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Sample records for current molecular taxonomy

  1. Clinical and Laboratory Features of the Nocardia spp. Based on Current Molecular Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Brown, June M.; Conville, Patricia S.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent explosion of newly described species of Nocardia results from the impact in the last decade of newer molecular technology, including PCR restriction enzyme analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing. These molecular techniques have revolutionized the identification of the nocardiae by providing rapid and accurate identification of recognized nocardiae and, at the same time, revealing new species and a number of yet-to-be-described species. There are currently more than 30 species of nocardiae of human clinical significance, with the majority of isolates being N. nova complex, N. abscessus, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, N. asteroides type VI (N. cyriacigeorgica), and N. brasiliensis. These species cause a wide variety of diseases and have variable drug susceptibilities. Accurate identification often requires referral to a reference laboratory with molecular capabilities, as many newer species are genetically distinct from established species yet have few or no distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. Correct identification is important in deciding the clinical relevance of a species and in the clinical management and treatment of patients with nocardial disease. This review characterizes the currently known pathogenic species of Nocardia, including clinical disease, drug susceptibility, and methods of identification. PMID:16614249

  2. Molecular taxonomy of phytopathogenic fungi: a case study in Peronospora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Göker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inappropriate taxon definitions may have severe consequences in many areas. For instance, biologically sensible species delimitation of plant pathogens is crucial for measures such as plant protection or biological control and for comparative studies involving model organisms. However, delimiting species is challenging in the case of organisms for which often only molecular data are available, such as prokaryotes, fungi, and many unicellular eukaryotes. Even in the case of organisms with well-established morphological characteristics, molecular taxonomy is often necessary to emend current taxonomic concepts and to analyze DNA sequences directly sampled from the environment. Typically, for this purpose clustering approaches to delineate molecular operational taxonomic units have been applied using arbitrary choices regarding the distance threshold values, and the clustering algorithms. METHODOLOGY: Here, we report on a clustering optimization method to establish a molecular taxonomy of Peronospora based on ITS nrDNA sequences. Peronospora is the largest genus within the downy mildews, which are obligate parasites of higher plants, and includes various economically important pathogens. The method determines the distance function and clustering setting that result in an optimal agreement with selected reference data. Optimization was based on both taxonomy-based and host-based reference information, yielding the same outcome. Resampling and permutation methods indicate that the method is robust regarding taxon sampling and errors in the reference data. Tests with newly obtained ITS sequences demonstrate the use of the re-classified dataset in molecular identification of downy mildews. CONCLUSIONS: A corrected taxonomy is provided for all Peronospora ITS sequences contained in public databases. Clustering optimization appears to be broadly applicable in automated, sequence-based taxonomy. The method connects traditional and modern

  3. Identification of bacterial strains in viili by molecular taxonomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of bacterial strains in viili by molecular taxonomy and their synergistic effects on milk curd and exopolysaccharides production. T Chen, Q Tan, M Wang, S Xiong, S Jiang, Q Wu, S Li, C Luo, H Wei ...

  4. Current and pending taxonomy of the Pasteurellaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein

    and provisional taxa) have been described within the family. In the presentation different methods for species delineation will be presented and potential problems discussed in relation to selected examples. It is currently recommended that a new species should be separated from other species by at lest two...... as a golden standard for separating species but the sequencing of housekeeping genes represents a promising alternative. Whole genome sequencing will probably accelerate as less labour intensive methods are developed and prices go down. Data from these genome sequencing projects will make a more detailed...

  5. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

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    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  6. Molecular Taxonomy of the Trichophyton rubrum Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Gräser, Y.; Kuijpers, A.F.A.; Presber, W; de Hoog, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    The validity of taxa around Trichophyton rubrum was evaluated by a combination of phenetic and molecular methods. Morphological and physiological features were compared to results of sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal operon, PCR fingerprinting, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. The 15 species and varieties investigated (Trichophyton circonvolutum, Trichophyton fischeri, Trichophyton fluviomuniense, Trichophyton glabrum, Trichophyton gourv...

  7. Questioning current practice in brown bear, Ursus arctos, conservation in Europe that undervalues taxonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gippoliti, S.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper highlights problems associated with the currently–accepted taxonomy of brown bear, Ursus arctos, and their consequences for conservation at the European level. The enormous morphological variability within Ursus arctos is not acknowledged in current taxonomy and conservation practice. Seven major clades are recognized in Ursus arctos by molecular researchers, and although Western Europe maintains most of the populations belonging to the relict Clade 1 brown bear lineage, no reference to this is made in current conservation policy. Furthermore, the tiny population of Apennine brown bears, characterized by unique skull morphology, is not even recognized as a distinct ESU (evolutionari significant unit) by current European legislation, nor is it included in the IUCN Red List. This may have serious consequences as brown bear conservation in Western Europe has been mainly based on restocking and reintroduction programs. (Author)

  8. [Molecular taxonomy techniques used for yeast identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghindea, Raluca; Csutak, Ortansa; Stoica, Ileana; Ionescu, Robertina; Soare, Simona; Pelinescu, Diana; Nohit, Ana-Maria; Creangă, Oana; Vassu, Tatiana

    2004-01-01

    Due to the major impact of yeasts in human life based on the existence of pathogen yeast species and of species with biotechnological abilities, in the last few years new molecular techniques are performed for an accurate identification of natural isolates. Our study is aimed to review some of these techniques such as electrokariotyping by PFGE (Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis), estimation of the molar percentage of guanine and cytosine, the applications of PCR reaction in yeast identification using RAPD (Random amplified polymorphic DNA), UP-PCR (Universally Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction), MLST (Multilocus sequence typing) techniques, mtDNA and rDNA homology studies. Such molecular techniques complete the phenotypical characterization based on classical taxonomical tests allowing thus the polyphasic identification of the microorganisms.

  9. Canine babesiosis: from molecular taxonomy to control

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    Irwin Peter J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Canine babesiosis is a clinically significant emerging vector-borne disease caused by protozoan haemoparasites. This review article considers recent literature pertaining to the taxonomic classification of Babesia and Theileria species affecting dogs and the geographical distribution of these parasites. The diagnosis of canine babesiosis by traditional, molecular and serological methods is reviewed, together with recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of piroplasmosis, and of the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  10. Molecular Taxonomy of the Trichophyton rubrum Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräser, Y.; Kuijpers, A. F. A.; Presber, W.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The validity of taxa around Trichophyton rubrum was evaluated by a combination of phenetic and molecular methods. Morphological and physiological features were compared to results of sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal operon, PCR fingerprinting, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. The 15 species and varieties investigated (Trichophyton circonvolutum, Trichophyton fischeri, Trichophyton fluviomuniense, Trichophyton glabrum, Trichophyton gourvilii, Trichophyton kanei, Trichophyton kuryangei, Trichophyton megninii, Trichophyton pedis, Trichophyton raubitschekii, Trichophyton rodhaini, Trichophyton rubrum var. nigricans, Trichophyton soudanense, Trichophyton violaceum var. indicum, and Trichophyton yaoundei) were reclassified or synonymized as T. rubrum or T. violaceum. PMID:10970379

  11. Taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauffer, Jr., Jay Richard; Madsen, Henry; Konings, Adrianus

    2007-01-01

    We have observed a dramatic decrease in the abundance of snail-eating fishes and an increase in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among village residents and expatriate tourists at Lake Malawi, Africa, over the past two decades. We hypothesized that these observations were linked by a cause......, intermediate-host snails, and human schistosomes in southern Lake Malawi could be applied to other areas throughout the lake. More than two-thirds of the cichlid species in Lake Malawi are undescribed, the taxonomy of the Bulinus snails is poorly known, and not all strains of Schistosoma hematobium have been...... identified. Before we can identify the interactions among these components of the system and effectively manage snail-eating fishes, we must be able to accurately delimit the taxonomic units (e.g., species, populations, and demes) within each of the above groups....

  12. A critique of current methods in nematode taxonomy | Abebe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    living and plant parasitic nematodes and critique those methods in the context of recent developments and trends including their implications in nematode taxonomy, biodiversity and biogeography. Key words: Species delimitation, taxonomic ...

  13. Molecular taxonomy of Pseudapocryptes (Bleeker, 1874) mudskippers from Sundarban mangroves, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, G; Ravi, V; Bharathi, R

    2017-01-01

    More than 40 species of mudskipper is recorded worldwide, but the molecular taxonomy of very few species is studied so far. The objective of this study is to determine the molecular taxonomy and phylogenetic relationship of the Pseudapocryptes elongatus and Pseudapocryptes lanceolatus collected from the mudflats of Sundarban, India. The mitochondrial COI gene was sequenced to analyze the molecular taxonomy. The species name associated with the present analyzed sequence as shown by BLAST searches of GenBank was used to define the phylogenetic relationship. Mitochondrial COI gene sequences of collected mudskippers were submitted to GenBank to get accession numbers. The BLAST search of GenBank matched 100% with the species name associated with the present analyzed sequence. The present study reveals the phylogenetic similarity between the species.

  14. Susceptibility profiles of Nocardia isolates based on current taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaberg, Robert; Fisher, Mark A; Hanson, Kimberley E

    2014-01-01

    The genus Nocardia has undergone rapid taxonomic expansion in recent years, and an increasing number of species are recognized as human pathogens. Many established species have predictable antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, but sufficient information is often not available for recently described organisms. Additionally, the effectiveness of sulfonamides as first-line drugs for Nocardia has recently been questioned. This led us to review antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for a large number of molecularly identified clinical isolates. Susceptibility results were available for 1,299 isolates representing 39 different species or complexes, including 11 that were newly described, during a 6-year study period. All tested isolates were susceptible to linezolid. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was rare (2%) except among Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis (31%) strains and strains of the N. transvalensis complex (19%). Imipenem susceptibility varied for N. cyriacigeorgica and N. farcinica, as did ceftriaxone susceptibility of the N. nova complex. Resistance to more than one of the most commonly used drugs (amikacin, ceftriaxone, TMP-SMX, and imipenem) was highest for N. pseudobrasiliensis (100%), N. transvalensis complex (83%), N. farcinica (68%), N. puris (57%), N. brasiliensis (51%), N. aobensis (50%), and N. amikacinitolerans (43%). Thus, while antimicrobial resistance can often be predicted, susceptibility testing should still be considered when combination therapy is warranted, for less well characterized species or those with variable susceptibility profiles, and for patients with TMP-SMX intolerance.

  15. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

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    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a species graphic that shows relationship among organisms or particularly among their gene sequences. The sequence separation are referred as taxa (singular taxon that is defined as phylogenetically distinct units on the tree. The tree consists of outer branches or leaves that represents taxa and nodes and branch represent correlation among taxa. When the nucleotide sequence from two different organism are similar, they were inferred to be descended from common ancestor. There were three methods which were used in phylogenetic, namely (1 Maximum parsimony, (2 Distance, and (3 Maximum likehoood. Those methods generally are applied to construct the evolutionary tree or the best tree for determine sequence variation in group. Every method is usually used for different analysis and data.

  16. Orobanche caryophyllacea Sm. (Orobanchaceae in Poland: current distribution, taxonomy, plant communities and hosts

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    Renata Piwowarczyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the current distribution of Orobanche caryophyllacea Sm. in Poland based on a critical revision of herbarium and literature data as well as the results of my field studies. The majority of localities are in south and south-eastern Poland: Małopolska Upland, Lublin Upland, Roztocze, Przemyśl Foothills, Pieniny Mts, rarely in the valleys of the Lower Vistula and Oder rivers or Wolin island. The distribution map in Poland is included. The taxonomy, biology and ecology of the species are discussed.

  17. Integrated Operational Taxonomic Units (IOTUs) in Echolocating Bats: A Bridge between Molecular and Traditional Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Andrea; Spada, Martina; Russo, Danilo; Mucedda, Mauro; Agnelli, Paolo; Crottini, Angelica; Ferri, Emanuele; Martinoli, Adriano; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Nowadays, molecular techniques are widespread tools for the identification of biological entities. However, until very few years ago, their application to taxonomy provoked intense debates between traditional and molecular taxonomists. To prevent every kind of disagreement, it is essential to standardize taxonomic definitions. Along these lines, we introduced the concept of Integrated Operational Taxonomic Unit (IOTU). IOTUs come from the concept of Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) and paralleled the Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit (MOTU). The latter is largely used as a standard in many molecular-based works (even if not always explicitly formalized). However, while MOTUs are assigned solely on molecular variation criteria, IOTUs are identified from patterns of molecular variation that are supported by at least one more taxonomic characteristic. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the use of IOTUs on the widest DNA barcoding dataset of Italian echolocating bats species ever assembled (i.e. 31 species, 209 samples). We identified 31 molecular entities, 26 of which corresponded to the morphologically assigned species, two MOTUs and three IOTUs. Interestingly, we found three IOTUs in Myotis nattereri, one of which is a newly described lineage found only in central and southern Italy. In addition, we found a level of molecular variability within four vespertilionid species deserving further analyses. According to our scheme two of them (i.e. M. bechsteinii and Plecotus auritus) should be ranked as unconfirmed candidate species (UCS). Conclusions/Significance From a systematic point of view, IOTUs are more informative than the general concept of OTUs and the more recent MOTUs. According to information content, IOTUs are closer to species, although it is important to underline that IOTUs are not species. Overall, the use of a more precise panel of taxonomic entities increases the clarity in the systematic field and has the potential to fill the gaps

  18. Molecular Taxonomy of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using Disease-Associated Genes

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    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Despite intensive research, the origin and progression of ALS remain largely unknown, suggesting that the traditional clinical diagnosis and treatment strategies might not be adequate to completely capture the molecular complexity underlying the disease. In our previous work, comprehensive genomic profiling of 41 motor cortex samples enabled to discriminate control from sporadic ALS patients and segregated these latter into two distinct subgroups, each associated with different deregulated genes and pathways. Interestingly, some deregulated genes in sporadic ALS were previously associated with familiar ALS, indicating shared pathogenic mechanisms between the two forms of disease. In this, we performed cluster analysis on the same whole-genome expression profiles using a restricted (203 subset of genes extensively implicated in monogenic forms of ALS. Surprisingly, this short and unbiased gene list was sufficiently representative to allow the accurate separation of SALS patients from controls and the stratification of SALS patients into two molecularly distinct subgroups. Overall, our findings support the existence of a molecular taxonomy for ALS and represent a further step toward the establishment of a molecular-based diagnosis and patient-tailored therapies.

  19. Integrative Taxonomy and Molecular Phylogeny of Genus Aplysina (Demospongiae: Verongida) from Mexican Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Barraza, José Antonio; Carballo, José Luis; Rocha-Olivares, Axayacatl; Ehrlich, Hermann; Hog, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Integrative taxonomy provides a major approximation to species delimitation based on integration of different perspectives (e.g. morphology, biochemistry and DNA sequences). The aim of this study was to assess the relationships and boundaries among Eastern Pacific Aplysina species using morphological, biochemical and molecular data. For this, a collection of sponges of the genus Aplysina from the Mexican Pacific was studied on the basis of their morphological, chemical (chitin composition), and molecular markers (mitochondrial COI and nuclear ribosomal rDNA: ITS1-5.8-ITS2). Three morphological species were identified, two of which are new to science. A. clathrata sp. nov. is a yellow to yellow-reddish or -brownish sponge, characterized by external clathrate-like morphology; A. revillagigedi sp. nov. is a lemon yellow to green, cushion-shaped sometimes lobate sponge, characterized by conspicuous oscules, which are slightly elevated and usually linearly distributed on rims; and A. gerardogreeni a known species distributed along the Mexican Pacific coast. Chitin was identified as the main structural component within skeletons of the three species using FTIR, confirming that it is shared among Verongida sponges. Morphological differences were confirmed by DNA sequences from nuclear ITS1-5.8-ITS2. Mitochondrial COI sequences showed extremely low but diagnostic variability for Aplysina revillagigedi sp. nov., thus our results corroborate that COI has limited power for DNA-barcoding of sponges and should be complemented with other markers (e.g. rDNA). Phylogenetic analyses of Aplysina sequences from the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean, resolved two allopatric and reciprocally monophyletic groups for each region. Eastern Pacific species were grouped in general accordance with the taxonomic hypothesis based on morphological characters. An identification key of Eastern Pacific Aplysina species is presented. Our results constitute one of the first approximations to integrative

  20. Towards a molecular taxonomy for protists: benefits, risks, and applications in plankton ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, David A

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of genetic information for the development of methods to study the diversity, distributions, and activities of protists in nature has spawned a new generation of powerful tools. For ecologists, one lure of these approaches lies in the potential for DNA sequences to provide the only immediately obvious means of normalizing the diverse criteria that presently exist for identifying and counting protists. A single, molecular taxonomy would allow studies of diversity across a broad range of species, as well as the detection and quantification of particular species of interest within complex, natural assemblages; goals that are not feasible using traditional methods. However, these advantages are not without their potential pitfalls and problems. Conflicts involving the species concept, disagreements over the true (physiological/ecological) meaning of genetic diversity, and a perceived threat by some that sequence information will displace knowledge regarding the morphologies, functions and physiologies of protistan taxa, have created debate and doubt regarding the efficacy and appropriateness of some genetic approaches. These concerns need continued discussion and eventual resolution as we move toward the irresistible attraction, and potentially enormous benefits, of the application of genetic approaches to protistan ecology. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  1. Combining morphometrics with molecular taxonomy: how different are similar foliose keratose sponges from the Australian tropics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Wahab, M A; Fromont, J; Whalan, S; Webster, N; Andreakis, N

    2014-04-01

    Sponge taxonomy can be challenging as many groups exhibit extreme morphological plasticity induced by local environmental conditions. Foliose keratose sponges of the sub-family Phyllospongiinae (Dictyoceratida, Thorectidae: Strepsichordaia, Phyllospongia and Carteriospongia) are commonly found in intertidal and subtidal habitats of the Indo-Pacific. Lacking spicules, these sponges can be difficult to differentiate due to the lack of reliable morphological characters for species delineation. We use molecular phylogenies inferred from the nuclear Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 region (ITS2) and morphometrics (19 characters; 52 character states) to identify evolutionarily significant units (ESUs; sensu Moritz) within foliose Phyllosponginiids collected from seven geographic locations across tropical eastern and Western Australia. The ITS2 topology was congruent with the tree derived from Bayesian inference of discrete morphological characters supporting expected taxonomic relationships at the genus level and the identification of five ESUs. However, phylogenies inferred from the ITS2 marker revealed multiple sequence clusters, some of which were characterised by distinct morphological features and specific geographic ranges. Our results are discussed in light of taxonomic incongruences within this study, hidden sponge diversity and the role of vicariant events in influencing present day distribution patterns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Integrated Approach to Taxonomy: The Fusion of Molecular and Morphological Systematics with Type Material in Benthic Foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Angela; Austin, William; Evans, Katharine; Bird, Clare; Schweizer, Magali; Darling, Kate

    2016-01-01

    A robust and consistent taxonomy underpins the use of fossil material in palaeoenvironmental research and long-term assessment of biodiversity. This study presents a new integrated taxonomic protocol for benthic foraminifera by unequivocally reconciling the traditional taxonomic name to a specific genetic type. To implement this protocol, a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene is used in combination with 16 quantitative morphometric variables to fully characterise the benthic foraminiferal species concept of Elphidium williamsoni Haynes, 1973. A combination of live contemporary topotypic specimens, original type specimens and specimens of genetic outliers were utilised in this study. Through a series of multivariate statistical tests we illustrate that genetically characterised topotype specimens are morphologically congruent with both the holotype and paratype specimens of E. williamsoni Haynes, 1973. We present the first clear link between morphologically characterised type material and the unique SSU rRNA genetic type of E. williamsoni. This example provides a standard framework for the benthic foraminifera which bridges the current discontinuity between molecular and morphological lines of evidence, allowing integration with the traditional Linnaean roots of nomenclature to offer a new prospect for taxonomic stability.

  3. My Home is my Bazaar - A Taxonomy and Classification of Current Wireless Home Network Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in wireless communication have produced a multitude of related protocols, leading to a growing market of products for home automation systems within energy management, elder care, etc. These systems are different from wired ones in terms of architectures and qualities, which leads......, cost, security, etc. Third, a classification based on the taxonomy and the collected data is presented. In the final discussion, we identify a number of key aspects that could be important technology criteria for future development of home automation protocols....

  4. My home is my bazaar - A taxonomy and classification of current wireless home network protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torbensen, Rune; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Hjorth, Theis Solberg

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in wireless communication have produced a multitude of related protocols, leading to a growing market of products for home automation systems within energy management, elder care, etc. These systems are different from wired ones in terms of architectures and qualities, which leads......, cost, security, etc. Third, a classification based on the taxonomy and the collected data is presented. In the final discussion, we identify a number of key aspects that could be important technology criteria for future development of home automation protocols....

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=NS ...

  7. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  8. The Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: Current Practices at Polytechnics in Bangladesh and its Effects in Developing Students' Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruque A. Haolader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polytechnics in Bangladesh endeavour to produce quality graduates for national and international job markets. The quality of graduates depends on several factors. This study examines the implementation process of the polytechnic curriculum with the objectives of determining the current level of practices in learn-ing/teaching material design, in delivering curriculum content, in assessing students and its effect on students' competence development. Data was collected through observation, opinion survey and competence test. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used for data interpretation and analysis in this descriptive type of research study. Findings revealed that the learning materials are mainly theory oriented and mostly cover those contents usually common in exams. About half of teachers are aware of the taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing, but they rarely put importance on it. In the classroom, teachers spend only a little time for delivering content at the level of apply/analyse. However, a significant number of tasks performed in labs are practical and occupation relevant and can be classified at higher levels of the taxonomy. In student assessment, the test-items assess mainly theoretical knowledge at the level of remember. The effect of these practices is reflected in demonstrating student performance in a competence test. The study concludes with some recommendations.

  9. Molecular Imaging: Current Status and Emerging Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific therapeutic treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use PET- or SPECT-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multimodality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and ultrasound imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies since they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and ultrasound modalities involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with ultrasound. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation such as endoscopes and microcatheters suggest that these molecular imaging modalities have numerous clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future. PMID:20541650

  10. MOLECULAR TAXONOMY AND THE EVOLUTION THEORY IN LIGHT OF EMERGING BIOINFORMATIC AND COSMOLOGICAL DATA

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    Sergei Y. Shchyogolev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of recent advances in the taxonomic study of organisms and current views on biological evolution and the origin of life. A discussion is presented on how the treelike and net components contribute to the topology of phylogenetic constructs, with account taken of the prevailing role of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryote evolution and life. Approaches are described to the rational selection and practical use of phylogenetic markers (including 16S rRNA gene DNA sequences in biomedical (including metagenomic applications with traditional and nontraditional (large amounts of molecular genetic data. Emerging results from taxonomic studies of the Earth’s biota and the methods of their generation are demonstrated. It is noted that the current developments in particle physics and in cosmology have important implications for solving paradoxes associated with the vanishingly small probability of some fundamental processes of prebiological and biological evolution.

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mphii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=NS ...

  12. Speciation in Indo-Pacific swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae): integrating molecular and phenotypic data for a new provisional taxonomy of the Collocalia esculenta complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheindt, Frank E; Christidis, Les; Norman, Janette A; Eaton, James A; Sadanandan, Keren R; Schodde, Richard

    2017-04-07

    White-bellied swiftlets of the Collocalia esculenta complex constitute a radiation of colony-breeding swifts distributed throughout the tropical Indo-Pacific region. Resolution of their taxonomy is challenging due to their morphological uniformity. To analyze the evolutionary history of this complex, we combine new biometric measurements and results from plumage assessment of museum specimens with novel as well as previously published molecular data. Together, this body of information constitutes the largest systematic dataset for white-bellied swiftlets yet compiled, drawn from 809 individuals belonging to 32 taxa for which new molecular, biometric, and/or plumage data are presented. We propose changing the classification of white-bellied swiftlets, for which two species are currently recognized, to elevate eight regional forms to species level, and we also describe two new subspecies. The ten taxa we recommend recognizing at the species level are: Collocalia linchi (Java to Lombok, Sumatran hills), C. dodgei (montane Borneo), C. natalis (Christmas Island), C. affinis (Greater Sundas, including the Thai-Malay Peninsula and Andaman-Nicobar Islands), C. marginata (Philippines), C. isonota (Philippines), C. sumbawae (west Lesser Sundas), C. neglecta (east Lesser Sundas), C. esculenta (Sulawesi, Moluccas, New Guinea, Bismarck Archipelago, Solomon Islands), and C. uropygialis (Vanuatu, New Caledonia). Future molecular and morphological work is needed to resolve questions of speciation and population affinities in the Philippines, Christmas Island, Wallacea and central Melanesia, and to shed light on historic diversification and patterns of gene flow in the complex.

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Phaeodactylum tricornutum Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_L.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum..._NL.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_S.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricorn...utum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricorn...utum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=213 ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Caenorhabditis_elegans_S.png Caenorhabditis_elegans_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=S h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=94 ...

  15. A molecular approach towards the taxonomy of fresh water prawns Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens (Decapoda, Palaemonidae) using mitochondrial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Deepak; Nidhin, B; Anil Kumar, K P; Pradeep, P J; Harikrishnan, M

    2016-07-01

    Genus Macrobrachium includes freshwater prawns which inhabit most diverse habitats ranging from low saline areas to inland hill streams and impounded water bodies. Being morphologically conserved, this genus has been exposed to severe disputes related to their taxonomy, systematics and phylogeny. Macrobrachium striatum and M. equidens represent two morphologically related congeneric species within this genus. Earlier, M. striatum was considered as a striped form of M. equidens. Though these species are now well-described morphologically and differentiated into two species, no molecular level investigation has been carried out in support of their speciation. We report a study on M. striatum and M. equidens with emphasis to their molecular data through mitochondrial markers (16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I). Results obtained from developed molecular markers of the two species revealed considerable genetic differentiation between them. Phylogram generated using Minimum evolution and Neighbour joining analyses differentiated M. striatum and M. equidens as two independent species. Genetic distance data showed high interspecific divergence (ranging from 3.9% to 17.0% for 16S rRNA sequences and 13.8% to 21.0% for COI sequences) between M. striatum and M. equidens confirming the findings of phylogram. Hence, it could be delineated that M. striatum and M. equidens represent two distinct species within genus Macrobrachium with emphasis to their morphology and genetics.

  16. Gregory Bateson's relevance to current molecular biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2008-01-01

    not come as a surprise today to realize how the general ideas that he was postulating for the study of communication systems in biology fit so well with the astonishing findings of current molecular biology, for example in the field of cellular signal transduction networks. I guess this is the case due...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aurus_stenops_L.png Stegosaurus_stenops_NL.png Stegosaurus_stenops_S.png Stegosaurus_stenops_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=S...tegosaurus+stenops&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available la_trichopoda_S.png Amborella_trichopoda_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+t...richopoda&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=13 ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aurus_rex_L.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_NL.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_S.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+rex&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrann...osaurus+rex&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+r...ex&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+rex&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=109 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ltithorax_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=NS ...

  3. Molecular taxonomy provides new insights into anopheles species of the neotropical arribalzagia series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovan F Gómez

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analysis of partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 sequences were used to evaluate initial identification and to investigate phylogenetic relationships of seven Anopheles morphospecies of the Arribalzagia Series from Colombia. Phylogenetic trees recovered highly supported clades for An. punctimaculas.s., An. calderoni, An. malefactor s.l., An. neomaculipalpus, An. apicimacula s.l., An. mattogrossensis and An. peryassui. This study provides the first molecular confirmation of An. malefactorfrom Colombia and discovered conflicting patterns of divergence for the molecular markers among specimens from northeast and northern Colombia suggesting the presence of two previously unrecognized Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs. Furthermore, two highly differentiated An. apicimacula MOTUs previously found in Panama were detected. Overall, the combined molecular dataset facilitated the detection of known and new Colombian evolutionary lineages, and constitutes the baseline for future research on their bionomics, ecology and potential role as malaria vectors.

  4. The impact of culture collections on molecular identification, taxonomy, and solving real problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the fungi, Fusarium has stood out as a major focus for culture collection resource development over the last century. This has facilitated unprecedented molecular taxonomic advancements, which in turn has led to problem solving in plant pathology, mycotoxicology, medical mycology, and basic re...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Schistosoma_mansoni_S.png Schistosoma_mansoni_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=...Schistosoma+mansoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=185 ...

  6. Advances in taxonomy of genus phoma: polyphyletic nature and role of phenotypic traits and molecular systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra Kumar; Tiwari, Vaibhav V; Irinyi, László; Kövics, György János

    2014-06-01

    Phoma is a highly polyphyletic genus with its unclear species boundaries. The conventional system of identification is functional but it has its limitations. Besides morphological studies, chemotaxonomy, secondary metabolite and protein profiling have been assessed for the classification and identification of these fungi. Molecular datasets have provided a better outlook towards the phylogenetic and evolutionary trends of Phoma. Molecular markers such as ITS-rDNA, tubulin, actin, translation elongation factor have been widely used by the taxonomists to demarcate species. However, outcomes gained up till now represent preliminary step towards the study of Phoma systematics and a combined approach would be beneficial in the understanding of this polyphyletic group members. Lately, on the base of molecular phylogeny of the type species of the seven Phoma sections a new teleomorph family, Didymellaceae has been established, besides the Phaeosphaeriaceae related to sect. Paraphoma anamorphs, and the Leptosphaeriaceae to sect. Heterospora anamorphs. The estimated ratio is about 70 % of the recognized Phoma-like species can be associated with the Didymellaceae ascomycetous family.

  7. Taxonomy of Ixinandria Isbrücker & Nijssen (Loricariidae: Loricariinae based on morphological and molecular data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica S. Rodriguez

    Full Text Available The genus Ixinandria was described in 1979 to include I. steinbachi from the upper río Juramento in northern Argentina and I. montebelloi from the upper río Bermejo in southern Bolivia. We used a multivariate morphometric analysis (Principal Components Analysis and a molecular comparison of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene to investigate variation among distinct populations from the known distribution range of both species. We conclude that the populations are not significantly distinct and do not deserve separate species recognition, and we place I. montebelloi in the synonymy of I. steinbachi.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of Blaberidae (Dictyoptera, Blattodea with implications for taxonomy and evolutionary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Legendre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present “tree-thinking” period, relying on accurate phylogenetic hypotheses is of paramount importance for biologists interested in an evolutionary perspective. In the Blaberidae cockroaches, a well-defined monophyletic family comprising several model species, no such phylogenetic tree is available despite several earlier contributions. Here, using six molecular markers (12S, 16S, 18S, 28S, COI and COII, we investigate the relationships of Blaberidae and compare our results with the traditional morphology-based classification. This resulted in a broad spectrum of situations, from congruent and well-supported hypotheses (e.g., the monophyly of Blaberidae, Oxyhaloinae and (Geoscapheiinae + Panesthiinae to incongruent and weakly supported results (e.g., polyphyly of Perisphaerinae. We emphasize that interesting and contrasted situations lie between the two extremities of this spectrum, especially concerning the genera Thanatophyllum Grandcolas, 1991, Phoetalia Stål, 1874, Laxta Walker, 1868 and Pronauphoeta Shelford, 1909. We also discuss the phylogenetic position of two incertae sedis genera (Eustegasta Gerstaecker, 1883 and Gynopeltis Gerstaecker, 1869. We conclude that in-depth signal analyses should be performed to better understand molecular evolution and its consequence on tree reconstruction for this group. As for phylogenetic relationships per se, new markers should be searched for, especially to decipher deeper relationships in Blaberidae.

  9. Taxonomy and molecular phylogeny of the Platystictidae of Sri Lanka (Insecta: Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedjanič, M; Conniff, K; Dow, R A; Stokvis, F R; Verovnik, R; Tol, J Van

    2016-11-01

    The 22 Sri Lankan representatives of the family Platystictidae, all endemic to the island and belonging to the distinct endemic subfamily Platystictinae, are revised, and a new reconstruction of the phylogeny based on molecular characters is provided. Five new species are described: Ceylonosticta venusta sp. nov. (holotype ♂: Rambodde Falls, at the tunnel; Nuwara Eliya District, Central Province; N7.0489, E80.6961; 12-vii-2012; to be deposited at National Museum of Natural History, Colombo, Sri Lanka), C. inferioreducta sp. nov. (holotype ♂: Norton Bridge, stream on the B43 road 1.5km WNW of Norton Bridge; Nuwara Eliya District, Central Province; N6.9171, E80.5075; 28-vii-2009; to be deposited at National Museum of Natural History, Colombo, Sri Lanka), C. mirifica sp. nov. (holotype ♂: Uwella, primary forest on the road Uwella-Ratnapura, 11.5km NW of Balangoda; Ratnapura District, Sabaragamuwa Province; N6.6968, E80.6059; 16-vii-2012; to be deposited at National Museum of Natural History, Colombo, Sri Lanka), Platysticta secreta sp. nov. (holotype ♂: Hasalaka; Kandy District, Central Province; N7.3535, E80.9509; 31-v-1975; deposited at National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, USA) and P. serendibica sp. nov. (holotype ♂: Kanneliya; Galle District, Southern Province; N6.2291, E80.3834; 8 & 9-vi-1975; deposited at National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, USA). Additionally, a determination key, figures showing morphological details and coloration in life, as well as distribution maps for all species are presented. Based on molecular analysis of 21 taxa, the phylogeny of Platystictinae is presented and discussed from the zoogeographical and paleogeographical point of view. Sri Lankan species, traditionally placed in the genera Platysticta Selys and Drepanosticta Laidlaw / Ceylonosticta Fraser, separated into distinct clades within the subfamily as presently defined, but the monophyletic nature

  10. TAXONOMY AND GENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF PANGASIIDAE, ASIAN CATFISHES, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudhy Gustiano

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Pangasiids are economically important riverine catfishes generally residing in freshwater from the Indian subcontinent to the Indonesian Archipelago. The systematics of this family are still poorly known. Consequently, lack of such basic information impedes the understanding of the biology of the Pangasiids and the study of their aquaculture potential as well as improvement of seed production and growth performance. The objectives of the present study are to clarify phylogeny of this family based on a biometric analysis and molecular evidence using 12S ribosomal mtDNA on the total of 1070 specimens. The study revealed that 28 species are recognised as valid in Pangasiidae. Four genera are also recognized as Helicophagus Bleeker 1858, Pangasianodon Chevey 1930, Pteropangasius Fowler 1937, and Pangasius Valenciennes 1840 instead of two as reported by previous workers. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recognised genera, and genetic relationships among taxa. Overall, trees from the different analyses show similar topologies and confirm the hypothesis derived from geological history, palaeontology, and similar models in other taxa of fishes from the same area. The oldest genus may already have existed when the Asian mainland was still connected to the islands in the southern part about 20 million years ago.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of Menthinae (Lamiaceae, Nepetoideae, Mentheae)--Taxonomy, biogeography and conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuchler, Christian; Meimberg, Harald; Heubl, Günther

    2010-05-01

    and Mentha, relationships not suggested previously. The enigmatic Micromeria cymuligera is close to Mentha and possibly is a representative of this genus. Species of Acinos, now regarded as part of Clinopodium, are mixed up with species of Ziziphora, questioning either the inclusion of Acinos in Clinopodium or generic distinctness of Ziziphora. All data sets suggest a monophyly of the New World taxa and argue for long distance dispersal from the Old World, rather than a vicariance explanation. Bystropogon marks the split up between the two lineages. Inclusion of 22 genera intermixed with Clinopodium spp. in the New World clade provides evidence that the current circumscription of the genus is highly unnatural. Low sequence divergence resulting in low phylogenetic resolution especially at the base of the clade indicate a rapid radiation accompanied by considerable ecological diversification and speciation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Australian lungfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: valencia orange [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: rabbit [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: pronghorn [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: peach [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: cabbage [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: rape [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: oat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: white rhinoceros [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: potato [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uberosum_S.png Solanum_tuberosum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: rice [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ativa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: onion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: sperm whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ephalus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: apple [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: loblolly pine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nus_taeda_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Arabian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: platypus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: giraffe [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pardalis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: white spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Picea_glauca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: giant panda [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lanoleuca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: blue whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: barley [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _S.png Hordeum_vulgare_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: lemon damsel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: water bears [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Echiniscus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=S ht...tp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=58 ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asian Swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Papilio_xuthus_S.png Papilio_xuthus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuth...us&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=123 ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: koji mold [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ergillus_oryzae_S.png Aspergillus_oryzae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus...+oryzae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=63 ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Danio rerio [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available io_NL.png Danio_rerio_S.png Danio_rerio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio...+rerio&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=92 ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Grey heron [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Ardea_cinerea_S.png Ardea_cinerea_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cine...rea&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=2 ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ramazzottius [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ttius_S.png Ramazzottius_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ra...mazzottius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=NS... http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=203 ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Common mormon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Papilio_polytes_S.png Papilio_polytes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+pol...ytes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=80 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guillardia theta [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available illardia_theta_S.png Guillardia_theta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+the...ta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=60 ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Peanut [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gaea_S.png Arachis_hypogaea_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=L htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ar...achis+hypogaea&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=207 ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: pig [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=...NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=166 ...

  5. Basal/HER2 breast carcinomas: integrating molecular taxonomy with cancer stem cell dynamics to predict primary resistance to trastuzumab (Herceptin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cufí, Silvia; Moreno, José Manuel; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Urruticoechea, Ander; Martín, Ángel G; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-15

    early tumor responses to trastuzumab should identify biological determinants that causally underlie the intrinsic flexibility of HER2-positive CSCs to "enter" into or "exit" from trastuzumab-sensitive states. An accurate integration of CSC cellular states and EMT-related biomarkers with the currently available breast cancer molecular taxonomy may significantly improve our ability to make a priori decisions about whether patients belonging to HER2 subtypes differentially enriched with a "mesenchymal transition signature" (e.g., luminal/HER2 vs. basal/HER2) would distinctly benefit from trastuzumab-based therapy ab initio.

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sitka spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Picea_sitchensis_L.png Picea_sitchensis_NL.png Picea_sitchen...sis_S.png Picea_sitchensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aquilegia formosa [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Aquilegia formosa Aquilegia formosa Aquilegia_formosa_L.png Aquilegia_formosa_NL.png Aqui...legia_formosa_S.png Aquilegia_formosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegi...a+formosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: black cottonwood [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available black cottonwood Populus trichocarpa Populus_trichocarpa_L.png Populus_trichocarpa_NL.png Populus_trichoc...arpa_S.png Populus_trichocarpa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichoc...arpa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=NL http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: llama [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ma_L.png Lama_glama_NL.png Lama_glama_S.png Lama_glama_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Lama+glama&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: crested porcupine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . Hystrix_cristata_L.png Hystrix_cristata_NL.png Hystrix_cristata_S.png Hystrix_cristata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cristata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=H...ystrix+cristata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cri...stata&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cristata&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: thale cress [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Arabidopsis_thaliana_S.png Arabidopsis_thaliana_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i...=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Eastern Gorilla [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Gorilla_beringei_L.png Gorilla_beringei_NL.png Gorilla_beringei_S.png Gorilla_beringei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Gorilla+beringei&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=...Gorilla+beringei&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gorilla+be...ringei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gorilla+beringei&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: rhesus monkey [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acaca_mulatta_L.png Macaca_mulatta_NL.png Macaca_mulatta_S.png Macaca_mulatta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: domestic silkworm [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available x_mori_S.png Bombyx_mori_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bombyx+mori&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Bombyx+mori&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bomb...yx+mori&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bombyx+mori&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: emperor penguin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_NL.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_S.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Aptenodytes+forsteri&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apte...nodytes+forsteri&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aptenodyte...s+forsteri&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aptenodytes+forsteri&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Lotus japonicus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Lotus japonicus Lotus japonicus Lotus_japonicus_L.png Lotus_japonicus_NL.png Lotus_japonicus_S.png Lotus_jap...onicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=L ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japon...icus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese macaque [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e Macaca_fuscata_L.png Macaca_fuscata_NL.png Macaca_fuscata_S.png Macaca_fuscata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fusc...ata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: brown bear [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_arctos_L.png Ursus_arctos_NL.png Ursus_arctos_S.png Ursus_arctos_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: moose [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lces_L.png Alces_alces_NL.png Alces_alces_S.png Alces_alces_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese squirrel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available urus_lis_L.png Sciurus_lis_NL.png Sciurus_lis_S.png Sciurus_lis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sea anemone [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nia_equina_S.png Actinia_equina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese skink [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utatus_L.png Eumeces_latiscutatus_NL.png Eumeces_latiscutatus_S.png Eumeces_latiscutatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Eumeces+latiscutatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Eumeces+latiscutatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eum...eces+latiscutatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eumeces+latiscutatus&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild goat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Capra_aegagrus_L.png Capra_aegagrus_NL.png Capra_aegagrus_S.png Capra_aegagrus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagru...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: quaking aspen [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Populus_tremuloides_S.png Populus_tremuloides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Po...pulus+tremuloides&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: rainbow trout [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ss_L.png Oncorhynchus_mykiss_NL.png Oncorhynchus_mykiss_S.png Oncorhynchus_mykiss_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+mykiss&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncor...hynchus+mykiss&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus...+mykiss&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+mykiss&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: tiger [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ra_tigris_L.png Panthera_tigris_NL.png Panthera_tigris_S.png Panthera_tigris_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigri...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: bread wheat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icum_aestivum_S.png Triticum_aestivum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aesti...vum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: oriental silverfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olepisma_villosa_NL.png Ctenolepisma_villosa_S.png Ctenolepisma_villosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+v...illosa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: wapiti [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cervus_canadensis_L.png Cervus_canadensis_NL.png Cervus_canadensis_S.png Cervus_canadensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+canadensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Cervus+canadensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+...canadensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+canadensis&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: tuatara [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Sphenodon_punctatus_NL.png Sphenodon_punctatus_S.png Sphenodon_punctatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+...punctatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctat...us&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctatus&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Atlantic hagfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Myxine_glutinosa_NL.png Myxine_glutinosa_S.png Myxine_glutinosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=N...L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: upland cotton [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gossypium_hirsutum_S.png Gossypium_hirsutum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypi...um+hirsutum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: reindeer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a Rangifer_tarandus_L.png Rangifer_tarandus_NL.png Rangifer_tarandus_S.png Rangifer_tarandus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangi...fer+tarandus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Comb jelly [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cucumis_S.png Beroe_cucumis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucum...is&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=30 ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: rat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available egicus_L.png Rattus_norvegicus_NL.png Rattus_norvegicus_S.png Rattus_norvegicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+no...rvegicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild radish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Raphanus_raphanistrum_S.png Raphanus_raphanistrum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: barrel medic [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Medicago_truncatula_S.png Medicago_truncatula_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Med...icago+truncatula&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Bornean orangutan [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Pongo_pygmaeus_L.png Pongo_pygmaeus_NL.png Pongo_pygmaeus_S.png Pongo_pygmaeus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygm...aeus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: mandrill [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drillus_sphinx_L.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NL.png Mandrillus_sphinx_S.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=M...andrillus+sphinx&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus...+sphinx&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: sea urchin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotus_lividus_NL.png Paracentrotus_lividus_S.png Paracentrotus_lividus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+lividus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+...lividus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+livid...us&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+lividus&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: phylum Xenoturbellida [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available noturbella_bocki_NL.png Xenoturbella_bocki_S.png Xenoturbella_bocki_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: southern cassowary [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _L.png Casuarius_casuarius_NL.png Casuarius_casuarius_S.png Casuarius_casuarius_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuari...us+casuarius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casu...arius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: ostrich [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available amelus_NL.png Struthio_camelus_S.png Struthio_camelus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Struthio+camelus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: turkey [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gris_gallopavo_NL.png Meleagris_gallopavo_S.png Meleagris_gallopavo_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: Atlantic salmon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _salar_NL.png Salmo_salar_S.png Salmo_salar_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+sa...lar&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: fathead minnow [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available las_L.png Pimephales_promelas_NL.png Pimephales_promelas_S.png Pimephales_promelas_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pime...phales+promelas&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+...promelas&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Nile crocodile [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oticus_L.png Crocodylus_niloticus_NL.png Crocodylus_niloticus_S.png Crocodylus_niloticus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cro...codylus+niloticus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: tomato [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Solanum_lycopersicum_S.png Solanum_lycopersicum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sola...num+lycopersicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: sorghum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sorghum Sorghum bicolor Sorghum_bicolor_L.png Sorghum_bicolor_NL.png Sorghum_bicolor_S.png Sorg...hum_bicolor_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=L http://b...iosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorg...hum+bicolor&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: chicken [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chicken Gallus gallus Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Gallus_gallus_L.png Gallus_gallus_NL.png Gallus..._gallus_S.png Gallus_gallus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus...+gallus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: wine grape [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available wine grape Vitis vinifera Vitis_vinifera_L.png Vitis_vinifera_NL.png Vitis_vinifera_S.png Vitis_vinifera..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=L http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Acytostelium subglobosum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acytostelium subglobosum Acytostelium subglobosum Acytostelium_subglobosum_L.png Acytostelium_subglobos...um_NL.png Acytostelium_subglobosum_S.png Acytostelium_subglobosum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytostelium+subglobosum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Acytostelium+subglobosum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytostelium+subglobos...um&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytostelium+subglobosum&t=N

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Lotus corniculatus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Lotus corniculatus Lotus corniculatus Lotus_corniculatus_L.png Lotus_corniculatus_NL.png Lotus_corn...iculatus_S.png Lotus_corniculatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corn...iculatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: honey bee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available honey bee Apis mellifera Arthropoda Apis_mellifera_L.png Apis_mellifera_NL.png Apis_mellife...ra_S.png Apis_mellifera_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellife...ra&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: field mustard [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available field mustard Brassica rapa Brassica_rapa_L.png Brassica_rapa_NL.png Brassica_rapa_...S.png Brassica_rapa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=L http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brass...ica+rapa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Polysphondylium pallidum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Polysphondylium pallidum Polysphondylium pallidum Polysphondylium_pallidum_L.png Polysph...ondylium_pallidum_NL.png Polysphondylium_pallidum_S.png Polysphondylium_pallidum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysph...ondylium+pallidum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysph...ondylium+pallidum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=N

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Bacillus subtilis [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis Bacillus subtilis Bacillus_subtilis_L.png Bacillus_subtilis_NL.png Bacillus..._subtilis_S.png Bacillus_subtilis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus...+subtilis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: soybean [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available soybean Glycine max Glycine_max_L.png Glycine_max_NL.png Glycine_max_S.png Glycine_max..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: tobacco [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tobacco Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana_tabacum_L.png Nicotiana_tabacum_NL.png Nicotiana_tabacum_S.png Nicotian...a_tabacum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotian...a+tabacum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Cryptococcus neoformans [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans Filobasidiella neoformans Filobasidiella_neoformans_L.png Filobasidiella_neoforman...s_NL.png Filobasidiella_neoformans_S.png Filobasidiella_neoformans_NS.png http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoforman

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: lion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eo_L.png Panthera_leo_NL.png Panthera_leo_S.png Panthera_leo_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Panthera+leo&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+leo&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+leo&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+leo&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: radish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivus_S.png Raphanus_sativus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+sativus&t=L htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+sativus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Raphanus+sativus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+sativus&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: emu [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Dromaius_novaehollandiae_NL.png Dromaius_novaehollandiae_S.png Dromaius_novaehollandiae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: tiger puffer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Takifugu_rubripes_NL.png Takifugu_rubripes_S.png Takifugu_rubripes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: chimpanzee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _troglodytes_L.png Pan_troglodytes_NL.png Pan_troglodytes_S.png Pan_troglodytes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglod...ytes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: sunflower [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thus_annuus_S.png Helianthus_annuus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuu...s&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: fission yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_L.png Schizosaccharomy...ces_pombe_NL.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_S.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomy...ces+pombe&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomy...ces+pombe&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NS

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: bighorn sheep [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tyla Ovis_canadensis_L.png Ovis_canadensis_NL.png Ovis_canadensis_S.png Ovis_canadensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+canadensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovi...s+canadensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+canadensi...s&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+canadensis&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: sika deer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ervus_nippon_L.png Cervus_nippon_NL.png Cervus_nippon_S.png Cervus_nippon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: zebra finch [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Taeniopygia_guttata_NL.png Taeniopygia_guttata_S.png Taeniopygia_guttata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+gu...ttata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t...=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Dictyostelium discoideum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum Dictyostelium discoideum Dictyostelium_discoideum_L.png Dictyostelium_discoi...deum_NL.png Dictyostelium_discoideum_S.png Dictyostelium_discoideum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoideum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoi...deum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoi...deum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoideum&t=N

  12. Transient currents in a molecular photo-diode

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, E. G.; Leonov, V. O.; May, V.; Hänggi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Light-induced charge transmission through a molecular junction (molecular diode) is studied in the framework of a HOMO-LUMO model and in using a kinetic description. Expressions are presented for the sequential (hopping) and direct (tunneling) transient current components together with kinetic equations governing the time-dependent populations of the neutral and charged molecular states which participate in the current formation. Resonant and off-resonant charge transmission processes are ana...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: hamadryas baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hamadryas baboon Papio hamadryas Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio..._hamadryas_L.png Papio_hamadryas_NL.png Papio_hamadryas_S.png Papio_hamadryas_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio...+hamadryas&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=186 ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Anopheles stephensi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Anopheles stephensi Anopheles stephensi Arthropoda Anopheles_stephensi_L.png Anopheles_step...hensi_NL.png Anopheles_stephensi_S.png Anopheles_stephensi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=149 ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese medaka [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Oryzias_latipes_L.png Oryzias_latipes..._NL.png Oryzias_latipes_S.png Oryzias_latipes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+latip...es&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+latipes&t=NL http:/.../biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+latipes&t=S http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+latipes&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=195 ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Schistosoma japonicum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum Schistosoma japonicum Platyhelminthes Schistosoma_japonicum_L.png Schistosoma_japon...icum_NL.png Schistosoma_japonicum_S.png Schistosoma_japonicum_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japon...icum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japon...icum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=132 ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Human [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_L.png Homo_sapiens_NL.png Homo_sapiens_S.png Homo_sapiens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=157 ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: cattle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rus_L.png Bos_taurus_NL.png Bos_taurus_S.png Bos_taurus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Bos+taurus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=28 ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: sheep [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es_L.png Ovis_aries_NL.png Ovis_aries_S.png Ovis_aries_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Ovis+aries&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=156 ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: house mouse [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ulus_L.png Mus_musculus_NL.png Mus_musculus_S.png Mus_musculus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=146 ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: spotted seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oca_largha_L.png Phoca_largha_NL.png Phoca_largha_S.png Phoca_largha_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=66 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Toxoplasma gondii [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii Toxoplasma gondii Toxoplasma_gondii_L.png Toxoplasma_gondii_NL.png Toxoplasma..._gondii_S.png Toxoplasma_gondii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma...+gondii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma+gondii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma+gondii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplas...ma+gondii&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=113 ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: slipper animalcule [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available slipper animalcule Paramecium tetraurelia Paramecium_tetraurelia_L.png Paramecium_tetraurelia_NL.png Paramec...ium_tetraurelia_S.png Paramecium_tetraurelia_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramec...ium+tetraurelia&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tet...raurelia&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tetraur...elia&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tetraurelia&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=204 ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Diplazium hachijoense [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diplazium hachijoense Diplazium hachijoense Diplazium_hachijoense_L.png Diplazium_hachijoe...nse_NL.png Diplazium_hachijoense_S.png Diplazium_hachijoense_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoe...nse&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=84 ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypanosoma_bruce...i_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+bruce...i&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Ratsnake [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese Ratsnake Elaphe climacophora Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Elaphe_climacophora_L.png Elaphe_clim...acophora_NL.png Elaphe_climacophora_S.png Elaphe_climacophora_NS.png http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=3 ...

  7. The integrative future of taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vences Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxonomy is the biological discipline that identifies, describes, classifies and names extant and extinct species and other taxa. Nowadays, species taxonomy is confronted with the challenge to fully incorporate new theory, methods and data from disciplines that study the origin, limits and evolution of species. Results Integrative taxonomy has been proposed as a framework to bring together these conceptual and methodological developments. Here we review perspectives for an integrative taxonomy that directly bear on what species are, how they can be discovered, and how much diversity is on Earth. Conclusions We conclude that taxonomy needs to be pluralistic to improve species discovery and description, and to develop novel protocols to produce the much-needed inventory of life in a reasonable time. To cope with the large number of candidate species revealed by molecular studies of eukaryotes, we propose a classification scheme for those units that will facilitate the subsequent assembly of data sets for the formal description of new species under the Linnaean system, and will ultimately integrate the activities of taxonomists and molecular biologists.

  8. Bad taxonomy can kill : molecular reevaluation of Unio mancus Lamarck, 1819 (Bivalvia : Unionidae and its accepted subspecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prie V.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The conservation status of European unionid species rests on the scientific knowledge of the 1980s, before the current revival of taxonomic reappraisals based on molecular characters. The taxonomic status of Unio mancus Lamarck, 1819, superficially similar to Unio pictorum (Linnaeus, 1758 and often synonymized with it, is re-evaluated based on a random sample of major French drainages and a systematic sample of historical type localities. We confirm the validity of U. mancus as a distinct species occurring in France and Spain, where it is structured into three geographical units here ranked as subspecies: U. m. mancus [Atlantic drainages, eastern Pyrenees, Spanish Mediterranean drainages], U. m. turtonii Payraudeau, 1826 [coastal drainages East of the Rhône and Corsica] and U. m. requienii Michaud, 1831 [Seine, Saône-Rhône, and coastal drainages West of the Rhône]. Many populations of Unio mancus have been extirpated during the 20th century and the remaining populations continue to be under pressure; U. mancus satisfies the criteria to be listed as «Endangered» in the IUCN Red List.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sympetrum frequens [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _frequens_NL.png Sympetrum_frequens_S.png Sympetrum_frequens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: pea aphid [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sum_NL.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_S.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.c...gi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: alpaca [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gna_pacos_L.png Vicugna_pacos_NL.png Vicugna_pacos_S.png Vicugna_pacos_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: maize [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available maize Zea mays Zea_mays_L.png Zea_mays_NL.png Zea_mays_S.png Zea_mays_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea...+mays&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: red fox [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _vulpes_L.png Vulpes_vulpes_NL.png Vulpes_vulpes_S.png Vulpes_vulpes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aegilops speltoides [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es_NL.png Aegilops_speltoides_S.png Aegilops_speltoides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sugarcane [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Saccharum_officinarum_S.png Saccharum_officinarum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Chile pepper [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available annuum_S.png Capsicum_annuum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: white shark [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available harias_L.png Carcharodon_carcharias_NL.png Carcharodon_carcharias_S.png Carcharodon_carcharias_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherichia_coli..._S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aardvark [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available opus_afer_L.png Orycteropus_afer_NL.png Orycteropus_afer_S.png Orycteropus_afer_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropu...s+afer&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: fruit fly [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available la_melanogaster_NL.png Drosophila_melanogaster_S.png Drosophila_melanogaster_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosop...hila+melanogaster&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophil...a+melanogaster&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Clementine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_clementina_S.png Citrus_clementina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementi...na&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: dugong [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Dugong_dugon_NL.png Dugong_dugon_S.png Dugong_dugon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Doguera baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Doguera baboon Papio anubis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio_anubis_L.png Papio..._anubis_NL.png Papio_anubis_S.png Papio_anubis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio...+anubis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: horse [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available horse Equus caballus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Equus_caballus_L.png Equus_caball...us_NL.png Equus_caballus_S.png Equus_caballus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=NL http:...//biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: Magellanic penguin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Spheniscus_magel...lanicus_L.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_NL.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_S.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_NS.png h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magell

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: saddleback dolphin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available saddleback dolphin Delphinus delphis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Cetacea Delphinus_delphi...s_L.png Delphinus_delphis_NL.png Delphinus_delphis_S.png Delphinus_delphis_NS.png htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphi...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphi...s&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphis&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: mummichog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Fundulus_heteroclitus_L.png Fund...ulus_heteroclitus_NL.png Fundulus_heteroclitus_S.png Fundulus_heteroclitus_NS.png http://biosci...encedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fundulus+heteroclitus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fund...ulus+heteroclitus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fund...ulus+heteroclitus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fundulus+heteroclitus&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Chinchilla [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Chinchilla Chinchilla lanigera Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Chinchi...lla_lanigera_L.png Chinchilla_lanigera_NL.png Chinchilla_lanigera_S.png Chinchilla_lanigera_NS.png http...://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchilla+lanigera&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchi...lla+lanigera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchi...lla+lanigera&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchilla+lanigera&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: coelacanth [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Latimeria_chalumnae_L.png Latimer...ia_chalumnae_NL.png Latimeria_chalumnae_S.png Latimeria_chalumnae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalumnae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeri...a+chalumnae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalu...mnae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalumnae&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: bottlenosed dolphin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bottlenosed dolphin Tursiops truncatus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Cetacea Tursiops..._truncatus_L.png Tursiops_truncatus_NL.png Tursiops_truncatus_S.png Tursiops_truncatus_NS.p...ng http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tursiops+truncatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tursiops...+truncatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tursiops...+truncatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tursiops+truncatus&t=NS http

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Planaria [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Dugesia_japonica_S.png Dugesia_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesi...a+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=124 ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guinea baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Guinea baboon Papio papio Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio_papio_L.png Papio_papi...o_NL.png Papio_papio_S.png Papio_papio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papi...o&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: okapi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available okapi Okapia johnstoni Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Okapi...a_johnstoni_L.png Okapia_johnstoni_NL.png Okapia_johnstoni_S.png Okapia_johnstoni_NS.png http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapi...a+johnstoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnston...i&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asiatic tapir [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Asiatic tapir Tapirus indicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Tapirus_indicus_L.png Tapi...rus_indicus_NL.png Tapirus_indicus_S.png Tapirus_indicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+ind...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: purple urchin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available purple urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Echinodermata Strongylocentrotus_purpuratus_L.png Strongylocentr...otus_purpuratus_NL.png Strongylocentrotus_purpuratus_S.png Strongylocentrotus_purpu...ratus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=L http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=NL http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese weasel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese weasel Mustela itatsi Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Must...ela_itatsi_L.png Mustela_itatsi_NL.png Mustela_itatsi_S.png Mustela_itatsi_NS.png http://biosciencedb...c.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+it...atsi&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asiatic elephant [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Asiatic elephant Elephas maximus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Elephas_max...imus_L.png Elephas_maximus_NL.png Elephas_maximus_S.png Elephas_maximus_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+max...imus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: sea lamprey [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus Chordata/Vertebrata/Hyperoartia Petromyzon_marinus_L.png Petromy...zon_marinus_NL.png Petromyzon_marinus_S.png Petromyzon_marinus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Petromyzon+marinus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Petromyzon+ma...rinus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Petromyzon+marinus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Petromyzon+marinus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: moss [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sp_patens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2...e+patens%2e&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t...=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Oryzias javanicus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oryzias javanicus Oryzias javanicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Oryzias_javanicus_L.png Oryzias_java...nicus_NL.png Oryzias_javanicus_S.png Oryzias_javanicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javan...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=S ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=77 ...

  1. The Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: Current Practices at Polytechnics in Bangladesh and Its Effects in Developing Students' Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haolader, Faruque A.; Ali, Md Ramjan; Foysol, Khan Md

    2015-01-01

    Polytechnics in Bangladesh endeavour to produce quality graduates for national and international job markets. The quality of graduates depends on several factors. This study examines the implementation process of the polytechnic curriculum with the objectives of determining the current level of practices in learning/teaching material design, in…

  2. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@sci.uut.ac.ir; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-05

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I–V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive. - Highlights: • Modeling a DNA based molecular transistor and studying its transport properties. • Choosing the appropriate DNA sequence using the quantum chaos tools. • Choosing the functional interval for voltages via the inverse participation ratio tool. • Detecting the rectifier and negative differential resistance behavior of DNA.

  3. Current induced light emission and light induced current in molecular tunneling junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of metal-molecule-metal junctions with light is considered within a simple generic model. We show, for the first time, that light induced current in unbiased junctions can take place when the bridging molecule is characterized by a strong charge-transfer transition. The same model shows current induced light emission under potential bias that exceeds the molecular excitation energy. Results based on realistic estimates of molecular-lead coupling and molecule-radiation field in...

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis and Current Therapy in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Dan Taksony Solyom; O'Rourke, Colm J; Taranta, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    approaches. Depending on the cellular target of malignant transformation, a large spectrum of molecular and morphological patterns is observed. As such, it is crucial to advance our existing understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of iCCA, particularly its genomic heterogeneity, to improve current...... clinical strategies and patient outcome. This was achieved for other cancers, such as breast carcinoma, facilitated by the delineation of patient subsets and of precision therapies. In iCCA, many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event....... In this review, we will focus on the key molecular achievements that are currently advancing the characterization and stratification of iCCA. We will discuss current clinical practice and how genomic achievements may advance diagnosis and therapy as well as ultimately improve patient outcome....

  5. Constructing a Business Model Taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Pernille; Nielsen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The paper proposes a research design recipe capable of leading to future business model taxonomies and discusses the potential benefits and implications of achieving this goal. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper provides a review of relevant scholarly literature about business...... models to clarify the subject as well as highlighting the importance of past studies of business model classifications. In addition it reviews the scholarly literature on relevant methodological approaches, such as cluster analysis and latent class analysis, for constructing a business model taxonomy....... The two literature streams combined to form the basis for the suggested recipe. Findings: The paper highlights the need for further large-scale empirical studies leading to a potential business model taxonomy, a topic that is currently under-exposed even though its merits are highlighted continuously...

  6. Optical conversion of pure spin currents in hybrid molecular devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, May C; Ma'Mari, Fatma Al; Rogers, Matthew; Gonçalves, Francisco J; Moorsom, Timothy; Brataas, Arne; Stamps, Robert; Ali, Mannan; Burnell, Gavin; Hickey, B J; Cespedes, Oscar

    2017-10-13

    Carbon-based molecules offer unparalleled potential for THz and optical devices controlled by pure spin currents: a low-dissipation flow of electronic spins with no net charge displacement. However, the research so far has been focused on the electrical conversion of the spin imbalance, where molecular materials are used to mimic their crystalline counterparts. Here, we use spin currents to access the molecular dynamics and optical properties of a fullerene layer. The spin mixing conductance across Py/C60 interfaces is increased by 10% (5 × 1018 m-2) under optical irradiation. Measurements show up to a 30% higher light absorbance and a factor of 2 larger photoemission during spin pumping. We also observe a 0.15 THz slowdown and a narrowing of the vibrational peaks. The effects are attributed to changes in the non-radiative damping and energy transfer. This opens new research paths in hybrid magneto-molecular optoelectronics, and the optical detection of spin physics in these materials.Carbon-based molecules could prove useful in terahertz and optical devices controlled by pure spin currents. Here, conversely, the authors use spin currents to probe molecular dynamics and enhance the optical response of a fullerene layer, enabling hybrid magneto-molecular optoelectronic devices.

  7. Making Mosquito Taxonomy Useful: A Stable Classification of Tribe Aedini that Balances Utility with Current Knowledge of Evolutionary Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Richard C.; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Fonseca, Dina M.; Schultz, Ted R.; Price, Dana C.; Strickman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The tribe Aedini (Family Culicidae) contains approximately one-quarter of the known species of mosquitoes, including vectors of deadly or debilitating disease agents. This tribe contains the genus Aedes, which is one of the three most familiar genera of mosquitoes. During the past decade, Aedini has been the focus of a series of extensive morphology-based phylogenetic studies published by Reinert, Harbach, and Kitching (RH&K). Those authors created 74 new, elevated or resurrected genera from what had been the single genus Aedes, almost tripling the number of genera in the entire family Culicidae. The proposed classification is based on subjective assessments of the “number and nature of the characters that support the branches” subtending particular monophyletic groups in the results of cladistic analyses of a large set of morphological characters of representative species. To gauge the stability of RH&K’s generic groupings we reanalyzed their data with unweighted parsimony jackknife and maximum-parsimony analyses, with and without ordering 14 of the characters as in RH&K. We found that their phylogeny was largely weakly supported and their taxonomic rankings failed priority and other useful taxon-naming criteria. Consequently, we propose simplified aedine generic designations that 1) restore a classification system that is useful for the operational community; 2) enhance the ability of taxonomists to accurately place new species into genera; 3) maintain the progress toward a natural classification based on monophyletic groups of species; and 4) correct the current classification system that is subject to instability as new species are described and existing species more thoroughly defined. We do not challenge the phylogenetic hypotheses generated by the above-mentioned series of morphological studies. However, we reduce the ranks of the genera and subgenera of RH&K to subgenera or informal species groups, respectively, to preserve stability as new data

  8. Molecular Testing of Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kyung Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular pathologic testing plays an important role for the diagnosis, prognostication and decision of treatment strategy in lymphoproliferative disease. Here, we briefly review the molecular tests currently used for lymphoproliferative disease and those which will be implicated in clinical practice in the near future. Specifically, this guideline addresses the clonality test for B- and T-cell proliferative lesions, molecular cytogenetic tests for malignant lymphoma, determination of cell-of-origin in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and molecular genetic alterations incorporated in the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms. Finally, a new perspective on the next-generation sequencing for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purpose in malignant lymphoma will be summarized.

  9. Molecular Testing of Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Yoon, Sun Och; Paik, Jin Ho; Kim, Young A; Shin, Bong Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Cha, Hee Jeong; Kim, Ji Eun; Huh, Jooryung; Ko, Young-Hyeh

    2017-05-01

    Molecular pathologic testing plays an important role for the diagnosis, prognostication and decision of treatment strategy in lymphoproliferative disease. Here, we briefly review the molecular tests currently used for lymphoproliferative disease and those which will be implicated in clinical practice in the near future. Specifically, this guideline addresses the clonality test for B- and T-cell proliferative lesions, molecular cytogenetic tests for malignant lymphoma, determination of cell-of-origin in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and molecular genetic alterations incorporated in the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms. Finally, a new perspective on the next-generation sequencing for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purpose in malignant lymphoma will be summarized.

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Australian echidna [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Australian echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Prototheria Tachygloss...us_aculeatus_L.png Tachyglossus_aculeatus_NL.png Tachyglossus_aculeatus_S.png Tachyglossus_aculeat...us_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/ta...xonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: dog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dog Canis lupus familiaris Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Canis_lupus..._familiaris_L.png Canis_lupus_familiaris_NL.png Canis_lupus_familiaris_S.png Canis_lupus_familiari...s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: domestic pigeon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available domestic pigeon Columba livia Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Columba_livia_L.png Columba_livia_NL.png Columba_livi...a_S.png Columba_livia_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese serow [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese serow Capricornis crispus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Capricorn...is_crispus_L.png Capricornis_crispus_NL.png Capricornis_crispus_S.png Capricornis_crispus..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricorn...is+crispus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: pygmy chimpanzee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pygmy chimpanzee Pan paniscus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Pan_pani...scus_L.png Pan_paniscus_NL.png Pan_paniscus_S.png Pan_paniscus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=NL http:...//biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=NS ...

  15. THE CURRENT METHODS FOR MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS OF FISH DISEASES (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zaloilo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The methods of molecular diagnostic (MMD gradually become widespread in modern fish farming. MMD contain a wide variety of specific approaches, each of which has distinct limits of their possible applications and is characterized by individual peculiarities in practical performance. In addition to high sensitivity and the possibility of rapid diagnostics, the main advantage of molecular methods is to determine the uncultivated infectious agents. DNA amplification allows identifying pathogenic microorganisms at very small quantities even in the minimum sample volume. Molecular methods of diagnostic enable the determination of infection in latent or acute phases. These methods allow showing the differences between pathogens with similar antigenic structures. The current literature data on this subject usually show a methodology in the narrow context of the tasks or practical results obtained through such approaches. Thus, a synthesis of existing information on the mechanisms of action and the limits of the typical problems of basic methods of molecular diagnostics are an urgent task of fish breeding. In particular, the following description will more effectively choose one or several approaches to identify pathogens in fish. Findings. This paper reviews the basic molecular methods that are used in the world's aquaculture for diagnosis of various diseases in commercial fish species. Originality. This work is a generalization of data on the principles and mechanisms for the implementation of diagnostics based on modern molecular techniques. For each of the mentioned approaches, the most promising areas of application were shown. The information is provided in the form of a comparative analysis of each methodology, indicating positive and negative practical aspects. Practical value. The current review of modern methods of molecular diagnostic in aquaculture is focused on practical application. Generalizing and analytical information can be

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations on the ionic current through charged nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, J. M.; Zou, X. Q.; Xie, Y. B.; Wang, Y. G.

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to investigate the ionic current through charged nanopores, and the results were compared with the calculation of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations based on the continuum theory. Results show that the current obtained by MD simulation is lower than the current calculated by PNP equations, and the discrepancy depends on the surface charge density of the nanopores. Also, MD simulation shows that the contribution of the electro-osmotic flow effect on ionic current could be 10% higher than the results obtained by solving PNP equations. Since the PNP equations do not take the effect of the pore wall into consideration, we suggest that adjusting the diffusion coefficient in the PNP equations can obtain more accurate results when calculating the ionic current through charged nanopores.

  17. Molecular taxonomy and identification within the Antarctic genus Trematomus (Notothenioidei, Teleostei): How valuable is barcoding with COI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautredou, A.-C.; Bonillo, C.; Denys, G.; Cruaud, C.; Ozouf-Costaz, C.; Lecointre, G.; Dettai, A.

    2010-08-01

    The Trematominae are a particularly interesting subfamily within the antarctic suborder Notothenioidei (Teleostei). The 14 closely related species occupy a large range of ecological of niches, extremely useful for evolutionary and biogeography studies in the Antarctic Ocean. But some Trematomus species can be difficult to identify by using morphological criteria, specially young stages and damaged specimens. Molecular identification would therefore be highly useful, however the suitability of the cytochrome oxidase I gene in a barcoding approach needs to be assessed. We evaluated species delineation within the genus Trematomus comparing morphological identification, nuclear markers (the rhodopsin retrogene and a new nuclear marker pkd1: polycystic kidney disease 1) and COI. We show that Trematomus vicarius is not distinguishable from Trematomus bernacchii with the molecular markers used, and neither is Trematomus loennbergii from Trematomus lepidorhinus. We suggest that until this is investigated further, studies including these species list them as T. loennbergii/ T. lepidorhinus group, and keep voucher samples and specimens. Generally, COI gives a congruent result with the rhodopsin retrogene, and except for the previously cited species pairs, COI barcoding is efficient for identification in this group. Moreover pkd1 might not be suitable for a phylogenetic study at this scale for this group.

  18. Molecular studies of Callithrix pygmaea (Primates, Platyrrhini based on transferrin intronic and ND1 regions: implications for taxonomy and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagliaro Claudia Helena

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional classifications of Platyrrhini monkeys, based mainly on morphological features, are being contested by recent molecular data. The subfamily Callitrichinae (Platyrrhini, Primates consists of a diverse group of species, many of them considered endangered. Our analysis of two DNA regions, a mtDNA gene (ND1 and a nuclear gene (intronic regions of the transferrin gene, suggests that Callithrix pygmaea may have sufficient variability to justify the existence of subspecies or even separate species. Phylogenetic dendrograms based on the ND1 region show that this species is more closely related to Amazonian than to Atlantic forest marmosets. These results reopen the discussion about diversity and conservation programs based exclusively on traditional classifications.

  19. Integrative taxonomy: Combining morphological, molecular and chemical data for species delineation in the parthenogenetic Trhypochthonius tectorum complex (Acari, Oribatida, Trhypochthoniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigmann Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a long-standing controversial about how parthenogenetic species can be defined in absence of a generally accepted species concept for this reproductive mode. An integrative approach was suggested, combining molecular and morphological data to identify distinct monophyletic entities. Using this approach, speciation of parthenogenetic lineages was recently demonstrated for groups of bdelloid rotifers and oribatid mites. Trhypochthonius tectorum, an oribatid mite from the entirely parthenogenetic desmonomatan family Trhypochthoniidae, is traditionally treated as a single species in Central Europe. However, two new morphological lineages were recently proposed for some Austrian populations of T. tectorum, and were described as novel subspecies (T. silvestris europaeus or form (T. japonicus forma occidentalis. We used the morphological and morphometrical data which led to this separation, and added mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and the chemical composition of complex exocrine oil gland secretions to test this taxonomical hypothesis. This is the first attempt to combine these three types of data for integrative taxonomical investigations of oribatid mites. Results We show that the previous European species T. tectorum represents a species complex consisting of three distinct lineages in Austria (T.tectorum, T. silvestris europaeus and T. japonicus forma occidentalis, each clearly separated by morphology, oil gland secretion profiles and mitochondrial cox1 sequences. This diversification happened in the last ten million years. In contrast to these results, no variation among the lineages was found in the nuclear 18S rDNA. Conclusions Our approach combined morphological, molecular and chemical data to investigate diversity and species delineation in a parthenogenetic oribatid mite species complex. To date, hypotheses of a general oribatid mite phylogeny are manifold, and mostly based on single-method approaches

  20. A taxonomy of automatic differentiation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juedes, D.W. (Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    Many of the current automatic differentiation (AD) tools have similar characteristics. Unfortunately, the similarities between these various AD tools often cannot be easily ascertained by reading the corresponding documentation. To clarify this situation, a taxonomy of AD tools is presented. The taxonomy places AD tools into the Elemental, Extensional, Integral, Operational, and Symbolic classes. This taxonomy is used to classify twenty-nine AD tools. Each tool is examined individually with respect to the mode of differentiation used and the degree of derivatives computed. A list detailing the availability of the surveyed AD tools is provided in the Appendix. 54 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Molecular phylogeny, morphology and taxonomy of Moroccan Triops granarius (Lucas, 1864) (Crustacea: Notostraca), with the description of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Michael; Hundsdoerfer, Anna K

    2016-10-25

    We used three molecular markers to investigate populations of Triops granarius from a study area in western Morocco that had a north-south span of approx. 434 km, the most distant populations situated at more than 470 km distance from each other. Previous studies had already investigated two Triops granarius populations from this region and revealed their affiliation to the major phylogenetic lineage that includes Triops cancriformis. By contrast, based on the geographic position of the type locality and the morphology of the type, Triops granarius s.s. likely belongs to a clade that forms the sister group to American and Australian Triops, i.e. including Triops longicaudatus and Triops australiensis. In the present study a second, hitherto unknown phylogenetic lineage was discovered among Moroccan populations of Triops granarius s.l. Our phylogenetic analyses show that both Moroccan lineages of Triops granarius s.l. represent a pair of genetically and morphologically well differentiated sister species that should be separated from Triops granarius. We therefore formally describe them as two new species, Triops maximus sp. nov. and Triops multifidus sp. nov. The early larval stages of both species show a peculiar morphology with 10 to 15 setae on the exopodite of the 2nd antenna. The number of these setae was generally thought to span five to seven in Notostraca. Despite the fact that the antennal setae form a central part of the main locomotory organ in early instars, we found their number to vary by up to two between body-sides of single individuals.

  2. Increased sampling reveals novel lineages of Entamoeba: consequences of genetic diversity and host specificity for taxonomy and molecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Victory, Emma L; Verweij, Jaco J; Tannich, Egbert; Alfellani, Mohammed; Legarraga, Paulette; Clark, C Graham

    2011-07-01

    To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL) rather than being assigned species names at present. To investigate genetic diversity and host specificity of selected Entamoeba species, a total of 91 new partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained, including 49 from Entamoeba coli, 18 from Entamoeba polecki, and 17 from Entamoeba hartmanni. We propose a new nomenclature for significant variants within established Entamoeba species. Based on current data we propose that the uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoeba infecting humans is called Entamoeba polecki and divided into four subtypes (ST1-ST4) and that Entamoeba coli is divided into two subtypes (ST1-ST2). New hosts for several species were detected and, while host specificity and genetic diversity of several species remain to be clarified, it is clear that previous reliance on cultivated material has given us a misleading and incomplete picture of variation within the genus Entamoeba. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating molecular biomarkers into current clinical management in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudchadkar, Ragini; Gibney, Geoffrey; Sondak, Vernon K

    2014-01-01

    Personalized melanoma medicine has progressed from histopathologic features to serum markers to molecular profiles. Since the identification of activating BRAF mutations and subsequent development of drugs targeting the mutant BRAF protein, oncologists now need to incorporate prognostic and predictive biomarkers into treatment decisions for their melanoma patients. Examples include subgrouping patients by genotype profiles for targeted therapy and the development of serologic, immunohistochemical, and genotype profiles for the selection of patients for immunotherapies. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current status of BRAF mutation testing, as well as promising serologic and molecular profiles that will impact patient care. As further research helps clarify the roles of these factors, the clinical outcomes of melanoma patients promise to be greatly improved.

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: gray slender loris [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: northern fur seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: southern two-toed sloth [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctylus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Choloepus+didactylus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Choloepus+didactylus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Choloepus+didactylus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Choloepus+didactylus&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Philippine flying lemur [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: crab-eating macaque [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: three-spined stickleback [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: common brandling worm [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Eisenia_fetida_S.png Eisenia_fetida_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fe...tida&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=73 ...

  11. Complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA operons of two species of Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda): a molecular resource for taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of important fish pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Jan; Kostadinova, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2015-06-19

    The genus Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda: Diplostomidae) is a diverse group of freshwater parasites with complex life-cycles and global distribution. The larval stages are important pathogens causing eye fluke disease implicated in substantial impacts on natural fish populations and losses in aquaculture. However, the problematic species delimitation and difficulties in the identification of larval stages hamper the assessment of the distributional and host ranges of Diplostomum spp. and their transmission ecology. Total genomic DNA was isolated from adult worms and shotgun sequenced using Illumina MiSeq technology. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons were assembled using established bioinformatic tools and fully annotated. Mt protein-coding genes and nuclear rRNA genes were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood and the resulting topologies compared. We characterised novel complete mt genomes and nuclear rRNA operons of two closely related species, Diplostomum spathaceum and D. pseudospathaceum. Comparative mt genome assessment revealed that the cox1 gene and its 'barcode' region used for molecular identification are the most conserved regions; instead, nad4 and nad5 genes were identified as most promising molecular diagnostic markers. Using the novel data, we provide the first genome wide estimation of the phylogenetic relationships of the order Diplostomida, one of the two fundamental lineages of the Digenea. Analyses of the mitogenomic data invariably recovered the Diplostomidae as a sister lineage of the order Plagiorchiida rather than as a basal lineage of the Diplostomida as inferred in rDNA phylogenies; this was concordant with the mt gene order of Diplostomum spp. exhibiting closer match to the conserved gene order of the Plagiorchiida. Complete sequences of the mt genome and rRNA operon of two species of Diplostomum provide a valuable resource for novel genetic markers for species delineation and

  12. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Cristiane C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Souza, Rangel C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety...... analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online genomic taxonomy whereby researchers and end-users of taxonomy will be able to identify their isolates through a web...

  13. Current molecular techniques for the detection of microbial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Luca; Magnani, Mauro; Saunders, Nick; Harms, Carsten; Bruce, Ian James

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally the detection of microbial pathogens in clinical, environmental or food samples has commonly needed the prelevation of cells by culture before the application ofthe detection strategy. This is done to increase cell number thereby overcoming problems associated with the sensitivity of classical detection strategies. However, culture-based methods have the disadvantages of taking longer, usually are more complex and require skilled personnel as well as not being able to detect viable but non cultivable microbial species. A number of molecular methods have been developed in the last 10 to 15 years to overcome these issues and to facilitate the rapid, accurate, sensitive and cost effective identification and enumeration of microorganisms which are designed to replace and/or support classical approaches to microbial detection. Amongst these new methods, ones based on the polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid hybridization have been shown to be particularly suitable for this purpose. This review generally summarizes some of the current and emerging nucleic acid based molecular approaches for the detection, discrimination andquantification ofmicrobes in environmental, food and clinical samples and includes reference to the recently developing areas of microfluidics and nanotechnology "Lab-on-a-chip".

  14. EPA Web Taxonomy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA's Web Taxonomy is a faceted hierarchical vocabulary used to tag web pages with terms from a controlled vocabulary. Tagging enables search and discovery of EPA's...

  15. Brucella taxonomy and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ficht, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Taxonomy and nomenclature represent man-made systems designed to enhance understanding of the relationship between organisms by comparison of discrete sets of properties. Initial efforts at bacterial taxonomy were flawed as a result of the previous use of nonsystematic approaches including common names resulting in confusing and inaccurate nomenclature. A decision was made to start afresh with bacterial nomenclature and to avoid the hazards experienced in the taxonomic classification of highe...

  16. Current Progress of Nanomaterials in Molecularly Imprinted Electrochemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunju; Yang, Bin; Jiang, Xinxin; Li, Jianping

    2018-01-02

    Nanomaterials have received much attention during the past decade because of their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Nanomaterials possess high chemical reactivity, also high surface energy. Thus, provide a stable immobilization platform for biomolecules, while preserving their reactivity. Due to the conductive and catalytic properties, nanomaterials can also enhance the sensitivity of molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensors by amplifying the electrode surface, increasing the electron transfer, and catalyzing the electrochemical reactions. Molecularly imprinted polymers that contain specific molecular recognition sites can be designed for a particular target analyte. Incorporating nanomaterials into molecularly imprinted polymers is important because nanomaterials can improve the response signal, increase the sensitivity, and decrease the detection limit of the sensors. This study describes the classification of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers, their analytical properties, and their applications in the electrochemical sensors. The progress of the research on nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers and the application of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers is also reviewed.

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: hemichordates (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hemichordates (Acorn worm) Glandiceps hacksi Hemichordata Glandiceps_hacksi_L.png Glandiceps_hack...si_NL.png Glandiceps_hacksi_S.png Glandiceps_hacksi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild Bactrian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odactyla Camelus_ferus_L.png Camelus_ferus_NL.png Camelus_ferus_S.png Camelus_ferus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+f...erus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Gossypium raimondii Ulbr. [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aimondii_NL.png Gossypium_raimondii_S.png Gossypium_raimondii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: cape rock hyrax [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Procavia+capensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Procavia+capensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Procav...ia+capensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Procavia+capensis&t=NS ... ... Procavia_capensis_L.png Procavia_capensis_NL.png Procavia_capensis_S.png Procavia_capensis_NS.png http://bi

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ciona intestinalis (Sea squirt) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=NS ... ...data Ciona_intestinalis_L.png Ciona_intestinalis_NL.png Ciona_intestinalis_S.png Ciona_intestinalis_NS.png h

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: yellow fever mosquito [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Aedes_aegypti_S.png Aedes_aegypti_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Striped bark scorpion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Centruroides_vittatus_NL.png Centruroides_vittatus_S.png Centruroides_vittatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroides+vittatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centru...roides+vittatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroide...s+vittatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroides+vittatus&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: common water flea [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available common water flea Daphnia pulex Arthropoda Daphnia_pulex_L.png Daphnia_pulex_NL.png Daphnia_pulex..._S.png Daphnia_pulex_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=L... http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=NS ...

  5. A study of conflict between molecular phylogeny and taxonomy in the Desmidiaceae (Streptophyta, Viridiplantae): analyses of 291 rbcL sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontcharov, Andrey A; Melkonian, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses of 93 new and 198 non-redundant GenBank rbcL sequences of the family Desmidiaceae (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) established 22 mostly highly supported clades, in addition to four non-supported lineages and eight single-taxon branches within the family. Nine novel clades and single-taxon branches were identified, suggesting that current taxon sampling has not reached saturation in the family. The highly polyphyletic nature of most desmid genera corroborated in this study using a large taxon set, calls for re-evaluation of the genus concept in the family Desmidiaceae that traditionally relied on features of cell morphology. Molecular phylogenetic data have shown that these morphological characters are highly homoplastic or plesiomorphic and thus cannot be used to delineate genera. The dramatic discrepancy between the currently practised systematic treatment of the family and the composition of the clades based on sequence comparisons requires emendation of almost all existing genera and description of a larger number of novel genera. The clades identified during this study provide a framework for the future emendation/description of genera in the Desmidiaceae. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Chitosan in Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers: Current and Future Prospects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Long; Huang, Yun-An; Zhu, Qiu-Jin; Ye, Chun

    2015-01-01

    ... to conventional functional monomers. Recently, chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers have gained considerable attention and showed significant potential in many fields, such as curbing environmental pollution, medicine, protein...

  7. A Theory of Taxonomy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Kleban, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomy is a standardized framework to classify and organize items into categories. Hierarchical taxonomies are ubiquitous, ranging from the classification of organisms to the file system on a computer. Characterizing the typical distribution of items within taxonomic categories is an important question with applications in many disciplines. Ecologists have long sought to account for the patterns observed in species-abundance distributions (the number of individuals per species found in some sample), and computer scientists study the distribution of files per directory. Is there a universal statistical distribution describing how many items are typically found in each category in large taxonomies? Here, we analyze a wide array of large, real-world datasets -- including items lost and found on the New York City transit system, library books, and a bacterial microbiome -- and discover such an underlying commonality. A simple, non-parametric branching model that randomly categorizes items and takes as input o...

  8. Company Taxonomy development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Haakon; Ørnager, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretically and empirically the understanding and implementation of an information taxonomy in the UN organization World Food Programme (WFP) by analysing users’ information behaviour and by establishing a minimum set of cross-silo metadata...... analyses of search log-files from WFP intranet portal (WFPgo) from September to November 2013, the results were applied and a suggested taxonomy tested at workshops conducted for the staff in headquarters. Findings – The results reveal an organization with a high demand for easier access to information...

  9. Molecular analysis of wild and domestic sheep questions current nomenclature and provides evidence for domestication from two different subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiendleder, Stefan; Kaupe, Bernhard; Wassmuth, Rudolf; Janke, Axel

    2002-05-07

    Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions (CR) were sequenced and analysed in order to investigate wild sheep taxonomy and the origin of domestic sheep (Ovis aries). The dataset for phylogenetic analyses includes 63 unique CR sequences from wild sheep of the mouflon (O. musimon, O. orientalis), urial (O. vignei), argali (O. ammon) and bighorn (O. canadensis) groups, and from domestic sheep of Asia, Europe and New Zealand. Domestic sheep occurred in two clearly separated branches with mouflon (O. musimon) mixed into one of the domestic sheep clusters. Genetic distances and molecular datings based on O. canadensis CR and mtDNA protein-coding sequences provide strong evidence for domestications from two mouflon subspecies. Other wild sheep sequences are in two additional well-separated branches. Ovis ammon collium and O. ammon nigrimontana are joined with a specimen from the transkaspian Ust-Urt plateau currently named O. vignei arkal. Ovis ammon ammon, O. ammon darwini and O. vignei bochariensis represent a separate clade and the earliest divergence from the mouflon group. Therefore, O. musimon, O. vignei bochariensis and Ust-Urt sheep are not members of a 'moufloniform' or O. orientalis species, but belong to different clades. Furthermore, Ust-Urt sheep could be a hybrid population or an O. ammon subspecies closely related to O. ammon nigrimontana.

  10. Taxonomy as an eScience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benjamin R; Godfray, H Charles J; Kitching, Ian J; Mayo, Simon J; Scoble, Malcolm J

    2009-03-13

    The Internet has the potential to provide wider access to biological taxonomy, the knowledge base of which is currently fragmented across a large number of ink-on-paper publications dating from the middle of the eighteenth century. A system (the CATE project) is proposed in which consensus or consolidated taxonomies are presented in the form of Web-based revisions. The workflow is designed to allow the community to offer, online, additions and taxonomic changes ('proposals') to the consolidated taxonomies (e.g. new species and synonymies). A means of quality control in the form of online peer review as part of the editorial process is also included in the workflow. The CATE system rests on taxonomic expertise and judgement, rather than using aggregation technology to accumulate taxonomic information from across the Web. The CATE application and its system and architecture are described in the context of the wider aims and purpose of the project.

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: malaria parasite P. falciparum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available malaria parasite P. falciparum Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium_falciparum_L.png Plasmodium_falciparum..._NL.png Plasmodium_falciparum_S.png Plasmodium_falciparum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/...taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=218 ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Old world swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aon_NL.png Papilio_machaon_S.png Papilio_machaon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pap...ilio+machaon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=47 ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: African clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Xenopus_laevis_NL.png Xenopus_laevis_S.png Xenopus_laevis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=11 ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Bush Warbler [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cettia_diphone_NL.png Cettia_diphone_S.png Cettia_diphone_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=26 ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Western clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Xenopus_tropicalis_L.png Xenopus_tropica...lis_NL.png Xenopus_tropicalis_S.png Xenopus_tropicalis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=137 ...

  16. Molecular diagnostics for thyroid nodules: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Sann Yu; Hodak, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers great promise for the evaluation of cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules. Numerous molecular genetic and immunohistochemical tests have been developed that may be performed on thyroid specimens obtained during standard fine-needle aspiration, some of which may greatly improve diagnostic yield. A sound understanding of the diagnostic performance of these tests, and how they can enhance clinical practice, is important. This article reviews the diagnostic utility of immunohistochemical and molecular testing for the clinical assessment of thyroid nodules, and makes recommendations about how these tests can be integrated into clinical practice for patients with cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Taxonomy in Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jerry P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a theoretical paradigm for distinguishing thinking, knowing and believing. A new taxonomy is presented for categorizing levels of knowing and outlines a structure of justification for each level. The paper discusses and explains the importance of such distinctions in decision making and thinking in general.

  18. Comment: 215 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 215.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:電子顕微鏡バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:30:03 2010/02/15 15:30:03 ...

  19. Comment: 61 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan イメージを差し替えました(添付は旧イメージ) ttamura 2009/04/21 12:50:03 ...

  20. Comment: 13 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan ヒトアイコンの別候補を作成してみました。 ttamura 2008/11/06 17:14:44 ... ...Human Homo sapiens Homo_sapiens_L.png 13.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for

  1. Emerging trends in molecular systematics and molecular phylogeny of mayflies (Insecta: Ephemeroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. Sivaramakrishnan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Current trends are reviewed in the molecular systematics and phylogeny of the Ephemeroptera (mayflies, an ancient monophyletic lineage of pterygote insects. Theories of mayfly origins are analyzed, followed by a discussion of higher classification schemes in light of recent developments in molecular systematics. Ephemeroptera evolution is a classic example of ancient rapid radiation, presenting challenges for phylogenetic analysis. The utility of combined studies of morphological and molecular data is substantiated with examples and the role of molecular systematics in unraveling the taxonomy of cryptic species complexes is highlighted. The importance of DNA barcoding in mayfly taxonomy is discussed in the light of recent progress, and future contributions of genetics to the study of taxonomy, ecology and evolution in mayflies are discussed.

  2. Classification and taxonomy of vegetable macergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukola Rhoda Aremu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macergens are bacteria capable of releasing pectic enzymes (pectolytic bacteria. These enzymatic actions result in the separation of plant tissues leading to total plant destruction. This can be attributed to soft rot diseases in vegetables. These macergens primarily belong to the genus Erwinia and to a range of opportunistic pathogens namely: the Xanthomonas spp, Pseudomonas spp., Clostridium spp., Cytophaga spp. and Bacillus spp. They consist of taxa that displayed considerable heterogeneity and intermingled with members of other genera belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae. They have been classified based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic which obviously not necessary in the taxonomy of all bacterial genera for defining bacterial species and describing new ones These taxonomic markers have been used traditionally as a simple technique for identification of bacterial isolates. The most important fields of taxonomy are supposed to be based on clear, reliable and worldwide applicable criteria. Hence, this review clarifies the taxonomy of the macergens to the species level and revealed that their taxonomy is beyond complete. For discovery of additional species, further research with the use modern molecular methods like phylogenomics need to be done. This can precisely define classification of macergens resulting in occasional, but significant changes in previous taxonomic schemes of these macergens.

  3. Using current molecular techniques for rapid differentiation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid fever is responsible for the deaths of many people annually. However, conventional and timeconsuming detection methods for Salmonella Typhi still dominate. By using a molecular based approach, it was possible to identify Salmonella Typhi by amplifying two specific genes (viaB and tyv) and by using RFLP ...

  4. Josephson current through a molecular transistor in a dissipative environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, T; Rossini, Gianpaolo; Flensberg, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We study the Josephson coupling between two superconductors through a single correlated molecular level, including Coulomb interaction on the level and coupling to a bosonic environment. All calculations are done to the lowest, i.e., the fourth, order in the tunneling coupling and we find a suppr...

  5. Chitosan in Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers: Current and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Huang, Yun-An; Zhu, Qiu-Jin; Ye, Chun

    2015-08-07

    Chitosan is widely used in molecular imprinting technology (MIT) as a functional monomer or supporting matrix because of its low cost and high contents of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. The various excellent properties of chitosan, which include nontoxicity, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and attractive physical and mechanical performances, make chitosan a promising alternative to conventional functional monomers. Recently, chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers have gained considerable attention and showed significant potential in many fields, such as curbing environmental pollution, medicine, protein separation and identification, and chiral-compound separation. These extensive applications are due to the polymers' desired selectivity, physical robustness, and thermal stability, as well as their low cost and easy preparation. Cross-linkers, which fix the functional groups of chitosan around imprinted molecules, play an important role in chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers. This review summarizes the important cross-linkers of chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers and illustrates the cross-linking mechanism of chitosan and cross-linkers based on the two glucosamine units. Finally, some significant attempts to further develop the application of chitosan in MIT are proposed.

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: African malaria mosquito [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eles_gambiae_NL.png Anopheles_gambiae_S.png Anopheles_gambiae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Anopheles+gambiae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+gambiae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxon...omy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+gambiae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+gambiae&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Southern elephant seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=M...irounga+leonina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=NS ... ...a/Carnivora Mirounga_leonina_L.png Mirounga_leonina_NL.png Mirounga_leonina_S.png Mirounga_leonina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: aye-aye [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aye-aye Daubentonia madagascariensis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Daubentonia_madaga...scariensis_L.png Daubentonia_madagascariensis_NL.png Daubentonia_madagascariensis_S.png Daubentonia_madagasc...ariensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascar...iensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascar...iensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascariensis&t=S http://bi

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Kuroda's sea hare [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Kuroda's sea hare Aplysia kurodai Mollusca Aplysia_kurodai_L.png Aplysia_kurodai_NL.png Aplysia_ku...rodai_S.png Aplysia_kurodai_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+ku...rodai&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+ku

  10. Comment: 219 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes Oryzias_latipes_L.png 219.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Sci...ence licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:メダカ HNI-Ⅱ系統バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:31:07 2010/02/16 09:53:27 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Pacific electric ray [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pacific electric ray Torpedo californica Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Torpedo_californica_L.png Torpedo..._californica_NL.png Torpedo_californica_S.png Torpedo_californica_NS.png http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese tree frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Hyla_japonica_L.png Hyla_japon...ica_NL.png Hyla_japonica_S.png Hyla_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japon...ica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japon

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese giant salamander [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese giant salamander Andrias japonicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Andrias_japonicus_L.png Andrias_jap...onicus_NL.png Andrias_japonicus_S.png Andrias_japonicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japon...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: red flour beetle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum Arthropoda Tribolium_castaneum_L.png Tribolium_castaneum_NL.png Tribol...ium_castaneum_S.png Tribolium_castaneum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribol...ium+castaneum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=N...L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: gold crucian carp [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gold crucian carp Carassius auratus auratus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Carassius_auratus_aura...tus_L.png Carassius_auratus_auratus_NL.png Carassius_auratus_auratus_S.png Carassius_auratus_aura...tus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=L http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Formosan subterranean termite [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Formosan subterranean termite Coptotermes formosanus Arthropoda Coptotermes_formosan...us_L.png Coptotermes_formosanus_NL.png Coptotermes_formosanus_S.png Coptotermes_formosanus_NS.png http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosan...us&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Ma...sam_L.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_NL.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_S.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masa...m_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=L http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: California sea lion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available California sea lion Zalophus californianus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Euth...eria/Carnivora Zalophus_californianus_L.png Zalophus_californianus_NL.png Zalophus_californianus_S.png Zalophus_california...nus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=L http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=NL http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aeropyrum pernix strain K1 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Aeropyrum pernix strain K1 Aeropyrum pernix K1 Aeropyrum_pernix_K1_L.png Aeropyrum_pernix_K1_NL.png Aeropyrum_pernix_K1_S.png Aeropyrum_pernix_K1_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aeropyrum+pernix+K1&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aeropyrum+pernix+K1&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aeropyrum+pernix+K1&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aeropyrum

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: gray short-tailed opossum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria.../Metatheria Monodelphis_domestica_L.png Monodelphis_domestica_NL.png Monodelphis_domestica_S.png Monodelphis_domestic...a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=L http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) Ptychodera flava Hemichordata Ptychodera_flava..._L.png Ptychodera_flava_NL.png Ptychodera_flava_S.png Ptychodera_flava_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=161 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Javan tree shrew [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Javan tree shrew Tupaia javanica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Tupaia_java...nica_L.png Tupaia_javanica_NL.png Tupaia_javanica_S.png Tupaia_javanica_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+java...nica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Florida lancelet (amphioxus) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Florida lancelet (amphioxus) Branchiostoma floridae Chordata/Urochordata,Cephalochordata Branchiostoma_flor...idae_L.png Branchiostoma_floridae_NL.png Branchiostoma_floridae_S.png Branchiostoma_flor...idae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=L http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+flor

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Reeve's pond turtle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Reeve's pond turtle Chinemys reevesii Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Chinemys_reeve...sii_L.png Chinemys_reevesii_NL.png Chinemys_reevesii_S.png Chinemys_reevesii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reeve...sii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=NS ...

  5. A review of the taxonomy of chondrichthyan fishes: a modern perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W T; Last, P R

    2012-04-01

    Taxonomic clarity is a fundamental requirement as it forms the foundation of all other life sciences. In the last decade, chondrichthyan taxonomy has undergone a scientific renaissance with >180 new species formally described. This effort encompasses c. 15% of the global chondrichthyan fauna, which consists of 1185 currently recognized species. The important role of chondrichthyan taxonomy for conservation management has been highlighted in recent years with new species descriptions or taxonomic resolution of a number of threatened species. These include Australian gulper (genus Centrophorus) and speartooth sharks (genus Glyphis) in coastal waters of Australia and Borneo. Closer examination of other wide-ranging species, for which the taxonomy was thought to be stable, has shown that they consist of species complexes, e.g. manta rays (Manta spp.) and spotted eagle rays (the Aetobatus narinari complex), and highlights the need for critical re-examination of other wide-ranging species. Molecular methods have provided another useful tool to taxonomists and they have proven to assist greatly with identifying cryptic species and species complexes. The limitations of particular molecular methods being used need, however, to be carefully considered and there are some concerns about how these are being integrated with classical taxonomy. The fundamental importance of taxonomic nomenclature to life sciences is often poorly understood but striving for nomenclatural stability is a critical component of taxonomy. Similarly, biological collections are an extremely vital asset to both taxonomists and the broader scientific community. These collections are becoming increasingly important due in part to molecular species identification initiatives such as the Barcode of Life which has resulted in a large number of voucher specimens linked to tissue samples being deposited. Biological collections are also proving to be imperative in biodiversity studies as they contain a 'gold mine

  6. After 7 years and 1000 citations: comparative assessment of the DNA barcoding and the DNA taxonomy proposals for taxonomists and non-taxonomists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teletchea, Fabrice

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, two different approaches-DNA taxonomy and DNA barcoding-were simultaneously proposed to overcome some of the perceived intrinsic weaknesses of the traditional morphology-based taxonomical system, and to help non-taxonomists to resolve their crucial need for accurate and rapid species identification tools. After 7 years, it seems unlikely that a completely new taxonomical system based on molecular characters only (DNA taxonomy) will develop in the future. It is more likely that both morphological and molecular data will be simultaneously analyzed, developing what has been coined as "integrative taxonomy". Concerning DNA barcoding, it is now clear that it does not focus on building a tree-of-life nor to perform DNA taxonomy, but rather to produce a universal molecular identification key based on strong taxonomic knowledge that is collated in the barcode reference library. The indisputable success of the DNA barcoding project is chiefly due to the fact that DNA barcoding standards considerably enhance current practices in the molecular identification field, and standardization offers virtually endless applications for various users.

  7. Molecular complexity of primary open angle glaucoma: current ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Current concepts of glaucoma pathogenesis suggest it to be a neurodegenerative disorder which is triggered by different factors including mechanical stress due to intra-ocular pressure, reduced blood flow to retina, reperfusion injury, oxidative stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, and aberrant immune response. Here we ...

  8. [Molecular basis of Rett syndrome: A current look].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleón F, Gretta; Juvier R, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that exclusively affects girls, and occurs along with autism. It is very uncommon, and has five distinct forms, one classic and the others atypical, which generally compromise manual skills, language, and mobility, and widely associated with the appearance of stereotypy and early epilepsy. With the aim of updating the information about RS, a search was performed in the computer data bases of PubMed, Hinari, SCIELO and Medline, as well as consulting other web sites including OMIM, ORPHANET, GeneMap, Genetests, Proteins and Gene, using the descriptors "Síndrome de Rett", "genes y Síndrome de Rett", "Rett Syndrome gene", "Rett Syndrome", "Rett Syndrome gene therapy", and "Rett Syndrome review". Of the 1,348 articles found, 42 articles were selected, which reported 3 genes causing the syndrome: MECP2, CDKL5 and FOXG. The MECP2 gene is mutated in 80% of patients with classic RS, as well as in 40% of those affected by any of its atypical forms. RS with early epilepsy and the congenital variant are mainly due to variations in the CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes, respectively. The diagnosis of RS is based on clinical criteria. However, the advances in molecular biology and genetics have opened a wide range of possibilities for diagnosing the different clinical forms that could not be classified before. Molecular analysis can help confirm the clinical criteria and provided information as regards the prognosis of the patient. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models.

  10. T-large granular lymphocyte leukemia: current molecular concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarski, Marcin W; Schade, Andrew E; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2006-08-01

    T-large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia is a chronic and often indolent T cell lymphoproliferation characterized by extreme expansion of a semi-autonomous cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone. Clinically, T-LGL can be associated with various cytopenias; neutropenia constitutes the most frequent manifestation. LGL clone represents a pathologic counterpart of the cytotoxic effector T cell but an abnormal memory CD8 cell seems to provide the supply of the matured LGL population. Analysis of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) rearrangement and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) of the TCR beta-chain is a useful tool to investigate clonal expansions, track the frequency of expanded clones and also clinically useful to monitor the response to therapy. The lessons learned from molecular analysis of clonal repertoire support a clinically-derived conclusion that the LGL clone arises in the context of an initially polyclonal immune response or an autoimmune process. Consequently, specific manifestations of T-LGL may be a result of the recognition spectrum of the transformed clone and the cytokines it produces. Due to the often monoclonal manifestation, T-LGL constitutes a suitable model to investigate polyclonal CTL-mediated processes. Application of new technologies, including TCR repertoire analysis by sequencing, clonotypic quantitative PCR and VB flow cytometry facilitate clinical diagnosis and may allow insights into the regulation of TCR repertoire and consequences resulting from the contraction of clonal diversity.

  11. Current Trends in the Molecular Classification of Renal Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N. Young

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common form of kidney cancer in adults. RCC is a significant challenge for pathologic diagnosis and clinical management. The primary approach to diagnosis is by light microscopy, using the World Health Organization (WHO classification system, which defines histopathologic tumor subtypes with distinct clinical behavior and underlying genetic mutations. However, light microscopic diagnosis of RCC subtypes is often difficult due to variable histology. In addition, the clinical behavior of RCC is highly variable and therapeutic response rates are poor. Few clinical assays are available to predict outcome in RCC or correlate behavior with histology. Therefore, novel RCC classification systems based on gene expression should be useful for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Recent microarray studies have shown that renal tumors are characterized by distinct gene expression profiles, which can be used to discover novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Here, we review clinical features of kidney cancer, the WHO classification system, and the growing role of molecular classification for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of this disease.

  12. Breast Cancer: Current Molecular Therapeutic Targets and New Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the most frequent cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Breast cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease classified into hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpressing (HER2+) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) based on histological features. Endocrine therapy, the mainstay of treatment for hormone-responsive breast cancer involves use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), selective estrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab have been the most extensively used therapeutics for breast cancer. Crosstalk between ER and other signalling networks as well as epigenetic mechanisms have been envisaged to contribute to endocrine therapy resistance. TNBC, a complex, heterogeneous, aggressive form of breast cancer in which the cells do not express ER, progesterone receptor or HER2 is refractory to therapy. Several molecular targets are being explored to target TNBC including androgen receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Receptors, protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, proteases, PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, microRNAs (miRs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potential therapeutic targets. miR-based therapeutic approaches include inhibition of oncomiRs by antisense oligonucleotides, restoration of tumour suppressors using miR mimics, and chemical modification of miRs. The lnRNAs HOTAIR, SPRY4-IT1, GAS5, and PANDAR, new players in tumour development and prognosis may have theranostic applications in breast cancer. Several novel classes of mechanism-based drugs have been designed and synthesised for treatment of breast cancer. Integration of nucleic acid sequencing studies with mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and posttranslational modifications as

  13. Molecular cytogenetics in haematological malignancy: current technology and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Lyndal; Horsley, Sharon W

    2005-09-01

    Cytogenetics has played a pivotal role in haematological malignancy, both as an aid to diagnosis and in identifying recurrent chromosomal rearrangements, an essential prerequisite to identifying genes involved in leukaemia and lymphoma pathogenesis. In the late 1980s, a series of technologies based around fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) revolutionised the field. Interphase FISH, multiplex-FISH (M-FISH, SKY) and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) have emerged as the most significant of these. More recently, microarray technologies have come to prominence. In the acute leukaemias, the finding of characteristic gene expression signatures corresponding to biological subgroups has heralded gene expression profiling as a possible future alternative to current cytogenetic and morphological methods for diagnosis. In the lymphomas, high-resolution array CGH has successfully identified new regions of deletion and amplification, providing the prospect of disease-specific arrays.

  14. A current review of molecular mechanisms regarding osteoarthritis and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew S; Ellman, Michael B; Yan, Dongyao; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Cole, Brian J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-09-25

    Osteoarthritis afflicts millions of individuals across the world resulting in impaired quality of life and increased health costs. To understand this disease, physicians have been studying risk factors, such as genetic predisposition, aging, obesity, and joint malalignment; however have been unable to conclusively determine the direct etiology. Current treatment options are short-term or ineffective and fail to address pathophysiological and biochemical mechanisms involved with cartilage degeneration and the induction of pain in arthritic joints. OA pain involves a complex integration of sensory, affective, and cognitive processes that integrate a variety of abnormal cellular mechanisms at both peripheral and central (spinal and supraspinal) levels of the nervous system Through studies examined by investigators, the role of growth factors and cytokines has increasingly become more relevant in examining their effects on articular cartilage homeostasis and the development of osteoarthritis and osteoarthritis-associated pain. Catabolic factors involved in both cartilage degradation in vitro and nociceptive stimulation include IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, PGE2, FGF-2 and PKCδ, and pharmacologic inhibitors to these mediators, as well as compounds such as RSV and LfcinB, may potentially be used as biological treatments in the future. This review explores several biochemical mediators involved in OA and pain, and provides a framework for the understanding of potential biologic therapies in the treatment of degenerative joint disease in the future. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: North Pacific right whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eu...theria/Cetacea Eubalaena_japonica_L.png Eubalaena_japonica_NL.png Eubalaena_japonica_S.png Eubalaena_japonic...a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Halocynthia roretzi (Sea squirt) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Halocynthia roretzi (Sea squirt) Halocynthia roretzi Chordata/Urochordata,Cephalochordata Halocynthia_ror...etzi_L.png Halocynthia_roretzi_NL.png Halocynthia_roretzi_S.png Halocynthia_roretzi_NS....png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=N

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: African savanna elephant [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available African savanna elephant Loxodonta africana Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Loxodonta_afri...cana_L.png Loxodonta_africana_NL.png Loxodonta_africana_S.png Loxodonta_africana_NS....png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+afric...ana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ciona savignyi (Sea squirt) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ciona savignyi (Sea squirt) Ciona savignyi Chordata/Urochordata,Cephalochordata Ciona_savigny...i_L.png Ciona_savignyi_NL.png Ciona_savignyi_S.png Ciona_savignyi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+savignyi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+savignyi&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+savignyi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+savignyi&t=NS ...

  19. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  20. Molecular phylogeny, biogeography, and an e-monograph of the papaya family (Caricaceae) as an example of taxonomy in the electronic age

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes Carvalho, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation addresses an issue of key importance to the field of systematics, namely how to foster taxonomic work and the dissemination of knowledge about species by taking full advantage of electronic data and bioinformatic tools. I tested and applied modern systematic tools to produce an electronic monograph of a family of flowering plants, Caricaceae. In addition to a taxonomic revision, a molecular phylogeny of the family that includes representatives of all biological species clari...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_L.png Synechoc...ystis_sp_PCC_6803_NL.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_S.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_NS.png http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechoc...ystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechoc...ystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis

  2. On the relation between steady-state currents and resonance states in molecular junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Peskin, Uri [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and Lise Meitner Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)], E-mail: uri@techunix.technion.ac.il

    2009-02-28

    The correlation between the current through a molecular junction and the decay rates of specific resonance states of the molecular conductor is analysed for different molecule-electrodes coupling strengths. Three transport regimes are identified for linear conductors. In the weak coupling regime the current is proportional to the sum of resonance widths and increases with increasing coupling. As the coupling strength increases, the current saturates and the transport becomes 'Ohmic-like', i.e. increases linearly with the voltage. In the strong coupling regime the current decreases with the coupling strength. This decrease is associated with a bifurcation of the conductor resonances into narrow (long-lived) ones which dominate the transmission and broad ones which are associated with the formation of localized molecular states at the electrodes interfaces. We show that the nature of the transport is determined by a dimensionless parameter which measures the degree of resonance overlap in the system.

  3. Taxonomy, systematics, and biogeography of Ficus subsection Urostigma (Moraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chantarasuwan, Bhanumas

    2014-01-01

    Five research methods were used in Taxonomy, Systematics, and Biogeography of Ficus subsection Urostigma(Moraceae); Morphological characters, leaf anatomy, pollen morphology, molecular phylogeny, and historical biogeography. Seven topics are the result: 1) A revision was made based on morphology in

  4. The taxonomy and diversity of Platerodrilus (Coleoptera, Lycidae inferred from molecular data and morphology of adults and larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Bocak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Oriental neotenic net-winged beetles attracted attention of biologists due to conspicuous large-bodied females; nevertheless phylogenetic relationships remain contentious and only a few species are known in both the fully metamorphosed males and neotenic females. The phylogenetic analyses and morphology of larvae and adults provide data for investigation of relationships and species delineation. Platrilus Kazantsev, 2009, Platerodriloplesius Wittmer, 1944, and Falsocalochromus Pic, 1942 are synonymized to Platerodrilus Pic, 1921. Platrilus hirtus (Wittmer, 1938 and Pl. crassicornis (Pic, 1923 are transferred to Platerodrilus Pic, 1921. Platerodrilus hoiseni Wong, 1996 is proposed as a junior subjective synonym of Falsocalochromus ruficollis Pic, 1942. Platerodrilus is divided in three species-groups: P. paradoxus, P. major, and P. sinuatus groups defined based on the shape of genitalia and molecular phylogeny. The following species are described: Platerodrilus foliaceus sp. n., P. wongi sp. n. (P. paradoxus group; P. ngi sp. n., P. wittmeri (P. major group, P. ijenensis sp. n., P. luteus sp. n., P. maninjauensis sp. n., P. montanus sp. n., P. palawanensis sp. n., P. ranauensis sp. n., P. sibayakensis sp. n., P. sinabungensis sp. n., P. talamauensis sp.n., and P. tujuhensis sp. n. (P. sinuatus group. P. korinchiana robinsoni Blair, 1928 is elevated to the species rank as P. robinsoni Blair, 1928, stat. n. The conspecific semaphoronts are identified using molecular phylogeny for P. foliaceus sp. n., P. tujuhensis sp. n., P. montanus sp. n., P. maninjauensis sp. n.; additional female larvae are assigned to the species-groups. Diagnostic characters are illustrated and keys are provided for P. paradoxus and P. major groups.

  5. A Taxonomy of Manufacturing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey G. Miller; Aleda V. Roth

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the development and analysis of a numerical taxonomy of manufacturing strategies. The taxonomy was developed with standard methods of cluster analysis, and is based on the relative importance attached to eleven competitive capabilities defining the manufacturing task of 164 large American manufacturing business units. Three distinct clusters of manufacturing strategy groups were observed. Though there is an industry effect, all three manufacturing strategy types are obser...

  6. Medical Parasitology Taxonomy Update: January 2012 to December 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simner, P J

    2017-01-01

    Parasites of medical importance have long been classified taxonomically by morphological characteristics. However, molecular-based techniques have been increasingly used and relied on to determine evolutionary distances for the basis of rational hierarchal classifications. This has resulted in several different classification schemes for parasites and changes in parasite taxonomy. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide a single reference for diagnostic laboratories that summarizes new and revised clinically relevant parasite taxonomy from January 2012 through December 2015. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. The Distributed Wind Cost Taxonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Trudy; Jimenez, Tony; Preus, Robert; Tegen, Suzanne; Baring-Gould, Ian

    2017-03-28

    To date, there has been no standard method or tool to analyze the installed and operational costs for distributed wind turbine systems. This report describes the development of a classification system, or taxonomy, for distributed wind turbine project costs. The taxonomy establishes a framework to help collect, sort, and compare distributed wind cost data that mirrors how the industry categorizes information. The taxonomy organizes costs so they can be aggregated from installers, developers, vendors, and other sources without losing cost details. Developing a peer-reviewed taxonomy is valuable to industry stakeholders because a common understanding the details of distributed wind turbine costs and balance of station costs is a first step to identifying potential high-value cost reduction opportunities. Addressing cost reduction potential can help increase distributed wind's competitiveness and propel the U.S. distributed wind industry forward. The taxonomy can also be used to perform cost comparisons between technologies and track trends for distributed wind industry costs in the future. As an initial application and piloting of the taxonomy, preliminary cost data were collected for projects of different sizes and from different regions across the contiguous United States. Following the methods described in this report, these data are placed into the established cost categories.

  8. Morphological and molecular taxonomy of a new species of Fundulotrema and comments on Gyrodactylus stephanus (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from Fundulus heteroclitus (Actinopterygii: Cyprinodontiformes) in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stanley D; Cone, David K

    2009-08-01

    Fundulotrema porterensis n. sp. (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) is described from the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus (L.; Cyprinodontidae), inhabiting Porters Lake, Nova Scotia, Canada. The new parasite species is characterized by having a ventral bar with small anterolateral processes and linguiform membrane, differentiating it from all other known species of Fundulotrema. The morphological description of F. porterensis is supplemented with 1011 sequenced base pairs (bp) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) spanning both internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) and 5.8S regions of the genome. A BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) search revealed that the 5.8S (157 bp) region varied by 1 bp from Gyrodactylus turnbulli Harris, 1986 and G. pictae Cable, Oosterhout, Barson and Harris, 2005, which also infect cyprinodontids. Morphometrically, F. porterensis most closely resembles Fundulotremafoxi (Rawson, 1973), but the 2 species are easily separated by length of hamuli (50.7 vs. 42.2 microm, respectively), length of anterolateral process of the ventral bar (4.9 vs. 8.9 microm), shape of marginal hooks, and shape of the ventral bar membrane. A morphological and molecular supplemental diagnosis of Gyrodactylus stephanus Mueller, 1937, from the mummichog, is also presented. This new material provides previously unrecorded information on the attributes of the ventral bar, marginal hooks, and also clarifies the structure of the male copulatory organ (MCO).

  9. Molecular Phylogeny and Taxonomy of a New Freshwater Hymenostomatid from Northeastern China, with the Establishment of a New Genus Anteglaucoma gen. n. (Protista, Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuming; Shi, Zihan; Wang, Chundi; Bourland, William A; Chen, Ying; Song, Weibo

    2017-09-01

    The morphology, infraciliature and SSU rDNA sequence of a new freshwater hymenostomatid ciliate, Anteglaucoma harbinensis gen. nov., spec. nov., collected from a farmland pond in Harbin, China, were investigated. The new genus Anteglaucoma is characterized as follows: small to medium-sized Glaucomidae with oral apparatus in anterior one-third of cell; paroral membrane composed of almost longitudinally arranged dikinetids; three adoral membranelles nearly equal in length and arranged almost longitudinally in parallel; silverline pattern tetrahymenid. The improved diagnosis of family Glaucomidae Corliss 1971 is provided based on the previous and present work. The type species Anteglaucoma harbinensis spec. nov. is defined by having 32-35 somatic kineties; four or five postoral kineties; membranelle 1 and membranelle 2 having five or six kinetosomal rows, membranelle 3 having three kinetosomal rows; single macronuclear nodule; contractile vacuole on average 15% from posterior body end; locomotion characterized by crawling with a rather hectic jerking motion; freshwater habitat. Phylogenetic analyses show that Anteglaucoma clusters in the family Glaucomidae and groups with the genera Glaucoma. The molecular and morphological data indicate that Glaucomidae is related to the family Bromeliophryidae in the phylogenetic trees. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  10. Taxonomy of Payments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Tan, Felix B.; Holst, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in payment instruments have fundamentally changed the ways we pay. These innovations, such as mobile/SMS payments and online banking, contain features that are likely to influence how people choose to pay. The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors that imp...... of payments. The taxonomy builds on and extends the work by Hirschman (1982). Since this work, and despite recent trends in payments, there has not been a comprehensive investigation that takes into account more recent innovations in payment instruments.......Purpose: Recent innovations in payment instruments have fundamentally changed the ways we pay. These innovations, such as mobile/SMS payments and online banking, contain features that are likely to influence how people choose to pay. The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors...... or checks. Research limitations/implications: The findings suggest that payers view payment instruments in a much broader sense, including context, control, or cultural beliefs. Consequently, the authors suggest that researchers try to understand the essence of an innovation before assuming any economic...

  11. The morphological and molecular changes of brain cells exposed to direct current electric field stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Simon J; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2014-12-07

    The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  12. The remote experiment position in actual taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Samoila, Cornel; Ursutiu, Doru; Cotfas, Petru; Zamfira, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    Taxonomy is a classification effort for establishment of learning/teaching operational objectives. There are some famous taxonomies, Bloom's being the most quoted. In spite of the fact that some researchers have tried to explain the position of elearning in already known taxonomies, this subject was not too much in the general attention. In the paper the authors intend to go deeply and to analyze the position of the new methodology-remote experiment-in the actual taxonomies. In addition they ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data - Taxonomy Icon | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Taxonom...y Icon Taxonomy Icon Data Data detail Data name Taxonomy Icon Data DOI 10.18908/lsdba...he icons. In a simple search table, you can narrow down the icons using a taxonomy tree view, located on top... of the table. Data file File name: taxonomy_icon_en.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/taxonomy-icon/LATEST/taxonom...ogodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_en Data acquisition method Illustrations (icons) are create

  14. Primate taxonomy: species and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, Anthony B; Mittermeier, Russell A

    2014-01-01

    Primatology as a discrete branch of science involving the study of primate behavior and ecology took off in the 1960s after discovery of the importance of primates as models for biomedical research and the realization that primates provide insights into the evolutionary history of humans. Osman Hill's unfortunately incomplete monograph series on the comparative anatomy and taxonomy of the primates(1) and the Napiers' 1967 A Handbook of Living Primates(2) recorded the world's view of primate diversity at this time. This taxonomy remained the baseline for nearly three decades, with the diversity of each genus being represented by some species, but extensively as subspecies. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular ecology studies of species radiations: current research gaps, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Harpe, Marylaure; Paris, Margot; Karger, Dirk N; Rolland, Jonathan; Kessler, Michael; Salamin, Nicolas; Lexer, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the drivers and limits of species radiations is a crucial goal of evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology, yet research on this topic has been hampered by the notorious difficulty of connecting micro- and macroevolutionary approaches to studying the drivers of diversification. To chart the current research gaps, opportunities and challenges of molecular ecology approaches to studying radiations, we examine the literature in the journal Molecular Ecology and revisit recent high-profile examples of evolutionary genomic research on radiations. We find that available studies of radiations are highly unevenly distributed among taxa, with many ecologically important and species-rich organismal groups remaining severely understudied, including arthropods, plants and fungi. Most studies employed molecular methods suitable over either short or long evolutionary time scales, such as microsatellites or restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) in the former case and conventional amplicon sequencing of organellar DNA in the latter. The potential of molecular ecology studies to address and resolve patterns and processes around the species level in radiating groups of taxa is currently limited primarily by sample size and a dearth of information on radiating nuclear genomes as opposed to organellar ones. Based on our literature survey and personal experience, we suggest possible ways forward in the coming years. We touch on the potential and current limitations of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in studies of radiations. We suggest that WGS and targeted ('capture') resequencing emerge as the methods of choice for scaling up the sampling of populations, species and genomes, including currently understudied organismal groups and the genes or regulatory elements expected to matter most to species radiations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Instruments and Taxonomy of Workplace Bullying in Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jun Park, PhD, RN

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The current instruments are not comprehensive enough. It is suggested that the modified taxonomy is verified and guide more reliable and inclusive instruments in the future. Furthermore, a formative measurement model, which defines a bullying as an inventory of different types of behaviors, should be used.

  17. Taxonomy and origin of reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut H. Røed

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Reindeer and caribou was probably the key species for the human immigration and colonization in the Arctic and sub-Arctic by the retreat of the ice in the last glacial period. The close connection between human and reindeer has contributed to great interest and variation in reindeer taxonomy and origin. Through the history several both species, subspecies and types of reindeer and caribou have been described. The early taxonomy of the species is marked by comparisons of individual specimen using traits as body size, skin colour or antler formations - characteristics known to be highly variable and subjected to environmental and nutritional level. During the mid 1900s the taxonomy was more based on variation of morphological traits among populations by analysing a large series of specimens representative of the various geographic populations and a consensus of classification of several subspecies, all belonging to the same species, evolved. During late 1900 the development of modern molecular techniques procured tools for revealing genetic structure of populations reflecting different origin and isolation rather than environmental influences. The genetic structure revealed a major genetic dichotomy between American woodland caribou on the one hand and all other types of reindeer and caribou on the other which gave evidence that the ancestors of present woodland caribou had survived and evolved in ice free refugium south to the glacier in North America and the ancestors of all other types of reindeer and caribou had evolved separated from these in refugium in Eurasia and Beringia. The ancestors of present reindeer in Scandinavia appear furthermore to have evolved from different populations separated during the last glaciation period and the colonization and origin of present wild and domestic reindeer will be discussed in this perspective.Taksonomi og opprinnelse til reinAbstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Rein og caribou har hatt stor betydning

  18. Taxonomy of operculate discomycetes: Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, Richard P.

    1972-01-01

    A general consideration is given on various aspects of the taxonomy of Operculate Discomycetes. The thesis is advanced that the genus, rather than the species, may represent the basic evolutionary unit. More detailed considerations are devoted to a few topics, for instance to the systematic position

  19. Taxonomy as a critical science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattel, Jan

    1990-01-01

    The critical function is an important aspect of the science of taxonomy. Every classification is built upon a critical evaluation and emendation of a previously existing one. Ultimately, this reaches back to pre-scientific classifications which are, like scientific ones, hierarchically structured.

  20. Amerind taxonomy and testable hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, M

    1998-06-01

    The acceptance of a 30,000 yr B.P. age for Valsequillo sets new parameters for hypotheses of Paleoindian entry into America. A review of Amerind taxonomy defines the early groups as Otamid-Sundadonts. Isolation in America led to an adaptive radiation that has implications for the origin and dispersal of Pithecanthropus.

  1. The Molecular Biology of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas and Current Trends in Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Quesada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic research in sarcoma models has been fundamental in the discovery of scientific milestones leading to a better understanding of the molecular biology of cancer. Yet, clinical research in sarcoma has lagged behind other cancers because of the multiple clinical and pathological entities that characterize sarcomas and their rarity. Sarcomas encompass a very heterogeneous group of tumors with diverse pathological and clinical overlapping characteristics. Molecular testing has been fundamental in the identification and better definition of more specific entities among this vast array of malignancies. A group of sarcomas are distinguished by specific molecular aberrations such as somatic mutations, intergene deletions, gene amplifications, reciprocal translocations, and complex karyotypes. These and other discoveries have led to a better understanding of the growth signals and the molecular pathways involved in the development of these tumors. These findings are leading to treatment strategies currently under intense investigation. Disruption of the growth signals is being targeted with antagonistic antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and inhibitors of several downstream molecules in diverse molecular pathways. Preliminary clinical trials, supported by solid basic research and strong preclinical evidence, promises a new era in the clinical management of these broad spectrum of malignant tumors.

  2. High-current operation of vertical-type organic transistor with preferentially oriented molecular film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukagawa, Hirohiko; Watanabe, Yasuyuki; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Fujikake, Hideo; Tokito, Shizuo; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance vertical-type organic transistor has been fabricated using bis(l,2,5-thiadiazolo)-p-quinobis(l,3-dithiole) (BTQBT) for the channel layer. The BTQBT molecules are oriented horizontally, with the molecular plane of each monolayer parallel to the substrate. The π-π stacking direction of the BTQBT molecules is aligned with the carrier transport direction in this vertical transistor. The modulated drain current density exceeded 1 A cm-2 upon the application of a gate voltage of less than 5 V. In addition, the device exhibits a high on/off current ratio of over 105.

  3. Teosinte inflorescence phytolith assemblages mirror Zea taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John P; Matson, R G; Thompson, Robert G; Blake, Michael

    2011-03-30

    Molecular DNA analyses of the New World grass (Poaceae) genus Zea, comprising five species, has resolved taxonomic issues including the most likely teosinte progenitor (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). However, archaeologically, little is known about the use of teosinte by humans both prior to and after the domestication of maize. One potential line of evidence to explore these relationships is opaline phytoliths produced in teosinte fruit cases. Here we use multidimensional scaling and multiple discriminant analyses to determine if rondel phytolith assemblages from teosinte fruitcases reflect teosinte taxonomy. Our results indicate that rondel phytolith assemblages from the various taxa, including subspecies, can be statistically discriminated. This indicates that it will be possible to investigate the archaeological histories of teosinte use pending the recovery of appropriate samples.

  4. Teosinte inflorescence phytolith assemblages mirror Zea taxonomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Hart

    Full Text Available Molecular DNA analyses of the New World grass (Poaceae genus Zea, comprising five species, has resolved taxonomic issues including the most likely teosinte progenitor (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays. However, archaeologically, little is known about the use of teosinte by humans both prior to and after the domestication of maize. One potential line of evidence to explore these relationships is opaline phytoliths produced in teosinte fruit cases. Here we use multidimensional scaling and multiple discriminant analyses to determine if rondel phytolith assemblages from teosinte fruitcases reflect teosinte taxonomy. Our results indicate that rondel phytolith assemblages from the various taxa, including subspecies, can be statistically discriminated. This indicates that it will be possible to investigate the archaeological histories of teosinte use pending the recovery of appropriate samples.

  5. Comment: 235 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 水谷治(東北大学(現 酒類総研)) Photo: Osamu Mizutani (Tohoku University (currently National Research Institute of Brewing)) bando 2010/08/04 09:28:07 2010/08/04 11:18:35 ... ...u University (currently National Research Institute of Brewing)) licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan 撮影: ...koji mold Aspergillus oryzae Aspergillus_oryzae_L.png 235.png Osamu Mizutani (Tohok

  6. Current status of molecular biological techniques for plant breeding in the Republic of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Si-Myung; Park, Bum-Seok; Yun, In-Sun; Goo, Doe-Hoe; Kim, Seok-Dong [Rural Development Administration, National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    Classical plant breeding has played an important role in developing new varieties in current agriculture. For decades, the technique of cross-pollination has been popular for breeding in cereal and horticultural crops to introduce special traits. However, recently the molecular techniques get widely accepted as an alternative tool in both introducing a useful trait for developing the new cultivars and investigating the characteristics of a trait in plant, like the identification of a gene. Using the advanced molecular technique, several genetically modified (GM) crops (e.g., Roundup Ready Soybean, YieldGard, LibertyLink etc.) became commercially cultivated and appeared in the global market since 1996. The GM crops, commercially available at the moment, could be regarded as successful achievements in history of crop breeding conferring the specific gene into economically valuable crops to make them better. Along with such achievements, on the other hand these new crops have also caused the controversial debate on the safety of GM crops as human consumption and environmental release as well. Nevertheless, molecular techniques are widespread and popular in both investigating the basic science of plant biology and breeding new varieties compared to their conventional counterparts. Thus, the Department of Bioresources at the National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (NIAST) has been using the molecular biological techniques as a complimentary tool for the improvement of crop varieties for almost two decades. (author)

  7. Ab initio theory for current-induced molecular switching: Melamine on Cu(001)

    KAUST Repository

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko

    2013-05-28

    Melamine on Cu(001) is mechanically unstable under the current of a scanning tunneling microscope tip and can switch among configurations. However, these are not equally accessible, and the switching critical current depends on the bias polarity. In order to explain such rich phenomenology, we have developed a scheme to evaluate the evolution of the reaction paths and activation barriers as a function of bias, which is rooted in the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method implemented within density functional theory. This, combined with the calculation of the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy signal, allows us to identify the vibrational modes promoting the observed molecular conformational changes. Finally, once our ab initio results are used within a resonance model, we are able to explain the details of the switching behavior, such as its dependence on the bias polarity, and the noninteger power relation between the reaction rate constants and both the bias voltage and the electric current. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  8. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Corticoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Hanna M; Ictv Report Consortium

    2017-05-01

    The Corticoviridae is a family of icosahedral, internal-membrane-containing viruses with double-stranded circular DNA genomes of approximately 10 kb. Only one species, Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2, has been recognized. Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2 infects Gram-negative bacteria and was isolated from seawater in 1968. Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2 is the first bacterial virus in which the presence of lipids in the virion has been demonstrated. Viral lipids are acquired selectively during virion assembly from the host cytoplasmic membrane. The outer protein capsid is an icosahedron with a pseudo T=21 symmetry. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the Corticoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/corticoviridae.

  9. Taxonomy of the extrasolar planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plávalová, Eva

    2012-04-01

    When a star is described as a spectral class G2V, we know that the star is similar to our Sun. We know its approximate mass, temperature, age, and size. When working with an extrasolar planet database, it is very useful to have a taxonomy scale (classification) such as, for example, the Harvard classification for stars. The taxonomy has to be easily interpreted and present the most relevant information about extrasolar planets. I propose an extrasolar planet taxonomy scale with four parameters. The first parameter concerns the mass of an extrasolar planet in the form of units of the mass of other known planets, where M represents the mass of Mercury, E that of Earth, N Neptune, and J Jupiter. The second parameter is the planet's distance from its parent star (semimajor axis) described in a logarithm with base 10. The third parameter is the mean Dyson temperature of the extrasolar planet, for which I established four main temperature classes: F represents the Freezing class, W the Water class, G the Gaseous class, and R the Roasters class. I devised one additional class, however: P, the Pulsar class, which concerns extrasolar planets orbiting pulsar stars. The fourth parameter is eccentricity. If the attributes of the surface of the extrasolar planet are known, we are able to establish this additional parameter where t represents a terrestrial planet, g a gaseous planet, and i an ice planet. According to this taxonomy scale, for example, Earth is 1E0W0t, Neptune is 1N1.5F0i, and extrasolar planet 55 Cnc e is 9E-1.8R1.

  10. Algal taxonomy: a road to nowhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Olivier; Guiry, Michael D; Leliaert, Frederik; Samyn, Yves; Verbruggen, Heroen

    2013-04-01

    The widespread view of taxonomy as an essentially retrogressive and outmoded science unable to cope with the current biodiversity crisis stimulated us to analyze the current status of cataloguing global algal diversity. Contrary to this largely pessimistic belief, species description rates of algae through time and trends in the number of active taxonomists, as revealed by the web resource AlgaeBase, show a much more positive picture. More species than ever before are being described by a large community of algal taxonomists. The lack of any decline in the rate at which new species and genera are described, however, is indicative of the large proportion of undiscovered diversity and bears heavily on any prediction of global algal species diversity and the time needed to catalogue it. The saturation of accumulation curves of higher taxa (family, order, and classes) on the other hand suggest that at these taxonomic levels most diversity has been discovered. This reasonably positive picture does not imply that algal taxonomy does not face serious challenges in the near future. The observed levels of cryptic diversity in algae, combined with the shift in methods used to characterize them, have resulted in a rampant uncertainty about the status of many older species. As a consequence, there is a tendency in phycology to move gradually away from traditional names to a more informal system whereby clade-, specimen- or strain-based identifiers are used to communicate biological information. Whether these informal names for species-level clades represent a temporary situation stimulated by the lag between species discovery and formal description, or an incipient alternative or parallel taxonomy, will be largely determined by how well we manage to integrate historical collections into modern taxonomic research. Additionally, there is a pressing need for a consensus about the organizational framework to manage the information about algal species names. An eventual strategy

  11. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: Molecular pathogenesis informs current approaches to therapy & hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignon Lee-cheun Loh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML is a rare childhood leukemia that has historically been very difficult to confidently diagnose and treat. The majority of patients ultimately require allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT for cure. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease now permit over 90% of patients to be molecularly characterized. Pre-HCT management of patients with JMML is currently symptom-driven. However, evaluation of potential high-risk clinical and molecular features will determine which patients could benefit from pre-HCT chemotherapy and/or local control of splenic disease. Furthermore, new techniques to quantify minimal residual disease burden will determine whether pre-HCT response to chemotherapy is beneficial for long-term disease-free survival. The optimal approach to HCT for JMML is unclear, with high relapse rates regardless of conditioning intensity. An ongoing clinical trial in the Children’s Oncology Group will test if less toxic approaches can be equally effective, thereby shifting the focus to post-HCT immunomanipulation strategies to achieve long-term disease control. Finally, our unraveling of the molecular basis of JMML is beginning to identify possible targets for selective therapeutic interventions, either pre- or post-HCT, an approach which may ultimately provide the best opportunity to improve outcomes for this aggressive disease.

  13. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    .... Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning...

  14. Sistemática, taxonomía y domesticación de alpacas y llamas: nueva evidencia cromosómica y molecular Systematics, taxonomy and domestication of alpaca and llama: new chromosomal and molecular evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN C MARÍN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Existen cuatro especies de camélidos sudamericanos, dos de ellos silvestres, guanaco (Lama guanicoe y vicuña (Vicugna vicugna, y dos formas domésticas, alpaca (Lama pacos y llama (Lama glama, cuyo origen ha sido objeto de debate. En el presente estudio la variación en el patrón de bandas G de los cromosomas de llamas y alpacas y la secuencia de dos genes mitocondriales han sido usados para estudiar el origen y la clasificación de llamas y alpacas. Patrones de bandas cromosómicas similares fueron observados en las cuatro especies de Lamini, incluso similares a los descritos para camello, Camelus bactrianus. Sin embargo, se encontraron finas y consistentes diferencias en los brazos cortos del cromosoma 1, permitiendo separar a camellos, guanacos y llamas, de las de vicuñas y alpacas. Este patrón fue consistente incluso en un híbrido guanaco x alpaca. Relaciones equivalentes fueron encontradas en las secuencias completas del gen para citocromo b, así como en el árbol de expansión mínima de las secuencias parciales de la región control, agrupando a guanacos con llamas y a vicuñas con alpacas. Los análisis filogenéticos mostraron a V. vicugna y a L. guanicoe como grupos recíprocamente monofHéticos. El análisis de las secuencias de ambos genes mostró dos ciados entre las vicuñas, concordantes con las subespecies reconocidas para esta especie, pero los resultados obtenidos para guanacos no reflejaron la existencia de las cuatro subespecies previamente propuestas. El análisis combinado de variaciones cromosómicas y moleculares demostraron una alta similitud genética entre alpacas y vicuñas, así como entre llamas y guanacos. Aunque se revela hibridización direccional, nuestros resultados apoyan fuertemente la hipótesis de que la llama se deriva de L. guanicoe, y la alpaca de V. vicugna, apoyando la reclasificación de la alpaca como V. pacosFour camelid species exist in South America: two wild, the guanaco (Lama guanicoe and

  15. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirsa L. E. van Westering

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+ concentration, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS localization and mitochondrial function and leads to inflammation and necrosis, all contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy. Current therapies only treat symptoms and therefore the need for targeting the genetic defect is immense. Several preclinical therapies are undergoing development, including utrophin up-regulation, stop codon read-through therapy, viral gene therapy, cell-based therapy and exon skipping. Some of these therapies are undergoing clinical trials, but these have predominantly focused on skeletal muscle correction. However, improving skeletal muscle function without addressing cardiac aspects of the disease may aggravate cardiomyopathy and therefore it is essential that preclinical and clinical focus include improving heart function. This review consolidates what is known regarding molecular pathology of the DMD heart, specifically focusing on intracellular Ca2+, nNOS and mitochondrial dysregulation. It briefly discusses the current treatment options and then elaborates on the preclinical therapeutic approaches currently under development to restore dystrophin thereby improving pathology, with a focus on the heart.

  17. What Is Our Current Understanding of PrPSc-Associated Neurotoxicity and Its Molecular Underpinnings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Daniel; Halliday, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The prion diseases are a collection of fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that cause rapid onset dementia and ultimately death. Uniquely, the infectious agent is a misfolded form of the endogenous cellular prion protein, termed PrP Sc . Despite the identity of the molecular agent remaining the same, PrP Sc can cause a range of diseases with hereditary, spontaneous or iatrogenic aetiologies. However, the link between PrP Sc and toxicity is complex, with subclinical cases of prion disease discovered, and prion neurodegeneration without obvious PrP Sc deposition. The toxic mechanisms by which PrP Sc causes the extensive neuropathology are still poorly understood, although recent advances are beginning to unravel the molecular underpinnings, including oxidative stress, disruption of proteostasis and induction of the unfolded protein response. This review will discuss the diseases caused by PrP Sc toxicity, the nature of the toxicity of PrP Sc , and our current understanding of the downstream toxic signaling events triggered by the presence of PrP Sc .

  18. Current Methods in the Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Jakko; Dziadek, Jarosław; Mazur, Paweł K.; Bielecki, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    In the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases, as in all infectious diseases, the key issue is to define the source of infection and to disclose its routes of transmission and dissemination in the environment. For this to be accomplished, the ability of discerning and tracking individual Mycobacterium strains is of critical importance. Molecular typing methods have greatly improved our understanding of the biology of mycobacteria and provide powerful tools to combat the diseases caused by these pathogens. The utility of various typing methods depends on the Mycobacterium species under investigation as well as on the research question. For tuberculosis, different methods have different roles in phylogenetic analyses and person-to-person transmission studies. In NTM diseases, most investigations involve the search for environmental sources or phylogenetic relationships. Here, too, the type of setting determines which methodology is most suitable. Within this review, we summarize currently available molecular methods for strain typing of M. tuberculosis and some NTM species, most commonly associated with human disease. For the various methods, technical practicalities as well as discriminatory power and accomplishments are reviewed. PMID:24527454

  19. The Cartesian Heritage of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucio, Brett

    2017-01-01

    This essay seeks to contribute to the critical reception of "Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives" by tracing the Taxonomy's underlying philosophical assumptions. Identifying Bloom's work as consistent with the legacy of Cartesian thought, I argue that its hierarchy of behavioral objectives provides a framework for certainty and…

  20. A taxonomy of systems of corporate governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimer, J.; Pape, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper argues that debate on corporate governance in an international context is hampered by the lack of a coherent framework. A taxonomy of systems of corporate governance is proposed as a remedy. The taxonomy is based upon eight characteristics: the prevailing concept of the firm, the board

  1. Cell and molecular biology of intervertebral disc degeneration: current understanding and implications for potential therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Z; Rui, Y F; Lu, J; Wang, C

    2014-10-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a chronic, complex process associated with low back pain; mechanisms of its occurrence have not yet been fully elucidated. Its process is not only accompanied by morphological changes, but also by systematic changes in its histological and biochemical properties. Many cellular and molecular mechanisms have been reported to be related with IDD and to reverse degenerative trends, abnormal conditions of the living cells and altered cell phenotypes would need to be restored. Promising biological therapeutic strategies still rely on injection of active substances, gene therapy and cell transplantation. With advanced study of tissue engineering protocols based on cell therapy, combined use of seeding cells, bio-active substances and bio-compatible materials, are promising for IDD regeneration. Recently reported progenitor cells within discs themselves also hold prospects for future IDD studies. This article describes the background of IDD, current understanding and implications of potential therapeutic strategies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. General aspects and current view of the molecular study of Phenylketonuria (PKU in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Alcántara-Ortigoza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is an autosomic recessive inborn errors of metabolism. It is caused y the deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase, an enzyme encoded by the PAH gene in 12q22. This gene has a wide mutation spectrum and several different genotypes have been identified. There are many experimental strategies that allow molecular diagnosis of PAH in order to identify causal mutations in patients with phenylektonuria. The identification of the PAH genotype in these patients allows genetic counseling, genotype-phenotype correlation and for some cases treatment adjustment. There are few studies concerning the mutation spectrum of PAH in Mexican patients. Currently, a study to identify the genotypes of these patients is being done. Only preliminary results are presented, nevertheless results are expected to clarify the mutation spectrum, enable the identification of possible genotype-phenotype correlations and elucidate the ancestral origin of the mutations.

  3. Comprehensive Social Skills Taxonomy: Development and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Nancy A; Kinnealey, Moya

    2015-01-01

    We developed a comprehensive social skills taxonomy based on archived children's social skill goal sheets, and we applied the taxonomy to 6,897 goals of children in 6 diagnostic categories to explore patterns related to diagnosis. We used a grounded theory approach to code and analyze social skill goals and develop the taxonomy. Multivariate analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc honestly significant difference test were used to analyze differences in social skill needs among diagnostic groups. We developed a taxonomy of 7 social skill constructs or categories, descriptions, and behavioral indicators. The 7 social skill categories were reflected across 6 diagnostic groups, and differences in social skill needs among groups were identified. This comprehensive taxonomy of social skills can be useful in developing research-based individual, group, or institutional programming to improve social skills. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Current clinical practice: differential management of uveal melanoma in the era of molecular tumor analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaberg, Thomas M; Cook, Robert W; Oelschlager, Kristen; Maetzold, Derek; Rao, P Kumar; Mason, John O

    2014-01-01

    Assess current clinical practices for uveal melanoma (UM) and the impact of molecular prognostic testing on treatment decisions. Cross-sectional survey and sequential medical records review. Ophthalmologists who treat UM. (A) Medical records review of all Medicare beneficiaries tested by UM gene expression profile in 2012, conducted under an institutional review board-approved protocol. (B) 109 ophthalmologists specializing in the treatment of UM were invited to participate in 24-question survey in 2012; 72 were invited to participate in a 23-question survey in 2014. Responses analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequency analyses (percentages, Tukey, histograms), and Fisher's exact test. Descriptive presentation of essay answers. The review of Medicare medical records included 191 evaluable patients, 88 (46%) with documented medical treatment actions or institutional policies related to surveillance plans. Of these 88, all gene expression profiling (GEP) Class 1 UM patients were treated with low-intensity surveillance. All GEP Class 2 UM patients were treated with high-intensity surveillance (P<0.0001 versus Class 1). There were 36 (19%) with information concerning referrals after initial diagnosis. Of these 36, all 23 Class 2 patients were referred to medical oncology; however, none of the 13 Class 1 patients were referred (P<0.0001 versus Class 1). Only Class 2 patients were recommended for adjunctive treatment regimens. 2012 survey: 50 respondents with an annual median of 35 new UM patients. The majority of respondents (82%) performed molecular analysis of UM tumors after fine needle biopsy (FNAB); median: 15 FNAB per year; 2014 survey: 35 respondents with an annual median of 30 new UM patients. The majority offered molecular analyses of UM tumor samples to most patients. Patients with low metastatic risk (disomy 3 or GEP Class 1) were generally assigned to less frequent (every 6 or 12 months) and less intensive clinical visits. Patients with high metastatic

  5. CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES: ROLE OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOMARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Aleksandrova

    2016-01-01

    .The alternative therapies of RD include the use of low-molecular-weight chemically synthesized agents that suppress the activity of tyrosine kinases. The important area of this therapy is to restore immunological tolerance and to correct autoimmune disorders by means of autologous hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells, regulatory T and B cells, gene therapy, and peptide antigens. The prospects for the laboratory diagnosis of RD are associated with the necessity of harmonizing and standardizing the current methods to determine autoantibodies and with the search for and clinical validation of novel proteomic, transcriptomic, and genomic biomarkers.

  6. GEM Building Taxonomy (Version 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzev, S.; Scawthorn, C.; Charleson, A.W.; Allen, L.; Greene, M.; Jaiswal, Kishor; Silva, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the development and applications of the Building Taxonomy for the Global Earthquake Model (GEM). The purpose of the GEM Building Taxonomy is to describe and classify buildings in a uniform manner as a key step towards assessing their seismic risk, Criteria for development of the GEM Building Taxonomy were that the Taxonomy be relevant to seismic performance of different construction types; be comprehensive yet simple; be collapsible; adhere to principles that are familiar to the range of users; and ultimately be extensible to non-buildings and other hazards. The taxonomy was developed in conjunction with other GEM researchers and builds on the knowledge base from other taxonomies, including the EERI and IAEE World Housing Encyclopedia, PAGER-STR, and HAZUS. The taxonomy is organized as a series of expandable tables, which contain information pertaining to various building attributes. Each attribute describes a specific characteristic of an individual building or a class of buildings that could potentially affect their seismic performance. The following 13 attributes have been included in the GEM Building Taxonomy Version 2.0 (v2.0): 1.) direction, 2.)material of the lateral load-resisting system, 3.) lateral load-resisting system, 4.) height, 5.) date of construction of retrofit, 6.) occupancy, 7.) building position within a block, 8.) shape of the building plan, 9.) structural irregularity, 10.) exterior walls, 11.) roof, 12.) floor, 13.) foundation system. The report illustrates the pratical use of the GEM Building Taxonomy by discussing example case studies, in which the building-specific characteristics are mapped directly using GEM taxonomic attributes and the corresponding taxonomic string is constructed for that building, with "/" slash marks separating attributes. For example, for the building shown to the right, the GEM Taxonomy string is: DX1/MUR+CLBRS+MOCL2/LWAL3/

  7. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the scab and spot anthracnose fungus Elsinoë (Myriangiales, Dothideomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.L. Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Species of Elsinoë are phytopathogens causing scab and spot anthracnose on many plants, including some economically important crops such as avocado, citrus, grapevines, and ornamentals such as poinsettias, field crops and woody hosts. Disease symptoms are often easily recognisable, and referred to as signature-bearing diseases, for the cork-like appearance of older infected tissues with scab-like appearance. In some Elsinoë-host associations the resulting symptoms are better described as spot anthracnose. Additionally the infected plants may also show mild to severe distortions of infected organs. Isolation of Elsinoë in pure culture can be very challenging and examination of specimens collected in the field is often frustrating because of the lack of fertile structures. Current criteria for species recognition and host specificity in Elsinoë are unclear due to overlapping morphological characteristics, and the lack of molecular and pathogenicity data. In the present study we revised the taxonomy of Elsinoë based on DNA sequence and morphological data derived from 119 isolates, representing 67 host genera from 17 countries, including 64 ex-type cultures. Combined analyses of ITS, LSU, rpb2 and TEF1-α DNA sequence data were used to reconstruct the backbone phylogeny of the genus Elsinoë. Based on the single nomenclature for fungi, 26 new combinations are proposed in Elsinoë for species that were originally described in Sphaceloma. A total of 13 species are epitypified with notes on their taxonomy and phylogeny. A further eight new species are introduced, leading to a total of 75 Elsinoë species supported by molecular data in the present study. For the most part species of Elsinoë appear to be host specific, although the majority of the species treated are known only from a few isolates, and further collections and pathogenicity studies will be required to reconfirm this conclusion.

  8. Current clinical practice: differential management of uveal melanoma in the era of molecular tumor analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaberg Jr TM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thomas M Aaberg Jr,1 Robert W Cook,2 Kristen Oelschlager,2 Derek Maetzold,2 P Kumar Rao,3 John O Mason III41Michigan State University Medical School and Retina Specialists of Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 2Castle Biosciences, Friendswood, TX, 3Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, 4Retina Consultants of Alabama and University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Objective: Assess current clinical practices for uveal melanoma (UM and the impact of molecular prognostic testing on treatment decisions.Design: Cross-sectional survey and sequential medical records review.Participants: Ophthalmologists who treat UM.Methods: (A Medical records review of all Medicare beneficiaries tested by UM gene expression profile in 2012, conducted under an institutional review board-approved protocol. (B 109 ophthalmologists specializing in the treatment of UM were invited to participate in 24-question survey in 2012; 72 were invited to participate in a 23-question survey in 2014.Main outcome measures: Responses analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequency analyses (percentages, Tukey, histograms, and Fisher’s exact test. Descriptive presentation of essay answers.Results: The review of Medicare medical records included 191 evaluable patients, 88 (46% with documented medical treatment actions or institutional policies related to surveillance plans. Of these 88, all gene expression profiling (GEP Class 1 UM patients were treated with low-intensity surveillance. All GEP Class 2 UM patients were treated with high-intensity surveillance (P<0.0001 versus Class 1. There were 36 (19% with information concerning referrals after initial diagnosis. Of these 36, all 23 Class 2 patients were referred to medical oncology; however, none of the 13 Class 1 patients were referred (P<0.0001 versus Class 1. Only Class 2 patients were recommended for adjunctive treatment regimens. 2012 survey: 50 respondents with an annual median of 35 new UM

  9. Taxonomy and conservation of Vietnam's primates: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Mary E; Sterling, Eleanor J; Hurley, Martha M

    2011-11-01

    Vietnam has the highest number of primate taxa overall (24-27) and the highest number of globally threatened primate taxa (minimum 20) in Mainland Southeast Asia. Conservation management of these species depends in part on resolving taxonomic uncertainties, which remain numerous among the Asian primates. Recent research on genetic, morphological, and acoustic diversity in Vietnam's primates has clarified some of these uncertainties, although a number of significant classification issues still remain. Herein, we summarize and compare the major current taxonomic classifications of Vietnam's primates, discuss recent advances in the context of these taxonomies, and suggest key areas for additional research to best inform conservation efforts in a region crucial to global primate diversity. Among the most important next steps for the conservation of Vietnam's primates is a new consensus list of Asian primates that resolves current differences between major taxonomies, incorporates recent research advances, and recognizes units of diversity at scales below the species-level, whether termed populations, morphs, or subspecies. Priority should be placed on recognizing distinct populations, regardless of the species concept in use, in order to foster the evolutionary processes necessary for primate populations to cope with inevitable environmental changes. The long-term conservation of Vietnam's primates depends not only on an accepted and accurate taxonomy but also on funding for on-the-ground conservation activities, including training, and the continued dedication and leadership of Vietnamese researchers and managers. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A taxonomy for mechanical ventilation: 10 fundamental maxims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatburn, Robert L; El-Khatib, Mohamad; Mireles-Cabodevila, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    The American Association for Respiratory Care has declared a benchmark for competency in mechanical ventilation that includes the ability to "apply to practice all ventilation modes currently available on all invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilators." This level of competency presupposes the ability to identify, classify, compare, and contrast all modes of ventilation. Unfortunately, current educational paradigms do not supply the tools to achieve such goals. To fill this gap, we expand and refine a previously described taxonomy for classifying modes of ventilation and explain how it can be understood in terms of 10 fundamental constructs of ventilator technology: (1) defining a breath, (2) defining an assisted breath, (3) specifying the means of assisting breaths based on control variables specified by the equation of motion, (4) classifying breaths in terms of how inspiration is started and stopped, (5) identifying ventilator-initiated versus patient-initiated start and stop events, (6) defining spontaneous and mandatory breaths, (7) defining breath sequences (8), combining control variables and breath sequences into ventilatory patterns, (9) describing targeting schemes, and (10) constructing a formal taxonomy for modes of ventilation composed of control variable, breath sequence, and targeting schemes. Having established the theoretical basis of the taxonomy, we demonstrate a step-by-step procedure to classify any mode on any mechanical ventilator. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Taxonomy of oxalotrophic Methylobacterium strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Nurettin; Kato, Yuko; Yilmaz, Ferah

    2008-10-01

    Most of the oxalotrophic bacteria are facultative methylotrophs and play important ecological roles in soil fertility and cycling of elements. This study gives a detailed picture of the taxonomy and diversity of these bacteria and provides new information about the taxonomical variability within the genus Methylobacterium. Twelve mesophilic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic oxalate-oxidizing strains were included in this work that had been previously isolated from the soil and some plant tissues by the potassium oxalate enrichment method. The isolates were characterized using biochemical tests, cellular lipid profiles, spectral characteristics of carotenoid pigments, G+C content of the DNA, and 16S rDNA sequencing. The taxonomic similarities among the strains were analyzed using the simple matching ( S SM) and Jaccard ( S J) coefficients, and the UPGMA clustering algorithm. The phylogenetic position of the strains was inferred by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequences. All isolates were Gram-negative, facultatively methylotrophic, oxidase and catalase positive, and required no growth factors. Based on the results of numerical taxonomy, the strains formed four closely related clusters sharing ≥85% similarity. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences demonstrated that oxalotrophic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic strains could be identified as members of the genus Methylobacterium. Except for M. variabile and M. aquaticum, all of the Methylobacterium type strains tested had the ability of oxalate utilization. Our results indicate that the capability of oxalate utilization seems to be an uncommon trait and could be used as a valuable taxonomic criterion for differentiation of Methylobacterium species.

  12. Organising knowledge taxonomies, knowledge and organisational effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Lambe, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Taxonomies are often thought to play a niche role within content-oriented knowledge management projects. They are thought to be 'nice to have' but not essential. In this ground-breaking book, Patrick Lambe shows how they play an integral role in helping organizations coordinate and communicate effectively. Through a series of case studies, he demonstrates the range of ways in which taxonomies can help organizations to leverage and articulate their knowledge. A step-by-step guide in the book to running a taxonomy project is full of practical advice for knowledge managers and business owners ali

  13. Building a taxonomy of GI knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arleth, Mette

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on and ongoing study concerning non-professional users` understanding of GI. Online access to GI are offered by many public authorities, in order to make the public able to serve them selves online and gain insight in the physical planning and area administration. The aim...... of this project is to investigate how and how well non-professional users actually understand GI. For that purpose a taxonomy of GI knowledge is built, drawing on Bloom`s taxonomy. The elements of this taxonomy are described after a presentation of the main research question of the study, the applications chosen...

  14. Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands.

  15. Intraspecific taxonomy of plant genetic resources – Important for differentiation of medicinal and aromatic plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohwasser, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomy of plant genetic resources is an important input in characterising and evaluating cultivated plants and essential for identification and documentation of the diversity of genebank collections. In former times taxonomical determination was based only on morphological characters. Nowadays, new molecular and chemical methods and techniques are available for providing additional information. As examples, investigations of parsley (Petroselinum crispum [Mill.] Nyman, Apiaceae and opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L., Papaveraceae collections of the German genebank are demonstrated. In addition to morphological description, the molecular distance and the phylogenetic relationship of the accessions were performed with molecular marker analysis. Essential oil compound and content for parsley and the content of the five main alkaloids (morphine, codeine, thebaine, noscapine, papaverine for opium poppy were measured with GC (gas chromatography and HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography, respectively. For parsley the results of the three methods support the existing taxonomy partly, a separation of root and leaf parsley was confirmed. However, the taxonomy of opium poppy should be revised because molecular and chemical data do not verify the morphological results. But nevertheless taxonomy of cultivated plants is an important tool to describe the variability of plant genetic resources.

  16. Taxonomy of Tricholoma in northern Europe based on ITS sequence data and morphological characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilmann-Clausen, J.; Christensen, M.; Frøslev, T.G.; Kjøller, R.

    2017-01-01

    Based on molecular and morphological data we investigated the taxonomy and phylogeny of the ectomycorrhizal genus Tricholoma in northern Europe. Our phylogenetic tree confirmed the presence of at least 72 well circumscribed species within the region. Of these, three species, viz. T.

  17. Psychiatric nosology and taxonomy in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldipur, C V

    1989-08-01

    This article considers the nosology and taxonomy of psychiatric disorders in Sushruta Samhita, an ancient Indian treatise on medicine. Some implications of this treatise for modern psychiatry are discussed.

  18. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate...

  19. EPA's Information Architecture and Web Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Information Architecture creates a topical organization of our website, instead of an ownership-based organization. The EPA Web Taxonomy allows audiences easy access to relevant information from EPA programs, by using a common vocabulary.

  20. TAXONOMY OF THE ORDER MONONEGAVIRALES: UPDATE 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Claudio L.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Bányai, Krisztián; Bào, Yīmíng; Basler, Christopher F.; Bavari, Sina; Bejerman, Nicolás; Blasdell, Kim R.; Briand, François-Xavier; Briese, Thomas; Bukreyev, Alexander; Calisher, Charles H.; Chandran, Kartik; Chéng, Jiāsēn; Clawson, Anna N.; Collins, Peter L.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Dolnik, Olga; Domier, Leslie L.; Dürrwald, Ralf; Dye, John M.; Easton, Andrew J.; Ebihara, Hideki; Farkas, Szilvia L.; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Formenty, Pierre; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Fù, Yànpíng; Ghedin, Elodie; Goodin, Michael M.; Hewson, Roger; Horie, Masayuki; Hyndman, Timothy H.; Jiāng, Dàohóng; Kitajima, Elliot W.; Kobinger, Gary P.; Kondo, Hideki; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A.; Lenardon, Sergio; Leroy, Eric M.; Li, Ci-Xiu; Lin, Xian-Dan; Liú, Lìjiāng; Longdon, Ben; Marton, Szilvia; Maisner, Andrea; Mühlberger, Elke; Netesov, Sergey V.; Nowotny, Norbert; Patterson, Jean L.; Payne, Susan L.; Paweska, Janusz T.; Randall, Rick E.; Rima, Bertus K.; Rota, Paul; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Schwemmle, Martin; Shi, Mang; Smither, Sophie J.; Stenglein, Mark D.; Stone, David M.; Takada, Ayato; Terregino, Calogero; Tesh, Robert B.; Tian, Jun-Hua; Tomonaga, Keizo; Tordo, Noël; Towner, Jonathan S.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Verbeek, Martin; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Walsh, John A.; Walker, Peter J.; Wang, David; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wetzel, Thierry; Whitfield, Anna E.; Xiè, Jiǎtāo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zhang, Yong-Zhen; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the order Mononegavirales was emended through the addition of two new families (Mymonaviridae and Sunviridae), the elevation of the paramyxoviral subfamily Pneumovirinae to family status (Pneumoviridae), the addition of five free-floating genera (Anphevirus, Arlivirus, Chengtivirus, Crustavirus, and Wastrivirus), and several other changes at the genus and species levels. This article presents the updated taxonomy of the order Mononegavirales as now accepted by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). PMID:27216929

  1. Taxonomy of the order Mononegavirales: update 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso, Claudio L.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Bányai, Krisztián; Bào, Yīmíng; Basler, Christopher F.; Bavari, Sina; Bejerman, Nicolás; Blasdell, Kim R.; Briand, François-Xavier; Briese, Thomas; Bukreyev, Alexander; Calisher, Charles H.; Chandran, Kartik; Chéng, Jiāsēn; Clawson, Anna N.; Collins, Peter L.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Dolnik, Olga; Domier, Leslie L.; Dürrwald, Ralf; Dye, John M.; Easton, Andrew J.; Ebihara, Hideki; Farkas, Szilvia L.; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Formenty, Pierre; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Fù, Yànpíng; Ghedin, Elodie; Goodin, Michael M.; Hewson, Roger; Horie, Masayuki; Hyndman, Timothy H.; Jiāng, Dàohóng; Kitajima, Elliot W.; Kobinger, Gary P.; Kondo, Hideki; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A.; Lenardon, Sergio; Leroy, Eric M.; Li, Ci-Xiu; Lin, Xian-Dan; Liú, Lìjiāng; Longdon, Ben; Marton, Szilvia; Maisner, Andrea; Mühlberger, Elke; Netesov, Sergey V.; Nowotny, Norbert; Patterson, Jean L.; Payne, Susan L.; Paweska, Janusz T.; Randall, Rick E.; Rima, Bertus K.; Rota, Paul; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Schwemmle, Martin; Shi, Mang; Smither, Sophie J.; Stenglein, Mark D.; Stone, David M.; Takada, Ayato; Terregino, Calogero; Tesh, Robert B.; Tian, Jun-Hua; Tomonaga, Keizo; Tordo, Noël; Towner, Jonathan S.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Verbeek, Martin; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Walsh, John A.; Walker, Peter J.; Wang, David; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wetzel, Thierry; Whitfield, Anna E.; Xiè, Jiǎtāo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zhang, Yong-Zhen; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2016-05-23

    In 2016, the order Mononegavirales was emended through the addition of two new families (Mymonaviridae and Sunviridae), the elevation of the paramyxoviral subfamily Pneumovirinae to family status (Pneumoviridae), the addition of five free-floating genera (Anphevirus, Arlivirus, Chengtivirus, Crustavirus, and Wastrivirus), and several other changes at the genus and species levels. This article presents the updated taxonomy of the order Mononegavirales as now accepted by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV).

  2. An integrative taxonomy on the locally endangered species of the Korean Scarabaeus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taeman; Kim, Jin Ill; Yi, Dae-Am; Jeong, Jongchel; An, Seung Lak; Park, In Gyun; Park, Haechul

    2016-07-22

    The ball-rolling dung beetles of the genus Scarabaeus are very ecologically important for the recycling of feces of large herbivores and the related nature management. There has been a significant decline, however, in the numbers of many species at the population and individual levels. S. typhon is currently thought to be the sole member of Scarabaeus distributed in Korea; however, that species underwent serious local extinctions in the 1970s. Before planning a full-scale species recovery, it is important to have an understanding of the exact species diversity and genetic structures of the focal species. We therefore attempted an integrative taxonomy focused on the Korean population of S. typhon and also on S. pius and S. sacer, which were once thought to be distributed in Korea, using both morphological and molecular approaches. The results of both approaches reveal the Korean species of Scarabaeus to be S. typhon and S. pius. In particular, our molecular results inferred from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genetic analysis show that S. typhon should be considered a single species despite having various haplotypes throughout its wide geographical range from Europe to Korea. We identified two distinct lineages of S. pius (groups A and B) across a wide distributional range. We conclude that the Korean specimens of S. pius belong to group A and that S. pius is new to Korea under the current taxonomic treatment.

  3. Imaging Neuroinflammation after Stroke: Current Status of Cellular and Molecular MRI Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deddens, L.H.; Van Tilborg, G.A.F.; Mulder, W.J.M.; de Vries, H.E.; Dijkhuizen, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategies for studying the spatiotemporal profile of neuroinflammatory processes after stroke are increasingly being explored since the first reports appeared about a decade ago. These strategies most often employ (super)paramagnetic contrast

  4. Molecular Phytopathology: Current Approaches and Main Directions in Diagnostics of Woody Plant Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Baranov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors describe the prospects for diagnosis of woody plants diseases based on the use of modern methods of molecular plant pathology. The metagenomic approach based on the analysis of complex pathogens, including non-pathogenic microflora is described. The use the multicopy universal loci characterized by a number of advantages in determining taxonomic affiliation of infectious agents during phytopathological molecular analysis is proposed.

  5. The taxobook principles and practices of building taxonomies

    CERN Document Server

    Hlava, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    This book outlines the basic principles of creation and maintenance of taxonomies and thesauri. It also provides step by step instructions for building a taxonomy or thesaurus and discusses the various ways to get started on a taxonomy construction project.Often, the first step is to get management and budgetary approval, so I start this book with a discussion of reasons to embark on the taxonomy journey. From there I move on to a discussion of metadata and how taxonomies and metadata are related, and then consider how, where, and why taxonomies are used.Information architecture has its corner

  6. Taxonomies of networks from community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Fenn, Daniel J.; Reid, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-09-01

    The study of networks has become a substantial interdisciplinary endeavor that encompasses myriad disciplines in the natural, social, and information sciences. Here we introduce a framework for constructing taxonomies of networks based on their structural similarities. These networks can arise from any of numerous sources: They can be empirical or synthetic, they can arise from multiple realizations of a single process (either empirical or synthetic), they can represent entirely different systems in different disciplines, etc. Because mesoscopic properties of networks are hypothesized to be important for network function, we base our comparisons on summaries of network community structures. Although we use a specific method for uncovering network communities, much of the introduced framework is independent of that choice. After introducing the framework, we apply it to construct a taxonomy for 746 networks and demonstrate that our approach usefully identifies similar networks. We also construct taxonomies within individual categories of networks, and we thereby expose nontrivial structure. For example, we create taxonomies for similarity networks constructed from both political voting data and financial data. We also construct network taxonomies to compare the social structures of 100 Facebook networks and the growth structures produced by different types of fungi.

  7. Ecogenomics and Taxonomy of Cyanobacteria Phylum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juline M. Walter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles. The genetic diversity among Cyanobacteria enables them to thrive across many habitats, although only a few studies have analyzed the association of phylogenomic clades to specific environmental niches. In this study, we adopted an ecogenomics strategy with the aim to delineate ecological niche preferences of Cyanobacteria and integrate them to the genomic taxonomy of these bacteria. First, an appropriate phylogenomic framework was established using a set of genomic taxonomy signatures (including a tree based on conserved gene sequences, genome-to-genome distance, and average amino acid identity to analyse ninety-nine publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Next, the relative abundances of these genomes were determined throughout diverse global marine and freshwater ecosystems, using metagenomic data sets. The whole-genome-based taxonomy of the ninety-nine genomes allowed us to identify 57 (of which 28 are new genera and 87 (of which 32 are new species different cyanobacterial genera and species, respectively. The ecogenomic analysis allowed the distinction of three major ecological groups of Cyanobacteria (named as i. Low Temperature; ii. Low Temperature Copiotroph; and iii. High Temperature Oligotroph that were coherently linked to the genomic taxonomy. This work establishes a new taxonomic framework for Cyanobacteria in the light of genomic taxonomy and ecogenomic approaches.

  8. Bacterial community comparisons by taxonomy-supervised analysis independent of sequence alignment and clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Woo Jun; Cole, James R; Jesus, Ederson da C; Wang, Qiong; Farris, Ryan J; Fish, Jordan A; Tiedje, James M

    2011-08-30

    High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes has increased our understanding of microbial community structure, but now even higher-throughput methods to the Illumina scale allow the creation of much larger datasets with more samples and orders-of-magnitude more sequences that swamp current analytic methods. We developed a method capable of handling these larger datasets on the basis of assignment of sequences into an existing taxonomy using a supervised learning approach (taxonomy-supervised analysis). We compared this method with a commonly used clustering approach based on sequence similarity (taxonomy-unsupervised analysis). We sampled 211 different bacterial communities from various habitats and obtained ∼1.3 million 16S rRNA sequences spanning the V4 hypervariable region by pyrosequencing. Both methodologies gave similar ecological conclusions in that β-diversity measures calculated by using these two types of matrices were significantly correlated to each other, as were the ordination configurations and hierarchical clustering dendrograms. In addition, our taxonomy-supervised analyses were also highly correlated with phylogenetic methods, such as UniFrac. The taxonomy-supervised analysis has the advantages that it is not limited by the exhaustive computation required for the alignment and clustering necessary for the taxonomy-unsupervised analysis, is more tolerant of sequencing errors, and allows comparisons when sequences are from different regions of the 16S rRNA gene. With the tremendous expansion in 16S rRNA data acquisition underway, the taxonomy-supervised approach offers the potential to provide more rapid and extensive community comparisons across habitats and samples.

  9. From Genome Sequence to Taxonomy - A Skeptic’s View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, Asli Ismihan; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    genome sequences to classify bacteria, and the method of choice, as always, depends on the question asked and the particular need. For example, 16S rRNA can define a bacterial species, and relate species, genera, and higher orders into groups consistent with their known biological properties. However...... many commonly used methods and also describes potential pitfalls if used inappropriately, as well as which questions are best addressed by particular methods. After a brief introduction to the classical methods of taxonomy, a description of the bacterial genomes currently available is given...

  10. Reads2Type: a web application for rapid microbial taxonomy identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saputra, Dhany; Rasmussen, Simon; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2015-01-01

    Identification of bacteria may be based on sequencing and molecular analysis of a specific locus such as 16S rRNA, or a set of loci such as in multilocus sequence typing. In the near future, healthcare institutions and routine diagnostic microbiology laboratories may need to sequence the entire g......, as the entire computational analysis is done on the computer of whom utilizes the web application. This also prevents data privacy issues to arise. The Reads2Type tool is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/~dhany/reads2type.html .......Identification of bacteria may be based on sequencing and molecular analysis of a specific locus such as 16S rRNA, or a set of loci such as in multilocus sequence typing. In the near future, healthcare institutions and routine diagnostic microbiology laboratories may need to sequence the entire...... genome of microbial isolates. Therefore we have developed Reads2Type, a web-based tool for taxonomy identification based on whole bacterial genome sequence data. Raw sequencing data provided by the user are mapped against a set of marker probes that are derived from currently available bacteria complete...

  11. Forensic Taxonomy of Android Social Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azfar, Abdullah; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Liu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    An Android social app taxonomy incorporating artifacts that are of forensic interest will enable users and forensic investigators to identify the personally identifiable information (PII) stored by the apps. In this study, 30 popular Android social apps were examined. Artifacts of forensic interest (e.g., contacts lists, chronology of messages, and timestamp of an added contact) were recovered. In addition, images were located, and Facebook token strings used to tie account identities and gain access to information entered into Facebook by a user were identified. Based on the findings, a two-dimensional taxonomy of the forensic artifacts of the social apps is proposed. A comparative summary of existing forensic taxonomies of different categories of Android apps, designed to facilitate timely collection and analysis of evidentiary materials from Android devices, is presented. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Current Status of Conventional and Molecular Interventions for Blast Resistance in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Srivastava

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyricularia oryzae anamorph of Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most notorious fungal pathogens causing severe economic loss in rice production worldwide. Various methods, viz. cultural, biological and molecular approaches, are utilized to counteract this pathogen. Moreover, some tolerant or resistant rice varieties have been developed with the help of breeding programmes. Isolation and molecular characterization of different blast resistance genes now open the gate for new possibilities to elucidate the actual allelic variants of these genes via various molecular breeding and transgenic approaches. However, the behavioral pattern of this fungus breakups the resistance barriers in the resistant or tolerant rice varieties. This host-pathogen barrier will be possibly countered in future research by comparative genomics data from available genome sequence data of rice and M. oryzae for durable resistance. Present review emphasized fascinating recent updates, new molecular breeding approaches, transgenic and genomics approaches (i.e. miRNA and genome editing for the management of blast disease in rice. The updated information will be helpful for the durable, resistance breeding programme in rice against blast pathogen.

  13. A Taxonomy of Human Translation Styles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael; Dragsted, Barbara; Lykke Jakobsen, Arnt

    2011-01-01

    While the translation profession becomes increasingly technological, we are still far from understanding how humans actually translate and how they could be best supported by machines. In this paper we outline a method which helps to uncover characteristics of human translation processes. Based...... on the translators' activity data, we develop a taxonomy of translation styles. The taxonomy could serve to inform the development of advanced translation assistance tools and provide a basis for a felicitous and grounded integration of human machine interaction in translation....

  14. A Task Taxonomy for Temporal Graph Visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerracher, Natalie; Kennedy, Jessie; Chalmers, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    By extending and instantiating an existing formal task framework, we define a task taxonomy and task design space for temporal graph visualisation. We discuss the process involved in their generation, and describe how the design space can be 'sliced and diced' into multiple overlapping task categories, requiring distinct visual techniques for their support. The approach addresses deficiencies in the task literature, offering domain independence, greater task coverage, and unambiguous task specification. The taxonomy and design space capture tasks for temporal graphs, and also static graphs, multivariate graphs, and graph comparison, and will be of value in the design and evaluation of temporal graph visualisation systems.

  15. A New Genomics-Driven Taxonomy of Bacteria and Archaea: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, George M

    2016-08-01

    Taxonomy is often criticized for being too conservative and too slow and having limited relevance because it has not taken into consideration the latest methods and findings. Yet the cumulative work product of its practitioners underpins contemporary microbiology and serves as a principal means of shaping and referencing knowledge. Using methods drawn from the field of exploratory data analysis, this minireview examines the current state of the field as it transitions from a taxonomy based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to one based on whole-genome sequences and tests the validity of some commonly held beliefs. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Genomics and Machine Learning for Taxonomy Consensus: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azé, Jérôme; Sola, Christophe; Zhang, Jian; Lafosse-Marin, Florian; Yasmin, Memona; Siddiqui, Rubina; Kremer, Kristin; van Soolingen, Dick; Refrégier, Guislaine

    2015-01-01

    Infra-species taxonomy is a prerequisite to compare features such as virulence in different pathogen lineages. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex taxonomy has rapidly evolved in the last 20 years through intensive clinical isolation, advances in sequencing and in the description of fast-evolving loci (CRISPR and MIRU-VNTR). On-line tools to describe new isolates have been set up based on known diversity either on CRISPRs (also known as spoligotypes) or on MIRU-VNTR profiles. The underlying taxonomies are largely concordant but use different names and offer different depths. The objectives of this study were 1) to explicit the consensus that exists between the alternative taxonomies, and 2) to provide an on-line tool to ease classification of new isolates. Genotyping (24-VNTR, 43-spacers spoligotypes, IS6110-RFLP) was undertaken for 3,454 clinical isolates from the Netherlands (2004-2008). The resulting database was enlarged with African isolates to include most human tuberculosis diversity. Assignations were obtained using TB-Lineage, MIRU-VNTRPlus, SITVITWEB and an algorithm from Borile et al. By identifying the recurrent concordances between the alternative taxonomies, we proposed a consensus including 22 sublineages. Original and consensus assignations of the all isolates from the database were subsequently implemented into an ensemble learning approach based on Machine Learning tool Weka to derive a classification scheme. All assignations were reproduced with very good sensibilities and specificities. When applied to independent datasets, it was able to suggest new sublineages such as pseudo-Beijing. This Lineage Prediction tool, efficient on 15-MIRU, 24-VNTR and spoligotype data is available on the web interface "TBminer." Another section of this website helps summarizing key molecular epidemiological data, easing tuberculosis surveillance. Altogether, we successfully used Machine Learning on a large dataset to set up and make available the first consensual

  17. Genomics and Machine Learning for Taxonomy Consensus: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Azé

    Full Text Available Infra-species taxonomy is a prerequisite to compare features such as virulence in different pathogen lineages. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex taxonomy has rapidly evolved in the last 20 years through intensive clinical isolation, advances in sequencing and in the description of fast-evolving loci (CRISPR and MIRU-VNTR. On-line tools to describe new isolates have been set up based on known diversity either on CRISPRs (also known as spoligotypes or on MIRU-VNTR profiles. The underlying taxonomies are largely concordant but use different names and offer different depths. The objectives of this study were 1 to explicit the consensus that exists between the alternative taxonomies, and 2 to provide an on-line tool to ease classification of new isolates. Genotyping (24-VNTR, 43-spacers spoligotypes, IS6110-RFLP was undertaken for 3,454 clinical isolates from the Netherlands (2004-2008. The resulting database was enlarged with African isolates to include most human tuberculosis diversity. Assignations were obtained using TB-Lineage, MIRU-VNTRPlus, SITVITWEB and an algorithm from Borile et al. By identifying the recurrent concordances between the alternative taxonomies, we proposed a consensus including 22 sublineages. Original and consensus assignations of the all isolates from the database were subsequently implemented into an ensemble learning approach based on Machine Learning tool Weka to derive a classification scheme. All assignations were reproduced with very good sensibilities and specificities. When applied to independent datasets, it was able to suggest new sublineages such as pseudo-Beijing. This Lineage Prediction tool, efficient on 15-MIRU, 24-VNTR and spoligotype data is available on the web interface "TBminer." Another section of this website helps summarizing key molecular epidemiological data, easing tuberculosis surveillance. Altogether, we successfully used Machine Learning on a large dataset to set up and make available the first

  18. The past, the present and the future of eutardigrade taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pilato

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Author first recalls the past of eutardigrade taxonomy and indicates the main factors that for a long time restrained its progress. One consequence of a superficial analysis is that very wide individual variability has been erroneously attributed to many species, and this has become the main problem for tardigrade taxonomists. The situation began to change after 1969 because of the first attempts to eliminate the above mentioned problems. Novelties gave impetus to the revision of tardigrade taxonomy, and genuine systematics, finally based on phylogenetics, became popular. Today the morphological characters are considered more in depth and studies utilising DNA sequences are more in fashion; they are surely useful and allow the distinction of morphologically very similar species. However, in the author’s opinion, this progress will be possible only if the molecular studies are always associated with careful morphological studies, which, in the meantime, will be more and more detailed also thanks to the use of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM.

  19. Taxonomies of Educational Technology Uses: Dewey, Chip and Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1990s, Chip Bruce created a taxonomy of education technology uses, which the author of the article helped to expand and evaluate. This taxonomy is based on John Dewey's "four impulses of the child": inquiry, construction, communication, and expression. This taxonomy has helped people interested in the uses of…

  20. The genus Gloriosa (Colchicaceae) : ethnobotany, phylogeny and taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maroyi, A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the ethnobotany, phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gloriosa L. over its distributional range. Some Gloriosa species are known to have economic and commercial value, but the genus is also well known for its complex alpha taxonomy. An appropriate taxonomy for this group is of

  1. An updated taxonomy for characterizing hackers according to their threat properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Sara Ligaard; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an up-to-date terminology for and categorization of hackers on the Internet, and to characterize each category of hackers by their threat properties. To be able to prioritize defense efforts, security experts need an accurate taxonomy of attackers...... for the production of detailed and precise threat assessments. We take an existing taxonomy for hackers and update it to correspond to the terminology used by hackers and security experts. Also, the categories of hackers are updated to reflect the threat properties demonstrated in recent attacks, and each category...... is described in terms of motivations, capabilities, triggers, methods, and trends. The result is a current and detailed taxonomy usable in planning of digital defense efforts as well as in forensics after an attack has occurred....

  2. Reconciling taxonomy and phylogenetic inference: formalism and algorithms for describing discord and inferring taxonomic roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsen Frederick A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although taxonomy is often used informally to evaluate the results of phylogenetic inference and the root of phylogenetic trees, algorithmic methods to do so are lacking. Results In this paper we formalize these procedures and develop algorithms to solve the relevant problems. In particular, we introduce a new algorithm that solves a "subcoloring" problem to express the difference between a taxonomy and a phylogeny at a given rank. This algorithm improves upon the current best algorithm in terms of asymptotic complexity for the parameter regime of interest; we also describe a branch-and-bound algorithm that saves orders of magnitude in computation on real data sets. We also develop a formalism and an algorithm for rooting phylogenetic trees according to a taxonomy. Conclusions The algorithms in this paper, and the associated freely-available software, will help biologists better use and understand taxonomically labeled phylogenetic trees.

  3. Unconventional Current Scaling and Edge Effects for Charge Transport through Molecular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obersteiner, Veronika; Huhs, Georg; Papior, Nick Rübner

    2017-01-01

    -size islands. On the basis of first-principles charge-transport simulations, we explain why the scaling of the conductivity of a junction has to be highly non-linear in the number of molecules it contains. Moreover, transport through molecular clusters is found to be highly inhomogeneous with pronounced edge...... effects determined by molecules in locally different electrostatic environments. These effects are most pronounced for comparably small clusters, but electrostatic considerations show that they prevail also for more extended systems....

  4. The impact of molecular biology on assessment of water quality: advantages and limitations of current techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, J R; Saunders, V A

    1997-01-01

    The advent of molecular biology has had a dramatic impact on all aspects of biology, not least applied microbial ecology. Microbiological testing of water has traditionally depended largely on culture techniques. Growing understanding that only a small proportion of microbial species are culturable, and that many microorganisms may attain a viable but non-culturable state, has promoted the development of novel approaches to monitoring pathogens in the environment. This has been paralleled by ...

  5. Validating the CDIO Syllabus for Engineering Education Using the Taxonomy of Engineering Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollacott, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    The CDIO (Conceive-Design-Implement-Operate) syllabus is the most detailed statement on the goals of engineering education currently found in the literature. This paper presents an in-depth validation exercise of the CDIO syllabus using the taxonomy of engineering competencies as a validating instrument. The study explains the attributes that make…

  6. Notes on Hygrophoraceae — VII. On the taxonomy and nomenclature of some species of Hygrophorus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, Eef

    1986-01-01

    Taxonomy and nomenclature of some West European species of Hygrophorus are discussed. The current use of Hygrophorus cossus (Sow.) Fr. as correct name of H. chrysaspis Métrod is rejected. Instead the name H. discoxanthus (Fr.) Rea is reintroduced. Hygrophorus barbatulus Becker is synonymized with H.

  7. Molecular Breeding for Ascochyta Blight Resistance in Lentil: Current Progress and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Rodda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14, self-pollinating, cool-season, grain legume that is cultivated worldwide and is highly valuable due to its high protein content. However, lentil production is constrained by many factors including biotic stresses, majority of which are fungal diseases such as ascochyta blight (AB, fusarium wilt, rust, stemphylium blight, anthracnose, and botrytis gray mold. Among various diseases, AB is a major -problem in many lentil-producing countries and can significantly reduce crop production. Breeding for AB resistance has been a priority for breeding programs across the globe and consequently, a number of resistance sources have been identified and extensively exploited. In order to increase the efficiency of combining genes from different genetic backgrounds, molecular genetic tools can be integrated with conventional breeding methods. A range of genetic linkage maps have been generated based on DNA-based markers, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs for AB resistance have been identified. Molecular markers linked to these QTLs may potentially be used for efficient pyramiding of the AB disease resistance genes. Significant genomic resources have been established to identify and characterize resistance genes, including an integrated genetic map, expressed sequence tag libraries, gene based markers, and draft genome sequences. These resources are already being utilized for lentil crop improvement, to more effectively select for disease resistance, as a case study of the Australian breeding program will show. The combination of genomic resources, effective molecular genetic tools and high resolution phenotyping tools will improve the efficiency of selection for ascochyta blight resistance and accelerate varietal development of global lentil breeding programs.

  8. Molecular Breeding for Ascochyta Blight Resistance in Lentil: Current Progress and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Matthew S; Davidson, Jennifer; Javid, Muhammad; Sudheesh, Shimna; Blake, Sara; Forster, John W; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2017-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14), self-pollinating, cool-season, grain legume that is cultivated worldwide and is highly valuable due to its high protein content. However, lentil production is constrained by many factors including biotic stresses, majority of which are fungal diseases such as ascochyta blight (AB), fusarium wilt, rust, stemphylium blight, anthracnose, and botrytis gray mold. Among various diseases, AB is a major -problem in many lentil-producing countries and can significantly reduce crop production. Breeding for AB resistance has been a priority for breeding programs across the globe and consequently, a number of resistance sources have been identified and extensively exploited. In order to increase the efficiency of combining genes from different genetic backgrounds, molecular genetic tools can be integrated with conventional breeding methods. A range of genetic linkage maps have been generated based on DNA-based markers, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for AB resistance have been identified. Molecular markers linked to these QTLs may potentially be used for efficient pyramiding of the AB disease resistance genes. Significant genomic resources have been established to identify and characterize resistance genes, including an integrated genetic map, expressed sequence tag libraries, gene based markers, and draft genome sequences. These resources are already being utilized for lentil crop improvement, to more effectively select for disease resistance, as a case study of the Australian breeding program will show. The combination of genomic resources, effective molecular genetic tools and high resolution phenotyping tools will improve the efficiency of selection for ascochyta blight resistance and accelerate varietal development of global lentil breeding programs.

  9. Current perspectives in the use of molecular imaging to target surgical treatments for genitourinary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesco; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Gill, Inderbir S; Kaouk, Jihad H; Remzi, Mesut; Thompson, R Houston; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; van der Poel, Henk G; Fornara, Paolo; Rassweiler, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) entails the visualisation, characterisation, and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. Translating this technology to interventions in real-time enables interventional MI/image-guided surgery, for example, by providing better detection of tumours and their dimensions. To summarise and critically analyse the available evidence on image-guided surgery for genitourinary (GU) oncologic diseases. A comprehensive literature review was performed using PubMed and the Thomson Reuters Web of Science. In the free-text protocol, the following terms were applied: molecular imaging, genitourinary oncologic surgery, surgical navigation, image-guided surgery, and augmented reality. Review articles, editorials, commentaries, and letters to the editor were included if deemed to contain relevant information. We selected 79 articles according to the search strategy based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis criteria and the IDEAL method. MI techniques included optical imaging and fluorescent techniques, the augmented reality (AR) navigation system, magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. Experimental studies on the AR navigation system were restricted to the detection and therapy of adrenal and renal malignancies and in the relatively infrequent cases of prostate cancer, whereas fluorescence techniques and optical imaging presented a wide application of intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. In most cases, image-guided surgery was shown to improve the surgical resectability of tumours. Based on the evidence to date, image-guided surgery has promise in the near future for multiple GU malignancies. Further optimisation of targeted imaging agents, along with the integration of imaging modalities, is necessary to further enhance intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. Copyright © 2013

  10. Current advances in molecular, biochemical, and computational modeling analysis of microalgal triacylglycerol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Sangram K; Carbonaro, Nicole; Park, Rudolph; Miller, Stephen M; Thorpe, Ian; Li, Yantao

    2016-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are highly reduced energy storage molecules ideal for biodiesel production. Microalgal TAG biosynthesis has been studied extensively in recent years, both at the molecular level and systems level through experimental studies and computational modeling. However, discussions of the strategies and products of the experimental and modeling approaches are rarely integrated and summarized together in a way that promotes collaboration among modelers and biologists in this field. In this review, we outline advances toward understanding the cellular and molecular factors regulating TAG biosynthesis in unicellular microalgae with an emphasis on recent studies on rate-limiting steps in fatty acid and TAG synthesis, while also highlighting new insights obtained from the integration of multi-omics datasets with mathematical models. Computational methodologies such as kinetic modeling, metabolic flux analysis, and new variants of flux balance analysis are explained in detail. We discuss how these methods have been used to simulate algae growth and lipid metabolism in response to changing culture conditions and how they have been used in conjunction with experimental validations. Since emerging evidence indicates that TAG synthesis in microalgae operates through coordinated crosstalk between multiple pathways in diverse subcellular destinations including the endoplasmic reticulum and plastids, we discuss new experimental studies and models that incorporate these findings for discovering key regulatory checkpoints. Finally, we describe tools for genetic manipulation of microalgae and their potential for future rational algal strain design. This comprehensive review explores the potential synergistic impact of pathway analysis, computational approaches, and molecular genetic manipulation strategies on improving TAG production in microalgae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining Taxonomies using Word2vec

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swoboda, Tobias; Hemmje, Matthias; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomies have gained a broad usage in a variety of fields due to their extensibility, as well as their use for classification and knowledge organization. Of particular interest is the digital document management domain in which their hierarchical structure can be effectively employed in order

  12. An Android Communication App Forensic Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azfar, Abdullah; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Liu, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Due to the popularity of Android devices and applications (apps), Android forensics is one of the most studied topics within mobile forensics. Communication apps, such as instant messaging and Voice over IP (VoIP), are one popular app category used by mobile device users, including criminals. Therefore, a taxonomy outlining artifacts of forensic interest involving the use of Android communication apps will facilitate the timely collection and analysis of evidentiary materials from such apps. In this paper, 30 popular Android communication apps were examined, where a logical extraction of the Android phone images was collected using XRY, a widely used mobile forensic tool. Various information of forensic interest, such as contact lists and chronology of messages, was recovered. Based on the findings, a two-dimensional taxonomy of the forensic artifacts of the communication apps is proposed, with the app categories in one dimension and the classes of artifacts in the other dimension. Finally, the artifacts identified in the study of the 30 communication apps are summarized using the taxonomy. It is expected that the proposed taxonomy and the forensic findings in this paper will assist forensic investigations involving Android communication apps. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Towards a taxonomy for project management competences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr Ruben Vrijhoef; J. Kessels; Steven Nijhuis

    2016-01-01

    Presented at Conference: IPMA World Conference 2014, At Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Volume: 28 A taxonomy is used for classifying things in general. For the purpose of this paper it is a systematic classification of competences into hierarchical groups where each sublevel constitutes a breakdown of

  14. A computer network attack taxonomy and ontology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, RP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available of attacks, means that an attack could be mitigated accordingly. The authors extend a previous, initial taxonomy of computer network attacks which forms the basis of a proposed network attack ontology in this paper. The objective of this ontology...

  15. Pollen morphology and taxonomy in the Loganiaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, W.; Leenhouts, P.W.

    1967-01-01

    The Loganiaceae is a heterogeneous, eurypalynous family with colpate, colporate or porate pollen grains (Erdtman 1952). Some years ago Dr. Leeuwenberg, specialist in the taxonomy of African Loganiaceae, asked the senior author to undertake an investigation of the pollen grains of that family.

  16. Enabling knowledge discovery: taxonomy development for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, J.; Busch, J.

    2003-01-01

    This white paper provides the background for why it is important to take the next steps with the NASA taxonomy including test and validation, XML schema development, integration with the FirstGov federal search engine, the OneNASA portal and its supporting web content management system.

  17. Molecular and cellular biology of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: a review of current concepts and future trends in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Russin, Jonathan J; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Soriano-Baron, Hector; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are classically described as congenital static lesions. However, in addition to rupturing, AVMs can undergo growth, remodeling, and regression. These phenomena are directly related to cellular, molecular, and physiological processes. Understanding these relationships is essential to direct future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The authors performed a search of the contemporary literature to review current information regarding the molecular and cellular biology of AVMs and how this biology will impact their potential future management. A PubMed search was performed using the key words "genetic," "molecular," "brain," "cerebral," "arteriovenous," "malformation," "rupture," "management," "embolization," and "radiosurgery." Only English-language papers were considered. The reference lists of all papers selected for full-text assessment were reviewed. Current concepts in genetic polymorphisms, growth factors, angiopoietins, apoptosis, endothelial cells, pathophysiology, clinical syndromes, medical treatment (including tetracycline and microRNA-18a), radiation therapy, endovascular embolization, and surgical treatment as they apply to AVMs are discussed. Understanding the complex cellular biology, physiology, hemodynamics, and flow-related phenomena of AVMs is critical for defining and predicting their behavior, developing novel drug treatments, and improving endovascular and surgical therapies.

  18. Current Molecular and Genetic Aspects of Pancreatic Cancer, the Role of Metastasis Associated Proteins (MTA): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Efstathios T; Pavlidis, Theodoros E

    2018-02-01

    Purpose/aim: To focus on current molecular and genetic aspects and MTA proteins, since pancreatic cancer is a lethal malignant with poor prognosis. Early diagnosis is essential step, contributing to potential curative resection. A PubMed search of relevant articles published up to August 2016 was performed to identify current information about pancreatic cancer regarding molecular biomarkers, with emphasis on carcinogenesis, novel therapeutic targets, and MTA proteins. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the process of carcinogenesis at the molecular level and the recognition of various oncogenes has opened new horizons for both diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metastasis associated (MTA) proteins (MTA1, MTA2, MTA3) comprise a well-established family of biomarkers. The oncogene MTA1 and its expression product MTA1 protein are the most important and adequately studied in the current research. It defines the growth, local invasiveness, lymphatic spread, and metastatic capacity of various malignancies such as colorectal or gastric cancer including also pancreatic cancer. This protein is associated with malignant potential and biological behavior. Consequently, it could contribute to cancer detection since the first stages of carcinogenesis, as well as in prediction of its malignant differentiation grade. The pre-operative information of the possibility of lymph node involvement may also affect the attempt and the extent of curative resection and lymphadenectomy. Carcinogenesis and implicated oncogenes, either activators or repressors, concentrate much research interest, as well as being useful as biomarkers and for targeted therapy. MTA proteins could become useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in current management of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Synthetic biology and molecular genetics in non-conventional yeasts: Current tools and future advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James M; Alper, Hal S

    2016-04-01

    Coupling the tools of synthetic biology with traditional molecular genetic techniques can enable the rapid prototyping and optimization of yeast strains. While the era of yeast synthetic biology began in the well-characterized model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is swiftly expanding to include non-conventional yeast production systems such as Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. These yeasts already have roles in the manufacture of vaccines, therapeutic proteins, food additives, and biorenewable chemicals, but recent synthetic biology advances have the potential to greatly expand and diversify their impact on biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the development of synthetic biological tools (including promoters and terminators) and enabling molecular genetics approaches that have been applied in these four promising alternative biomanufacturing platforms. An emphasis is placed on synthetic parts and genome editing tools. Finally, we discuss examples of synthetic tools developed in other organisms that can be adapted or optimized for these hosts in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of Pasiphaeidae (Crustacea, Decapoda, Caridea) reveals systematic incongruence of the current classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunshi; De Grave, Sammy; Ho, Tsz Wai; Ip, Brian H Y; Tsang, Ling Ming; Chan, Tin-Yam; Chu, Ka Hou

    2017-10-01

    Caridean shrimps constitute one of the most diverse groups of decapod crustaceans, notwithstanding their poorly resolved infraordinal relationships. One of the systematically controversial families in Caridea is the predominantly pelagic Pasiphaeidae, comprises 101 species in seven genera. Pasiphaeidae species exhibit high morphological disparity, as well as ecological niche width, inhabiting shallow to very deep waters (>4000m). The present work presents the first molecular phylogeny of the family, based on a combined dataset of six mitochondrial and nuclear gene markers (12S rDNA, 16S rDNA, histone 3, sodium-potassium ATPase α-subunit, enolase and ATP synthase β-subunit) from 33 species belonged to six genera of Pasiphaeidae with 19 species from 12 other caridean families as outgroup taxa. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses conducted on the concatenated dataset of 2265bp suggest the family Pasiphaeidae is not monophyletic, with Psathyrocaris more closely related to other carideans than to the other five pasiphaeid genera included in this analysis. Leptochela occupies a sister position to the remaining genera and is genetically quite distant from them. At the generic level, the analysis supports the monophyly of Pasiphaea, Leptochela and Psathyrocaris, while Eupasiphae is shown to be paraphyletic, closely related to Parapasiphae and Glyphus. The present molecular result strongly implies that certain morphological characters used in the present systematic delineation within Pasiphaeidae may not be synapomorphies and the classification within the family needs to be urgently revised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced molecular diagnostic techniques for detection of food-borne pathogens: Current applications and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesha, S; Manukumar, H M

    2018-01-02

    The elimination of disease-causing microbes from the food supply is a primary goal and this review deals with the overall techniques available for detection of food-borne pathogens. Now-a-days conventional methods are replaced by advanced methods like Biosensors, Nucleic Acid-based Tests (NAT), and different PCR-based techniques used in molecular biology to identify specific pathogens. Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., and pathogens are detected in contaminated food items that cause always diseases in human in any one or the other way. Identification of food-borne pathogens in a short period of time is still a challenge to the scientific field in general and food technology in particular. The low level of food contamination by major pathogens requires specific sensitive detection platforms and the present area of hot research looking forward to new nanomolecular techniques for nanomaterials, make them suitable for the development of assays with high sensitivity, response time, and portability. With the sound of these, we attempt to highlight a comprehensive overview about food-borne pathogen detection by rapid, sensitive, accurate, and cost affordable in situ analytical methods from conventional methods to recent molecular approaches for advanced food and microbiology research.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Perioperative Hepatic Protection: A Review of Current Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Talebi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver is one of the most important organs needing great concern during the perioperative period. There are a number of different mechanisms that interact with liver cells and might affect their integrity and cell live. Though these mechanisms are not all the same, there is a great common point: all affect the metabolic pathways of the liver. Ischemia, anesthetic drug effects and other perioperative insults may affect the liver. Disturbance in an organ’s blood flow is an inherent part of diverse surgical procedures, which leads to lack of oxygen and nutrient supply. These ischemic periods can be particularly long in case of liver surgeries, such as resection of large hepatic tumors, management of hepatic trauma and liver transplant. Once the blood flow and oxygen supply are restored, the interruption of blood flow affects the oxygen dependent cells in liver, which require mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for their metabolism. Molecular mechanisms such as Redox status, ionic interchange disturbances as well as different mediators and cells like KC, SEC, dendritic cells, leukocytes, and lymphocytes, are involved in the process ultimately leading to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. This review provides an overview on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in liver injuries, categorizing these mechanisms in 3 different classes: preoperative mechanisms, intraoperative mechanisms and postoperative mechanisms. Each of them are discussed in a different part of the manuscript

  3. Taxonomy for Common-Cause Failure Vulnerability and Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Korsah, Kofi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mullens, James Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pullum, Laura L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The potential for CCF vulnerability inhibits I&C modernization, thereby challenging the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, concern about CCF vulnerability in highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden that results in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty in determining which mitigation strategies will be acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. To address the conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the US nuclear industry, crosscutting research is needed to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive basis to qualify digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the development of a CCF taxonomy. The basis for the CCF taxonomy was generated by determining consistent terminology and establishing a classification approach. The terminology is based on definitions from standards, guides, and relevant nuclear power industry technical reports. The classification approach is derived from identified classification schemes focused on I&C systems and key characteristics, including failure modes. The CCF taxonomy provides the basis for a systematic organization of key systems aspects relevant to analyzing the potential for

  4. Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Raquel Martins Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer.

  5. Current status and future perspectives on molecular and serological methods in diagnostic mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna; Chen, Sharon; Sleiman, Sue; Sorrell, Tania

    2009-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of infectious morbidity. Nonculture-based methods are increasingly used for rapid, accurate diagnosis to improve patient outcomes. New and existing DNA amplification platforms have high sensitivity and specificity for direct detection and identification of fungi in clinical specimens. Since laboratories are increasingly reliant on DNA sequencing for fungal identification, measures to improve sequence interpretation should support validation of reference isolates and quality control in public gene repositories. Novel technologies (e.g., isothermal and PNA FISH methods), platforms enabling high-throughput analyses (e.g., DNA microarrays and Luminex xMAP) and/or commercial PCR assays warrant further evaluation for routine diagnostic use. Notwithstanding the advantages of molecular tests, serological assays remain clinically useful for patient management. The serum Aspergillus galactomannan test has been incorporated into diagnostic algorithms of invasive aspergillosis. Both the galactomannan and the serum beta-D-glucan test have value for diagnosing infection and monitoring therapeutic response.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of current classical swine fever virus isolates of wild boar in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leifer, I; Hoffmann, B; Höper, D

    2010-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) has caused significant economic losses in industrialized pig production, and is still present in some European countries. Recent CSF outbreaks in Europe were mainly associated with strains of genogroup 2 (subgroup 2.3). Although there are extensive datasets regarding 2.......3 strains, there is very little information available on longer fragments or whole classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genomes. Furthermore, there are no detailed analyses of the molecular epidemiology of CSFV wild boar isolates available. Nevertheless, complete genome sequences are supportive...... in phylogenetic analyses, especially in affected wild boar populations. Here, German CSFV strains of subgroup 2.3 were fully sequenced using two different approaches: (i) a universal panel of CSFV primers that were developed to amplify the complete genome in overlapping fragments for chain-terminator sequencing...

  7. Molecular basis of hepatic fibrosis and current status of its diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process of acute or chronic liver injury, hepatic stellate cells interact with various types of cells such as hepatic parenchymal cells, Kupffer cells, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells to mediate extracellular matrix deposition and sinusoid capillarization and thus initiate the process of hepatic fibrosis. The nature of hepatic fibrosis is repair response after liver injury. Liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis; however, it is generally associated with the risk of bleeding and even death. Noninvasive diagnostic methods for liver fibrosis mainly include serum biomarkers, imaging techniques, and predictive statistical model, but such methods cannot completely replace liver biopsy. At present, the treatment of hepatic fibrosis focuses on the research and development of new drugs targeting primary disease, hepatic stellate cells, or balance of extracellular matrix synthesis/degradation. The research on the molecular mechanism of hepatic fibrosis provides a solid theoretical basis for exploring the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  8. Current Perspectives on In Vivo Noninvasive Tracking of Extracellular Vesicles with Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Gangadaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and preclinical in vivo tracking of extracellular vesicles (EVs are a crucial tool for the development and optimization of EV-based diagnosis and treatment. EVs have gained interest due to their unique properties that make them excellent candidates for biological applications. Noninvasive in vivo EV tracking has allowed marked progress towards elucidating the mechanisms and functions of EVs in real time in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize several molecular imaging methods that deal with EVs derived from different cells, which have allowed investigations of EV biodistribution, as well as their tracking, delivery, and tumor targeting, to determine their physiological functions and to exploit imaging-derived information for EV-based theranostics.

  9. Building a Framework for a Dual Task Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. McIsaac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of dual task interference has gained increasing attention in the literature for the past 35 years, with six MEDLINE citations in 1979 growing to 351 citations indexed in 2014 and a peak of 454 cited papers in 2013. Increasingly, researchers are examining dual task cost in individuals with pathology, including those with neurodegenerative diseases. While the influence of these papers has extended from the laboratory to the clinic, the field has evolved without clear definitions of commonly used terms and with extreme variations in experimental procedures. As a result, it is difficult to examine the interference literature as a single body of work. In this paper we present a new taxonomy for classifying cognitive-motor and motor-motor interference within the study of dual task behaviors that connects traditional concepts of learning and principles of motor control with current issues of multitasking analysis. As a first step in the process we provide an operational definition of dual task, distinguishing it from a complex single task. We present this new taxonomy, inclusive of both cognitive and motor modalities, as a working model; one that we hope will generate discussion and create a framework from which one can view previous studies and develop questions of interest.

  10. DNA Variations in Oculocutaneous Albinism: An Updated Mutation List and Current Outstanding Issues in Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Wang, Xinjing; Wang, Chen; Sergeev, Yuri; Dolinska, Monika; Bower, Matthew; Fischer, Roxanne; Winer, David; Dubrovsky, Genia; Balog, Joan Z.; Huizing, Marjan; Hart, Rachel; Zein, Wadih M.; Gahl, William A.; Brooks, Brian P.; Adams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a rare genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented hair, skin, and eyes. There are four types of OCA, caused by mutations in TYR (OCA-1), OCA2 (OCA-2), TYRP1 (OCA-3), or SLC45A2 (OCA-4). Here we report 22 novel mutations; 14 from a cohort of 61 patients seen as part of the NIH OCA Natural History Study and 8 from a prior study at the University of Minnesota. We also include a comprehensive list of almost 600 previously reported OCA mutations, along with ethnicity information, carrier frequencies, and in silico pathogenicity predictions. In addition to discussing the clinical and molecular features of OCA, we address the cases of apparent missing heritability. In our cohort, 25% of patients did not have two mutations in a single OCA gene. We demonstrate the utility of multiple detection methods to reveal mutations missed by Sanger sequencing. Finally, we review the TYR p.R402Q temperature sensitive variant and confirm its association with cases of albinism with only one identifiable TYR mutation. PMID:23504663

  11. A Current View of Functional Biomaterials for Wound Care, Molecular and Cellular Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Piraino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intricate process of wound healing involves activation of biological pathways that work in concert to regenerate a tissue microenvironment consisting of cells and external cellular matrix (ECM with enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors. Distinct stages characterize the mammalian response to tissue injury: hemostasis, inflammation, new tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Hemostasis and inflammation start right after the injury, while the formation of new tissue, along with migration and proliferation of cells within the wound site, occurs during the first week to ten days after the injury. In this review paper, we discuss approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to address each of these processes through the application of biomaterials, either as support to the native microenvironment or as delivery vehicles for functional hemostatic, antibacterial, or anti-inflammatory agents. Molecular therapies are also discussed with particular attention to drug delivery methods and gene therapies. Finally, cellular treatments are reviewed, and an outlook on the future of drug delivery and wound care biomaterials is provided.

  12. A gene-tree test of the traditional taxonomy of American deer: the importance of voucher specimens, geographic data, and dense sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Eliécer E.; Helgen, Kristofer M.; McDonough, Molly M.; Bauer, Franziska; Hawkins, Melissa T. R.; Escobedo-Morales, Luis A.; Patterson, Bruce D.; Maldonado, Jesús E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The taxonomy of American deer has been established almost entirely on the basis of morphological data and without the use of explicit phylogenetic methods; hence, phylogenetic analyses including data for all of the currently recognized species, even if based on a single gene, might improve current understanding of their taxonomy. We tested the monophyly of the morphology-defined genera and species of New World deer ( Odocoileini ) with phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA seque...

  13. Current and Emerging Technologies for Probing Molecular Signatures of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Ercole

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is understood as an interplay between the initial injury, subsequent secondary injuries, and a complex host response all of which are highly heterogeneous. An understanding of the underlying biology suggests a number of windows where mechanistically inspired interventions could be targeted. Unfortunately, biologically plausible therapies have to-date failed to translate into clinical practice. While a number of stereotypical pathways are now understood to be involved, current clinical characterization is too crude for it to be possible to characterize the biological phenotype in a truly mechanistically meaningful way. In this review, we examine current and emerging technologies for fuller biochemical characterization by the simultaneous measurement of multiple, diverse biomarkers. We describe how clinically available techniques such as cerebral microdialysis can be leveraged to give mechanistic insights into TBI pathobiology and how multiplex proteomic and metabolomic techniques can give a more complete description of the underlying biology. We also describe spatially resolved label-free multiplex techniques capable of probing structural differences in chemical signatures. Finally, we touch on the bioinformatics challenges that result from the acquisition of such large amounts of chemical data in the search for a more mechanistically complete description of the TBI phenotype.

  14. Biomarkers for rheumatoid arthritis: From molecular processes to diagnostic applications-current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Britt; Papp, Gábor; Bosnes, Vidar; Zeher, Margit; Nagy, György; Szodoray, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Early diagnosis and immediately started appropriate treatment are mandatory for the prevention of radiographic progression, functional disability and unfavourable disease outcome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current classification criteria for RA include two different types of biomarkers representing inflammatory processes, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) or immune processes including autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA). After the discovery of RF, the recent recognition of various autoantibodies against post-translationally modified proteins opened new avenues to diagnosing RA and predicting the course of the disease. Citrullination and carbamylation of amino acids generate new epitopes that can potentially promote the production of novel autoantibodies. In spite of growing knowledge, the pathogenic role of these autoantibodies is still not fully elucidated in RA. In this paper, we review the currently available and novel promising immune biomarkers, which may help in early diagnosis and estimating prognosis in RA. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The ACTTION–APS–AAPM Pain Taxonomy (AAAPT) Multidimensional Approach to Classifying Acute Pain Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael L.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Belfer, Inna; Brennan, Timothy J.; Bruehl, Stephen; Brummett, Chad M.; Buckenmaier, Chester C.; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Cohen, Robert I.; Desjardins, Paul; Edwards, David; Fillingim, Roger; Gewandter, Jennifer; Gordon, Debra B.; Hurley, Robert W.; Kehlet, Henrik; Loeser, John D.; Mackey, Sean; McLean, Samuel A.; Polomano, Rosemary; Rahman, Siamak; Raja, Srinivasa; Rowbotham, Michael; Suresh, Santhanam; Schachtel, Bernard; Schreiber, Kristin; Schumacher, Mark; Stacey, Brett; Stanos, Steven; Todd, Knox; Turk, Dennis C.; Weisman, Steven J.; Wu, Christopher; Carr, Daniel B.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Terman, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    , despite the advent of modern multimodal analgesic strategies. Mismanaged acute pain has a broad societal impact as significant numbers of patients may progress to suffer from chronic pain. An acute pain taxonomy provides a much-needed standardization of clinical diagnostic criteria, which benefits clinical care, research, education, and public policy. For the purposes of the present taxonomy, acute pain is considered to last up to seven days, with prolongation to 30 days being common. The current understanding of acute pain mechanisms poorly differentiates between acute and chronic pain and is often insufficient to distinguish among many types of acute pain conditions. Given the usefulness of the AAPT multidimensional framework, the AAAPT undertook a similar approach to organizing various acute pain conditions. PMID:28482098

  16. Improving the leakage current of polyimide-based resistive memory by tuning the molecular chain stack of the polyimide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Chang; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; You, Hsin-Chiang; Lin, Guan-Wei; Kao, Min-Fang; Manga, Yankuba B.; Yang, Wen-Luh

    2018-02-01

    We have developed an organic-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM) by using spin-coated polyimide (PI) as the resistive layer. In this study, the chain distance and number of chain stacks of PI molecules are investigated. We employed different solid contents of polyamic acid (PAA) to synthesize various PI films, which served as the resistive layer of ReRAM, the electrical performance of which was evaluated. By tuning the PAA solid content, the intermolecular interaction energy of the PI films is changed without altering the molecular structure. Our results show that the leakage current in the high-resistance state and the memory window of the PI-based ReRAM can be substantially improved using this technique. The superior properties of the PI-based ReRAM are ascribed to fewer molecular chain stacks in the PI films when the PAA solid content is decreased, hence suppressing the leakage current. In addition, a device retention time of more than 107 s can be achieved using this technique. Finally, the conduction mechanism in the PI-based ReRAM was analyzed using hopping and conduction models.

  17. Current Status of Herbal Medicines in Chronic Liver Disease Therapy: The Biological Effects, Molecular Targets and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Hong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver dysfunction or injury is a serious health problem worldwide. Chronic liver disease involves a wide range of liver pathologies that include fatty liver, hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The efficiency of current synthetic agents in treating chronic liver disease is not satisfactory and they have undesirable side effects. Thereby, numerous medicinal herbs and phytochemicals have been investigated as complementary and alternative treatments for chronic liver diseases. Since some herbal products have already been used for the management of liver diseases in some countries or regions, a systematic review on these herbal medicines for chronic liver disease is urgently needed. Herein, we conducted a review describing the potential role, pharmacological studies and molecular mechanisms of several commonly used medicinal herbs and phytochemicals for chronic liver diseases treatment. Their potential toxicity and side effects were also discussed. Several herbal formulae and their biological effects in chronic liver disease treatment as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are also summarized in this paper. This review article is a comprehensive and systematic analysis of our current knowledge of the conventional medicinal herbs and phytochemicals in treating chronic liver diseases and on the potential pitfalls which need to be addressed in future study.

  18. An integrative view of cisplatin-induced renal and cardiac toxicities: molecular mechanisms, current treatment challenges and potential protective measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, George J.; Peppone, Luke J.; de Graaf, Inge A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most widely-used chemotherapeutic agents against various malignancies. Its clinical application is limited, however, by inherent renal and cardiac toxicities and other side effects, of which the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. Experimental studies show cisplatin generates reactive oxygen species, which impair the cell’s antioxidant defense system, causing oxidative stress and potentiating injury, thereby culminating in kidney and heart failure. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal and cardiac toxicities may allow clinicians to prevent or treat this problem better and may also provide a model for investigating drug-induced organ toxicity in general. This review discusses some of the major molecular mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal and cardiac toxicities including disruption of ionic homeostasis and energy status of the cell leading to cell injury and cell death. We highlight clinical manifestations of both toxicities as well as (novel)biomarkers such as kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We also present some current treatment challenges and propose potential protective strategies with novel pharmacological compounds that might mitigate or prevent these toxicities, which include the use of hydrogen sulfide. PMID:27717837

  19. Molecular taxonomy of Plagioscion Heckel (Perciformes, Sciaenidae and evidence from mtDNA RFLP markers for an invasive species in the Paraná river, Southern Brazil Taxonomia molecular de Plagioscion Heckel (Perciformes, Sciaenidae e evidências de marcadores moleculares RFLPs de mtDNA para uma espécie invasora no rio Paraná, Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Torres

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial RFLP markers were developed to examine whether Plagioscion squamosissimus (Heckel, 1840 is invasive in natural environments of the congener P. ternetzi in the Paraná river, in southern Brazil. Specimens of P. squamosissimus and of the putative P. ternetzi (Boulenger, 1895 were obtained from the Negro river (Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil and from Paraná river, respectively. Fragments of the cytochrome b gene (900bp were amplified by PCR and four restriction enzymes (Eco RI, Mbo I, Bam HI and Alu I yielded the mitochondrial markers. An additional RFLP analysis with a cytochrome b gene sequence of Plagioncion sp. from GeneBank was carried out to validate the prior analysis. No genetic differentiation was found among either sample. While molecular variation in the cytochrome b analysis was no substantial among individuals, the combined analysis was important for demonstrating that there is no evidence for differentiation of the putative sample P. ternetzi from that of P. squamosissimus. The ecological implications of the introduced occurrence of P. squamosissimus, as well as the role of molecular taxonomic approaches for biodiversity studies are discussed.Marcadores RFLPs mitocondriais foram desenvolvidos para verificar se Plagioscion squamosissimus (Heckel, 1840 é invasora nos ambientes naturais da espécie congênere P. ternetzi no rio Paraná, no sul do Brasil. Exemplares de Plagioscion squamosissimus e supostamente de P. ternetzi (Boulenger, 1895 foram obtidos, respectivamente, do rio Negro (Manaus, AM, Brasil e rio Paraná (Foz do Iguaçu, PR, Brasil. Foram amplificados, via PCR, fragmentos de cerca de 900pb do Citocromo b e foram utilizadas quatro enzimas de restrição (Eco RI, Mbo I, Bam HI e Alu I para os fins de geração dos marcadores moleculares. Foi desenvolvida, a partir de uma seqüência de Citocromo b de Plagioscion sp. (genebank, uma análise de RFLP adicional, objetivando validar a primeira análise acima mencionada

  20. Benchmarking of methods for genomic taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    One of the first issues that emerges when a prokaryotic organism of interest is encountered is the question of what it is--that is, which species it is. The 16S rRNA gene formed the basis of the first method for sequence-based taxonomy and has had a tremendous impact on the field of microbiology......; (ii) Reads2Type that searches for species-specific 50-mers in either the 16S rRNA gene or the gyrB gene (for the Enterobacteraceae family); (iii) the ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST) method that samples up to 53 ribosomal genes; (iv) TaxonomyFinder, which is based on species...

  1. Toward a comprehensive taxonomy of human motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talevich, Jennifer R.; Walsh, David A.; Iyer, Ravi; Chopra, Gurveen

    2017-01-01

    A major success in personality has been the development of a consensual structure of traits. However, much less progress has been made on the structure of an equally important aspect of human psychology: motives. We present an empirically and theoretically structured hierarchical taxonomy of 161 motives gleaned from a literature review from McDougall to the present and based on the cluster analysis of similarity judgments among these 161 motives, a broader sampling of motives than previous work. At the broadest level were: Meaning, Communion, and Agency. These divided into nine clusters: Morality & Virtue, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Actualization, Avoidance, Social Relating, Family, Health, Mastery & Competence, and Financial & Occupational Success. Each divided into more concrete clusters to form 5 levels. We discuss contributions to research on motives, especially recent work on goal systems, and the aiding of communication and systematization of research. Finally, we compare the taxonomy to other motive organizations. PMID:28231252

  2. Molecular epidemiology of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Russia (Current Status, 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanov, Alexey; Vorobyev, Denis; Chestkov, Aleksandr; Leinsoo, Arvo; Shaskolskiy, Boris; Dementieva, Ekaterina; Solomka, Viktoria; Plakhova, Xenia; Gryadunov, Dmitry; Deryabin, Dmitriy

    2016-08-09

    The widespread distribution of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains that are resistant to previously used and clinically implemented antibiotics is a significant global public health problem. In line with WHO standards, the national Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (RU-GASP) has been in existence in Russia since 2004; herein, the current status (2015) is described, including associations between N. gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility, primary genetic resistance determinants and specific strain sequence types. A total of 124 N. gonorrhoeae strains obtained from 9 regions in Russia in 2015 were examined using N. gonorrhoeae Multi-Antigen Sequence Typing (NG-MAST), an antimicrobial susceptibility test according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria and an oligonucleotide microarray for the identification of mutations in the penA, ponA, rpsJ, gyrA and parC genes responsible for penicillin G, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolone resistance. Genogroup (G) isolates were evaluated based on their porB and tbpB sequence types (STs). NG-MAST analysis showed a diversified population of N. gonorrhoeae in Russia with 58 sequence types, 35 of which were described for the first time. The STs 807, 1544, 1993, 5714, 9476 and 12531, which were typical for some Russian Federation regions and several countries of the former Soviet Union, were represented by five or more isolates. The internationally widespread ST 1407 was represented by a single strain in the present study. Division into genogroups facilitated an exploration of the associations between N. gonorrhoeae sequence type, antimicrobial resistance spectra and genetic resistance determinant contents. Preliminarily susceptible (G-807, G-12531) and resistant (G-5714, G-9476) genogroups were revealed. The variability in the most frequently observed STs and genogroups in each participating region indicated geographically restricted antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae

  3. Taxonomy of Challenges for Digital Forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karie, Nickson M; Venter, Hein S

    2015-07-01

    Since its inception, over a decade ago, the field of digital forensics has faced numerous challenges. Despite different researchers and digital forensic practitioners having studied and analysed various known digital forensic challenges, as of 2013, there still exists a need for a formal classification of these challenges. This article therefore reviews existing research literature and highlights the various challenges that digital forensics has faced for the last 10 years. In conducting this research study, however, it was difficult for the authors to review all the existing research literature in the digital forensic domain; hence, sampling and randomization techniques were employed to facilitate the review of the gathered literature. Taxonomy of the various challenges is subsequently proposed in this paper based on our review of the literature. The taxonomy classifies the large number of digital forensic challenges into four well-defined and easily understood categories. The proposed taxonomy can be useful, for example, in future developments of automated digital forensic tools by explicitly describing processes and procedures that focus on addressing specific challenges identified in this paper. However, it should also be noted that the purpose of this paper was not to propose any solutions to the individual challenges that digital forensics face, but to serve as a survey of the state of the art of the research area. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. The current progress in understanding the molecular functions and mechanisms of visfatin in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lele; Chen, Yiyue; Wang, Wanchun

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis, (OA), also known as degenerative arthritis or degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It is a group of mechanical abnormalities involving degradation of the joints and occurs when the protective cartilage (articular cartilage) on the ends of bones such as the knees, hips and fingers abrades over time. It mainly affects the whole joint structure, including the articular cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue. Extensive work has been done in the past decades to investigate the cellular mechanism of this disease. However, to date, it is still poorly understood, and there is no effective treatment. Recently, both in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed adipokines play critical roles during OA development. Among these, leptin and adiponectin have been well investigated, whereas the effect of the novel adipokine, visfatin, on OA still needs to be revealed. Therefore, in this short review, we will focus on visfatin and summarize the current progress in the research on its role in OA development.

  5. Mathematics, curriculum and assessment: The role of taxonomies in the quest for coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Long

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A challenge encountered when monitoring mathematics teaching and learning at high school is that taxonomies such as Bloom’s, and variations of this work, are not entirely adequate for providing meaningful feedback to teachers beyond very general cognitive categories that are difficult to interpret. Challenges of this nature are also encountered in the setting of examinations, where the requirement is to cover a range of skills and cognitive domains. The contestation as to the cognitive level is inevitable as it is necessary to analyse the relationship between the problem and the learners’ background experience. The challenge in the project described in this article was to find descriptive terms that would be meaningful to teachers. The first attempt at providing explicit feedback was to apply the assessment frameworks that include a content component and a cognitive component, namely knowledge, routine procedures, complex procedures and problem solving, currently used in the South African curriculum documents. The second attempt investigated various taxonomies, including those used in international assessments and in mathematics education research, for constructs that teachers of mathematics might find meaningful. The final outcome of this investigation was to apply the dimensions required to understand a mathematical concept proposed by Usiskin (2012: the skills-algorithm, property-proof, use-application and representation-metaphor dimension. A feature of these dimensions is that they are not hierarchical; rather, within each of the dimensions, the mathematical task may demand recall but may also demand the highest level of creativity. For our purpose, we developed a two-way matrix using Usiskin’s dimensions on one axis and a variation of Bloom’s revised taxonomy on the second axis. Our findings are that this two-way matrix provides an alternative to current taxonomies, is more directly applicable to mathematics and provides the

  6. A Reasoning Technique for Taxonomy Expert System of Living Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Desiani, Anita; Firdaus, Firdaus; Maiyanti, Sri Indra

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomy of living organisms can help scientists to sort organisms in order and help them to identify new organisms by finding out which their groups. It also is easier to study organisms when they are sorted in groups. Taxonomy of living organisms system is a important basic part of ecology system. Researcher should know about any organisms that they noted in an ecology. Integration between classification taxonomy of Living Organisms and technology information will have many advantages for ...

  7. Application of a Taxonomy to Characterize the Public Health Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Angela J; Meit, Michael; Heffernan, Megan; Boulton, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    A public health workforce taxonomy was published in 2014 to provide a standardized mechanism for describing public health worker characteristics. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) used 7 of the taxonomy's 12 axes as a basis for its survey response choices, 3 of which are the focus of this analysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative utility, reliability, and accuracy of the public health workforce taxonomy in categorizing local and state public health workers using a survey tool. This specifically included the goal of reducing the number of responses classified as "other" occupation, certification, or program area by recoding responses into taxonomy categories and determining potential missing categories for recommendation to the advisory committee that developed the taxonomy. Survey questions associated with the occupation, certification, and program area taxonomy axes yielded qualitative data from respondents who selected "other." The "other" responses were coded by 2 separate research teams at the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies and NORC at the University of Chicago. Researchers assigned taxonomy categories to all analyzable qualitative responses and assessed the percentage of PH WINS responses that could be successfully mapped to taxonomy categories. Between respondent self-selection and research team recoding, the public health workforce taxonomy successfully categorized 95% of occupation responses, 75% of credential responses, and 83% of program area responses. Occupational categories that may be considered for inclusion in the taxonomy in the future include disease intervention specialists and occupations associated with regulation, certification, and licensing. The public health workforce taxonomy performed remarkably well in categorizing worker characteristics in its first use in a national survey. The analysis provides some recommendations for future

  8. Review of taxonomy, geographic distribution, and paleoenvironments of Azhdarchidae (Pterosauria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averianov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The taxonomy, geographic distribution, and paleoenvironmental context of azhdarchid pterosaurs are reviewed. All purported pteranodontid, tapejarid, and azhdarchid specimens from the Cenomanian Kem Kem beds of Morocco are referred to a single azhdarchid taxon, Alanqa saharica. The four proposed autapomorphies of Eurazhdarcho langendorfensis from the lower Maastrichtian Sebeş Formation of Romania are based on misinterpretations of material and this taxon is likely a subjective junior synonym of Hatzegopteryx thambema. Among 54 currently reported azhdarchid occurrences (51 skeletal remains and 3 tracks) 13% are from lacustrine deposits, 17% from fluvial plain deposits, 17% from coastal plain deposits, 18% from estuarine and lagoonal deposits, and 35% from costal marine deposits. Azhdarchids likely inhabited a variety of environments, but were abundant near large lakes and rivers and most common in nearshore marine paleoenvironments. PMID:25152671

  9. Taxonomy and biogeography of Stephanoxis Simon, 1897 (Aves: Trochilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Cavarzere

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After the description in the 19th century of two hummingbird species currently allocated to the genus Stephanoxis, Peters (1945 merged both taxa into a single species without providing any rationale. Here we re-evaluate the taxonomy and species limits of the representatives of this genus based on an extensive number of specimens. We demonstrate these taxa are better treated as full species under both the Biological and Phylogenetic Species Concepts due to their well-defined range and plumage patterns and reciprocally diagnosability. They have distinct, allopatric distributions segregated by a 160 km gap between the Serra do Mar, to the east, and Serra de Paranapiacaba, to the west, in the state of São Paulo. Stephanoxis species have ranges which are congruent with other montane bird species’ suggesting shared vicariance events during preterit interglacial periods.

  10. Taxonomy and Biology of Phlebotomine Vectors of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIPTERA, *DISEASE VECTORS, *TAXONOMY, *VECTOR ANALYSIS , ANTIBODIES, BIOLOGY , BRAIN, CHROMOSOMES, COLOMBIA, COLONIES( BIOLOGY ), DISEASES, FEMALES... HUMANS , INFECTIOUS DISEASES, LABORATORIES, LEISHMANIA, LEISHMANIASIS, NEUTRALIZATION, PATIENTS, SEROLOGY, STRAINS( BIOLOGY ).

  11. The ALI-ARMS Code for Modeling Atmospheric non-LTE Molecular Band Emissions: Current Status and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Feofilov, A. G.; Manuilova, R. O.; Yankovsky, V. A.; Rezac, L.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The Accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) technique was developed in stellar astrophysics at the beginning of 1990s for solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem in atomic lines and multiplets in stellar atmospheres. It was later successfully applied to modeling the non-LTE emissions and radiative cooling/heating in the vibrational-rotational bands of molecules in planetary atmospheres. Similar to the standard lambda iterations ALI operates with the matrices of minimal dimension. However, it provides higher convergence rate and stability due to removing from the iterating process the photons trapped in the optically thick line cores. In the current ALI-ARMS (ALI for Atmospheric Radiation and Molecular Spectra) code version additional acceleration of calculations is provided by utilizing the opacity distribution function (ODF) approach and "decoupling". The former allows replacing the band branches by single lines of special shape, whereas the latter treats non-linearity caused by strong near-resonant vibration-vibrational level coupling without additional linearizing the statistical equilibrium equations. Latest code application for the non-LTE diagnostics of the molecular band emissions of Earth's and Martian atmospheres as well as for the non-LTE IR cooling/heating calculations are discussed.

  12. Malignant melanoma in pigmented skin: does the current interventional model fit a different clinical, histologic, and molecular entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Maslin, Benjamin; Kauffman, Catherine Lisa; Ichim, Thomas E; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2013-09-01

    Although the incidence of malignant melanoma in African Americans is considerably lower than in Caucasians, African Americans have a less-favorable prognosis related to later presentation and more deeply invasive lesions at diagnosis. To review the current literature addressing the specific clinical, histopathologic, and molecular features of melanoma in darkly pigmented individuals. We reviewed the most up-to-date literature pertaining to melanoma in this patient population, including data from clinical studies, epidemiologic analyses, and molecular and genetic studies. Several studies have suggested differences between lightly and darkly pigmented populations with regard to clinicopathologic character and the underlying genetic processes affecting its pathogenesis. Further investigation is warranted to better elucidate the clinical and underlying biological differences in melanoma between Caucasians and African Americans. Such research may help to ameliorate the disparities in melanoma outcomes through improved screening, public health measures aimed at prevention, and potentially novel targeted therapeutic approaches. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of metallic friction and of its dependence on electric currents - development and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos Anastasios

    We have extended the HOLA molecular dynamics (MD) code to run slider-on-block friction experiments for Al and Cu. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely and show marked deformation despite the hardness difference. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. Our first data also show a mechanism for decoupling between load and friction at high velocities. Such a mechanism can explain an increase in the coefficient of friction of metals with velocity. The study of the effects of currents on our system required the development of a suitable electrodynamic (ED) solver, as the disparity of MD and ED time scales threatened the efficiency of our code. Our first simulations combining ED and MD are presented.

  14. Nuclear Medicine Technologists' Perception and Current Assessment of Quality: A Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, April; Farrell, Mary Beth; Williams, Jessica; Basso, Danny

    2017-06-01

    In 2015, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section (SNMMI-TS) launched a multiyear quality initiative to help prepare the technologist workforce for an evidence-based health-care delivery system that focuses on quality. To best implement the quality strategy, the SNMMI-TS first surveyed technologists to ascertain their perception of quality and current measurement of quality indicators. Methods: An internet survey was sent to 27,989 e-mail contacts. Questions related to demographic data, perceptions of quality, quality measurement, and opinions on the minimum level of education are discussed in this article. Results: A total of 4,007 (14.3%) responses were received. When asked to list 3 words or phrases that represent quality, there were a plethora of different responses. The top 3 responses were image quality, quality control, and technologist education or competency. Surveying patient satisfaction was the most common quality measure (80.9%), followed by evaluation of image quality (78.2%). Evaluation of image quality (90.3%) and equipment functionality (89.4%) were considered the most effective measures. Technologists' differentiation between quality, quality improvement, quality control, quality assurance, and quality assessment seemed ambiguous. Respondents were confident in their ability to assess and improve quality at their workplace (91.9%) and agreed their colleagues were committed to delivering quality work. Of note, 70.7% of respondents believed that quality is directly related to the technologist's level of education. Correspondingly, respondents felt there should be a minimum level of education (99.5%) and that certification or registry should be required (74.4%). Most respondents (59.6%) felt that a Bachelor's degree should be the minimum level of education, followed by an Associate's degree (40.4%). Conclusion: To best help nuclear medicine technologists provide quality care, the SNMMI-TS queried technologists to

  15. Modern taxonomy of biotechnologically important Aspergillus and Penicillium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houbraken, Jos; de Vries, Ronald P; Samson, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomy is a dynamic discipline and name changes of fungi with biotechnological, industrial, or medical importance are often difficult to understand for researchers in the applied field. Species belonging to the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium are commonly used or isolated, and inadequate taxonomy or uncertain nomenclature of these genera can therefore lead to tremendous confusion. Misidentification of strains used in biotechnology can be traced back to (1) recent changes in nomenclature, (2) new taxonomic insights, including description of new species, and/or (3) incorrect identifications. Changes in the recent published International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants will lead to numerous name changes of existing Aspergillus and Penicillium species and an overview of the current names of biotechnological important species is given. Furthermore, in (biotechnological) literature old and invalid names are still used, such as Aspergillus awamori, A. foetidus, A. kawachii, Talaromyces emersonii, Acremonium cellulolyticus, and Penicillium funiculosum. An overview of these and other species with their correct names is presented. Furthermore, the biotechnologically important species Talaromyces thermophilus is here combined in Thermomyces as Th. dupontii. The importance of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and related genera is also illustrated by the high number of undertaken genome sequencing projects. A number of these strains are incorrectly identified or atypical strains are selected for these projects. Recommendations for correct strain selection are given here. Phylogenetic analysis shows a close relationship between the genome-sequenced strains of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus. Talaromyces stipitatus and T. marneffei (syn. Penicillium marneffei) are closely related to Thermomyces lanuginosus and Th. dupontii (syn. Talaromyces thermophilus), and these species appear to be distantly related to Aspergillus and Penicillium. In the last part of

  16. Expanding the Taxonomy of the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Christopher C.; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Lobbezoo, Frank; Schiffman, Eric L.; Alstergren, Per; Anderson, Gary C.; de Leeuw, Reny; Jensen, Rigmor; Michelotti, Ambra; Ohrbach, Richard; Petersson, Arne; List, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorder (TMD) classification to include less common, but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing, and further criteria refinement. Methods A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria, and the ability to operationalize and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMD taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Results Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders, and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalized diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. Conclusions The expanded TMD taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalize and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24443898

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Separation Behavior at the Interface between PVDF Binder and Copper Current Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Li-ion batteries, the mechanical strengths at the interfaces of binder/particle and binder/current collector play an important role in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the composite electrode. In this work, the separation behaviors between polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF binders and copper current collectors are studied in the opening and sliding modes using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The simulation shows that the separation occurs inside the PVDF rather than at the interface due to the strong adhesion between PVDF and copper. This fracture behavior is different from the behavior of the PVDF/graphite basal plane that shows a clear separation at the interface. The results suggest that the adhesion strength of the PVDF/copper is stronger than that of the PVDF/graphite basal plane. The methodology used in MD simulation can directly evaluate the adhesion strength at the interfaces of various materials between binders, substrates, and particles at the atomic scales. The proposed method can therefore provide a guideline for the design of the electrode in order to enhance the mechanical integrity for better battery performance.

  18. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, R. K.; Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S.; Ray, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation further reveals that there exists a composition gradient within the QDs and Ge core can be charged more efficiently than the Si-Ge periphery at low level of bias. Schematic energy band diagram at the tip-sample contact is presented to explain the current transport mechanism, charging/discharging characteristics and the threshold voltages of I-V characteristics of the individual Ge QDs.

  19. Molecular phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Veloporphyrellus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Chun Li; Beatriz Ortiz-Santana; Nian-Kai Zeng; Bang Feng; Zhu L. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Veloporphyrellus is a genus known from North and Central America, southeastern Asia, and Africa. Because species of this genus are phenotypically similar to some taxa in several genera, such as Boletellus, Leccinum, Strobilomyces, Suillus and Tylopilus s.l. belonging to Boletales, its phylogenetic disposition has...

  20. An inclusive taxonomy of behavioral biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peón

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper overviews the theoretical and empirical research on behavioral biases and their influence in the literature. To provide a systematic exposition, we present a unified framework that takes the reader through an original taxonomy, based on the reviews of relevant authors in the field. In particular, we establish three broad categories that may be distinguished: heuristics and biases; choices, values and frames; and social factors. We then describe the main biases within each category, and revise the main theoretical and empirical developments, linking each bias with other biases and anomalies that are related to them, according to the literature.

  1. Constructive Alignment and the SOLO Taxonomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Dahl, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    explain and discuss these principles, give examples of how the new syllabi were constructed, and describe the process by which they were formed. We also explain and discuss the results of a comparative study comparing the competences of Computer Science with those of Mathematics (and classical Natural...... the science faculties at University of Aarhus, Denmark (AU) and the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) that had been rewritten to explicitly incorporate course objectives, interpreted as intended learning outcomes (ILOs), using the principles of Constructive Alignment and the SOLO Taxonomy. In this paper we...

  2. Constructive Alignment and the SOLO Taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Dahl, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    explain and discuss these principles, give examples of how the new syllabi were constructed, and describe the process by which they were formed. We also explain and discuss the results of a comparative study comparing the competences of Computer Science with those of Mathematics (and classical Natural...... the science faculties at University of Aarhus, Denmark (AU) and the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) that had been rewritten to explicitly incorporate course objectives, interpreted as intended learning outcomes (ILOs), using the principles of Constructive Alignment and the SOLO Taxonomy. In this paper we...

  3. Photographic taxonomy: a methodological proposal for the research of selfies in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertz Wendel de Camargo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexities that involve selfies could not be contemplated in a single article. Thus, our goals are to provide a brief epistemological framework that allows a plausible interpretation of this photographic genre and to present the methodological approaches to the selection of a corpus for a possible self-portrait analysis on Instagram. We conclude that, despite the polysemic nature of social networks, it is possible a taxonomy of selfie applicable to other current photographic genres in media culture.

  4. The Semantic Web: Differentiating between Taxonomies and Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    Explains the concept of a semantic Web where software agents perform jobs for end-users by using hierarchies, metadata, and structured vocabularies. Discusses taxonomies; defining ontologies and taxonomies; standardized language and conceptual relationships; different points of emphasis; and topic maps as new Web infrastructure. (LRW)

  5. Understanding the Advising Learning Process Using Learning Taxonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleck, Jeanette K.; Smith, Cathleen L.; Allen, Janine M.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the learning that transpires in advising, we used Anderson et al.'s (2001) revision of Bloom's (1956) taxonomy and Krathwohl, Bloom, and Masia's (1964) affective taxonomy to analyze eight student-reported advising outcomes from Smith and Allen (2014). Using the cognitive processes and knowledge domains of Anderson et al.'s…

  6. DNA Taxonomy - the Riddle of Oxychloë (Juncaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Drábková, Lenka

    2005-01-01

    Recently, advocates of DNA taxonomy have complained that there is inadequate control of the taxonomy in databases such as GenBank. This is correct, but the uncertainty may be extended to the sequences themselves. The present study shows that as long as vouchers are available neither problem...... sequence and the other is most likely ''a contaminant.''...

  7. Recent taxonomy changes and their impact on biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The revolution in DNA sequencing technology has led to and improved understanding of genetics and taxonomy of biocontrol agents. Our lab recently reported the genomes of some important Bacillus bacterial biocontrol agents, which in turn resulted in a change of taxonomy for these commercially importa...

  8. A Taxonomy of Functions of Dental X-Ray Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    The taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists presented in this report resulted from a dental radiography curriculum development project undertaken at Middlesex County College (MCC) in 1981. After an introductory section citing arguments for creating taxonomies of objectives, the report explains the impetus for the curriculum…

  9. Translation of a Taxonomy into a Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    This paper explains the process by which Middlesex County College (MCC) translated a taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists into a curriculum guide for its dental radiography program. After noting the limited use of taxonomies, the paper describes MCC's curriculum project during which: (1) the developing a curriculum (DACUM)…

  10. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, R.K. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: We have elaborately explained the individual Ge QD charging phenomena and current transport, which is very important to understand the Ge/Si nano devices. This paper will give a flavor to properly understand these phenomena linked together along with the photocurrent mechanism which is related to the Ge/Si valence band offset. • Both the CAFM and KPFM techniques point out the functionality of doping nature of the underneath Si substrate on the aforementioned characteristics of Ge QDs. • Analysis of the surface potential mapping using KPFM technique yields an approximate valence band offset measurement which is required to understand the intra-valence transition of holes for the realization of long wavelength infrared photodetector. • KPFM and CAFM can be utilized to explore the charging/discharging phenomena of dots and their composition variations. • Current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of the individual Ge QD strongly depends on the individual QD size. • Energy band diagrams for diamond tip and Ge QD shows the higher barrier for electrons and lower barrier for holes allowing the easy tunneling for holes to dominate the transport. - Abstract: It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation

  11. Does the name really matter? The importance of botanical nomenclature and plant taxonomy in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Bradley C; Balick, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    Medical research on plant-derived compounds requires a breadth of expertise from field to laboratory and clinical skills. Too often basic botanical skills are evidently lacking, especially with respect to plant taxonomy and botanical nomenclature. Binomial and familial names, synonyms and author citations are often misconstrued. The correct botanical name, linked to a vouchered specimen, is the sine qua non of phytomedical research. Without the unique identifier of a proper binomial, research cannot accurately be linked to the existing literature. Perhaps more significant, is the ambiguity of species determinations that ensues of from poor taxonomic practices. This uncertainty, not surprisingly, obstructs reproducibility of results-the cornerstone of science. Based on our combined six decades of experience with medicinal plants, we discuss the problems of inaccurate taxonomy and botanical nomenclature in biomedical research. This problems appear all too frequently in manuscripts and grant applications that we review and they extend to the published literature. We also review the literature on the importance of taxonomy in other disciplines that relate to medicinal plant research. In most cases, questions regarding orthography, synonymy, author citations, and current family designations of most plant binomials can be resolved using widely-available online databases and other electronic resources. Some complex problems require consultation with a professional plant taxonomist, which also is important for accurate identification of voucher specimens. Researchers should provide the currently accepted binomial and complete author citation, provide relevant synonyms, and employ the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III family name. Taxonomy is a vital adjunct not only to plant-medicine research but to virtually every field of science. Medicinal plant researchers can increase the precision and utility of their investigations by following sound practices with respect to botanical

  12. Digital Libraries: The Challenge of Integrating Instagram with a Taxonomy for Content Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ibba

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability and social implication are two current challenges in the digital library (DL context. To resolve the problem of interoperability, our work aims to find a relationship between the main metadata schemas. In particular, we want to formalize knowledge through the creation of a metadata taxonomy built with the analysis and the integration of existing schemas associated with DLs. We developed a method to integrate and combine Instagram metadata and hashtags. The final result is a taxonomy, which provides innovative metadata with respect to the classification of resources, as images of Instagram and the user-generated content, that play a primary role in the context of modern DLs. The possibility of Instagram to localize the photos inserted by users allows us to interpret the most relevant and interesting informative content for a specific user type and in a specific location and to improve access, visibility and searching of library content.

  13. A taxonomy of primary health care practices: an avenue for informing management and policy implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Gulyas, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Health policy and practice managers often treat primary practices as being homogenous, despite evidence that these organisations vary along multiple dimensions. This treatment can be a barrier to the development of a strong health care system. Therefore, a more sophisticated taxonomy of organisations could inform management and policy to better cater to the diversity of practice contexts, needs and capabilities. The purpose of this study was to categorise primary practices using practice features and characteristics associated with the job satisfaction of GPs. The current study uses data from 3906 GPs from the 2008 wave of the MABEL survey. Seven configurations of primary health care practices emerged from multivariate cluster analyses. The configurations incorporate, yet move beyond, simplistic categorisations such as geographic location and highlight the complexity facing managers and health policy interventions. The multidimensional configurations in the taxonomy are a mechanism for informing health care management and policy. The process of deriving configurations can be applied in a variety of countries and contexts.

  14. Leaf arrangements are invalid in the taxonomy of orchid species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jakubska-Busse

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The selection and validation of proper distinguishing characters are of crucial importance in taxonomic revisions. The modern classifications of orchids utilize the molecular tools, but still the selection and identification of the material used in these studies is for the most part related to general species morphology. One of the vegetative characters quoted in orchid manuals is leaf arrangement. However, phyllotactic diversity and ontogenetic changeability have not been analysed in detail in reference to particular taxonomic groups. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of leaf arrangements in the taxonomy of the genus Epipactis Zinn, 1757. Typical leaf arrangements in shoots of this genus are described as distichous or spiral. However, in the course of field research and screening of herbarium materials, we indisputably disproved the presence of distichous phyllotaxis in the species Epipactis purpurata Sm. and confirmed the spiral Fibonacci pattern as the dominant leaf arrangement. In addition, detailed analyses revealed the presence of atypical decussate phyllotaxis in this species, as well as demonstrated the ontogenetic formation of pseudowhorls. These findings confirm ontogenetic variability and plasticity in E. purpurata. Our results are discussed in the context of their significance in delimitations of complex taxa within the genus Epipactis.

  15. Aspergillus section Nidulantes (formerly Emericella: Polyphasic taxonomy, chemistry and biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus section Nidulantes includes species with striking morphological characters, such as biseriate conidiophores with brown-pigmented stipes, and if present, the production of ascomata embedded in masses of Hülle cells with often reddish brown ascospores. The majority of species in this section have a sexual state, which were named Emericella in the dual name nomenclature system. In the present study, strains belonging to subgenus Nidulantes were subjected to multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses using internal transcribed spacer region (ITS, partial β-tubulin (BenA, calmodulin (CaM and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2 sequences. Nine sections are accepted in subgenus Nidulantes including the new section Cavernicolus. A polyphasic approach using morphological characters, extrolites, physiological characters and phylogeny was applied to investigate the taxonomy of section Nidulantes. Based on this approach, section Nidulantes is subdivided in seven clades and 65 species, and 10 species are described here as new. Morphological characters including colour, shape, size, and ornamentation of ascospores, shape and size of conidia and vesicles, growth temperatures are important for identifying species. Many species of section Nidulantes produce the carcinogenic mycotoxin sterigmatocystin. The most important mycotoxins in Aspergillus section Nidulantes are aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, emestrin, fumitremorgins, asteltoxins, and paxillin while other extrolites are useful drugs or drug lead candidates such as echinocandins, mulundocandins, calbistrins, varitriols, variecolins and terrain. Aflatoxin B1 is produced by four species: A. astellatus, A. miraensis, A. olivicola, and A. venezuelensis.

  16. Shedding subspecies: The influence of genetics on reptile subspecies taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrom, Shannon M; Pangle, Kevin L; Swanson, Bradley J

    2014-07-01

    The subspecies concept influences multiple aspects of biology and management. The 'molecular revolution' altered traditional methods (morphological traits) of subspecies classification by applying genetic analyses resulting in alternative or contradictory classifications. We evaluated recent reptile literature for bias in the recommendations regarding subspecies status when genetic data were included. Reviewing characteristics of the study, genetic variables, genetic distance values and noting the species concepts, we found that subspecies were more likely elevated to species when using genetic analysis. However, there was no predictive relationship between variables used and taxonomic recommendation. There was a significant difference between the median genetic distance values when researchers elevated or collapsed a subspecies. Our review found nine different concepts of species used when recommending taxonomic change, and studies incorporating multiple species concepts were more likely to recommend a taxonomic change. Since using genetic techniques significantly alter reptile taxonomy there is a need to establish a standard method to determine the species-subspecies boundary in order to effectively use the subspecies classification for research and conservation purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Taxonomy of segmental myocardial systolic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, Adam K.; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Cleland, John G.

    2017-01-01

    The terms used to describe different states of myocardial health and disease are poorly defined. Imprecision and inconsistency in nomenclature can lead to difficulty in interpreting and applying trial outcomes to clinical practice. In particular, the terms ‘viable’ and ‘hibernating’ are commonly applied interchangeably and incorrectly to myocardium that exhibits chronic contractile dysfunction in patients with ischaemic heart disease. The range of inherent differences amongst imaging modalities used to define myocardial health and disease add further challenges to consistent definitions. The results of several large trials have led to renewed discussion about the classification of dysfunctional myocardial segments. This article aims to describe the diverse myocardial pathologies that may affect the myocardium in ischaemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, and how they may be assessed with non-invasive imaging techniques in order to provide a taxonomy of myocardial dysfunction. PMID:27147609

  18. Submilliampere threshold current pseudomorphic InGaAs/AlGaAs buried-heterostructure quantum well lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Eng, L. E.; Chen, T. R.; Sanders, S.; Zhuang, Y. H.; Zhao, B.; Yariv, A.; Morkoç, H.

    1989-01-01

    We report on low threshold current strained InGaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Broad-area threshold current densities of 114 A/cm2 at 990 nm were measured for 1540-µm-long lasers. Threshold currents of 2.4 mA at 950 nm were obtained for an uncoated buried-heterostructure device with a 2-µm-wide stripe and 425-µm-long cavity. With reflective coatings the best device showed 0.9 mA threshold current (L=225 µm). Preliminary modulation measurements show bandw...

  19. Mitochondrial phylogeography, subspecific taxonomy, and conservation genetics of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; Aves: Gruidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhymer, J.M.; Fain, M.G.; Austin, J.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Krajewski, C.

    2001-01-01

    Six subspecies of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have been denoted based on perceived morphological and/or breeding locality differences among them. Three subspecies are migratory, breeding from the high arctic in North America and Siberia (lesser sandhill, G. c. canadensis), south through central Canada (Canadian sandhill, G. c. rowani) and into the northern United States (greater sandhill, G. c. tabida). A review of sandhill crane taxonomy indicates that the size variation, on the basis of which these subspecies were named, may be clinal and not diagnostic. The other three subspecies, all listed as endangered or threatened, are non-migratory, resident in Florida (G. c. pratensis), Mississippi (G. c. pulla), and Cuba (G. c. nesiotes). We used analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) sequences to determine whether haplotypes representing current subspecies show any genetic cohesion or are more consistent with a pattern of clinal variation in morphology. CR sequences indicate that only two highly divergent (5.3%) lineages of sandhill cranes occur in North America: one lineage composed only of arctic-nesting G. c. canadensis, the other of the remaining North American subspecies (we lack data on the Cuban population). The deep split between lineages is consistent with an estimated isolation of approximately 1.5 Mya (mid-Pleistocene), while the distribution of mutational changes within lineages is consistent with an hypothesis of rapid, post-Pleistocene population expansions. No other phylogeographic structuring is concordant with subspecific boundaries, however, analysis of molecular variance indicates that there is significant population genetic differentiation among all subspecies except G. c. tabida and G. c. rowani, which are indistinguishable. We suggest that recognition of the recently named G. c. rowani be abandoned.

  20. Ontologies, taxonomies and thesauri in systems science and systematics

    CERN Document Server

    Currás, Emilia

    2010-01-01

    The originality of this book, which deals with such a new subject matter, lies in the application of methods and concepts never used before - such as ontologies and taxonomies, as well as thesauri - to the ordering of knowledge based on primary information. Chapters in the book also examine the study of ontologies, taxonomies and thesauri from the perspective of systematics and general systems theory. Ontologies, Taxonomies and Thesauri in Systems Science and Systematics will be extremely useful to those operating within the network of related fields, which includes documentation and informati

  1. An IT Service Taxonomy for Elaborating IT Service Catalog

    OpenAIRE

    Rabbi, Md Forhad

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, I, as the author, have tried to propose a methodology for establishing IT service taxonomy in order to elaborate IT service portfolio and IT service catalog. As a core part of my thesis, IT service taxonomy has been discussed to manage IT services in an efficient way in the small and medium sized enterprises The small and medium sized enterprises can use the categories and sub categories of this taxonomy to define their service catalog and portfolio. In that regards, a list of...

  2. [Which definition and taxonomy of incident to use for a French reporting system in primary care settings?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keriel-Gascou, M; Brami, J; Chanelière, M; Haeringer-Cholet, A; Larrieu, C; Villebrun, F; Robert, T; Michel, P

    2014-02-01

    There is no widely accepted definition of incident for primary care doctors in France and no taxonomic classification system for epidemiological use. In preparation for a future epidemiological study on primary care incidents in France (the ESPRIT study), this work was designed to identify the definitions and taxonomic classifications used internationally along with the usual methods and results in terms of frequency in the literature. The goal was to determine a French definition and taxonomy. Systematic review of the literature and consensus methods. An exhaustive search of epidemiological surveys was performed. A structured grid was used. After having identified the definitions used in the literature, a definition was chosen using the focus groups method. Taxonomies identified in the literature were classified by relationship, architecture, code number, and number of studies published. Subsequently, a consensus among experts, who independently tested these taxonomies on six incidents, was reached for choosing the most appropriate for epidemiological data collection (little information on a large number of cases). Twenty-four papers reporting 17 studies were selected among 139 articles. Five definitions and eight taxonomies were found. The chosen definition of incident was based on the WHO definition "A patient safety incident is an event or circumstance that could have resulted, or did result, in harm to a patient, and whose wish it is not repeated again". The test of incidents resulted in the choice of the TAPS version of the International Taxonomy of Medical Error in Primary Care for a reproducible and internationally recognized codification and the tempos method for its current use in French general practice. The definitions, taxonomies, data collection characteristics and frequency of incidents results in the international literature on incidents in primary care are key components for the preparation of an epidemiological survey on incidents in primary care

  3. Population Genetic Differentiation and Taxonomy of Three Closely Related Species of Saxifraga (Saxifragaceae) from Southern Tibet and the Hengduan Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Qing-Bo; Li, Yan; Gengji, Zhuo-Ma; Gornall, Richard J.; Wang, Jiu-Li; Liu, Hai-Rui; Jia, Liu-Kun; Chen, Shi-Long

    2017-01-01

    The effects of rapid, recent uplift of the Hengduan Mountains on evolution and diversification of young floristic lineages still remain unclear. Here, we investigate diversification of three closely related Saxifraga species with a distribution restricted to the Hengduan Mountains (HM) and southern Tibet, and comment on their taxonomy based on molecular evidence. Three chloroplast DNA fragments (rbcL, trnL-F, trnS-G) and the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were employe...

  4. Development and evaluation of a comprehensive clinical decision support taxonomy: comparison of front-end tools in commercial and internally developed electronic health record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Feblowitz, Joshua; Meltzer, Seth; McMullen, Carmit; Guappone, Ken; Carpenter, Jim; Richardson, Joshua; Simonaitis, Linas; Evans, R Scott; Nichol, W Paul; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-05-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) is a valuable tool for improving healthcare quality and lowering costs. However, there is no comprehensive taxonomy of types of CDS and there has been limited research on the availability of various CDS tools across current electronic health record (EHR) systems. To develop and validate a taxonomy of front-end CDS tools and to assess support for these tools in major commercial and internally developed EHRs. We used a modified Delphi approach with a panel of 11 decision support experts to develop a taxonomy of 53 front-end CDS tools. Based on this taxonomy, a survey on CDS tools was sent to a purposive sample of commercial EHR vendors (n=9) and leading healthcare institutions with internally developed state-of-the-art EHRs (n=4). Responses were received from all healthcare institutions and 7 of 9 EHR vendors (response rate: 85%). All 53 types of CDS tools identified in the taxonomy were found in at least one surveyed EHR system, but only 8 functions were present in all EHRs. Medication dosing support and order facilitators were the most commonly available classes of decision support, while expert systems (eg, diagnostic decision support, ventilator management suggestions) were the least common. We developed and validated a comprehensive taxonomy of front-end CDS tools. A subsequent survey of commercial EHR vendors and leading healthcare institutions revealed a small core set of common CDS tools, but identified significant variability in the remainder of clinical decision support content.

  5. Biogeography and taxonomy of racket-tail hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae: Ocreatus): evidence for species delimitation from morphology and display behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Karl-L; Weller, André-A; Jürgens, Dietmar

    2016-11-27

    We analyzed geographic variation, biogeography, and intrageneric relationships of racket-tail hummingbirds Ocreatus (Aves, Trochilidae). Presently, the genus is usually considered monospecific, with O. underwoodii including eight subspecies (polystictus, discifer, underwoodii, incommodus, melanantherus, peruanus, annae, addae), although up to three species have been recognized by some authors. In order to evaluate the current taxonomy we studied geographic variation in coloration, mensural characters, and behavioral data of all Ocreatus taxa. We briefly review the taxonomic history of the genus. Applying the Biological Species Concept, species delimitation was based on a qualitative-quantitative criteria analysis including an evaluation of character states. Our results indicate that the genus should be considered a superspecies with four species, the monotypic Ocreatus addae, O. annae, and O. peruanus, and the polytypic O. underwoodii (including the subspecies underwoodii, discifer, incommodus, melanantherus, polystictus). In this taxonomic treatment, O. annae becomes an endemic species to Peru and O. addae is endemic to Bolivia. We recommend additional sampling of distributional, ethological, and molecular data for an improved resolution of the evolutionary history of Ocreatus.

  6. SDSS-BASED ASTEROID TAXONOMY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) asteroid photometric observations classified according to the SDSS-based Asteroid Taxonomy, as developed by...

  7. A Taxonomy of Information Technology-Enhanced Pricing Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixit, A.; Whipple, T.W.; Zinkhan, G.M.; Gailey, E.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of evolving technology, opportunities for innovative pricing strategies continuously emerge. The authors provide an updated taxonomy to show how such emerging strategies relate to recent technological advances. Specifically, they cite increased availability of information, enhanced

  8. Consensus statement: Virus taxonomy in the age of metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Mike J; Benkő, Mária; Breitbart, Mya; Brister, J Rodney; Carstens, Eric B; Davison, Andrew J; Delwart, Eric; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Harrach, Balázs; Hull, Roger; King, Andrew M Q; Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Kuhn, Jens H; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Nibert, Max L; Orton, Richard; Roossinck, Marilyn J; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sullivan, Matthew B; Suttle, Curtis A; Tesh, Robert B; van der Vlugt, René A; Varsani, Arvind; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2017-03-01

    The number and diversity of viral sequences that are identified in metagenomic data far exceeds that of experimentally characterized virus isolates. In a recent workshop, a panel of experts discussed the proposal that, with appropriate quality control, viruses that are known only from metagenomic data can, and should be, incorporated into the official classification scheme of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Although a taxonomy that is based on metagenomic sequence data alone represents a substantial departure from the traditional reliance on phenotypic properties, the development of a robust framework for sequence-based virus taxonomy is indispensable for the comprehensive characterization of the global virome. In this Consensus Statement article, we consider the rationale for why metagenomic sequence data should, and how it can, be incorporated into the ICTV taxonomy, and present proposals that have been endorsed by the Executive Committee of the ICTV.

  9. The HCBS Taxonomy- A New Language for Classifying Home...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The home- and community-based services (HCBS) taxonomy provides a common language for describing and categorizing HCBS across Medicaid programs. Prior to the...

  10. Taxonomy of the European Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (Aves: Muscicapidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvador, Rodrigo B.; Van der Jeugd, Henk; Tomotani, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    The convoluted taxonomy of the European Pied Flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca ([Pallas], 1764) (Aves: Passeriformes: Muscicapidae) might present a challenge for researchers working in other areas of biology. We present here a historical review of this species’ nomenclature, discuss its generic

  11. Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested for a study in which we ranked almost 600 science questions from college life science exams and standardized tests. The BBT was then implemented in three different collegiate settings. Implementation of the BBT helped us to adjust our teaching to better enhance our students' current mastery of the material, design questions at higher cognitive skills levels, and assist students in studying for college-level exams and in writing study questions at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. From this work we also created a suite of complementary tools that can assist biology faculty in creating classroom materials and exams at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy and students to successfully develop and answer questions that require higher-order cognitive skills.

  12. Adoption of geodemographic and ethno-cultural taxonomies for analysing Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard James Webber

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to contribute to the discussion of the differential level of adoption of Big Data among research communities. Recognising the impracticality of conducting an audit across all forms and uses of Big Data, we have restricted our enquiry to one very specific form of Big Data, namely general purpose taxonomies, of which Mosaic, Acorn and Origins are examples, that rely on data from a variety of Big Data feeds. The intention of these taxonomies is to enable the records of consumers and citizens held on Big Data datasets to be coded according to type of residential neighbourhood or ethno-cultural heritage without any use of questionnaires. Based on our respective experience in the academic social sciences, in government and in the design and marketing of these taxonomies, we identify the features of these classifications which appear to render them attractive or problematic to different categories of potential user or researcher depending on how the relationship is conceived. We conclude by identifying seven classifications of user or potential user who, on account of their background, current position and future career expectations, tend to respond in different ways to the opportunity to adopt these generic systems as aids for understanding social processes.

  13. A taxonomy of behaviour change methods: an Intervention Mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Gerjo; Gottlieb, Nell H; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Parcel, Guy S; Ruiter, Robert A C; Fernández, María E; Markham, Christine; Bartholomew, L Kay

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Intervention Mapping (IM) taxonomy of behaviour change methods and its potential to be developed into a coding taxonomy. That is, although IM and its taxonomy of behaviour change methods are not in fact new, because IM was originally developed as a tool for intervention development, this potential was not immediately apparent. Second, in explaining the IM taxonomy and defining the relevant constructs, we call attention to the existence of parameters for effectiveness of methods, and explicate the related distinction between theory-based methods and practical applications and the probability that poor translation of methods may lead to erroneous conclusions as to method-effectiveness. Third, we recommend a minimal set of intervention characteristics that may be reported when intervention descriptions and evaluations are published. Specifying these characteristics can greatly enhance the quality of our meta-analyses and other literature syntheses. In conclusion, the dynamics of behaviour change are such that any taxonomy of methods of behaviour change needs to acknowledge the importance of, and provide instruments for dealing with, three conditions for effectiveness for behaviour change methods. For a behaviour change method to be effective: (1) it must target a determinant that predicts behaviour; (2) it must be able to change that determinant; (3) it must be translated into a practical application in a way that preserves the parameters for effectiveness and fits with the target population, culture, and context. Thus, taxonomies of methods of behaviour change must distinguish the specific determinants that are targeted, practical, specific applications, and the theory-based methods they embody. In addition, taxonomies should acknowledge that the lists of behaviour change methods will be used by, and should be used by, intervention developers. Ideally, the taxonomy should be readily usable for this goal; but alternatively, it should be

  14. A New Taxonomy of Asteroids Based on Visible and Near-Infrared Spectral Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, Francesca; Binzel, R. P.; Bus, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Present taxonomies, such as that of Tholen (1984) and Bus (1999), classify asteroids based on their spectral properties over visible wavelengths. With the advent of near-infrared instrumentation (such as SpeX on the NASA IRTF; Rayner 2003), an increasing number of asteroids have available spectra covering the range 0.45- to 2.45-microns. We seek to extend current Bus asteroid taxonomy to take advantage of the further spectral information provided over these longer wavelengths. We begin with 0.45- to 2.45-micron measurements of 365 asteroids, sampling all 26 of the classes defined by Bus (1999). We determine which of these classes remain robust (or converge or diverge) when extended to longer wavelengths. The new taxonomy is comprised by 24 classes. The definitions for these classes are quantified by spectral slope and five dimensions of Principle Component Analysis, accounting for a combined 99.9% of the variance. The most striking feature in this new principle component space is the separation of objects based on the presence or absence of a 2-micron absorption feature. We eliminated three Bus classes: Ld, Sl, and Sk. We are able to clarify, and in some cases redefine the Bus S subclasses (Sa, Sl, Sk, Sq, Sr). A new intermediate class, Sv, bridges the S- and V-classes. We introduce a "w” ("weathered") notation to denote, for example, S-type objects that differ only in slope from their spectral neighbors. (We emphasize "w” is a notation only: S- and Sw-type objects are the same class.) High-sloped S, Sa, Sq, Sr, V and Q objects are given a "w" notation. We present eigenvectors and a flow chart for the utilization of this taxonomy by other researchers.

  15. Evaluation of Elementary Science Textbooks According to Bloom Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    AKÇAY, Behiye; AKÇAY, Hakan; KAHRAMANOĞLU, Elif

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of changes in middle school science texbooks’ questions from 1926 to 2013. Middle school science textbooks’ questions analyzed and classified based on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain. Textbooks were selected from declaration of Republic of Turkey to present day. Data obtained from seven different science curricula prepared in 1926, 1948, 1974, 1992, 2000, 2004 and 2013. The questions analyzed based on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Domain lev...

  16. Group psychological abuse: Taxonomy and severity of its components

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Carballeira, Álvaro; Saldaña, Omar; Almendros, Carmen; Martín-Peña, Javier; Escartín Solanelles, Jordi; Porrúa, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delimit group psychological abuse through a psychosocial approach. An operational definition of the phenomenon and a taxonomy of group psychological abuse strategies were proposed based on a review of the scientific literature. A panel of 31 experts in the area evaluated the content of the taxonomy and judged the severity of the strategies through a Delphi study. Group psychological abuse was defined by the application of abusive strategies, their continued du...

  17. A taxonomy of epithelial human cancer and their metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Moor Bart

    2009-12-01

    . Moreover, a signature was developed based on our unsupervised clustering of breast tumors and this was predictive for disease-specific survival in three independent studies. Next, the metastases from ovarian, breast, lung and vulva cluster with their tissue of origin while metastases from colon showed a bimodal distribution. A significant part clusters with tissue of origin while the remaining tumors cluster with the tissue of destination. Conclusion Our molecular taxonomy of epithelial human cancer indicates surprising correlations over tissues. This may have a significant impact on the classification of many cancer sites and may guide pathologists, both in research and daily practice. Moreover, these results based on unsupervised analysis yielded a signature predictive of clinical outcome in breast cancer. Additionally, we hypothesize that metastases from gastrointestinal origin either remember their tissue of origin or adapt to the tissue of destination. More specifically, colon metastases in the liver show strong evidence for such a bimodal tissue specific profile.

  18. Surfacing the deep data of taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderic Page

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic databases are perpetuating approaches to citing literature that may have been appropriate before the Internet, often being little more than digitised 5 × 3 index cards. Typically the original taxonomic literature is either not cited, or is represented in the form of a (typically abbreviated text string. Hence much of the “deep data” of taxonomy, such as the original descriptions, revisions, and nomenclatural actions are largely hidden from all but the most resourceful users. At the same time there are burgeoning efforts to digitise the scientific literature, and much of this newly available content has been assigned globally unique identifiers such as Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs, which are also the identifier of choice for most modern publications. This represents an opportunity for taxonomic databases to engage with digitisation efforts. Mapping the taxonomic literature on to globally unique identifiers can be time consuming, but need be done only once. Furthermore, if we reuse existing identifiers, rather than mint our own, we can start to build the links between the diverse data that are needed to support the kinds of inference which biodiversity informatics aspires to support. Until this practice becomes widespread, the taxonomic literature will remain balkanized, and much of the knowledge that it contains will linger in obscurity.

  19. Taxonomy and Chemotaxonomy of the Genus Hypericum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Sara L; Robson, Norman K B

    2011-01-01

    The genus Hypericum L. (St. John's Wort, Hypericaceae) includes, at the most recent count, 469 species that are either naturally occurring on, or which have been introduced to, every continent in the world, except Antarctica. These species occur as herbs, shrubs, and infrequently trees, and are found in a variety of habitats in temperate regions and in high mountains in the tropics, avoiding only zones of extreme aridity, temperature and/or salinity. Monographic work on the genus has resulted in the recognition and description of 36 taxonomic sections, delineated by specific combinations of morphological characteristics and biogeographic distribution ranges. Hypericum perforatum L. (Common St. John's wort, section Hypericum), one of the best-known members of the genus, is an important medicinal herb of which extracts are taken for their reported activity against mild to moderate depression. Many other species have been incorporated in traditional medicine systems in countries around the world, or are sold as ornamentals. Several classes of interesting bioactive secondary metabolites, including naphthodianthrones (e.g. hypericin and pseudohypericin), flavonol glycosides (e.g. isoquercitrin and hyperoside), biflavonoids (e.g. amentoflavone), phloroglucinol derivatives (e.g. hyperforin and adhyperforin) and xanthones have been identified from members of the genus. A general overview of the taxonomy of the genus and the distribution of relevant secondary metabolites is presented.

  20. Taxonomy and Chemotaxonomy of the Genus Hypericum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Sara L.; Robson, Norman K. B.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Hypericum L. (St. John’s Wort, Hypericaceae) includes, at the most recent count, 469 species that are either naturally occurring on, or which have been introduced to, every continent in the world, except Antarctica. These species occur as herbs, shrubs, and infrequently trees, and are found in a variety of habitats in temperate regions and in high mountains in the tropics, avoiding only zones of extreme aridity, temperature and/or salinity. Monographic work on the genus has resulted in the recognition and description of 36 taxonomic sections, delineated by specific combinations of morphological characteristics and biogeographic distribution ranges. Hypericum perforatum L. (Common St. John’s wort, section Hypericum), one of the best-known members of the genus, is an important medicinal herb of which extracts are taken for their reported activity against mild to moderate depression. Many other species have been incorporated in traditional medicine systems in countries around the world, or are sold as ornamentals. Several classes of interesting bioactive secondary metabolites, including naphthodianthrones (e.g. hypericin and pseudohypericin), flavonol glycosides (e.g. isoquercitrin and hyperoside), biflavonoids (e.g. amentoflavone), phloroglucinol derivatives (e.g. hyperforin and adhyperforin) and xanthones have been identified from members of the genus. A general overview of the taxonomy of the genus and the distribution of relevant secondary metabolites is presented. PMID:22662019

  1. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  2. An End-to-End DNA Taxonomy Methodology for Benthic Biodiversity Survey in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, Central Pacific Abyss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian G. Glover

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen increased survey and sampling expeditions to the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ, central Pacific Ocean abyss, driven by commercial interests from contractors in the potential extraction of polymetallic nodules in the region. Part of the International Seabed Authority (ISA regulatory requirements are that these contractors undertake environmental research expeditions to their CCZ exploration claims following guidelines approved by the ISA Legal and Technical Commission (ISA, 2010. Section 9 (e of these guidelines instructs contractors to “…collect data on the sea floor communities specifically relating to megafauna, macrofauna, meiofauna, microfauna, nodule fauna and demersal scavengers”. There are a number of methodological challenges to this, including the water depth (4000–5000 m, extremely warm surface waters (~28 °C compared to bottom water (~1.5 °C and great distances to ports requiring a large and long seagoing expedition with only a limited number of scientists. Both scientists and regulators have recently realized that a major gap in our knowledge of the region is the fundamental taxonomy of the animals that live there; this is essential to inform our knowledge of the biogeography, natural history and ultimately our stewardship of the region. Recognising this, the ISA is currently sponsoring a series of taxonomic workshops on the CCZ fauna and to assist in this process we present here a series of methodological pipelines for DNA taxonomy (incorporating both molecular and morphological data of the macrofauna and megafauna from the CCZ benthic habitat in the recent ABYSSLINE cruise program to the UK-1 exploration claim. A major problem on recent CCZ cruises has been the collection of high-quality samples suitable for both morphology and DNA taxonomy, coupled with a workflow that ensures these data are made available. The DNA sequencing techniques themselves are relatively standard, once good samples have been

  3. NanoString, a novel digital color-coded barcode technology: current and future applications in molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hin-Fung; Xue, Vivian Weiwen; Koh, Su-Pin; Chiu, Ya-Ming; Ng, Lawrence Po-Wah; Wong, Sze-Chuen Cesar

    2017-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sample is a gold mine of resources for molecular diagnosis and retrospective clinical studies. Although molecular technologies have expanded the range of mutations identified in FFPE samples, the applications of existing technologies are limited by the low nucleic acids yield and poor extraction quality. As a result, the routine clinical applications of molecular diagnosis using FFPE samples has been associated with many practical challenges. NanoString technologies utilize a novel digital color-coded barcode technology based on direct multiplexed measurement of gene expression and offer high levels of precision and sensitivity. Each color-coded barcode is attached to a single target-specific probe corresponding to a single gene which can be individually counted without amplification. Therefore, NanoString is especially useful for measuring gene expression in degraded clinical specimens. Areas covered: This article describes the applications of NanoString technologies in molecular diagnostics and challenges associated with its applications and the future development. Expert commentary: Although NanoString technology is still in the early stages of clinical use, it is expected that NanoString-based cancer expression panels would play more important roles in the future in classifying cancer patients and in predicting the response to therapy for better personal therapeutic care.

  4. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Talaromyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, N.; Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillispori, Helici, Islandici, Purpurei, Subinflati, Talaromyces and Trachyspermi. We provide morphological descriptions for each of these species, as well as notes on their identification using morphology and DNA sequences. For molecular identification, BenA is proposed as a secondary molecular marker...... to the accepted ITS barcode for fungi....

  5. Taxonomy and Systematics of the Genus Makatinus Heyns, 1965 (Nematoda: Dorylaimida: Aporcelaimidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Santiago, Reyes; Varela, Ingrid

    2017-09-01

    The taxonomy and the systematics of the genus Makatinus are discussed by means of the characterization of its morphological pattern and the first molecular (D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S rDNA) analysis of a representative of this taxon, Makatinus crassiformis from Costa Rica. The presence of two or more pairs of male ad-cloacal genital papillae is the most characteristic autapomorphy of the genus, but the status of its species on this concern differ among them. Both morphological and molecular data support a relationship with Aporcelaimellus, which, however, might not be as close as usually assumed. An emended diagnosis of the genus, a key to species identification, and a compendium of their morphometrics are provided. Makatinus siddiqii is regarded as species inquirenda, Makatinus simus is retained under Eudorylaimus, and Makatinus tritici becomes a junior synonym of Aporcelaimellus tritici.

  6. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  7. Peruvian Children's Folk Taxonomy of Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pizarro-Neyra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Free listing was used to obtain names of marine animals from 234 Peruvian children with families involved in fishing activities. They live in the fishing towns of Vila-vila, Morro Sama and Ilo, located in Southern Peru. Fishes, birds and the category “other marine animal” were used for the classification of marine fauna by children. The group of 6-8 year-olds shows a mean frequency of 19.7 names per child, while the group of 9-11 year-olds shows a mean frequency of 25.7 names per child. Folk species of fish is the most frequently recorded category with a predominance of coastal species and with a mean frequency of 7.56 and 11.51 names per child for the groups of 6-8 year-olds and 9-11 year-olds, respectively. In contrast, bird names are less frequently recorded in the lists. Some bird and mollusc names have lexical under-differentiation at a generic level and apparently have lower cultural significance than fish. Children’s classification in different levels of organization is evidence of a folk biology. The folk taxonomy of marine animals could be influenced by the lesser cognitive development of younger children and the ecological salience of some species. Some species with coastal habitat exhibit a high dominance index of folk names. Cultural transmission of knowledge about birds could be failing due to the recent occupancy of the study sites by migratory people and the sexual division of work in the children’s families.

  8. Climbing Bloom's taxonomy pyramid: Lessons from a graduate histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nikki B; Hwang, Charles; Scott, Sara; Stallard, Stefanie; Purkiss, Joel; Hortsch, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Bloom's taxonomy was adopted to create a subject-specific scoring tool for histology multiple-choice questions (MCQs). This Bloom's Taxonomy Histology Tool (BTHT) was used to analyze teacher- and student-generated quiz and examination questions from a graduate level histology course. Multiple-choice questions using histological images were generally assigned a higher BTHT level than simple text questions. The type of microscopy technique (light or electron microscopy) used for these image-based questions did not result in any significant differences in their Bloom's taxonomy scores. The BTHT levels for teacher-generated MCQs correlated positively with higher discrimination indices and inversely with the percent of students answering these questions correctly (difficulty index), suggesting that higher-level Bloom's taxonomy questions differentiate well between higher- and lower-performing students. When examining BTHT scores for MCQs that were written by students in a Multiple-Choice Item Development Assignment (MCIDA) there was no significant correlation between these scores and the students' ability to answer teacher-generated MCQs. This suggests that the ability to answer histology MCQs relies on a different skill set than the aptitude to construct higher-level Bloom's taxonomy questions. However, students significantly improved their average BTHT scores from the midterm to the final MCIDA task, which indicates that practice, experience and feedback increased their MCQ writing proficiency. Anat Sci Educ 10: 456-464. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. An Analytical Overview of Spirituality in NANDA-I Taxonomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Ana Cláudia; Caldeira, Sílvia; Chaves, Erika; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de

    2017-03-01

    To discuss the approach of spirituality in NANDA-I taxonomies, based on the elements that characterize this phenomenon. This study was based on concepts that are usually adopted in the literature for defining spirituality and on the analysis of the NANDA-I taxonomies from I to III. Spirituality is included in all taxonomies but all three are missing some attributes to guarantee the completeness of this dimension for nursing diagnosis. Taxonomy III makes different approaches to spirituality and some inconsistencies. Contribute to the development and review of the new proposal for taxonomy. Discutir a abordagem à espiritualidade nas taxonomias da NANDA-I, baseada nos elementos que caracterizam este fenômeno. MÉTODOS: Este estudo foi baseado em conceitos usualmente adotados na literatura de enfermagem para definir espiritualidade e na análise das taxonomias da NANDA-I, desde a I à III. A espiritualidade está incluída nas taxonomias, porém estas carecem de atributos do seu conceito. CONCLUSÕES: A taxonomia III faz diferentes abordagens à espiritualidade, porém com algumas inconsistências identificadas. IMPLICAÇÕES PARA A ENFERMAGEM: Esta análise pode contribuir para o desenvolvimento e revisão da taxonomia III. © 2017 NANDA International, Inc.

  10. The ACTTION-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT): an evidence-based and multidimensional approach to classifying chronic pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, Roger B; Bruehl, Stephen; Dworkin, Robert H; Dworkin, Samuel F; Loeser, John D; Turk, Dennis C; Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Arnold, Lesley; Bennett, Robert; Edwards, Robert R; Freeman, Roy; Gewandter, Jennifer; Hertz, Sharon; Hochberg, Marc; Krane, Elliot; Mantyh, Patrick W; Markman, John; Neogi, Tuhina; Ohrbach, Richard; Paice, Judith A; Porreca, Frank; Rappaport, Bob A; Smith, Shannon M; Smith, Thomas J; Sullivan, Mark D; Verne, G Nicholas; Wasan, Ajay D; Wesselmann, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Current approaches to classification of chronic pain conditions suffer from the absence of a systematically implemented and evidence-based taxonomy. Moreover, existing diagnostic approaches typically fail to incorporate available knowledge regarding the biopsychosocial mechanisms contributing to pain conditions. To address these gaps, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society (APS) have joined together to develop an evidence-based chronic pain classification system called the ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy. This paper describes the outcome of an ACTTION-APS consensus meeting, at which experts agreed on a structure for this new taxonomy of chronic pain conditions. Several major issues around which discussion revolved are presented and summarized, and the structure of the taxonomy is presented. ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy will include the following dimensions: 1) core diagnostic criteria; 2) common features; 3) common medical comorbidities; 4) neurobiological, psychosocial, and functional consequences; and 5) putative neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms, risk factors, and protective factors. In coming months, expert working groups will apply this taxonomy to clusters of chronic pain conditions, thereby developing a set of diagnostic criteria that have been consistently and systematically implemented across nearly all common chronic pain conditions. It is anticipated that the availability of this evidence-based and mechanistic approach to pain classification will be of substantial benefit to chronic pain research and treatment. The ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy is an evidence-based chronic pain classification system designed to classify chronic pain along the following dimensions: 1) core diagnostic criteria; 2) common features; 3) common medical comorbidities; 4) neurobiological, psychosocial

  11. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  12. Huperzia squarrosa (G. Forst. Trev. (Lycopodiaceae in Manipur: Taxonomy and Biological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Yumkham

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The tassel fern, Huperzia squarrosa (G. Forst. Trev. is a rare epiphytic fern ally found in specific localities of the state Manipur, North East India. Regarded as a sacred plant, it has been traded extensively from ages in local markets. The species has great potential in terms of sustainability and exploited for traditional and horticultural purposes. To understand the biology of tassels, a detailed study on taxonomy is provided along with data on ecology, life cycle, reproduction, propagation techniques and current conservation status of the species. Significant harvesting guidelines and recommendations along with features that could enhance their conservation were also highlighted.

  13. A polyphasic taxonomy of Daldinia (Xylariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Marc; Læssøe, Thomas; Fournier, Jacques; Decock, Cony; Schmieschek, Beata; Tichy, Hans-Volker; Peršoh, Derek

    2014-03-15

    . A preliminary molecular phylogeny based on 5.8S/ITS nrDNA including numerous representatives of all hitherto described taxa for which cultures are extant, was found basically in agreement with the above mentioned segregation of the genus, based on morphological and chemotaxonomic evidence. In the rDNA based phylogenetic tree, Daldinia appears clearly distinct from members of the genera Annulohypoxylon and Hypoxylon; nevertheless, representatives of small genera of predominantly tropical origin (Entonaema, Phylacia, Ruwenzoria, Rhopalostroma, Thamnomyces) appear to have evolved from daldinioid ancestors and are nested inside the Daldinia clade. Interestingly, these findings correlate with chemotaxonomic characters to a great extent, especially regarding the distribution of marker metabolites in their mycelial cultures. Hence, the current study revealed for the first time that fungal secondary metabolite profiles can have taxonomic value beyond the species rank and even coincide with phylogenetic data. Daldinia andina sp. nov., D. australis sp. nov., D. hausknechtii sp. nov., D. rehmii sp. nov., D. starbaeckii sp. nov., D. theissenii sp. nov., D. cahuchosa comb. nov., D. nemorosa comb. nov.

  14. A polyphasic taxonomy of Daldinia (Xylariaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Marc; Læssøe, Thomas; Fournier, Jacques; Decock, Cony; Schmieschek, Beata; Tichy, Hans-Volker; Peršoh, Derek

    2014-01-01

    . A preliminary molecular phylogeny based on 5.8S/ITS nrDNA including numerous representatives of all hitherto described taxa for which cultures are extant, was found basically in agreement with the above mentioned segregation of the genus, based on morphological and chemotaxonomic evidence. In the rDNA based phylogenetic tree, Daldinia appears clearly distinct from members of the genera Annulohypoxylon and Hypoxylon; nevertheless, representatives of small genera of predominantly tropical origin (Entonaema, Phylacia, Ruwenzoria, Rhopalostroma, Thamnomyces) appear to have evolved from daldinioid ancestors and are nested inside the Daldinia clade. Interestingly, these findings correlate with chemotaxonomic characters to a great extent, especially regarding the distribution of marker metabolites in their mycelial cultures. Hence, the current study revealed for the first time that fungal secondary metabolite profiles can have taxonomic value beyond the species rank and even coincide with phylogenetic data. Taxonomic novelties: Daldinia andina sp. nov., D. australis sp. nov., D. hausknechtii sp. nov., D. rehmii sp. nov., D. starbaeckii sp. nov., D. theissenii sp. nov., D. cahuchosa comb. nov., D. nemorosa comb. nov. PMID:24790283

  15. Let's rise up to unite taxonomy and technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Bik

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available What do you think of when you think of taxonomy? An 18th century gentlemen in breeches? Or perhaps botany drawings hung on the walls of a boutique hotel? Such old-fashioned conceptions to the contrary, taxonomy is alive today although constantly struggling for survival and recognition. The scientific community is losing valuable resources as taxonomy experts age and retire, and funding for morphological studies and species descriptions remains stagnant. At the same time, organismal knowledge (morphology, ecology, physiology has never been more important: genomic studies are becoming more taxon focused, the scientific community is recognizing the limitations of traditional "model" organisms, and taxonomic expertise is desperately needed to fight against global biodiversity declines resulting from human impacts. There has never been a better time for a taxonomic renaissance.

  16. Let’s rise up to unite taxonomy and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    What do you think of when you think of taxonomy? An 18th century gentlemen in breeches? Or perhaps botany drawings hung on the walls of a boutique hotel? Such old-fashioned conceptions to the contrary, taxonomy is alive today although constantly struggling for survival and recognition. The scientific community is losing valuable resources as taxonomy experts age and retire, and funding for morphological studies and species descriptions remains stagnant. At the same time, organismal knowledge (morphology, ecology, physiology) has never been more important: genomic studies are becoming more taxon focused, the scientific community is recognizing the limitations of traditional “model” organisms, and taxonomic expertise is desperately needed to fight against global biodiversity declines resulting from human impacts. There has never been a better time for a taxonomic renaissance. PMID:28820884

  17. Let's rise up to unite taxonomy and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bik, Holly M

    2017-08-01

    What do you think of when you think of taxonomy? An 18th century gentlemen in breeches? Or perhaps botany drawings hung on the walls of a boutique hotel? Such old-fashioned conceptions to the contrary, taxonomy is alive today although constantly struggling for survival and recognition. The scientific community is losing valuable resources as taxonomy experts age and retire, and funding for morphological studies and species descriptions remains stagnant. At the same time, organismal knowledge (morphology, ecology, physiology) has never been more important: genomic studies are becoming more taxon focused, the scientific community is recognizing the limitations of traditional "model" organisms, and taxonomic expertise is desperately needed to fight against global biodiversity declines resulting from human impacts. There has never been a better time for a taxonomic renaissance.

  18. Susceptibility to affect: a comparison of three personality taxonomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenski, J M; Larsen, R J

    1999-10-01

    This study had three major goals: to clarify the relationships between Eysenck's, Gray's, and Cloninger's personality taxonomies, to show that traits from these taxonomies predict differential sensitivities to emotional states, and to explore the relationship between sensitivity to an emotional state and how much that state is actually experienced. A factor analysis of traits from Eysenck's, Gray's, and Cloninger's personality taxonomies resulted in three factors that were named reward sensitivity, impulsivity-thrill seeking, and punishment sensitivity. These factors predicted a global measure of affect, emotional reactions to a laboratory mood induction, and self-reported affect in daily life. Generally, reward sensitivity predicted positive, but not negative emotions, whereas punishment sensitivity predicted negative, but not positive emotions. Impulsivity-thrill seeking predicted few emotions in either context. Coherence among the relationships found across methodological contexts suggests that the traits that predict emotion susceptibilities in the laboratory similarly predict emotional experience in ongoing daily life.

  19. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) : A Dimensional Alternative to Traditional Nosologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotov, Roman; Krueger, Robert F.; Watson, David; Achenbach, Thomas M.; Althoff, Robert R.; Bagby, R. Michael; Brown, Timothy A.; Carpenter, William T.; Caspi, Avshalom; Clark, Lee Anna; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Forbes, Miriam K.; Forbush, Kelsie T.; Goldberg, David; Hasin, Deborah; Hyman, Steven E.; Ivanova, Masha Y.; Lynam, Donald R.; Markon, Kristian; Miller, Joshua D.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Morey, Leslie C.; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Ormel, Johan; Patrick, Christopher J.; Regier, Darrel A.; Rescorla, Leslie; Ruggero, Camilo J.; Samuel, Douglas B.; Sellbom, Martin; Simms, Leonard J.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Slade, Tim; South, Susan C.; Tackett, Jennifer L.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Waszczuk, Monika A.; Widiger, Thomas A.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Zimmerman, Mark

    The reliability and validity of traditional taxonomies are limited by arbitrary boundaries between psychopathology and normality, often unclear boundaries between disorders, frequent disorder co-occurrence, heterogeneity within disorders, and diagnostic instability. These taxonomies went beyond

  20. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility of a molecular magnet submonolayer directly patterned onto a micro superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Luis, F., E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Bellido, E.; Ruiz-Molina, D., E-mail: druiz@cin2.es [Centro de Investigación en Nanociencia y Nanotecnología (CIN2, CSIC-ICN) Edificio CM7, Esfera UAB, Campus UAB, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés (Spain); Miguel, R. de [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA)—Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, J. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA)—Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lostao, A. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA)—Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundación ARAID, E-50004, Aragón (Spain); and others

    2011-07-18

    We report the controlled integration, via dip pen nanolithography, of monolayer dots of ferritin-based CoO nanoparticles (12 μ{sub B}) into the most sensitive areas of a microSQUID sensor. The nearly optimum flux coupling between these nanomagnets and the microSQUID improves the achievable sensitivity by a factor 10{sup 2}, enabling us to measure the linear susceptibility of the molecular array down to very low temperatures (13 mK). This method opens the possibility of applying ac susceptibility experiments to characterize two-dimensional arrays of single molecule magnets within a wide range of temperatures and frequencies.