to postintervention results showed clinically important reductions in the duration of indwelling bladder catheters as well as marked reduction in practice variation. Following the intervention, Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9 guidelines were met in 97% of patients. Although clinical quality improvement was notable, the process to accomplish this-identification of patients suitable for standardized pathways, protocol application, and electronic systems to support the standardized practice model-has potentially greater relevance than the specific clinical results. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  12. Using intranet-based order sets to standardize clinical care and prepare for computerized physician order entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, John E; Brower, Kathleen; Ellis, Rosemary; Brown, Shirley

    2004-07-01

    The high cost of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and physician resistance to standardized care have delayed implementation. An intranet-based order set system can provide some of CPOE's benefits and offer opportunities to acculturate physicians toward standardized care. INTRANET CLINICIAN ORDER FORMS (COF): The COF system at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) allows caregivers to enter and print orders through the intranet at points of care and to access decision support resources. Work on COF began in March 2000 with transfer of 25 MUSC paper-based order set forms to an intranet site. Physician groups developed additional order sets, which number more than 200. Web traffic increased progressively during a 24-month period, peaking at more than 6,400 hits per month to COF. Decision support tools improved compliance with Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services core indicators. Clinicians demonstrated a willingness to develop and use order sets and decision support tools posted on the COF site. COF provides a low-cost method for preparing caregivers and institutions to adopt CPOE and standardization of care. The educational resources, relevant links to external resources, and communication alerts will all link to CPOE, thereby providing a head start in CPOE implementation.

  13. The current status of bereavement follow-up in hospice and palliative care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, T; Akabayashi, A; Nishitateno, K

    2002-03-01

    In order to explore the implementation of bereavement care in hospice/palliative care settings in Japan, a self-administered questionnaire was sent to all 54 government-approved hospice/palliative care units (PCUs) in May of 1999 (recovery rate 93%). Results showed that bereavement follow-up is performed in 37 institutes (74%) and memorial cards and services are most frequently provided. Memorial cards are provided mainly by nurses, and memorial services involve many health care professionals as well as volunteers. Religious workers tended to be involved in memorial services and social group meetings. Individually oriented interventions such as telephone contacts, personal visits and personal counselling were reportedly used less often. The need for individual-oriented programmes was recognized, and many institutes were considering the expansion of their programmes to include them. However, the difficulties of implementing such care at hospice/PCUs were also raised. Two socio-cultural factors possibly affecting bereavement care in Japan, namely, the roles of family and religious (Buddhist) ceremonies were discussed. It was pointed out that the spirit of bereavement care may be embodied in existing religious ceremonies. We conclude that it is necessary to develop bereavement care programmes based on common, basic hospice care tenets while making full use of existing local resources and taking into account regional values.

  14. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-11-01

    The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for reducing the impact of recurring errors in the

  15. Child obesity prevention in primary health care: investigating practice nurse roles, attitudes and current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alison; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Laws, Rachel; Harris, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity affects approximately 20% of Australian pre-schoolers. The general practice nurse (PN) workforce has increased in recent years; however, little is known of PN capacity and potential to provide routine advice for the prevention of child obesity. This mixed methods pilot study aims to explore the current practices, attitudes, confidence and training needs of Australian PNs surrounding child obesity prevention in the general practice setting. PNs from three Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales were invited to complete a questionnaire investigating PN roles, attitudes and practices in preventive care with a focus on child obesity. A total of 59 questionnaires were returned (response rate 22%). Semi-structured qualitative interviews were also conducted with a subsample of PNs (n = 10). Questionnaire respondent demographics were similar to that of national PN data. PNs described preventive work as enjoyable despite some perceived barriers including lack of confidence. Number of years working in general practice did not appear to strongly influence nurses' perceived barriers. Seventy per cent of PNs were interested in being more involved in conducting child health checks in practice, and 85% expressed an interest in taking part in child obesity prevention training. Findings from this pilot study suggest that PNs are interested in prevention of child obesity despite barriers to practice and low confidence levels. More research is needed to determine the effect of training on PN confidence and behaviours in providing routine healthy life-style messages for the prevention of child obesity. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Huntington's disease: current epidemiology and pharmacological management in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Catherine; Hoppitt, Thomas J; Calvert, Melanie; Gill, Paramjit; Eaton, Benjamin; Yao, Guiqing; Pall, Hardev

    2011-01-01

    Recent debate suggests Huntington's disease (HD) may be more prevalent than previously reported. In addition, relatively little is known about current disease management. This study aims to provide epidemiological data and describe the pharmacological management of HD in the United Kingdom. A primary care research database was accessed to identify incident and prevalent HD cases between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008. Patients with Read codes denoting a definite diagnosis or possible diagnosis, and undiagnosed patients with a positive family history were identified. A subset of patients with a definite diagnosis and prescribed medication indicating symptom onset was also identified. Epidemiological data were estimated. Pharmacological prescriptions to HD patients from 2004 to 2008 were identified, and prescription frequencies were grouped according to the British National Formulary categories. HD incidence estimates ranged from 0.44 to 0.78 per 100,000 person-years, and HD prevalence ranged from 5.96 to 6.54 per 100,000 of the population. Forty-four percent of pharmacological prescriptions targeted the central nervous system. Nearly half of the HD patients were prescribed antidepressants, and over 40% were prescribed analgesics. Although prevalence estimates fell short of figures suggested in recent debate, it is feasible that the true prevalence may be much higher than previously reported. Pharmacological management appears to rely heavily on central nervous system drugs and nutrition support. Many of these drugs are prescribed to HD patients for reasons other than the medication's primary use. Further work is required to evaluate the impact of alternative management strategies, such as therapist intervention, counselling, and organisation support, on the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Achieving transparency in carbon labelling for construction materials – Lessons from current assessment standards and carbon labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Peng; Low, Sui Pheng; Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of international GHG standards is reviewed. • The evolution of international carbon labelling schemes is reviewed. • The transparency requirements in carbon labelling schemes are revealed. • Key recommendations are provided to improve transparency in carbon labelling. - Abstract: The construction industry is one of the largest sources of carbon emissions. Manufacturing of raw materials, such as cement, steel and aluminium, is energy intensive and has considerable impact on carbon emissions level. Due to the rising recognition of global climate change, the industry is under pressure to reduce carbon emissions. Carbon labelling schemes are therefore developed as meaningful yardsticks to measure and compare carbon emissions. Carbon labelling schemes can help switch consumer-purchasing habits to low-carbon alternatives. However, such switch is dependent on a transparent scheme. The principle of transparency is highlighted in all international greenhouse gas (GHG) standards, including the newly published ISO 14067: Carbon footprint of products – requirements and guidelines for quantification and communication. However, there are few studies which systematically investigate the transparency requirements in carbon labelling schemes. A comparison of five established carbon labelling schemes, namely the Singapore Green Labelling Scheme, the CarbonFree (the U.S.), the CO 2 Measured Label and the Reducing CO 2 Label (UK), the CarbonCounted (Canada), and the Hong Kong Carbon Labelling Scheme is therefore conducted to identify and investigate the transparency requirements. The results suggest that the design of current carbon labels have transparency issues relating but not limited to the use of a single sign to represent the comprehensiveness of the carbon footprint. These transparency issues are partially caused by the flexibility given to select system boundary in the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to measure GHG emissions. The

  18. A standardized perioperative surgical site infection care process among children with stoma closure: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Juan; Bracho-Blanchet, Eduardo; Tovilla-Mercado, Jose; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Nieto-Zermeño, Jaime; Davila-Perez, Roberto; Teyssier-Morales, Gustavo; Lule-Dominguez, Martha

    2008-10-01

    We report on the effectiveness of a standardized perioperative care process for lowering surgical site infection (SSI) rates among children with stoma closure at a tertiary-care public pediatric teaching hospital in Mexico City. All consecutive children with stoma closure operated on between November 2003 and October 2005 were prospectively followed for 30 days postoperatively. We conducted a before-after study to evaluate standardized perioperative bowel- and abdominal-wall care process results on SSI rates. Seventy-one patients were operated on, and all completed follow-up. SSI rates declined from 42.8% (12/28) before to 13.9% (6/43) after the standardization procedure (relative risk (RR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-7.2; p = 0.006). SSI independently associated risk factors comprised peristomal skin inflammation >3 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 9.6; 95% CI = 1.8-49.6; p = 0.007) and intraoperative complications (OR = 13.3; 95% CI = 1.4-127.2; p = 0.02). Being operated on during the after-study period was shown to be a protective factor against SSI (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.4-0.97; p = 0.04). Standardization was able to reduce SSI rates threefold in children with stoma closure in a short period of time.

  19. Medical Device Connectivity Challenges Outline the Technical Requirements and Standards For Promoting Big Data Research and Personalized Medicine in Neurocritical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Anna; Smielewski, Peter; Rosenthal, Eric; Moberg, Dick

    2018-03-01

    Brain injuries are complicated medical problems and their management requires data from disparate sources to extract actionable information. In neurocritical care, interoperability is lacking despite the perceived benefits. Several efforts have been underway, but none have been widely adopted, underscoring the difficulty of achieving this goal. We have identified the current pain points of data collection and integration based on the experience with two large multi-site clinical studies: Transforming Research And Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) in the United States and Collaborative European Neuro Trauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) in Europe. The variability of measurements across sites remains a barrier to uniform data collection. We found a need for annotation standards and for a standardized archive format for high-resolution data. Overall, the hidden cost for successful data collection was initially underestimated.Although the use of bedside data integration solutions, such as the Moberg's Component Neuromonitoring System (Moberg Research, Inc., Ambler, PA, USA) or ICM+ software (Cambridge Enterprise, Cambridge, UK), facilitated the homogenous collection of synchronized data, there remain issues that need to be addressed by the neurocritical care community. To this end, we have organized a Working Group on Neurocritical Care Informatics, whose next step is to create an overarching informatics framework that takes advantage of the collected information to answer scientific questions and to accelerate the translation of trial results to actions benefitting military medicine.

  20. Evidence-based health care: development and audit of a clinical standard for research and its impact on an NHS trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Claire; Bullock, Ian

    2005-04-01

    Working within a modern National Health Service in the United Kingdom, the place for research and its dissemination is increasingly important. The organization of this within each National Health Service (NHS) Trust is challenging but nevertheless essential. If health care professionals are to be empowered to adopt an evidence-based approach in both the planning and delivery of care, research aware employees are crucial. This paper highlights the importance of NHS hospital trusts implementing initiatives that will facilitate this process. One such initiative has been the development and survey of a clinical standard for research. The primary development aim was to provide a benchmark standard for all nursing research. The standard was developed to fit within the current dynamic quality improvement (DQI) programme and has directly contributed to an evolving culture of research by shaping nurses' awareness, and offering a support and consultancy network within the Trust. The standard is one aspect of a research awareness programme, with the primary objective of providing guidance and education whilst developing nurses throughout the research process. The planned strategic outcome is to see a positive outcome on the quality of research in the Trust. A baseline survey was conducted to provide a definitive snap shot of research understanding and practice within the Trust following the introduction of the research standard. The standard was developed by a team of clinicians led by a member of the quality team, to ensure that it fitted the DQI structure, and a member of the Nursing Research Unit (NRU). The standard was distributed to every clinical area and 192 nurses were surveyed to evaluate its impact on their awareness of educational opportunities, their use of the consultancy and support service, their use of other support services, their research utilization and research quality. The survey demonstrated that the implementation of the standard had increased awareness

  1. Current experiences and educational preferences of general practitioners and staff caring for people with dementia living in residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Christopher; Horner, Barbara; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Scherer, Samuel; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Bretland, Nick; Flett, Penelope; Schaper, Frank; Flicker, Leon

    2009-08-12

    Residential care is important for older adults, particularly for those with advanced dementia and their families. Education interventions that achieve sustainable improvement in the care of older adults are critical to quality care. There are few systematic data available regarding the educational needs of Residential Care Facility (RCF) staff and General Practitioners (GPs) relating to dementia, or the sustainability of educational interventions. We sought to determine participation in dementia education, perceived levels of current knowledge regarding dementia, perceived unmet educational needs, current barriers, facilitators and preferences for dementia education. A mixed methods study design was utilised. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of general practitioners, and staff in 223 consecutive residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Responses were received from 102 RCF staff working in 10 facilities (out of 33 facilities who agreed to distribute the survey) and 202 GPs (19% of metropolitan GPs). Quantitative survey data were summarised descriptively and chi squared statistics were used to analyse the distribution of categorical variables. Qualitative data were collected from general practitioners, staff in residential care facilities and family carers of people with dementia utilizing individual interviews, surveys and focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Among RCF staff and GPs attending RCF, participation in dementia education was high, and knowledge levels generally perceived as good. The individual experiences and needs of people with dementia and their families were emphasised. Participants identified the need for a person centred philosophy to underpin educational interventions. Limited time was a frequently mentioned barrier, especially in relation to attending dementia care education. Perceived educational needs relating to behaviours of concern, communication, knowledge regarding dementia, aspects of

  2. Deviation from the Standard of Care for Early Breast Cancer in the Elderly: What are the Consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susie X; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Leung, Anna M

    2015-08-01

    For elderly patients with early-stage breast cancer, the standards of care often are not strictly followed due to either clinician biases or patient preferences. The authors hypothesized that forgoing radiation and lymph node (LN) staging for elderly patients with early-stage breast cancer would have a negative impact on survival. From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database, 53,619 women older than 55 years with stage 1 breast cancer who underwent breast conservation surgery were identified. Analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and outcomes of patients who received the standards of care with LN sampling and radiation and those of patients who did not, with control used for confounders. To account for selection bias from covariate imbalance, propensity score matching was performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Older patients were less likely to receive radiation and LN sampling. These standards of care were associated with improved overall survival rates of 15.8 and 27.1 % after 10 years, respectively (p ≤ 0.0001). This survival advantage persisted after propensity score matching, with a 7.4 % higher survival rate for patients who received radiation and a 16.8 % higher survival rate for those who underwent LN staging (p standard of care for stage 1 breast cancer. Even after controlling for other factors, the study showed that failure to adhere to the standards of LN sampling and radiation therapy may have a negative impact in survival.

  3. Clinical balance assessment: perceptions of commonly-used standardized measures and current practices among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Straus, Sharon E; Inness, Elizabeth L; Salbach, Nancy M; Jaglal, Susan B

    2013-03-20

    Balance impairment is common in multiple clinical populations, and comprehensive assessment is important for identifying impairments, planning individualized treatment programs, and evaluating change over time. However, little information is available regarding whether clinicians who treat balance are satisfied with existing assessment tools. In 2010 we conducted a cross-sectional survey of balance assessment practices among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada, and reported on the use of standardized balance measures (Sibley et al. 2011 Physical Therapy; 91: 1583-91). The purpose of this study was to analyse additional survey data and i) evaluate satisfaction with current balance assessment practices and standardized measures among physiotherapists who treat adult or geriatric populations with balance impairment, and ii) identify factors associated with satisfaction. The questionnaire was distributed to 1000 practicing physiotherapists. This analysis focuses on questions in which respondents were asked to rate their general perceptions about balance assessment, the perceived utility of individual standardized balance measures, whether they wanted to improve balance assessment practices, and why. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics and utility of individual measures was compared across clinical practice areas (orthopaedic, neurological, geriatric or general rehabilitation). The questionnaire was completed by 369 respondents, of which 43.4% of respondents agreed that existing standardized measures of balance meet their needs. In ratings of individual measures, the Single Leg Stance test and Berg Balance Scale were perceived as useful for clinical decision-making and evaluating change over time by over 70% of respondents, and the Timed Up-and-Go test was perceived as useful for decision-making by 56.9% of respondents and useful for evaluating change over time by 62.9% of respondents, but there were significant differences across practice groups. Seventy

  4. Effectiveness of direct-current cardioversion for treatment of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, in particular atrial fibrillation, in surgical intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Andreas; Ritsch, Nicole; Knotzer, Hans; Dünser, Martin; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Ulmer, Hanno; Mutz, Norbert; Hasibeder, Walter

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate primary success rate and effectiveness of direct-current cardioversion in postoperative critically ill patients with new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Prospective intervention study. Twelve-bed surgical intensive care unit in a university teaching hospital. Thirty-seven consecutive, adult surgical intensive care unit patients with new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias without previous history of tachyarrhythmias. Direct-current cardioversion using a monophasic, damped sinus-wave defibrillator. Energy levels used were 50, 100, 200, and 300 J for regular supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (n = 6) and 100, 200, and 360 J for irregular supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (n = 31). None of the patients was hypoxic, hypokalemic, or hypomagnesemic at onset of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. Direct-current cardioversion restored sinus rhythm in 13 of 37 patients (35% primary responders). Most patients responded to the first or second direct-current cardioversion shock. Only one of 25 patients requiring more than two direct-current cardioversion shocks converted into sinus rhythm. Primary responders were significantly younger and demonstrated significant differences in arterial Po2 values at onset of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias compared with nonresponders. At 24 and 48 hrs, only six (16%) and five (13.5%) patients remained in sinus rhythm, respectively. In contrast to recent literature, direct-current cardioversion proved to be an ineffective method for treatment of new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and, in particular, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response in surgical intensive care unit patients.

  5. Twinning rate in a sample from a Brazilian hospital with a high standard of reproductive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Maria Duccini Dal Colletto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Epidemiological studies on twin births have been motivated mostly by the positive correlation between twinning rate and human fertility, prematurity, low birth weight, increased risk of infant death and long term risk for morbidity. OBJECTIVE: This paper intends to estimate the incidence of multiple births in a private hospital in Brazil with a high standard of reproductive care, and to evaluate the effects of maternal age, gestation order and assisted fertilization on twinning rate. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: First-class tertiary private hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: The multiple birth rate was investigated among 7,997 deliveries from 1995 to 1998, including 7,786 singletons, 193 twins, 17 triplets and one quadruplet. RESULTS: The rates per 1,000 dizygotic and monozygotic pairs and for triplets were estimated as 19.51, 4.50 and 2.13, respectively. The dizygotic and triplet rates were the highest observed in Brazil up to the present day. The twinning rate among primigravidae older than 30 years was very high (45.02 per 1,000 and was due to a disproportionately high frequency of dizygotic pairs. The triplet rate was also very high among the mothers of this age group (5.71 per 1,000. These facts are strong indicators that these women were the ones most frequently submitted to assisted reproductive techniques. The mean maternal age of the studied population was about six years higher than that estimated for mothers in the general population of southeastern Brazil. Primigravidae aged under 30 years as well as multigravidae showed similar twinning rates, which were almost 20 per 1,000. Among the deliveries of multigravidae older than 30 years, an unusually high frequency of monozygotic twins was observed (7.04 per 1,000, probably as a consequence of the residual effect of long-term use of oral contraceptives. CONCLUSIONS: The dizygotic twinning rate increased from 13.51 to 28.98 per 1,000 over the four years

  6. Effectiveness of Pelvic Physiotherapy in Children With Functional Constipation Compared With Standard Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelenburg-van Lonkhuyzen, Marieke L; Bols, Esther M J; Benninga, Marc A; Verwijs, Wim A; de Bie, Rob A

    2017-01-01

    Functional constipation (FC) is a common childhood problem often related to pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. We compared the effectiveness of pelvic physiotherapy (PPT) vs standard medical care (SMC) in children with FC. We performed a multicenter randomized controlled trial of 53 children (age, 5-16 y) with FC according to the Rome III criteria, at hospitals in The Netherlands from December 2009 to May 2014. Group allocation was concealed using a central computer system. SMC consisted of education, toilet training, and laxatives (n = 26), whereas PPT included SMC plus specific physiotherapeutic interventions (n = 27). Results were obtained from written reports from the subjects' pediatricians and parents. The primary outcome was absence of FC, according to Rome III criteria, after a 6-month follow-up period. Secondary outcomes were global perceived effect (range, 1-9; success was defined as a score ≥ 8), numeric rating scales assessing quality of life (parent and child; scale, 1-10), and the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ). Treatment was effective for 92.3% of the children receiving PPT and for 63.0% of the children receiving SMC (adjusted odds ratio for success of PPT, 11.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-78.3) (P = .011). Significantly more children undergoing PPT stopped using laxatives (adjusted odds ratio, 6.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-26.4) (P = .009). Treatment success (based on global perceived effect) was achieved for 88.5% of subjects receiving PPT vs 33.3% of subjects receiving SMC) (P children (P = .028). Results from the SDQ did not differ significantly between groups (P = .78). In a randomized controlled trial of children with FC, PPT was more effective than SMC on all outcomes measured, with the exception of findings from the SDQ. PPT should be considered as a treatment option for FC in children 5-16 years old. Dutch Clinical Trial Registration no: NL30551.068.09. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  7. Compliance of child care centers in Pennsylvania with national health and safety performance standards for emergency and disaster preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi; Kapoor, Shawn; Mahmood, Qasim; Way, Emily; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2010-04-01

    To determine the preparedness of child care centers in Pennsylvania to respond to emergencies and disasters based on compliance with National Health and Safety Performance Standards for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs. A questionnaire focusing on the presence of a written evacuation plan, the presence of a written plan for urgent medical care, the immediate availability of equipment and supplies, and the training of staff in first aid/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as delineated in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs, 2nd Edition, was mailed to 1000 randomly selected child care center administrators located in Pennsylvania. Of the 1000 questionnaires sent, 496 questionnaires were available for analysis (54% usable response rate). Approximately 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99%-100%) of child care centers surveyed were compliant with recommendations to have a comprehensive written emergency plan (WEP) for urgent medical care and evacuation, and 85% (95% CI, 82%-88%) practice their WEP periodically throughout the year. More than 20% of centers did not have specific written procedures for floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, blizzards, or bomb threats, and approximately half of the centers did not have specific written procedures for urgent medical emergencies such as severe bleeding, unresponsiveness, poisoning, shock/heart or circulation failure, seizures, head injuries, anaphylaxis or allergic reactions, or severe dehydration. A minority of centers reported having medications available to treat an acute asthma attack or anaphylaxis. Also, 77% (95% CI, 73%-80%) of child care centers require first aid training for each one of its staff members, and 33% (95% CI, 29%-37%) require CPR training. Although many of the child care centers we surveyed are in compliance with the recommendations for emergency and disaster preparedness, specific areas for improvement include increasing the frequency

  8. Medicaid management information systems performance standards: Health Care Financing Administration. Notice with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    This notice contains performance standards (review elements and factors). We are required by section 1903(r)(6)(E) of the Social Security Act to notify all States of proposed procedures, standards, and other requirements at least one quarter prior to the fiscal year in which the procedures, standards, and other requirements will be used for Medicaid Management Information Systems reapproval reviews. This Notice meets that statutory requirements. By October 1, 1981, we will use the performance standards and existing systems requirements when conducting the annual review of State system performance.

  9. Current trends in Canadian health care: myths and misconceptions in health economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyte, P C

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the economic aspects of the trends in Canadian health care. Various myths and misconceptions abound regarding the applicability of economics to behaviour in the health care industry as well as to the interpretation of recent trends. Both issues are examined in this paper. While most discussions regarding health care trends begin with the share of health expenditures in Gross National Product, I propose an alternative share that adjusts for cyclical variations in both unemployment and labour force participation. Using this measure, I show that the "real" growth of resources devoted to the health care industry is much larger than that obtained with conventional measures, and that the difference in growth rates between Canada and the U.S. is narrowed considerably. The paper outlines and disputes the validity of three public health policy propositions. First, it is not empirically valid to say that the introduction of universal medical insurance in Canada successfully contained the growth in the share of society's resources devoted to the health care industry. Second, it is not correct to argue that the change in the federal funding for hospital and medical care in 1977 was a "fiscal non-event". And finally, the proposed "equity" funding formula for Ontario hospitals is unlikely to contain costs and will potentially skew hospitals towards the provision of complex forms of care instead of cost-effective community-based alternatives.

  10. Minimum standard guidelines of care on requirements for setting up a laser room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhepe Niteen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Lasers are now becoming an integral part of dermatological practice in India, with more and more dermatologists starting laser dermatology practice. Lasers, when are used with care, by properly trained operators, in carefully designed environment, can deliver a range of useful aesthetic and dermatologic treatments. Facility: Laser treatment is an office procedure, hence it does not require hospital set-up. The laser room facility requires careful planning keeping in mind safety of both patient and operator, convenience of operating, and optimum handling of costly equipments. The facility should be designed to handle procedures under local anesthesia and sedation. Facilities, staff and equipment to handle any emergencies should be available. Location: A room in existing dermatology clinic can be adequately converted to a laser room. Dimensions of laser room, its door and patient′s table should be such that it should facilitate easy movement of patient, machine trolley, operator and assistant in case of routine procedures and in emergency. Physician Qualification: Any dermatologist with MD or diploma in dermatology can do laser procedures, provided he/ she has acquired necessary skills by virtue of training, observing a competent dermatologist. Such training may be obtained during post graduation or later in specified workshops or courses under a competent dermatologist or at centre which routinely performs such procedures. Electricity and uninterrupted power supply: Laser equipments should be connected to stabilizer or UPS circuits only. Preferably an on line UPS as recommended by the laser company should be installed. Earthing of the equipment is essential to avoid damage to the equipment and electrical shocks to the operator. Sufficient power back up to complete the procedure if power is off midway, is essential. Air-conditioning: Laser machines should be operated in low ambient temperature, with

  11. Palliative care for patients in the USA with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: current challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houseman G

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gail Houseman,1 Mary Kelley2 1The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, ALS Center at Penn Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a motor neuron disease that results in eventual paralysis of all voluntary muscles. Cognitive impairment may be a co-occurring condition with the ALS patient. Palliative care, which involves symptom management, is the most utilized treatment of choice. Managing the symptoms of ALS can be challenging. This paper provides experience-based facts on daily care provision in the USA and some practical guidelines. Keywords: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, palliative care, challenges, symptom management

  12. Evidence-Based Practice Standard Care for Acute Pain Management in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease in an Urgent Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Brathwaite, Ron; Kim, Ook

    Vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) with sickle cell disease (SCD) require opioid treatment. Despite evidence to support rapid pain management within 30 minutes, care for these patients does not consistently meet this benchmark. This quality improvement study sought to decrease the first analgesic administration time, increase patient satisfaction, and expedite patient flow. A prospective pre-/postevaluation design was used to evaluate outcomes with patients 18 years or older with VOEs in an urgent care (UC) center after implementation of evidence-based practice standard care (EBPSC). A pre- and postevaluation survey of SCD patients' satisfaction with care and analogous surveys of the UC team to assess awareness of EBPSC were used. A retrospective review of the electronic medical records of patients with VOEs compared mean waiting time from triage to the first analgesic administration and the mean length of stay (LOS) over 6 months. Implementing EBPSC decreased the mean time of the first analgesic administration (P = .001), significantly increased patient satisfaction (P = .002), and decreased the mean LOS (P = .010). Implementing EBPSC is a crucial step for improving the management of VOEs and creating a positive patient experience. The intervention enhances the quality of care for the SCD population in a UC center.

  13. Mental health care in Nepal : current situation and challenges for development of a district mental health care plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luitel, Nagendra P; Jordans, Mark Jd; Adhikari, Anup; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Hanlon, Charlotte; Lund, Crick; Komproe, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Globally mental health problems are a serious public health concern. Currently four out of five people with severe mental illness in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) receive no effective treatment. There is an urgent need to address this enormous treatment gap. Changing the focus

  14. Achieving universal health care coverage: Current debates in Ghana on covering those outside the formal sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiiro Gilbert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, extending financial protection and equitable access to health services to those outside the formal sector employment is a major challenge for achieving universal coverage. While some favour contributory schemes, others have embraced tax-funded health service cover for those outside the formal sector. This paper critically examines the issue of how to cover those outside the formal sector through the lens of stakeholder views on the proposed one-time premium payment (OTPP policy in Ghana. Discussion Ghana in 2004 implemented a National Health Insurance Scheme, based on a contributory model where service benefits are restricted to those who contribute (with some groups exempted from contributing, as the policy direction for moving towards universal coverage. In 2008, the OTPP system was proposed as an alternative way of ensuring coverage for those outside formal sector employment. There are divergent stakeholder views with regard to the meaning of the one-time premium and how it will be financed and sustained. Our stakeholder interviews indicate that the underlying issue being debated is whether the current contributory NHIS model for those outside the formal employment sector should be maintained or whether services for this group should be tax funded. However, the advantages and disadvantages of these alternatives are not being explored in an explicit or systematic way and are obscured by the considerable confusion about the likely design of the OTPP policy. We attempt to contribute to the broader debate about how best to fund coverage for those outside the formal sector by unpacking some of these issues and pointing to the empirical evidence needed to shed even further light on appropriate funding mechanisms for universal health systems. Summary The Ghanaian debate on OTPP is related to one of the most important challenges facing low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve a universal health care system. It

  15. 77 FR 17219 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... professional trade associations and societies, medical and health care professional entities, health insurance... American Academy of Actuaries. In subpart C of the proposed rule, we proposed to codify in regulation...

  16. 77 FR 70643 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...; laboratory services; preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services... services and chronic disease management; and (10) pediatric services, including oral and vision care. With... pediatric dental coverage, supplement...

  17. Orthopaedic traumatology: fundamental principles and current controversies for the acute care surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Shad K; Schoch, Shawn; Marchand, Lucas; Mirza, Amer

    2018-01-01

    Multiply injured patients with fractures are co-managed by acute care surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons. In most centers, orthopaedic surgeons definitively manage fractures, but preliminary management, including washouts, splinting, reductions, and external fixations, may be performed by selected acute care surgeons. The acute care surgeon should have a working knowledge of orthopaedic terminology to communicate with colleagues effectively. They should have an understanding of the composition of bone, periosteum, and cartilage, and their reaction when there is an injury. Fractures are usually fixed urgently, but some multiply injured patients are better served with a damage control strategy. Extremity compartment syndrome should be suspected in all critically injured patients with or without fractures and a low threshold for compartment pressure measurements or empiric fasciotomy maintained. Acute care surgeons performing rib fracture fixation and other chest wall injury reconstructions should follow the principles of open fracture reduction and stabilization. PMID:29766123

  18. Orthopaedic traumatology: fundamental principles and current controversies for the acute care surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Shad K; Schoch, Shawn; Marchand, Lucas; Mirza, Amer; Mayberry, John

    2018-01-01

    Multiply injured patients with fractures are co-managed by acute care surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons. In most centers, orthopaedic surgeons definitively manage fractures, but preliminary management, including washouts, splinting, reductions, and external fixations, may be performed by selected acute care surgeons. The acute care surgeon should have a working knowledge of orthopaedic terminology to communicate with colleagues effectively. They should have an understanding of the composition of bone, periosteum, and cartilage, and their reaction when there is an injury. Fractures are usually fixed urgently, but some multiply injured patients are better served with a damage control strategy. Extremity compartment syndrome should be suspected in all critically injured patients with or without fractures and a low threshold for compartment pressure measurements or empiric fasciotomy maintained. Acute care surgeons performing rib fracture fixation and other chest wall injury reconstructions should follow the principles of open fracture reduction and stabilization.

  19. Physician payment 2008 for interventionalists: current state of health care policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Giordano, James

    2007-09-01

    Physicians in the United States have been affected by significant changes in the pattern(s) of medical practice evolving over the last several decades. These changes include new measures to 1) curb increasing costs, 2) increase access to patient care, 3) improve quality of healthcare, and 4) pay for prescription drugs. Escalating healthcare costs have focused concerns about the financial solvency of Medicare and this in turn has fostered a renewed interest in the economic basis of interventional pain management practices. The provision and systemization of healthcare in North America and several European countries are difficult enterprises to manage irrespective of whether these provisions and systems are privatized (as in the United States) or nationalized or seminationalized (as in Great Britain, Canada, Australia and France). Consequently, while many management options have been put forth, none seem to be optimally geared toward affording healthcare as a maximized individual and social good, and none have been completely enacted. The current physician fee schedule (released on July 12, 2007) includes a 9.9% cut in payment rate. Since the Medicare program was created in 1965, several methods have been used to determine physicians' rate(s) for each covered service. The sustained growth rate (SGR) system, established in 1998, has evoked negative consequences on physician payment(s). Based on the current Medicare expenditure index, practice expenses are projected to increase by 34.5% from 2002 to 2016, whereas, if actual practice inflation is considered, this increase will be 90%. This is in contrast to projected physician payment cuts that are depicted to be 51%. No doubt, this scenario will be devastating to many practices and the US medical community at large. Resolutions to this problem have been offered by MedPAC, the Government Accountability Office, physician organizations, economists, and various other interested groups. In the past, temporary measures have

  20. The Wound CARE Instrument: the process for developing standards for wound management education and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsted, Heather L; Woodbury, M Gail; Stevenson, Kimberly

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the collaborative process undertaken by the Canadian Association for Enterostomal Therapy and the Canadian Association of Wound Care in an effort to improve the quality of wound prevention and management education and programming. The end result of this process is the Wound CARE Instrument which promotes an interprofessional, collaborative appraisal process to support the development, adoption or adaption of wound management educational events and programs. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  1. Does a trade-off between current reproductive success and survival affect the honesty of male signalling in species with male parental care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, N B; Alonzo, S H

    2010-11-01

    Recent theory predicted that male advertisement will reliably signal investment in paternal care in species where offspring survival requires paternal care and males allocate resources between advertisement and care. However, the predicted relationship between care and advertisement depended on the marginal gains from investment in current reproductive traits. Life history theory suggests that these fitness gains are also subject to a trade-off between current and future reproduction. Here, we investigate whether male signalling remains a reliable indicator of parental care when males allocate resources between current advertisement, paternal care and survival to future reproduction. We find that advertisement is predicted to remain a reliable signal of male care but that advertisement may cease to reliably indicate male quality because low-quality males are predicted to invest in current reproduction, whereas higher-quality males are able to invest in both current reproduction and survival to future reproduction. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Integrated primary health care in Greece, a missing issue in the current health policy agenda: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Lionis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past years, Greece has undergone several endeavors aimed at modernizing and improving national health care services with a focus on PHC. However, the extent to which integrated primary health care has been achieved is still questioned. Purpose: This paper explores the extent to which integrated primary health care (PHC is an issue in the current agenda of policy makers in Greece, reporting constraints and opportunities and highlighting the need for a policy perspective in developing integrated PHC in this Southern European country. Methods: A systematic review in PubMed/Medline and SCOPUS, along with a hand search in selected Greek biomedical journals was undertaken to identify key papers, reports, editorials or opinion letters relevant to integrated health care. Results: Our systematic review identified 198 papers and 161 out of them were derived from electronic search. Fifty-three papers in total served the scope of this review and are shortly reported. A key finding is that the long-standing dominance of medical perspectives in Greek health policy has been paving the way towards vertical integration, pushing aside any discussions about horizontal or comprehensive integration of care. Conclusion: Establishment of integrated PHC in Greece is still at its infancy, requiring major restructuring of the current national health system, as well as organizational culture changes. Moving towards a new policy-based model would bring this missing issue on the discussion table, facilitating further development.

  3. Preparing nursing students for enhanced roles in primary care: The current state of prelicensure and RN-to-BSN education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, Danuta M; Whelan, Ellen Marie

    With the current emphasis on including registered nurses (RNs) on the primary care teams, it is essential that nursing programs prepare students for employment in these settings. This study explored the current state of prelicensure and RN-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) online education regarding the implementation of primary care content in the curricula. A sample of 1,409 schools and/or colleges from across the United States was invited to participate in an online survey. About 529 surveys were returned for an overall response rate of 37.5%. Summative content analysis was used to analyze survey data. Although most respondents have implemented some primary care content, some found it challenging and others have demurred from incorporating primary care content altogether. Nursing leaders and faculty in academia must collaborate with clinical partners to design and expand didactic and clinical learning experiences that emphasize primary care content in the prelicensure and RN-to-BSN education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Current standard rules of combined anteversion prevent prosthetic impingement but ignore osseous contact in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Markus; Woerner, Michael; Craiovan, Benjamin; Voellner, Florian; Worlicek, Michael; Springorum, Hans-Robert; Grifka, Joachim; Renkawitz, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    In this prospective study of 135 patients undergoing cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) we asked whether six current definitions of combined anteversion prevent impingement and increase postoperative patient individual impingement-free range-of-motion (ROM). Implant position was measured by an independent, external institute on 3D-CT performed six weeks post-operatively. Post-operative ROM was calculated using a CT-based algorithm detecting osseous and/or prosthetic impingement by virtual hip movement. Additionally, clinical ROM was evaluated pre-operatively and one-year post-operatively by a blinded observer. Combined component position of cup and stem according to the definitions of Ranawat, Widmer, Dorr, Hisatome and Yoshimine inhibited prosthetic impingement in over 90 %, while combined osseous and prosthetic impingement still occurred in over 40 % of the cases. The recommendations by Jolles, Widmer, Dorr, Yoshimine and Hisatome enabled higher flexion (p ≤ 0.001) and internal rotation (p ≤ 0.006). Clinically, anteversion rules of Widmer and Yoshimine provided one-year post-operatively statistically but not clinically relevant higher internal rotation (p ≤0.034). Standard rules of combined anteversion detect prosthetic but fail to prevent combined osseous and prosthetic impingement in THA. Future models will have to account for the patient-individual anatomic situation to ensure impingement-free ROM.

  5. Chapter 1. Introduction. Recommendations and standard operating procedures for intensive care unit and hospital preparations for an influenza epidemic or mass disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprung, Charles L.; Cohen, Robert; Adini, Bruria; Christian, Michael D.; Camargo, Ruben; Ceraso, Daniel; Azoulay, Elie; Duguet, Alexandre; Guery, Benoit; Reinhart, Konrad; Barlavie, Yaron; Benin-Goren, Odeda; Klein, Motti; Leoniv, Yuval; Margalit, Gila; Rubinovitch, Bina; Sonnenblick, Moshe; Steinberg, Avraham; Weissman, Charles; Wolff, Donna; Kesecioglu, Jozef; de Jong, Menno; Moreno, Rui; An, Youzhong; Du, Bin; Joynt, Gavin M.; Colvin, John; Loo, Shi; Richards, Guy; Artigas, Antonio; Pugin, Jerome; Amundson, Dennis; Devereaux, Asha; Beigel, John; Danis, Marion; Farmer, Chris; Hick, John L.; Maki, Dennis; Masur, Henry; Rubinson, Lewis; Sandrock, Christian; Talmor, Daniel; Truong, Robert; Zimmerman, Janice; Brett, Steve; Montgomery, Hugh; Rhodes, Andrew; Sanderson, Frances; Taylor, Bruce; Monrgomery, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    In December 2007, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine established a Task Force to develop standard operating procedures (SOPs) for operating intensive care units (ICU) during an influenza epidemic or mass disaster. To provide direction for health care professionals in the preparation and

  6. Unravelling current sexual care in chronic kidney disease: perspective of social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ek, Gaby F; Keurhorst, Dirry; Krouwel, Esmée M; Nicolai, Melianthe P J; Den Ouden, Marjolein E M; Elzevier, Henk W; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C M; Den Oudsten, Brenda L

    2018-03-01

    Fifty to eighty percent of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a form of sexual dysfunction (SD), even after renal transplantation. Despite this, inquiring about SD is often not included in the daily practice of renal care providers. This paper explores the perspectives of renal social workers regarding sexual care for patients and evaluates their practice, attitude towards responsibility and knowledge of SD. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 41-item online survey. Seventy-nine members of the Dutch Federation of Social Workers Nephrology. It was revealed that 60% of respondents discussed SD with a fifth of their patients. Frequency of discussion was associated with experience (p = 0.049), knowledge (p = 0.001), supplementary education (p = 0.006), and the availability of protocols on sexual care (p = 0.007). Main barriers towards discussing SD consisted of 'culture and religion' (51.9%), 'language and ethnicity' (49.4%), and 'presence of a third person' (45.6%). Sufficient knowledge of SD was present in 28% of respondents. The responsibility for discussion was 96% nephrologists and 81% social workers. This study provides evidence that a part of Dutch nephrology social workers do not provide sexual care regularly, due to insufficient experience and sexual knowledge, absence of privacy and protocols and barriers based on cultural diversity. According to the respondents the responsibility for this aspect of care should be multidisciplinary. Recommendations include a need for further education on the topic, private opportunities to discuss SD and multidisciplinary guidelines on sexual care. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  7. A qualitative study of the current situation of elderly care in Iran: what can we do for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharinezhad, Salime; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Ravaghi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    With the successful improvement of global health systems and social security in societies, the world is now advancing toward aging. All countries have to face the phenomenon of population aging sooner or later depending on their degree of development; however, elderly care is predicted to soon become a major concern for developing countries such as Iran. This study was conducted to identify the challenges of elderly care in Iran and to help policymakers develop roadmaps for the future through providing a clearer image of the current state of affairs in this area of healthcare. This study has adopted a framework approach to qualitative data analysis. For this purpose, 37 semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2015 with a number of key informants in elderly care who were familiar with the process at macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Maximum variation purposive sampling was performed to select the study samples. A conceptual framework was designed using a review of the literature, and key issues were then identified for data analysis. The elderly care process yielded five major challenges, including policymaking, access, technical infrastructure, integrity and coordination, and health-based care services. According to the stakeholders of elderly care in Iran, the current care system is not well-suited for meeting the needs of the elderly, as the elderly tend to receive the services they need sporadically and in a non-coherent manner. Given the rapid growth of the elderly population in the coming decades, it is the authorities' job to concentrate on the challenges faced by the health system and to use foresight methods for the comprehensive and systematical management of the issue.

  8. A qualitative study of the current situation of elderly care in Iran: what can we do for the future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salime Goharinezhad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the successful improvement of global health systems and social security in societies, the world is now advancing toward aging. All countries have to face the phenomenon of population aging sooner or later depending on their degree of development; however, elderly care is predicted to soon become a major concern for developing countries such as Iran. Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the challenges of elderly care in Iran and to help policymakers develop roadmaps for the future through providing a clearer image of the current state of affairs in this area of healthcare. Design: This study has adopted a framework approach to qualitative data analysis. For this purpose, 37 semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2015 with a number of key informants in elderly care who were familiar with the process at macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Maximum variation purposive sampling was performed to select the study samples. A conceptual framework was designed using a review of the literature, and key issues were then identified for data analysis. Results: The elderly care process yielded five major challenges, including policymaking, access, technical infrastructure, integrity and coordination, and health-based care services. Discussion: According to the stakeholders of elderly care in Iran, the current care system is not well-suited for meeting the needs of the elderly, as the elderly tend to receive the services they need sporadically and in a non-coherent manner. Given the rapid growth of the elderly population in the coming decades, it is the authorities’ job to concentrate on the challenges faced by the health system and to use foresight methods for the comprehensive and systematical management of the issue.

  9. Diagnosed, identified, current and complete depression among patients attending primary care in southern Catalonia: different aspects of the same concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesó-Curto, Pilar; Ferré-Grau, Carme; Lleixà-Fortuño, Mar; Albacar-Riobóo, Nuria; Lejeune, Marylene

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the prevalence and the conceptualizations of depression detected by the healthcare system, identified by the patient or classified/identified in the validated Goldberg's questionnaire in a community. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of 317 patients. The different types of depression diagnosed, identified, current or total were stratified by age and gender groups. The difference in the conceptualization of depression from the medical or ordinary people point of view indicate that depression care requires the understanding of the lifestyle, beliefs, attitudes, family and social networks of the people the physicians and nurses care for. © 2014.

  10. Long-term care of the elderly: Current status, policies and dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matković Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Serbia, the long-term care as a system does not actually exist. One part of the system is regulated through cash benefits, one part through institutional social care and community-based social services, and one part is just being established under the health care system. The linkages among these segments are not strong and there is insufficient awareness of the need to regard the different parts of the system as being interdependent and interconnected. According to the different surveys, home care is needed for the daily functioning of more than 80,000 elderly people, especially for around 27,000 of those who are completely immobile. More than 300 thousand elderly persons have indicated that they are in need of some type of self-care support. By tradition, elderly people in Serbia rely primarily on family support. Some are getting the state support as well. Research shows that 62 thousand elderly persons (5 percent receive attendance allowance; 9,000 elderly are accommodated in institutions (0.7 percent, while 11.7 thousand (1 percent persons received some type of support through home care community based services. In addition, in Belgrade there are also 2,000 elderly who are beneficiaries of medical and palliative care at home. The government expenditures for these purposes can be very roughly estimated at 0.55 percent of GDP, largely for cash benefits (0.37 percent. Considered over a medium and longer term, the government expenditures on longterm care in Serbia will inevitably increase significantly, primarily due to an increase in the number and share of elderly people and the increase in additional life years spent in ill health or in need of assistance. An increase in the expenditures will also be influenced by a change in the family models and the increasing number of elderly that will be living alone, as well as the diminishing possibilities for reliance on the closest family members, especially due to emigration flows both at local

  11. Assessment of immigrant certified nursing assistants' communication when responding to standardized care challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Meredith; Roter, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) provide 80% of the hands-on care in US nursing homes; a significant portion of this work is performed by immigrants with limited English fluency. This study is designed to assess immigrant CNA's communication behavior in response to a series of virtual simulated care challenges. A convenience sample of 31 immigrant CNAs verbally responded to 9 care challenges embedded in an interactive computer platform. The responses were coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), CNA instructors rated response quality and spoken English was rated. CNA communication behaviors varied across care challenges and a broad repertoire of communication was used; 69% of response content was characterized as psychosocial. Communication elements (both instrumental and psychosocial) were significant predictors of response quality for 5 of 9 scenarios. Overall these variables explained between 13% and 36% of the adjusted variance in quality ratings. Immigrant CNAs responded to common care challenges using a variety of communication strategies despite fluency deficits. Virtual simulation-based observation is a feasible, acceptable and low cost method of communication assessment with implications for supervision, training and evaluation of a para-professional workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of care in nutrition programmes: current research and a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, P L; Bentley, M; Pelto, G

    2000-02-01

    The importance of cultural and behavioural factors in children's nutrition, particularly with regard to feeding, has been recognized only recently. The combination of evidence regarding the importance of caregiving behaviour for good nutrition, and improved strategies for measuring behaviour have led to a renewed interest in care. The UNICEF conceptual framework suggests that care, in addition to food security and health care services, are critical for children's survival, growth and development. The present paper focuses on the care practice of complementary feeding, specifically behavioural factors such as parental interaction patterns, feeding style and adaptation of feeding to the child's motor abilities (self-feeding or feeding by others). Three kinds of feeding styles (Birch & Fisher, 1995) are identified: controlling; laissez-faire; responsive. Probable effects of each feeding style on nutrient intake are described. A number of studies of feeding behaviour have suggested that the laissez-faire style is most frequently observed among families and communities with a higher prevalence of malnourished children. Nutrition interventions that have been able to show significant effects on outcomes, such as the Hearth Model in Vietnam (Sternin et al. 1997), have usually incorporated behavioural components in their intervention. At this time, there have been no tests of the efficacy of behavioural interventions to improve feeding practices. Research is needed to understand behavioural factors in complementary feeding, and to identify and test intervention strategies designed to improve nutrient intake of young children. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of how nutrition programmes might change if care were incorporated.

  13. Clinical pathways for primary care: current use, interest and perceived usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Richard C; Toy, Jennifer M; Drechsler, Adam

    2018-02-26

    Translating clinical evidence to daily practice remains a challenge and may improve with clinical pathways. We assessed interest in and usability of clinical pathways by primary care professionals. An online survey was created. Interest in pathways for patient care and learning was assessed at start and finish. Participants completed baseline questions then pathway-associated question sets related to management of 2 chronic diseases. Perceived pathway usability was assessed using the system usability scale. Accuracy and confidence of answers was compared for baseline and pathway-assisted questions. Of 115 participants, 17.4% had used clinical pathways, the lowest of decision support tool types surveyed. Accuracy and confidence in answers significantly improved for all pathways. Interest in using pathways daily or weekly was above 75% for the respondents. There is low utilization of, but high interest in, clinical pathways by primary care clinicians. Pathways improve accuracy and confidence in answering written clinical questions.

  14. Current and future health care professionals attitudes toward and knowledge of statistics: How confidence influences learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Kornides, Melanie L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals require some understanding of statistics to successfully implement evidence based practice. Developing competency in statistical reasoning is necessary for students training in health care administration, research, and clinical care. Recently, the interest in healthcare professional's attitudes toward statistics has increased substantially due to evidence that these attitudes can hinder professionalism developing an understanding of statistical concepts. In this study, we analyzed pre- and post-instruction attitudes towards and knowledge of statistics obtained from health science graduate students, including nurses and nurse practitioners, enrolled in an introductory graduate course in statistics (n = 165). Results show that the students already held generally positive attitudes toward statistics at the beginning of course. However, these attitudes-along with the students' statistical proficiency-improved after 10 weeks of instruction. The results have implications for curriculum design and delivery methods as well as for health professionals' effective use of statistics in critically evaluating and utilizing research in their practices.

  15. TeleWound care – providing remote wound assessment and treatment in the home care setting: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria N

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nick Santamaria,1 Suzanne Kapp2 1University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Royal District Nursing Service Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The use of wound telemedicine systems in the home care environment has been expanding for the last decade. These systems can generally be grouped into two main types: store and forward systems and video conference type systems; additionally, there are also hybrid systems available that include elements of both. Evidence to date suggests that these systems provide significant benefits to patients, clinicians, and to the health care system generally. Reductions in resource use, visit substitution, costs, and high patient and clinician satisfaction have been reported; however, there is a lack of integration with existing health care technology and no clearly defined technical or clinical standards as yet. Similarly, the legalities associated with wound telemedicine and remote consultation remain unclear. As wound telemedicine systems continue to evolve and be deployed in different locations, there remains significant potential to harness their power to benefit patients being treated at home. Keywords: telemedicine, home care, e-health

  16. Paediatric rheumatology practice in the UK benchmarked against the British Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology/Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance Standards of Care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavirayani, Akhila; Foster, Helen E

    2013-12-01

    To describe current clinical practice against the BSPAR/ARMA Standards of Care (SOCs) for children and young people (CYP) with incident JIA. Ten UK paediatric rheumatology centres (including all current centres nationally accredited for paediatric rheumatology higher specialist training) participated in a retrospective case notes review using a pretested pro forma based on the SOC. Data collected per centre included clinical service configuration and the initial clinical care for a minimum of 30 consecutive new patients seen within the previous 2 years and followed up for at least 6 months. A total of 428 CYP with JIA (median age 11 years, range 1-21 years) were included, with complete data available for 73% (311/428). Against the key SOCs, 41% (175/428) were assessed ≤10 weeks from symptom onset, 60% (186/311) ≤4 weeks from referral, 26% (81/311) had eye screening at ≤6 weeks, 83% (282/341) had joint injections at ≤6 weeks, 59% (184/311) were assessed by a nurse specialist at ≤4 weeks and 45% (141/311) were assessed by a physiotherapist at ≤8 weeks. A median of 6% of patients per centre participated in clinical trials. All centres had access to eye screening and prescribed biologic therapies. All had access to a nurse specialist and physiotherapist. Most had access to an occupational therapist (8/10), psychologist (8/10), joint injection lists (general anaesthesia/inhaled analgesia) (9/10) and designated transitional care clinics (7/10). This first description of UK clinical practice in paediatric rheumatology benchmarked against the BSPAR/ARMA SOCs demonstrates variable clinical service delivery. Considerable delay in access to specialist care is evident and this needs to be addressed in order to improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  18. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This

  19. Islamic Spiritual Care as a New Profession : Expectations and Professional Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajouaou, M.; Ayten, Ali; Koç, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual care is a discipline that is practised on the interface of religion on the one hand and the public domain on the other, i.e., in penitentiary institutions, heath institutions, and the military, etc. Its legitimacy is found primarily in the sacred sources of a religion (Ajouaou, M., R.

  20. 77 FR 42658 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Data Collection To Support Standards Related to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral and vision care... services provided that a stand-alone dental benefit plan that covers pediatric oral services is offered... include pediatric oral services, issuers need to know if stand-alone dental plans would be offered through...

  1. 77 FR 33133 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Data Collection To Support Standards Related to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ...; preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral and... wellness services and chronic disease management; and pediatric services, including oral and vision care... coverage for pediatric oral services provided that a stand-alone dental benefit plan that covers pediatric...

  2. Current state of information technology use in a US primary care practice-based research network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Andrews

    2004-02-01

    Conclusion While interest in enabling information technologies was high in KAN, adoption was variable, with use of several key technologies reported as low.The results suggest that research in this network that would be dependent on or enhanced by IT might be impeded and, generally, greater attention should be given to enhancing the IT infrastructure in primary care.

  3. Ambulatory anesthetic care in children undergoing myringotomy and tube placement: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hal; Engelhardt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Myringotomy and tube placement is one of the most frequently performed ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeries in the pediatric population. Effective anesthetic management is vital to ensuring successful ambulatory care and ensuring child and parental satisfaction. This review summarizes recently published studies about the long-term effects of general anesthesia in young children, novel approaches to preoperative fasting and simplified approaches to the assessment and management of emergence delirium (ED) and emergence agitation (EA). New developments in perioperative ambulatory care, including management of comorbidities and day care unit logistics, are discussed. Long-term follow-up of children exposed to general anesthesia before the age of 4 years has limited impact on academic achievement or cognitive performance and should not delay the treatment of common ENT pathology, which can impair speech and language development. A more liberal approach to fasting, employing a 6-4-0 regime allowing children fluids up until theater, may become an accepted practice in future. ED and EA should be discriminated from pain in recovery and, where the child is at risk of harm, should be treated promptly. Postoperative pain at home remains problematic in ambulatory surgery and better par