WorldWideScience

Sample records for current formation models

  1. Comparison and Evaluation of Current Animal Models for Perineural Scar Formation in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila O Zanjani

    2013-07-01

    Our study suggests that none of the applied animal models reproduce all essential features of clinical perineural scar formation. Therefore, more studies are needed to develop optimal animal models for translating preclinical investigations

  2. On the formation of current ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Flemming, Burg W.

    2015-01-01

    For grain sizes finer than coarse sand, the first flow-transverse bedforms to develop are current ripples. Although numerous studies have analysed different aspects of bedform morphodynamics, to date no comprehensive physical explanation for the formation of ripples has been given. We offer...... such an explanation based on a virtual boundary layer concept, and present a model predicting ripple height on the basis of grain size, current velocity and water depth. The model contradicts the conventional view of current ripples as bedforms not scaling with flow depth. Furthermore, it confirms the dependence...

  3. The Current Status of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Understanding galaxy formation is one of the most pressing issues in cosmology. We review the current status of galaxy formation from both an observational and a theoretical perspective, and summarise the prospects for future advances.

  4. A particle-core-MD model for intrabeam scattering and halo formation in high current beams in a FODO channel

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlmann, N; Comunian, M; Pisent, A

    2002-01-01

    An essential problem for the successful operation of high current linear ion accelerators is the control of beam losses due to halo particles. As a possible mechanism for the formation of such a halo we concentrate on the interplay between intrabeam scattering (IBS) and the incidence of particles which are driven to high amplitudes by resonances with the nonlinear space charge fields of a mismatched beam. Since a fully microscopic numerical treatment including all the mutual Coulomb interactions between the beam ions requires much too high computational effort, we developed an approximative method. These particle-core-molecular-dynamics (PCMD) simulations suitably join the mean-field description of the time evolution of the beam in framework of the envelope equations and a microscopic calculation of the Coulomb interactions between pseudo-particles with a renormalized charge. With this method we studied matched and mismatched continuous KV-beams in a FODO channel. In first simulation runs we observed a signif...

  5. An extended polarization model to study the influence of current collector geometry of large-format lithium-ion pouch cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, Stephan; Rheinfeld, Alexander; Erhard, Simon V.; Jossen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, depth-of-discharge and temperature distribution of a large-format lithium-ion pouch cell are examined by means of a two-dimensional electro-thermal polarization model. A method of improving the dynamic behavior of the model while maintaining its accuracy under constant current loads by applying intermittent charge and discharge data is given. The model is validated with the aid of experimental data gained from dynamic and constant current discharge profiles applied to a commercial 40 Ah Li-ion pouch cell. Two major design studies are carried out focusing on a variation of geometrical parameters, namely the size and the positioning of the cell tabs. For each design, the influence of current collector thickness on the uniformity of the temperature and depth-of-discharge distribution is investigated during a 4C constant current discharge operation. Simulation results show that reducing the current collector thickness results in a moderate increase of 3 °C in maximum temperature and 1.5% in depth-of-discharge imbalance if the tab size is increased. In consequence, lowering the share of inactive components within a lithium-ion cell by optimizing the thickness of the current collector foils should be further considered to enhance the performance of typical lithium-ion cell designs.

  6. Models of current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Sebastian; Engelke, Lukas; Winterer, Markus; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2017-06-01

    Densification of (semi-)conducting particle agglomerates with the help of an electrical current is much faster and more energy efficient than traditional thermal sintering or powder compression. Therefore, this method becomes more and more common among experimentalists, engineers, and in industry. The mechanisms at work at the particle scale are highly complex because of the mutual feedback between current and pore structure. This paper extends previous modelling approaches in order to study mixtures of particles of two different materials. In addition to the delivery of Joule heat throughout the sample, especially in current bottlenecks, thermoelectric effects must be taken into account. They lead to segregation or spatial correlations in the particle arrangement. Various model extensions are possible and will be discussed.

  7. Coevolutionary modeling in network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shyoukh, Ibrahim

    2014-12-03

    Network coevolution, the process of network topology evolution in feedback with dynamical processes over the network nodes, is a common feature of many engineered and natural networks. In such settings, the change in network topology occurs at a comparable time scale to nodal dynamics. Coevolutionary modeling offers the possibility to better understand how and why network structures emerge. For example, social networks can exhibit a variety of structures, ranging from almost uniform to scale-free degree distributions. While current models of network formation can reproduce these structures, coevolutionary modeling can offer a better understanding of the underlying dynamics. This paper presents an overview of recent work on coevolutionary models of network formation, with an emphasis on the following three settings: (i) dynamic flow of benefits and costs, (ii) transient link establishment costs, and (iii) latent preferential attachment.

  8. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, V P

    2002-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonlocal nonlinear approximations are introduced and partially analyzed that are generalizations of the previously known exactly solvable local model neglecting electron inertia.

  9. Heterogeneous chemistry: a mechanism missing in current models to explain secondary inorganic aerosol formation during the January 2013 haze episode in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe regional haze pollution events occurred in eastern and central China in January 2013, which had adverse effects on the environment and public health. Extremely high levels of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5 with dominant components of sulfate and nitrate are responsible for the haze pollution. Although heterogeneous chemistry is thought to play an important role in the production of sulfate and nitrate during haze episodes, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of heterogeneous chemistry on haze formation in China by using the 3-D models due to of a lack of treatments for heterogeneous reactions in most climate and chemical transport models. In this work, the offline-coupled WRF-CMAQ model with newly added heterogeneous reactions is applied to East Asia to evaluate the impacts of heterogeneous chemistry and the meteorological anomaly during January 2013 on regional haze formation. The revised CMAQ with heterogeneous chemistry not only captures the magnitude and temporal variation of sulfate and nitrate, but also reproduces the enhancement of relative contribution of sulfate and nitrate to PM2.5 mass from clean days to polluted haze days. These results indicate the significant role of heterogeneous chemistry in regional haze formation and improve the understanding of the haze formation mechanisms during the January 2013 episode.

  10. Uncertainty of current understanding regarding OBT formation in plants

    CERN Document Server

    Melintescu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    The radiological impact models are important tools for supporting nuclear safety. For tritium, a special radionuclide entering the life cycle, the processes involved in its transport into the environment are complex and not well enough understood. The tritiated water (HTO) enters the plants by atmospheric and root pathway and is converted to organically bound tritium (OBT) in exchangeable and non-exchangeable forms. The observed OBT/HTO ratios in crops exhibit a large variability and contradict the current models for routine releases. If a spike release (i.e. short time but intense atmospheric release higher than the normal release rate) occurs during routine emission, the dose to public is higher than for normal routine emission. The experimental data for a short and intense atmospheric contamination of wheat are presented together with the models predictions. Although the current understanding of processes involved in OBT formation in plants is still insufficient, considering the non-equilibrium situation i...

  11. Heterogeneous chemistry: a mechanism missing in current models to explain secondary inorganic aerosol formation during the January 2013 haze episode in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; He, K. B.; Wang, K.; Zheng, G. J.; Duan, F. K.; Ma, Y. L.; Kimoto, T.

    2015-02-01

    Severe regional haze pollution events occurred in eastern and central China in January 2013, which had adverse effects on the environment and public health. Extremely high levels of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less (PM2.5) with dominant components of sulfate and nitrate are responsible for the haze pollution. Although heterogeneous chemistry is thought to play an important role in the production of sulfate and nitrate during haze episodes, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of heterogeneous chemistry on haze formation in China by using the 3-D models due to of a lack of treatments for heterogeneous reactions in most climate and chemical transport models. In this work, the WRF-CMAQ model with newly added heterogeneous reactions is applied to East Asia to evaluate the impacts of heterogeneous chemistry and the meteorological anomaly during January 2013 on regional haze formation. As the parameterization of heterogeneous reactions on different types of particles is not well established yet, we arbitrarily selected the uptake coefficients from reactions on dust particles and then conducted several sensitivity runs to find the value that can best match observations. The revised CMAQ with heterogeneous chemistry not only captures the magnitude and temporal variation of sulfate and nitrate, but also reproduces the enhancement of relative contribution of sulfate and nitrate to PM2.5 mass from clean days to polluted haze days. These results indicate the significant role of heterogeneous chemistry in regional haze formation and improve the understanding of the haze formation mechanisms during the January 2013 episode.

  12. Formation of the current sheet in a coronal streamer

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2011-01-01

    The present work is on the study of a coronal streamer observed in March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model. The results of the analysis show indications on the formation of the current sheet, one of the source regions of the slow coronal wind.

  13. Formation of current coils in geodynamo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Akira; Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Sato, Tetsuya

    2008-08-28

    Computer simulations have been playing an important role in the development of our understanding of the geodynamo, but direct numerical simulation of the geodynamo with a realistic parameter regime is still beyond the power of today's supercomputers. Difficulties in simulating the geodynamo arise from the extreme conditions of the core, which are characterized by very large or very small values of the non-dimensional parameters of the system. Among them, the Ekman number, E, has been adopted as a barometer of the distance of simulations from real core conditions, in which E is of the order of 10(-15). Following the initial computer simulations of the geodynamo, the Ekman number achieved has been steadily decreasing, with recent geodynamo simulations performed with E of the order of 10(-6). Here we present a geodynamo simulation with an Ekman number of the order of 10(-7)-the highest-resolution simulation yet achieved, making use of 4,096 processors of the Earth Simulator. We have found that both the convection flow and magnetic field structures are qualitatively different from those found in larger-Ekman-number dynamos. The convection takes the form of sheet plumes or radial sheet jets, rather than the columnar cell structures that are usually found. We have found that this sheet plume convection is an effective dynamo and the generated current is organized as a set of coils in the shape of helical springs or at times as a torus.

  14. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Victor P.

    2002-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonl......The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local...

  15. Direct Electrical Current Reduces Bacterial and Yeast Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ruiz-Ruigomez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies are needed for prevention of biofilm formation. We have previously shown that 24 hr of 2,000 µA of direct current (DC reduces Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in vitro. Herein, we examined the effect of a lower amount of DC exposure on S. epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Propionibacterium acnes, and Candida albicans biofilm formation. 12 hr of 500 µA DC decreased S. epidermidis, S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2, 1, 1, and 2 log10 cfu/cm2, respectively (p<0.05. Reductions in S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and E. coli biofilm formation were observed with as few as 12 hr of 200 µA DC (2, 2 and 0.4 log10 cfu/cm2, resp.; a 1 log10 cfu/cm2 reduction in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was observed at 36 hr. 24 hr of 500 µA DC decreased C. albicans biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2 log10 cfu/cm2. No reduction in P. acnes biofilm formation was observed. 1 and 2 log10 cfu/cm2 reductions in E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation on titanium discs, respectively, were observed with 12 hr of exposure to 500 µA. Electrical current is a potential strategy to reduce biofilm formation on medical biomaterials.

  16. Formation of the storm-time ring current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Lun; PU Zuyin; ZHOU Xuzhi; FU Suiyan; ZONG Qiugang

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of ring current injection and intensification of the storm-time symmetric ring current is conducted with three-dimensional (3-D) test particle trajectory calculations (TPTCs) in this paper. TPTCs reveal more accurately the process of ring current injection. The main results are the following: (1) an intense convection electric field can effectively energize and inject plasma sheet particles into ring current region within 1-3 h. (2) Injection ions often follow chaotic trajectories in non-adiabatic regions,which may have implications in storm and ring current physics. (3) The shielding electric field, which arises as a consequence of enhanced convection and co-exists with injection and convection electric field, leads the original open trajectories to change into closed ones, thus may play an important role in the formation of the symmetric ring current.

  17. Cosmological models of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menci, N.

    I review the present status of galaxy formation models within a cosmological framework. I focus on semi-analytic models based on the Cold Dark Matter scenario, discussing the role of the different physical process involving dark matter and baryons in determining the observed statistical properties of galaxies and their dependence on cosmic time and on environment evolution. I will highlight some present problems and briefly present the main effects of assuming a Warm Dark Matter scenario.

  18. Formation of current singularity in a topologically constrained plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yao [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Huang, Yi-Min [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Qin, Hong [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Univ Sci & Technol China, Dept Modern Phys, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China.; Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences

    2016-02-01

    Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies.

  19. Dynamics of the current filament formation and its steady-state characteristics in chalcogenide based PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoslovskiy, Nikita; Tsendin, Konstantin

    2017-03-01

    In the phase-change memory (PCM) crystallization occurs in the high-current filament which forms during switching to the conductive state. In the present paper we conduct a numerical modeling of the current filament formation dynamics in thin chalcogenide films using an electronic-thermal model based on negative-U centers tunnel ionization and Joule heating. The key role of inhomogeneities in the filament formation process is shown. Steady-state filament parameters were obtained from the analysis of the stationary heat conduction equation. The filament formation dynamics and the steady-state filament radius and temperature could be controlled by material parameters and contact resistance. Consequently it is possible to control the size of the region wherein crystallization occurs. A good agreement with numerous experimental data leads to the conclusion that thermal effects play a significant role in CGS conduction and high-current filament formation while switching.

  20. Current concepts in biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Paul D; Olson, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a highly significant nosocomial pathogen mediating infections primarily associated with indwelling biomaterials (e.g., catheters and prostheses). In contrast to Staphylococcus aureus, virulence properties associated with S. epidermidis are few and biofilm formation is the defining virulence factor associated with disease, as demonstrated by animal models of biomaterial-related infections. However, other virulence factors, such as phenol-soluble modulins and poly-γ-DL-glutamic acid, have been recently recognized that thwart innate immune system mechanisms. Formation of S. epidermidis biofilm is typically considered a four-step process consisting of adherence, accumulation, maturation and dispersal. This article will discuss recent advances in the study of these four steps, including accumulation, which can be either polysaccharide or protein mediated. It is hypothesized that studies focused on understanding the biological function of each step in staphylococcal biofilm formation will yield new treatment modalities to treat these recalcitrant infections. PMID:20521936

  1. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT I. BAROTROPIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, Princeton Ocean Model (POM) was used to study the formation of the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC) in the barotropic case. Monthly averaged wind stress and the inflow/outflow transports in January were used in the numerical simulation which reproduced the SCSWC. The effects of wind stress and inflow/outflow were studied separately. Numerical experiments showed that the Kuroshio intrusion through the Luzon Strait and the slope shelf in the northern SCS are necessary conditions for the formation of the SCSWC. In a flat bottom topography experiment, the wind stress driven northeast current in the northern SCS is a compensatory current.

  2. Modeling Formation of Globular Clusters: Beacons of Galactic Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Oleg Y

    2010-01-01

    Modern hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation are able to predict accurately the rates and locations of the assembly of giant molecular clouds in early galaxies. These clouds could host star clusters with the masses and sizes of real globular clusters. I describe current state-of-the-art simulations aimed at understanding the origin of the cluster mass function and metallicity distribution. Metallicity bimodality of globular cluster systems appears to be a natural outcome of hierarchical formation and gradually declining fraction of cold gas in galaxies. Globular cluster formation was most prominent at redshifts z>3, when massive star clusters may have contributed as much as 20% of all galactic star formation.

  3. On the modelling of river delta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleynse, N.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents approaches to the modelling of river delta formation. In particular, it provides results of numerical stratigraphic-morphodynamic modelling of river delta formation under various environmental forcings.

  4. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Danielle M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Goto, Tomotsugu, E-mail: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu [Dark Cosmology Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  5. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  6. Physical Models of Galaxy Formation in a Cosmological Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, Rachel S.; Davé, Romeel

    2014-01-01

    Modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context presents one of the greatest challenges in astrophysics today, due to the vast range of scales and numerous physical processes involved. Here we review the current status of models that employ two leading techniques to simulate the physics of galaxy formation: semi-analytic models and numerical hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on a set of observational targets that describe the evolution of the global and structural properties of galaxies ...

  7. H$_2$-based star formation laws in galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Lizhi; Hirschmann, Michaela; Fontanot, Fabio; Zoldan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We update our recently published model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA), to include a self-consistent treatment of the partition of cold gas in atomic and molecular hydrogen. Our model provides significant improvements with respect to previous ones used for similar studies. In particular, GAEA (i) includes a sophisticated chemical enrichment scheme accounting for non-instantaneous recycling of gas, metals, and energy; (ii) reproduces the measured evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function; (iii) reproduces the observed correlation between galaxy stellar mass and gas metallicity at different redshifts. These are important prerequisites for models considering a metallicity dependent efficiency of molecular gas formation. We also update our model for disk sizes and show that model predictions are in nice agreement with observational estimates for the gas, stellar and star forming disks at different cosmic epochs. We analyse the influence of different star formation laws including empirical relations b...

  8. Modeling of Current Transformers Under Saturation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prochazka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During a short circuit the input signal of the relay can be distort by the magnetic core saturation of the current transformer. It is useful to verify the behavior of CT by a mathematical model. The paper describes one phase and three phase models and it presents some methods of how to analyze and classify a deformed secondary current

  9. Global Models of Planet Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mordasini, C; Dittkrist, K -M; Jin, S; Alibert, Y

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increase in observational data on exoplanets, the processes that lead to the formation of planets are still not well understood. But thanks to the high number of known exoplanets, it is now possible to look at them as a population that puts statistical constraints on theoretical models. A method that uses these constraints is planetary population synthesis. Its key element is a global model of planet formation and evolution that directly predicts observable planetary properties based on properties of the natal protoplanetary disk. To do so, global models build on many specialized models that address one specific physical process. We thoroughly review the physics of the sub-models included in global formation models. The sub-models can be classified as models describing the protoplanetary disk (gas and solids), the (proto)planet (solid core, gaseous envelope, and atmosphere), and finally the interactions (migration and N-body interaction). We compare the approaches in different global models and id...

  10. Formation of current filaments and magnetic field generation in a quantum current-carrying plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghadosi, M. R.; Majedi, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and magnetic field in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the presence of quantum effects using the quantum hydrodynamic model. A new nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained for the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field in the diffusion regime. This equation is solved by applying the Adomian decomposition method, and then the profiles of magnetic field and electron density are plotted. It is shown that the saturation time of filamentation instability increases and, consequently, the instability growth rate and the magnetic field amplitude decrease in the presence of quantum effects.

  11. Numerical modeling of transformer inrush currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an application of a vector hysteresis model to the prediction of the inrush current due the arbitrary initial excitation of a transformer after a fault. The approach proposed seems promising in order to predict the transient overshoot in current and the optimal time to close the circuit after the fault.

  12. Numerical modeling of transformer inrush currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardelli, E. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Perugia, I-06125 Perugia (Italy); Center for Electric and Magnetic Applied Research (Italy); Faba, A., E-mail: faba@unipg.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Perugia, I-06125 Perugia (Italy); Center for Electric and Magnetic Applied Research (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents an application of a vector hysteresis model to the prediction of the inrush current due the arbitrary initial excitation of a transformer after a fault. The approach proposed seems promising in order to predict the transient overshoot in current and the optimal time to close the circuit after the fault.

  13. Current understanding of the formation and adaptation of metabolic systems based on network theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-12

    Formation and adaptation of metabolic networks has been a long-standing question in biology. With recent developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics, the understanding of metabolism is progressively becoming clearer from a network perspective. This review introduces the comprehensive metabolic world that has been revealed by a wide range of data analyses and theoretical studies; in particular, it illustrates the role of evolutionary events, such as gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, and environmental factors, such as nutrient availability and growth conditions, in evolution of the metabolic network. Furthermore, the mathematical models for the formation and adaptation of metabolic networks have also been described, according to the current understanding from a perspective of metabolic networks. These recent findings are helpful in not only understanding the formation of metabolic networks and their adaptation, but also metabolic engineering.

  14. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  15. Current-sheet formation in 3D ideal incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer; Marliani

    2000-05-22

    The evolution of current density and vorticity in the ideal, inviscid incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions is studied numerically. Highly effective resolutions are obtained by adaptive structured mesh refinement techniques. We report on results for three different initial conditions showing similar behavior: in the early stage of the evolution a fast increase in vorticity and current density is observed. Thereafter, the evolution towards nearly two-dimensional current sheets results in a depletion of nonlinearity.

  16. The formation, properties and impact of secondary organic aerosol: current and emerging issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hallquist

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA accounts for a significant fraction of ambient tropospheric aerosol and a detailed knowledge of the formation, properties and transformation of SOA is therefore required to evaluate its impact on atmospheric processes, climate and human health. The chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation are complex and varied, and, despite considerable progress in recent years, a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation does not exist and therefore represents a major research challenge in atmospheric science. This review begins with a description of the current state of knowledge on the global SOA budget and the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors. The topic of gas-particle partitioning theory is followed by an account of the analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA. A survey of recent laboratory, field and modeling studies is also presented. The following topical and emerging issues are highlighted and discussed in detail; molecular characterization of biogenic SOA constituents, condensed phase reactions and oligomerization, the interaction of atmospheric organic components with sulfuric acid, the chemical and photochemical processing of organics in the atmospheric aqueous phase, aerosol formation from real plant emissions, interaction of atmospheric organic components with water, thermodynamics and mixtures in atmospheric models. Finally, the major challenges ahead in laboratory, field and modeling studies of SOA are discussed and recommendations for future research directions are proposed.

  17. The formation, properties and impact of secondary organic aerosol: current and emerging issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wildt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA accounts for a significant fraction of ambient tropospheric aerosol and a detailed knowledge of the formation, properties and transformation of SOA is therefore required to evaluate its impact on atmospheric processes, climate and human health. The chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation are complex and varied, and, despite considerable progress in recent years, a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation does not exist and therefore represents a major research challenge in atmospheric science. This review begins with an update on the current state of knowledge on the global SOA budget and is followed by an overview of the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors, gas-particle partitioning theory and the analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA. A survey of recent laboratory, field and modeling studies is also presented. The following topical and emerging issues are highlighted and discussed in detail: molecular characterization of biogenic SOA constituents, condensed phase reactions and oligomerization, the interaction of atmospheric organic components with sulfuric acid, the chemical and photochemical processing of organics in the atmospheric aqueous phase, aerosol formation from real plant emissions, interaction of atmospheric organic components with water, thermodynamics and mixtures in atmospheric models. Finally, the major challenges ahead in laboratory, field and modeling studies of SOA are discussed and recommendations for future research directions are proposed.

  18. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  19. Observational Tests of Planet Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sozzetti, A; Latham, D W; Carney, B W; Laird, J B; Stefanik, R P; Boss, A P; Charbonneau, D; O'Donovan, F T; Holman, M J; Winn, J N

    2007-01-01

    We summarize the results of two experiments to address important issues related to the correlation between planet frequencies and properties and the metallicity of the hosts. Our results can usefully inform formation, structural, and evolutionary models of gas giant planets.

  20. Cellular Automaton Modeling of Pattern Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlijst, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Book review Andreas Deutsch and Sabine Dormann, Cellular Automaton Modeling of Biological Pattern Formation, Characterization, Applications, and Analysis, Birkhäuser (2005) ISBN 0-8176-4281-1 331pp..

  1. Kinetic exchange models for social opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lallouache, Mehdi; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

    2010-01-01

    We propose a minimal model for the collective dynamics of opinion formation in the society, by modifying kinetic exchange dynamics studied in the context of income, money or wealth distributions in a society.

  2. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  3. Testing Models for Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    1993-01-01

    I review a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter $\\Omega \\simeq 1$, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales $\\sim$ 1Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs small-scale $\\Omega$ discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum (compared to standard CDM) on scales $\\lambda \\sim 10-100$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe --- the inflationary predictions of $\\Omega = 1$ and gaussianity both seem to be OK; furthermore, the COBE result severely restricts modifications such as tilting the primordial spectrum --- but in the assumed matter content. The power s...

  4. On the role of collective interactions in asymmetric ring current formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bespalov

    Full Text Available The contribution of resonant wave-particle interactions to the formation and decay of the magnetospheric ring current is analysed in the framework of a self-consistent set of equations which take into account azimuthal plasmasphere asymmetry. It is shown that the cyclotron interaction of westward drifting energetic protons with Alfven waves in the evening-side plasmaspheric bulge region leads to the formation of a ring current asymmetry located near 18:00 MLT. The time-scale of this asymmetry is determined by the proton drift time through the plasmaspheric bulge and is about 1 - 3 h. A symmetrical ring current decays mainly due to charge exchange processes. The theory is compared with known experimental data on ions and waves in the ring current and on low-latitude magnetic disturbances. New low-latitude magnetometer data on the magnetic storm of 24 - 26 July 1986 are also discussed. The model presented explains the observed localization of an asymmetrical ring current loop in the evening sector and the difference in relaxation time-scales of the asymmetry and the Dst index. It also explains measured wave turbulence levels in the evening-side plasmasphere and wave observation statistics.

  5. Prevention of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation using electrical current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, Jose L; Rouse, Mark S; Euba, Gorane; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2014-09-05

    A technique for the prevention of staphylococcal adhesion by electrical current exposure was investigated. Teflon coupons were exposed to a continuous flow of 103 cfu/ml Staphylococcus epidermidis with or without 2000 microA DC electrical current delivered by electrodes on opposite sides of a coupon, touching neither each other nor the coupon. A mean 3.46 (SD, 0.20) and 5.70 (SD, 1.03) log10 cfu/cm2 were adhered to the non-electrical current exposed coupons after 4 h and 24 h, respectively. A mean 2.46 (SD, 0.31) and 1.47 (SD, 0.73) log10 cfu/cm2 were adhered after 4 h and 24 h with exposure to 2000 microA electrical current delivered by graphite electrodes. A mean 2.21 (SD, 0.14) and 0.55 (SD, 0.00) log10 cfu/cm2 were adhered after 4 h and 24 h with exposure to 2000 microA electrical current delivered by stainless steel electrodes. Electrical current may be useful in the prevention of staphylococcal adhesion to biomaterials.

  6. Behavioral modeling of Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Polak; Lukas Langhammer; Jan Jerabek

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the digitally adjustable current amplifier (DACA) and its analog behavioral model (ABM), which is suitable for both ideal and advanced analyses of the function block using DACA as active element. There are four levels of this model, each being suitable for simulation of a certain degree of electronic circuits design (e.g. filters, oscillators, generators). Each model is presented through a schematic wiring in the simulation program OrCAD, including a description of equat...

  7. Pattern formation and functionality in swarm models

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, E M; Chialvo, D R; Rauch, Erik M; Millonas, Mark M; Chialvo, Dante R

    1995-01-01

    We explore a simplified class of models we call swarms, which are inspired by the collective behavior of social insects. We perform a mean-field stability analysis and perform numerical simulations of the model. Several interesting types of behavior emerge in the vicinity of a second-order phase transition in the model, including the formation of stable lines of traffic flow, and memory reconstitution and bootstrapping. In addition to providing an understanding of certain classes of biological behavior, these models bear a generic resemblance to a number of pattern formation processes in the physical sciences.

  8. Simulation of Gravity Currents Using VOF Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹建锋; 黄钰期; 应新亚; 任安禄

    2002-01-01

    By the Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase flow model two-dimensional gravity currents with three phases including air are numerically simulated in this article. The necessity of consideration of turbulence effect for high Reynolds numbers is demonstrated quantitatively by LES (the Large Eddy Simulation) turbulence model. The gravity currents are simulated for h ≠ H as well as h = H, where h is the depth of the gravity current before the release and H is the depth of the intruded fluid. Uprising of swell occurs when a current flows horizontally into another lighter one for h ≠ H. The problems under what condition the uprising of swell occurs and how long it takes are considered in this article. All the simulated results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results available.

  9. How to Use Current Medical Literature and APA Format Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Robin

    Directives and guidance in obtaining current medical literature are provided in this publication with special emphasis given to locating material in the Portland, Oregon area. The uses and types of periodical indexes are identified and periodical index citation examples are indicated. Explanations are offered on: (1) how to conduct an effective…

  10. How to Use Current Medical Literature and APA Format Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Robin

    Directives and guidance in obtaining current medical literature are provided in this publication with special emphasis given to locating material in the Portland, Oregon area. The uses and types of periodical indexes are identified and periodical index citation examples are indicated. Explanations are offered on: (1) how to conduct an effective…

  11. Formation models of cometary ices in protoplanetary disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro Molano, G.; Kamp, I.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to constrain the chemical conditions in the early Solar System by analyzing chemical evolution models of protoplanetary disks and comparing them to our current knowledge of Solar System bodies, such as comets. We propose that the region located at 10 AU≤r≤30 AU is ideal for the formation

  12. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  13. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  14. Physical Models of Galaxy Formation in a Cosmological Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Rachel S.; Davé, Romeel

    2015-08-01

    Modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context presents one of the greatest challenges in astrophysics today due to the vast range of scales and numerous physical processes involved. Here we review the current status of models that employ two leading techniques to simulate the physics of galaxy formation: semianalytic models and numerical hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on a set of observational targets that describe the evolution of the global and structural properties of galaxies from roughly cosmic high noon (z â¼ 2-3) to the present. Although minor discrepancies remain, overall, models show remarkable convergence among different methods and make predictions that are in qualitative agreement with observations. Modelers have converged on a core set of physical processes that are critical for shaping galaxy properties. This core set includes cosmological accretion, strong stellar-driven winds that are more efficient at low masses, black hole feedback that preferentially suppresses star formation at high masses, and structural and morphological evolution through merging and environmental processes. However, all cosmological models currently adopt phenomenological implementations of many of these core processes, which must be tuned to observations. Many details of how these diverse processes interact within a hierarchical structure formation setting remain poorly understood. Emerging multiscale simulations are helping to bridge the gap between stellar and cosmological scales, placing models on a firmer, more physically grounded footing. Concurrently, upcoming telescope facilities will provide new challenges and constraints for models, particularly by directly constraining inflows and outflows through observations of gas in and around galaxies.

  15. Plasmoid formation in the elongated current sheet during transient CHI on HIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masayoshi; Fujita, Akihiro; Matsui, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Naoyuki; Kanki, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The Transient-Coaxial Helicity Injection (T-CHI) is a promising candidate for the non-inductive plasma start-up on Spherical Torus (ST). The problem of the flux closure in the T-CHI is important and related to understand the physics of fast magnetic reconnection. The recent MHD simulation (F. Ebrahimi and R. Raman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 205003 (2015)) on T-CHI for NSTX predicts the formation and breakup of an elongated Sweet-Parker (S-P) current sheet and a transient to plasmoid instability. According to this simulation, the reconnection rate based on the plasmoid instability is faster than that by S-P model and becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number S. In this meeting, we will present that the formation of multiple X-points and plasmoids has been observed in T-CHI start-up plasmas on HIST. The stronger external guide (toroidal) magnetic field makes plasma less compressible, leading to slower reconnection time and longer current sheet. The experimental observation shows that 2/3 plasmoids are generated in the elongated current sheet with the narrow width comparable to the ion skin depth or the ion sound gyro-radius. The small plasmoids develop to a large-scale flux structure due to a current inward diffusion during the decay phase.

  16. Modelling Galaxy Formation at high z

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    I describe a semi-analytical model for the formation and evolution of galaxies in hierarchical clustering models, and its predictions for the properties of the galaxy population at high z. The predictions are found to agree well with the observed properties of the Lyman break galaxies found at z sim 3 by Steidel et al. The models predict that the star formation rate per comoving volume should have peaked at z sim 1-2, which also agrees well with recent observational data.

  17. A Model of Client Impression Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodden, Jack L.; Winer, Jane L.

    1978-01-01

    The model describes the clients' impression-formation process, describes changes in client impressions as therapy progresses, and suggests the relevance of client impressions for therapy outcome. An attempt at empirical validation by using a clinical population lent some support to certain aspects of the proposed model. (Author)

  18. Current limit diagrams for dendrite formation in solid-state electrolytes for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, R.; Wolfenstine, J.

    2017-03-01

    We build upon the concept that nucleation of lithium dendrites at the lithium anode-solid state electrolyte interface is instigated by the higher resistance of grain boundaries that raises the local electro-chemical potential of lithium, near the lithium-electrode. This excess electro-chemo-mechanical potential, however, is reduced by the mechanical back stress generated when the dendrite is formed within the electrolyte. These parameters are coalesced into an analytical model that prescribes a specific criterion for dendrite formation. The results are presented in the form of current limit diagrams that show the "safe" and "fail" regimes for battery function. A higher conductivity of the electrolyte can reduce dendrite formation.

  19. Behavioral modeling of Digitally Adjustable Current Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Polak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the digitally adjustable current amplifier (DACA and its analog behavioral model (ABM, which is suitable for both ideal and advanced analyses of the function block using DACA as active element. There are four levels of this model, each being suitable for simulation of a certain degree of electronic circuits design (e.g. filters, oscillators, generators. Each model is presented through a schematic wiring in the simulation program OrCAD, including a description of equations representing specific functions in the given level of the simulation model. The design of individual levels is always verified using PSpice simulations. The ABM model has been developed based on practically measured values of a number of DACA amplifier samples. The simulation results for proposed levels of the ABM model are shown and compared with the results of the real easurements of the active element DACA.

  20. Stellar and HI Mass Functions Predicted by a Simple Preheating Galaxy Formation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the new preheating mechanism of galaxy formation suggested by Mo et al., we construct a simple model of formation of disk galaxies within the current paradigm of galaxy formation. It incorporates preheating, gas cooling, bulge formation and star formation. The predicted stellar and HI mass functions of galaxies are discussed and compared with the observations. It is found that our model can roughly match both the observed galaxy luminosity function and the observed HI-mass function.

  1. Modelling of compound nucleus formation in fusion of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A

    2004-01-01

    A new model that includes the time-dependent dynamics of the single-particle (s.p.) motion in conjunction with the macroscopic evolution of the system is proposed for describing the compound nucleus (CN) formation in fusion of heavy nuclei. The diabaticity initially keeps the entrance system around its contact configuration, but the gradual transition from the diabatic to the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) leads to fusion or quasifission. Direct measurements of the probability for CN formation are crucial to discriminate between the current models.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Current Sheet Formation in a Quasi-Separatrix Layer using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Effenberger, Frederic; Arnold, Lukas; Grauer, Rainer; Dreher, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The formation of a thin current sheet in a magnetic quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is investigated by means of numerical simulation using a simplified ideal, low-$\\beta$, MHD model. The initial configuration and driving boundary conditions are relevant to phenomena observed in the solar corona and were studied earlier by Aulanier et al., A&A 444, 961 (2005). In extension to that work, we use the technique of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to significantly enhance the local spatial resolution of the current sheet during its formation, which enables us to follow the evolution into a later stage. Our simulations are in good agreement with the results of Aulanier et al. up to the calculated time in that work. In a later phase, we observe a basically unarrested collapse of the sheet to length scales that are more than one order of magnitude smaller than those reported earlier. The current density attains correspondingly larger maximum values within the sheet. During this thinning process, which is finally limite...

  3. Simulation of a distributed current source in a linear format CFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Marcus; Browning, Jim

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental limit on Crossed-Field Amplifiers (CFA) gain is beam to RF power ratio. With too much beam power, the RF signal on the slow wave circuit is ``swamped.'' It is proposed here that a controllable, distributed cathode source can be used to tailor current injection and optimize gain. In this work a linear format CFA with a meander line slow wave circuit is tested experimentally and numerically using Vsim. Simulations of the original design, which operates at 900 MHz, shows 100 mA. This beam current is higher than the capabilities of the Field Emitter Array cathodes available to the group; therefore no experimental gain was observed. To be able to compare simulation to experiment, the CFA model under study was changed to the experiment used at Northeastern University in 1991, which also uses a meander line circuit and an injected beam configuration. Direct comparisons between the simulation and this experiment are performed to validate the model. Additional simulations study the effect of different current distributions on gain, bandwidth, and efficiency. Practical considerations such as how to control the energy of the beam separately from the sole potential in order to minimize lost current to sole are also examined. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boise State University.

  4. Probability of detection models for eddy current NDE methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, S.N.

    1993-04-30

    The development of probability of detection (POD) models for a variety of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is motivated by a desire to quantify the variability introduced during the process of testing. Sources of variability involved in eddy current methods of NDE include those caused by variations in liftoff, material properties, probe canting angle, scan format, surface roughness and measurement noise. This thesis presents a comprehensive POD model for eddy current NDE. Eddy current methods of nondestructive testing are used widely in industry to inspect a variety of nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials. The development of a comprehensive POD model is therefore of significant importance. The model incorporates several sources of variability characterized by a multivariate Gaussian distribution and employs finite element analysis to predict the signal distribution. The method of mixtures is then used for estimating optimal threshold values. The research demonstrates the use of a finite element model within a probabilistic framework to the spread in the measured signal for eddy current nondestructive methods. Using the signal distributions for various flaw sizes the POD curves for varying defect parameters have been computed. In contrast to experimental POD models, the cost of generating such curves is very low and complex defect shapes can be handled very easily. The results are also operator independent.

  5. Modeling Start Curves of Bainite Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bohemen, S.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that calculations with a physically based model give an accurate description of the start curve of bainite formation in a wide range of steels. The temperature dependence of the overall kinetics, which determines the characteristic C shape of the start curve, is controlled by both

  6. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT Ⅱ. BAROCLINIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 方国洪; 施心慧

    2001-01-01

    In this part, Levitus' climatological temperature and salinity are incorporated in the numerical model developed in Part I. Diagnostic and prognostic experiment on the thermohaline circulation were conducted. The smooth Levitus' data do not include any information on the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC), so it is not in the model-produced diagnostic thermohaline circulation. Although the SCSWC does not appear in the wind-driven circulation in the barotropic case, it appears in the prognostic wind-driven circulation in the baroclinic case. This implies that the differing circulation pat-terns between barotropic case and bareclinic case are due to the stratification. The prognostic thermohaline circulation with wind stress and inflow/outflow transports at open boundaries are also discussed. Coupling of density and dynamic forces makes the circulation pattern more complicated, Even though the stratification is not always a direct cause of the formation of the SCSWC, it is at least an indirect cause.

  7. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT II. BAROCLINIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 方国洪; 施心慧

    2001-01-01

    In this part, Levitus' climatological temperature and salinity are incorporated in the numerical model developed in Part I. Diagnostic and prognostic experiment on the thermohaline circulation were conducted. The smooth Levitus' data do not include any information on the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC), so it is not in the model-produced diagnostic thermohaline circulation. Although the SCSWC does not appear in the wind-driven circulation in the barotropic case, it appears in the prognostic wind-driven circulation in the baroclinic case. This implies that the differing circulation patterns between barotropic case and baroclinic case are due to the stratification. The prognostic thermohaline circulation with wind stress and inflow/outflow transports at open boundaries are also discussed. Coupling of density and dynamic forces makes the circulation pattern more complicated. Even though the stratification is not always a direct cause of the formation of the SCSWC, it is at least an indirect cause.``

  8. Physical Models of Galaxy Formation in a Cosmological Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Somerville, Rachel S

    2014-01-01

    Modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context presents one of the greatest challenges in astrophysics today, due to the vast range of scales and numerous physical processes involved. Here we review the current status of models that employ two leading techniques to simulate the physics of galaxy formation: semi-analytic models and numerical hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on a set of observational targets that describe the evolution of the global and structural properties of galaxies from roughly Cosmic High Noon ($z\\sim 2-3$) to the present. Although minor discrepancies remain, overall, models show remarkable convergence between different methods and make predictions that are in qualitative agreement with observations. Modelers seem to have converged on a core set of physical processes that are critical for shaping galaxy properties. This core set includes cosmological accretion, strong stellar-driven winds that are more efficient at low masses, black hole feedback that preferentially suppresses star...

  9. A Summary of Proposed Changes to the Current ICARTT Format Standards and their Implications to Future Airborne Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, E. A.; Kusterer, J.; Quam, B.; Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Beach, A. L., III

    2015-12-01

    The current ICARTT file format standards were developed for the purpose of fulfilling the data management needs for the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign in 2004. The goal of the ICARTT file format was to establish a common and simple to use data file format to promote data exchange and collaboration among science teams with similar science objectives. ICARTT has been the NASA standard since 2010, and is widely used by NOAA, NSF, and international partners (DLR, FAAM). Despite its level of acceptance, there are a number of issues with the current ICARTT format, especially concerning the machine readability. To enhance usability, the ICARTT Refresh Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) was established to enable a platform for atmospheric science data producers, users (e.g. modelers) and data managers to collaborate on developing criteria for this file format. Ultimately, this is a cross agency effort to improve and aggregate the metadata records being produced. After conducting a survey to identify deficiencies in the current format, we determined which are considered most important to the various communities. Numerous recommendations were made to improve upon the file format while maintaining backward compatibility. The recommendations made to date and their advantages and limitations will be discussed.

  10. Benchmarking an Unstructured-Grid Model for Tsunami Current Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Priest, George; Allan, Jonathan; Stimely, Laura

    2016-12-01

    We present model results derived from a tsunami current benchmarking workshop held by the NTHMP (National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) in February 2015. Modeling was undertaken using our own 3D unstructured-grid model that has been previously certified by the NTHMP for tsunami inundation. Results for two benchmark tests are described here, including: (1) vortex structure in the wake of a submerged shoal and (2) impact of tsunami waves on Hilo Harbor in the 2011 Tohoku event. The modeled current velocities are compared with available lab and field data. We demonstrate that the model is able to accurately capture the velocity field in the two benchmark tests; in particular, the 3D model gives a much more accurate wake structure than the 2D model for the first test, with the root-mean-square error and mean bias no more than 2 cm s-1 and 8 mm s-1, respectively, for the modeled velocity.

  11. A unified multiwavelength model of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Benson, Andrew J.; Bower, Richard G.; Cole, Shaun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Helly, John C.; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Mitchell, Peter D.

    2016-11-01

    We present a new version of the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. This brings together several previous developments of GALFORM into a single unified model, including a different initial mass function (IMF) in quiescent star formation and in starbursts, feedback from active galactic nuclei suppressing gas cooling in massive haloes, and a new empirical star formation law in galaxy discs based on their molecular gas content. In addition, we have updated the cosmology, introduced a more accurate treatment of dynamical friction acting on satellite galaxies, and updated the stellar population model. The new model is able to simultaneously explain both the observed evolution of the K-band luminosity function and stellar mass function, and the number counts and redshift distribution of sub-mm galaxies selected at 850 μm. This was not previously achieved by a single physical model within the Λcold dark matter framework, but requires having an IMF in starbursts that is somewhat top-heavy. The new model is tested against a wide variety of observational data covering wavelengths from the far-UV to sub-mm, and redshifts from z = 0 to 6, and is found to be generally successful. These observations include the optical and near-infrared (IR) luminosity functions, H I mass function, fraction of early type galaxies, Tully-Fisher, metallicity-luminosity and size-luminosity relations at z = 0, as well as far-IR number counts, and far-UV luminosity functions at z ˜ 3-6. Discrepancies are, however, found in galaxy sizes and metallicities at low luminosities, and in the abundance of low-mass galaxies at high-z, suggesting the need for a more sophisticated model of supernova feedback.

  12. Modelling Global Pattern Formations for Collaborative Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Khaled, Rilla;

    2012-01-01

    We present our research towards the design of a computational framework capable of modelling the formation and evolution of global patterns (i.e. group structures) in a population of social individuals. The framework is intended to be used in collaborative environments, e.g. social serious games...... and computer simulations of artificial societies. The theoretical basis of our research, together with current state of the art and future work, are briefly introduced....

  13. A Network Formation Model Based on Subgraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekhar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new class of random-graph models for the statistical estimation of network formation that allow for substantial correlation in links. Various subgraphs (e.g., links, triangles, cliques, stars) are generated and their union results in a network. We provide estimation techniques for recovering the rates at which the underlying subgraphs were formed. We illustrate the models via a series of applications including testing for incentives to form cross-caste relationships in rural India, testing to see whether network structure is used to enforce risk-sharing, testing as to whether networks change in response to a community's exposure to microcredit, and show that these models significantly outperform stochastic block models in matching observed network characteristics. We also establish asymptotic properties of the models and various estimators, which requires proving a new Central Limit Theorem for correlated random variables.

  14. Opinion formation models on a gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Gastner

    Full Text Available Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales proportional g(-1/4, not proportional g(-4/7 as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation.

  15. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  16. CFD-DEM Simulations of Current-Induced Dune Formation and Morphological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', `small dune', `vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver...

  17. The role of oxygen ions in the formation of a bifurcated current sheet in the magnetotail

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, S; Zimbardo, G; Veltri, P

    2010-01-01

    Cluster observations in the near-Earth magnetotail have shown that sometimes the current sheet is bifurcated, i.e. it is divided in two layers. The influence of magnetic turbulence on ion motion in this region is investigated by numerical simulation, taking into account the presence of both protons and oxygen ions. The magnetotail current sheet is modeled as a magnetic field reversal with a normal magnetic field component $B_n$, plus a three-dimensional spectrum of magnetic fluctuations $\\delta {\\bf B}$, which represents the observed magnetic turbulence. The dawn-dusk electric field E$_y$ is also included. A test particle simulation is performed using different values of $\\delta {\\bf B}$, E$_y$ and injecting two different species of particles, O$^+$ ions and protons. O$^+$ ions can support the formation of a double current layer both in the absence and for large values of magnetic fluctuations ($\\delta B/B_0 = 0.0$ and $\\delta B/B_0 \\geq 0.4$, where B$_0$ is the constant magnetic field in the magnetospheric l...

  18. Dynamical Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lunine, Jonathan I; Raymond, Sean N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Quinn, Thomas; Graps, Amara

    2009-01-01

    We review the problem of the formation of terrestrial planets, with particular emphasis on the interaction of dynamical and geochemical models. The lifetime of gas around stars in the process of formation is limited to a few million years based on astronomical observations, while isotopic dating of meteorites and the Earth-Moon system suggest that perhaps 50-100 million years were required for the assembly of the Earth. Therefore, much of the growth of the terrestrial planets in our own system is presumed to have taken place under largely gas-free conditions, and the physics of terrestrial planet formation is dominated by gravitational interactions and collisions. The earliest phase of terrestrial-planet formation involve the growth of km-sized or larger planetesimals from dust grains, followed by the accumulations of these planetesimals into ~100 lunar- to Mars-mass bodies that are initially gravitationally isolated from one-another in a swarm of smaller planetesimals, but eventually grow to the point of sig...

  19. Continuum Modeling of Biological Network Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2017-04-10

    We present an overview of recent analytical and numerical results for the elliptic–parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai, which models the formation of biological transportation networks. The model describes the pressure field using a Darcy type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects. Randomness in the material structure is represented by a linear diffusion term and conductance relaxation by an algebraic decay term. We first introduce micro- and mesoscopic models and show how they are connected to the macroscopic PDE system. Then, we provide an overview of analytical results for the PDE model, focusing mainly on the existence of weak and mild solutions and analysis of the steady states. The analytical part is complemented by extensive numerical simulations. We propose a discretization based on finite elements and study the qualitative properties of network structures for various parameter values.

  20. Current Sheet Formation in a Conical Theta Pinch Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hallock, Ashley K.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-01-01

    Data from an inductive conical theta pinch accelerator are presented to gain insight into the process of inductive current sheet formation in the presence of a preionized background gas produced by a steady-state RF-discharge. The presence of a preionized plasma has been previously shown to allow for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages and energies than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerator concepts, leading to greater accelerator efficiencies at lower power levels. Time-resolved magnetic probe measurements are obtained for different background pressures and pulse energies to characterize the effects of these parameters on current sheet formation. Indices are defined that describe time-resolved current sheet characteristics, such as the total current owing in the current sheet, the time-integrated total current ('strength'), and current sheet velocity. It is found that for a given electric field strength, maximums in total current, strength, and velocity occur for one particular background pressure. At other pressures, these current sheet indices are considerably smaller. The trends observed in these indices are explained in terms of the principles behind Townsend breakdown that lead to a dependence on the ratio of the electric field to the background pressure. Time-integrated photographic data are also obtained at the same experimental conditions, and qualitatively they compare quite favorably with the time-resolved magnetic field data.

  1. Toy Models for Galaxy Formation versus Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dekel, A; Tweed, D; Cacciato, M; Ceverino, D; Primack, J R

    2013-01-01

    We describe simple useful toy models for key processes of galaxy formation in its most active phase, at z > 1, and test the approximate expressions against the typical behaviour in a suite of high-resolution hydro-cosmological simulations of massive galaxies at z = 4-1. We address in particular the evolution of (a) the total mass inflow rate from the cosmic web into galactic haloes based on the EPS approximation, (b) the penetration of baryonic streams into the inner galaxy, (c) the disc size, (d) the implied steady-state gas content and star-formation rate (SFR) in the galaxy subject to mass conservation and a universal star-formation law, (e) the inflow rate within the disc to a central bulge and black hole as derived using energy conservation and self-regulated Q ~ 1 violent disc instability (VDI), and (f) the implied steady state in the disc and bulge. The toy models provide useful approximations for the behaviour of the simulated galaxies. We find that (a) the inflow rate is proportional to mass and to (...

  2. Effects of imbalanced currents on large-format LiFePO4/graphite batteries systems connected in parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Hu, Xiaosong; Jin, Chao; Jiang, Jiuchun; Zhang, Yanru; Yip, Tony

    2016-05-01

    With the development and popularization of electric vehicles, it is urgent and necessary to develop effective management and diagnosis technology for battery systems. In this work, we design a parallel battery model, according to equivalent circuits of parallel voltage and branch current, to study effects of imbalanced currents on parallel large-format LiFePO4/graphite battery systems. Taking a 60 Ah LiFePO4/graphite battery system manufactured by ATL (Amperex Technology Limited, China) as an example, causes of imbalanced currents in the parallel connection are analyzed using our model, and the associated effect mechanisms on long-term stability of each single battery are examined. Theoretical and experimental results show that continuously increasing imbalanced currents during cycling are mainly responsible for the capacity fade of LiFePO4/graphite parallel batteries. It is thus a good way to avoid fast performance fade of parallel battery systems by suppressing variations of branch currents.

  3. Nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional instabilities of thin and thick electron scale current sheets: Plasmoid formation and current filamentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg [Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, Göttingen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-Von-Liebig-Weg-3, Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Nonlinear evolution of three dimensional electron shear flow instabilities of an electron current sheet (ECS) is studied using electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of the evolution on current sheet thickness is examined. For thin current sheets (half thickness =d{sub e}=c/ω{sub pe}), tearing mode instability dominates. In its nonlinear evolution, it leads to the formation of oblique current channels. Magnetic field lines form 3-D magnetic spirals. Even in the absence of initial guide field, the out-of-reconnection-plane magnetic field generated by the tearing instability itself may play the role of guide field in the growth of secondary finite-guide-field instabilities. For thicker current sheets (half thickness ∼5 d{sub e}), both tearing and non-tearing modes grow. Due to the non-tearing mode, current sheet becomes corrugated in the beginning of the evolution. In this case, tearing mode lets the magnetic field reconnect in the corrugated ECS. Later thick ECS develops filamentary structures and turbulence in which reconnection occurs. This evolution of thick ECS provides an example of reconnection in self-generated turbulence. The power spectra for both the thin and thick current sheets are anisotropic with respect to the electron flow direction. The cascade towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow.

  4. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers and the accumulation of complexe...

  5. Numerical modeling of the first star's formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, E.; Chièe, J.-P.

    Although our knowledge in cosmology has considerably advanced in recent years, the z ≃5 - z ≃1000 period, or dark age, is largely unknown on the observational point of view, and theoretical as well. It is nevertheless a decisive step, where the first baryonic objects form (Pop III stars). These are likely to be responsible for the reionization of the universe at about z ≅10 and they synthesize the first heavy elements, fundamental for the next generation objects. I will first present the numerical model developed to study their formation. I will discuss the included physics (hydrodynamics of gas and dark matter, out of equilibrium thermochemistry, radiative transfer, convection...). Then I will present results from a cloud collapse to the formation of a proto-star, illustrating the influence of the physics. Finally, I will present the 1D to 3D perspectives of this work.

  6. Assessing the role of oxygen on ring current formation and evolution through numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.; Yu Ganushkina, N.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2015-06-01

    We address the effect of ionospheric outflow and magnetospheric ion composition on the physical processes that control the development of the 5 August 2011 magnetic storm. Simulations with the Space Weather Modeling Framework are used to investigate the global dynamics and energization of ions throughout the magnetosphere during storm time, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the ring current. Simulations involving multifluid (with variable H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) and single-fluid (with constant H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) MHD for the global magnetosphere with inner boundary conditions set either by specifying a constant ion density or by physics-based calculations of the ion fluxes reveal that dynamical changes of the ion composition in the inner magnetosphere alter the total energy density of the magnetosphere, leading to variations in the magnetic field as well as particle drifts throughout the simulated domain. A low oxygen to hydrogen ratio and outflow resulting from a constant ion density boundary produced the most disturbed magnetosphere, leading to a stronger ring current but misses the timing of the storm development. Conversely, including a physics-based solution for the ionospheric outflow to the magnetosphere system leads to a reduction in the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). The increased presence of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere affects the global magnetospheric structure and dynamics and brings the nightside reconnection point closer to the Earth. The combination of reduced CPCP together with the formation of the reconnection line closer to the Earth yields less adiabatic heating in the magnetotail and reduces the amount of energetic plasma that has access to the inner magnetosphere.

  7. A simple model of ostracism formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilwon Kim

    Full Text Available We study formation of ostracism in a society from a game theoretical perspective. The dynamics of group formation is complicated in that the choices of the individuals and the form of the groups mutually affect each other in the process. A suggested simple model shows that individual efforts to increase his/her own sense of belonging is responsible for both growth of groups and creation of an outcast. Once a person happens to get behind in synchronizing with others, tendency to alienate him may grow among others, possibly making him left out in the end. Alienating minority occurs even when there is a penalty for disliking and people are encouraged to favor others. Considering that the target is accidentally picked, we can understand ostracism as an inherent part of the group formation, rather than a result of specific discrepancy among people. Another finding is that a single individual who seeks for unconditional unification of the society ("philanthropist" likely invites his/her own isolation from the society, while the existence of such person generally promotes coalition of others.

  8. A simple model of ostracism formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilwon

    2014-01-01

    We study formation of ostracism in a society from a game theoretical perspective. The dynamics of group formation is complicated in that the choices of the individuals and the form of the groups mutually affect each other in the process. A suggested simple model shows that individual efforts to increase his/her own sense of belonging is responsible for both growth of groups and creation of an outcast. Once a person happens to get behind in synchronizing with others, tendency to alienate him may grow among others, possibly making him left out in the end. Alienating minority occurs even when there is a penalty for disliking and people are encouraged to favor others. Considering that the target is accidentally picked, we can understand ostracism as an inherent part of the group formation, rather than a result of specific discrepancy among people. Another finding is that a single individual who seeks for unconditional unification of the society ("philanthropist") likely invites his/her own isolation from the society, while the existence of such person generally promotes coalition of others.

  9. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  10. Morphogenesis and pattern formation in biological systems experiments and models

    CERN Document Server

    Noji, Sumihare; Ueno, Naoto; Maini, Philip

    2003-01-01

    A central goal of current biology is to decode the mechanisms that underlie the processes of morphogenesis and pattern formation. Concerned with the analysis of those phenomena, this book covers a broad range of research fields, including developmental biology, molecular biology, plant morphogenesis, ecology, epidemiology, medicine, paleontology, evolutionary biology, mathematical biology, and computational biology. In Morphogenesis and Pattern Formation in Biological Systems: Experiments and Models, experimental and theoretical aspects of biology are integrated for the construction and investigation of models of complex processes. This collection of articles on the latest advances by leading researchers not only brings together work from a wide spectrum of disciplines, but also provides a stepping-stone to the creation of new areas of discovery.

  11. Representing hybrid compensatory non-compensatory choice set formation in semi-compensatory models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Bekhor, Shlomo; Shigtan, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Semi-compensatory models represent a choice process consisting of an elimination-based choice set formation upon satisfying criteria thresholds and a utility-based choice. Current semi-compensatory models assume a purely non-compensatory choice set formation and hence do not support multinomial c...

  12. A simple model for pediment formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Jonathan; Braun, Jean; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cecile; Simon, Brendan

    2016-04-01

    Pediments are very flat and smooth erosive surfaces, connected to higher relief by a scarp, that covers up to two thirds of the Earth's surface. A physical mechanism to explain their formation remains elusive. Commonly accepted hypotheses include: (1) the widening of an incised river network (lateral corrasion of Gilbert, 1877), (2) sheetflow erosion, (3) subsurface weathering and exhumation (Strudley et al, 2006) and (4) slope retreat, usually at the base of an escarpment (King, 1949), potentially helped by flexural isostatic rebound (Pelletier, 2010). Here we explore the third hypothesis, which we believe applies mostly in regions characterised by intense rainfall where deep weathering profiles are commonly observed. In this study, using a new coupled model of groundwater flow and surface erosion, we highlight the critical impact of the geometry of the water table and of the unsaturated zone within a weathering profile to explain its evolution through time. The model is calibrated and used to explain the formation of pediments as the product of a dynamical balance between weathering front propagation and surface erosion. We also explore the effects of abrupt changes in rainfall intensity and base level drop on the geometry of the predicted pediments.

  13. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, D., E-mail: denis.michel@live.fr [Universite de Rennes1-IRSET, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 13, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-21

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation, and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers, and the accumulation of complexes in vivo by rescue from degradation. Overlooked aspects of these processes are also pointed: the exponential distribution of fibril lengths can be recovered using various models because it is attributable to randomness only. It is also suggested that the same term “critical concentration” is used for different things, involved in either nucleation or elongation.

  14. Modeling of Astrochemistry during Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincelin, Ugo; Herbst, Eric; Chang, Qiang; Vasyunina, Tatiana; Aikawa, Yuri; Furuya, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    Interstellar matter is not inert, but is constantly evolving. On the one hand, its physical characteristics such as its density and its temperature, and on the other hand, its chemical characteristics such as the abundances of the species and their distribution, can change drastically. The phases of this evolution spread over different timescales, and this matter evolves to create very different objects such as molecular clouds (T ˜ 10 K, n ˜ 10^4 cm-3, t ˜ 10^6 years), collapsing prestellar cores (inner core : T ˜ 1000 K, n ˜ 1016 cm-3, t ˜ 10^4 years), protostellar cores (inner core : T ˜ 10^5 K, n ˜ 1024 cm-3, t ˜ 10^6 years), or protoplanetary disks (T ˜ 10-1000 K, n ˜ 109-1012 cm-3, t ˜ 10^7 years). These objects are the stages of the star formation process. Starting from the diffuse cloud, matter evolves to form molecular clouds. Then, matter can condense to form prestellar cores, which can collapse to form a protostar surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. The protostar can evolve in a star, and planets and comets can be formed in the disk. Thus, modeling of astrochemistry during star formation should consider chemical and physical evolution in parallel. We present a new gas-grain chemical network involving deuterated species, which takes into account ortho, para, and meta states of H_2, D_2, H_3^+, H_2D^+, D_2H^+, and D_3^+. It includes high temperature gas phase reactions, and some ternary reactions for high density, so that it should be able to simulate media with temperature equal to [10;800] K and density equal to [˜10^4;˜1012] cm-3. We apply this network to the modeling of low-mass and high-mass star formation, using a gas-grain chemical code coupled to a time dependent physical structure. Comparisons with observational constraints, such as the HDO/H_2O ratio in high mass star forming region, give good agreement which is promising. Besides, high density conditions have highlighted some limitations of our grain surface modeling. We present a

  15. An empirical behavioral model of price formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mike, S

    2005-01-01

    Although behavioral economics has demonstrated that there are many situations where rational choice is a poor empirical model, it has so far failed to provide quantitative models of economic problems such as price formation. We make a step in this direction by developing empirical models that capture behavioral regularities in trading order placement and cancellation using data from the London Stock Exchange. For order placement we show that the probability of placing an order at a given price is well approximated by a Student distribution with less than two degrees of freedom, centered on the best quoted price. This result is surprising because it implies that trading order placement is symmetric, independent of the bid-ask spread, and the same for buying and selling. We also develop a crude but simple cancellation model that depends on the position of an order relative to the best price and the imbalance between buying and selling orders in the limit order book. These results are combined to construct a sto...

  16. The simplest model of galaxy formation I: A formation history model of galaxy stellar mass growth

    CERN Document Server

    Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a simple model to self-consistently connect the growth of galaxies to the formation history of their host dark matter halos. Our model is defined by two simple functions: the "baryonic growth function" which controls the rate at which new baryonic material is made available for star formation, and the "physics function" which controls the efficiency with which this material is converted into stars. Using simple, phenomenologically motivated forms for both functions that depend only on a single halo property, we demonstrate the model's ability to reproduce the z=0 red and blue stellar mass functions. Furthermore, by adding redshift as a second input variable to the physics function we show that the reproduction of the global stellar mass function out to z=3 is improved. We conclude by discussing the general utility of our new model, highlighting its usefulness for creating mock galaxy samples which have a number of key advantages over those generated by other techniques.

  17. Modeling Pancake Formation with a Coupled Wave-Ice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Bateman, S. P.; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent results from the ONR-sponsored Arctic Sea State DRI cruise (Thomson et al., 2016, EOS, in press) suggest that small-scale pancake ice formation is an important process in the initial recovery and refreezing of the Arctic pack ice each autumn. Ocean surface waves and ambient temperature play significant roles in shaping and/or limiting the pancake growth patterns, which may either facilitate or delay the recovery of the ice pack. Here we apply a phase-resolving, coupled wave-ice system, consisting of a CFD wave model (NHWAVE) and a discrete-element ice model (LIGGGHTS), to investigate the formation processes of pancake ice under different conditions. A series of simulations is run, each beginning with a layer of disconnected ice particles floating on the ocean surface. Wave conditions and ice bonding properties are varied to examine the effects of mild versus stormy conditions, wind waves versus swell, and warmer versus colder temperatures. Model runs are limited to domains of O(1 sq km). Initial tests have shown some success in replicating qualitative results from the Sea State cruise, including the formation of irregularly shaped pancakes from the "frazil" ice layer, changes in formation processes caused by varying ambient temperature (represented through variations in ice bonding strength), occasional rafting of one pancake on top of another, and increased wave attenuation as pancakes grow larger.

  18. Pattern formation in superdiffusion Oregonator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Yan, Jia; Liu, Fu-Cheng; He, Ya-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formations in an Oregonator model with superdiffusion are studied in two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations. Stability analyses are performed by applying Fourier and Laplace transforms to the space fractional reaction-diffusion systems. Antispiral, stable turing patterns, and travelling patterns are observed by changing the diffusion index of the activator. Analyses of Floquet multipliers show that the limit cycle solution loses stability at the wave number of the primitive vector of the travelling hexagonal pattern. We also observed a transition between antispiral and spiral by changing the diffusion index of the inhibitor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. Y2012009 and ZD2015025), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  19. Structure formation in the DGP cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The DGP brane-world model provides an alternative to the standard LCDM cosmology, in which the late universe accelerates due to a modification of gravity rather than vacuum energy. The cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ in LCDM is replaced by a single parameter, the crossover scale $r_c$, in DGP. The Supernova redshift observations can be fitted by both models, with $\\Lambda\\sim H_0^2$ and $r_c \\sim H_0^{-1}$. This degeneracy is broken by structure formation, which is suppressed in different ways in the two models. There is some confusion in the literature about how the standard linear growth factor is modified in DGP. While the luminosity distance can be computed purely from the modified 4-dimensional Friedman equation, the evolution of density perturbations requires an analysis of the 5-dimensional gravitational field. We show that if the 5-dimensional effects are inappropriately neglected, then the 4-dimensional Bianchi identities are violated and the computed growth factor is incorrect. By using the 5-dimens...

  20. Current approaches to gene regulatory network modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brazma Alvis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many different approaches have been developed to model and simulate gene regulatory networks. We proposed the following categories for gene regulatory network models: network parts lists, network topology models, network control logic models, and dynamic models. Here we will describe some examples for each of these categories. We will study the topology of gene regulatory networks in yeast in more detail, comparing a direct network derived from transcription factor binding data and an indirect network derived from genome-wide expression data in mutants. Regarding the network dynamics we briefly describe discrete and continuous approaches to network modelling, then describe a hybrid model called Finite State Linear Model and demonstrate that some simple network dynamics can be simulated in this model.

  1. THE EVOLUTION OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT DURING THE FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jincheng; Yan, Xiaoli; Qu, Zhongquan; Xue, Zhike; Xiang, Yongyuan; Li, Hao, E-mail: egnever@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the electric current related to the formation and eruption of active region filaments in NOAA AR 11884. The vertical current on the solar surface was investigated by using vector magnetograms (VMs) observed by HMI on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. To obtain the electric current along the filament's axis, we reconstructed the magnetic fields above the photosphere by using nonlinear force-free field extrapolation based on photospheric VMs. Spatio-temporal evolutions of the vertical current on the photospheric surface and the horizontal current along the filament's axis were studied during the long-term evolution and eruption-related period, respectively. The results show that the vertical currents of the entire active region behaved with a decreasing trend and the magnetic fields also kept decreasing during the long-term evolution. For the eruption-related evolution, the mean transverse field strengths decreased before two eruptions and increased sharply after two eruptions in the vicinity of the polarity inversion lines underneath the filament. The related vertical current showed different behaviors in two of the eruptions. On the other hand, a very interesting feature was found: opposite horizontal currents with respect to the current of the filament's axis appeared and increased under the filament before the eruptions and disappeared after the eruptions. We suggest that these opposite currents were carried by the new flux emerging from the photosphere bottom and might be the trigger mechanism for these filament eruptions.

  2. The Evolution of the Electric Current during the Formation and Eruption of Active-region Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jincheng; Yan, Xiaoli; Qu, Zhongquan; Xue, Zhike; Xiang, Yongyuan; Li, Hao

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the electric current related to the formation and eruption of active region filaments in NOAA AR 11884. The vertical current on the solar surface was investigated by using vector magnetograms (VMs) observed by HMI on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. To obtain the electric current along the filament's axis, we reconstructed the magnetic fields above the photosphere by using nonlinear force-free field extrapolation based on photospheric VMs. Spatio-temporal evolutions of the vertical current on the photospheric surface and the horizontal current along the filament's axis were studied during the long-term evolution and eruption-related period, respectively. The results show that the vertical currents of the entire active region behaved with a decreasing trend and the magnetic fields also kept decreasing during the long-term evolution. For the eruption-related evolution, the mean transverse field strengths decreased before two eruptions and increased sharply after two eruptions in the vicinity of the polarity inversion lines underneath the filament. The related vertical current showed different behaviors in two of the eruptions. On the other hand, a very interesting feature was found: opposite horizontal currents with respect to the current of the filament's axis appeared and increased under the filament before the eruptions and disappeared after the eruptions. We suggest that these opposite currents were carried by the new flux emerging from the photosphere bottom and might be the trigger mechanism for these filament eruptions.

  3. CFD-DEM simulations of current-induced dune formation and morphological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport, particularly those during the formation and evolution of bedforms, is of critical scientific importance and has engineering relevance. Traditional approaches of sediment transport simulations heavily rely on empirical models, which are not able to capture the physics-rich, regime-dependent behaviors of the process. With the increase of available computational resources in the past decade, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) has emerged as a viable high-fidelity method for the study of sediment transport. However, a comprehensive, quantitative study of the generation and migration of different sediment bed patterns using CFD-DEM is still lacking. In this work, current-induced sediment transport problems in a wide range of regimes are simulated, including 'flat bed in motion', 'small dune', 'vortex dune' and suspended transport. Simulations are performed by using SediFoam, an open-source, massively parallel CFD-DEM solver developed by the authors. This is a general-purpose solver for particle-laden flows tailed for particle transport problems. Validation tests are performed to demonstrate the capability of CFD-DEM in the full range of sediment transport regimes. Comparison of simulation results with experimental and numerical benchmark data demonstrates the merits of CFD-DEM approach. In addition, the improvements of the present simulations over existing studies using CFD-DEM are presented. The present solver gives more accurate prediction of sediment transport rate by properly accounting for the influence of particle volume fraction on the fluid flow. In summary, this work demonstrates that CFD-DEM is a promising particle-resolving approach for probing the physics of current-induced sediment transport.

  4. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  5. Current issues in dietary acrylamide:formation,mitigation and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedreschi, F.; Salome Mariotti, M.; Granby, Kit

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is known as a neurotoxin in humans and it is classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency of Research on Cancer. AA is produced as by-product of the Maillard reaction in starchy foods processed at high temperatures (>120 °C). This review includes...... of the final product. Sugars in potatoes may be reduced by blanching. Levels of AA in different foods show large variations and no general upper limit is easily applicable, since some formation will always occur. Current policy is that practical measures should be taken voluntarily to reduce AA formation...

  6. Current status: Animal models of nausea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The advantages, and possible benefits of a valid, reliable animal model for nausea are discussed, and difficulties inherent to the development of a model are considered. A principle problem for developing models arises because nausea is a subjective sensation that can be identified only in humans. Several putative measures of nausea in animals are considered, with more detailed consideration directed to variation in cardiac rate, levels of vasopressin, and conditioned taste aversion. Demonstration that putative measures are associated with reported nausea in humans is proposed as a requirement for validating measures to be used in animal models. The necessity for a 'real-time' measure of nausea is proposed as an important factor for future research; and the need for improved understanding of the neuroanatomy underlying the emetic syndrome is discussed.

  7. Current status of cosmological MDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Mikheeva, E V; Arkhipova, N A; Malinovsky, A M

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of cosmological models in spatially flat Friedmann Universe with cosmic gravitational wave background and zero $\\Lambda$-term is presented. The number of free parameters is equal to 5, they are $\\sigma_8$, $n$, $\\Omega_\

  8. Surface CUrrents from a Diagnostic model (SCUD): Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SCUD data product is an estimate of upper-ocean velocities computed from a diagnostic model (Surface CUrrents from a Diagnostic model). This model makes daily...

  9. Modeling waves, currents and sandbars on natural beaches: The effect of surface rollers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, F.; de Swart, H.E.; Calvete, D.; Falqués, A.

    2011-01-01

    A morphodynamic model has been extended to gain more fundamental knowledge about the formation of nearshore sand bars. The model describes feedbacks between waves, rollers, depth-averaged currents and bed evolution, so that self-organized processes can develop. Offshore wave, wind and tide condition

  10. Galacticus: A Semi-Analytic Model of Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Galacticus is designed to solve the physics involved in the formation of galaxies within the current standard cosmological framework. It is of a type of model known as “semi-analytic” in which the numerous complex non-linear physics involved are solved using a combination of analytic approximations and empirical calibrations from more detailed, numerical solutions. Models of this type aim to begin with the initial state of the Universe (specified shortly after the Big Bang) and apply physical principles to determine the properties of galaxies in the Universe at later times, including the present day. Typical properties computed include the mass of stars and gas in each galaxy, broad structural properties (e.g. radii, rotation speeds, geometrical shape etc.), dark matter and black hole contents, and observable quantities such as luminosities, chemical composition etc.

  11. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  12. Caustic-based approach to understanding bunching dynamics and current spike formation in particle bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Dowd, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    Current modulations, current spikes, and current horns, are observed in a range of accelerator physics applications including strong bunch compression in Free Electron Lasers and linear colliders, trains of microbunching for terahertz radiation, microbunching instability and many others. This paper considers the fundamental mechanism that drives intense current modulations in dispersive regions, beyond the common explanation of nonlinear and higher-order effects. Under certain conditions, neighboring electron trajectories merge to form caustics, and often result in characteristic current spikes. Caustic lines and surfaces are regions of maximum electron density, and are witnessed in accelerator physics as folds in phase space of accelerated bunches. We identify the caustic phenomenon resulting in cusplike current profiles and derive an expression which describes the conditions needed for particle-bunch caustic formation in dispersive regions. The caustic expression not only reveals the conditions necessary for caustics to form but also where in longitudinal space the caustics will form. Particle-tracking simulations are used to verify these findings. We discuss the broader implications of this work including how to utilize the caustic expression for manipulation of the longitudinal phase space to achieve a desired current profile shape.

  13. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F.

    2016-12-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from (1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and (2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetric fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time, a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnection site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplification increases the local Lundquist number, which then triggers a plasmoid instability and breaks the primary current sheet at the reconnection site. The plasmoids formation driven by large-scale flux amplification, i.e., a large-scale dynamo, observed here has strong implications for astrophysical reconnection as well as fast reconnection events in laboratory plasmas.

  14. Formation of high-carbon abrasion-resistant surface layers when high-energy heating by high-frequency currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, N. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Martyushev, N. V.; Miller, R. A.; Rubtsova, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    The paper shows the possibility of carburization of low-carbon steel surface layers using high-frequency currents. The mathematical modeling of carburization using high-energy heating by high-frequency currents (HEH HFC) has been carried out, the temperature fields formed during the given processing have been calculated, as well as the structural changes in the surface layers have been simulated. The features of the structure formation in the surface layers of low-carbon steel after carburizing via HEH HFC have been determined by optical and scanning microscopy, which is confirmed by the computational models. The rational mode of fusion via HEH HFC has also been determined (power density of the source qs = (1.5 ... 4.0) • 108 W m-2, (the relative travel speed of parts Vp = 5 ... 100 mm / sec), with forming the compressive retained stresses in the surface layer (σRS ≈ -300 ... -400 MPa).

  15. Models of Solar Irradiance Variations: Current Status

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki

    2008-03-01

    Regular monitoring of solar irradiance has been carried out since 1978 to show that solar total and spectral irradiance varies at different time scales. Whereas variations on time scales of minutes to hours are due to solar oscillations and granulation, variations on longer time scales are driven by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. Here the most recent advances in modelling of solar irradiance variations on time scales longer than a day are briefly reviewed.

  16. A simple analytic model of wormhole formations

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    An explicit and simple solution representing the wormhole formation is presented. The spacetime is constructed by gluing the Minkowski and Roberts spacetimes at null hypersurfaces in a regular manner. The parameters in the Roberts solution are required to give the negative kinetic term for the massless scalar field. Although a curvature singularity appears at the moment of the wormhole formation, it disappears instantaneously. This instantaneous singularity is weak in the both senses of Tipler and Kr\\'{o}lak along radial causal geodesics.

  17. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. Current sheet formation and non-ideal behaviour at three-dimensional magnetic null points

    CERN Document Server

    Pontin, D I; Galsgaard, K

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the evolution of the magnetic field, and of current sheet formation, at three-dimensional (3D) magnetic null points is investigated. A kinematic example is presented which demonstrates that there is no possible choice of boundary conditions which renders the evolution of the field ideal at the null, when the ratios of the null eigenvalues are time-dependent. Resistive MHD simulations are described which demonstrate that this evolution is generic. A 3D null is subjected to boundary driving by shearing motions, and it is shown that a current sheet localised at the null is formed. The qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet are discussed. Accompanying the sheet development is the growth of a localised parallel electric field, one of the signatures of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the relevance of the results to a recent theory of turbulent reconnection are discussed.

  19. Influence of DC arc current on the formation of cobalt-based nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P B ORPE; C BALASUBRAMANIAN; S MUKHERJEE

    2017-08-01

    The synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanostructures using DC arc discharge technique with varying arc current is reported here. The structural, morphological, compositional and magnetic properties of thesenanostructures were studied as a function of applied arc current. Various techniques like X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, EDAX and vibrating sample magnetometry were used to carry out this studyand the results are reported here. The results clearly indicate that for a given oxygen partial pressure, an arc current of 100A favours the formation of unreacted cobalt atomic species. Also change in arc current leads to variationin phase, diversity in morphology etc. Other property changes such as thermal changes, mechanical changes etc. are not addressed here. The magnetic characterization further indicates that the anisotropy in shape plays a crucial role in deciding the magnetic properties of the nanostructured materials.We have quantified an interesting result in our experiment, that is, for a given partial pressure, 100A arc current results in unique variation in structural and magnetic properties as compared to other arc currents.

  20. [Comparative characteristic of the formation of stereotype of aging in participants of current war conflicts and World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakymets', V M

    2006-01-01

    The study was carried out to examine participants of current war conflicts and World War II in order to compare the development of the formation of stereotype of old age. It was established that participants of World War II have higher level of the formation of pessimistic stereotype of old age than participants of current war conflicts have.

  1. Tidal current-induced formation——storm-induced change——tidal current-induced recovery——Interpretation of depositional dynamics of formation and evolution of radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张长宽; 张东生; 张君伦; 王震

    1999-01-01

    The results of simulated tidal current field, wave field and storm-induced current field are employed to interpret the depositional dynamic mechanism of formation and evolution of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The anticlockwise rotary tidal wave to the south of Shandong Peninsula meets the following progressive tidal wave from the South Yellow Sea, forming a radial current field outside Jianggang. This current field provides a necessary dynamic condition for the formation and existence of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The results of simulated "old current field (holocene)" show that there existed a convergent-divergent tidal zone just outside the palaeo-Yangtze River estuary where a palaeo-underwater accumulation was developed. The calculated results from wave models indicate that the wave impact on the topography, under the condition of high water level and strong winds, is significant. The storm current induced by typhoons landing in the Yangtze River estuary

  2. Kink deformation of Weibel-mediated current filaments and onset of shock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyer, Charles; Alves, E. Paulo; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Weibel instability is believed to mediate the interaction of high Mach number collisionless shocks in weakly magnetized astrophysical environments. Although the generation of current filaments and strong magnetic fields by this instability has now been demonstrated experimentally, it is still not clear what is the long-term evolution of these filaments and how they lead to shock formation. We have studied the stability of Weibel-mediated current filaments using 2D/3D Particle-In-Cell simulations and analytical theory. We show that these are prone to kink-like instabilities that we characterize in both the linear and non-linear stage for a single filament, leading to an efficient ion slowing down and isotropization. We then demonstrate that our results are relevant to the self-consistent counter-streaming plasma interaction. Our 3D simulations show that the kink deformation dominates the late-stage of the interaction, when the current filaments break and most of the flow dissipation occurs, leading to the onset of magnetic turbulence and shock formation. We will discuss the important implications of these results for the shock structure and its ability to accelerate particles. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  3. A mathematical model of star formation in the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sharaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is generally concerned with star formation in the Galaxy, especially blue stars. Blue stars are the most luminous, massive and the largest in radius. A simple mathematical model of the formation of the stars is established and put in computational algorithm. This algorithm enables us to know more about the formation of the star. Some real and artificial examples had been used to justify this model.

  4. Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation is rarely used for dimming light-emitting diodes in polychromatic luminaires due to big color shifts caused by varying magnitude of LED driving current and nonlinear relationship between intensity of a diode and driving current. Current-voltage empirical model of light...

  5. SAM: A Simple Averaging Model of Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the Simple Averaging Model (SAM) which was developed to demonstrate impression-formation computer modeling with less complex and less expensive procedures than are required by most established programs. (RC)

  6. A Process Model of Family Formation and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Diana R.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models of family formation have assumed sexual coupling as the foundation of family life. This article proposes instead a model of family formation predicated on the processes of taking care of one another, eating together, and sharing life together. The interpersonal dynamics that distinguish a family from other close relationships…

  7. Mark formation modeling in optical rewritable recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusche, J.H.; Segal, A.; Vuik, C.; Urbach, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In optical rewritable recording media, such as the Blu-ray Disc, amorphous marks are formed on a crystalline background of a phase-change layer, by means of short, high power laser pulses. In order to improve this data storage concept, it is of great importance to understand the mark formation

  8. Mark formation modeling in optical rewritable recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusche, J.H.; Segal, A.; Vuik, C.; Urbach, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    In optical rewritable recording media, such as the Blu-ray Disc, amorphous marks are formed on a crystalline background of a phase-change layer, by means of short, high power laser pulses. In order to improve this data storage concept, it is of great importance to understand the mark formation proce

  9. Modeling the current distribution in HTS tapes with transport current and applied magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazawa, Takashi; Rabbers, Jan-Jaap; Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Haken, ten Bennie; Kate, ten Herman H.J.; Maeda, Hideaki

    1999-01-01

    A numerical model is developed for the current distribution in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) tape, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2 Ca2Cu3Ox-Ag, subjected to a combination of a transport current and an applied magnetic field. This analysis is based on a two-dimensional formulation of Maxwell's equations in te

  10. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Shetty, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masse...

  11. Modeling of tethered satellite formations using graph theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Smith, Roy S; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    satellite formation and proposes a method to deduce the equations of motion for the attitude dynamics of the formation in a compact form. The use of graph theory and Lagrange mechanics together allows a broad class of formations to be described using the same framework. A method is stated for finding...... could form stable formations in space are cumbersome when done at a case to case basis, and a common framework providing a basic model of the dynamics of tethered satellite formations can therefore be advantageous. This paper suggests the use of graph theoretical quantities to describe a tethered...

  12. Flame oxidation of stainless steel felt enhances anodic biofilm formation and current output in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Donose, Bogdan C; Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Prévoteau, Antonin; Patil, Sunil A; Freguia, Stefano; Gooding, J Justin; Rabaey, Korneel

    2014-06-17

    Stainless steel (SS) can be an attractive material to create large electrodes for microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), due to its low cost and high conductivity. However, poor biocompatibility limits its successful application today. Here we report a simple and effective method to make SS electrodes biocompatible by means of flame oxidation. Physicochemical characterization of electrode surface indicated that iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were generated in situ on an SS felt surface by flame oxidation. IONPs-coating dramatically enhanced the biocompatibility of SS felt and consequently resulted in a robust electroactive biofilm formation at its surface in BESs. The maximum current densities reached at IONPs-coated SS felt electrodes were 16.5 times and 4.8 times higher than the untreated SS felts and carbon felts, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum current density achieved with the IONPs-coated SS felt (1.92 mA/cm(2), 27.42 mA/cm(3)) is one of the highest current densities reported thus far. These results demonstrate for the first time that flame oxidized SS felts could be a good alternative to carbon-based electrodes for achieving high current densities in BESs. Most importantly, high conductivity, excellent mechanical strength, strong chemical stability, large specific surface area, and comparatively low cost of flame oxidized SS felts offer exciting opportunities for scaling-up of the anodes for BESs.

  13. MODELING OF THE HIGH CONCENTRATION LAYER OF COHESIVE SEDIMENT UNDER THE ACTION OF WAVES AND CURRENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghe ZHANG; Yongsheng WU; Jijian LIAN; Pingxing DING

    2001-01-01

    High concentration layer of cohesive sediment frequently occurs in muddy estuaries and coastal zones, and causes rapid siltation of the waterways. A one dimensional vertical coupled model describing the interactions between waves, currents and suspended cohesive sediment is developed in the present paper. The numerical results and analyses with field measurements reveal the mechanism of the formation and transport behaviors of the layer under the action of waves and currents.

  14. Retrospective coping strategies during sexual identity formation and current biopsychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Ouellet, Émilie; Lefebvre-Louis, Jean-Philippe; Sindi, Shireen; Johnson, Philip Jai; Smith, Nathan Grant; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian, gay men, and bisexual individuals (LGBs) often experience distress related to the recognition, self-acceptance, and disclosure of their sexual orientation. Retrospectively reported coping strategies enacted during sexual identity formation among LGBs were assessed in relation to current stress indices measured using environmental (frequency of perceived daily hassles), psychological (perceived distress), and biological (allostatic load [AL] levels representing physiological dysregulations) perspectives. Forty-six healthy LGBs between the ages of 18 and 45 (M = 23.91, SE = .80) participated. Questionnaires included the Ways of Coping Checklist adapted to disclosure milestones, Daily Hassles Inventory, and Perceived Stress Scale. AL was calculated using 21 biomarkers of neuroendocrine, immune, cardiovascular, and metabolic functioning. Avoidance coping during sexual identity formation was positively associated with frequency of daily hassles (β = .598, p < .001), perceived stress (β = .361, p = .015), and AL (β = .405, p = .006). By contrast, seeking social support was negatively associated with perceived stress (β = -.598, p = .048). Emotion-focused coping strategies during LGB sexual identity development are associated with current indices of biopsychosocial stress.

  15. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Seaton, Daniel B; Darnel, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    We present AIA observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014~February~25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand km thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between $8-10\\,\\mathrm{MK}$. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was $M_{A} \\approx 0.004-0.007$, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  16. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Bartz, Allison E.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2017-02-01

    We present Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014 February 25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand kilometers thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between 8 and 10 MK. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was MA ≈ 0.004–0.007, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  17. Extrasolar planets: constraints for planet formation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nuno C; Benz, Willy; Mayor, Michel

    2005-10-14

    Since 1995, more than 150 extrasolar planets have been discovered, most of them in orbits quite different from those of the giant planets in our own solar system. The number of discovered extrasolar planets demonstrates that planetary systems are common but also that they may possess a large variety of properties. As the number of detections grows, statistical studies of the properties of exoplanets and their host stars can be conducted to unravel some of the key physical and chemical processes leading to the formation of planetary systems.

  18. Current focusing and steering: modeling, physiology, and psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Ben H; Litvak, Leonid M

    2008-08-01

    Current steering and current focusing are stimulation techniques designed to increase the number of distinct perceptual channels available to cochlear implant (CI) users by adjusting currents applied simultaneously to multiple CI electrodes. Previous studies exploring current steering and current focusing stimulation strategies are reviewed, including results of research using computational models, animal neurophysiology, and human psychophysics. Preliminary results of additional neurophysiological and human psychophysical studies are presented that demonstrate the success of current steering strategies in stimulating auditory nerve regions lying between physical CI electrodes, as well as current focusing strategies that excite regions narrower than those stimulated using monopolar configurations. These results are interpreted in the context of perception and speech reception by CI users. Disparities between results of physiological and psychophysical studies are discussed. The differences in stimulation used for physiological and psychophysical studies are hypothesized to contribute to these disparities. Finally, application of current steering and focusing strategies to other types of auditory prostheses is also discussed.

  19. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies.

  20. Current filamentation model for the Weibel/Filamentation instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Chang-Mo; Huynh, Cong Tuan; Kim, Chul Min

    2016-10-01

    A current filamentaion model for a nonrelativistic plasma with e +/e- beam has been presented together with PIC simulations, which can explain the mangetic field enhancement during the Weibel/ Filamentation instabilities. This filament model assumes the Hammer-Rostoker equilibrium. In addition, this model predicts preferential acceleration/deceleration for electron-ion plasmas depending on the injected beam to be e +/e-.

  1. On the study of phase formation and critical current density in superconducting MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suchitra Rajput; Sujeet Chaudhary; Subhash C Kashyap; Pankaj Srivastava

    2006-06-01

    Superconducting bulk MgB2 samples have been synthesized by employing sintering technique without using any additional process steps, generally undertaken in view of the substantial loss of magnesium, during heat treatment. Starting with Mg rich powders having different atomic ratios of Mg : B, as against the nominally required Mg : B = 1 : 2 ratio, we have obtained superconducting MgB2 samples of different characteristics. The effect of excess Mg in the starting mixture and processing temperature on the phase-formation, transition temperature (C) and critical current density (C) have been investigated by electrical transport and a.c. susceptibility measurements. The X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses of MgB2 bulk samples have been carried out to understand the role of excess Mg and the effect of processing temperature. It is established that MgB2 samples with high critical current density can be synthesized from a Mg rich powder having Mg : B in 2 : 2 ratio, at temperatures around 790°C. Critical current density has been found to vary systematically with processing temperature.

  2. UAV Formation Flight Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed a distributed collision-free formation flight control law in the framework of nonlinear model predictive control. Formation configuration is determined in the virtual reference point coordinate system. Obstacle avoidance is guaranteed by cost penalty, and intervehicle collision avoidance is guaranteed by cost penalty combined with a new priority strategy.

  3. Quantum current operators; 3, Commutative quantum current operators semi-infinite construction and functional models

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, J; Ding, Jintai; Feigin, Boris

    1996-01-01

    We construct a commutative current operator $\\bar x^+(z)$ inside $U_q(\\hat{\\frak sl}(2))$. With this operator and the condition of quantum integrability on the quantum current of $U_q(\\hat{\\frak sl}(2))$, we derive the quantization of the semi-infinite construction of integrable modules of The quantization of the functional models for $\\hat{\\frak sl}(2)$ are also given.

  4. Modelling and simulation of the ice melting process on a current-carrying conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Z.

    2006-07-01

    Mathematical models were developed to determine the current and energy requirements for thermal de-icing and ice prevention on overhead power transmission lines. The models were based on the Joule effect under various meteorological and current transmission conditions. The minimum current intensity required to inhibit ice formation on a single power line conductor was determined. Correction factors were then introduced for 3 specific aluminum conductors with steel reinforcement (ACSRs). Water runback on the conductor surface was considered as well as deviation of the water layer from the thermal equilibrium state. Model results were in good agreement with measurements taken in an icing research wind tunnel. The overall heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for stranded conductors was then assessed to complete the model. A computational model using finite differences was also developed to calculate the current and energy requirements for de-icing partially ice covered conductors. Joule heating by AC current and impulse current were the 2 heating techniques analyzed. Thermal conductivity of the ACSR conductor was also estimated. Experimentally validated analytical approaches were proposed to determine the shedding time and corresponding energy required to de-ice a completely ice covered conductor by heating with increased nominal AC current. It was concluded that ice accretion on a single power line can be prevented using the experimentally validated mathematical models that calculate the current and energy requirements of de-icing conductors.

  5. A continuum model for current distribution in Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmedov, A I; Breschi, M

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of eddy currents induced in flat Rutherford-type cables by external time dependent magnetic fields has been performed. The induced currents generate in turn a secondary magnetic field which has a longitudinal periodicity (periodic pattern). The dependence of the amplitude of the pattern on the history of the cable excitation has been investigated. The study has been carried out with two different models for the simulation of current distribution in Rutherford cables, namely a network model, based on a lumped parameters circuit and a "continuum" model, based on a distributed parameters circuit. We show the results of simulations of the current distribution in the inner cable of a short LHC dipole model in different powering conditions and compare them to experimental data. (12 refs).

  6. Cardiac magnetic source imaging based on current multipole model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Fa-Kuan; Wang Qian; Hua Ning; Lu Hong; Tang Xue-Zheng; Ma Ping

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the heart current source can be reduced into a current multipole. By adopting three linear inverse methods, the cardiac magnetic imaging is achieved in this article based on the current multipole model expanded to the first order terms. This magnetic imaging is realized in a reconstruction plane in the centre of human heart, where the current dipole array is employed to represent realistic cardiac current distribution. The current multipole as testing source generates magnetic fields in the measuring plane, serving as inputs of cardiac magnetic inverse problem. In the heart-torso model constructed by boundary element method, the current multipole magnetic field distribution is compared with that in the homogeneous infinite space, and also with the single current dipole magnetic field distribution.Then the minimum-norm least-squares (MNLS) method, the optimal weighted pseuDOInverse method (OWPIM), and the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) are selected as the algorithms for inverse computation based on current multipole model innovatively, and the imaging effects of these three inverse methods are compared. Besides,two reconstructing parameters, residual and mean residual, are also discussed, and their trends under MNLS, OWPIM and OCLIM each as a function of SNR are obtained and compared.

  7. Return-current formation in the electron beam – plasma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bárta

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a 3-D electromagnetic particle-in-cell model an evolution of the electron distribution function in the beam-plasma system with the return current is computed. It was found that the resulting electron distribution function depends on the magnetic field assumed along the beam-propagation direction. While for small magnetic fields the electron distribution function becomes broad in the direction perpendicular to the beam propagation due to the Weibel (filamentation instability and the return current is formed by a shifted bulk distribution, for stronger magnetic fields the distribution, especially on the return current side, is extended in the beam-propagation direction. To understand better the instabilities influencing the mentioned processes, the dispersion diagrams are computed and discussed.

  8. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  9. [Posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus in newborns--current concepts of formation and treatment possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Jolanta; Swietliński, Janusz

    2005-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is still one of major complications of preterm birth. Transfontanel ultrasonographic examination is a recognized method of peri/intraventricular haemorrhage imaging. Haemorrhages are distinguished according to four degrees Papile classification. Early diagnosis of posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus is a very important task for neonatologist. Traditional clinical symptoms of ventricular expansion are useless criteria for posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus diagnosis. Early diagnosis of posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus is possible with ultrasonographic measurement of ventricular size--for example with ventricular index of Levine. There are four mechanisms responsible for posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus formation: blockage of cerebro-spinal fluid circulation and its absorption, fibrosis and scarring around the medulla and in subarachnoid spaces and endogenic fibrinolytic mechanisms insufficiency. Authors decribe current known and used methods of neonatal and neurosurgical interventions in posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, as well as a new method involving drainage, irigation and fibrinolytic therapy (DRIFT), which seems to be promising in clinical neonatal care.

  10. Acceleration and transport of ions in turbulent current sheets: formation of non-maxwelian energy distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to particle acceleration in turbulent current sheet (CS. Our results show that the mechanism of CS particle interaction with electromagnetic turbulence can explain the formation of power law energy distributions. We study the ratio between adiabatic acceleration of particles in electric field in the presence of stationary turbulence and acceleration due to electric field in the case of dynamic turbulence. The correlation between average energy gained by particles and average particle residence time in the vicinity of the neutral sheet is discussed. It is also demonstrated that particle velocity distributions formed by particle-turbulence interaction are similar in essence to the ones observed near the far reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  11. Polaron Model of the Formation of Hydrated Electron States

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A computer simulation of the formation of photoexcited electrons in water is performed within the framework of a dynamic model. The obtained results are discussed in comparison with experimental data and theoretical estimates.

  12. A recurrent connectionist model of person impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Labiouse, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Major findings in impression formation are reviewed and modeled from a connectionist perspective. The findings are in the areas of primacy and recency in impression formation, asymmetric diagnosticity of ability- and morality-related traits, increased recall for trait-inconsistent information, assimilation and contrast in priming, and discounting of trait inferences by situational information. The majority of these phenomena are illustrated with well-known experiments and simulated with an autoassociative network architecture with linear activation update and using the delta learning algorithm for adjusting the connection weights. All of the simulations successfully reproduced the empirical findings. Moreover, the proposed model is shown to be consistent with earlier algebraic models of impression formation (Anderson, 1981; Busemeyer, 1991; Hogarth and Einhorn, 1992). The discussion centers on how our model compares to other connectionist approaches to impression formation and how it may contribute to a more parsimonious and unified theory of person perception.

  13. Bifurcation Diagram and Pattern Formation of Phase Slip Centers in Superconducting Wires Driven with Electric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J.; Sternberg, P.; Ma, Q.

    2007-10-01

    We provide here new insights into the classical problem of a one-dimensional superconducting wire exposed to an applied electric current using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model. The most striking feature of this system is the well-known appearance of oscillatory solutions exhibiting phase slip centers (PSC’s) where the order parameter vanishes. Retaining temperature and applied current as parameters, we present a simple yet definitive explanation of the mechanism within this nonlinear model that leads to the PSC phenomenon and we establish where in parameter space these oscillatory solutions can be found. One of the most interesting features of the analysis is the evident collision of real eigenvalues of the associated PT-symmetric linearization, leading as it does to the emergence of complex elements of the spectrum.

  14. How pattern formation in ring networks of excitatory and inhibitoryspiking neurons depends on the input current regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eKriener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern formation, i.e., the generation of an inhomogeneous spatial activity distribution in a dynamical system with translation invariant structure, is a well-studied phenomenon in neuronal network dynamics,specifically in neural field models. These are population models to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of large groups of neurons in terms of macroscopic variables such as population firing rates. Though neural field models are often deduced from and equipped with biophysically meaningfulproperties, a direct mapping to simulations of individual spiking neuron populations is rarely considered. Neurons have a distinct identity defined by their action on their postsynaptic targets. In its simplest form they act either excitatorily or inhibitorily.When the distribution of neuron identities is assumed to be periodic, pattern formation can be observed, given the coupling strength is supercritical, i.e., larger than a critical weight. We find that this critical weight is strongly dependent on the characteristics of the neuronal input, i.e., depends on whether neurons are mean- orfluctuation driven, and different limits in linearizing the full non-linear system apply in order to assess stability.In particular, if neurons are mean-driven, the linearization has a very simple form and becomesindependent of both the fixed point firing rate and the variance of the input current, while in the very strongly fluctuation-driven regime the fixed point rate, as well as the input mean and variance areimportant parameters in the determination of the critical weight.We demonstrate that interestingly even in ``intermediate'' regimes, when the system is technically fluctuation-driven, the simple linearization neglecting the variance of the input can yield the better prediction of the critical couplingstrength. We moreover analyze the effects of structural randomness by rewiring individualsynapses or redistributing weights, as well as coarse-graining on pattern

  15. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n =0 Bθ can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  16. Current status of ACE format libraries for MCNP at nuclear date center of KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Gil, Choong Sup; Lee, Young Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The current status of ACE format MCNP/MCNPX libraries by NDC of KAERI is presented with a short description of each library. Validation calculations with recent nuclear data evaluations ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and JENDL-4.0 have been carried out by the MCNP5 code for 119 criticality benchmark problems taken from the expanded criticality validation suite supplied by LANL. The overall performances of the ACE format KN-libraries have been analyzed in comparison with the results calculated with the ENDF/B-VII.0-based ENDF70 library of LANL. It was confirmed that the ENDF/B-VII.1-based KNE71 library showed better performances than the others by comparing the RMS errors and χ2 values for five benchmark categories as well as whole benchmark problems. ENDF/B-VII.1 and JEFF-3.2 have a tendency to yield more reliable MCNP calculation results within certain confidence intervals regarding the total uncertainties for the keff values. It is found that the adoption of the latest evaluated nuclear data might ensure better outcomes in various research and development areas.

  17. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  18. Enhanced Tunnelling Models for Child Universe Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ansoldi, S; Shilon, I

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a recently proposed model that allows for an enhanced rate of child universe production under generic conditions, we elaborate on refinements that may allow for non-singular initial configurations. A possibility to treat both, the initial state and the tunnelling beyond the semiclassical level will also be introduced.

  19. Inter-model analysis of tsunami-induced coastal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynett, Patrick J.; Gately, Kara; Wilson, Rick; Montoya, Luis; Arcas, Diego; Aytore, Betul; Bai, Yefei; Bricker, Jeremy D.; Castro, Manuel J.; Cheung, Kwok Fai; David, C. Gabriel; Dogan, Gozde Guney; Escalante, Cipriano; González-Vida, José Manuel; Grilli, Stephan T.; Heitmann, Troy W.; Horrillo, Juan; Kânoğlu, Utku; Kian, Rozita; Kirby, James T.; Li, Wenwen; Macías, Jorge; Nicolsky, Dmitry J.; Ortega, Sergio; Pampell-Manis, Alyssa; Park, Yong Sung; Roeber, Volker; Sharghivand, Naeimeh; Shelby, Michael; Shi, Fengyan; Tehranirad, Babak; Tolkova, Elena; Thio, Hong Kie; Velioğlu, Deniz; Yalçıner, Ahmet Cevdet; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Zaytsev, Andrey; Zhang, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program organized a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical modeling of tsunami currents. Thirteen teams of international researchers, using a set of tsunami models currently utilized for hazard mitigation studies, presented results for a series of benchmarking problems; these results are summarized in this paper. Comparisons focus on physical situations where the currents are shear and separation driven, and are thus de-coupled from the incident tsunami waveform. In general, we find that models of increasing physical complexity provide better accuracy, and that low-order three-dimensional models are superior to high-order two-dimensional models. Inside separation zones and in areas strongly affected by eddies, the magnitude of both model-data errors and inter-model differences can be the same as the magnitude of the mean flow. Thus, we make arguments for the need of an ensemble modeling approach for areas affected by large-scale turbulent eddies, where deterministic simulation may be misleading. As a result of the analyses presented herein, we expect that tsunami modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts.

  20. PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chakhmakhchyan, L

    2013-01-01

    We consider a PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks, generated by the intermittency map and the typical Chirikov map. The Ulam networks generated by these maps have certain similarities with such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW), showing an algebraic decay of the PageRank probability. We find that the opinion formation process on Ulam networks have certain similarities but also distinct features comparing to the WWW. We attribute these distinctions to internal differences in network structure of the Ulam and WWW networks. We also analyze the process of opinion formation in the frame of generalized Sznajd model which protects opinion of small communities.

  1. Mathematical modeling of biomass fuels formation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaska, Krzysztof; Wandrasz, Andrzej J

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand for thermal and electric energy in many branches of industry and municipal management accounts for a drastic diminishing of natural resources (fossil fuels). Meanwhile, in numerous technical processes, a huge mass of wastes is produced. A segregated and converted combustible fraction of the wastes, with relatively high calorific value, may be used as a component of formed fuels. The utilization of the formed fuel components from segregated groups of waste in associated processes of co-combustion with conventional fuels causes significant savings resulting from partial replacement of fossil fuels, and reduction of environmental pollution resulting directly from the limitation of waste migration to the environment (soil, atmospheric air, surface and underground water). The realization of technological processes with the utilization of formed fuel in associated thermal systems should be qualified by technical criteria, which means that elementary processes as well as factors of sustainable development, from a global viewpoint, must not be disturbed. The utilization of post-process waste should be preceded by detailed technical, ecological and economic analyses. In order to optimize the mixing process of fuel components, a mathematical model of the forming process was created. The model is defined as a group of data structures which uniquely identify a real process and conversion of this data in algorithms based on a problem of linear programming. The paper also presents the optimization of parameters in the process of forming fuels using a modified simplex algorithm with a polynomial worktime. This model is a datum-point in the numerical modeling of real processes, allowing a precise determination of the optimal elementary composition of formed fuels components, with assumed constraints and decision variables of the task.

  2. FORMATION OF A INNOVATION REGIONAL CLUSTER MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Merzlikina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. As a result of investigation of science and methodical approaches related problems of building and development of innovation clusters there were some issues in functional assignments of innovation and production clusters. Because of those issues, article’s authors differ conceptions of innovation cluster and production cluster, as they explain notion of innovation-production cluster. The main goal of this article is to reveal existing organizational issues in cluster building and its successful development. Based on regional clusters building analysis carried out there was typical practical structure of cluster members interaction revealed. This structure also have its cons, as following: absence cluster orientation to marketing environment, lack of members’ prolonged relations’ building and development system, along with ineffective management of information, financial and material streams within cluster, narrow competence difference and responsibility zones between cluster members, lack of transparence of cluster’s action, low environment changes adaptivity, hard to use cluster members’ intellectual property, and commercialization of hi-tech products. When all those issues listed above come together, it reduces life activity of existing models of innovative cluster-building along with practical opportunity of cluster realization. Because of that, authors offer an upgraded innovative-productive cluster building model with more efficient business processes management system, which includes advanced innovative cluster structure, competence matrix and subcluster responsibility zone. Suggested model differs from other ones by using unified innovative product development control center, which also controls production and marketing realization.

  3. A mathematical model of aortic aneurysm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Gong, Shihua; Wu, Shuonan; Xu, Jinchao; Go, Michael R.; Friedman, Avner; Zhu, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a localized enlargement of the abdominal aorta, such that the diameter exceeds 3 cm. The natural history of AAA is progressive growth leading to rupture, an event that carries up to 90% risk of mortality. Hence there is a need to predict the growth of the diameter of the aorta based on the diameter of a patient’s aneurysm at initial screening and aided by non-invasive biomarkers. IL-6 is overexpressed in AAA and was suggested as a prognostic marker for the risk in AAA. The present paper develops a mathematical model which relates the growth of the abdominal aorta to the serum concentration of IL-6. Given the initial diameter of the aorta and the serum concentration of IL-6, the model predicts the growth of the diameter at subsequent times. Such a prediction can provide guidance to how closely the patient’s abdominal aorta should be monitored. The mathematical model is represented by a system of partial differential equations taking place in the aortic wall, where the media is assumed to have the constituency of an hyperelastic material. PMID:28212412

  4. Modelling of helical current filaments induced by LHW on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Michael; Denner, Peter; Liang, Yunfeng [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Zeng, Long [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Wang, Liang; Liu, Fukun; Qian, Jinping; Shen, Biao; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Gauthier, Eric [Association EURATOM-CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: the EAST Team

    2013-07-01

    Helical radiation belts have been observed in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the plasma during the application of lower hybrid wave (LHW) heating at the superconducting tokamak EAST. Modelled SOL field lines, starting in-front of the LHW antennas, show agreement in position and pitch angle to the experimental observed radiation belts. A splitting of the strike-line can be observed on the outer divertor plates during the application of LHW heating. Agreement in the comparison of the Mirnov coil signals and a modelled electric current flow along these SOL field lines was found. A lower hybrid current drive can induce such an electric current flow near the plasma edge. This electric current flow causes a change of the plasma topology which could result in the splitting of the strike-line as known from the application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields. Comparisons of modelled footprint structures and experimental observed heat load patterns in the divertor region are discussed.

  5. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Matthew B; Papin, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  6. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Biggs

    Full Text Available Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  7. ANALYTICAL CHIP FORMATION MODEL OF MICRO-END-MILLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chengfeng; LAI Xinmin; LI Hongtao; PENG Linfa; NI Jun

    2008-01-01

    A new analytical chip formation model is proposed for micro-end-milling operations. The model calculates an instantaneous uncut chip thickness by considering the combination of exact trochoidal trajectory of the tool tip and tool run-out, while the simplified circular trajectory and the neglected run-out create negligible change in conventional-scale chip formation models. Newton-Raphson iterative method is employed during the calculation to obtain quadratic convergence. The proposed approach allows the calculation of instantaneous uncut chip thickness to be done accurately and rapidly, and the prediction accuracy of this model is also verified by comparing the simulation results to experimental cutting forces.

  8. PageRank model of opinion formation on social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Vivek; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2012-11-01

    We propose the PageRank model of opinion formation and investigate its rich properties on real directed networks of the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, LiveJournal, and Twitter. In this model, the opinion formation of linked electors is weighted with their PageRank probability. Such a probability is used by the Google search engine for ranking of web pages. We find that the society elite, corresponding to the top PageRank nodes, can impose its opinion on a significant fraction of the society. However, for a homogeneous distribution of two opinions, there exists a bistability range of opinions which depends on a conformist parameter characterizing the opinion formation. We find that the LiveJournal and Twitter networks have a stronger tendency to a totalitarian opinion formation than the university networks. We also analyze the Sznajd model generalized for scale-free networks with the weighted PageRank vote of electors.

  9. PageRank model of opinion formation on social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kandiah, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    We propose the PageRank model of opinion formation and investigate its rich properties on real directed networks of Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, LiveJournal and Twitter. In this model the opinion formation of linked electors is weighted with their PageRank probability. We find that the society elite, corresponding to the top PageRank nodes, can impose its opinion to a significant fraction of the society. However, for a homogeneous distribution of two opinions there exists a bistability range of opinions which depends on a conformist parameter characterizing the opinion formation. We find that LiveJournal and Twitter networks have a stronger tendency to a totalitar opinion formation. We also analyze the Sznajd model generalized for scale-free networks with the weighted PageRank vote of electors.

  10. Modeling pollution formation in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Modeling combustion under conditions that prevail in Diesel engine presents a great challenge. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has invested Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds to accelerate progress in this area. Research has been concerned with building a chemical mechanism to interface with a high fidelity fluid code to describe aspects of Diesel combustion. The complexity of these models requires implementation on massively parallel machines. The author will describe his efforts concerned with building such a complex mechanism. He begins with C and CO{sub 2} chemistry and adds sequentially higher hydrocarbon chemistry, aromatic production chemistry, soot chemistry, and chemistry describing NO{sub x} production. The metrics against which this chemistry is evaluated are flame velocities, induction times, ignition delay times, flammability limits, flame structure measurements, and light scattering. He assembles a set of elementary reactions, kinetic rate coefficients, and thermochemistry. He modifies existing Sandia codes to be able to investigate the behavior of the mechanism in well-stirred reactors, plug flow reactors, and one-dimensional flames. The modified combustion code with a chemical mechanism at the appropriate level of complexity is then interfaced with the high fidelity fluids code. The fluids code is distinguished by its ability to solve the requisite partial differential equations with adaptively refined grids necessary to describe the strong variation in spatial scales in combustion.

  11. Dark current and light illumination effects on grating formation during periodic long-term operation in photorefractive polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujihara, T. [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mamiya, J. [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R1-12, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kawamoto, M. [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nano Medical Engineering Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sassa, T., E-mail: tsassa@riken.jp [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-01-14

    Photorefractive grating formation dynamics in long-timescale writing and the effects of periodic writing through the control of writing beam irradiation or electric field application were investigated using typical photorefractive polymers. Both dark current and writing beam irradiation affected grating formation dynamics. Dark current in polymers changed the effective trap density over time through deep trap filling and/or detrapping and thus affected grating formation considerably. The writing beam irradiation also affected grating development in the presence of an electric field owing to the accumulation of filled deep traps. However, grating development recovered after the elimination of the electric field freed up the filled deep traps.

  12. Merging imagery and models for river current prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Cheryl Ann; Linzell, Robert S.; McKay, Paul

    2011-06-01

    To meet the challenge of operating in river environments with denied access and to improve the riverine intelligence available to the warfighter, advanced high resolution river circulation models are combined with remote sensing feature extraction algorithms to produce a predictive capability for currents and water levels in rivers where a priori knowledge of the river environment is limited. A River Simulation Tool (RST) is developed to facilitate the rapid configuration of a river model. River geometry is extracted from the automated processing of available imagery while minimal user input is collected to complete the parameter and forcing specifications necessary to configure a river model. Contingencies within the RST accommodate missing data such as a lack of water depth information and allow for ensemble computations. Successful application of the RST to river environments is demonstrated for the Snohomish River, WA. Modeled currents compare favorably to in-situ currents reinforcing the value of the developed approach.

  13. A Neuron Model Based Ultralow Current Sensor System for Bioapplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Arifuzzman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultralow current sensor system based on the Izhikevich neuron model is presented in this paper. The Izhikevich neuron model has been used for its superior computational efficiency and greater biological plausibility over other well-known neuron spiking models. Of the many biological neuron spiking features, regular spiking, chattering, and neostriatal spiny projection spiking have been reproduced by adjusting the parameters associated with the model at hand. This paper also presents a modified interpretation of the regular spiking feature in which the firing pattern is similar to that of the regular spiking but with improved dynamic range offering. The sensor current ranges between 2 pA and 8 nA and exhibits linearity in the range of 0.9665 to 0.9989 for different spiking features. The efficacy of the sensor system in detecting low amount of current along with its high linearity attribute makes it very suitable for biomedical applications.

  14. MODEL STUDY OF THE DOUBLE FED MACHINE WITH CURRENT CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Lyapin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with modeling results of the double fed induction machine with current control in the rotor circuit. We show the most promising applications of electric drives on the basis of the double fed induction machine and their advantages. We present and consider functional scheme of the electric drive on the basis of the double fed induction machine with current control. Equations are obtained for creation of such machine mathematical model. Expressions for vector projections of rotor current are given. According to the obtained results, the change of the vector projections of rotor current ensures operation of the double fed induction machine with the specified values of active and reactive stator power throughout the variation range of sliding motion. We consider static characteristics of double fed machine with current control. Energy processes proceeding in the machine are analyzed. We confirm the operationpossibility of double fed induction machine with current controlin the rotor circuit with given values of active and reactive stator power. The presented results can be used for creation of mathematical models and static characteristics of double fed machines with current control of various capacities.

  15. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  16. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  17. A depositional model for organic-rich Duvernay Formation mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Levi J.; McMillan, Julia M.; Harris, Nicholas B.

    2017-01-01

    The Upper Devonian Duvernay Formation of western Canada is an organic-rich shale formation now targeted as a hydrocarbon reservoir. We present a detailed sedimentological analysis of the Duvernay Formation in order to better understand organic-rich mudstone depositional processes and conditions and to characterize the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of mudstone lithofacies that affect petrophysical and geomechanical rock properties. Organic-rich mudstone facies of the Duvernay Formation were deposited in a dynamic depositional environment by a variety of sediment transport mechanisms, including suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents in variably oxygenated bottom waters. Suspension settling dominated in distal relatively deep areas of the basin, but evidence for weak turbidity currents and bottom water currents was observed in the form of graded beds and thin grain-supported siltstone laminae. Organic enrichment primarily occurred in distal areas as a result of bottom water anoxia and low depositional rates of inorganic sediment. In deep water locations near platform margins, alternating silty-sandy contourite beds and organic-rich mudstone beds are present, the former interpreted to have been deposited and reworked by bottom water currents flowing parallel to slope. In shallower, more oxygenated settings, mudstone lithologies vary from calcareous to argillaceous. These sediments were deposited from suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents, although primary sedimentary structures are often obscured by extensive bioturbation. Locally, organic enrichment in dysoxic rather than anoxic bottom waters was driven by a slightly increased sedimentation rate and possibly also by aggregation of sedimentary particles in the water column due to interaction between organic matter and clay minerals. Large variations observed in sediment composition, from siliceous to calcareous to argillaceous, reflect multiple biogenic

  18. Neural Network based Modeling and Simulation of Transformer Inrush Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Kumar Singh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Inrush current is a very important phenomenon which occurs during energization of transformer at no load due to temporary over fluxing. It depends on several factors like magnetization curve, resistant and inductance of primary winding, supply frequency, switching angle of circuit breaker etc. Magnetizing characteristics of core represents nonlinearity which requires improved nonlinearity solving technique to know the practical behavior of inrush current. Since several techniques still working on modeling of transformer inrush current but neural network ensures exact modeling with experimental data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model based on data of switching angle and remanent flux for predicting peak of inrush current. Back Propagation with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm was used to train the ANN architecture and same was tested for the various data sets. This research work demonstrates that the developed ANN model exhibits good performance in prediction of inrush current’s peak with an average of percentage error of -0.00168 and for modeling of inrush current with an average of percentage error of -0.52913.

  19. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  20. nIFTy Cosmology: Comparison of Galaxy Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Knebe, Alexander; Thomas, Peter A; Benson, Andrew; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bower, Richard; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cora, Sofia A; Croton, Darren J; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; De Lucia, Gabriella; Devriendt, Julien E; Elahi, Pascal J; Font, Andreea; Fontanot, Fabio; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gargiulo, Ignacio D; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Helly, John; Henriques, Bruno; Hirschmann, Michaela; Lee, Jaehyun; Mamon, Gary A; Monaco, Pierluigi; Onions, Julian; Padilla, Nelson D; Power, Chris; Pujol, Arnau; Skibba, Ramin A; Somerville, Rachel S; Srisawat, Chaichalit; Vega-Martinez, Cristian A; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investig...

  1. A reduced thermodynamic model on the formation of the Nansha warm water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shuqun; GAN Zijun; LI Chiwai; LONG Xiaomin; DONG Danpeng

    2004-01-01

    A reduced vertically integrated upper mixed layer model is set up to numerically study the thermodynamic process of the formation of the "Nansha warm water"(NWW) in the Nansha Islands sea areas in spring. According to the numerical experiments, it is shown that, in spring, the formation of the NWW is mainly due to the sea surface net heat flux and the local weak current strength; the contribution from temperature advection transport and warm water exchange with the outer seas (Sulu Sea or south of Sunda shelf) is very little. In the sea areas where the current is strong, the advection may also play an important role in the temperature field.

  2. Meson Exchange Current (MEC) Models in Neutrino Interaction Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Katori, Teppei

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  3. Characterization of exoplanets from their formation I: Models of combined planet formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mordasini, C; Klahr, H; Henning, T

    2012-01-01

    A first characterization of many exoplanets has recently been achieved by the observational determination of their radius. For some planets, a measurement of the luminosity has also been possible, with many more directly imaged planets expected in the future. The statistical characterization of exoplanets through their mass-radius and mass-luminosity diagram is thus becoming possible. This is for planet formation and evolution theory of similar importance as the mass-distance diagram. Our aim in this and a companion paper is to extend our formation model into a coupled formation and evolution model. We want to calculate in a self-consistent way all basic characteristics (M,a,R,L) of a planet and use the model for population synthesis calculations. Here we show how we solve the structure equations describing the gaseous envelope not only during the early formation phase, but also during gas runaway accretion, and during the evolutionary phase at constant mass on Gyr timescales. We then study the in situ format...

  4. Optimal schooling formations using a potential flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchieu, Andrew; Gazzola, Mattia; de Brauer, Alexia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A self-propelled, two-dimensional, potential flow model for agent-based swimmers is used to examine how fluid coupling affects schooling formation. The potential flow model accounts for fluid-mediated interactions between swimmers. The model is extended to include individual agent actions by means of modifying the circulation of each swimmer. A reinforcement algorithm is applied to allow the swimmers to learn how to school in specified lattice formations. Lastly, schooling lattice configurations are optimized by combining reinforcement learning and evolutionary optimization to minimize total control effort and energy expenditure.

  5. Mathematical Modelling of Melt Lake Formation On An Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, Sammie; Feltham, Daniel; Flocco, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of surface meltwater on ice shelves can lead to the formation of melt lakes. These structures have been implicated in crevasse propagation and ice-shelf collapse; the Larsen B ice shelf was observed to have a large amount of melt lakes present on its surface just before its collapse in 2002. Through modelling the transport of heat through the surface of the Larsen C ice shelf, where melt lakes have also been observed, this work aims to provide new insights into the ways in which melt lakes are forming and the effect that meltwater filling crevasses on the ice shelf will have. This will enable an assessment of the role of meltwater in triggering ice-shelf collapse. The Antarctic Peninsula, where Larsen C is situated, has warmed several times the global average over the last century and this ice shelf has been suggested as a candidate for becoming fully saturated with meltwater by the end of the current century. Here we present results of a 1-D mathematical model of heat transfer through an idealized ice shelf. When forced with automatic weather station data from Larsen C, surface melting and the subsequent meltwater accumulation, melt lake development and refreezing are demonstrated through the modelled results. Furthermore, the effect of lateral meltwater transport upon melt lakes and the effect of the lakes upon the surface energy balance are examined. Investigating the role of meltwater in ice-shelf stability is key as collapse can affect ocean circulation and temperature, and cause a loss of habitat. Additionally, it can cause a loss of the buttressing effect that ice shelves can have on their tributary glaciers, thus allowing the glaciers to accelerate, contributing to sea-level rise.

  6. Model for the formation energies of alanates and boranates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Setten, Michiel J.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a simple model for the formation energies (FEs) of alkali and alkaline earth alanates and boranates, based upon ionic bonding between metal cations and AlH4- or BH4- anions. The FEs agree well with values obtained from first principles calculations and with experimental FEs. The model

  7. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K

    2006-01-01

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  8. Community Benchmarking of Tsunami-Induced Nearshore Current Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynett, P. J.; Wilson, R. I.; Gately, K.

    2015-12-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Strategic Plan includes a requirement to develop and run a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical tsunami modeling of currents. For this workshop, five different benchmarking datasets were organized. These datasets were selected based on characteristics such as geometric complexity, currents that are shear/separation driven (and thus are de-coupled from the incident wave forcing), tidal coupling, and interaction with the built environment. While tsunami simulation models have generally been well validated against wave height and runup, comparisons with speed data are much less common. As model results are increasingly being used to estimate or indicate damage to coastal infrastructure, understanding the accuracy and precision of speed predictions becomes of important. As a result of this 2-day workshop held in early 2015, modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts. In this presentation, the model results - from 14 different modelers - will be presented and summarized, with a focus on statistical and ensemble properties of the current predictions.

  9. A geomechanical model of a sinkhole formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchiv, Alexandru; Zamfirescu, Florian; Mocuta, Marius; Popa, Iulian; Zlibut, Alexandru; Huggenberger, Peter; Zechner, Eric; Dresmann, Horst; Scheidler, Stefan; Wiesmeier, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    On December 2010 a sinkhole was suddenly formed close to the eastern flank of Ocna-Mures salt dome. Soon after the collapse the sinkhole was filled with brine forming a salt lake called Plus Lake. The total volume of sinkhole of about 100000 m3 remained constant since February 2011. The Ocna Mures salt dome is situated on the western border of the Transylvanian basin (Romania) and has been exploited for a long time. The ceilings of some shallow mine chambers are now collapsed and filled with brine. Along the eastern flank of the salt dome there is a disturbed zone due to diapirism. Its presence is suggested by the strong fragmentation of rock in the boreholes drilled along the salt-sterile contact, as it resulted from the low values of RQD index. The sinkhole is probably due to a pressure increase along the diapir flank. The causes of this sudden increase of pressure are not well known. Most probably it is due to the damage of the tubing of a flank borehole as mentioned in a technical report of the exploiting company. The injected fresh water expelled through the breaches of the damaged borehole and, due to the high pressure flushed up the crushed material of the disturbed zone. In order to better understand the setting up of the Plus Lake joint research efforts were performed by teams from Bucharest and Basel Universities since 2013. For the geomechanical approach a numerical model was performed using the Flac 7.0 code. In a first stage the creep behavior of salt was analyzed considering a Norton creep law. It resulted that after 100 years the salt reached equilibrium, the creep could be neglected and in a first approximation mechanical equilibrium could be analyzed considering only an elasto-plastic behavior of both the salt and the sterile. For both the salt and the surrounding sedimentary rocks the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was considered. The properties of sterile rocks were estimated following the GSI system. Due to poor rock quality the strength parameters have

  10. Flavor Changing Neutral Currents in a Realistic Composite Technicolor Model

    CERN Document Server

    Carone, C D; Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral $B$, $D$, and $K$ meson systems.

  11. Kinetic thin current sheets: their formation in relation to magnetotail mesoscale turbulent dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kropotkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (PS features nonlinear structures on two totally different scales. There are very thin current sheets (CS on kinetic scale of the ion gyroradius. And there are intense plasma flow and magnetic field variations on mesoscales (a few earth radii; those are interpreted as mostly 2-D MHD turbulence. On the other hand, the specific nature of slow large scale magnetotail evolution leads to large differences in the PS properties and those of the lobe plasma. As a result, while fast reconnection bursts in the tail provide quasi-stationary fast mesoscale reconfigurations in the lobes, they cannot however be accompanied by restructuring of CS on the same fast time scale. Violations of force balance in the PS are thus generated. Simulation using a hybrid code and starting with such imbalance, provides an evidence of very thin kinetic CS structures formation, embedded into the much thicker PS. The momentum balance gets locally restored by means of ion acceleration up to the Alfvénic velocity. The process provides an effective mechanism for transformation of magnetic energy accumulated in the magnetotail, into energy of plasma flows. The fast flows may drive turbulence on shorter spatial scales. In their turn, these motions may serve as an origin for new neutral line generation, and reconnection. Application to substorm phenomenology is discussed.

  12. One-Dimensional Modelling of Marine Current Turbine Runaway Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available If a turbine loses its electrical load, it will rotate freely and increase speed, eventually achieving that rotational speed which produces zero net torque. This is known as a runaway situation. Unlike many other types of turbine, a marine current turbine will typically overshoot the final runaway speed before slowing down and settling at the runaway speed. Since the hydrodynamic forces acting on the turbine are dependent on rotational speed and acceleration, turbine behaviour during runaway becomes important for load analyses during turbine design. In this article, we consider analytical and numerical models of marine current turbine runaway behaviour in one dimension. The analytical model is found not to capture the overshoot phenomenon, while still providing useful estimates of acceleration at the onset of runaway. The numerical model incorporates turbine wake build-up and predicts a rotational speed overshoot. The predictions of the models are compared against measurements of runaway of a marine current turbine. The models are also used to recreate previously-published results for a tidal turbine and applied to a wind turbine. It is found that both models provide reasonable estimates of maximum accelerations. The numerical model is found to capture the speed overshoot well.

  13. Comparison of analytical eddy current models using principal components analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contant, S.; Luloff, M.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring the gap between the pressure tube (PT) and the calandria tube (CT) in CANDU® fuel channels is essential, as contact between the two tubes can lead to delayed hydride cracking of the pressure tube. Multifrequency transmit-receive eddy current non-destructive evaluation is used to determine this gap, as this method has different depths of penetration and variable sensitivity to noise, unlike single frequency eddy current non-destructive evaluation. An Analytical model based on the Dodd and Deeds solutions, and a second model that accounts for normal and lossy self-inductances, and a non-coaxial pickup coil, are examined for representing the response of an eddy current transmit-receive probe when considering factors that affect the gap response, such as pressure tube wall thickness and pressure tube resistivity. The multifrequency model data was analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), a statistical method used to reduce the data set into a data set of fewer variables. The results of the PCA of the analytical models were then compared to PCA performed on a previously obtained experimental data set. The models gave similar results under variable PT wall thickness conditions, but the non-coaxial coil model, which accounts for self-inductive losses, performed significantly better than the Dodd and Deeds model under variable resistivity conditions.

  14. Modeling Tools for Drilling, Reservoir Navigation, and Formation Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant Dutta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry routinely uses borehole tools for measuring or logging rock and fluid properties of geologic formations to locate hydrocarbons and maximize their production. Pore fluids in formations of interest are usually hydrocarbons or water. Resistivity logging is based on the fact that oil and gas have a substantially higher resistivity than water. The first resistivity log was acquired in 1927, and resistivity logging is still the foremost measurement used for drilling and evaluation. However, the acquisition and interpretation of resistivity logging data has grown in complexity over the years. Resistivity logging tools operate in a wide range of frequencies (from DC to GHz and encounter extremely high (several orders of magnitude conductivity contrast between the metal mandrel of the tool and the geologic formation. Typical challenges include arbitrary angles of tool inclination, full tensor electric and magnetic field measurements, and interpretation of complicated anisotropic formation properties. These challenges combine to form some of the most intractable computational electromagnetic problems in the world. Reliable, fast, and convenient numerical modeling of logging tool responses is critical for tool design, sensor optimization, virtual prototyping, and log data inversion. This spectrum of applications necessitates both depth and breadth of modeling software—from blazing fast one-dimensional (1-D modeling codes to advanced threedimensional (3-D modeling software, and from in-house developed codes to commercial modeling packages. In this paper, with the help of several examples, we demonstrate our approach for using different modeling software to address different drilling and evaluation applications. In one example, fast 1-D modeling provides proactive geosteering information from a deep-reading azimuthal propagation resistivity measurement. In the second example, a 3-D model with multiple vertical resistive fractures

  15. Modeling Tools for Drilling, Reservoir Navigation, and Formation Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant Dutta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry routinely uses borehole tools for measuring or logging rock and fluid properties of geologic formations to locate hydrocarbons and maximize their production. Pore fluids in formations of interest are usually hydrocarbons or water. Resistivity logging is based on the fact that oil and gas have a substantially higher resistivity than water. The first resistivity log was acquired in 1927, and resistivity logging is still the foremost measurement used for drilling and evaluation. However, the acquisition and interpretation of resistivity logging data has grown in complexity over the years. Resistivity logging tools operate in a wide range of frequencies (from DC to GHz and encounter extremely high (several orders of magnitude conductivity contrast between the metal mandrel of the tool and the geologic formation. Typical challenges include arbitrary angles of tool inclination, full tensor electric and magnetic field measurements, and interpretation of complicated anisotropic formation properties. These challenges combine to form some of the most intractable computational electromagnetic problems in the world. Reliable, fast, and convenient numerical modeling of logging tool responses is critical for tool design, sensor optimization, virtual prototyping, and log data inversion. This spectrum of applications necessitates both depth and breadth of modeling software—from blazing fast one-dimensional (1-D modeling codes to advanced threedimensional (3-D modeling software, and from in-house developed codes to commercial modeling packages. In this paper, with the help of several examples, we demonstrate our approach for using different modeling software to address different drilling and evaluation applications. In one example, fast 1-D modeling provides proactive geosteering information from a deep-reading azimuthal propagation resistivity measurement. In the second example, a 3-D model with multiple vertical resistive fractures

  16. Flavor changing neutral currents in a realistic composite technicolor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-03-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral K, B, and D meson systems. Notably, we find that this model gives rise to a typical value for {ɛ‧}/{ɛ} that is much smaller than most standard model estimates.

  17. Current Concepts: Mouse Models of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan N. Lavoie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SjS is a complex chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology which primarily targets the exocrine glands, resulting in eventual loss of secretory function. The disease can present as either primary SjS or secondary SjS, the latter of which occurs concomitantly with another autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, or primary biliary cirrhosis. Current advancements in therapeutic prevention and treatment for SjS are impeded by lack of understanding in the pathophysiological and clinical progression of the disease. Development of appropriate mouse models for both primary and secondary SjS is needed in order to advance knowledge of this disease. This paper details important features, advantages, and pitfalls of current animal models of SjS, including spontaneous, transgenic, knockout, immunization, and transplantation chimera mouse models, and emphasizes the need for a better model in representing the human SjS phenotype.

  18. Analogue Behavioral Modeling of Switched-Current Building Block Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xuan; WANG Wei; SHI Jianlei; TANG Pushan; D.ZHOU

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a behavioral modeling technique for the second-generation switched-current building block circuits. The proposed models are capable of capturing the non-ideal behavior of switched-current circuits, which includes the charge injection effects and device mismatch effects. As a result, system performance degradations due to the building block imperfections can be detected at the early design stage by fast behavioral simulations. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed models, we developed a time-domain behavioral simulator. Experimental results have shown that compared with SPICE, the behavioral modeling error is less than 2.15%, while behavioral simulation speed up is 4 orders in time-domain.

  19. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Alice E; Hilmer, Sarah N; Mach, John; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Howlett, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans.

  20. Numeral eddy current sensor modelling based on genetic neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu A-Long

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method used to the numeral eddy current sensor modelling based on the genetic neural network to settle its nonlinear problem. The principle and algorithms of genetic neural network are introduced. In this method, the nonlinear model parameters of the numeral eddy current sensor are optimized by genetic neural network (GNN) according to measurement data. So the method remains both the global searching ability of genetic algorithm and the good local searching ability of neural network. The nonlinear model has the advantages of strong robustness,on-line modelling and high precision.The maximum nonlinearity error can be reduced to 0.037% by using GNN.However, the maximum nonlinearity error is 0.075% using the least square method.

  1. Modeling the current-voltage characteristics of bilayer polymer photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. A.; Ramsdale, C. M.; Greenham, N. C.

    2003-02-01

    We have developed a numerical model to predict the current-voltage curves of bilayer conjugated polymer photovoltaic devices. The model accounts for charge photogeneration, injection, drift, diffusion, and recombination, and includes the effect of space charge on the electric field within the device. Charge separation at the polymer-polymer interface leads to the formation of bound polaron pairs which may either recombine monomolecularly or be dissociated into free charges, and we develop expressions for the field dependence of the dissociation rate. We find that the short-circuit quantum efficiency is determined by the competition between polaron pair dissociation and recombination. The model shows a logarithmic dependence of the open-circuit voltage on the incident intensity, as seen experimentally. This additional intensity-dependent voltage arises from the field required to produce a drift current that balances the current due to diffusion of carriers away from the interface.

  2. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  3. A turbidity current model for real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; Morales, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Traditional turbidity current models suffer from several drawbacks. Among them not preserving freshwater mass, a missing pressure term, or not including terms related to deposition, erosion and entrainment in the momentum equation. In Morales et al.(2009) a new turbidity current model was proposed trying to overcome all these drawbacks. This model takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid bedload transport of particles at the bed due to the current. Moreover, this model includes the effects of the deposition, erosion and water entrainment into the momentum equation,commonly neglected in this type of models and, finally, in the absence of water entrainment, freshwater mass in the turbidity current is preserved. Despite these improvements, the numerical results obtained by this model when applied to real river systems were not satisfactory due to the simple form of the friction term that was considered. In the present work we propose a different parameterization of this term, where bottom and interface fluid frictions are separately parameterized with more complex expressions. Moreover, the discretization of the deposition/erosion terms is now performed semi-implicitly which guarantees the positivity of the volumetric concentration of sediments in suspension and in the erodible sediment layer at the bed. The numerical simulations obtained with this new turbidity current model (component of HySEA numerical computing platform) greatly improve previous numerical results for simplified geometries as well as for real river systems. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. References: T. Morales, M. Castro, C. Parés, and E. Fernández-Nieto (2009). On

  4. Nonlinear flow model for well production in an underground formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Guo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow in underground formations is a nonlinear process. In this article we modelled the nonlinear transient flow behaviour of well production in an underground formation. Based on Darcy's law and material balance equations, we used quadratic pressure gradients to deduce diffusion equations and discuss the origins of nonlinear flow issues. By introducing an effective-well-radius approach that considers skin factor, we established a nonlinear flow model for both gas and liquid (oil or water. The liquid flow model was solved using a semi-analytical method, while the gas flow model was solved using numerical simulations because the diffusion equation of gas flow is a stealth function of pressure. For liquid flow, a series of standard log-log type curves of pressure transients were plotted and nonlinear transient flow characteristics were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The effect of nonlinearity upon pressure transients should not be ignored. For gas flow, pressure transients were simulated and compared with oil flow under the same formation and well conditions, resulting in the conclusion that, under the same volume rate production, oil wells demand larger pressure drops than gas wells. Comparisons between theoretical data and field data show that nonlinear models will describe fluid flow in underground formations realistically and accurately.

  5. Methodology for construction of Vulcan model of the Saltby Volcanic Formation, DGSM Nottingham-Melton project

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The object of constructing the Vulcan model was to create a quantitative 3-D visualisation of the concealed Saltby Volcanic Formation (SVF) (Carboniferous) within the area covered by the Nottingham and Melton Mobray 1:50 000 scale geological sheets (Nos. 126 and 142) which forms part of the current (2003) DGSM Nottingham-Melton Project. The model was not intended to be a structural geological representation; rather, a lithostratigraphic visualisation 'normalised' to an arbitrar...

  6. Modeling and strain gauging of eddy current repulsion deicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel O.

    1993-01-01

    Work described in this paper confirms and extends work done by Zumwalt, et al., on a variety of in-flight deicing systems that use eddy current repulsion for repelling ice. Two such systems are known as electro-impulse deicing (EIDI) and the eddy current repulsion deicing strip (EDS). Mathematical models for these systems are discussed for their capabilities and limitations. The author duplicates a particular model of the EDS. Theoretical voltage, current, and force results are compared directly to experimental results. Dynamic strain measurements results are presented for the EDS system. Dynamic strain measurements near EDS or EIDI coils are complicated by the high magnetic fields in the vicinity of the coils. High magnetic fields induce false voltage signals out of the gages.

  7. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  8. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  9. Hypersonic Vehicle Tracking Based on Improved Current Statistical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Guangjun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new method of tracking the near space hypersonic vehicle is put forward. According to hypersonic vehicles’ characteristics, we improved current statistical model through online identification of the maneuvering frequency. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to analyze the performance of the method. The results show that the improved method exhibits very good tracking performance in comparison with the old method.

  10. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  11. [Neither Descartes nor Freud? current pain models in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, N; Egle, U T; von Känel, R

    2008-05-14

    Models explaining chronic pain based on the mere presence or absence of peripheral somatic findings or which view pain of psychological origin when there is no somatic explanation, have their shortcomings. Current scientific knowledge calls for distinct pain concepts, which integrate neurobiological and neuropsychological aspects of pain processing.

  12. NODC Standard Format Current Meter (Components) (F015) Data (1962-1992) (NCEI Accession 0066358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series measurements of ocean currents. These data are obtained from current meter moorings and represent the Eulerian method of current...

  13. Dynamic Cell Formation based on Multi-objective Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhu Jia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi-objective model is proposed to address the dynamic cellular manufacturing (DCM formation problem. This model considers four conflicting objectives: relocation cost, machine utilization, material handling cost and maintenance cost. The model also considers the situation that some machines could be shared by more than one cell at the same period. A genetic algorithm is applied to get the solution of this mathematical model. Three numerical examples are simulated to evaluate the validity of this model.  

  14. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  15. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  16. Forced current sheet structure, formation and evolution: application to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Domrin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of a simulation model, the earlier predicted nonlinear kinetic structure, a Forced Kinetic Current Sheet (FKCS, with extremely anisotropic ion distributions, is shown to appear as a result of a fast nonlinear process of transition from a previously existing equilibrium. This occurs under triggering action of a weak MHD disturbance that is applied at the boundary of the simulation box. In the FKCS, current is carried by initially cold ions which are brought into the CS by convection from both sides, and accelerated inside the CS. The process then appears to be spontaneously self-sustained, as a MHD disturbance of a rarefaction wave type propagates over the background plasma outside the CS. Comparable to the Alfvénic discontinuity in MHD, transformation of electromagnetic energy into the energy of plasma flows occurs at the FKCS. But unlike the MHD case, ``free" energy is produced here: dissipation should occur later, through particle interaction with turbulent waves generated by unstable ion distribution being formed by the FKCS action. In this way, an effect of magnetic field ``annihilation" appears, required for fast magnetic reconnection. Application of the theory to observations at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail is considered.

  17. The impact of shearing flows on electroactive biofilm formation, structure, and current generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.-Andrew; Buie, Cullen

    2016-11-01

    A special class of bacteria exist that directly produce electricity. First explored in 1911, these electroactive bacteria catalyze hydrocarbons and transport electrons directly to a metallic electron acceptor forming thicker biofilms than other species. Electroactive bacteria biofilms are thicker because they are not limited by transport of oxygen or other terminal electron acceptors. Electroactive bacteria can produce power in fuel cells. Power production is limited in fuel cells by the bacteria's inability to eliminate protons near the insoluble electron acceptor not utilized in the wild. To date, they have not been successfully evolved or engineered to overcome this limit. This limitation may be overcome by enhancing convective mass transport while maintaining substantial biomass within the biofilm. Increasing convective mass transport increases shear stress. A biofilm may respond to increased shear by changing biomass, matrix, or current production. In this study, a rotating disk electrode is used to separate nutrient from physical stress. This phenomenon is investigated using the model electroactive bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens at nutrient loads comparable to flow-through microbial fuel cells. We determine biofilm structure experimentally by measuring the porosity and calculating the tortuosity from confocal microscope images. Biofilm adaptation for electron transport is quantified using electrical impedance spectroscopy. Our ultimate objective is a framework relating biofilm thickness, porosity, shear stress and current generation for the optimization of bioelectrochemical systems The Alfred P Sloan Foundation MPHD Program.

  18. Analytical Modeling for the Grating Eddy Current Displacement Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Chunfeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As a new type of displacement sensor, grating eddy current displacement sensor (GECDS combines traditional eddy current sensors and grating structure in one. The GECDS performs a wide range displacement measurement without precision reduction. This paper proposes an analytical modeling approach for the GECDS. The solution model is established in the Cartesian coordinate system, and the solving domain is limited to finite extents by using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. Based on the second order vector potential, expressions for the electromagnetic field as well as coil impedance related to the displacement can be expressed in closed-form. Theoretical results are then confirmed by experiments, which prove the suitability and effectiveness of the analytical modeling approach.

  19. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    CERN Document Server

    White, M J; Brueck, H D; 10.1063/1.4706965

    2012-01-01

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world, however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. The XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) magnets are operated at 2 K, which makes vapor-cooled current leads impractical due to the sub-atmospheric bath pressure. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal inte...

  20. Galaxy formation history through hod model from euclid mock catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Sakr, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) is a model giving the average number of galaxies in a dark matter halo, function of its mass and other intrinsic properties, like distance from halo center, luminosity and redshift of its constituting galaxies. It is believed that these parameters could also be related to the galaxy history of formation. We want to investigate more this relation in order to test and better refine this model. To do that, we extract HOD indicators from EUCLID mock catalogs for different luminosity cuts and for redshifts ranges going from 0.1 < z < 3.0. We study and interpret the trends of indicators function of these variations and tried to retrace galaxy formation history following the idea that galaxy evolution is the combination rather than the conflict of the two main proposed ideas nowadays: the older hierarchical mass merger driven paradigm and the recent downsizing star formation driven approach.

  1. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice

    2016-10-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass halos changes behavior at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter halos, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter halos. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  2. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, T.-W.; Ménard, B.

    2017-01-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass haloes changes behaviour at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter haloes, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation, and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter haloes. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  3. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina eGeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  4. A local PDE model of aggregation formation in bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavy-Waddy, Paul-Christopher; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    We study pattern formation in a model of cyanobacteria motion recently proposed by Galante, Wisen, Bhaya and Levy. By taking a continuum limit of their model, we derive a novel fourth-order nonlinear parabolic PDE equation that governs the behaviour of the model. This PDE is {{u}t}=-{{u}xx}-{{u}xxxx}+α {{≤ft(\\frac{{{u}x}{{u}xx}}{u}\\right)}x} . We then derive the instability thresholds for the onset of pattern formation. We also compute analytically the spatial profiles of the steady state aggregation density. These profiles are shown to be of the form \\text{sec}{{\\text{h}}p} where the exponent p is related to the parameters of the model. Full numerical simulations give a favorable comparison between the continuum and the underlying discrete system, and show that the aggregation profiles are stable above the critical threshold.

  5. Stochastic resonance in the Weidlich model of public opinion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinec, Peter

    1997-02-01

    As a prototypical nonlinear sociological system we study the Weidlich model of public opinion formation. At an optimal value of the collective climate parameter (which plays the role of noise for this system) we have found a maximal value of signal-to-noise ratio and a largest amplification of a periodic external preference factor which are the characteristics of stochastic resonance.

  6. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  7. Business Models, transparency and efficient stock price formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Vali, Edward; Hvidberg, Rene

    of this, our hypothesis is that if it is possible to improve, simplify and define the way a company communicates its business model to the market, then it must be possible for the company to create a more efficient price formation of its share. To begin with, we decided to investigate whether transparency...

  8. Impression Formation and Modifiability: Testing a Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Hoza, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a developmental model of impression formation based on observed behavior, prior expectancies, and additional incongruent information. Participants were 51 kindergartners, 53 second graders, and 104 college students who provided trait and liking judgments after watching a child actor engage in behaviors from three…

  9. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  10. On a Boltzmann-type price formation model

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2013-06-26

    In this paper, we present a Boltzmann-type price formation model, which is motivated by a parabolic free boundary model for the evolution of price presented by Lasry and Lions in 2007. We discuss the mathematical analysis of the Boltzmann-type model and show that its solutions converge to solutions of the model by Lasry and Lions as the transaction rate tends to infinity. Furthermore, we analyse the behaviour of the initial layer on the fast time scale and illustrate the price dynamics with various numerical experiments. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Testing models of triggered star formation: theory and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J; Acreman, David M

    2012-01-01

    One of the main reasons that triggered star formation is contentious is the failure to accurately link the observations with models in a detailed, quantitative, way. It is therefore critical to continuously test and improve the model details and methods with which comparisons to observations are made. We use a Monte Carlo radiation transport and hydrodynamics code TORUS to show that the diffuse radiation field has a significant impact on the outcome of radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. We also calculate SEDs and synthetic images from the models to test observational diagnostics that are used to determine bright rimmed cloud conditions and search for signs of RDI.

  12. On pattern formation in the Gray-Scott model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui PENG; Ming-xin WANG

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, we investigate an elliptic system well-known as the Gray-Scott model and present some further results for positive solutions of this model. More precisely, we give the refined a priori estimates of positive solutions, and improve some previous results for the non-existence and existence of positive non-constant solutions as the parameters are varied, which imply some certain conditions where the pattern formation occurs or not.

  13. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. I. Models and Star Formation Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2005-01-01

    We model star formation in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies composed of a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas, using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Absorbing sink particles are used to directly measure the mass of gravitationally collapsing gas. They reach masses characteristic of stellar clusters. In this paper, we describe our galaxy models and numerical methods, followed by an investigation of the gravitational instability in these galaxies. Gravitational collapse forms star clusters with correlated positions and ages, as observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Gravitational instability alone acting in unperturbed galaxies appears sufficient to produce flocculent spiral arms, though not more organized patterns. Unstable galaxies show collapse in thin layers in the galactic plane; associated dust will form thin dust lanes in those galaxies, in agreement with observations. We find an exponential relationship between the global star formation timescale and ...

  14. A unified multi-wavelength model of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, Cedric G; Frenk, Carlos S; Benson, Andrew J; Bower, Richard G; Cole, Shaun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Helly, John C; Lagos, Claudia D P; Mitchell, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    We present a new version of the GALFORM semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. This brings together several previous developments of GALFORM into a single unified model, including a different initial mass function (IMF) in quiescent star formation and in starbursts, feedback from active galactic nuclei supressing gas cooling in massive halos, and a new empirical star formation law in galaxy disks based on their molecular gas content. In addition, we have updated the cosmology, introduced a more accurate treatment of dynamical friction acting on satellite galaxies, and updated the stellar population model. The new model is able to simultaneously explain both the observed evolution of the K-band luminosity function and stellar mass function, and the number counts and redshift distribution of sub-mm galaxies selected at 850 mu. This was not previously achieved by a single physical model within the LambdaCDM framework, but requires having an IMF in starbursts that is somewhat top-heavy. The new model is teste...

  15. Star formation in semi-analytic galaxy formation models with multiphase gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Rachel S.; Popping, Gergö; Trager, Scott C.

    2015-11-01

    We implement physically motivated recipes for partitioning cold gas into different phases (atomic, molecular, and ionized) in galaxies within semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on cosmological merger trees. We then model the conversion of molecular gas into stars using empirical recipes motivated by recent observations. We explore the impact of these new recipes on the evolution of fundamental galaxy properties such as stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and gas and stellar phase metallicity. We present predictions for stellar mass functions, stellar mass versus SFR relations, and cold gas phase and stellar mass-metallicity relations for our fiducial models, from redshift z ˜ 6 to the present day. In addition we present predictions for the global SFR, mass assembly history, and cosmic enrichment history. We find that the predicted stellar properties of galaxies (stellar mass, SFR, metallicity) are remarkably insensitive to the details of the recipes used for partitioning gas into H I and H2. We see significant sensitivity to the recipes for H2 formation only in very low mass haloes (M_h ≲ 10^{10.5} M_{⊙}), which host galaxies with stellar masses m_* ≲ 10^8 M_{⊙}. The properties of low-mass galaxies are also quite insensitive to the details of the recipe used for converting H2 into stars, while the formation epoch of massive galaxies does depend on this significantly. We argue that this behaviour can be interpreted within the framework of a simple equilibrium model for galaxy evolution, in which the conversion of cold gas into stars is balanced on average by inflows and outflows.

  16. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  17. 3-dimensional current collection model. [of Tethered Satellite System 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kai-Shen; Shiah, A.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent current collection model of a satellite has been developed for the TSS-1 system. The system has been simulated particularly for the Research of Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) experiment. The Maxwellian distributed particles with the geomagnetic field effects are applied in this numerical simulation. The preliminary results indicate that a ring current is observed surrounding the satellite in the equatorial plane. This ring current is found between the plasma sheath and the satellite surface and is oscillating with a time scale of approximately 1 microsec. This is equivalent to the electron plasma frequency. An hour glass shape of electron distribution was observed when the viewing direction is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. This result is consistent with previous findings from Linson (1969) and Antoniades et al. (1990). Electrons that are absorbed by the satellite are limited from the background ionosphere as indicated by Parker and Murphy (1967).

  18. Comparing models of star formation simulating observed interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, L. F.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Rodrigues, I.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we make a comparison between different models of star formation to reproduce observed interacting galaxies. We use observational data to model the evolution of a pair of galaxies undergoing a minor merger. Minor mergers represent situations weakly deviated from the equilibrium configuration but significant changes in star fomation (SF) efficiency can take place, then, minor mergers provide an unique scene to study SF in galaxies in a realistic but yet simple way. Reproducing observed systems also give us the opportunity to compare the results of the simulations with observations, which at the end can be used as probes to characterize the models of SF implemented in the comparison. In this work we compare two different star formation recipes implemented in Gadget3 and GIZMO codes. Both codes share the same numerical background, and differences arise mainly in the star formation recipe they use. We use observations from Pico dos Días and GEMINI telescopes and show how we use observational data of the interacting pair in AM2229-735 to characterize the interacting pair. Later we use this information to simulate the evolution of the system to finally reproduce the observations: Mass distribution, morphology and main features of the merger-induced star formation burst. We show that both methods manage to reproduce roughly the star formation activity. We show, through a careful study, that resolution plays a major role in the reproducibility of the system. In that sense, star formation recipe implemented in GIZMO code has shown a more robust performance. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Colciencias, Doctorado Nacional - 617 program.

  19. Passive Target Tracking Based on Current Statistical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiao-long; XIE Jian-ying; YANG Yu-pu

    2005-01-01

    Bearing-only passive tracking is regarded as a nonlinear hard tracking problem. There are still no completely good solutions to this problem until now. Based on current statistical model, the novel solution to this problem utilizing particle filter (PF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The new solution adopts data fusion from two observers to increase the observability of passive tracking. It applies the residual resampling step to reduce the degeneracy of PF and it introduces the Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods (MCMC) to reduce the effect of the "sample impoverish". Based on current statistical model, the EKF, the UKF and particle filter with various proposal distributions are compared in the passive tracking experiments with two observers. The simulation results demonstrate the good performance of the proposed new filtering methods with the novel techniques.

  20. Energy current loss instability model on a computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edighoffer, John A.

    1995-04-01

    The computer program called Energy Stability in a Recirculating Accelerator (ESRA) Free Electron Laser (FEL) has been written to model bunches of particles in longitudinal phase space transversing a recirculating accelerator and the associated rf changes and aperture current losses. This energy-current loss instability was first seen by Los Alamos's FEL group in their energy recovery experiments. This code addresses these stability issues and determines the transport, noise, feedback and other parameters for which these FEL systems are stable or unstable. Two representative systems are modeled, one for the Novosibirisk high power FEL racetrack microtron for photochemical research, the other is the CEBAF proposed UV FEL system. Both of these systems are stable with prudent choices of parameters.

  1. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Seunghwan; Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice

    2016-01-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. Among all the models considered, only the model of Lu et al. can match the observational data; all other models fail to reproduce the faint-end upturn seen in the observation. The CSMFs are used to update the halo-based empirical model of Lu et al., and the model parameters obtained are very similar to those inferred by Lu et al. from a completely different set of observational constraints. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass halos changes behavior at a characteristic redshift $z_c \\sim 2$. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environments, becoming $z_c \\sim 4$ in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model ...

  2. A vertex model of Drosophila ventral furrow formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Spahn

    Full Text Available Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is an outstanding model system to study the mechanisms involved in large-scale tissue rearrangements. Ventral cells accumulate myosin at their apical sides and, while being tightly coupled to each other via apical adherens junctions, execute actomyosin contractions that lead to reduction of their apical cell surface. Thereby, a band of constricted cells along the ventral epithelium emerges which will form a tissue indentation along the ventral midline (the ventral furrow. Here we adopt a 2D vertex model to simulate ventral furrow formation in a surface view allowing easy comparison with confocal live-recordings. We show that in order to reproduce furrow morphology seen in vivo, a gradient of contractility must be assumed in the ventral epithelium which renders cells more contractile the closer they lie to the ventral midline. The model predicts previous experimental findings, such as the gain of eccentric morphology of constricting cells and an incremental fashion of apical cell area reduction. Analysis of the model suggests that this incremental area reduction is caused by the dynamical interplay of cell elasticity and stochastic contractility as well as by the opposing forces from contracting neighbour cells. We underpin results from the model through in vivo analysis of ventral furrow formation in wildtype and twi mutant embryos. Our results show that ventral furrow formation can be accomplished as a "tug-of-war" between stochastically contracting, mechanically coupled cells and may require less rigorous regulation than previously thought.For the developmental biologist it is a fascinating question how cells can coordinate major tissue movements during embryonic development. The so-called ventral furrow of the Drosophila embryo is a well-studied example of such a process when cells from a ventral band, spanning nearly the entire length of the embryo, undergo dramatic shape change by contracting their

  3. Vibration acceleration promotes bone formation in rodent models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ryohei; Nakata, Ken; Kawano, Fuminori; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Ogasawara, Issei; Nakai, Naoya; Mae, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Tomohiko; Tachibana, Yuta; Yokoi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    All living tissues and cells on Earth are subject to gravitational acceleration, but no reports have verified whether acceleration mode influences bone formation and healing. Therefore, this study was to compare the effects of two acceleration modes, vibration and constant (centrifugal) accelerations, on bone formation and healing in the trunk using BMP 2-induced ectopic bone formation (EBF) mouse model and a rib fracture healing (RFH) rat model. Additionally, we tried to verify the difference in mechanism of effect on bone formation by accelerations between these two models. Three groups (low- and high-magnitude vibration and control-VA groups) were evaluated in the vibration acceleration study, and two groups (centrifuge acceleration and control-CA groups) were used in the constant acceleration study. In each model, the intervention was applied for ten minutes per day from three days after surgery for eleven days (EBF model) or nine days (RFH model). All animals were sacrificed the day after the intervention ended. In the EBF model, ectopic bone was evaluated by macroscopic and histological observations, wet weight, radiography and microfocus computed tomography (micro-CT). In the RFH model, whole fracture-repaired ribs were excised with removal of soft tissue, and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Ectopic bones in the low-magnitude group (EBF model) had significantly greater wet weight and were significantly larger (macroscopically and radiographically) than those in the other two groups, whereas the size and wet weight of ectopic bones in the centrifuge acceleration group showed no significant difference compared those in control-CA group. All ectopic bones showed calcified trabeculae and maturated bone marrow. Micro-CT showed that bone volume (BV) in the low-magnitude group of EBF model was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (3.1±1.2mm3 v.s. 1.8±1.2mm3 in high-magnitude group and 1.3±0.9mm3 in control-VA group), but BV in the

  4. Charge and Current in the Quantum Hall Matrix Model

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    We extend the quantum Hall matrix model to include couplings to external electric and magnetic fields. The associated current suffers from matrix ordering ambiguities even at the classical level. We calculate the linear response at low momenta -- this is unambigously defined. In particular, we obtain the correct fractional quantum Hall conductivity, and the expected density modulations in response to a weak and slowly varying magnetic field. These results show that the classical quantum Hall ...

  5. A Bayesian approach to the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation: methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Weinberg, Martin D; Katz, Neal S

    2010-01-01

    We believe that a wide range of physical processes conspire to shape the observed galaxy population but we remain unsure of their detailed interactions. The semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation uses multi-dimensional parameterizations of the physical processes of galaxy formation and provides a tool to constrain these underlying physical interactions. Because of the high dimensionality, the parametric problem of galaxy formation may be profitably tackled with a Bayesian-inference based approach, which allows one to constrain theory with data in a statistically rigorous way. In this paper, we develop a generalized SAM using the framework of Bayesian inference. We show that, with a parallel implementation of an advanced Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo algorithm, it is now possible to rigorously sample the posterior distribution of the high-dimensional parameter space of typical SAMs. As an example, we characterize galaxy formation in the current $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using stellar mass function of galaxies a...

  6. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels.

  7. Modeling the heliospheric current sheet: Solar cycle variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.

    2002-07-01

    In this report we employ an empirically driven, three-dimensional MHD model to explore the evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during the course of the solar cycle. We compare our results with a simpler ``constant-speed'' approach for mapping the HCS outward into the solar wind to demonstrate that dynamic effects can substantially deform the HCS in the inner heliosphere (ballerina skirt,'' we discuss an interval approaching the maximum of solar cycle 23 (Carrington rotations 1960 and 1961) when the shape would be better described as ``conch shell''-like. We use Ulysses magnetic field measurements to support the model results.

  8. Pion electromagnetic current in a light-front model

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Frederico, T

    1999-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factor of the pion is calculated in a pseudoscalar field theoretical model which constituent quarks. We extract the form factor using the "+" component of the electromagnetic current in the light-cone formalism. For comparison, we also compute the form factor in the covariant framework and we obtain perfect agreement. It is shown that the pair terms do not contribute in this pseudoscalar model. This explains why a naive light-cone calculation, i.e., omitting pair terms from the onset, also yields the same results.

  9. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  10. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  11. Modelling the formation of organic particles in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; O'Dowd, C.

    2003-12-01

    A modelling study investigating the formation of organic particles from inorganic, thermodynamically stable clusters was carried out. A recently-developed theory, the so-called nano-Köhler theory, which describes a thermodynamic equilibrium between a nanometer-size cluster, water and water-soluble organic compound, was implemented in a dynamical model along with a treatment of the appropriate aerosol and gas-phase processes. The obtained results suggest that both gaseous sulphuric acid and organic vapours contribute to organic particle formation. The initial growth of freshly-nucleated clusters having a diameter around 1 nm is driven by condensation of gaseous sulphuric acid and by a lesser extent cluster self-coagulation. After the clusters have reached sizes of around 2 nm in diameter, low-volatile organic vapours start to condense spontaneously into the clusters, thereby accelerating their growth to detectable sizes. A shortage of gaseous sulphuric acid or organic vapours limit, or suppress altogether, the particle formation, since freshly-nucleated clusters are rapidly coagulated away by pre-existing particles. The obtained modelling results were applied to explaining the observed seasonal cycle in the number of aerosol formation events in a continental forest site.

  12. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  13. A Bayesian approach to the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation: methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu; Mo, H. J.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2011-09-01

    We believe that a wide range of physical processes conspire to shape the observed galaxy population, but we remain unsure of their detailed interactions. The semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation uses multidimensional parametrizations of the physical processes of galaxy formation and provides a tool to constrain these underlying physical interactions. Because of the high dimensionality, the parametric problem of galaxy formation may be profitably tackled with a Bayesian-inference-based approach, which allows one to constrain theory with data in a statistically rigorous way. In this paper, we develop a SAM in the framework of Bayesian inference. We show that, with a parallel implementation of an advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, it is now possible to rigorously sample the posterior distribution of the high-dimensional parameter space of typical SAMs. As an example, we characterize galaxy formation in the current Λ cold dark matter cosmology using the stellar mass function of galaxies as an observational constraint. We find that the posterior probability distribution is both topologically complex and degenerate in some important model parameters, suggesting that thorough explorations of the parameter space are needed to understand the models. We also demonstrate that because of the model degeneracy, adopting a narrow prior strongly restricts the model. Therefore, the inferences based on SAMs are conditional to the model adopted. Using synthetic data to mimic systematic errors in the stellar mass function, we demonstrate that an accurate observational error model is essential to meaningful inference.

  14. A physical model for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Torrey, Paul; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; ),

    2013-01-01

    We present a new comprehensive model of the physics of galaxy formation designed for large-scale hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation using the moving mesh code AREPO. Our model includes primordial and metal line cooling with self-shielding corrections, stellar evolution and feedback processes, gas recycling, chemical enrichment, a novel subgrid model for the metal loading of outflows, black hole (BH) seeding, BH growth and merging procedures, quasar- and radio-mode feedback, and a prescription for radiative electro-magnetic (EM) feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Stellar feedback is realised through kinetic outflows. The scaling of the mass loading of galactic winds can be set to be either energy or momentum driven, or a mixture of both. The metal mass loading of outflows can be adjusted independently of the wind mass loading. This is required to simultaneously reproduce the stellar mass content of low mass haloes and their gas oxygen abundances. Radiative EM AGN feedback is implemented...

  15. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Poschinger, U; Wester, R; Weidemüller, M; Koch, C P; Kosloff, R; Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose a perturbative model for the light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85Rb2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find for optimized pulse shapes an improvement for the formation of ground state molecules by more than a factor of 10 compared to unshaped pulses at the same pump-dump delay time, and by 40% compared to unshaped pulses at the respective optimal pump-dump delay time. Since our model yields directly the spectral amplitudes and phases of the optimized pulses, the results are directly applicable in pulse shaping experiments.

  16. Star formation in Herschel's Monsters versus semi-analytic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppioni, C.; Calura, F.; Pozzi, F.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; De Lucia, G.; Fontanot, F.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Menci, N.; Monaco, P.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a direct comparison between the observed star formation rate functions (SFRFs) and the state-of-the-art predictions of semi-analytic models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution. We use the PACS Evolutionary Probe Survey and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data sets in the COSMOS and GOODS-South fields, combined with broad-band photometry from UV to sub-mm, to obtain total (IR+UV) instantaneous star formation rates (SFRs) for individual Herschel galaxies up to z ˜ 4, subtracted of possible active galactic nucleus (AGN) contamination. The comparison with model predictions shows that SAMs broadly reproduce the observed SFRFs up to z ˜ 2, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, all the models seem to underpredict the bright end of the SFRF at z ≳ 2. The cause of this underprediction could lie in an improper modelling of several model ingredients, like too strong (AGN or stellar) feedback in the brighter objects or too low fallback of gas, caused by weak feedback and outflows at earlier epochs.

  17. Formation of Novae and Coronae on Venus. Tectonophysical Modeling Using Gravity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassilnikov, A. S.

    2001-03-01

    Novae and coronae formation was simulated using caoutchouc as a model of lower ductile part of lithosphere and dry flour as a model of upper brittle part of it. Distribution and character of the deformational structures is described.

  18. Disk galaxy formation and evolution models up to intermediate redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Firmani, C

    1999-01-01

    Making use of a seminumerical method we develop a scenario of disk galaxy formation and evolution in the framework of inflationary cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies. Within the virializing dark matter halos, disks in centrifugal equilibrium are built-up and their galactic evolution is followed through an approach which considers the gravitational interactions among the galaxy components, the turbulence and energy balance of the ISM, the star formation (SF) process due to disk gravitational instabilities, the stellar evolution and the secular formation of a bulge. We find that the main properties and correlations of disk galaxies are determined by the mass, the hierarchical mass aggregation history and the primordial angular momentum. The models follow the same trends across the Hubble sequence than the observed galaxies. The predicted TF relation is in good agreement with the observations except for the standart CDM. While the slope of this relation remains almost constant up to intermediate redshifts, its z...

  19. Structure formation in the Lemaitre-Tolman model I

    CERN Document Server

    Krasinski, A; Krasinski, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Structure formation within the Lemaitre-Tolman model is investigated in a general manner. We seek models such that the initial density perturbation within a homogeneous background has a smaller mass than the structure into which it will develop, and the perturbation then accretes more mass during evolution. This is a generalisation of the approach taken by Bonnor in 1956. It is proved that any two spherically symmetric density profiles specified on any two constant time slices can be joined by a Lemaitre-Tolman evolution, and exact implicit formulae for the arbitrary functions that determine the resulting L-T model are obtained. Examples of the process are investigated numerically.

  20. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  1. Structure formation in a nonlocally modified gravity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sohyun; Dodelson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We study a nonlocally modified gravity model proposed by Deser and Woodard which gives an explanation for current cosmic acceleration. By deriving and solving the equations governing the evolution of the structure in the Universe, we show that this model predicts a pattern of growth that differs from standard general relativity (+dark energy) at the 10-30% level. These differences will be easily probed by the next generation of galaxy surveys, so the model should be tested shortly.

  2. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  3. A semi-analytical model for exploring Galilean satellites formation from a massive disk

    CERN Document Server

    Miguel, Yamila

    2015-01-01

    A better knowledge of Jovian satellites' origins will bring light on the environment that surrounded Jupiter during its formation and can help us to understand the characteristics of this unique satellite system. We developed a semi-analytical model to investigate Jupiter's regular satellite formation and present the results of our population synthesis calculations. We performed simulations adopting a massive, static, low-viscosity circumplanetary disk model, in agreement with a current study of magnetorotational instability in a circum-planetary disk. We find that the high gas density leads to very rapid migration of satellitesimals due to gas drag and type II migration of satellites in a faster disk-dominated mode. A large concentration of solids, large building blocks and longer type II migration time-scales favor formation and survival of large satellites. However, bodies as massive as Ganymede and those located far away from Jupiter, such as Callisto, are difficult to form with this scenario.

  4. Social Networks and Choice Set Formation in Discrete Choice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Wichmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The discrete choice literature has evolved from the analysis of a choice of a single item from a fixed choice set to the incorporation of a vast array of more complex representations of preferences and choice set formation processes into choice models. Modern discrete choice models include rich specifications of heterogeneity, multi-stage processing for choice set determination, dynamics, and other elements. However, discrete choice models still largely represent socially isolated choice processes —individuals are not affected by the preferences of choices of other individuals. There is a developing literature on the impact of social networks on preferences or the utility function in a random utility model but little examination of such processes for choice set formation. There is also emerging evidence in the marketplace of the influence of friends on choice sets and choices. In this paper we develop discrete choice models that incorporate formal social network structures into the choice set formation process in a two-stage random utility framework. We assess models where peers may affect not only the alternatives that individuals consider or include in their choice sets, but also consumption choices. We explore the properties of our models and evaluate the extent of “errors” in assessment of preferences, economic welfare measures and market shares if network effects are present, but are not accounted for in the econometric model. Our results shed light on the importance of the evaluation of peer or network effects on inclusion/exclusion of alternatives in a random utility choice framework.

  5. Simulation of current generation in a 3-D plasma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, F.S.; Dawson, J.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Two wires carrying current in the same direction will attract each other, and two wires carrying current in the opposite direction will repel each other. Now, consider a test charge in a plasma. If the test charge carries current parallel to the plasma, then it will be pulled toward the plasma core, and if the test charge carries current anti-parallel to the plasma, then it will be pushed to the edge. The electromagnetic coupling between the plasma and a test charge (i.e., the A{sub {parallel}} {circ} v{sub {parallel}} term in the test charge`s Hamiltonian) breaks the symmetry in the parallel direction, and gives rise to a diffusion coefficient which is dependent on the particle`s parallel velocity. This is the basis for the {open_quotes}preferential loss{close_quotes} mechanism described in the work by Nunan et al. In our previous 2+{1/2}D work, in both cylindrical and toroidal geometries, showed that if the plasma column is centrally fueled, then an initial current increases steadily. The results in straight, cylindrical plasmas showed that self generated parallel current arises without trapped particle or neoclassical diffusion, as assumed by the bootstrap theory. It suggests that the fundamental mechanism seems to be the conservation of particles canonical momenta in the direction of the ignorable coordinate. We have extended the simulation to 3D to verify the model put forth. A scalable 3D EM-PIC code, with a localized field-solver, has been implemented to run on a large class of parallel computers. On the 512-node SP2 at Cornell Theory Center, we have benchmarked the 2+{1/2}D calculations using 32 grids in the previously ignored direction, and a 100-fold increase in the number of particles. Our preliminary results show good agreements between the 2+{1/2}D and the 3D calculations. We will present our 3D results at the meeting.

  6. Modeling of leakage currents in high-k dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegert, Gunther Christian

    2012-03-15

    Leakage currents are one of the major bottlenecks impeding the downscaling efforts of the semiconductor industry. Two core devices of integrated circuits, the transistor and, especially, the DRAM storage capacitor, suffer from the increasing loss currents. In this perspective a fundamental understanding of the physical origin of these leakage currents is highly desirable. However, the complexity of the involved transport phenomena so far has prevented the development of microscopic models. Instead, the analysis of transport through the ultra-thin layers of high-permittivity (high-k) dielectrics, which are employed as insulating layers, was carried out at an empirical level using simple compact models. Unfortunately, these offer only limited insight into the physics involved on the microscale. In this context the present work was initialized in order to establish a framework of microscopic physical models that allow a fundamental description of the transport processes relevant in high-k thin films. A simulation tool that makes use of kinetic Monte Carlo techniques was developed for this purpose embedding the above models in an environment that allows qualitative and quantitative analyses of the electronic transport in such films. Existing continuum approaches, which tend to conceal the important physics behind phenomenological fitting parameters, were replaced by three-dimensional transport simulations at the level of single charge carriers. Spatially localized phenomena, such as percolation of charge carriers across pointlike defects, being subject to structural relaxation processes, or electrode roughness effects, could be investigated in this simulation scheme. Stepwise a self-consistent, closed transport model for the TiN/ZrO{sub 2} material system, which is of outmost importance for the semiconductor industry, was developed. Based on this model viable strategies for the optimization of TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/TiN capacitor structures were suggested and problem areas

  7. Star Formation and Metallicity Gradients in Semi-analytic Models of Disk Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Huang, Meiling; Yates, Robert M; Moran, Sean; Heckman, Timothy M; Davé, Romeel; Guo, Qi

    2013-01-01

    We updated our radially-resolved SAMs of galaxy formation to track the radial distribution of stars, metals, atomic and molecular gas in galactic disks. The models are run on both MS and MS II using the recipes outlined in Fu et al. (2010) and Guo et al. (2011), with 3 main changes: (1) We adopt a simple star formation law where \\Sigma_SFR \\propto \\Sigma_H2. (2) We inject the heavy elements produced by SNe directly into the halo, instead of first mixing them with the disk cold gas. (3) We include radial gas inflows in disks using a model of the form v_inflow=alpha r. The average \\Sigma_H2 profiles in L_* galaxies strongly constrains the inflow velocities, favoring models where v_inflow ~ 7 km/s at r=10 kpc. The radial inflow model has little influence on the gas and stellar metallicity gradients in the outer disks. Gas metallicity gradients are affected much more strongly by the fraction of metals that are directly injected into the halo gas, rather than mixed with the interstellar cold gas. Metals ejected ou...

  8. Modeling for Stellar Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Hu, Chia-Yu; Choi, Ena

    2017-02-01

    Various heuristic approaches to model unresolved supernova (SN) feedback in galaxy formation simulations exist to reproduce the formation of spiral galaxies and the overall inefficient conversion of gas into stars. Some models, however, require resolution-dependent scalings. We present a subresolution model representing the three major phases of supernova blast wave evolution—free expansion, energy-conserving Sedov–Taylor, and momentum-conserving snowplow—with energy scalings adopted from high-resolution interstellar-medium simulations in both uniform and multiphase media. We allow for the effects of significantly enhanced SN remnant propagation in a multiphase medium with the cooling radius scaling with the hot volume fraction, {f}{hot}, as {(1-{f}{hot})}-4/5. We also include winds from young massive stars and AGB stars, Strömgren sphere gas heating by massive stars, and a mechanism that limits gas cooling that is driven by radiative recombination of dense H ii regions. We present initial tests for isolated Milky Way-like systems simulated with the Gadget-based code SPHgal with improved SPH prescription. Compared to pure thermal SN input, the model significantly suppresses star formation at early epochs, with star formation extended both in time and space in better accord with observations. Compared to models with pure thermal SN feedback, the age at which half the stellar mass is assembled increases by a factor of 2.4, and the mass-loading parameter and gas outflow rate from the galactic disk increase by a factor of 2. Simulation results are converged for a variation of two orders of magnitude in particle mass in the range (1.3–130) × 104 solar masses.

  9. A dynamic model for tumour growth and metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Volker; Schumacher, Udo

    2012-07-05

    A simple and fast computational model to describe the dynamics of tumour growth and metastasis formation is presented. The model is based on the calculation of successive generations of tumour cells and enables one to describe biologically important entities like tumour volume, time point of 1st metastatic growth or number of metastatic colonies at a given time. The model entirely relies on the chronology of these successive events of the metastatic cascade. The simulation calculations were performed for two embedded growth models to describe the Gompertzian like growth behaviour of tumours. The initial training of the models was carried out using an analytical solution for the size distribution of metastases of a hepatocellular carcinoma. We then show the applicability of our models to clinical data from the Munich Cancer Registry. Growth and dissemination characteristics of metastatic cells originating from cells in the primary breast cancer can be modelled thus showing its ability to perform systematic analyses relevant for clinical breast cancer research and treatment. In particular, our calculations show that generally metastases formation has already been initiated before the primary can be detected clinically.

  10. A quantitative model for integrating landscape evolution and soil formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, T.; Stockmann, U.; Minasny, B.; McBratney, Alex B.

    2013-06-01

    evolution is closely related to soil formation. Quantitative modeling of the dynamics of soils and landscapes should therefore be integrated. This paper presents a model, named Model for Integrated Landscape Evolution and Soil Development (MILESD), which describes the interaction between pedogenetic and geomorphic processes. This mechanistic model includes the most significant soil formation processes, ranging from weathering to clay translocation, and combines these with the lateral redistribution of soil particles through erosion and deposition. The model is spatially explicit and simulates the vertical variation in soil horizon depth as well as basic soil properties such as texture and organic matter content. In addition, sediment export and its properties are recorded. This model is applied to a 6.25 km2 area in the Werrikimbe National Park, Australia, simulating soil development over a period of 60,000 years. Comparison with field observations shows how the model accurately predicts trends in total soil thickness along a catena. Soil texture and bulk density are predicted reasonably well, with errors of the order of 10%, however, field observations show a much higher organic carbon content than predicted. At the landscape scale, different scenarios with varying erosion intensity result only in small changes of landscape-averaged soil thickness, while the response of the total organic carbon stored in the system is higher. Rates of sediment export show a highly nonlinear response to soil development stage and the presence of a threshold, corresponding to the depletion of the soil reservoir, beyond which sediment export drops significantly.

  11. Ovule development, a new model for lateral organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Mara; Colombo, Lucia; Roig-Villanova, Irma

    2014-01-01

    In spermatophytes the ovules upon fertilization give rise to the seeds. It is essential to understand the mechanisms that control ovule number and development as they ultimately determine the final number of seeds and, thereby, the yield in crop plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovules arise laterally from a meristematic tissue within the carpel referred to as placenta. For a correct determination of the number of ovules, a precise establishment of the positions where ovule primordia emerge is needed, and a tight definition of the boundaries between ovules is therefore also required. In the last decades, few factors have been identified to be involved in the determination of ovule number. Recently, plant hormones have also been revealed as fundamental players in the control of the initiation of ovule formation. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about both the molecular and hormonal mechanisms that control ovule formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  12. Ovule development, a new model for lateral organ formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eCucinotta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In spermatophytes the ovules upon fertilization give rise to the seeds. It is essential to understand the mechanisms that control ovule number and development as they ultimately determine the final number of seeds and, thereby, the yield in crop plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovules arise laterally from a meristematic tissue within the carpel referred to as placenta. For a correct determination of the number of ovules, a precise establishment of the positions where ovule primordia emerge is needed, and a tight definition of the boundaries between ovules is therefore also required. In the last decades, few factors have been identified to be involved in the determination of ovule number. Recently, plant hormones have also been revealed as fundamental players in the control of the initiation of ovule formation. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about both the molecular and hormonal mechanisms that control ovule formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  13. Constraining Galaxy Formation Models with Dwarf Ellipticals in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Conselice, C J

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations demonstrate that dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in clusters, despite their faintness, are likely a critical galaxy type for understanding the processes behind galaxy formation. Dwarf ellipticals are the most common galaxy type, and are particularly abundant in rich galaxy clusters. The dwarf to giant ratio is in fact highest in rich clusters of galaxies, suggesting that cluster dEs do not form in groups that later merge to form clusters. Dwarf ellipticals are potentially the only galaxy type whose formation is sensitive to global, rather than local, environment. The dominant idea for explaining the formation of these systems, through Cold Dark Matter models, is that dEs form early and within their present environments. Recent results suggest that some dwarfs appear in clusters after the bulk of massive galaxies form, a scenario not predicted in standard hierarchical structure formation models. Many dEs have younger and more metal rich stellar populations than dwarfs in lower density enviro...

  14. Semiparametric Additive Transformation Model under Current Status Data

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Guang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the efficient estimation of the semiparametric additive transformation model with current status data. A wide range of survival models and econometric models can be incorporated into this general transformation framework. We apply the B-spline approach to simultaneously estimate the linear regression vector, the nondecreasing transformation function, and a set of nonparametric regression functions. We show that the parametric estimate is semiparametric efficient in the presence of multiple nonparametric nuisance functions. An explicit consistent B-spline estimate of the asymptotic variance is also provided. All nonparametric estimates are smooth, and shown to be uniformly consistent and have faster than cubic rate of convergence. Interestingly, we observe the convergence rate interfere phenomenon, i.e., the convergence rates of B-spline estimators are all slowed down to equal the slowest one. The constrained optimization is not required in our implementation. Numerical results are used to illustra...

  15. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrahimi, F

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from 1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and 2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetic fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnetion site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplificatio...

  16. Modeling of finite aspect ratio effects on current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by a full wave code. This eliminates the need to use the approximation inherent in the parameterization. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code. The accuracy of the parameterization of the current drive efficiency, {eta}, is judged by a comparison with a direct calculation: where {chi} is the adjoint function, {epsilon} is the kinetic energy, and {rvec {Gamma}} is the quasilinear flux. It is shown that for large aspect ratio devices ({epsilon} {r_arrow} 0), the parameterization is nearly identical to the direct calculation. As the aspect ratio approaches unity, visible differences between the two calculations appear.

  17. The efficiency of nanotube formation on titanium anodized under voltage and current control in fluoride/glycerol electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valota, A.; LeClere, D. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.; Berger, S.; Kunze, J.; Schmuki, P.

    2008-09-01

    The formation of nanotubes on titanium is compared for anodizing under controlled voltage and controlled current in a fluoride/glycerol electrolyte. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis are employed to determine the film compositions. Film morphologies are examined by electron microscopy. The findings reveal films of approximate composition TiO2.0.15TiF4 that probably also contain derivatives of glycerol. Controlled voltage conditions resulted in more uniform final nanotube dimensions, for a particular charge density, and the highest efficiency of film growth, with the charge of the titanium in the film representing ~48% of the charge passed during anodizing. Under current control, the efficiency decreased from ~40% to ~23% with increase of the current density from 0.1 to 0.5 mA cm-2. Further, the thickness of the barrier layer was sometimes enhanced under current control, possibly due to a non-uniform current distribution and consequently elevated local temperature.

  18. A collective opinion formation model under Bayesian updating and confirmation bias

    CERN Document Server

    Nishi, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    We propose a collective opinion formation model with a so-called confirmation bias. The confirmation bias is a psychological effect with which, in the context of opinion formation, an individual in favor of an opinion is prone to misperceive new incoming information as supporting the current belief of the individual. Our model modifies a Bayesian decision-making model for single individuals (Rabin and Schrag, Q. J. Econ. 114, 37 (1999)) to the case of a well-mixed population of interacting individuals in the absence of the external input. We numerically simulate the model to show that all the agents eventually agree on one of the two opinions only when the confirmation bias is weak. Otherwise, the stochastic population dynamics ends up creating a disagreement configuration (also called polarization), particularly for large system sizes. A strong confirmation bias allows various final disagreement configurations with different fractions of the individuals in favor of the opposite opinions.

  19. Dynamic WTA optimization model of air defense operation of warships' formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jinjun; Cong Rong; Xiong Jiguang

    2006-01-01

    WTA (weapon-target allocation) of air defense operation is a very complicated problem and current models focus on static and restricted WTA problem mostly. Based on the dynamic characteristics of air defense operational command and decision of warships' formation, a dynamic WTA model is established. Simulation results show that switch fire and repetition fire of anti-air weapon systems affect the result of the air defense operation remarkably and the dynamic model is more satisfying than static ones. Related results are gained based on the analysis of the simulation results and the results are accordant with the intuitionistic tactical judgment. The model is some reference for the research of air defense C3I system of warships' formation.

  20. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  1. A Thermodynamic Model for Argon Plasma Kernel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Keck

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma kernel formation of argon is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been performed in a constant volume cylindrical vessel located in a shadowgraph system. The experiments have been done in constant pressure. The energy of plasma is supplied by an ignition system through two electrodes located in the vessel. The experiments have been done with two different spark energies to study the effect of input energy on kernel growth and its properties. A thermodynamic model employing mass and energy balance was developed to predict the experimental data. The agreement between experiments and model prediction is very good. The effect of various parameters such as initial temperature, initial radius of the kernel, and the radiation energy loss have been investigated and it has been concluded that initial condition is very important on formation and expansion of the kernel.

  2. Vegetation pattern formation of a water-biomass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Guohong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model with diffusion and cross-diffusion is proposed to describe the interaction between the vegetation and the soil water. Based on the view of Turing pattern, we discuss the conditions of the diffusion-induced instability and the cross-diffusion-induced instability of a homogenous uniform steady state. We find that either a fast diffusion speed of water or a great hydraulic diffusivity due to the suction of roots may drive the instability of the homogenous steady state. Furthermore, we find that both the rain-fall rate and the infiltration feedback parameter can induce the transitions among the vegetation state, pattern formation and bare soil state. It is also found that the "terrain slope" may cause the instability of the homogenous steady state and drive the formation of periodic stripe pattern. Consequently, the diversity of dryland vegetation in reality can be explained as a result of pattern solutions of the model.

  3. A panoptic model for planetesimal formation and pebble delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Dominik, Carsten; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2016-01-01

    The journey from dust particle to planetesimal involves physical processes acting on scales ranging from micrometers (the sticking and restructuring of aggregates) to hundreds of astronomical units (the size of the turbulent protoplanetary nebula). Considering these processes simultaneously is essential when studying planetesimal formation. We develop a novel, global, semi-analytical model for the evolution of the mass-dominating dust particles in a turbulent protoplanetary disk that takes into account the evolution of the dust surface density while preserving the essential characteristics of the porous coagulation process. This panoptic model is used to study the growth from submicron to planetesimal sizes in disks around Sun-like stars. For highly porous ices, unaffected by collisional fragmentation and erosion, rapid growth to planetesimal sizes is possible in a zone stretching out to ${\\sim}10\\mathrm{~AU}$ for massive disks. When porous coagulation is limited by erosive collisions, the formation of planet...

  4. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  5. Some observational tests of a minimal galaxy formation model

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, J D

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter simulations can serve as a basis for creating galaxy histories via the galaxy-dark matter connection. Here, one such model by Becker (2015) is implemented with several variations on three different dark matter simulations. Stellar mass and star formation rates are assigned to all simulation subhalos at all times, using subhalo mass gain to determine stellar mass gain. The observational properties of the resulting galaxy distributions are compared to each other and observations for a range of redshifts from 0-2. Although many of the galaxy distributions seem reasonable, there are noticeable differences as simulations, subhalo mass gain definitions, or subhalo mass definitions are altered, suggesting that the model should change as these properties are varied. Agreement with observations may improve by including redshift dependence in the added-by-hand random contribution to star formation rate. There appears to be an excess of faint quiescent galaxies as well (perhaps due in part to differing defin...

  6. Massive fermion model in 3d and higher spin currents

    CERN Document Server

    Bonora, L; Prester, P Dominis; de Souza, B Lima; Smolic, I

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the 3d free massive fermion theory coupled to external sources. The presence of a mass explicitly breaks parity invariance. We calculate two- and three-point functions of a gauge current and the energy momentum tensor and, for instance, obtain the well-known result that in the IR limit (but also in the UV one) we reconstruct the relevant CS action. We then couple the model to higher spin currents and explicitly work out the spin 3 case. In the UV limit we obtain an effective action which was proposed many years ago as a possible generalization of spin 3 CS action. In the IR limit we derive a different higher spin action. This analysis can evidently be generalized to higher spins. We also discuss the conservation and properties of the correlators we obtain in the intermediate steps of our derivation.

  7. Recommendation systems in the scope of opinion formation: a model

    CERN Document Server

    Blattner, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated data in real world recommender applications often feature fat-tailed distributions of the number of times individual items have been rated or favored. We propose a model to simulate such data. The model is mainly based on social interactions and opinion formation taking place on a complex network with a given topology. A threshold mechanism is used to govern the decision making process that determines whether a user is or is not interested in an item. We demonstrate the validity of the model by fitting attendance distributions from different real data sets. The model is mathematically analyzed by investigating its master equation. Our approach provides an attempt to understand recommender system's data as a social process. The model can serve as a starting point to generate artificial data sets useful for testing and evaluating recommender systems.

  8. Integrated modeling of nitrogen oxides formation in diesel engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To account for the effects of both chemistry and flow turbulence,the present study proposes an integrated NO sub-model that combines the extended Zel'dovich mechanism and engine CFD computations to simulate the NO histories in a diesel engine.NOx sub-model parameters and pollutant formation mechanisms can be more easily investigated by solving the NOx sub-model.The new NO formation model incorporating the effects of hoth chemical kinetics and turbulent mixing was applied to simulate a diesel engine with a quiescent combustion chamber,and one with a re-entrant combustion chamber;the premise of the model being the reaction rate is mainlv determined by a kinetic timescale and a turbulent timescale.The results indicate that the predicted NO formulation from the new model agrees well with the measured data.As the utilization of fossil fuels continues to increase,the control of NOx emissions is a worldwide concern;and it is imperative to understand fully the NOx reaction processes in combustion systems.This technology has the Dotential to enhance the application of various combustion techniques used to reduce NOx emissions from practical combustion systems.

  9. Modeling of current distribution on smooth and columnar platinum structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinola, Carlos F

    2011-01-17

    Studying the growth and stability of anisotropic or isotropic disordered surfaces in electrodeposition is of importance in catalytic electrochemistry. In some cases, the metallic nature of the electrode defines the topography and roughness, which are also controlled by the experimental time and applied external potential. Because of the experimental restrictions in conventional electrochemical techniques and ex situ electron microscopies, a theoretical model of the surface geometry could aid in understanding the electrodeposition process and current distributions. In spite of applying a complex theory such as dynamic scaling method or perturbation theories, the resolution of mixed mass-/charge-transfer equations (tertiary distribution) for the electrodeposition process would give reliable information. One of the main problems with this type of distribution is the mathematics when solving the spatial n-dimensional differential equations. Use of a primary current distribution is proposed here to simplify the differential equations; however it limits wide application of the first assumption. Distributions of concentration profile, current density, and electrode potential are presented here as a function of the distance normal to the surface for the cases of smooth and rough platinum growth. In the particular case of columnar surfaces, cycloid curves are used to model the electrode, from which the concentration profile is presented in a parameterized form after solving a first-type curvilinear integral. The concentration contour results in a combination of a trigonometric inverse function and a linear distribution leading to a negative concavity curve. The calculation of the current density and electrode potential contours also show trigonometric shapes exhibiting forbidden imaginary values only at the minimal values of the trochoid curve.

  10. An analytic model with critical behavior in black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, T; Koike, Tatsuhiko; Mishima, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytic model is presented which exhibits a critical behavior in black hole formation, namely, collapse of a thin shell coupled with outgoing null fluid. It is seen that the critical behavior is caused by the gravitational nonlinearity near the event horizon. We calculate the value of the critical exponent analytically and find that it is very dependent on the coupling constants of the system.

  11. Comparison of Return Stroke Current Profiles for Transmission-Line-Type and Traveling-Current-Source-Type Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.O. Adepitan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at determining the dependence of the current along a channel on the model used, assuming the same base current. We compared three transmission-line-type models, namely: Transmission Line (TL, Modified Transmission Line with Linear decay, Modified Transmission Line with Exponential decay and two traveling-current-source-type models: Bruce-Golde (BG and Traveling Current Source (TCS models. The current profiles along the channel at different heights predicted by these models are presented and discussed. Comparison is based on the assumption that all the models have the same base current. It was found that at low heights and within a time window frame of 15 :s, the currents of the transmission-line-type models predict a zero value at one time or the other with a maximum turning point following some 1:s after. A linear relationship is predicted between the current peak and the channel height. A discontinuity of current peak was observed at high heights. No zero value of current was recorded in case of TCS both at low and high channel heights.

  12. Modelling sea ice formation in the Terra Nova Bay polynya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansiviero, M.; Morales Maqueda, M. Á.; Fusco, G.; Aulicino, G.; Flocco, D.; Budillon, G.

    2017-02-01

    Antarctic sea ice is constantly exported from the shore by strong near surface winds that open leads and large polynyas in the pack ice. The latter, known as wind-driven polynyas, are responsible for significant water mass modification due to the high salt flux into the ocean associated with enhanced ice growth. In this article, we focus on the wind-driven Terra Nova Bay (TNB) polynya, in the western Ross Sea. Brine rejected during sea ice formation processes that occur in the TNB polynya densifies the water column leading to the formation of the most characteristic water mass of the Ross Sea, the High Salinity Shelf Water (HSSW). This water mass, in turn, takes part in the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass of the world ocean, which plays a major role in the global meridional overturning circulation, thus affecting the global climate system. A simple coupled sea ice-ocean model has been developed to simulate the seasonal cycle of sea ice formation and export within a polynya. The sea ice model accounts for both thermal and mechanical ice processes. The oceanic circulation is described by a one-and-a-half layer, reduced gravity model. The domain resolution is 1 km × 1 km, which is sufficient to represent the salient features of the coastline geometry, notably the Drygalski Ice Tongue. The model is forced by a combination of Era Interim reanalysis and in-situ data from automatic weather stations, and also by a climatological oceanic dataset developed from in situ hydrographic observations. The sensitivity of the polynya to the atmospheric forcing is well reproduced by the model when atmospheric in situ measurements are combined with reanalysis data. Merging the two datasets allows us to capture in detail the strength and the spatial distribution of the katabatic winds that often drive the opening of the polynya. The model resolves fairly accurately the sea ice drift and sea ice production rates in the TNB polynya, leading to

  13. Animal models of transcranial direct current stimulation: Methods and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark P; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: (1) transcranial stimulation; (2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and (3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching "quasi-uniform" assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  14. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welling, Daniel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zaharia, Sorin G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morley, Steven K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  15. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Franz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH, which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  16. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Guilherme; Delpey, Matthias T.; Brito, David; Pinto, Lígia; Leitão, Paulo; Neves, Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH), which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica) located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal) to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  17. Understanding Gully Formation and Seasonal Flows on Recent and Current Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    The discoveries of gullies and seasonal slope flows (RSL) have re-ignited the debate over various channel, valley, and gully formation mechanisms on Mars. The controversy over whether liquid water was involved with gully formation, harkens back to the mid-1970s to early 2000s, where catastrophic flooding, surface runnoff and ground-water sapping processes were strongly debated along with other mechanisms as the primary processes responsible for channel and valley formation on Mars. However, over the past decade, the value of multiple working hypotheses has again become apparent, this time in understanding the formation of Martian gullies and Recurring Slope Lineae. Various mechanisms put forth to explain these landforms include liquid H2O/ice erosion, CO2 ice/frost sublimation, CO2 ice block sliding, water and brine flows, salt deliquescence, and dry granular flows, among others.We carried out detailed morphologic/morphometric studies of gullies in various environmental settings on Mars to evaluate the potential formation processes. Using HiRISE images and DTMs, we mapped and generated detailed longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of gully systems and estimated volumes for both the gullies and their debris aprons. Several gullies form highly integrated patterns similar to fluvial systems. Additionally, RSL are often found either in the tributaries of these integrated systems or in adjacent regions, implying that RSL may play a role in initiating gully formation or mark the last vestiges of water activity in these locations. We also find that the more highly integrated gullies have volumes significantly larger than their aprons, suggesting that the missing volumes (~40-60% or more) were likely the volatiles involved in gully formation. Additionally, THEMIS and TES surface temperatures of these integrated gully sites, many of which also contain RSL, are at or above freezing seasonally suggesting that the volatile component may be consistent with H2O although CO2

  18. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi.

  19. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  20. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  1. The use of technology in a model of formative assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsa García López

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a formative assessment model for the Mathematical Analysis course taken by engineering students. It includes online questionnaires with feedback, a portfolio with weekly assignments, exams involving the use of mathematical software and a project to be completed in small groups of two or three students. The model has been perfected since 2009, and during the 2014-15 academic year the creation of a pilot online learning community was added. Based on Google+, it has been used for a peer assessment experiment involving student projects, among other uses.

  2. Model for Formation of Dunes at the North Martian Pole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; CHEN Chu-Xin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera(MOC)took images of a series of strange horseshoe-shaped dunes at the North Martian pole in 2004.These dunes would be formed due to the strong Martian winds whose pattern is different from that on the Earth.We study the cause of the formation of these dunes and make a model for them.In this model,wind speed near the north Martian pole can be evaluated based on the shape of the dunes.We also estimate the surpassing speed of dunes of different sizes.

  3. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels. PMID:25628559

  4. The formation of adipocere in model aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, B H; Notter, S J; Dent, B; Selvalatchmanan, J; Fu, S

    2016-01-01

    An examination of the chemistry of adipocere formation in aquatic systems provides insight into how environmental factors affect the decomposition processes of human remains. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICPMS) have been employed to monitor the changes to the chemistry of adipocere formed in aquatic environments used to model seawater, river and chlorinated water systems. Seawater was shown to inhibit adipocere formation, and a distinctively different elemental composition was produced in this environment due to the high concentrations of salts. By comparison, river water has been shown to accelerate the formation of adipocere. Chlorinated water appears to significantly enhance adipocere formation, based on a comparison with established fatty acid concentration values. However, a competing reaction to form chlorohydrins in chlorinated water is believed to be responsible for the unusual findings in this environment. The application of the chemical characterization of adipocere to an understanding of how this particular decomposition product forms in different water environments has been demonstrated, and there is potential to utilise this approach to identify the environment in which a body has been immersed.

  5. Modelling of frost formation and growth on microstuctured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaha, Md. Ali; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Frost formation on heat exchangers is an undesirable phenomenon often encountered in different applications where the cold surface with a temperature below freezing point of water is exposed to humid air. The formation of frost on the heat transfer surface results in an increase in pressure drop and reduction in heat transfer, resulting in a reduction of the system efficiency. Many factors, including the temperature and moisture content of air, cold plate temperature, surface wettability etc., are known to affect frost formation and growth. In our present study, a model for frost growth on rectangular, periodic microgroove surfaces for a range of microgroove dimension (ten to hundreds of micron) is presented. The mathematical model is developed analytically by solving the governing heat and mass transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. For temperature, a convective boundary condition at frost-air interface and a fixed cold plate surface temperature is used. Instead of considering the saturation or super-saturation models, density gradient at the surface is obtained by considering experimentally-found specified heat flux. The effect of surface wettability is incorporated by considering the distribution of condensed water droplets at the early stage of frost formation. Thickness, density and thermal conductivity of frost layer on the micro-grooved surfaces are found to vary with the dimension of the grooves. The variation of density and thickness of the frost layer on these micro-grooved surfaces under natural convection is numerally determined for a range of plate temperature and air temperature conditions and is compared with experimental results found in the open literature.

  6. Optimization Model of Subjectivity Formation in Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vorobyeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the issues of the subjectivity formation in the educational environment, as well as the application of the relative psycho-technologies of facilitation and optimization of the process. The correlation between the notions of personality and subject is considered, though their scientific and semantic distinctions still remain obscure. In the frame- work of the competence approach, based on the concepts of accepted in education and psychology functional paradigm, the above terms are widely spread. Therefore, finding out the specifics of their genesis is both relevant and up-to-date. The authors conclude that the personality and subject are not equivalents, the same as the personality growth is not equivalent to the subjectivity formation. By means of theoretical analyses of the domestic approaches to the phenomena of subject and subjectivity, the four-stage process of the subject-genesis in the educa- tional environment has been modeled. At every stage of subjectivity formation in the particular conditions, it is necessary to use psycho-technologies relating to the actual targets of subject-genesis, which makes it possible to optimize the educational process in the context of the competence approach. The level-based description of the given process is proposed along with the model of its optimization in implementing the target psycho-technologies. The model can be applied both as a methodology basis for the complex development and optimization of psycho-pedagogical facilitation of the sub- jectivity formation, and as a theoretical basis for the educational strategy development and correction in a particular educational establishment. 

  7. Optimization Model of Subjectivity Formation in Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vorobyeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the issues of the subjectivity formation in the educational environment, as well as the application of the relative psycho-technologies of facilitation and optimization of the process. The correlation between the notions of personality and subject is considered, though their scientific and semantic distinctions still remain obscure. In the frame- work of the competence approach, based on the concepts of accepted in education and psychology functional paradigm, the above terms are widely spread. Therefore, finding out the specifics of their genesis is both relevant and up-to-date. The authors conclude that the personality and subject are not equivalents, the same as the personality growth is not equivalent to the subjectivity formation. By means of theoretical analyses of the domestic approaches to the phenomena of subject and subjectivity, the four-stage process of the subject-genesis in the educa- tional environment has been modeled. At every stage of subjectivity formation in the particular conditions, it is necessary to use psycho-technologies relating to the actual targets of subject-genesis, which makes it possible to optimize the educational process in the context of the competence approach. The level-based description of the given process is proposed along with the model of its optimization in implementing the target psycho-technologies. The model can be applied both as a methodology basis for the complex development and optimization of psycho-pedagogical facilitation of the sub- jectivity formation, and as a theoretical basis for the educational strategy development and correction in a particular educational establishment. 

  8. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoshi, K., E-mail: oyoshi.keiji@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  9. Some observational tests of a minimal galaxy formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Dark matter simulations can serve as a basis for creating galaxy histories via the galaxy-dark matter connection. Here, one such model by Becker is implemented with several variations on three different dark matter simulations. Stellar mass and star formation rates are assigned to all simulation subhaloes at all times, using subhalo mass gain to determine stellar mass gain. The observational properties of the resulting galaxy distributions are compared to each other and observations for a range of redshifts from 0 to 2. Although many of the galaxy distributions seem reasonable, there are noticeable differences as simulations, subhalo mass gain definitions or subhalo mass definitions are altered, suggesting that the model should change as these properties are varied. Agreement with observations may improve by including redshift dependence in the added-by-hand random contribution to star formation rate. There appears to be an excess of faint quiescent galaxies as well (perhaps due in part to differing definitions of quiescence). The ensemble of galaxy formation histories for these models tend to have more scatter around their average histories (for a fixed final stellar mass) than the two more predictive and elaborate semi-analytic models of Guo et al. and Henriques et al., and require more basis fluctuations (using principal component analysis) to capture 90 per cent of the scatter around their average histories. The codes to plot model predictions (in some cases alongside observational data) are publicly available to test other mock catalogues at https://github.com/jdcphysics/validation/. Information on how to use these codes is in Appendix A.

  10. Numerical modeling of batch formation in waste incineration plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obroučka Karel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is a mathematical description of algorithm for controlled assembly of incinerated batch of waste. The basis for formation of batch is selected parameters of incinerated waste as its calorific value or content of pollutants or the combination of both. The numerical model will allow, based on selected criteria, to compile batch of wastes which continuously follows the previous batch, which is a prerequisite for optimized operation of incinerator. The model was prepared as for waste storage in containers, as well as for waste storage in continuously refilled boxes. The mathematical model was developed into the computer program and its functionality was verified either by practical measurements or by numerical simulations. The proposed model can be used in incinerators for hazardous and municipal waste.

  11. A formative model for student nurse development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. van der Merwe

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Preparing student nurses for the profession is a complex task for nurse educators; especially when dealing with the development of personal and interpersonal skills, qualities and values held in high esteem by the nursing profession and the community they serve. These researchers developed a model for formative evaluation of students by using the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning. This model was implemented in clinical practice situations and evaluated for its usefulness. It seems that the model enhanced the standards of nursing care because it had a positive effect on the behaviour of students and they were better motivated; the model also improved interpersonal relationships and communication between practising nurses and students.

  12. The high redshift galaxy population in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Kitzbichler, M G; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-01-01

    We compare observations of the high redshift galaxy population to the predictions of the galaxy formation model of Croton et al. (2006). This model, implemented on the Millennium Simulation of the concordance LCDM cosmogony, introduces "radio mode" feedback from the central galaxies of groups and clusters in order to obtain quantitative agreement with the luminosity, colour, morphology and clustering properties of the low redshift galaxy population. Here we compare the predictions of this same model to the observed counts and redshift distributions of faint galaxies, as well as to their inferred luminosity and mass functions out to redshift 5. With the exception of the mass functions, all these properties are sensitive to modelling of dust obscuration. A simple but plausible treatment gives moderately good agreement with most of the data, although the predicted abundance of relatively massive (~M*) galaxies appears systematically high at high redshift, suggesting that such galaxies assemble earlier in this mo...

  13. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  14. High resolution modelling of the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Logemann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The northward inflow of Atlantic Water through Denmark Strait – the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC – is simulated with a numerical model of the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. The model uses the technique of adaptive grid refinement which allows a high spatial resolution (1 km horizontal, 10 m vertical around Iceland. The model is used to assess time and space variability of volume and heat fluxes for the years 1997–2003. Passive tracers are applied to study origin and composition of NIIC water masses. The NIIC originates from two sources: the Irminger Current, flowing as part of the sub-polar gyre in 100–500 m depth along the Reykjanes Ridge and the shallow Icelandic coastal current, flowing north-westward on the south-west Icelandic shelf. The ratio of volume flux between the deep and shallow branch is around 2:1. The NIIC continues as a warm and saline branch northward through Denmark Strait where it entrains large amounts of polar water due to the collision with the southward flowing East Greenland Current. After passing Denmark Strait, the NIIC follows the coast line eastward being an important heat source for north Icelandic waters. At least 60% of the temporal temperature variability of north Icelandic waters is caused by the NIIC. The NIIC volume and heat transport is highly variable and depends strongly on the wind field north-east of Denmark Strait. Daily means can change from 1 Sv eastward to 2 Sv westward within a few days. Highest monthly mean transport rates occur in summer when winds from north are weak, whereas the volume flux is reduced by around 50% in winter. Summer heat flux rates can be even three times higher than in winter. The simulation also shows variability on the interannual scale. In particular weak winds from north during winter 2002/2003 combined with mild weather conditions south of Iceland led to anomalous high NIIC volume (+40% and heat flux (+60% rates. In this period, simulated north Icelandic

  15. Islamic Theoretical Intertemporal Model of the Current Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Belkacem Ghassan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop an Islamic intertemporal model of the current account based on the prevailing theoretical and empirical literature of PVMCA (Obstfeld and Rogoff, 1996, Cerrato et al., 2014. The proposed model is based on the budget constraint of the present and future consumption, which depends on the obligatory Zakat from the income and assets, the return rate on the owned assets, the inheritance linking previous to subsequent generation. Using logarithmic utility function, featured by a unitary elasticity of intertemporal substitution and a unitary coefficient of relative risk aversion, we show through Euler equation of consumption that there is an inverse relationship between consumption growth from the last age to the first one and the Zakat rate on assets. The outcomes of this result are that the Zakat on assets disciplines the consumer to have more rationality in consumption, and allows additional marginal assets for future generations. By assuming a unitary subjective discount rate, we indicate that the more the return rate on assets is high, the more the consumption growth between today and tomorrow will be fast. Through the budget constraint, if Zakat rate on the Zakatable assets is greater than Zakat rate on income, this leads to a relative expansion in private consumption of the wealthy group. Besides, we point out that an increase in return rate on assets, can drive to increasing or decreasing current consumption, because the substitution and income effects work in opposite ways.

  16. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  17. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  18. CURRENT STATE OF THE PROBLEM OF FORMATION OF INNOVATIVE COMPETENCES OF STUDENTS TECHNICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Konstantinovna Hetman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The state policy of modern Russia clearly formulated in the framework of «Strategy of innovative development of the Russian Federation until 2020», one of the priorities determines the development of human resources in science, education, technologies and innovations. Pursuant to the requirements of modern business, the system of higher professional education aimed at training of competitive graduates, the distinguishing quality of which is not only a high level of knowledge and skills, but also the development/implementation of innovations in professional activity. In work the analysis of modern condition of a problem of formation of innovative competence, summed up the experience of researchers on the issues of the competence approach the formation of professional and General cultural competences. Presents the dependence of the level of preparation of bachelors and the formation of different kinds of innovation. The basic components of innovation. Also describes the basic qualities of innovative thinking of the bachelor-engineer, given the author’s definition of innovation competencies.

  19. Language Play and Linguistic Hybridity as Current Trends in Hungarian Word-Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réka Benczes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hungarian literature on word-formation typically focuses on rule-governed descriptions of regular and typologically relevant patterns. However, there are plenty of other word-formation trends that usually go unnoticed in mainstream morphological research. The present paper will focus on two such trends: 1 rhyming and alliterating compounds such as pannon puma ‘Pannonian puma’ (a euphemism for Hungary’s economic performance, on the analogy of Asian tiger; and 2 creative prefixations such as meggugliz (‘to google’ and felhájpol (‘to hype’. Although these are seemingly two quite different patterns, in fact they share two significant traits. On the one hand, they are demonstrations of the fact that language users make full use of the creative possibilities in language and routinely play with sounds and meanings. On the other hand, they are also indications of the influential role of English in present-day Hungarian word-formation. It seems that language users are not only aware of the possibilities that this interference can result in but are also able to exploit these consciously. This crossing of language boundaries is becoming increasingly inevitable with the global spread of English.

  20. Volatile particles formation during PartEmis: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vancassel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study of the formation of volatile particles in a combustor exhaust has been carried out in the frame of the PartEmis European project. A kinetic model has been used in order to investigate nucleation efficiency of the H2O-H2SO4 binary mixture in the sampling system. A value for the fraction of the fuel sulphur S(IV converted into S(VI has been indirectly deduced from comparisons between model results and measurements. In the present study, ranges between roughly 2.5% and 6%, depending on the combustor settings and on the value assumed for the parameter describing sulphuric acid wall losses. Soot particles hygroscopicity has also been investigated as their activation is a key parameter for contrail formation. Growth factors of monodisperse particles exposed to high relative humidity (95% have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The modelling study confirms that the growth factor increases as the soot particle size decreases.

  1. Fractal model for simulation of frost formation and growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A planar fractal model for simulation of frost formation and growth was proposed based on diffusion limited aggregation(DLA)model and the computational simulation was carried out in this paper.By changing the times of program running circulation and the ratio of random particles generated,the simulation figures were gained under different conditions.A microscope is used to observe the shape and structure of frost layer and a digital camera with high resolution is used to record the pattern of frost layer at different time.Through comparing the simulation figures with the experimental images,we find that the simulation results agree well with the experimental images in shape and the fractal dimension of simulation figures is nearly equal to that of experimental images.The results indicate that it is reasonable to represent frost layer growth time with the program circulation times and to simulate the frost layer density variation during its growth process by reducing the random particle generation probability.The feasibility of using the suggested model to simulate the process of frost formation and growth was justified.The insufficiencies and its causes of this fractal model are also discussed.

  2. Dynamic Model Visualizing the Process of Viral Plaque Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Microbiology and Virology courses, viral plaques are often presented to students as the way one can visualize viruses/bacteriophages. While students generally grasp the idea that counting plaques is essentially the same as counting viruses in their sample (assuming that one virus entering the cell is sufficient for productive infection, the process of plaque formation itself remains largely obscure. Many students fail to appreciate that viral plaques are actually a “laboratory-made” phenomenon allowing us to observe and study the growth of lytic viruses. The latter often presents a challenge for the interpretation of experimental data related to viral growth and drug discovery using plaque reduction assay. The hands-on model described here creates an opportunity for students to experience the process of viral plaque formation while engaging multiple senses and creating a lasting impression.  

  3. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced ...

  4. Modeling biogenic gas bubbles formation and migration in coarse sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.

    2011-12-01

    Shujun Ye Department of Hydrosciences, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China; sjye@nju.edu.cn Brent E. Sleep Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 CANADA; sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca Methane gas generation in porous media was investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional sand-filled cell. Inoculation of the lower portion of the cell with a methanogenic culture and addition of methanol to the bottom of the cell led to biomass growth and formation of a gas phase. The formation, migration, distribution and saturation of gases in the cell were visualized by the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Gas generated at the bottom of the cell in the biologically active zone moved upwards in discrete fingers, so that gas phase saturations (gas-filled fraction of void space) in the biologically active zone at the bottom of the cell did not exceed 40-50%, while gas accumulation at the top of the cell produced gas phase saturations as high as 80%. Macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) at near pore scale[Glass, et al., 2001; Kueper and McWhorter, 1992]was used to model gas bubbles growth in porous media. The nonwetting phase migration pathway can be yielded directly by MIP. MIP was adopted to simulate the expansion, fragmentation, and mobilization of gas clusters in the cell. The production of gas, and gas phash saturations were simulated by a continuum model - compositional simulator (COMPSIM) [Sleep and Sykes, 1993]. So a combination of a continuum model and a MIP model was used to simulate the formation, fragmentation and migration of biogenic gas bubbles. Key words: biogenic gas; two dimensional; porous media; MIP; COMPSIM

  5. Tsunami-HySEA model validation for tsunami current predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; González-Vida, José Manuel; Ortega, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Model ability to compute and predict tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be produced by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Besides, an accurate simulation of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations is fundamental for advancing in the study of tsunami sediment transport. These considerations made the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) proposing a benchmark exercise focussed on modeling and simulating tsunami currents. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities were available to compare and to validate model results. After Tohoku 2011 many current meters measurement were made, mainly in harbors and channels. In this work we present a part of the contribution made by the EDANYA group from the University of Malaga to the NTHMP workshop organized at Portland (USA), 9-10 of February 2015. We have selected three out of the five proposed benchmark problems. Two of them consist in real observed data from the Tohoku 2011 event, one at Hilo Habour (Hawaii) and the other at Tauranga Bay (New Zealand). The third one consists in laboratory experimental data for the inundation of Seaside City in Oregon. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. The GPU and multi-GPU computations were performed at the Unit of Numerical Methods (UNM) of the Research Support Central Services (SCAI) of the University of Malaga.

  6. An investigation of counter-current flow in porous media with history-dependent modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Grader, A. S.; Halleck, P. H.; Karpyn, Z. T.

    2003-04-01

    Counter-current fluid flow occurs in many reservoir processes. It is important to understand and model these processes in order to operate them effectively. Both drainage and imbibition processes exist simultaneously when counter-current flow occurs. It has thus proven difficult to model this type of flow, especially when fluid banks form. Previously, counter-current flow experiments have been done in glass bead packs and the spatial and temporal saturation distributions obtained with X-ray computed tomography (CT). In the current paper, a new saturation-history-dependent approach has been developed to simulate the experiments. Hysteresis in both capillary pressure and relative permeabilities is considered during the process of matching the simulation results to experimental data. Capillary pressure and relative permeabilities are extracted with the aid of a deterministic reservoir simulator. During the history matching process, a family of curves (called scanning curves) is constructed connecting the two branches of the capillary hystersis loop. Each grid block of the sample is assigned a different scanning curve according to its saturation history. Simulation of the experiments reproduced two-dimensional saturation distributions over time with good accuracy. Similar results could not be obtained with traditional simulation using only one capillary pressure curve. History-dependent modeling successfully predicted cross-diameter counter-current flow in a cylindrical geometry. The parameters used in the single capillary pressure method are the average of the parameters used in the history-dependent method. Total effective mobility controls the flow process, being smaller in counter-current flow than in co-current flow. Experiments documented in the literature that exhibited formation of fluid banks were also successfully simulated. We anticipate that application of this method will improve the prediction of full-scale fluid flow processes such as ground water

  7. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  8. Shigella vaccine development: prospective animal models and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Shigella was first discovered in 1897 and is a major causative agent of dysenteric diarrhea. The number of affected patients has decreased globally because of improved sanitary conditions; however, Shigella still causes serious problems in many subjects, including young children and the elderly, especially in developing countries. Although antibiotics may be effective, a vaccine would be the most powerful solution to combat shigellosis because of the emergence of drug-resistant strains. However, the development of a vaccine is hampered by several problems. First, there is no suitable animal model that can replace human-based studies for the investigation of the in vivo mechanisms of Shigella vaccines. Mouse, guinea pig, rat, rabbit, and nonhuman primates could be used as models for shigellosis, but they do not represent human shigellosis and each has its own weaknesses. However, a recent murine model based on peritoneal infection with virulent S. flexneri 2a is promising. Moreover, although the inflammatory responses and mechanisms such as pathogenassociated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns have been studied, the pathology and immunology of Shigella are still not clearly defined. Despite these obstacles, many vaccine candidates have been developed, including live attenuated, killed whole cells, conjugated, and subunit vaccines. The development of Shigella vaccines also demands considerations of the cost, routes of administration, ease of storage (stability), cross-reactivity, safety, and immunogenicity. The main aim of this review is to provide a detailed introduction to the many promising vaccine candidates and animal models currently available, including the newly developed mouse model.

  9. Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

    2015-01-01

    Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

  10. A case study in modeling a nuclear formation evaluation sub

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, S. (Teleco Oilfield Services, Inc., Middletown, CT (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that constructing an accurate Monte Carlo representation of a complex nuclear formation evaluation tool requires careful matching of computed values to the results of laboratory experiments. The availability of only finite computing resources forces restraint in the step by step addition of complexity to the model. Once confidence in the model has been established, it can be used to predict tool response to many situations not reproducible in a laboratory. High temperatures, high pressures, and pore fluids composed of liquid-gas mixtures are typical of conditions encountered in real oil wells that are difficult to reproduce in a laboratory. Tool design and the effects of design modifications can also be evaluated efficiently using the model.

  11. Lessons from the Current Japanese Triple Helix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Hosono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since mid-1990s, the Japanese government has encouraged university-industry collaboration to foster innovations for economic growth. Learning from the American licensing model of technology transfer, Japanese Bay-Dole Act and TLO (Technology Licensing Organization Act were enacted in late 1990s. In addition, the corporatization of Japanese National Universities (JNUs in 2004 spurred their technology-transfer activities to obtain external funds. As a result, more than 50 TLOs has been established since FY1998, and also the number of patent application and licensed patents were increased at JUNs rapidly after FY2004. However, the licensing income has been stayed poor and some of TLOs were abolished. There are few evidences that the introduction of licensing model of technology transfer into Japan could contribute to innovation properly. Therefore, this study will try to clarify if licensing model of technology transfer work in Japan by analyzing the Japanese National University (JNU patent. There are 20,485 applied patent, which invented by JNU’s researcher(s from FY2004 to 2007. 38% of them were applied by solely by JNUs and 52% were by JNU and Private Firms etc. In the Japanese Patent Act, jointly applied patents are not licensed to the third party without the consent of co-applicant(s. Hence, more than half of the patent invented by JNU researchers is not basically used for patent licensing. Consequently, JNUs and TLOs face difficulties in patent licensing under the current Patent Act.

  12. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  13. Method for the formation of cylindrical current and its application to evaluate electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.-C.; Chang, C.-S.; Liang, W.-L.; Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F.; Lin, J.-F.

    2012-07-01

    A cylindrical current method is developed to obtain a stable and precise electrical resistivity of a specimen with or without a coating film. The electrical resistivity of a standard silicon wafer doped with boron at a concentration can be measured using the proposed method if the experimental results of electrical voltage varying with the distance from the center line of the cylindrical current are available. A comparison of the electrical resistivity obtained using the present method and the theoretical reference value indicates that the proposed method produces reliable and precise measurements. Using four test samples, the experimental results of electrical resistivity measured by the present method are shown to be reproducible and more precise than those measured by the four-terminal sensing method and the van der Pauw method. The electrical voltage and current obtained at various distances from the center line of the cylindrical current are almost independent of the distance and the direction of measurements. The effect of specimen's crystallinity appears to be the governing factor of electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity decreases with increasing crystallinity generally.

  14. Dynamical charge and pseudospin currents in graphene and possible Cooper pair formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawetz, K.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the quantum kinetic equations for systems with SU(2) structure, regularization-free density and pseudospin currents are calculated in graphene realized as the infinite-mass limit of electrons with quadratic dispersion and a proper spin-orbit coupling. Correspondingly the currents possess no quasiparticle part but only anomalous parts. The intraband and interband conductivities are discussed with respect to magnetic fields and magnetic domain puddles. It is found that the magnetic field and mean field of domains can be represented by an effective Zeeman field. For large Zeeman fields the dynamical conductivities become independent of the density and are universal in this sense. The different limits of vanishing density, relaxation, frequency, and Zeeman field are not interchangeable. The optical conductivity agrees well with the experimental values using screened impurity scattering and an effective Zeeman field. The universal value of Hall conductivity is shown to be modified due to the Zeeman field. The pseudospin current reveals an anomaly since a quasiparticle part appears though it vanishes for particle currents. The density and pseudospin response functions to an external electric field are calculated and the dielectric function is discussed with respect to collective excitations. A frequency and wave-vector range is identified where the dielectric function changes sign and the repulsive Coulomb potential becomes effectively attractive allowing Cooper pairing.

  15. Modeling of microporosity formation in A356 aluminum alloy casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J. D.; Cockcroft, S. L.; Maijer, D. M.

    2006-03-01

    A numerical model for predicting microporosity formation in aluminum castings has been developed, which describes the redistribution of hydrogen between solid and liquid phases, the transport of hydrogen in liquid by diffusion, and Darcy flow in the mushy zone. For simulating the nucleation of hydrogen pores, the initial pore radius is assumed to be a function of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, whereas pore growth is based on the assumption that hydrogen activity within the pore and the liquid are in equilibrium. One of the key features of the model is that it uses a two-stage approach for porosity prediction. In the first stage, the volume fraction of porosity is calculated based on the reduced pressure, whereas, in the second stage, at fractions solid greater than the liquid encapsulation point, the fraction porosity is calculated based on the volume of liquid trapped within the continuous solid network, which is estimated using a correlation based on the Niyama parameter. The porosity model is used in conjunction with a thermal model solved using the commercial finite-element package ABAQUS. The parameters influencing the formation of microporosity are discussed including a means to describe the supersaturation of hydrogen necessary for pore nucleation. The model has been applied to examine the evolution of porosity in a series of experimental samples cast using unmodified A356 in which the initial hydrogen content was varied from 0.048 to 0.137 (cc/100 g). A comparison between the model predictions and the experimental measurements indicates good agreement in terms of the variation in porosity with distance from the chill and the variation resulting from initial hydrogen content.

  16. WD40-repeat proteins in plant cell wall formation: current evidence and research prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea eGuerriero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR proteins often function as molecular hubs mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico aproaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighbourhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbours of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CESAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed.

  17. Cosmological Structure Formation in Decaying Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Dalong; Tang, Jiayu

    2015-01-01

    The standard cold dark matter (CDM) model predicts too many and too dense small structures. We consider an alternative model that the dark matter undergoes two-body decays with cosmological lifetime $\\tau$ into only one type of massive daughters with non-relativistic recoil velocity $V_k$. This decaying dark matter model (DDM) can suppress the structure formation below its free-streaming scale at time scale comparable to $\\tau$. Comparing with warm dark matter (WDM), DDM can better reduce the small structures while being consistent with high redshfit observations. We study the cosmological structure formation in DDM by performing self-consistent N-body simulations and point out that cosmological simulations are necessary to understand the DDM structures especially on non-linear scales. We propose empirical fitting functions for the DDM suppression of the mass function and the mass-concentration relation, which depend on the decay parameters lifetime $\\tau$ and recoil velocity $V_k$, and redshift. The fitting ...

  18. Critical state model with anisotropic critical current density

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwat, K V; Ravikumar, G

    2003-01-01

    Analytical solutions of Bean's critical state model with critical current density J sub c being anisotropic are obtained for superconducting cylindrical samples of arbitrary cross section in a parallel geometry. We present a method for calculating the flux fronts and magnetization curves. Results are presented for cylinders with elliptical cross section with a specific form of the anisotropy. We find that over a certain range of the anisotropy parameter the flux fronts have shapes similar to those for an isotropic sample. However, in general, the presence of anisotropy significantly modifies the shape of the flux fronts. The field for full flux penetration also depends on the anisotropy parameter. The method is extended to the case of anisotropic J sub c that also depends on the local field B, and magnetization hysteresis curves are presented for typical values of the anisotropy parameter for the case of |J sub c | that decreases exponentially with |B|.

  19. High voltage direct current modelling in optimal power flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz-Perez, H. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Mexico, Unidad de Ingenieria Especializada, Rio Rodano No. 14 - Piso 10, Sala 1002, Col. Cuauhtemoc, C.P. 06598, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Acha, E. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G128LT, Scotland (United Kingdom); Fuerte-Esquivel, C.R. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia 58030, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-03-15

    Two-terminal high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission links are in operation throughout the world. They are key elements in electrical power networks; their representation is oversimplified or ignored in most power system studies. This is particularly the case in Optima Power Flow (OPF) studies. Hence, an OPF program has been extended to incorporate HVDC links, taking due account of overlapping and power transfer control characteristics. This is a new development in Newton Optimal Power Flows, where the converter equations are included directly in the matrix W. The method is indeed a unified one since the solution vector is extended to accommodate the DC variables. The HVDC link model correctly takes into account the relevant DC limit variables. The impact of HVDC links on OPF studies is illustrated by numeric examples, which includes a 5-node system, the AEP 14-node and a 166-node system. (author)

  20. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douai, D., E-mail: david.douai@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, Association Euratom-CEA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kogut, D. [CEA, IRFM, Association Euratom-CEA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Brezinsek, S. [FZJ, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52441 Jülich (Germany); Hagelaar, G.J.M. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’Energie, UMR5213, Toulouse (France); Hong, S.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lomas, P.J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lyssoivan, A. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Nunes, I. [Associação EURATOM-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pitts, R.A. [ITER International Organization, F-13067 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Rohde, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Vries, P.C. de [ITER International Organization, F-13067 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET–CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  1. Hyperbolicity in Temperature and Flow Fields During the Formation of a Loop Current Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    oceanic general circulation model framed in hy- brid isopycnic-Cartesian coordinates, Ocean Model., 4, 55–88, doi:10.1016/S1463-5003(01)00012-9, 2002...112, C04013, doi:10.1029/2006JC003695, 2007. Rosmond, T. E.: The Design and Testing of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System

  2. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  3. Formation Mechanism of Micropores on the Surface of Pure Aluminum Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yang; CAI Jie; WAN Ming-Zhen; LV Peng; GUAN Qing-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of micropores formed on the surface of polycrystalline pure aluminum under high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation is explained. It is discovered that dispersed micropores with sizes of 0.1-1μm on the irradiated surface of pure aluminum can be successfully fabricated after HCPEB irradiation. The dominant formation mechanism of the surface micropores should be attributed to the formation of supersaturation vacancies within the near surface during the HCPEB irradiation and the migration of vacancies along gra,in boundaries and/or dislocations towards the irradiated surface. It is expected that the HCPEB technique will become a new method for the rapid synthesis of surface porous materials.%The mechanism of micropores formed on the surface of polycrystalline pure aluminum under high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation is explained.It is discovered that dispersed micropores with sizes of 0.1-1μm on the irradiated surface of pure aluminum can be successfully fabricated after HCPEB irradiation.The dominant formation mechanism of the surface micropores should be attributed to the formation of supersaturation vacancies within the near surface during the HCPEB irradiation and the migration of vacancies along grain boundaries and/or dislocations towards the irradiated surface.It is expected that the HCPEB technique will become a new method for the rapid synthesis of surface porous materials.High-current pulsed electron beams (HCPEBs)have attracted much attention in the field of material surface modification.[1-7] During the transient bombardment process a high energy (108-109 W·cm-2) is deposited only in a very thin layer (less than tens of micrometers) within a very short time (a few microseconds) and thereby causes ultrafast heating and cooling on the irradiated surface of materials.The dynamic stress fields induced in these processes can induce intense deformation on the material surface.

  4. Simplified Modeling of Tropospheric Ozone Formation Considering Alternative Fuels Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Aragão Ferreira da Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian cities have been constantly exposed to air quality episodes of high ozone concentrations (O3 . Known for not be emitted directly into the environment, O3 is a result of several chemical reactions of other pollutants emitted to atmosphere. The growth of vehicle fleet and government incentives for using alternative fuels like ethanol and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG are changing the Brazilian Metropolitan Areas in terms of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde emissions, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's present in the atmosphere and known to act on the kinetics of ozone. Driven by high concentrations of tropospheric ozone in urban/industry centers and its implications for environment and population health, the target of this work is understand the kinetics of ozone formation through the creation of a mathematical model in FORTRAN 90, describing a system of coupled ordinary differential equations able to represent a simplified mechanism of photochemical reactions in the Brazilian Metropolitan Area. Evaluating the concentration results of each pollutant were possible to observe the precursor’s influence on tropospheric ozone formation, which seasons were more conducive to this one and which are the influences of weather conditions on formation of photochemical smog.

  5. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The mechan......Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging....... The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... of the Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  6. Diffusion model of the formation of growth microdefects: A new approach to defect formation in crystals (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanin, V. I.; Talanin, I. E.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical studies of defect formation in semiconductor silicon play an important role in the creation of breakthrough ideas for next-generation technologies. A brief comparative analysis of modern theoretical approaches to the description of interaction of point defects and formation of the initial defect structure of dislocation-free silicon single crystals has been carried out. Foundations of the diffusion model of the formation of structural imperfections during the silicon growth have been presented. It has been shown that the diffusion model is based on high-temperature precipitation of impurities. The model of high-temperature precipitation of impurities describes processes of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of impurities during cooling of a crystal from 1683 to 300 K. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion model of defect formation provides a unified approach to the formation of a defect structure beginning with the crystal growth to the production of devices. The possibilities of using the diffusion model of defect formation for other semiconductor crystals and metals have been discussed. It has been shown that the diffusion model of defect formation is a platform for multifunctional solution of many key problems in modern solid state physics. Fundamentals of practical application of the diffusion model for engineering of defects in crystals with modern information technologies have been considered. An algorithm has been proposed for the calculation and analysis of a defect structure of crystals.

  7. Atlantis model outputs - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  8. Mechanism of formation of subnanosecond current front in high-voltage pulse open discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Alexandrov, A. L.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Bokhan, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    The mechanism of subnanosecond current front rise observed previously in the experiment in high-voltage pulse open discharge in helium is studied in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. The Boltzmann equations for electrons, ions, and fast atoms are solved self-consistently with the Poisson equations for the electrical potential. The partial contributions to the secondary electron emission from the ions, fast atoms, photons, and electrons, bombarding the electrode, are calculated. In simulations, as in the experiment, the discharge glows between two symmetrical cathodes and the anode grid in the midplane at P =6 Torr and the applied voltage of 20 kV. The electron avalanche development is considered for two experimental situations during the last stage of breakdown: (i) with constant voltage and (ii) with decreasing voltage. For case (i), the subnanosecond current front rise is set by photons from the collisional excitation transfer reactions. For the case (ii), the energetic electrons swamp the cathode during voltage drop and provide the secondary electron emission for the subnanosecond current rise, observed in the experiment.

  9. Constraints on the Formation of Double Neutron Stars from the Observed Eccentricities and Current Limits on Merger Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, M.; Belczynski, K.; Bulik, T.; Gladysz, W.

    2017-03-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse supernovae (CCSN) from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of σ = 265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs and then modify this distribution by changing σ toward smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with σ = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both observational constraints simultaneously. The models with low kicks after CCSN for binaries with the second NS forming through core collapse SN are marginally consistent with the observations. This means that either 14 observed DNSs are not representative of the intrinsic Galactic population, or that our modeling of DNS formation needs revision.

  10. Modeling and interpreting speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    We report on the development of a unified Monte-Carlo based computational model for exploring speckle pattern formation in swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is a well-established optical imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of turbid media, including biological tissues, utilizing back scattered low coherence light. The obtained OCT images include characteristic features known as speckles. Currently, there is a growing interest to the OCT speckle patterns due to their potential application for quantitative analysis of medium's optical properties. Here we consider the mechanisms of OCT speckle patterns formation for swept-source OCT approaches and introduce further developments of a Monte-Carlo based model for simulation of OCT signals and images. The model takes into account polarization and coherent properties of light, mutual interference of back-scattering waves, and their interference with the reference waves. We present a corresponding detailed description of the algorithm for modeling these light-medium interactions. The developed model is employed for generation of swept-source OCT images, analysis of OCT speckle formation and interpretation of the experimental results. The obtained simulation results are compared with selected analytical solutions and experimental studies utilizing various sizes / concentrations of scattering microspheres.

  11. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss that works through direct bone conduction. BAHA is used to help people with chronic ear infections, congenital external auditory canal atresia and single sided deafness who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. The last generation of hearing aid for sensorineural hearing loss is cochlear implant. Bimodal amplification improves binaural hearing. Hearing aids alone do not make listening easier in all situations. The things that can interfere with listening are background noises, distance from a sound and reverberation or echo. The device used most often today is the Frequency Modulated (FM system.

  12. Modelling counter-current chromatography: a chemical engineering perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanian, A E

    2002-10-11

    In conventional chromatography, a solute is usually viewed to be longitudinally transported only in the mobile phase, remaining longitudinally motionless in the stationary phase. In counter-current chromatography, both phases undergo intense mixing in the variable force field of a coil planet centrifuge and longitudinal dispersion of matter in the stationary phase is not to be excluded. To take into account longitudinal mixing in both phases, a cell model of chromatographic process is proposed in which the number of perfectly mixed cells n is determined by the rates of mixing in stationary (Ds) and mobile (Dm) phases by the equation n = LF/(2ADc)/(1 + Sf(lambda - 1)) with A = K(D)D(S)/Dm (F, L, Ac and KD are the mobile phase flow-rate, column length, column cross-section and distribution ratio, respectively). This equation has been derived by comparing the discontinuous cell model with continuous diffusion assuming equilibrium conditions. Parameter determination and their relationships are discussed.

  13. A geomagnetically induced current warning system: model development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, A.; Clarke, E.; Reay, S.; Thomson, A.

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC), which can flow in technological systems at the Earth's surface, are a consequence of magnetic storms and Space Weather. A well-documented practical problem for the power transmission industry is that GIC can affect the lifetime and performance of transformers within the power grid. Operational mitigation is widely considered to be one of the best strategies to manage the Space Weather and GIC risk. Therefore in the UK a magnetic storm warning and GIC monitoring and analysis programme has been under development by the British Geological Survey and Scottish Power plc (the power grid operator for Central Scotland) since 1999. Under the auspices of the European Space Agency's service development activities BGS is developing the capability to meet two key user needs that have been identified. These needs are, firstly, the development of a near real-time solar wind shock/ geomagnetic storm warning, based on L1 solar wind data and, secondly, the development of an integrated surface geo-electric field and power grid network model that should allow prediction of GIC throughout the power grid in near real time. While the final goal is a `seamless package', the components of the package utilise diverse scientific techniques. We review progress to date with particular regard to the validation of the individual components of the package. The Scottish power grid response to the October 2003 magnetic storms is also discussed and model and validation data are presented.

  14. A two-layer depth-averaged model for both the dilute and the concentrated parts of pyroclastic currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelfoun, Karim

    2017-06-01

    Pyroclastic currents are very destructive and their complex behavior makes the related hazards difficult to predict. A new numerical model has been developed to simulate the emplacement of both the concentrated and the dilute parts of pyroclastic currents using two coupled depth-averaged approaches. Interaction laws allow the concentrated current (pyroclastic flow) to generate a dilute current (pyroclastic surge) and, inversely, the dilute current to form a concentrated current or a deposit. The density of the concentrated current is assumed to be constant during emplacement, whereas the density of the dilute current changes depending on the particle supply from the concentrated current and the mass lost through sedimentation. The model is explored theoretically using simplified geometries as proxies for natural source conditions and topographies. It reproduces the relationships observed in the field between the surge genesis and the topography: the increase in surge production in constricted valleys, the decoupling between the concentrated and the dilute currents, and the formation of surge-derived concentrated flows. The strong nonlinear link between the surge genesis and the velocity of the concentrated flow beneath it could explain the sudden occurrence of powerful and destructive surges and the difficulty of predicting this occurrence. A companion paper compares the results of the model with the field data for the eruption of Merapi in 2010 and demonstrates that the approach is able to reproduce the natural emplacement of the concentrated and the dilute pyroclastic currents studied with good accuracy.

  15. A Model of Digital Payment Infrastructure Formation and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina; Damsgaard, Jan

    2014-01-01

    in the regulatory environment and combining it with the disruptive and innovative nature of the mobile phone, the result is a market that is rapidly transforming from well-established structure into a state of flux. We build a model to understand and explain this transformation of the digital payment infrastructure....... The model captures the formation and development of the digital payment infrastructure with a particular emphasis on the regulator´s and innovator’s perspective. It consists of four stages characterized by slow incremental change which are followed by short and rapid bursts of discontinuity. Each stage...... is portrayed by its evolutionary dynamics, the nature of the payment platform, the legal implications, the level of competition, and what drives the discontinuity....

  16. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-08-05

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H(+) translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na(+) translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. The electrochemical Na(+) gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains.

  17. Formation, characterization and mathematical modeling of the aerobic granular sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bing-Jie [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Advanced Water Management Centre

    2013-07-01

    Reports on successful aerobic granulation of sludge in pilot-scale reactor for treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater and identifies the key factors responsible for this process. Develops comprehensive models for sludge granulation, microbial interactions and microbial products formation to provide insights into the dynamics of all the soluble and solid components in aerobic granular sludge system. Demonstrates accelerated start-up and optimization of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation process by seeding the reactor with aerobic granules. Aerobic granular sludge technology will play an important role as an innovative technology alternative to the present activated sludge process in industrial and municipal wastewater treatment in the near future. Intended to fill the gaps in the studies of aerobic granular sludge, this thesis comprehensively investigates the formation, characterization and mathematical modeling of aerobic granular sludge, through integrating the process engineering tools and advanced molecular microbiology. The research results of this thesis contributed significantly to the advance of understanding and optimization of the bacterial granulation processes, the next generation of technology for cost-effective biological wastewater treatment.

  18. Numerical study on the perception-based network formation model

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation, we numerically study a perception-based network formation model. Here each individual is assumed to have his/her own perception of the actual network, and use it to decide whether to create a link to other individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating his/her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. The initial actual network and initial perceptions are modeled by Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random networks but with different linking probabilities. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. The effect of initial conditions on the complexity o...

  19. A Model of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Leading to Reticulate Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tamulonis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these fossils, which are billions of years old, directly to the specific microorganisms that built them. Identifying the physicochemical conditions and microorganism properties that lead microbial mats to form macroscopic structures can lead to a better understanding of the conditions on Earth at the dawn of life. In this article, a cell-based model is used to simulate the formation of reticulate patterns in cultures of Pseudanabaena. A minimal system of long and flexible trichomes capable of gliding motility is shown to be sufficient to produce stable patterns consisting of a network of streams. Varying model parameters indicate that systems with little to no cohesion, high trichome density and persistent movement are conducive to reticulate pattern formation, in conformance with experimental observations.

  20. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  1. Lessons from the Current Japanese Triple Helix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Hosono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since mid-1990s, the Japanese government has encouraged university-industry collaboration to foster innovations for economic growth. Learning from the American licensing model of technology transfer, Japanese Bay-Dole Act and TLO (Technology Licensing Organization Act were enacted in late 1990s. In addition, the corporatization of Japanese National Universities (JNUs in 2004 spurred their technology-transfer activities to obtain external funds. As a result, more than 50 TLOs has been established since FY1998, and also the number of patent application and licensed patents were increased at JUNs rapidly after FY2004. However, the licensing income has been stayed poor and some of TLOs were abolished. There are few evidences that the introduction of licensing model of technology transfer into Japan could contribute to innovation properly. Therefore, this study will try to clarify if licensing model of technology transfer work in Japan by analyzing the Japanese National University (JNU patent. There are 20,485 applied patent, which invented by JNU’s researcher(s from FY2004 to 2007. 38% of them were applied by solely by JNUs and 52% were by JNU and Private Firms etc. In the Japanese Patent Act, jointly applied patents are not licensed to the third party without the consent of co-applicant(s. Hence, more than half of the patent invented by JNU researchers is not basically used for patent licensing. Consequently, JNUs and TLOs face difficulties in patent licensing under the current Patent Act. Keywords: Technology Transfer, TLO, University Patent, Japan

  2. A General Shear-Dependent Model for Thrombus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, He; Humphrey, Jay D; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Modeling the transport, activation, and adhesion of platelets is crucial in predicting thrombus formation and growth following a thrombotic event in normal or pathological conditions. We propose a shear-dependent platelet adhesive model based on the Morse potential that is calibrated by existing in vivo and in vitro experimental data and can be used over a wide range of flow shear rates ([Formula: see text]). We introduce an Eulerian-Lagrangian model where hemodynamics is solved on a fixed Eulerian grid, while platelets are tracked using a Lagrangian framework. A force coupling method is introduced for bidirectional coupling of platelet motion with blood flow. Further, we couple the calibrated platelet aggregation model with a tissue-factor/contact pathway coagulation cascade, representing the relevant biology of thrombin generation and the subsequent fibrin deposition. The range of shear rates covered by the proposed model encompass venous and arterial thrombosis, ranging from low-shear-rate conditions in abdominal aortic aneurysms and thoracic aortic dissections to thrombosis in stenotic arteries following plaque rupture, where local shear rates are extremely high.

  3. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  4. Regional modeling of SOA formation under consideration of HOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzsche, Kathrin; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Tilgner, Andreas; Berndt, Torsten; Poulain, Laurent; Wolke, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the major burden of the atmospheric organic particulate matter with about 140 - 910 TgC/yr (Hallquist et al., 2009). SOA particles are formed via the oxidation of volatile organic carbons (VOCs), where the volatility of the VOCs is lowered. Therefore, gaseous compounds can either nucleate to form new particles or condense on existing particles. The framework of SOA formation under natural conditions is very complex, because there are a variety of gas-phase precursors, atmospheric degradation pathways and formed oxidation products. Up to now, atmospheric models underpredict the SOA mass. Therefore, improved regional scale model implementations are necessary to achieve a better agreement between model predictions and field measurements. Recently, highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) were found in the gas phase from laboratory and field studies (Jokinen et al., 2015, Mutzel et al., 2015, Berndt et al., 2016a,b). From box model studies, it is known that HOMs are important for the early aerosol growth, however they are not yet considered in mechanisms applied in regional models. The present study utilizes the state-of-the-art multiscale model system COSMO-MUSCAT (Wolke et al., 2012), which is qualified for process studies in local and regional areas. The established model system was enhanced by a kinetic partitioning approach (Zaveri et al., 2014) for the gas-to-particle transfer of oxidized VOCs. The framework of the partitioning approach and the gas-phase mechanism were tested in a box model and evaluated with chamber studies, before implementing in the 3D model system COSMO-MUSCAT. Moreover, HOMs are implemented in the same way for the regional SOA modeling. 3D simulations were performed with an equilibrium partitioning and diffusion dependent partitioning approach, respectively. The presentation will provide first 3D simulation results including comparisons with field measurements from the TROPOS field site

  5. Modeling SOAaq Formation: Explicit Organic Chemistry in Cloud Droplets with CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, A. G.; Sareen, N.; Fahey, K.; Hutzell, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere has a substantial impact on climate and can lead to air quality changes that adversely impact human health and the environment. The chemistry is complex because of the variety of compounds present in the atmosphere and the phase transitions associated with multiphase reactions. These reactions can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAAQ) in the atmosphere. When included, current photochemical models typically use a simple parameterization to describe SOAAQ formation. Here, we discuss the implementation of explicit aqueous SOA chemistry in a box model of the CMAQ 5.0.1 aqueous phase chemistry mechanism using the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP). The expanded chemistry model includes reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde as precursors to form SOAAQ and is based on the mechanism from Lim et. al. 2010. The current aqueous phase chemistry module in CMAQ uses a forward Euler method to solve the system of oxidation equations, estimating the pH with a bisection method assuming electroneutrality, and multiphase processes are solved sequentially. This is not robust for systems with large dynamic range (e.g., multiphase systems), and inhibits expansion of the aqueous phase chemical mechanism to adequately incorporate the growing body of literature that describes multiphase organic chemistry. The KPP solver allows for all processes to be solved simultaneously and facilitates expansion of the current mechanism. Addition of explicit organic reactions and H2O2 photolysis in the KPP box model results in increased mass of organic aerosol and more realistic predictions. For particulate matter focused air quality management strategies to be effective, it is important that models move away from the yield-based approach currently used and expand to include more explicit organic chemistry.

  6. Formation of an Integrated Stock Price Forecast Model in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Dzikevičius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technical and fundamental analyses are widely used to forecast stock prices due to lack of knowledge of other modern models and methods such as Residual Income Model, ANN-APGARCH, Support Vector Machine, Probabilistic Neural Network and Genetic Fuzzy Systems. Although stock price forecast models integrating both technical and fundamental analyses are currently used widely, their integration is not justified comprehensively enough. This paper discusses theoretical one-factor and multi-factor stock price forecast models already applied by investors at a global level and determines possibility to create and apply practically a stock price forecast model which integrates fundamental and technical analysis with the reference to the Lithuanian stock market. The research is aimed to determine the relationship between stock prices of the 14 Lithuanian companies listed in the Main List by the Nasdaq OMX Baltic and various fundamental variables. Based on correlation and regression analysis results and application of c-Squared Test, ANOVA method, a general stock price forecast model is generated. This paper discusses practical implications how the developed model can be used to forecast stock prices by individual investors and suggests additional check measures.

  7. Modeling of defect formation in silicon carbide during PVT growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachev, Roman Victorovich

    2002-01-01

    The improvement of PVT grown SiC structural quality is crucial for the wide commercialization of SiC devices that feature superior characteristics for power conditioning and control. This is why, this dissertation is devoted to investigation and development of comprehensive models that can help to explain, understand and, then, suppress (eliminate) formation of various defects in SiC during PVT growth. The dissertation consists of six chapters. The first chapter is introductory. The second chapter considers in detail the general principles and physical bases of the SiC PVT growth technique along with the temperature dependence of pressure, composition and stoichiometry of the SiC gaseous phase. Questions related to the diffusive mass transport in the SiC growth cell are also discussed. The growth velocity as a function of the mass transport rate, the heat balance at the surface of crystallization and the growth front-crystal backside temperature difference is analyzed. Also the graphitization processes and instability of the sublimation temperature in the source material region are addressed. Chapter number three concerns generation of silicon and carbon second phase precipitates at the front of SiC crystallization. The comprehensive models concerning these phenomena are developed. The fourth chapter considers defect formation in SiC caused by the presence of carbon and/or silicon second phase particles at the growth front. Generation mechanisms of such structural defects as heterogeneous inclusions, point and planar defects, and filamentary voids are discussed in detail. Chapter number five deals with the defects caused by thermal stresses in the growing boule of SiC. Analytical estimations of the axially symmetric temperature field distribution and shear stress radial distribution in plane strain approximation are employed in order to estimate the extent to which such phenomena cause the generation of dislocations and micropipe formation in the growing ingot. The

  8. The efficiency of nanotube formation on titanium anodized under voltage and current control in fluoride/glycerol electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valota, A; LeClere, D J; Hashimoto, T; Skeldon, P; Thompson, G E [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Berger, S; Kunze, J; Schmuki, P [Department of Materials Science, WW4-LKO, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martenstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-09-03

    The formation of nanotubes on titanium is compared for anodizing under controlled voltage and controlled current in a fluoride/glycerol electrolyte. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis are employed to determine the film compositions. Film morphologies are examined by electron microscopy. The findings reveal films of approximate composition TiO{sub 2}.0.15TiF{sub 4} that probably also contain derivatives of glycerol. Controlled voltage conditions resulted in more uniform final nanotube dimensions, for a particular charge density, and the highest efficiency of film growth, with the charge of the titanium in the film representing {approx}48% of the charge passed during anodizing. Under current control, the efficiency decreased from {approx}40% to {approx}23% with increase of the current density from 0.1 to 0.5 mA cm{sup -2}. Further, the thickness of the barrier layer was sometimes enhanced under current control, possibly due to a non-uniform current distribution and consequently elevated local temperature.

  9. New pathway for the formation of metallic cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compounds induced by an electric current

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Jin Park; Ju-Young Cho; Min-Woo Jeong; Sekwon Na; Young-Chang Joo

    2016-01-01

    The novel discovery of a current-induced transition from insulator to metal in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeSb4Te7 have been studied by means of a model using line-patterned samples. The resistivity of cubic phase Ge-Sb-Te compound was reduced by an electrical current (~1 MA/cm2), and the final resistivity was determined based on the stress current density, regardless of the initial resistivity and temperature, which indicates that the conductivity of Ge-Sb-Te compound can be modu...

  10. Modeling And Simulation of Speed and flux Estimator Based on Current & voltage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Chandra Jain

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduce a estimator based on and current & voltage model used in induction motor (IM drive. The rotor speed estimation is based on the model reference adaptive system (MRAS approach. The closed loop control mechanism is based on the voltage and current model. The control and estimation algorithms utilize the synchronous coordinates as a frame of reference. A speed sensor less induction motor (IM drive with Robust control characteristics is introduced. First, a speed observation system, which is insensitive to the variations of motor parameters.

  11. Modeling of formation of intraplate partial melting zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study suggests the mathematical model of dynamics of partial melting in lithosphere causing formation of magmatic systems. The intraplate magmatic systems can be formed at achievement of required thermodynamic conditions, which can be developed due to the following mechanisms: contact heating; decompression melting at mantle matter penetration into lithosphere; and heating by filtering mantle melts and fluids in the weakened lithosphere zones above the asthenospheric structure related to a hotspot. The most efficient mechanism from the point of time and heating degree is the latter one. It is heating of lithosphere matter by mantle melts and fluids, which is especially important for development of melting sites in these systems. At formation of intraplate magmatic systems the fluid is filtered in a porous medium, porous matrix melts partially, and finally a granulated medium is formed there. To decrease the processes of heat and mass transfer in this system, the equations of dynamics of multiphase multivelocity media are derived in this study. In contrast to the Darcy-type models used in previous studies, the suggested two-velocity hydrodynamics theory describing fluid motions in a porous medium with complex reology is the thermodynamically consistent one and allows the description of nonstationary nonlinear processes. The governing equations of the model describe both the process of filtration through the deformed porous matrix and hydrodynamics of heterophase granulated medium without pressure equilibrium in phases. The work was supported by the grants 08-05-00467, 09-05-00602, 09-05-01084 from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  12. Drought Duration Biases in Current Global Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Several droughts in the recent past are characterized by their increased duration and intensity. In particular, substantially prolonged droughts have brought major societal and economic losses in certain regions, yet climate change projections of such droughts in terms of duration is subject to large uncertainties. This study analyzes the biases of drought duration in state-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Drought durations are defined as negative precipitation anomalies and evaluated with three observation-based datasets in the period of 1901-2010. Large spread in biases of GCMs is commonly found in all regions, with particular strong biases in North East Brazil, Africa, Northern Australia, Central America, Central and Northern Europe, Sahel and Asia. Also in most regions, the interquartile range of bias lies below 0, meaning that the GCMs tend to underestimate drought durations. Meanwhile in some regions such as Western South America, the Amazon, Sahel, West and South Africa, and Asia, considerable inconsistency among the three observation-based datasets were found. These results indicate substantial uncertainties and errors in current GCMs for simulating drought durations as well as a large spread in observation-based datasets, both of which are found to be particularly strong in those regions that are often considered to be hot spots of projected future drying. The underlying sources of these uncertainties need to be identified in further study and will be applied to constrain GCM-based drought projections under climate change.

  13. The break of shielding current at pulsed field magnetization of a superconducting annulus (experiment and model simulation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, V. S.; Krasnoperov, E. P.; Kartamyshev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    During the pulsed field magnetization of a high-T c annulus in liquid nitrogen the shielding current drops abruptly, providing rapid penetration of the magnetic flux into the hole of the superconductor. After the break of current the trapped field in the hole is small and negative although the body of the annulus remains highly magnetized. In the present work the current breaking effect is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of the pulse parameter on the shielding current evolution during the break is researched. A simple model for the qualitative description of this process is proposed. The model shows the development of heating localized on the inhomogeneity of the high-temperature superconductor annulus providing the formation of a high resistive channel with temperature near to T c. The appearance of this hot channel leads to the rapid reduction of the shielding current and presents a new scenario of flux jump at high temperature.

  14. A three-dimensional, wave-current coupled, sediment transport model for POM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hua

    2010-01-01

    In the high-energy environment of coastal seas and estuaries,strong sediment resuspension/ deposition events are driven by surface waves,tides,winds and buoyancy driven currents.In recent years,A POM based three-dimensional ,wave-current coupled ,sediment transport model has been developed by the University of New South Wales.This paper presents several examples of the model applications to study sediment dynamics in the environments where forcings such as waves,tides, and winds are equally important to affect sediment fluxes and distributions.Firstly,the sediment transport model coupled to the Yellow Sea general circulation model and a third generation wave model SWAN was implemented in the Yellow Sea to study the dynamics of the sediment transport and resuspension in the northern Jiangsu shoal-water(NJSW).The sediment distributions and fluxes and their inter-annual variability were studied by realistic numerical simulations.The study found that the surface waves played a dominant role over the tides to form the turbidity maxima along the muddy coast of NJSW. Secondly,the sediment transport model was used to explore the effect of suspended sediment-induced stratificationin the bottom boundary layer(BBL).The model uses a re-parameterized bottom drag coefficient Cd that incorporates a linear stability function of flux Richardson number RsThe study has shown that the sediment induced stratification in the BBL reduces the vertical eddy viscosity and bottom shear stress in comparison with the model prediction in a neutrally stratified BBL.In response to these apparent reductions,the tidal current shear is increased and sediments are abnormally concentrated within a thin wall layer that is overlain by a thicker layer with much smaller concentration.The formation of this fluid-mud layer near the seabed has led to a significant reduction in the total sediment transport.This study contributes to the understanding of formations of tidal flats along the coasts of turbid seas

  15. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  16. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  17. An improved ice cloud formation parameterization in the EMAC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacer, Sara; Pozzer, Andrea; Karydis, Vlassis; Tsimpidi, Alexandra; Tost, Holger; Sullivan, Sylvia; Nenes, Athanasios; Barahona, Donifan; Lelieveld, Jos

    2017-04-01

    Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface and are an important modulator of the radiative energy budget of the atmosphere. Despite their importance in the global climate system, there are still large uncertainties in understanding the microphysical properties and interactions with aerosols. Ice crystal formation is quite complex and a variety of mechanisms exists for ice nucleation, depending on aerosol characteristics and environmental conditions. Ice crystals can be formed via homogeneous nucleation or heterogeneous nucleation of ice-nucleating particles in different ways (contact, immersion, condensation, deposition). We have implemented the computationally efficient cirrus cloud formation parameterization by Barahona and Nenes (2009) into the EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) model in order to improve the representation of ice clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. The parameterization computes the ice crystal number concentration from precursor aerosols and ice-nucleating particles accounting for the competition between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and among different freezing modes. Our work shows the differences and the improvements obtained after the implementation with respect to the previous version of EMAC.

  18. ON THE FORMATION OF DIPEPTIDES IN INTERSTELLAR MODEL ICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Kim, Y. S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Stockton, A. M.; Jensen, E. C.; Mathies, R. A. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    The hypothesis of an exogenous origin and delivery of biologically important molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation. Dipeptides like Gly-Gly detected in the Murchison meteorite are considered as key molecules in prebiotic chemistry because biofunctional dipeptides present the vital link in the evolutionary transition from prebiotic amino acids to early proteins. However, the processes that could lead to the exogenous abiotic synthesis of dipeptides are unknown. Here, we report the identification of two proteinogenic dipeptides-Gly-Gly and Leu-Ala-formed via electron-irradiation of interstellar model ices followed by annealing the irradiated samples to 300 K. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced, non-enzymatic formation of proteinogenic dipeptides in interstellar ice analogs is facile. Once synthesized and incorporated into the ''building material'' of solar systems, biomolecules at least as complex as dipeptides could have been delivered to habitable planets such as early Earth by meteorites and comets, thus seeding the beginning of life as we know it.

  19. On the Formation of Dipeptides in Interstellar Model Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R. I.; Stockton, A. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Jensen, E. C.; Mathies, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    The hypothesis of an exogenous origin and delivery of biologically important molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation. Dipeptides like Gly-Gly detected in the Murchison meteorite are considered as key molecules in prebiotic chemistry because biofunctional dipeptides present the vital link in the evolutionary transition from prebiotic amino acids to early proteins. However, the processes that could lead to the exogenous abiotic synthesis of dipeptides are unknown. Here, we report the identification of two proteinogenic dipeptides—Gly-Gly and Leu-Ala—formed via electron-irradiation of interstellar model ices followed by annealing the irradiated samples to 300 K. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced, non-enzymatic formation of proteinogenic dipeptides in interstellar ice analogs is facile. Once synthesized and incorporated into the ''building material'' of solar systems, biomolecules at least as complex as dipeptides could have been delivered to habitable planets such as early Earth by meteorites and comets, thus seeding the beginning of life as we know it.

  20. Modeling of Propagation and Transformation of Transient Nonlinear Waves on A Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Sulisz; Maciej Paprota

    2013-01-01

    A novel theoretical approach is applied to predict the propagation and transformation of transient nonlinear waves on a current. The problem was solved by applying an eigenfunction expansion method and the derived semi-analytical solution was employed to study the transformation of wave profile and the evolution of wave spectrum arising from the nonlinear interactions of wave components in a wave train which may lead to the formation of very large waves. The results show that the propagation of wave trains is significantly affected by a current. A relatively small current may substantially affect wave train components and the wave train shape. This is observed for both opposing and following current. The results demonstrate that the application of the nonlinear model has a substantial effect on the shape of a wave spectrum. A train of originally linear and very narrow-banded waves changes its one-peak spectrum to a multi-peak one in a fairly short distance from an initial position. The discrepancies between the wave trains predicted by applying the linear and nonlinear models increase with the increasing wavelength and become significant in shallow water even for waves with low steepness. Laboratory experiments were conducted in a wave flume to verify theoretical results. The free-surface elevations recorded by a system of wave gauges are compared with the results provided by the nonlinear model. Additional verification was achieved by applying a Fourier analysis and comparing wave amplitude spectra obtained from theoretical results with experimental data. A reasonable agreement between theoretical results and experimental data is observed for both amplitudes and phases. The model predicts fairly well multi-peak spectra, including wave spectra with significant nonlinear wave components.

  1. The Formation of Molecular Clouds: Insights from Numerical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2010-10-01

    Galactic star formation occurs at a surprisingly low rate. Yet, recent large-scale surveys of dark clouds in the Galaxy show that one rarely finds molecular clouds without young stellar objects, suggesting that star formation should occur rapidly upon molecular cloud formation. This rapid onset challenges the traditional concept of ``slow'' star formation in long-lived molecular clouds. It also imposes strong constraints on the physical properties of the parental clouds, mandating that a cloud's structure and dynamics controlling stellar birth must arise during its formation. This requires a new approach to study initial conditions of star formation, namely addressing the formation of molecular clouds. Taking into account the observational constraints, I will outline the physics of flow-driven molecular cloud formation. I will discuss the relevance and the limitations of this scenario for setting the star formation efficiency in our Galaxy and beyond.

  2. Laboratory and Numerical Modeling of Smoke Characteristics for Superfog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, C.; Lu, V.; Tsui, K.; Princevac, M.; Venkatram, A.; Mahalingam, S.; Achtemeier, G.; Weise, D.

    2011-12-01

    Land management techniques in wildland areas include prescribed fires to promote biodiversity and reduce risk of severe wildfires across the United States. Several fatal car pileups have been associated with smoke-related visibility reduction from prescribed burns. Such events have occurred in year 2000 on the interstate highways I-10 and I-95, 2001 on the I-4, 2006 on the I-95, and 2008 on the I-4 causing numerous fatalities, injuries, and damage to property. In some of the cases visibility reduction caused by smoke and fog combinations traveling over roadways have been reported to be less than 3 meters, defined as superfog. Our research focuses on delineating the conditions that lead to formation of the rare phenomena of superfog and creating a tool to enable land managers to effectively plan prescribed burns and prevent tragic events. It is hypothesized that the water vapor from combustion, live fuels, soil moisture, and ambient air condense onto the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) particles emitted from low intensity smoldering fires. Physical and numerical modeling has been used to investigate these interactions. A physical model in the laboratory has been developed to characterize the properties of smoke resulting from smoldering pine needle litters at the PSW Forest Service in Riverside, CA. Temporal measurements of temperature, relative humidity, sensible heat flux, radiation heat flux, convective heat flux, particulate matter concentrations and visibilities have been measured for specific cases. The size distribution and number concentrations of the fog droplets formed inside the chamber by mixing cool dry and moist warm air masses to produce near superfog visibilities were measured by a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer. Thermodynamic modeling of smoke and ambient air was conducted to estimate liquid water contents (LWC) available to condense into droplets and form significant reductions in visibility. The results show that LWC of less than 2 g m-3 can be

  3. Modelling opinion formation driven communities in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo K

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper we proposed a model to study the dynamics of opinion formation in human societies by a co-evolution process involving two distinct time scales of fast transaction and slower network evolution dynamics. In the transaction dynamics we take into account short range interactions as discussions between individuals and long range interactions to describe the attitude to the overall mood of society. The latter is handled by a uniformly distributed parameter $\\alpha$, assigned randomly to each individual, as quenched personal bias. The network evolution dynamics is realized by rewiring the societal network due to state variable changes as a result of transaction dynamics. The main consequence of this complex dynamics is that communities emerge in the social network for a range of values in the ratio between time scales. In this paper we focus our attention on the attitude parameter $\\alpha$ and its influence on the conformation of opinion and the size of the resulting communities. We present numer...

  4. Thermodynamic model of coherent island formation on vicinal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxubetter@gmail.com; Sun, Xiao-Hong [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Yu, Yanguang [School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Ren, Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2014-04-28

    A thermodynamic model has been proposed to address the formation of coherent island on the vicinal substrate. The morphological transition from square based island to elongated based one with various substrate misorientations is described. The initial stage of nucleation and growth process of islands in Stranski–Krastanow system is studied by taking into account the elastic deformations and the change of energy in the case of two-dimensional growth mode. The theoretical analysis shows the minimum nucleation barrier of island is on the decrease with increment of substrate misorientation, which means the nucleation of island on vicinal substrate is more favorable than that on flat substrate. By using the fitting data of experimental results done by Persichetti et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 036104 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 82, 121309(R) (2010)], we provide a meaningful explanation of the experimental observations.

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  7. Parameterization of Cloud Droplet Formation in Global Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenes, A.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    An aerosol activation parameterization has been developed based on a generalized representation of aerosol size and composition within the framework of an ascending adiabatic parcel; this allows for parameterizing the activation of chemically complex aerosol with an arbitrary size distribution and mixing state. The new parameterization introduces the concept of"population splitting", in which the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that form droplets are treated as two separate populations; those that have a size close to their critical diameter and those that do not.Explicit consideration of kinetic limitations of droplet growth is introduced. Our treatment of the activation process unravels much of its complexity. As a result of this, a substantial number of conditions of droplet formation can be treated completely free of empirical information or correlations; there are, however, some conditions of droplet activation for which an empirically derived correlation is utilized. Predictions of the parameterization are compared against extensive cloud parcel model simu;lations for a variety of aerosol activation conditions that cover a wide range of chemical variability and CCN concentrations. The parameterization tracks the parcel model simulations closely and robustly. The parameterization presented here is intended to allow for a comprehensive assessment of the aerosol indirect effect in general circulation models.

  8. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  9. Light-front model of the kaon electromagnetic current

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Frederico, T; Tomio, Lauro

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factor is extracted from both components of the electromagnetic current: J(plus) and J(minus) with a pseudo-scalar coupling of the quarks to the kaon. In the case of J(plus) there is no pair term contribution in the Drell-Yan frame. However, J(minus) component of the electromagnetic current the pair term contribution is different from zero and is necessary include it to preserve the rotational symmetry of the current.

  10. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Murai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL, a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat.

  11. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  12. AUTOMATED FORMATION OF CALCULATION MODELS OF TURBOGENERATORS FOR SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT FEMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Milykh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Attention is paid to the popular FEMM (Finite Element Method Magnetics program which is effective in the numerical calculations of the magnetic fields of electrical machines. The main problem of its using - high costs in time on the formation of a graphical model representing the design and on the formation of the physical model representing the materials properties and the winding currents of machines – is solved. For this purpose, principles of the automated formation of such models are developed and presented on the turbogenerator example. The task is performed by a program written in an algorithmic language Lua integrated into the package FEMM. The program is universal in terms of varying the geometry and dimensions of the designed turbogenerators. It uses a minimum of input information in a digital form representing the design of the whole turbogenerator and its fragments. A general structure of the Lua script is provided, significant parts of its text, the graphic results of work's phases, as well as explanations of the program and instructions for its use are given. Performance capabilities of the compiled Lua script are shown on the example of the real 340 MW turbogenerator.

  13. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  14. Insights into the formation and dynamics of coignimbrite plumes from one-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwell, S. L.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.

    2016-06-01

    Coignimbrite plumes provide a common and effective mechanism by which large volumes of fine-grained ash are injected into the atmosphere. Nevertheless, controls on formation of these plumes as a function of eruptive conditions are still poorly constrained. Herein, two 1-D axysymmetric steady state models were coupled, the first describing the parent pyroclastic density current and the second describing plume rise. Global sensitivity analysis is applied to investigate controls on coignimbrite plume formation and describe coignimbrite source and the maximum plume height attained. For a range of initial mass flow rates between 108 and 1010 kg/s, modeled liftoff distance (the distance at which neutral buoyancy is attained), assuming radial supercritical flow, is controlled by the initial flow radius, gas mass fraction, flow thickness, and temperature. The predicted decrease in median grain size between flow initiation and plume liftoff is negligible. Calculated initial plume vertical velocities, assuming uniform liftoff velocity over the pyroclastic density current invasion area, are much greater (several tens of m/s) than those previously used in modeling coignimbrite plumes (1 m/s). Such velocities are inconsistent with the fine grain size of particles lofted into coignimbrite plumes, highlighting an unavailability of large clasts, possibly due to particle segregation within the flow, prior to plume formation. Source radius and initial vertical velocity have the largest effect on maximum plume height, closely followed by initial temperature. Modeled plume heights are between 25 and 47 km, comparable with Plinian eruption columns, highlighting the potential of such events for distributing fine-grained ash over significant areas.

  15. The impact of steam and current density on carbon formation from biomass gasification tar on Ni/YSZ, and Ni/CGO solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Joshua; Millan, Marcos; Brandon, Nigel

    The combination of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and biomass gasification has the potential to become an attractive technology for the production of clean renewable energy. However the impact of tars, formed during biomass gasification, on the performance and durability of SOFC anodes has not been well established experimentally. This paper reports an experimental study on the mitigation of carbon formation arising from the exposure of the commonly used Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium-doped ceria) SOFC anodes to biomass gasification tars. Carbon formation and cell degradation was reduced through means of steam reforming of the tar over the nickel anode, and partial oxidation of benzene model tar via the transport of oxygen ions to the anode while operating the fuel cell under load. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that a threshold current density of 365 mA cm -2 was required to suppress carbon formation in dry conditions, which was consistent with the results of experiments conducted in this study. The importance of both anode microstructure and composition towards carbon deposition was seen in the comparison of Ni/YSZ and Ni/CGO anodes exposed to the biomass gasification tar. Under steam concentrations greater than the thermodynamic threshold for carbon deposition, Ni/YSZ anodes still exhibited cell degradation, as shown by increased polarization resistances, and carbon formation was seen using SEM imaging. Ni/CGO anodes were found to be more resilient to carbon formation than Ni/YSZ anodes, and displayed increased performance after each subsequent exposure to tar, likely due to continued reforming of condensed tar on the anode.

  16. The OPEP protein model: from single molecules, amyloid formation, crowding and hydrodynamics to DNA/RNA systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Fabio; Melchionna, Simone; Tuffery, Pierre; Pasquali, Samuela; Mousseau, Normand; Cragnolini, Tristan; Chebaro, Yassmine; St-Pierre, Jean-Francois; Kalimeri, Maria; Barducci, Alessandro; Laurin, Yoann; Tek, Alex; Baaden, Marc; Nguyen, Phuong Hoang; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-07-07

    The OPEP coarse-grained protein model has been applied to a wide range of applications since its first release 15 years ago. The model, which combines energetic and structural accuracy and chemical specificity, allows the study of single protein properties, DNA-RNA complexes, amyloid fibril formation and protein suspensions in a crowded environment. Here we first review the current state of the model and the most exciting applications using advanced conformational sampling methods. We then present the current limitations and a perspective on the ongoing developments.

  17. Model for Formation of Martian Residual Cap Depressions (Swiss Cheese)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2001-12-01

    In an effort for explain the formation of the `Swiss-cheese' terrain visible on the southern residual cap of Mars (Thomas et al., Nature, 404,2000); we have developed a radiative model to follow the growth/decay of an initial depression due to sublimation/condensation of carbon dioxide. The pits making up this terrain have many distinctive features; they are shallow (~10m deep), with steep walls and flat floors and contain an interior moat that runs along the bottom of the walls. Their diameters range from a few 10's of meters to a kilometer. The model accounts for incident sunlight, emitted thermal radiation, and scattered short and long wave radiation. We have included the effects of a layer of water ice placed under the carbon dioxide at adjustable depth. The water ice layer is free to store heat during the summer (when the carbon dioxide has been removed) through subsurface diffusion of heat. Release of this heat at the end of the summer can inhibit frost formation. We have investigated many cases involving pure dry ice with constant albedo, albedo as a function of insolation, and differing albedo for fresh and residual frost (the latter has lower albedo). In most cases the initial depressions heal themselves and disappear into the surrounding terrain. Cases involving the layer of water ice provide a much closer approximation to the shape of the observed features (especially the flat bottoms). A problem arises of how much exposed water ice we can have during the summer season and still have temperatures averaged over the footprint of the Thermal Emission Spectrometer be close to the carbon dioxide sublimation temperatures. The depth to the water ice layer is a strong controlling factor of the evolution of depression shape and depth in our model. Matching this shape with observations yields important information regarding the depth to any putative water ice layer within the residual cap itself. It is known from laboratory measurements that carbon dioxide is too

  18. Modelling Collective Opinion Formation by Means of Active Brownian Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, F; Schweitzer, Frank; Holyst, Janusz

    1999-01-01

    The concept of active Brownian particles is used to model a collective opinion formation process. It is assumed that individuals in community create a two-component communication field that influences the change of opinions of other persons and/or can induce their migration. The communication field is described by a reaction-diffusion equation, meaning that it has a certain lifetime, which models memory effects, further it can spread out in the community. Within our stochastic approach, the opinion change of the individuals is described by a master equation, while the migration is described by a set of Langevin equations, coupled by the communication field. In the mean-field limit which holds for fast communication, we derive a critical population size, above which the community separates into a majority and a minority with opposite opinions. The existence of external support (e.g. from mass media) can change the ratio between minority and majority, until above a critical external support the supported subpop...

  19. Physical processes in an electron current layer causing intense plasma heating and formation of x-lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, Igor; Wells, B. E.

    2015-05-01

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/me = 400. An ECL evolves through the following stages: (i) Electrostatic (ES) current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation with half width w about 2 electron skin depth (de), (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping of electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with significantly large growth rates in the lower end of the whistler frequency range, (iv) widening of the ECL and modulation of its width by the ETI, (v) gradual heating of electrons by the CDI-driven ES ion modes create the condition that the electrons become hotter than the ions, (vi) despite the reduced electron drift associated with the current disruption by the CDI, the enhanced electron temperature continues to favor a slow growth of the ion waves reaching nonlinear amplitudes, (vii) the nonlinear ion waves undergo modulation and collapse into localized density cavities containing spiky electric fields like in double layers (DLs), (viii) such spiky electric fields are very effective in further rapid heating of both electrons and ions. As predicted by the electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) theories, the ETI growth rate maximizes at wave numbers in the range 0.4 field and w is the evolving half width of the ECL. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the emerging x-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower-hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. We compare our results with experimental results and satellite observation.

  20. Covariance of Light-Front Models Pair Current

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Naus, H W L; Sauer, P U

    1999-01-01

    We compute the "+" component of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component $q^+=q^0+q^3$. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the longitudinal zero momentum mode, contributing to the light-front current in the Breit-frame. The covariance of the current is violated, if such pair terms are not included in its matrix elements. We illustrate our discussion with some numerical examples.

  1. BAFF blockade prevents anti-drug antibody formation in a mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Morel, Laurence; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in association with enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human GAA in Gaa(-/-) mice. BAFF blockade delayed antibody production and increased GAA activity within tissues with protection from anaphylaxis. Anti-BAFF also resolved antibody formation during an immune response and precluded the maturation of antibody secreting cells from entering the bone marrow compartment. This treatment modality may therefore be a viable alternative for the clinical management of antibody formation for Pompe disease and has potential use against antibody formation in other protein replacement therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Revised model of thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    It is shown analytically and experimentally that thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements at negative bias incompletely describe oxide-trap charge in SIMOX and bipolar base oxides irradiated at 0 V. Positive-bias TSC is also required.

  3. Constraints on the formation of double neutron stars from the observed eccentricities and current limits on merger rates

    CERN Document Server

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Bulik, Tomasz; Gladysz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse SN from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of sigma=265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs et al. (2005) and then modify this distribution by changing the velocity dispersion towards smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with sigma = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both obs...

  4. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  5. The Effects of Presentation Format for Behavior Modeling of Interpersonal Skills in Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Min Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the most effective model presentation format in behavior modeling to teach interpersonal skills in online learning environments. Four model presentation formats were compared; video, pictures plus audio, audio only, and text-script only. The effects of the model presentation were investigated in terms of…

  6. Land use change modelling: current practice and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Schot, P.; Dijst, M.J.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Land use change models are tools to support the analysis of the causes and consequences of land use dynamics. Scenario analysis with land use models can support land use planning and policy. Numerous land use models are available, developed from different disciplinary backgrounds. This paper reviews

  7. Dense water cascading, bottom currents and sediment wave formation at the exit of the Bari canyon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Leonardo; Miserocchi, Stefano; Boldrin, Alfredo; Turchetto, Margherita; Foglini, Federica; Trincardi, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The dense water forming in the North Adriatic (NAdDW) spreading southward along the Italian continental shelf, sinks in the Southern Adriatic basin through particular cascading events. Such events are seasonal, occurring specially in April, with variable intensity. These phenomena control the water mass mixing, the deep ocean ventilation, the behaviour of deep ecosystems, the formation of complex erosive and depositional bedforms and the abyssal export and burial of nutrients and carbon. Because of the NadDW formation is linked to climate factors (frequency, duration and size of Bura winds), the temporal variations of the NadDW dispersion into the Southern Adriatic allow to make inferences of the impact of recent climate changes on the ecosystems of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Previous research projects (EuroStrataform, HERMES) acquired a large data set of bathymetric, side-scan sonar (TOBI) and Chirp sonar profiles, which were used to build detailed morpho-bathymetric maps of the Southern Adriatic margin. There, the seabed is extremely complex, characterized by a large variety of bedforms (sediment waves, erosive scours, longitudinal furrows and giant comet marks). A branch of the cascading NAdDW is confined and accelerated through the Bari canyon where it produces a strong current capable of reaching down-slope velocities greater than 60 cm s-1 near the bottom at ~600 m of water depth, eroding the canyon thalweg and entraining large amounts of fine-grained sediment. At the exit of the canyon, in water depth greater than 800 m, the current becomes less confined, spreads laterally and generates an 80-km2-wide field of mud waves; these bedforms migrate up current and show amplitudes up to 50 m and wavelengths of about 1 km. Cruise IMPACT-09 of RV Urania was carried out in the Southern Adriatic Sea from 17-30 March 2009 with main scope of studying the impact of NadDW cascading events on the deep ecosystems of the Southern Adriatic. Experiments planned in the cruise

  8. Influence of powder pre-annealing on the phase formation and critical current of Bi-2223/Ag tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X.P.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Li, M.Y.;

    2004-01-01

    the precursor with Ca2PbO4 phase (tape T1) had lower transformation rate of 2223 phase than tapes fabricated using the precursor with 3321 phase (tape T2). SEM results show that a large fraction of secondary phases with big particle size was formed in the tape T1 during the subsequent sintering, which might......The influence of precursor powders with different lead-rich phases, such as Ca2PbO4 and Pb-3(Sr,Bi)(3)Ca2CuOy (3 3 2 1), on the phase formation and critical current of Bi-2223/Ag tapes has been studied. Three precursors with different phase assemblages were prepared and used to make the tapes...

  9. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  10. HFC-134a refrigerant gas hydrate formation process and RIN model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the macroscopic visualization experiments of HFC-134a refrigerant gas hydrate formation are investigated. According to the macroscopic photos and Mori's microscopic photos of HFC-134a hydrate formation process, the mechanism of gas hydrate formation is analyzed.A random inducement nucleation model is presented to describe the hydrate formation process. The factors affecting the fractal growth dimension in the model, such as step,branch increment and angle, are discussed.``

  11. Modeling Current Transfer from PV Modules Based on Meteorological Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Smith, Ryan; Kurtz, Sarah; Jordan, Dirk; Wohlgemuth, John

    2016-11-21

    Current transferred from the active cell circuit to ground in modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID) stress is analyzed with respect to meteorological data. Duration and coulombs transferred as a function of whether the module is wet (from dew or rain) or the extent of uncondensed surface humidity are quantified based on meteorological indicators. With this, functions predicting the mode and rate of coulomb transfer are developed for use in estimating the relative PID stress associated with temperature, moisture, and system voltage in any climate. Current transfer in a framed crystalline silicon module is relatively high when there is no condensed water on the module, whereas current transfer in a thin-film module held by edge clips is not, and displays a greater fraction of coulombs transferred when wet compared to the framed module in the natural environment.

  12. Erosion Control of Scour during Construction. Report 7. Current--A Wave-Induced Current Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    a part of the Ash Wednesday storm of March 1962 was simulated. The numerical results obtained for this case appeared to be reasonable , and the...case, the model yields results that appear to be reasonable . 34 _ _ ~ ~ . . -,.-.-- - ~ n r~ - -r r ~ rn- ~ - .--.--- n- ---- n---. -.- o-" - PART V...4 4 4 4A 44 4 4 4 8 . 4 4 J A 4) 0 AA.. * ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 00 A. N 4VPW))440 444444Nii1))iiIIii)1))))i I& . ’a AWIbIAIA lb ’ CIDP ’a44V

  13. Oligomer formation in the troposphere: from experimental knowledge to 3-D modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lemaire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols has proven to be a critical element of air quality and climate issues. However, its composition and the aging processes it undergoes remain insufficiently understood. This work builds on laboratory knowledge to simulate the formation of oligomers from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA in the troposphere at the continental scale. We compare the results of two different modeling approaches, a 1st-order kinetic process and a pH-dependent parameterization, both implemented in the CHIMERE air quality model (AQM, to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of oligomerized SOA over western Europe. Our results show that there is a strong dependence of the results on the selected modeling approach: while the irreversible kinetic process leads to the oligomerization of about 50 % of the total BSOA mass, the pH-dependent approach shows a broader range of impacts, with a strong dependency on environmental parameters (pH and nature of aerosol and the possibility for the process to be reversible. In parallel, we investigated the sensitivity of each modeling approach to the representation of SOA precursor solubility (Henry's law constant values. Finally, the pros and cons of each approach for the representation of SOA aging are discussed and recommendations are provided to improve current representations of oligomer formation in AQMs.

  14. Inter-machine comparison of the termination phase and energy conversion in tokamak disruptions with runaway current plateau formation and implications for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Esposito, B.; Riccardo, V.; FTU; DIII-D Teams; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-08-01

    The termination of the current and the loss of runaway electrons following runaway current plateau formation during disruptions have been investigated in the JET, DIII-D and FTU tokamaks. Substantial conversion of magnetic energy into runaway kinetic energy, up to ˜10 times the initial plateau runaway kinetic energy, has been inferred for the slowest current terminations. Both modelling and experiment suggest that, in present devices, the efficiency of conversion into runaway kinetic energy is determined to a great extent by the characteristic runaway loss time, τdiff, and the resistive time of the residual ohmic plasma after the disruption, τres, increasing with the ratio τdiff/τres. It is predicted that, in large future devices such as ITER, the generation of runaways by the avalanche mechanism will play an important role, particularly for slow runaway discharge terminations, increasing substantially the amount of energy deposited by the runaways onto the plasma-facing components by the conversion of magnetic energy of the runaway plasma into runaway kinetic energy. Estimates of the power fluxes on the beryllium plasma-facing components during runaway termination in ITER indicate that for runaway currents of up to 2 MA no melting of the components is expected. For larger runaway currents, minimization of the effects of runaway impact on the first wall requires a reduction in the kinetic energy of the runaway beam before termination and, in addition, high plasma density ne and low ohmic plasma resistance (long τres) to prevent large conversion of magnetic into runaway kinetic energy during slow current terminations.

  15. A Model of Electron-Positron Pair Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The elementary electron-positron pair formation process is consideredin terms of a revised quantum electrodynamic theory, with specialattention to the conservation of energy, spin, and electric charge.The theory leads to a wave-packet photon model of narrow line widthand needle-radiation properties, not being available from conventionalquantum electrodynamics which is based on Maxwell's equations. Themodel appears to be consistent with the observed pair productionprocess, in which the created electron and positron form two raysthat start within a very small region and have original directionsalong the path of the incoming photon. Conservation of angular momentum requires the photon to possess a spin, as given by the present theory but not by the conventional one. The nonzero electric field divergence further gives rise to a local intrinsic electric charge density within the photon body, whereas there is a vanishing total charge of the latter. This may explain the observed fact that the photon decays on account of the impact from an external electric field. Such a behaviour should not become possible for a photon having zero local electric charge density.

  16. A Model For Halo Formation With Axion Mixed Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, David J E

    2013-01-01

    There are several issues to do with dwarf galaxy predictions in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology that have suscitated much recent debate about the possible modification of the nature of dark matter as providing a solution. We explore a novel solution involving ultra-light axions that can potentially resolve the missing satellites problem, the cusp-core problem, and the `too big to fail' problem. We discuss approximations to non-linear structure formation in dark matter models containing a component of ultra-light axions across four orders of magnitude in mass, $10^{-24}\\lesssim m_a \\lesssim 10^{-20}$, a range too heavy to be well constrained by linear cosmological probes such as the CMB and matter power spectrum, and too light for other astrophysical or terrestrial axion searches. We find that an axion of mass $m_a\\approx 10^{-21}\\text{eV}$ contributing $\\Omega_a/\\Omega_d \\gtrsim 0.85$ of the total dark matter can introduce a significant kpc scale core in a typical Milky Way satellite galaxy in sharp contr...

  17. Phenomenological Models of Holographic Superconductors and Hall currents

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Francesco; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G

    2010-01-01

    We study general models of holographic superconductivity parametrized by four arbitrary functions of a neutral scalar field of the bulk theory. The models can accommodate several features of real superconductors, like arbitrary critical temperatures and critical exponents in a certain range, and perhaps impurities, boundary or thickness effects. We find analytical expressions for the critical exponents of the general model and show that they satisfy the Rushbrooke identity. An important subclass of models exhibits second order phase transitions. A study of the specific heat shows that general models can also describe holographic superconductors undergoing first, second and third (or higher) order phase transitions. We discuss how small deformations of the HHH model lead to the appearance of resonance peaks in the conductivity, which become narrower as the temperature is gradually decreased, without the need for tuning mass of the scalar to be close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. Finally, we investigate ...

  18. Model of vertical plasma motion during the current quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramov, D. I.; Breizman, B. N.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak disruptions impair plasma position control, which allows the plasma column to move and hit the wall. These detrimental events enhance thermal and mechanical loads due to halo currents and runaway electron losses. Their fundamental understanding and prevention is one of the high-priority items for ITER.

  19. Covariance of light-front models: pair current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Frederico, T.; Naus, H.W.L.; Sauer, P.U.

    1999-01-01

    We compute the + component, i.e., j+ = j0 + j3, of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component q+ = q0 + q3. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the longit

  20. Hybrid Models of Alternative Current Filter for Hvdc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufa Ruslan A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a hybrid simulation concept of HVDC, the developed hybrid AC filter models, providing the sufficiently full and adequate modeling of all single continuous spectrum of quasi-steady-state and transient processes in the filter, are presented. The obtained results suggest that usage of the hybrid simulation approach is carried out a methodically accurate with guaranteed instrumental error solution of differential equation systems of mathematical models of HVDC.

  1. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  2. The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Buell

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

  3. Disc instabilities and semi-analytic modelling of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E

    2008-01-01

    The Efstathiou, Lake and Negroponte (1982) criterion can not distinguish bar stable from bar unstable discs and thus should not be used in semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations. I discuss the reasons for this, illustrate it with examples and point out shortcomings in the recipes used for spheroid formation. I propose an alternative, although much less straightforward, possibility.

  4. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  5. Current Trends in the Detection of Sociocultural Signatures: Data-Driven Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Bell, Eric B.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-09-15

    The harvesting of behavioral data and their analysis through evidence-based reasoning enable the detection of sociocultural signatures in their context to support situation awareness and decision making. Harvested data are used as training materials from which to infer computational models of sociocultural behaviors or calibrate parameters for such models. Harvested data also serve as evidence input that the models use to provide insights about observed and future behaviors for targets of interest. The harvested data is often the result of assembling diverse data types and aggregating them into a form suitable for analysis. Data need to be analyzed to bring out the categories of content that are relevant to the domain being addressed in order to train or run a model. If, for example, we are modeling the intent of a group to engage in violent behavior using messages that the group has broadcasted, then these messages need to be processed to extract and measure indicators of violent intent. The extracted indicators and the associated measurements (e.g. rates or counts of occurrence) can then be used to train/calibrate and run computational models that assess the propensity for violence expressed in the source message. Ubiquitous access to the Internet, mobile telephony and technologies such as digital photography and digital video have enabled social media application platforms such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter that are altering the nature of human social interaction. The fast increasing pace of online social interaction introduces new challenges and opportunities for gathering sociocultural data. Challenges include the development of harvesting and processing techniques tailored to new data environments and formats (e.g. Twitter, Facebook), the integration of social media content with traditional media content, and the protection of personal privacy. As these and other challenges are addressed, a new wealth of behavioral data and data analysis methods becomes

  6. Model of Current Threshold for Perception in Testing Electrical Safety Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓飞; 张朝晖; 李东; 刘国忠; 赵旭

    2010-01-01

    A generalized mathematical model of human body current threshold for perception was established and the current flowing through human body could be arbitrary cyclical waveforms.The relationship between human body current threshold for perception and current frequency, true root mean square(RMS) value and influence factor was described.A test system was established based on electroencephalogram(EEG) to study the relationship between human body current threshold for perception and current waveform, frequency ...

  7. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - III. Modelling galaxy formation and the epoch of reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Simon J.; Geil, Paul M.; Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Duffy, Alan R.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce MERAXES, a new, purpose-built semi-analytic galaxy formation model designed for studying galaxy growth during reionization. MERAXES is the first model of its type to include a temporally and spatially coupled treatment of reionization and is built upon a custom (100 Mpc)3 N-body simulation with high temporal and mass resolution, allowing us to resolve the galaxy and star formation physics relevant to early galaxy formation. Our fiducial model with supernova feedback reproduces the observed optical depth to electron scattering and evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function between z = 5 and 7, predicting that a broad range of halo masses contribute to reionization. Using a constant escape fraction and global recombination rate, our model is unable to simultaneously match the observed ionizing emissivity at z ≲ 6. However, the use of an evolving escape fraction of 0.05-0.1 at z ˜ 6, increasing towards higher redshift, is able to satisfy these three constraints. We also demonstrate that photoionization suppression of low-mass galaxy formation during reionization has only a small effect on the ionization history of the intergalactic medium. This lack of `self-regulation' arises due to the already efficient quenching of star formation by supernova feedback. It is only in models with gas supply-limited star formation that reionization feedback is effective at regulating galaxy growth. We similarly find that reionization has only a small effect on the stellar mass function, with no observationally detectable imprint at M* > 107.5 M⊙. However, patchy reionization has significant effects on individual galaxy masses, with variations of factors of 2-3 at z = 5 that correlate with environment.

  8. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in a 3-D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Orlando, J. J.; Baidar, S.; Brioude, J.; Fast, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Knighton, W. B.; Oetjen, H.; Setyan, A.; Stark, H.; Thalman, R.; Tyndall, G.; Washenfelder, R.; Waxman, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    basin) is about a third of the simple uptake coefficient formulation without consideration of aerosol phase state and composition. All these model formulations are based on very limited and recent field or laboratory data and we conclude that the current uncertainty on glyoxal SOA formation spans a factor of 10 in this domain and time period.

  9. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in a 3-D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Knote

    2013-10-01

    SOA in the LA basin is about a third of the simple uptake coefficient formulation without consideration of aerosol phase state and composition. All these model formulations are based on very limited and recent field or laboratory data and we conclude that the current uncertainty on glyoxal SOA formation spans a factor of 10 in this domain and time period.

  10. Data Assimilation and Model Simulations in the California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    regions in order to improve our scientific understanding of the structure and dynamics of such regions. OBJECTIVES The broad objective of this research...analysis, and to apply the method to several quasi-synoptic hydrographic data sets from the California Current and the Alboran Sea. WORK COMPLETED During...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School,Department of Meteorology (MR/Hy),589 Dyer Rd

  11. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  12. Testing Benjamin Graham’s net current asset value model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsoo An

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to empirically test one of Graham’s investment methods based on the net current asset value (NCAV. The NCAV is truly unique, and conservative, and commonly known as the net-net method.  The ratio of the net current asset value to market value (NCAV/MV was employed in this study to test a stock’s performance comparing to the performance of S&P 500 as the market index. We used all stocks in Portfolio123 whose raw data were supplied by Compustat, Standard & Poors, Capital IQ, and Reuters for the period of January 2, 1999 to August 31, 2012. The overall results show that the firms with high net current asset values outperform the market. These results are strong in the up market. It can be argued that the firms with a high NCAV/MV ratio are likely to move toward their fundamental value and generate high excess return because its stock prices are now undervalued. The implications of the study are: (a a positive NCAV/MV ratio may be a good indicator of the underpriced security; (b investing in the growth period and avoiding the downturn period leads investors to earn much higher returns from the firms with a high NCAV/MV ratio; and (c The NCAV/MV strategy requires a longer holding period of the portfolio in order to generate excess returns.

  13. The equatorial electrojet current modelling from SWARM satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaissa, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial ElectroJet (EEJ) is an intense eastward electric current circulating in the ionospheric magnetic equator band between 100 and 130 km of altitude in E region. These currents vary by day, by season, by solar activity, and also with the main magnetic field of internal origin. The irregularity of the ionosphere has a major impact on the performance of communication systems and navigation (GPS), industry.... Then it becomes necessary study the characteristics of EEJ. In this paper, we present a study of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) phenomenon along one year (2014) period. In addition, the satellite data used in this study are obtained with SWARM satellite scalar magnetometer data respecting magnetically quiet days with KP < 2. In this paper, we process to separate and extract the electrojet intensity signal from other recorded signal-sources interfering with the main signal and reduce considerably the signal to noise ratio during the SWARM measurements. This pre-processing step allows removing all external contributions in regard to EEJ intensity value. Key words: Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Equatorial electrojet (EEJ)); SWARM.

  14. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  15. Immediate Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Brain Nitrotyrosine Formation in a Piglet Asphyxia Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Rudge, Brogan; Hughes, Michael P; Rahim, Ahad A; Hristova, Mariya; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) is a promising therapeutic intervention that could be administered as an alternative to cooling in cases of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). In the current study we hypothesized that RIPostC in the piglet model of birth asphyxia confers protection by reducing nitrosative stress and subsequent nitrotyrosine formation, as well as having an effect on glial immunoreactivity. Postnatal day 1 (P1) piglets underwent HI brain injury and were randomised to HI (control) or HI + RIPostC. Immunohistochemistry assessment 48 hours after HI revealed a significant decrease in brain nitrotyrosine deposits in the RIPostC-treated group (p = 0.02). This was accompanied by a significant increase in eNOS expression (p piglet model of neonatal asphyxia, which appears to be mediated by modulation of nitrosative stress, despite glial activation.

  16. Physical processes in an electron current layer causing intense plasma heating and formation of x-lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra; Wells, B. E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Khazanov, Igor [CSPAR, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m{sub e} = 400. An ECL evolves through the following stages: (i) Electrostatic (ES) current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation with half width w about 2 electron skin depth (d{sub e}), (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping of electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with significantly large growth rates in the lower end of the whistler frequency range, (iv) widening of the ECL and modulation of its width by the ETI, (v) gradual heating of electrons by the CDI-driven ES ion modes create the condition that the electrons become hotter than the ions, (vi) despite the reduced electron drift associated with the current disruption by the CDI, the enhanced electron temperature continues to favor a slow growth of the ion waves reaching nonlinear amplitudes, (vii) the nonlinear ion waves undergo modulation and collapse into localized density cavities containing spiky electric fields like in double layers (DLs), (viii) such spiky electric fields are very effective in further rapid heating of both electrons and ions. As predicted by the electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) theories, the ETI growth rate maximizes at wave numbers in the range 0.4 < k{sub x}W < 0.8 where k{sub x} is the wave number parallel to the ECL magnetic field and w is the evolving half width of the ECL. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the emerging x-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower-hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. We compare our results with experimental results and satellite observation.

  17. Modeling transcriptional networks regulating secondary growth and wood formation in forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The complex interactions among the genes that underlie a biological process can be modeled and presented as a transcriptional network, in which genes (nodes) and their interactions (edges) are shown in a graphical form similar to a wiring diagram. A large number of genes have been identified that are expressed during the radial woody growth of tree stems (secondary growth), but a comprehensive understanding of how these genes interact to influence woody growth is currently lacking. Modeling transcriptional networks has recently been made tractable by next-generation sequencing-based technologies that can comprehensively catalog gene expression and transcription factor-binding genome-wide, but has not yet been extensively applied to undomesticated tree species or woody growth. Here we discuss basic features of transcriptional networks, approaches for modeling biological networks, and examples of biological network models developed for forest trees to date. We discuss how transcriptional network research is being developed in the model forest tree genus, Populus, and how this research area can be further developed and applied. Transcriptional network models for forest tree secondary growth and wood formation could ultimately provide new predictive models to accelerate hypothesis-driven research and develop new breeding applications.

  18. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chen; Jinyuan, Liu; Ping, Duan; Guangrui, Liu; Xingyu, Bian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  19. A proposed-standard format to represent and distribute tomographic models and other earth spatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postpischl, L.; Morelli, A.; Danecek, P.

    2009-04-01

    Formats used to represent (and distribute) tomographic earth models differ considerably and are rarely self-consistent. In fact, each earth scientist, or research group, uses specific conventions to encode the various parameterizations used to describe, e.g., seismic wave speed or density in three dimensions, and complete information is often found in related documents or publications (if available at all) only. As a consequence, use of various tomographic models from different authors requires considerable effort, is more cumbersome than it should be and prevents widespread exchange and circulation within the community. We propose a format, based on modern web standards, able to represent different (grid-based) model parameterizations within the same simple text-based environment, easy to write, to parse, and to visualise. The aim is the creation of self-describing data-structures, both human and machine readable, that are automatically recognised by general-purpose software agents, and easily imported in the scientific programming environment. We think that the adoption of such a representation as a standard for the exchange and distribution of earth models can greatly ease their usage and enhance their circulation, both among fellow seismologists and among a broader non-specialist community. The proposed solution uses semantic web technologies, fully fitting the current trends in data accessibility. It is based on Json (JavaScript Object Notation), a plain-text, human-readable lightweight computer data interchange format, which adopts a hierarchical name-value model for representing simple data structures and associative arrays (called objects). Our implementation allows integration of large datasets with metadata (authors, affiliations, bibliographic references, units of measure etc.) into a single resource. It is equally suited to represent other geo-referenced volumetric quantities — beyond tomographic models — as well as (structured and unstructured

  20. Comparison of Channel Segregation Formation in Model Alloys and Steels via Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Li, D. Z.; Liu, H. W.; Fu, P. X.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the evolutions of channel segregations in several alloy systems, such as the typically used model alloys ( e.g., Ga-In, Sn-Pb, Sn-Bi, Al-Cu, and Ni-based superalloy) and some special steels, are numerically simulated in a cavity solidified unidirectionally. The simulations are based on a modified continuum macrosegregation model with an extension to the multicomponent systems. The results of model alloys and steels indicate that when the thermosolutal convection is strong enough, flow instability occurs, which in turn destabilizes the mushy zone. Subsequently, the channel segregation forms with the continuous interaction between solidification and flow. The formation behavior and severity of channel segregations in various systems are different owing to their distinct melt convection strengths and solidification natures. In the current simulations, channels are apparent for model alloys with high content of solutes, whereas they are slight in some special steels, such as 27SiMn steel, and totally disappear in carbon steels. These occurrence features of channel segregation in simulations of steels are consistent with the analyses by a modified Rayleigh number associated with alloying elements, and both outcomes are well supported by the fully sectioned steel ingots in experiments.

  1. A Statistical Model of Current Loops and Magnetic Monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyer, Arvind, E-mail: arvind@math.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Mathematics (India)

    2015-12-15

    We formulate a natural model of loops and isolated vertices for arbitrary planar graphs, which we call the monopole-dimer model. We show that the partition function of this model can be expressed as a determinant. We then extend the method of Kasteleyn and Temperley-Fisher to calculate the partition function exactly in the case of rectangular grids. This partition function turns out to be a square of a polynomial with positive integer coefficients when the grid lengths are even. Finally, we analyse this formula in the infinite volume limit and show that the local monopole density, free energy and entropy can be expressed in terms of well-known elliptic functions. Our technique is a novel determinantal formula for the partition function of a model of isolated vertices and loops for arbitrary graphs.

  2. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  3. Current approaches to model extracellular electrical neural microstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eJoucla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, high-density microelectrode arrays provide unprecedented possibilities to precisely activate spatially well-controlled central nervous system (CNS areas. However, this requires optimizing stimulating devices, which in turn requires a good understanding of the effects of microstimulation on cells and tissues. In this context, modeling approaches provide flexible ways to predict the outcome of electrical stimulation in terms of CNS activation. In this paper, we present state-of-the-art modeling methods with sufficient details to allow the reader to rapidly build numerical models of neuronal extracellular microstimulation. These include 1 the computation of the electrical potential field created by the stimulation in the tissue, and 2 the response of a target neuron to this field. Two main approaches are described: First we describe the classical hybrid approach that combines the finite element modeling of the potential field with the calculation of the neuron’s response in a cable equation framework (compartmentalized neuron models. Then, we present a whole finite element approach allows the simultaneous calculation of the extracellular and intracellular potentials, by representing the neuronal membrane with a thin-film approximation. This approach was previously introduced in the frame of neural recording, but has never been implemented to determine the effect of extracellular stimulation on the neural response at a sub-compartment level. Here, we show on an example that the latter modeling scheme can reveal important sub-compartment behavior of the neural membrane that cannot be resolved using the hybrid approach. The goal of this paper is also to describe in detail the practical implementation of these methods to allow the reader to easily build new models using standard software packages. These modeling paradigms, depending on the situation, should help build more efficient high-density neural prostheses for CNS rehabilitation.

  4. Development and current status of the "Cambridge" loudness models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-13

    This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness-the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids.

  5. Molecular dynamical modelling of endohedral fullerenes formation in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. A.; Lubkova, T. A.; Popov, Z. I.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Visotin, M. A.; Irle, S.

    2016-02-01

    The initial stages of fullerene and endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) synthesis in carbon-helium plasma at 1500 K and 2500 K have been simulated with quantum chemical molecular dynamics (MD) based on density-functional tight-binding (DFTB). The cases of formation of large (>100 atoms) sp2-carbon clusters with scandium atoms inside were observed. These clusters are considered as precursors of fullerenes or EMFs, and thus it is shown that formation of EMFs can be explained within the framework of "shrinking hot giant" mechanism. Also, the dependence of formation rates on plasma parameters, including temperature, buffer gas and metal atoms concentrations, has been studied.

  6. Kinetics of N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine formation in aqueous model systems of sugars and casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha T; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the formation of N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) in two caseinate solutions containing: (1) glucose, (2) lactose, each heated at 120 °C and 130 °C. At both heating temperatures, CML concentration in lactose-caseinate solution was higher than in glucose-caseinate solution. In both solutions, more CML was formed at 130 °C than at 120 °C. Using multiresponse modelling, two degradation routes for the sugars were confirmed: (1) isomerisation of glucose or lactose and subsequent degradation via Lobry de Bruyn-Alberda van Ekenstein (LA) arrangement; (2) the Maillard reaction between the reducing sugar and lysine residues. Modelling results suggested that CML was not formed from oxidation of the reducing sugars, but from the Maillard reaction via the Amadori rearrangement product. Since CML appeared to be thermally unstable under the current study conditions, it may not be a perfect indicator for heat damage of processed foods. This is the first study in which CML formation was linked to available information on the Maillard reaction via multiresponse modelling.

  7. Putting microbes into microbial-based models of soil organic matter formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, S.

    2012-12-01

    Soil organic matter formation (SOM) is a two-step process that begins with litter decomposition and is followed by the incorporation of C into stable SOM pools. It is known that microbes play a critical role in both processes, but their specific contributions remain undefined and even the newest models of SOM formation largely 'black box' the microbial community. For example, the current paradigm predicts that litter chemical changes during decomposition are predictable based on the extent or stage of decomposition, and that chemically distinct litter types will eventually become indistinguishable after decomposition. This convergence in chemical composition is thought to occur regardless of initial differences in litter quality or variation in biological communities. Further, while microbial ecophysiology may have direct influences on the rates of SOM accumulation, chemistry and stability, how the expression of ecophysiological traits vary across environments and between microbial communities is unclear. Here, I examine the role of decomposer communities in regulating the two-step SOM formation process. First, I examine litter chemical changes and convergence during decomposition and the degree to which they are influenced by decomposer community characteristics. In contrast to the current paradigm, I show that decomposer communities strongly mediate changes in litter chemistry during decomposition, and that there is neither chemical convergence nor a consistent, predictable change in litter chemistry during decomposition. Instead, litter chemical changes are a function of the interactions between initial litter quality and the resident decomposer communities, which often vary among soil ecosystems. Second, I identify several knowledge gaps that need to be addressed in order to advance our understanding of litter incorporation into stable SOM pools, focusing on the importance of microbial physiological processes to SOM formation, including: 1) differences in

  8. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMlC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at the meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  9. A current circuit model of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kunzl, T A; Jessner, A; Kunzl, Th.

    2002-01-01

    We present the outline of a new model for the coherent radio emission of pulsars that succeeds in reproducing the energetics and brightness temperatures of the observed radio emission from the observationally deduced distances of 50-100 pulsar radii above the neutron star in a narrow region. The restrictions imposed by energy conservation, plasma dynamics of the coherent radiation process and propagation effects are used to apply the action of a plasma process like coherent inverse Compton scattering (CICS) (see Benford, 1992). In accordance with our findings (Kunzl et al. 1998a) this process requires Lorentz factors of about 10 which are lower than in most other radio emission models. This implies that no significant pair production can take place near the surface and we expect charge densities close to the Goldreich-Julian value (Goldreich & Julian (1969)). To fulfill the energetic and electrodynamic constraints the model requires constant re-acceleration in dissipation regions which can be interpreted ...

  10. An Empirical Model for the Galaxy Luminosity and Star-Formation Rate Function at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star-formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z~4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z>8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass M{_h} by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z~4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-M{_h} relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 10 indicate that JWST will be able to detect galaxies out to z~15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density and associated reionization history by galaxies for which we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit leads to a fully reionized universe by z~6.5 an...

  11. Current Status of cosmological models with mixed dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mikheeva, E V

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of cosmological mixed dark matter models in spatially flat Friedmann Universe with zero $\\Lambda$-term is presented. We argue that the introduction of cosmic gravity waves helps to satisfy observational constraints. The analysis of models is based on the confrontation with the mass function of clusters of galaxies and the CMB anisotropy. The implication of Press-Schechter formalism allowed to constrain $\\sigma_8=0.52 \\pm 0.01$. This normalisation of the spectrum of density perturbations has been used to calculate numerically the value of the large scale CMB anisotropy and the relative contribution of cosmological gravitational waves, T/S. We found that increasing $\\Omega_\

  12. Dividing Streamline Formation Channel Confluences by Physical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarni Nur Trilita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Confluence channels are often found in open channel network system and is the most important element. The incoming flow from the branch channel to the main cause various forms and cause vortex flow. Phenomenon can cause erosion of the side wall of the channel, the bed channel scour and sedimentation in the downstream confluence channel. To control these problems needed research into the current width of the branch channel. The incoming flow from the branch channel to the main channel flow bounded by a line distributors (dividing streamline. In this paper, the wide dividing streamline observed in the laboratory using a physical model of two open channels, a square that formed an angle of 30º. Observations were made with a variety of flow coming from each channel. The results obtained in the laboratory observation that the width of dividing streamline flow is influenced by the discharge ratio between the channel branch with the main channel. While the results of a comparison with previous studies showing that the observation in the laboratory is smaller than the results of previous research.

  13. Numerical modeling of experimental observations on gas formation and multi-phase flow of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, R.; Dash, Z.; Sakaki, T.; Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the concerns related to geologic CO2 sequestration is potential leakage of CO2 and its subsequent migration to shallow groundwater resources leading to geochemical impacts. Developing approaches to monitor CO2 migration in shallow aquifer and mitigate leakage impacts will require improving our understanding of gas phase formation and multi-phase flow subsequent to CO2 leakage in shallow aquifers. We are utilizing an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to characterize the multi-phase flow of CO2 in shallow aquifers. The laboratory experiments involve a series of highly controlled experiments in which CO2 dissolved water is injected in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil columns and tanks. The experimental results are used to study the effects of soil properties, temperature, pressure gradients and heterogeneities on gas formation and migration. We utilize the Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) simulator (Zyvoloski et al, 2010) to numerically model the experimental results. The numerical models capture the physics of CO2 exsolution, multi-phase fluid flow as well as sand heterogeneity. Experimental observations of pressure, temperature and gas saturations are used to develop and constrain conceptual models for CO2 gas-phase formation and multi-phase CO2 flow in porous media. This talk will provide details of development of conceptual models based on experimental observation, development of numerical models for laboratory experiments and modelling results.

  14. Taenia solium: current understanding of laboratory animal models of taeniosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisser, A; Avila, G; Maravilla, P; Mendlovic, F; León-Cabrera, S; Cruz-Rivera, M; Garza, A; Gómez, B; Aguilar, L; Terán, N; Velasco, S; Benítez, M; Jimenez-Gonzalez, D E

    2010-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a public health problem in many developing countries and is the most frequent parasitic disease of the brain. The human tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor for acquiring neurocysticercosis. Since the parasite lodges only in the human intestine, experimental models of Taenia solium taeniosis have been explored. Macaques, pigs, dogs, cats and rabbits are unsuccessful hosts even in immunodepressed status. By contrast, rodents are adequate hosts since tapeworms with mature, pregravid and, in some cases, gravid proglottids develop after infection. In this review, information that has been generated with experimental models of taeniosis due to T. solium is discussed. Initially, the use of the model for immunodiagnosis of human taeniosis and evaluation of intervention measures is summarized. Next, descriptions of tapeworms and comparison of hamsters, gerbils and other mammals as experimental models are discussed, as well as data on the humoral immune response, the inflammatory reaction and the production of cytokines associated to Th1 and Th2 responses in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, evaluation of protection induced against the development of tapeworms by recombinant T. solium calreticulin in hamsters is summarized and compared to other studies.

  15. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation in a genetic absence model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeiri, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The proposed area of onset for absence epilepsy characteristic of spontaneously occurring spike and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) in the genetic absence rat model is the subgranular layer of the somatosensory cortex. Modulation of the hyperexcitable cortical foci by bilateral transcranial direct curre

  16. Business model innovation: Past research, current debates, and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide state-of-the-art knowledge about business model innovation (BMI) and suggest avenues for future research. Design/methodology/approach – A systematic literature review approach was adopted with thematic analysis being conducted on 92 articles...

  17. Current Status of Superheat Spray Modeling With NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzan, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of liquid fuel behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA's supersonics project office initiative on high altitude emissions, we have undertaken an effort to assess the accuracy of various existing CFD models used in the modeling of superheated sprays. As a part of this investigation, we have completed the implementation of a modeling approach into the national combustion code (NCC), and then applied it to investigate the following three cases: (1) the validation of a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle, (2) the differences between two superheat vaporization models were studied based on both hot and cold flow calculations of a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, (3) the spray characteristics generated by a single-element LDI (Lean Direct Injector) experiment were studied to investigate the differences between superheat and non-superheat conditions. Further details can be found in the paper.

  18. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Surface Current Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface and sub-surface current model outputs were obtained from researchers at the University of Massachusetts-Boston to examine spatial and temporal current...

  19. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Subsurface Current Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface and sub-surface current model outputs were obtained from researchers at the University of Massachusetts-Boston to examine spatial and temporal current...

  20. On the current-driven model in the classical electrodynamics of continuous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Vadim A

    2010-12-01

    The current-driven model in which a continuous medium is excited by a pre-determined current which overlaps with the medium in all points in space but is not subject to constitutive relations is critically analyzed.

  1. Planet formation in transition disks: Modeling, spectroscopy, and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowsky, Joseph Paul

    due to either a massive planet accreting the material onto it or via a photoevaporation process whereby the central star's radiation field ejects material from the inner disk out of the bound system in the the interstellar medium. It is presumed that this phase is the last gasp of the planetary disk's evolution before the debris disk stage and before a fully formed solar system evolves. Our work specifically focuses on one object of this transition disk class: HD100546. We add to the understanding of transition disks by showing that a model where ro-vibrational OH emission in the NIR is preferentially emitted along the 'wall' of the disk is consistent with observations, and furthermore that adding an eccentricity to this `wall' component is required to generate the necessary observed line shape. In conjunction with this observation we present supporting material which motivates the usage of such an eccentric wall component in light of predictions of the influence of giant planet formation occurring within the disk.

  2. Networking the seceder model: Group formation in social and economic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Andreas; Holme, Petter

    2004-09-01

    The seceder model illustrates how the desire to be different from the average can lead to formation of groups in a population. We turn the original, agent based, seceder model into a model of network evolution. We find that the structural characteristics of our model closely match empirical social networks. Statistics for the dynamics of group formation are also given. Extensions of the model to networks of companies are also discussed.

  3. Networking the seceder model: Group formation in social and economic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grönlund, A

    2004-01-01

    The seceder model illustrates how the desire to be different than the average can lead to formation of groups in a population. We turn the original, agent based, seceder model into a model of network evolution. We find that the structural characteristics our model closely matches empirical social networks. Statistics for the dynamics of group formation are also given. Extensions of the model to networks of companies are also discussed.

  4. Growth instability due to lattice-induced topological currents in limited-mobility epitaxial growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanaput, Wittawat; Limkumnerd, Surachate; Chatraphorn, Patcha

    2010-10-01

    The energetically driven Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier had been generally accepted as the primary cause of the growth instability in the form of quasiregular moundlike structures observed on the surface of thin film grown via molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique. Recently the second mechanism of mound formation was proposed in terms of a topologically induced flux of particles originating from the line tension of the step edges which form the contour lines around a mound. Through large-scale simulations of MBE growth on a variety of crystalline lattice planes using limited-mobility, solid-on-solid models introduced by Wolf-Villain and Das Sarma-Tamborenea in 2+1 dimensions, we show that there exists a topological uphill particle current with strong dependence on specific lattice crystalline structure. Without any energetically induced barriers, our simulations produce spectacular mounds very similar, in some cases, to what have been observed in many recent MBE experiments. On a lattice where these currents cease to exist, the surface appears to be scale invariant, statistically rough as predicted by the conventional continuum growth equation.

  5. Modeling and Decentralized Control for the Multiple UAVs Formation based on Lyapunov design and redesign

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Zhicheng; Fantoni, Isabelle; Zavala-Río, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper concerns the leader-follower multiple agent formation with nonlinear and coupled individual dynamics. We address the problem of multi-agent formation control by proposing a decentralized control strategy. The agents in the formation are quad-rotors UAVs. By attributing the high-order nonlinear and unmodelled dynamics as uncertainties, we propose a switching singular system model to represent the formation of the multiple UAVs system with switching topology. ...

  6. Modelling Infragravity Waves and Currents across a Fringing Reef: Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongeren, A. R.; Duong Minh, T.; Lowe, R.; Roelvink, J.; Ranasinghe, R.; Symonds, G.

    2010-12-01

    The majority of the world’s coastlines contain submerged reef structures of various types, i.e. tropical coral reefs, relic temperate limestone platforms, and other submerged rock formations. Relatively little research has been conducted to study nearshore hydrodynamic processes that occur in reef environments. A good understanding of these processes is important because waves and wave-induced currents drive sediment transport, nutrient dynamics, and dispersal of larval coral and fish. Through the development of improved hydrodynamic models, the impact of environmental changes and human impacts on reefs may be accurately assessed. However, predictive models have historically been developed and tested using sandy coast environments. There are some important differences with reefs: wave breaking over the reef results in onshore flows with a higher bed friction coefficient, as well as set-up. Recent field studies (e.g., Lowe et al. JPO, 2009a) have shown the transformation of swell energy on reefs, and numerical model studies (Symonds and Black, JCR 2001, Ranasinghe et al., Coastal Eng. 2006, Lowe et al. J. Geoph. Res. 2009b) have shown that the spatial pattern of mean wave heights and mean currents can be qualitatively reproduced. However, the bulk of the measured variability is often in the infragravity frequency band (Pequignet et al. Geoph. Res. Lett., 2009 and Lowe et al., in prep.). The recently developed open-source model XBeach (Roelvink et al, Coastal Eng. 2009) is specifically designed to model these wave motions and associated sediment transport and has been successfully applied to sandy coasts (McCall et al., Coastal Eng. 2010). The objective of this paper is to apply XBeach to simulate infragravity forcing at Ningaloo Reef, a large fringing coral reef located along the northwest coastline of Western Australia. A field experiment at Ningaloo Reef (Western Australia) conducted in June 2009 by Lowe et al (in prep.) specifically aimed at measuring

  7. The Formation of Lunar Impact Basins: Observational Constraints from LRO Datasets and Comparisons with Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. M. H.; Head, J. W., III

    2016-12-01

    Impact basins provide windows into the subsurface and through time on a planetary body. However, meaningful geologic interpretations rely on a detailed understanding of their formation and the origin of basin materials. Data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have been critical to advancing our understanding of the formation of impact basins. We present a number of recent observations, including measurements of basin morphometry, mineralogy, and gravity anomalies, which provide a framework for constraining current formation models. Image data from the LRO Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and altimetry data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) were used to refine the recognition of both fresh and degraded impact basins, including their ring structures. Analyses of gravity anomalies from the GRAIL mission show that mantle uplifts confined within the inner basin rings are characteristics that basins acquire from the onset. We used LOLA data to also make new measurements of basin morphometry. Small basins possessing two concentric rings ("peak-ring basins") have unique topographic signatures, consisting of inner depressions bounded by a peak ring and a higher annulus that grades to steeper wall material. LRO Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images and Diviner rock abundance maps were used to identify boulder-rich outcrops in basin rings, which focused mineralogical analyses using Moon Mineralogy Mapper hyperspectral data. Crystalline plagioclase and candidate shock plagioclase outcrops were found to be abundant within basins of all sizes. These observations combined with crater scaling laws and lunar crustal thickness constrain the depth of origin of basin peak rings to be near the maximum depth of excavation. Comparisons between iSALE numerical models and observations show important consistencies and inconsistencies that can help to refine current models. In particular, improvements in the match between observed and modeled morphometry of craters transitional

  8. Cognitive mechanisms of mindfulness: A test of current models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbel, Ben; Mahar, Doug

    2015-12-15

    Existing models of mindfulness describe the self-regulation of attention as primary, leading to enhanced decentering and ability to access and override automatic cognitive processes. This study compared 23 experienced and 21 non-meditators on tests of mindfulness, attention, decentering, and ability to override automatic cognitive processes to test the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie mindfulness practice. Experienced meditators had significantly higher mindfulness and decentering than non-meditators. No significant difference between groups was found on measures of attention or ability to override automatic processes. These findings support the prediction that mindfulness leads to enhanced decentering, but do not support the cognitive mechanisms proposed to underlie such enhancement. Since mindfulness practice primarily involves internally directed attention, it may be the case that cognitive tests requiring externally directed attention and timed responses do not accurately assess mindfulness-induced cognitive changes. Implications for the models of mindfulness and future research are discussed.

  9. Modeling and control of the output current of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a dynamic Matlab SIMULINK model of the relationship between the fuel cell current set point of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system and the output current of the system is developed. The model contains an estimated fuel cell model, based on a polarization curve and assumed first order...

  10. Is it appropriate to model turbidity currents with the Three-Equation Model?

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Peng; He, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Three-Equation Model (TEM) was developed in the 1980s to model turbidity currents (TCs) and has been widely used ever since. However, its physical justification was questioned because self-accelerating TCs simulated with the steady TEM seemed to violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance. This violation was considered as a result of very strong sediment erosion that consumes more turbulent kinetic energy than is produced. To confine bed erosion and thus remedy this issue, the Four-Equation Model (FEM) was introduced by assuming a proportionality between the bed shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy. Here we analytically proof that self-accelerating TCs simulated with the original steady TEM actually never violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance, provided that the bed drag coefficient is not unrealistically low. We find that stronger bed erosion, surprisingly, leads to more production of turbulent kinetic energy due to conversion of potential energy of eroded material into kinetic energy of ...

  11. A multi-cell, multi-scale model of vertebrate segmentation and somite formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Hester

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis, the formation of the body's primary segmental structure common to all vertebrate development, requires coordination between biological mechanisms at several scales. Explaining how these mechanisms interact across scales and how events are coordinated in space and time is necessary for a complete understanding of somitogenesis and its evolutionary flexibility. So far, mechanisms of somitogenesis have been studied independently. To test the consistency, integrability and combined explanatory power of current prevailing hypotheses, we built an integrated clock-and-wavefront model including submodels of the intracellular segmentation clock, intercellular segmentation-clock coupling via Delta/Notch signaling, an FGF8 determination front, delayed differentiation, clock-wavefront readout, and differential-cell-cell-adhesion-driven cell sorting. We identify inconsistencies between existing submodels and gaps in the current understanding of somitogenesis mechanisms, and propose novel submodels and extensions of existing submodels where necessary. For reasonable initial conditions, 2D simulations of our model robustly generate spatially and temporally regular somites, realistic dynamic morphologies and spontaneous emergence of anterior-traveling stripes of Lfng. We show that these traveling stripes are pseudo-waves rather than true propagating waves. Our model is flexible enough to generate interspecies-like variation in somite size in response to changes in the PSM growth rate and segmentation-clock period, and in the number and width of Lfng stripes in response to changes in the PSM growth rate, segmentation-clock period and PSM length.

  12. Reducing dental plaque formation and caries development. A review of current methods and implications for novel pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalesinskas, Povilas; Kačergius, Tomas; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Pečiulienė, Vytautė; Ericson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is an oral disease, which has a high worldwide prevalence despite the availability of various prophylactic means, including the daily use of fluoride toothpastes, water fluoridation, dental sealants, oral health educational programs and various antiseptic mouth-rinses. One important reason for this is uncontrolled increase in consumption of foods containing considerable sucrose concentration, especially among children. Sucrose is easily metabolized by oral bacteria (mostly streptococci) to acids and, subsequently, causing tooth decay or dental caries. In the oral ecosystem, streptococci principally reside on tooth surfaces forming biofilm. Important structural and binding materials of biofilm are glucan polymers synthesized by several isoforms of glucosyltransferase enzyme present in certain species of oral bacteria, including mutans group streptococci - Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, which preferably colonize humans. Thus, there is a constant need to develop the methods and chemotherapeutics for improving oral health care and decreasing teeth decay through the suppression of cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper was to review literature related to the pathogenesis of dental caries as well as currently existing and experimental pharmaceutical substances used for prevention of this process.

  13. Grain refinement, hardening and metastable phase formation by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment under heating and melting modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosdidier, T., E-mail: Thierry.grosdidier@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zou, J.X. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Bolle, B. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), ENIM, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Hao, S.Z.; Dong, C. [Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-08-15

    High current pulsed electron beam is a recently developed technique for surface modification. The pulsed electron irradiation introduces concentrated energy depositions in the thin surface layer of the treated materials, giving rise to an extremely fast heating and subsequent rapid cooling of the surface together with the formation of dynamic stress waves. Improved surface properties (hardness, corrosion resistance) can be obtained under the 'melting' mode when the top surface is melted and rapidly solidified (10{sup 7} K/s). In steels, this is essentially the result of nanostructures formed from the highly undercooled melt, melt surface purification, strain hardening induced by the thermal stress waves as well as metastable phase selections in the rapidly solidified melted layers. The use of the 'heating' mode is less conventional, combining effects of the heavy deformation and recrystallization/recovery mechanisms. A detailed analysis of a FeAl alloy demonstrates grain size refinement, hardening, solid-state enhanced diffusion and texture modification without modification of the surface geometry.

  14. Syringomyelia associated with arachnoid septum at the craniovertebral junction, contradicting the currently prevailing theory of syringomyelia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Han Soo; Tsuchiya, Tsukasa; Fujisawa, Naoaki; Oya, Soichi; Matsui, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Despite a number of various hypotheses in the literature, the pathophysiology of syringomyelia is still not well understood. In this article, we report two cases of cervical syringomyelia not associated with Chiari I malformation. Both cases had a septum-like structure in the subarachnoid space on the dorsal side of the cord at the craniovertebral junction. Cardiac-gated phase-contrast cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow on the dorsal side of the spinal cord. Surgical excision of this septum, restoring the CSF flow, resulted in a prompt reduction of the syrinx size in both cases. Findings in these cases contradict the currently prevailing hypothesis of syrinx formation that postulate that the piston-like movement of the cerebellar tonsils enhance the pulsatile CSF flow in the spinal subarachnoid space, driving the CSF into the syrinx through the perivascular space of Virchow and Robin. The authors propose that a mechanism based on the decreased pulsatile CSF flow in the spinal subarachnoid space will be more suitable as a hypothesis in studying the pathophyisiology of syringomyelia. These cases also provide an important lesson in managing the patients with syringomyelia not associated with Chiari I malformation.

  15. Betting for Integral Formation through the Models of Arts Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Margarita Barco Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time integral formation has been a main purpose of educational curricula. But even though it proves necessary on the ground of the benefits education may bring to human development, its outcomes are not always visible and many times it actually does not exist beyond the speech. In the field of arts teaching, the wholeness of human expressions seems to be one of the main goals in the formative purposes for young people and children. Such a commitment demands serious reflection on how and what artistic practices may bring to the formation of integral citizens, be it from the perspective of free expression or from a cognitivist or cultural one. Tracking the curricula in art education will allow us to understand the movement and whereabouts of such a high view, bringing together the conceptual and methodological arguments for it to match contemporaneity, so underlining the pertinence of art practices in education.

  16. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and behavioral models of smoking addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige eFraser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While few studies have applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to smoking addiction, existing work suggests that the intervention holds promise for altering the complex system by which environmental cues interact with cravings to drive behavior. Imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS studies suggest that increased dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC activation and integrity may be associated with increased resistance to smoking cues. Anodal tDCS of the DLPFC, believed to boost activation, reduces cravings in response to these cues. The finding that noninvasive stimulation modifies cue induced cravings has profound implications for understanding the processes underlying addiction and relapse. TDCS can also be applied to probe mechanisms underlying and supporting nicotine addiction, as was done in a pharmacologic study that applied nicotine, tDCS, and TMS paired associative stimulation to find that stopping nicotine after chronic use induces a reduction in plasticity, causing difficulty in breaking free from association between cues and cravings. This mini-review will place studies that apply tDCS to smokers in the context of research involving the neural substrates of nicotine addiction.

  17. The Current Status of Kinematic Solar Dynamo Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2000-09-01

    This review provides a historical overview of how research in kinematic solar dynamo modeling evolved during the last few decades and assesses the present state of research. The early pioneering papers assumed the dynamo to operate in the convection zone. It was suggested in the 1980s that the dynamo operates in a thin layer at the bottom of the convection zone. Some researchers in recent years are arguing that the poloidal field is produced near the surface—an idea that goes back to Babcock (1961) and Leighton (1969).

  18. Projected current density comparison in tDCS block and smooth FE modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-08-01

    Current density distribution and projected current density calculation following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) forward model in a human head were compared between two modeling pipelines: block and smooth. Block model was directly constructed from MRI voxel resolution and simulated in C. Smooth models underwent a boundary smoothing process by applying recursive Gaussian filters and simulated in COMSOL. Three smoothing levels were added to determine their effects on current density distribution compared to block models. Median current density percentage differences were calculated in anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobes (OCC) and precentral gyrus (PRC) and normalized against a baseline value. A maximum of + 20% difference in median current density was found for three standard electrode montages: F3-RS, T7-T8 and Cz-Oz. Furthermore, median current density percentage differences in each montage target brain structures were found to be within + 7%. Higher levels of smoothing increased median current density percentage differences in T7-T8 and Cz-Oz target structures. However, while demonstrating similar trends in each montage, additional smoothing levels showed no clear relationship between their smoothing effects and calculated median current density in the five cortical structures. Finally, relative L2 error in reconstructed projected current density was found to be 17% and 21% for block and smooth pipelines, respectively. Overall, a block model workflow may be a more attractive alternative for simulating tDCS stimulation because involves a shorter modeling time and independence from commercial modeling platforms.

  19. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  20. Current Methods of Natural Hazards Communication used within Catastrophe Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, C.; Latchman, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the field of catastrophe modelling, natural hazards need to be explained every day to (re)insurance professionals so that they may understand estimates of the loss potential of their portfolio. The effective communication of natural hazards to city professionals requires different strategies to be taken depending on the audience, their prior knowledge and respective backgrounds. It is best to have at least three sets of tools in your arsenal for a specific topic, 1) an illustration/animation, 2) a mathematical formula and 3) a real world case study example. This multi-faceted approach will be effective for those that learn best by pictorial means, mathematical means or anecdotal means. To show this we will use a set of real examples employed in the insurance industry of how different aspects of natural hazards and the uncertainty around them are explained to city professionals. For example, explaining the different modules within a catastrophe model such as the hazard, vulnerability and loss modules. We highlight how recent technology such as 3d plots, video recording and Google Earth maps, when used properly can help explain concepts quickly and easily. Finally we also examine the pitfalls of using overly-complicated visualisations and in general how counter-intuitive deductions may be made.

  1. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, M.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2008-09-01

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  2. Short-run and Current Analysis Model in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Anghelache

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the short-run statistic indicators is a compulsory requirement implied in the current analysis. Therefore, there is a system of EUROSTAT indicators on short run which has been set up in this respect, being recommended for utilization by the member-countries. On the basis of these indicators, there are regular, usually monthly, analysis being achieved in respect of: the production dynamic determination; the evaluation of the short-run investment volume; the development of the turnover; the wage evolution: the employment; the price indexes and the consumer price index (inflation; the volume of exports and imports and the extent to which the imports are covered by the exports and the sold of trade balance. The EUROSTAT system of indicators of conjuncture is conceived as an open system, so that it can be, at any moment extended or restricted, allowing indicators to be amended or even removed, depending on the domestic users requirements as well as on the specific requirements of the harmonization and integration. For the short-run analysis, there is also the World Bank system of indicators of conjuncture, which is utilized, relying on the data sources offered by the World Bank, The World Institute for Resources or other international organizations statistics. The system comprises indicators of the social and economic development and focuses on the indicators for the following three fields: human resources, environment and economic performances. At the end of the paper, there is a case study on the situation of Romania, for which we used all these indicators.

  3. Short-run and Current Analysis Model in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Mitrut

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the short-run statistic indicators is a compulsory requirement implied in the current analysis. Therefore, there is a system of EUROSTAT indicators on short run which has been set up in this respect, being recommended for utilization by the member-countries. On the basis of these indicators, there are regular, usually monthly, analysis being achieved in respect of: the production dynamic determination; the evaluation of the short-run investment volume; the development of the turnover; the wage evolution: the employment; the price indexes and the consumer price index (inflation; the volume of exports and imports and the extent to which the imports are covered by the exports and the sold of trade balance. The EUROSTAT system of indicators of conjuncture is conceived as an open system, so that it can be, at any moment extended or restricted, allowing indicators to be amended or even removed, depending on the domestic users requirements as well as on the specific requirements of the harmonization and integration. For the short-run analysis, there is also the World Bank system of indicators of conjuncture, which is utilized, relying on the data sources offered by the World Bank, The World Institute for Resources or other international organizations statistics. The system comprises indicators of the social and economic development and focuses on the indicators for the following three fields: human resources, environment and economic performances. At the end of the paper, there is a case study on the situation of Romania, for which we used all these indicators.

  4. Blood clot formation does not affect metastasis formation or tumor growth in a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rossnagl

    Full Text Available Cancer is associated with increased fracture risk, due either to metastasis or associated osteoporosis. After a fracture, blood clots form. Because proteins of the coagulation cascade and activated platelets promote cancer development, a fracture in patients with cancer often raises the question whether it is a pathologic fracture or whether the fracture itself might promote the formation of metastatic lesions. We therefore examined whether blood clot formation results in increased metastasis in a murine model of experimental breast cancer metastasis. For this purpose, a clot was surgically induced in the bone marrow of the left tibia of immundeficient mice. Either one minute prior to or five minutes after clot induction, human cancer cells were introduced in the circulation by intracardiac injection. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site was determined by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Metastasis formation and longitudinal growth were evaluated by bioluminescence imaging. The number of cancer cells that homed to the intervention site after 24 hours was similar to the number of cells in the opposite tibia that did not undergo clot induction. This effect was confirmed using two more cancer cell lines. Furthermore, no difference in the number of macroscopic lesions or their growth could be detected. In the control group 72% developed a lesion in the left tibia. In the experimental groups with clot formation 79% and 65% developed lesions in the left tibia (p = ns when comparing each experimental group with the controls. Survival was similar too. In summary, the growth factors accumulating in a clot/hematoma are neither enough to promote cancer cell homing nor support growth in an experimental model of breast cancer bone metastasis. This suggests that blood clot formation, as occurs in traumatic fractures, surgical interventions, and bruises, does not increase the risk of metastasis formation.

  5. Elemental abundances in Milky Way-like galaxies from a hierarchical galaxy formation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Tornatore, Luca; Frenk, Carlos S.; Helmi, Amina; Navarro, Julio F.; White, Simon D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a new method to account for the finite lifetimes of stars and trace individual abundances within a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. At variance with previous methods, based on the storage of the (binned) past star formation history of model galaxies, our method projects the inform

  6. Soot Formation Modeling of n-dodecane and Diesel Sprays under Engine-Like Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the modelling of soot formation process in diesel spray combustion under engine-like conditions. The key aim is to investigate the soot formation characteristics at different ambient temperatures. Prior to simulating the diesel combustion, numerical models including a revised m...

  7. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation III: Modelling galaxy formation and the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B; Angel, Paul W; Duffy, Alan R; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Meraxes, a new, purpose-built semi-analytic galaxy formation model designed for studying galaxy growth during reionization. Meraxes is the first model of its type to include a temporally- and spatially-coupled treatment of reionization and is built upon a custom (100 Mpc)$^3$ N-body simulation with high temporal and mass resolution, allowing us to resolve the galaxy and star formation physics relevant to early galaxy formation. Our fiducial model with supernova feedback reproduces the observed optical depth to electron scattering and evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function between $z$=5-7, predicting that a broad range of halo masses contribute to reionization. Using a constant escape fraction and global recombination rate, our model is unable to simultaneously match the observed ionizing emissivity at $z{\\lesssim}6$. However, the use of an evolving escape fraction of 0.05-0.1 at $z{\\sim}6$, increasing towards higher redshift, is able to satisfy these three constraints. We also demonstrate ...

  8. Modeling the formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) in drinking water biofiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin; Ye Lin; Wei Gu

    2008-01-01

    Both a theoretical and an empirical model were developed for predicting the formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) during drinking water biofiltration. Four pilot-scale biofilters with ceramsite as the medium were fed with different acetate loadings for the determination of SMP formation. Using numerically simulated and measured parameters, the theoretical model was developed according to the substrate and biomass balance. The results of this model matched the measured data better for higher SMP formation but did not fit well when SMP formation was lower. In order to better simulate the reality and overcome the difficulties of measuring the kinetic parameters, a simpler empirical model was also developed. In this model, SMP formation was expressed as a function of fed organic loadings and the depth of the medium, and a much better fit was obtained.

  9. Modeling the formation of soluble microbial products (SMP in drinking water biofiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin YU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Both a theoretical and an empirical model were developed for predicting the formation of soluble microbial products (SMP during drinking water biofiltration. Four pilot-scale biofilters with ceramsite as the medium were fed with different acetate loadings for the determination of SMP formation. Using numerically simulated and measured parameters, the theoretical model was developed according to the substrate and biomass balance. The results of this model matched the measured data better for higher SMP formation but did not fit well when SMP formation was lower. In order to better simulate the reality and overcome the difficulties of measuring the kinetic parameters, a simpler empirical model was also developed. In this model, SMP formation was expressed as a function of fed organic loadings and the depth of the medium, and a much better fit was obtained.

  10. Progress and Current Challenges in Modeling Large RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarowthu, Srinivas

    2016-02-27

    Recent breakthroughs in next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the discovery of several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). It is now apparent that RNA molecules are not only just carriers of genetic information but also key players in many cellular processes. While there has been a rapid increase in the number of ncRNA sequences deposited in various databases over the past decade, the biological functions of these ncRNAs are largely not well understood. Similar to proteins, RNA molecules carry out a function by forming specific three-dimensional structures. Understanding the function of a particular RNA therefore requires a detailed knowledge of its structure. However, determining experimental structures of RNA is extremely challenging. In fact, RNA-only structures represent just 1% of the total structures deposited in the PDB. Thus, computational methods that predict three-dimensional RNA structures are in high demand. Computational models can provide valuable insights into structure-function relationships in ncRNAs and can aid in the development of functional hypotheses and experimental designs. In recent years, a set of diverse RNA structure prediction tools have become available, which differ in computational time, input data and accuracy. This review discusses the recent progress and challenges in RNA structure prediction methods.

  11. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  12. Current understanding of divertor detachment: experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischmeier, W; Groth, M; Kallenbach, A; Chankin, A; Coster, D; Dux, R; Herrmann, A; Muller, H; Pugno, R; Reiter, D; Scarabosio, A; Watkins, J; Team, T D; Team, A U

    2008-05-23

    A qualitative as well as quantitative evaluation of experimentally observed plasma parameters in the detached regime proves to be difficult for several tokamaks. A series of ohmic discharges have been performed in ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D at similar as possible plasma parameters and at different line averaged densities, {bar n}{sub e}. The experimental data represent a set of well diagnosed discharges against which numerical simulations are compared. For the numerical modeling the fluid-code B2.5 coupled to the Monte Carlo neutrals transport code EIRENE is used. Only the combined enhancement of effects, such as geometry, drift terms, neutral conductance, increased radial transport and divertor target composition, explains a significant fraction of the experimentally observed asymmetries of the ion fluxes as a function of {bar n}{sub e} to the inner and outer target plates in ASDEX Upgrade. The relative importance of the mechanisms leading to detachment are different in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade.

  13. Ovarian aging and menopause: current theories, hypotheses, and research models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Julie M; Zelinski, Mary B; Ingram, Donald K; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2005-12-01

    Aging of the reproductive system has been studied in numerous vertebrate species. Although there are wide variations in reproductive strategies and hormone cycle components, many of the fundamental changes that occur during aging are similar. Evolutionary hypotheses attempt to explain why menopause occurs, whereas cellular hypotheses attempt to explain how it occurs. It is commonly believed that a disruption in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is responsible for the onset of menopause. Data exist to demonstrate that the first signs of menopause occur at the level of the brain or the ovary. Thus, finding an appropriate and representative animal model is especially important for the advancement of menopause research. In primates, there is a gradual decline in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis ultimately resulting in irregularities in menstrual cycles and increasingly sporadic incidence of ovulation. Rodents also exhibit a progressive deterioration in HPG axis function; however, they also experience a period of constant estrus accompanied by intermittent ovulations, reduced progesterone levels, and elevated circulating estradiol levels. It is remarkable to observe that females of other classes also demonstrate deterioration in HPG axis function and ovarian failure. Comparisons of aging in various taxa provide insight into fundamental biological mechanisms of aging that could underlie reproductive decline.

  14. Blended learning in anesthesia education: current state and future model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Jaya; Kurup, Viji

    2012-12-01

    Educators in anesthesia residency programs across the country are facing a number of challenges as they attempt to integrate blended learning techniques in their curriculum. Compared with the rest of higher education, which has made advances to varying degrees in the adoption of online learning anesthesiology education has been sporadic in the active integration of blended learning. The purpose of this review is to discuss the challenges in anesthesiology education and relevance of the Universal Design for Learning framework in addressing them. There is a wide chasm between student demand for online education and the availability of trained faculty to teach. The design of the learning interface is important and will significantly affect the learning experience for the student. This review examines recent literature pertaining to this field, both in the realm of higher education in general and medical education in particular, and proposes the application of a comprehensive learning model that is new to anesthesiology education and relevant to its goals of promoting self-directed learning.

  15. Ice formation and development in aged, wintertime cumulus over the UK: observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, I.; Bower, K. N.; Choularton, T. W.; Dearden, C.; Crosier, J.; Westbrook, C.; Capes, G.; Coe, H.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Williams, P.; Trembath, J.; Cui, Z.; Blyth, A.

    2012-06-01

    In situ high resolution aircraft measurements of cloud microphysical properties were made in coordination with ground based remote sensing observations of a line of small cumulus clouds, using Radar and Lidar, as part of the Aerosol Properties, PRocesses And InfluenceS on the Earth's climate (APPRAISE) project. A narrow but extensive line (~100 km long) of shallow convective clouds over the southern UK was studied. Cloud top temperatures were observed to be higher than -8 °C, but the clouds were seen to consist of supercooled droplets and varying concentrations of ice particles. No ice particles were observed to be falling into the cloud tops from above. Current parameterisations of ice nuclei (IN) numbers predict too few particles will be active as ice nuclei to account for ice particle concentrations at the observed, near cloud top, temperatures (-7.5 °C). The role of mineral dust particles, consistent with concentrations observed near the surface, acting as high temperature IN is considered important in this case. It was found that very high concentrations of ice particles (up to 100 L-1) could be produced by secondary ice particle production providing the observed small amount of primary ice (about 0.01 L-1) was present to initiate it. This emphasises the need to understand primary ice formation in slightly supercooled clouds. It is shown using simple calculations that the Hallett-Mossop process (HM) is the likely source of the secondary ice. Model simulations of the case study were performed with the Aerosol Cloud and Precipitation Interactions Model (ACPIM). These parcel model investigations confirmed the HM process to be a very important mechanism for producing the observed high ice concentrations. A key step in generating the high concentrations was the process of collision and coalescence of rain drops, which once formed fell rapidly through the cloud, collecting ice particles which caused them to freeze and form instant large riming particles. The

  16. Is it appropriate to model turbidity currents with the three-equation model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Pähtz, Thomas; He, Zhiguo

    2015-07-01

    The three-equation model (TEM) was developed in the 1980s to model turbidity currents (TCs) and has been widely used ever since. However, its physical justification was questioned because self-accelerating TCs simulated with the steady TEM seemed to violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance. This violation was considered as a result of very strong sediment erosion that consumes more turbulent kinetic energy than is produced. To confine bed erosion and thus remedy this issue, the four-equation model (FEM) was introduced by assuming a proportionality between the bed shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy. Here we analytically proof that self-accelerating TCs simulated with the original steady TEM actually never violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance, provided that the bed drag coefficient is not unrealistically low. We find that stronger bed erosion, surprisingly, leads to more production of turbulent kinetic energy due to conversion of potential energy of eroded material into kinetic energy of the current. Furthermore, we analytically show that, for asymptotically supercritical flow conditions, the original steady TEM always produces self-accelerating TCs if the upstream boundary conditions ("ignition" values) are chosen appropriately, while it never does so for asymptotically subcritical flow conditions. We numerically show that our novel method to obtain the ignition values even works for Richardson numbers very near to unity. Our study also includes a comparison of the TEM and FEM closures for the bed shear stress to simulation data of a coupled Large Eddy and Discrete Element Model of sediment transport in water, which suggests that the TEM closure might be more realistic than the FEM closure.

  17. Genome-scale metabolic model for Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its application to the analysis of flavor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahaut, Nicolas A L; Wiersma, Anne; van de Bunt, Bert; Martens, Dirk E; Schaap, Peter J; Sijtsma, Lolke; Dos Santos, Vitor A Martins; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-10-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is a paradigm strain for lactococci used in industrial dairy fermentations. However, despite of its importance for process development, no genome-scale metabolic model has been reported thus far. Moreover, current models for other lactococci only focus on growth and sugar degradation. A metabolic model that includes nitrogen metabolism and flavor-forming pathways is instrumental for the understanding and designing new industrial applications of these lactic acid bacteria. A genome-scale, constraint-based model of the metabolism and transport in L. lactis MG1363, accounting for 518 genes, 754 reactions, and 650 metabolites, was developed and experimentally validated. Fifty-nine reactions are directly or indirectly involved in flavor formation. Flux Balance Analysis and Flux Variability Analysis were used to investigate flux distributions within the whole metabolic network. Anaerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures were used for estimating the energetic parameters. A thorough model-driven analysis showing a highly flexible nitrogen metabolism, e.g., branched-chain amino acid catabolism which coupled with the redox balance, is pivotal for the prediction of the formation of different flavor compounds. Furthermore, the model predicted the formation of volatile sulfur compounds as a result of the fermentation. These products were subsequently identified in the experimental fermentations carried out. Thus, the genome-scale metabolic model couples the carbon and nitrogen metabolism in L. lactis MG1363 with complete known catabolic pathways leading to flavor formation. The model provided valuable insights into the metabolic networks underlying flavor formation and has the potential to contribute to new developments in dairy industries and cheese-flavor research.

  18. A model for the formation of the active region corona driven by magnetic flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: We present the first model that couples the formation of the corona of a solar active region to a model of the emergence of a sunspot pair. This allows us to study when, where, and why active region loops form, and how they evolve. Methods: We use a 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the emergence of an active region through the upper convection zone and the photosphere as a lower boundary for a 3D MHD coronal model. The coronal model accounts for the braiding of the magnetic fieldlines, which induces currents in the corona to heat up the plasma. We synthesize the coronal emission for a direct comparison to observations. Starting with a basically field-free atmosphere we follow the filling of the corona with magnetic field and plasma. Results: Numerous individually identifiable hot coronal loops form, and reach temperatures well above 1 MK with densities comparable to observations. The footpoints of these loops are found where small patches of magnetic flux concentrations move into the sunspots. The loop formation is triggered by an increase in upward-directed Poynting flux at their footpoints in the photosphere. In the synthesized extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission these loops develop within a few minutes. The first EUV loop appears as a thin tube, then rises and expands significantly in the horizontal direction. Later, the spatially inhomogeneous heat input leads to a fragmented system of multiple loops or strands in a growing envelope. Animation associated with Fig. 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  20. Toy models of ice formation in turbulent overcooled water

    CERN Document Server

    De Santi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A study of ice formation in stationary turbulent conditions is carried out in various limit regimes with regard to crystal growth rate, overcooling and ice entrainment at the water surface. Analytical expressions of the temperature, salinity and ice concentration mean profiles are provided, and the role of fluctuations in ice production is numerically quantified. A lower bound on the ratio of sensible heat flux to latent heat flux to the atmosphere is derived.