WorldWideScience

Sample records for current disruption observed

  1. Dipolarization front and current disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The modification of current density on the dawn-dusk cross section of the magnetotail with the earthward approach of a dipolarization front (DF) is examined through the recently published results of a three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the current density intensifies by 37% abruptly within 1.5 ion gyrotime as the DF approaches and shows localized regions with north-south extrusions. After reaching its peak value, it undergoes a drastic current reduction (DCR) by 65% within 2 ion gyrotime. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurs in the neutral sheet region in association with DCR, demonstrating the non-MHD behavior of the phenomenon. The evolution of current density from this 3-D PIC simulation bears several similarities to those observed for the current disruption (CD) phenomenon, such as explosive growth and disruption of the current density leading to a breakdown of the frozen-in condition. The evolution is also similar to those from a previous two-dimensional (2-D) PIC simulation specially designed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the cross-field current instability for CD. One interpretation of these findings is that CD and substorm triggering can be associated with earthward intrusion of a DF into the near-Earth plasma sheet as indicated by previous Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. An alternative interpretation is that both DF and CD are consequences of a global evolution from an ion-tearing-like instability of the magnetotail.

  2. Plasma current asymmetries during disruptions in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Morris, J.; Riccardo, V.; Zakharov, L. E.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    A key feature of disruptions during vertical displacement events, discovered in JET in 1996, is the toroidal variation in the measured plasma current Ip, i.e. the plasma current asymmetries, lasting for almost the entire current quench. The unique magnetic diagnostics at JET (full set of poloidal coils and saddle loops recorded either from two toroidally opposite or from four toroidally orthogonal locations) allow for a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical disruptions with a large scale database. This paper presents an analysis of 4854 disruptions over an 18 year period that includes both the JET carbon (C) wall and the ITER-like (IL) wall (a mixed beryllium/tungsten first wall). In spite of the Ip quench time significantly increasing for the IL-wall compared to C-wall disruptions, the observed toroidal asymmetry time integral (˜ sideways force impulse), did not increase for IL-wall disruptions. The Ip asymmetry has a dominantly n = 1 structure. Its motion in the toroidal direction has a sporadic behaviour, in general. The distributions of the number of rotation periods are found to be very similar for both C- and IL-wall disruptions, and multi-turn rotation was sometimes observed. The Ip asymmetry amplitude has no degradation with rotation frequency for either the C- or IL-wall disruption. Therefore dynamic amplification remains a potentially serious issue for ITER due to possible mechanical resonance of the machine components with the rotating asymmetry.

  3. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Wolstenholme, Jennifer T; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  4. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  5. Water Current Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tidal, river and ocean current observations collected by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Period of record is late 1800s to mid-1980s.

  6. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, R.E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Koskinen, H.E.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)); Boesinger, T. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); McEntire, R.W.; Potemra, T.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States))

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports on observations of a magnetospheric substorm on June 7, 1985. This event was observed simultaneously by a number of different systems. Particle and magnetic field data were collected by AMPTE/CCE, located near the neutral sheet; magnetic field data was monitored by the EISCAT magnetometer cross; STARE radar data was also collected; and Pi 1 data from Sodankyla. The ground based systems observed the poleward and westward expansion of electrojet activity at the start of the storm. The satellite was able to see the storms onset, and record perturbations in the current sheet at the onset of the substorm, in addition to later perturbations, which the authors argue originates tailward of the satellite. Satellite measurements are shown to occur in conjunction with ground events.

  7. Characterization of plasma current quench during disruption in EAST tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大龙; 沈飙; 杨飞; 钱金平; 肖炳甲

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of plasma current quench is presented in this paper based on the disruption database. It demon-strates that 26.8%discharges have disrupted in the last 2012 campaign, in addition, plasma disruptive rate grows with the increase of plasma current. Best-fit linear and instantaneous plasma current quench rate is extracted from the recent EAST disruptions, showing that 80%–30%interval of the maximum plasma current is well fit for EAST device. The lowest area-normalized current quench time is 3.33 ms/m2 with the estimated plasma electron temperature being 7.3 eV∼9.5 eV. In the disruption case the maximum eddy current goes up to 400 kA, and a fraction of currents are respectively driven on upper and lower outer plate with nearly 100 MPa–200 MPa stress in the leg.

  8. Observation of runaway electron behaviour during disruptions in LHCD discharges in the HT-7 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H.W.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, S.Y.; Zhou, R.J.; Zhong, G.Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2011-09-15

    Production of runaway electrons during disruptions has been observed in the HT-7 Tokamak. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry part of the pre-disruptive current, are observed in lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) limiter discharges. It is found that the runaway current can mitigate the disruptions effectively. We can use gas puffing to increase the line-averaged density to restrain the runaway electrons and rebuild the plasmas after the disruptions. Detailed observations are presented on the runaway electrons generated following disruptions in the HT-7 tokamak discharges. The results indicate that the magnetic oscillations play a significant role in the loss of runaway electrons in disruptions. There are two important preconditions to rebuild plasmas by runaway electrons after the disruptions. One of them are weak magnetic oscillations; another one are LHWs (lower-hybrid waves) (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  10. An effect of abrupt current disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Dembovskis, Andis

    2011-01-01

    Every engine, let it internal combustion engine in car or turbine of airplane, needs a high quality fuel igniter. During last decades there have been some minor changes made in ignition systems, like invention of Capacitive Discharge Ignition, Multiple Discharge Ignition, Ignition with Direct Current Discharge, but all based on the same priciple of High Voltage spark path creation. This work contains description, schematics and photographs of a new spark creation approach, providing high robustness through high power, big volume, long duration plasma. The system uses less or the same amount of energy as would CDI ignition, jet providing many times more efficient energy output. The solution is a highly applicable innovation, being able to significantly improve spark robustnes in all current HV spark ignition systems. Despite a simplicity of setup, it is still unclear why the effect persists, thus calling for additional research input.

  11. Observational Assessment of Preschool Disruptive Behavior, Part II: Validity of the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Keenan, Kate; Egger, Helen L.; Cicchetti, Domenic; Burns, James; Carter, Alice S.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to determine whether the multidomain, multicontext Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS) is a valid observational method for assessing disruptive behavior of preschool children. It is concluded that the DB-DOS is a valid method for a direct observational assessment of clinically significant disruptive…

  12. Preschool Children's Observed Disruptive Behavior: Variations across Sex, Interactional Context, and Disruptive Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%),…

  13. Ultraviolet and optical observations of tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezari S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tidal disruption events are expected to produce a luminous flare of radiation from fallback accretion of tidally disrupted stellar debris onto the central supermassive black hole. The first convincing candidates for tidal disruption events were discovered in the soft X-rays: large-amplitude, luminous, extremely-soft X-ray flares from inactive galaxies in the ROSAT All-Sky survey. However, the sparsely sampled light curves and lack of multiwavelength observations for these candidates make it difficult to directly constrain the parameters of their events (e.g., Eddington ratio, mass of the black hole, type of star disrupted. Here I present a review of the recent progress made in studying tidal disruption events in detail from taking advantage of wide-field, multi-epoch observations of UV and optical surveys (GALEX, SDSS, PTF, Pan-STARRS1 to measure well-sampled light curves, trigger prompt multiwavelength follow-up observations, and measure rates. I conclude with the promising potential of the next generation of optical synoptic surveys, such as LSST, to probe black hole demographics with samples of thousands of tidal disruption events.

  14. Observational Assessment of Preschool Disruptive Behavior, Part I: reliability of the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakschlag, Lauren S; Hill, Carri; Carter, Alice S; Danis, Barbara; Egger, Helen L; Keenan, Kate; Leventhal, Bennett L; Cicchetti, Domenic; Maskowitz, Katie; Burns, James; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

    2008-06-01

    To examine the reliability of the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS), a new observational method for assessing preschool disruptive behavior. The DB-DOS is a structured clinic-based assessment designed to elicit clinically salient behaviors relevant to the diagnosis of disruptive behavior in preschoolers. Child behavior is assessed in three interactional contexts that vary by partner (parent versus examiner) and level of support provided. Twenty-one disruptive behaviors are coded within two domains: problems in Behavioral Regulation and problems in Anger Modulation. A total of 364 referred and nonreferred preschoolers participated: interrater reliability and internal consistency were assessed on a primary sample (n = 335) and test-retest reliability was assessed in a separate sample (n = 29). The DB-DOS demonstrated good interrater and test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated an excellent fit of the DB-DOS multidomain model of disruptive behavior. The DB-DOS is a reliable observational tool for clinic-based assessment of preschool disruptive behavior. This standardized assessment method holds promise for advancing developmentally sensitive characterization of preschool psychopathology.

  15. Non-Axisymmetric Disruption SOL Current Measurement In DIII-D Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Joshua; Hanson, J.; Navratil, G.; Bialek, J.

    2016-10-01

    J. Cabrera, J. Hanson, G. Navratil, J. Bialek, Columbia U-During tokamak disruptions known as vertical displacement events (VDEs) currents which flow between the plasma core and plasma facing components can reach nearly 20% of the total plasma current. These scrape off layer (SOL) currents are thought to affect the dynamics of plasma disruption. We have made use of an array of tile current monitors installed on the DIII-D tokamak to perform low toroidal mode number (n VDEs. In all cases examined (over 30 shots) currents exhibited toroidal asymmetry with toroidal peaking factor 2. Strong initial peaking in n=1 current measurements are correlated with n=1 magnetic fluctuations during VDEs. Following the peak SOL current and after observation of the final last closed flux surface (LCFS), n=1 mode activity 20% of n=0 peak amplitude persists for 10ms. Predictions from the VALEN-IVB simulation code utilizing current profile reconstructions from magnetic sensor array measurements will be compared with SOL current measurements. Possible effects of these SOL currents on plasma dynamics during disruption are considered. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  16. Lagrangian Observations of Rip Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    me with her faith that I could do it and her positive attitude despite the challenges she has faced as a new sixth-grade teacher. xiv THIS PAGE...turned off for the day. Throughout the deployment period drifters were deployed in similar-sized groups composed of new drifters and/or those that... Techonology , 20, 1069-1075, 2003. Schmidt, W.E., R.T. Guza, and D.N. Slinn, Surf zone currents over irregular bathymetry: Drifter observations and numerical

  17. Observations of infrared radiation during disruptions in TEXTOR: heat pulses and runaway electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, R. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Grewe, T. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Finken, K.H. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Lopes Cardozo, N.J. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Mank, G. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Waidmann, G. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    Disruptions are studied in TEXTOR using two infrared cameras. In the thermal quench phase, fast changing heat fluxes are observed, each delivering energies larger than 1 kJ/m{sup 2} to the limiter. These bursts are correlated with an electron temperature pulse near the limiter and an increased release of impurities. Further bursts are observed in the current decay phase. For the first time a disruption generated beam of runaway electrons, accelerated in about 10 ms to about 20 MeV, is observed inside the plasma by the infrared synchrotron radiation. This beam carries a current of about 20 kA and is lost within approximately 100 {mu}s. The heat deposition on the limiter due to the runaways is comparable to the power flux by the heat bursts. ((orig.)).

  18. Observational Progress in Identifying and Characterizing Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, S. Bradley

    I present an overview of observational efforts across the electromagnetic spectrum to identify and study tidal disruption flares (TDFs), when a star wanders too close to a super-massive black hole and is torn apart by tidal forces. In particular I will focus on four unexpected surprises that challenge the most basic analytic picture of these events: 1) large inferred radii for the optical/UV-emitting material; 2) the ubiquity of outflows, detected at radio, X-ray, and UV wavelengths, ranging from speeds of 100 km/s to near the speed of light; 3) the peculiar atomic abundances observed in the UV and optical spectra of these objects; and, 4) the preference for these events to occur in post-starburst galaxies.

  19. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoshi, K., E-mail: oyoshi.keiji@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  20. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  1. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  2. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  3. Observable currents in lattice field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, José A

    2016-01-01

    Observable currents are spacetime local objects that induce physical observables when integrated on an auxiliary codimension one surface. Since the resulting observables are independent of local deformations of the integration surface, the currents themselves carry most of the information about the induced physical observables. I study observable currents in a multisymplectic framework for Lagrangian field theory over discrete spacetime. A weak version of observable currents preserves many of their properties, while inducing a family of observables capable of separating points in the space of physically distinct solutions. A Poisson bracket gives the space of observable currents the structure of a Lie algebra. Peierls bracket for bulk observables gives an algebra homomorphism mapping equivalence classes of bulk observables to weak observable currents. The study covers scalar fields, nonlinear sigma models and gauge theories (including gauge theory formulations of general relativity) on the lattice. Even when ...

  4. In situ observation of crystallinity disruption patterns during starch gelatinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Canhui; Wei, Cunxu

    2013-01-30

    Twelve starches were isolated from the tuberous root of sweet potato, the rhizomes of lotus and yam, the tuber of potato, the corm of water chestnut, and the seeds of pea, bean, barley, wheat, lotus, water caltrop, and ginkgo. Their gelatinization processes were in situ viewed using a polarizing microscope in combination with a hot stage. Four patterns of crystallinity disruption during heating were proposed. The crystallinity disruption initially occurred on the proximal surface of the eccentric hilum, on the distal surface of the eccentric hilum, from the central hilum, or on the surface of the central hilum starch granule. The patterns of initial disruption on the distal surface of the eccentric hilum and on the surface of the central hilum starch were reported for the first time. The heterogeneous distribution of amylose in starch granule might partly explain the different patterns of crystallinity disruption and swelling during gelatinization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Island Coalescence Scenario for Near-Earth Current Disruption in the Magnetotail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhi-Wei; LU Xing-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A current disruption and dipolarization scenario associated with island coalescences in the near-Earth region is proposed.The thin and elongated current-sheet built up during the growth phase is unstable due to a tearing mode instability that leads to formation of multiple magnetic islands (or magnetic flux ropes in the three dimensional case) in the near-Earth region.The growth rate of the tearing mode should be different in different locations because the rate is in general determined by the external driving force and the local plasma sheet properties.When the rate of the magnetic reconnection in the mid-tail region around 20 RE is much larger than that in other locations,the strong bulk earthward flows resulting from the fast reconnection in the mid-tail drive the earthward convection and the coalescence of the magnetic islands.Consequently,the cross-tail current in the near-Earth region is suddenly disrupted and the geometry of the magnetic field changes from tail-like to dipolar-like in the ideal time scale.This proposed scenario is tested by Hall MHD simulation and is compared with the observations.

  6. Linking Informant Discrepancies to Observed Variations in Young Children’s Disruptive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2009-01-01

    Prior work has not tested the basic theoretical notion that informant discrepancies in reports of children’s behavior exist, in part, because different informants observe children’s behavior in different settings. We examined patterns of observed preschool disruptive behavior across varying social contexts in the laboratory and whether they related to parent-teacher rating discrepancies of disruptive behavior in a sample of 327 preschoolers. Observed disruptive behavior was assessed with a la...

  7. Observer Manual and Current Data Collection Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer Program web page that lists the observer field manual and all current data collection forms that observers are required to take out to sea.

  8. Observer Manual and Current Data Collection Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer Program web page that lists the observer field manual and all current data collection forms that observers are required to take out to sea.

  9. Current disruption and its spreading in collision-less magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neeraj; Buechner, Joerg; Dorfman, Seth; Ji, Hantao; Sharma, A. Surjalal; Max-Planck/Princeton CenterPlasma Physics Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Recent magnetic reconnection experiments (MRX) [Dorfman et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 233 (2012)] have disclosed current disruption in the absence of guide field. During current disruption in MRX, current density and total out-of-reconnection-plane current drop simultaneous with a rise in out-of-reconnection-plane electric field. Here we show that current disruption is an intrinsic property of dynamic formation of X-point configuration of magnetic field in magnetic reconnection, independent of the model used for plasma description and of dimensionality (2-D or 3-D) of reconnection. An analytic expression for the current drop is derived from Ampere's equation and its predictions are verified by 2-D and 3-D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. Three dimensional EMHD simulations show that the current disruption due to localized reconnection spreads along the direction of electron flow with a speed which depends on the wave number of the perturbation. The implications of these results for MRX and other reconnection experiments will be presented. This work was partially funded by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics.

  10. Suppression of runaway current generation by supersonic molecular beam injection during disruptions on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Dai, A. J.; Wang, X. L.; Jiang, Z. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT Team

    2017-08-01

    The suppression of disruption-generated runaway electrons (REs) by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been investigated on the J-TEXT tokamak. Experimental results demonstrate that the hydrogen injected by SMBI during plasma current flattop phase can provoke magnetic perturbations, which increase RE losses rapidly. The effective radial diffusion coefficient of REs due to SMBI is estimated as D r ≈ 16 m2 s-1. Based on this benefit, the SMBI has been used to explore the suppression of disruption-generated REs. In J-TEXT, RE current is created with rapid argon injection by a massive gas injection valve. It is found that hydrogen SMBI before disruption efficiently suppresses the generation of RE current.

  11. The current status of observational cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jeremiah P Ostriker; Tarun Souradeep

    2004-10-01

    Observational cosmology has indeed made very rapid progress in recent years. The ability to quantify the universe has largely improved due to observational constraints coming from structure formation. The transition to precision cosmology has been spearheaded by measurements of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) over the past decade. Observations of the large scale structure in the distribution of galaxies, high red-shift supernova, have provided the required complementary information. We review the current status of cosmological parameter estimates from joint analysis of CMB anisotropy and large scale structure (LSS) data. We also sound a note of caution on overstating the successes achieved thus far.

  12. Linking Informant Discrepancies to Observed Variations in Young Children's Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Henry, David B.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2009-01-01

    Prior work has not tested the basic theoretical notion that informant discrepancies in reports of children's behavior exist, in part, because different informants observe children's behavior in different settings. We examined patterns of observed preschool disruptive behavior across varying social contexts in the laboratory and whether they…

  13. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L. J.; Yu, K. X.; Zhang, M., E-mail: zhangming@hust.edu.cn; Zhuang, G.; Li, X.; Yuan, T.; Rao, B.; Zhao, Q. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  14. Disruption forces on the tokamak wall with and without poloidal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2017-05-01

    The contributions into the disruption radial force on the tokamak vacuum vessel wall are calculated and analyzed. One is due to the induced toroidal current in the wall, and another is due to the poloidal current. The latter is not accounted for in the models that represent the wall as a set of isolated toroidal filaments. It is shown that such modeling must lead to significant errors in the evaluation of the force during either thermal or current quench. The analytical derivations are performed here for an arbitrary tokamak configuration with final estimates for a circular large-aspect-ratio plasma and a coaxial wall reacting on perturbations as a perfect conductor. The results are compared with those recently obtained numerically by the codes DINA, MAXFEA and CarMa0NL. The discrepancies between the DINA simulations (Khayrutdinov et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 115012) and earlier analytical predictions are explained. The recent conclusion (Villone et al 2015 Fusion Eng. Des. 93 57) on the role of the disruption-induced poloidal current in the wall is confirmed and extended to a wider area.

  15. Associations between Peer Nominations, Teacher Ratings, Self-Reports, and Observations of Malicious and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David B.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity of two aggression scales for predicting observations of malicious or disruptive behavior at school. Subgroups of a sample of 1,560 children (age 8.6 plus or minus 1.5 years) were assessed using (a) peer nominations of aggression, (b) teacher reports on the Teacher Report Form (TRF) of the Child Behavior Checklist…

  16. Changes in proton currents in murine microglia induced by cytoskeletal disruptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, R; Heinemann, U; Eder, C

    1998-05-15

    Voltage-gated proton currents (IPR) were investigated in cultured murine microglia using the whole-cell configuration of the patch clamp technique. At a gradient of 1.5 between intracellular (pHi = 6.0) and extracellular pH (pHo = 7.5) values, outward IPR were detected at depolarizing potentials, while the activation threshold of IPR was -40 mV. Time-dependent activation of IPR was fitted by a single exponential with a time constant of 661 ms at +40 mV. An increase in the activation time constant of IPR was seen after exposure of microglia to the cytoskeletal disruptive agents cytochalasin D or colchicine. Moreover, the current density of IPR was significantly reduced by 49% in cells treated with cytochalasin D and by 27% in cells treated with colchicine for 24 h. In contrast, voltage-dependence of steady-state activation of IPR was unchanged after disruption of the cytoskeleton. Exposure of microglia to the cytoskeletal stabilizers phalloidin and taxol did not affect IPR of microglia.

  17. Radio follow-up observations of stellar tidal disruption flares: Constraints on off-axis jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körding E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs, which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. Plus, the existing followup observation are mostly within ∼ 10 months of the discovery, so the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of six known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1–8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57.

  18. Measurement of scrape-off-layer current dynamics during MHD activity and disruptions in HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J. P.; Brooks, J. W.; Abler, M. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Hansen, C. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    We report scrape-off layer (SOL) current measurements during magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode activity, resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), and disruptions in the High Beta Tokamak—Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. Currents are measured via segmented plasma current Rogowski coils, jumpers running toroidally between otherwise-isolated vessel sections, and a grounded electrode in the scrape-off layer. These currents strongly depend on the plasma’s major radius, and amplitude and phase of non-axisymmetric field components. SOL currents connecting through the vessel are seen to reach  ∼0.2{--}0.5 % of the plasma current during typical kink activity and RMPs. Plasma current asymmetries and scrape-off-layer currents generated during disruptions, which are commonly called halo currents, reach  ∼4 % of I p. Asymmetric toroidal currents between vessel sections rotate at tens of kHz through most of the current quench, then symmetrize once I p reaches  ∼30 % of its pre-disruptive value. Toroidal jumper currents oscillate between co- and counter-I p, with co-I p being dominant on average during disruptions. A relative increase in local plasma current measured by a segmented I p Rogowski coil correlates with counter-I p current in the nearest toroidal jumper. Measurements are interpreted in the context of two models that produce contrary predictions for the toroidal vessel current polarity during disruptions. Plasma current asymmetry measurements are consistent with both models, and SOL currents scale with plasma displacement toward the vessel wall. The design of an upcoming SOL current diagnostic and control upgrade is also briefly presented.

  19. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braby, Laura; Backeberg, Björn C.; Ansorge, Isabelle; Roberts, Michael J.; Krug, Marjolaine; Reason, Chris J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing eddy characteristics from a global data set of automatically tracked eddies for the Agulhas Current in combination with surface drifters as well as geostrophic currents from satellite altimeters, it is shown that eddies from the Mozambique Channel and south of Madagascar dissipate as they approach the Agulhas Current. By tracking the offshore position of the current core and its velocity at 30°S in relation to eddies, it is demonstrated that eddy dissipation occurs through a transfer of momentum, where anticyclones consistently induce positive velocity anomalies, and cyclones reduce the velocities and cause offshore meanders. Composite analyses of the anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-current interaction events demonstrate that the positive (negative) velocity anomalies propagate downstream in the Agulhas Current at 44 km/d (23 km/d). Many models are unable to represent these eddy dissipation processes, affecting our understanding of the Agulhas Current.

  20. Some observational results of sea storm current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Dr. Hollister, a marine geologist of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, first pointed out that there was ocean storm current in the ocean. He found out the wavy texture in the seabed core samples, and suggested that this wavy texture was caused by the high speed sea current in remote antiquity. He then suggested a bold hypothesis that there existed a benthic storm current near the ocean bottom, and presented this hypothesis at the IUGG conference held at San Francisco in 1963. Unfortunately, the attention was not drawn to the hypothesis at the conference, and the hypothesis was criticized as a sheer nonsense.

  1. After Action Reviews: Current Observations and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    without a verbatim quotation from the first paragraph of the 1993 Training Circular (TC 25-20), A Leader’s Guide to After-Action Reviews. It states...Viet Nam Wars. Marshall spoke with Soldiers in theatre , immediately after combat actions, and although sometimes disparaged because of limited numbers...1). The current EXROE has expanded from 15 to 22 chapters to reflect changes in training offered, but the AAR bottom line is repeated 8 verbatim in

  2. Forest biomass observation: current state and prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Schepaschenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With this article, we provide an overview of the methods, instruments and initiatives for forest biomass observation at global scale. We focus on the freely available information, provided by both remote and in-situ observations. The advantages and limitation of various space borne methods, including optical, radar (C, L and P band and LiDAR, as well as respective instruments available on the orbit (MODIS, Proba-V, Landsat, Sentinel-1, Sentinel-2 , ALOS PALSAR, Envisat ASAR or expecting (BIOMASS, GEDI, NISAR, SAOCOM-CS are discussed. We emphasize the role of in-situ methods in the development of a biomass models, providing calibration and validation of remote sensing data. We focus on freely available forest biomass maps, databases and empirical models. We describe the functionality of Biomass.Geo-Wiki.org portal, which provides access to a collection of global and regional biomass maps in full resolution with unified legend and units overplayed with high-resolution imagery. The Forest-Observation-System.net is announced as an international cooperation to establish a global in-situ forest biomass database to support earth observation and to encourage investment in relevant field-based observations and science. Prospects of unmanned aerial vehicles in the forest inventory are briefly discussed. The work was partly supported by ESA IFBN project (contract 4000114425/15/NL/FF/gp.

  3. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Braby, L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruijter et al., 1999; Schouten et al., 2002; Tsugawa andHasumi, 2010]. These pulses have been shown to propagate poleward along the offshore edge of the Agulhas Current [van Leeuwen et al., 2000; Backeberg et al., 2008], occasionally affecting the...), Mesoscale activity in the Comoros Basin from satellite altimetry and a high resolution ocean circulation model, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 119, 4570–4760, doi:10.1002/2014JC010008. de Ruijter, W. P. M., P. J. van Leeuwen, and J. R. E. Lutjeharms (1999...

  4. Magnetic Reconnection Onset via Disruption of a Forming Current Sheet by the Tearing Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, D A; Loureiro, N F

    2016-03-11

    The recent realization that Sweet-Parker current sheets are violently unstable to the secondary tearing (plasmoid) instability implies that such current sheets cannot occur in real systems. This suggests that, in order to understand the onset of magnetic reconnection, one needs to consider the growth of the tearing instability in a current layer as it is being formed. Such an analysis is performed here in the context of nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamics for a generic time-dependent equilibrium representing a gradually forming current sheet. It is shown that two onset regimes, single-island and multi-island, are possible, depending on the rate of current sheet formation. A simple model is used to compute the criterion for transition between these two regimes, as well as the reconnection onset time and the current sheet parameters at that moment. For typical solar corona parameters, this model yields results consistent with observations.

  5. Current Observational Constraints on Cosmic Doomsday

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun

    2004-09-14

    In a broad class of dark energy models, the universe may collapse within a finite time t{sub c}. Here we study a representative model of dark energy with a linear potential, V({phi})=V{sub 0}(1 + {alpha}{phi}). This model is the simplest doomsday model, in which the universe collapses rather quickly after it stops expanding. Observational data from type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), cosmic microwave background anisotropy (CMB), and large scale structure (LSS) are complementary in constraining dark energy models. Using the new SN Ia data (Riess sample), the CMB data from WMAP, and the LSS data from 2dF, we find that the collapse time of the universe is t{sub c} {approx}> 42 (24) gigayears from today at 68% (95%) confidence.

  6. Towards disruptions in Earth observation? New Earth Observation systems and markets evolution: Possible scenarios and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gil; Claverie, Alain; Pasco, Xavier; Darnis, Jean-Pierre; de Maupeou, Benoît; Lafaye, Murielle; Morel, Eric

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews the trends in Earth observation (EO) and the possible impacts on markets of the new initiatives, launched either by existing providers of EO data or by new players, privately funded. After a presentation of the existing models, the paper discusses the new approaches, addressing both commercial and institutional markets. New concepts for the very high resolution markets, in Europe and in the US, are the main focus of this analysis. Two complementary perspectives are summarised: on the one hand, the type of system and its operational performance and, on the other, the related business models, concepts of operation and ownership schemes.

  7. Discovery of an outflow from radio observations of the tidal disruption event ASASSN-14li

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Kate D; Guillochon, James; Zauderer, Bevin A; Williams, Peter K G

    2015-01-01

    The tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBH) lights up dormant systems and can be used to probe accretion and outflow processes. Theoretical calculations indicate that most tidal disruption events (TDEs) lead to super-Eddington accretion, which in turn drives outflows. The discovery of luminous radio emission from the $\\gamma$-ray TDE Sw J1644+57 revealed the formation of a relativistic jetted outflow, but such events represent $\\lesssim 1\\%$ of the TDE population. Direct evidence for outflows in the bulk of the TDE population, discovered through optical, ultraviolet (UV), and X-ray observations, has been lacking. Here we report the discovery of transient radio emission from the nearby optically-discovered TDE ASASSN-14li (distance of 90 Mpc), making it the first normal TDE detected in the radio, and unambiguously pointing to the formation of a non-relativistic outflow with a kinetic energy of $\\approx 10^{48}$ erg, a velocity of $\\approx 12,000-39,000$ km s$^{-1}$, and a mass of $\\approx ...

  8. Radio Observations of the Tidal Disruption Event XMMSL1 J0740‑85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K. D.; Wieringa, M. H.; Berger, E.; Saxton, R. D.; Komossa, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present radio observations of the tidal disruption event candidate (TDE) XMMSL1 J0740‑85 spanning 592 to 875 days post X-ray discovery. We detect radio emission that fades from an initial peak flux density at 1.6 GHz of 1.19 ± 0.06 mJy to 0.65 ± 0.06 mJy, suggesting an association with the TDE. This makes XMMSL1 J0740‑85 at d = 75 Mpc the nearest TDE with detected radio emission to date and only the fifth TDE with radio emission overall. The observed radio luminosity rules out a powerful relativistic jet like that seen in the relativistic TDE Swift J1644+57. Instead, we infer from an equipartition analysis that the radio emission most likely arises from a non-relativistic outflow similar to that seen in the nearby TDE ASASSN-14li, with a velocity of about 104 km s‑1 and a kinetic energy of about 1048 erg, expanding into a medium with a density of about 102 cm‑3. Alternatively, the radio emission could arise from a weak initially relativistic but decelerated jet with an energy of ∼ 2× {10}50 erg, or (for an extreme disruption geometry) from the unbound debris. The radio data for XMMSL1 J0740‑85 continues to support the previous suggestion of a bimodal distribution of common non-relativistic isotropic outflows and rare relativistic jets in TDEs (in analogy with the relation between Type Ib/c supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts). The radio data also provide a new measurement of the circumnuclear density on a sub-parsec scale around an extragalactic supermassive black hole.

  9. Pharmacotherapy of Disruptive Behavior in Mentally Retarded Subjects: A Review of the Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Frank; Reis, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    The review presented here describes the state of the art of pharmacological treatment of aggression in subjects with mental retardation (MR) summing up results for both, children and adults. In general, psychopharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior in individuals with MR is similar to the treatment in subjects without MR. Compared to…

  10. Pharmacotherapy of Disruptive Behavior in Mentally Retarded Subjects: A Review of the Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Frank; Reis, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    The review presented here describes the state of the art of pharmacological treatment of aggression in subjects with mental retardation (MR) summing up results for both, children and adults. In general, psychopharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior in individuals with MR is similar to the treatment in subjects without MR. Compared to…

  11. Associating ground magnetometer observations with current or voltage generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Xu, Z.; Clauer, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    A circuit analogy for magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems has two extremes for driversof ionospheric currents: ionospheric elec tric fields/voltages constant while current/conductivity vary—the“voltage generator”—and current constant while electric field/conductivity vary—the “current generator.......”Statistical studies of ground magnetometer observations associated with dayside Transient High LatitudeCurrent Systems (THLCS) driven by similar mechanisms find contradictory results using this paradigm:some studies associate THLCS with voltage generators, others with current generators. We argue that mostof...... these two assumptions substantially alter expectations for magnetic perturbations associatedwith either a current or a voltage generator. Our results demonstrate that before interpreting groundmagnetometer observations of THLCS in the context of current/voltage generators, the location...

  12. Observation of burst frequency in extracted ECR ion current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taki, G. S.; Sarma, P. R.; Drentje, A. G.; Nakagawa, T.; Ray, P. K.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2007-01-01

    Earlier we reported an ion current jump which was observed at a fixed negative biased disc potential in the 6.4GHz ECR ion source at VECC, Kolkata. In a recent experiment with neon ions, we measured the time spectra of the ion current and observed the presence of a burst frequency in the kilohertz r

  13. Skin barrier disruption by acetone: observations in a hairless mouse skin model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rissmann, R.; Oudshoorn, M.H.M.; Hennink, W.E.; Ponec, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To disrupt the barrier function of the skin, different in vivo methods have been established, e.g., by acetone wiping or tape-stripping. In this study, the acetone-induced barrier disruption of hairless mice was investigated in order to establish a reliable model to study beneficial, long-term effec

  14. Observational Constraints on the Catastrophic Disruption Rate of Small Main Belt Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Hsieh, Henry; Kleyna, Jan; Granvik, Mikael; Micheli, Marco; Spahr, T; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Morgan, J S; Tonry, J L

    2014-01-01

    We have calculated 90% confidence limits on the steady-state rate of catastrophic disruptions of main belt asteroids in terms of the absolute magnitude at which one catastrophic disruption occurs per year (HCL) as a function of the post-disruption increase in brightness (delta m) and subsequent brightness decay rate (tau). The confidence limits were calculated using the brightest unknown main belt asteroid (V = 18.5) detected with the Pan-STARRS1 (Pan-STARRS1) telescope. We measured the Pan-STARRS1's catastrophic disruption detection efficiency over a 453-day interval using the Pan-STARRS moving object processing system (MOPS) and a simple model for the catastrophic disruption event's photometric behavior in a small aperture centered on the catastrophic disruption event. Our simplistic catastrophic disruption model suggests that delta m = 20 mag and 0.01 mag d-1 99% of main belt catastrophic disruptions in the size range to which this study was sensitive (100 m) are not impact-generated, but are instead due ...

  15. Radio observations of the tidal disruption event XMMSL1 J0740$-$85

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Kate D; Berger, Edo; Saxton, Richard D; Komossa, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    We present radio observations of the tidal disruption event candidate (TDE) XMMSL1 J0740$-$85 spanning 592 to 875 d post X-ray discovery. We detect radio emission that fades from an initial peak flux density at 1.6 GHz of $1.19\\pm 0.06$ mJy to $0.65\\pm 0.06$ mJy suggesting an association with the TDE. This makes XMMSL1 J0740$-$85 at $d=75$ Mpc the nearest TDE with detected radio emission to date and only the fifth TDE with radio emission overall. The observed radio luminosity rules out a powerful relativistic jet like that seen in the relativistic TDE Swift J1644+57. Instead we infer from an equipartition analysis that the radio emission most likely arises from a non-relativistic outflow similar to that seen in the nearby TDE ASASSN-14li, with a velocity of about $10^4$ km s$^{-1}$ and a kinetic energy of about $10^{48}$ erg, expanding into a medium with a density of about $10^2$ cm$^{-3}$. Alternatively, the radio emission could arise from a weak initially-relativistic but decelerated jet with an energy of $...

  16. An optimal current observer for predictive current controlled buck DC-DC converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Run; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zou, Xuecheng; Tong, Qiaoling; Zhang, Qiao

    2014-05-19

    In digital current mode controlled DC-DC converters, conventional current sensors might not provide isolation at a minimized price, power loss and size. Therefore, a current observer which can be realized based on the digital circuit itself, is a possible substitute. However, the observed current may diverge due to the parasitic resistors and the forward conduction voltage of the diode. Moreover, the divergence of the observed current will cause steady state errors in the output voltage. In this paper, an optimal current observer is proposed. It achieves the highest observation accuracy by compensating for all the known parasitic parameters. By employing the optimal current observer-based predictive current controller, a buck converter is implemented. The converter has a convergently and accurately observed inductor current, and shows preferable transient response than the conventional voltage mode controlled converter. Besides, costs, power loss and size are minimized since the strategy requires no additional hardware for current sensing. The effectiveness of the proposed optimal current observer is demonstrated experimentally.

  17. Dynamics of the earth's ring current - Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The development of currents within an arbitrary distribution of particles trapped in the geomagnetic field is described. These currents combine to form the earth's ring current and thus are responsible for the worldwide depressions of surface magnetic field strength during periods of magnetic activity known as magnetic storms. Following a brief review of trapped particle motion in magnetic fields, ring current development is described and presented in terms of basic field and particle distribution parameters. Experimental observations then are presented and discussed within the theoretical framework developed earlier. New results are presented which, in the area of composition and charge state observations, hold high promise in solving many long standing ring current problems. Finally, available experimental results will be used to assess the present understanding as to ring current sources, generation, and dissipation.

  18. West Coast Observing System (WCOS) ADCP Currents Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The West Coast Observing System (WCOS) project provides access to temperature and currents data collected at four of the five National Marine Sanctuary sites,...

  19. Satellite observations of the northeast monsoon coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shetye, S.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    Satellite Infrared observations, from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), during November 1987-February 1988 and hydrographic data from the eastern Arabian Sea are used to describe the poleward flowing coastal current in the eastern...

  20. Environmental epigenomics: Current approaches to assess epigenetic effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC's) on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Orozco, Natalia; Santiago-Toledo, Gerardo; Barrón, Valeria; Espinosa-García, Ana María; García-García, José Antonio; García-Arrazola, Roeb

    2017-04-01

    Environmental Epigenomics is a developing field to study the epigenetic effect on human health from exposure to environmental factors. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been detected primarily in pharmaceutical drugs, personal care products, food additives, and food containers. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been associated with a high incidence and prevalence of many endocrine-related disorders in humans. Nevertheless, further evidence is needed to establish a correlation between exposure to EDC and human disorders. Conventional detection of EDCs is based on chemical structure and concentration sample analysis. However, substantial evidence has emerged, suggesting that cell exposure to EDCs leads to epigenetic changes, independently of its chemical structure with non-monotonic low-dose responses. Consequently, a paradigm shift in toxicology assessment of EDCs is proposed based on a comprehensive review of analytical techniques used to evaluate the epigenetic effects. Fundamental insights reported elsewhere are compared in order to establish DNA methylation analysis as a viable method for assessing endocrine disruptors beyond the conventional study approach of chemical structure and concentration analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Polarity-Specific Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Disrupts Auditory Pitch Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko eMatsushita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is attracting increasing interest because of its potential for therapeutic use. While its effects have been investigated mainly with motor and visual tasks, less is known in the auditory domain. Past tDCS studies with auditory tasks demonstrated various behavioural outcomes, possibly due to differences in stimulation parameters or task measurements used in each study. Further research using well-validated tasks are therefore required for clarification of behavioural effects of tDCS on the auditory system. Here, we took advantage of findings from a prior functional magnetic resonance imaging study, which demonstrated that the right auditory cortex is modulated during fine-grained pitch learning of microtonal melodic patterns. Targeting the right auditory cortex with tDCS using this same task thus allowed us to test the hypothesis that this region is causally involved in pitch learning. Participants in the current study were trained for three days while we measured pitch discrimination thresholds using microtonal melodies on each day using a psychophysical staircase procedure. We administered anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS to three groups of participants over the right auditory cortex on the second day of training during performance of the task. Both the sham and the cathodal groups showed the expected significant learning effect (decreased pitch threshold over the three days of training; in contrast we observed a blocking effect of anodal tDCS on auditory pitch learning, such that this group showed no significant change in thresholds over the three days. The results support a causal role for the right auditory cortex in pitch discrimination learning.

  2. Integrating Observations of the Boundary Current Flow around Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    GOALS The long-term goal is to investigate the boundary-current and inter -basin ocean circulation which governs the conditions and variability in Bay...observations, and NASCar in general has a focus on the inter -basin exchange to which our observations are expected to provide important insight

  3. European Union's strategy on endocrine disrupting chemicals and the current position of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perharič, Lucija; Fatur, Tanja; Drofenik, Jernej

    2016-06-01

    In view of the European Union regulations 1107/2009 and 528/2012, which say that basic substances in plant protection and biocidal products marketed in the European Union (EU) should not have an inherent capacity to cause endocrine disruption, an initiative was started to define scientific criteria for the identification of endocrine disruptors (EDs). The objectives of the EU strategy on EDs are to protect human health and the environment, to assure the functioning of the market, and to provide clear and coherent criteria for the identification of EDs that could have broad application in the EU legislation. Policy issues were to be addressed by the Ad-hoc group of Commission Services, EU Agencies and Member States established in 2010, whereas the scientific issues were to be addressed by the Endocrine Disruptors Expert Advisory Group (ED EAG), established in 2011. The ED EAG adopted the 2002 World Health Organization (WHO) definition of endocrine disruptor and agreed that for its identification it is necessary to produce convincing evidence of a biologically plausible causal link between an adverse effect and endocrine disrupting mode of action. In 2014, the European Commission proposed four ED identification criteria options and three regulatory options, which are now being assessed for socio-economic, environmental, and health impact. Slovenia supports the establishing of identification criteria and favours option 4, according to which ED identification should be based on the WHO definition with the addition of potency as an element of hazard characterisation. As for regulatory options, Slovenia favours the risk-based rather than hazard-based regulation.

  4. Observational templates of star cluster disruption. The stellar group NGC 1901 in front of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, G; Villanova, S; Bidin, C M; le de Marcos, C F; Baumgardt, H; Solivella, G; Carraro, Giovanni; Marcos, Raul de la Fuente; Villanova, Sandro; Bidin, Christian Moni; Marcos, Carlos de le Fuente; Baumgardt, Holger; Solivella, Gladys

    2007-01-01

    Observations indicate that present-day star formation in the Milky Way disk takes place in stellar ensembles or clusters rather than in isolation. Bound, long lived stellar groups are known as open clusters. They gradually lose stars and in their final evolutionary stages they are severely disrupted leaving an open cluster remnant made of a few stars. In this paper, we study in detail the stellar content and kinematics of the poorly populated star cluster NGC1901. This object appears projected against the Large Magellanic Cloud. The aim of the present work is to derive the current evolutionary status, binary fraction, age and mass of this stellar group. These are fundamental quantities to compare with those from N-body models in order to study the most general topic of star cluster evolution and dissolution.The analysis is performed using wide-field photometry in the UBVI pass-band, proper motions from the UCAC.2 catalog, and 3 epochs of high resolution spectroscopy, as well as results from extensive N-body c...

  5. DMSP F7 observations of a substorm field-aligned current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Spence, H. E.; Meng, C.-I.

    1991-01-01

    Observations are described of a substorm field-aligned current (FAC) system traversed by the DMSP F7 spacecraft just after 0300 UT on April 25, 1985. It is shown that the substorm FAC portion of the current system was located equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. The equatorward boundary of the substorm FAC into the magnetotail was mapped using the Tsyganenko (1987) model, showing that the boundary corresponds to 6.9 earth radii. The result is consistent with the suggestion of Akasofu (1972) and Lopez and Lui (1990) that the region of substorm initiation lies relatively close to the earth and the concept that an essential feature of substorms is the disruption and diversion of the near-earth current sheet.

  6. Morphology of the ring current derived from magnetic field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Our examination of the 20 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from ISEE, AMPTE/CCE and Polar missions has allowed us to quantify how the ring current flows and closes in the magnetosphere at a variety of disturbance levels. Using intercalibrated magnetic field data from the three spacecraft, we are able to construct the statistical magnetic field maps and derive 3-dimensional current density by the simple device of taking the curl of the statistically determined magnetic field. The results show that there are two ring currents, an inner one that flows eastward at ~3 RE and a main westward ring current at ~4–7 RE for all levels of geomagnetic disturbances. In general, the in-situ observations show that the ring current varies as the Dst index decreases, as we would expect it to change. An unexpected result is how asymmetric it is in local time. Some current clearly circles the magnetosphere but much of the energetic plasma stays in the night hemisphere. These energetic particles appear not to be able to readily convect into the dayside magnetosphere. During quiet times, the symmetric and partial ring currents are similar in strength (~0.5MA and the peak of the westward ring current is close to local midnight. It is the partial ring current that exhibits most drastic intensification as the level of disturbances increases. Under the condition of moderate magnetic storms, the total partial ring current reaches ~3MA, whereas the total symmetric ring current is ~1MA. Thus, the partial ring current contributes dominantly to the decrease in the Dst index. As the ring current strengthens the peak of the partial ring current shifts duskward to the pre-midnight sector. The partial ring current is closed by a meridional current system through the ionosphere, mainly the field-aligned current, which maximizes at local times near the dawn and dusk. The closure currents flow in

  7. Disturbance observer based current controller for vector controlled IM drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Dal, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of the current control loop, usually, well known parameter compensation and/or cross decoupling techniques are employed for advanced ac drives. In this paper, instead of using these techniques an observer-based current controller is proposed for vector controlled...... coupling effects and increase robustness against parameters change without requiring any other compensation strategies. The experimental implementation results are provided to demonstrate validity and performance of the proposed control scheme.......In order to increase the accuracy of the current control loop, usually, well known parameter compensation and/or cross decoupling techniques are employed for advanced ac drives. In this paper, instead of using these techniques an observer-based current controller is proposed for vector controlled...

  8. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  9. Currents in the Dead Sea: Lagrangian and Eulerian observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Tal; Gertman, Isaac; Katsenelson, Boris; Bodzin, Raanan; Lensly, Nadav

    2015-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal hypersaline lake located in the lowest surface on Earth (currently -429 m bsl). The physical properties of the brine are significantly different than in common marine systems: the DS brine density is ~1.24 gr/cc and its viscosity ~3 times higher than marine systems. We present observational data on wind and currents in the Dead Sea. The observation setup includes a few fixed (Eulerian) stations which are equipped with wind meter and current meter profiler that covers the entire water column (ADCP). Thermal stratification is continuously measured in some of the stations using a thermistor chain. Lagrangian drifters that record the shallow water currents were released in liner array of single drifters between the fixed stations, and also in triplets (15 m triangle). The results include the measured time series data of wind (atmospheric forcing) and the measured current profiles from the fixed stations. Data of the Lagrangian drifters is presented as trajectories along with vector time series. Quality control check included comparison of drifter data and ADCP data whenever the drifters passed by the fixed stations; a very good agreement was found between the different measuring approaches. We discuss the following issues : (i) the relation between the wind and current data, (ii) the Lagrangian trajectories and transport aspects.

  10. Observed currents at Bombay High during a winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.

    and diurnal tides were oriented roughly perpendicular to the shelf-break while the mean currents were northwestwards along the shelf-break. During the observation period, the mixed layer (-50 m) remained isothermal while a steady rise in temperature (~2˚C...

  11. New Physical Insights about Tidal Disruption Events from a Comprehensive Observational Inventory at X-Ray Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchettl, Katie; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the X-ray emission from 70 transient sources that have been classified as tidal disruption events (TDEs) in the literature. We explore the properties of these candidates, using nearly three decades of X-ray observations to quantify their properties and characteristics. We find that the emission from X-ray TDEs increase by two to three orders of magnitude, compared to pre-flare constraints. These emissions evolve significantly with time, and decay with power-law indices that are typically shallower than the canonical t ‑5/3 decay law, implying that X-ray TDEs are viscously delayed. These events exhibit enhanced (relative to galactic) column densities and are quite soft in nature, with no strong correlation between the amount of detected soft and hard emission. At their peak, jetted events have an X-ray to optical ratio ≫1, whereas non-jetted events have a ratio ∼1, which suggests that these events undergo reprocessing at different rates. X-ray TDEs have long T 90 values, consistent with what would be expected from a viscously driven accretion disk formed by the disruption of a main-sequence star by a black hole with a mass disruptions and/or disruptions of low-mass stars.

  12. Comments on Current Space Systems Observing the Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, L. A.

    2016-07-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), which was established in 1992, has been effective in specifying the observations needed for climate studies, and advocating that these observations be made. As a result, there are essential climate variables being observed, particularly from space, and these have formed the basis for our ever-improving models of how the Earth system functions and the human impact on it. We cannot conclude, however, that the current observing system in space is adequate. Climate change is accelerating, and we need to ensure that our observations capture, with completeness and with proper resolution and cadence, the most important changes. Perhaps of most significance, we need to use observations from space to guide the mitigation and adaptation strategies on which at last our civilization seems prepared to embark. And we need to use our observations to educate particularly policy makers on the reality of climate change, so that none deny the need to act. COSPAR is determined to play its part in highlighting the need to strengthen the climate observing system and notably its research component. This is being accomplished through events like the present roundtable, through the work of its Scientific Commission A, its Task Group on GEO (where COSPAR is serving as a member of its Program Board), and by promoting among space agencies and policy-makers the recently released scientific roadmap on Integrated Earth System Science for the period 2016-2025.

  13. X-ray Observations of Disrupted Recycled Pulsars: No Refuge for Orphaned Central Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gotthelf, E V; Allen, B; Knispel, B

    2013-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray survey of the disrupted recycled pulsars (DRPs), isolated radio pulsars with P > 20 ms and B_s 1E4 - 1E5 yr, roughly 10 times the ages of the approximately 10 known CCOs in a similar volume of the Galaxy. The order of a hundred CCO descendants that could be detected by this method are thus either intrinsically radio quiet, or occupy a different region of (P,B_s) parameter space from the DRPs. This motivates a new X-ray search for orphaned CCOs among radio pulsars with larger B-fields, which could verify the theory that their fields are buried by fall-back of supernova ejecta, but quickly regrow to join the normal pulsar population.

  14. Tide and tidal current observation in the Karimata Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zexun; Fang, Guohong; Sulistiyo, Budi; Dwi Susanto, R.; Setiawan, Agus; Rameyo Adi, Tukul; Qiao, Fangli; Fan, Bin; Li, Shujiang

    2013-04-01

    B2 and B3 are in the Karimata Strait between Belitung Island and Kalimantan. All stations have the sea level and current profile observation data longer than 1 month. Based on the observation, we analyzed the harmonic constants of the tide and tidal current, and calculated the tidal current ellipse and the horizontal tidal energy flux. The results show that, (1) The type of tide in Karimata Strait is regular diurnal. (2)The amplitude of K1 is bigger than 60 cm at all stations, and the phase lag is about 150°. For semi-diurnal tides, the amplitude is smaller than 5cm. (3) All stations show reciprocating tidal current. The major axis of tidal current ellipse is about 10 cm/s for diurnal tides, and smaller than 5cm/s for semi-diurnal tides. (4) The tidal energy propagates from the South China Sea to Indonesian Seas through the Karimata Strait. For Section A, K1 energy flux density is 2.85 KW/m at A1 and 6.97 KW/m at A2. The K1 energy propagation cross section A is about 1.8 GW. For section B, the K1 energy flux density is 11.55 KW/m at B1, 6.42 KW/m at B2, and 7.49 KW/m at B3.

  15. Current systematic carbon cycle observations and needs for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ciais

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The goal of this study is to identify the current state of carbon observations and needs for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion (by several orders of magnitude of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over remote areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with ground-based data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in-situ and remotely sensed data at much higher resolution and density than currently achieved for natural fluxes, although over a small land area (cities, industrial

  16. Local structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Runov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty rapid crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by the Cluster spacecraft during July-October 2001 at a geocentric distance of 19 RE are examined in detail to address the structure of the current sheet. We use four-point magnetic field measurements to estimate electric current density; the current sheet spatial scale is estimated by integration of the translation velocity calculated from the magnetic field temporal and spatial derivatives. The local normal-related coordinate system for each case is defined by the combining Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA and the curlometer technique. Numerical parameters characterizing the plasma sheet conditions for these crossings are provided to facilitate future comparisons with theoretical models. Three types of current sheet distributions are distinguished: center-peaked (type I, bifurcated (type II and asymmetric (type III sheets. Comparison to plasma parameter distributions show that practically all cases display non-Harris-type behavior, i.e. interior current peaks are embedded into a thicker plasma sheet. The asymmetric sheets with an off-equatorial current density peak most likely have a transient nature. The ion contribution to the electric current rarely agrees with the current computed using the curlometer technique, indicating that either the electron contribution to the current is strong and variable, or the current density is spatially or temporally structured.

  17. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  18. Field-aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F region that are interpreted as being caused by the passage of the payload through a structured field-aligned current system. The field-aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of about 1 km. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of .001 A/sq m.

  19. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase synchronization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haihong Li; Weiqing Liu; Qiongling Dai; Jinghua Xiao

    2006-09-01

    The dynamics of two uncoupled distinct Chua circuits driven by a common direct current voltage is explored experimentally. It was found that, with increasing current intensity, the dominant frequencies of these two Chua circuits will first vary at different speeds, approach an identical value for a certain current intensity and then separate. Techniques such as synchronization index and phase difference distribution were employed to analyze the phase coherence between these two Chua circuits.

  20. New physical insights about Tidal Disruption Events from a comprehensive observational inventory at X-ray wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Auchettl, Katie; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the X-ray emission from 66 transient sources which have been classified as a tidal disruption event (TDE) in the literature. We explore the properties of these candidates using nearly three decades of X-ray observations to quantify the properties and characteristics of X-ray TDEs observationally. We find that the emission from X-ray TDEs increase by two to four orders of magnitude compared to pre-flare constraints, which evolves significantly with time and decays with powerlaw indices that are typically shallower than the canonical $t^{-5/3}$ decay law, implying that X-ray TDEs are viscously delayed. These events exhibit enhanced column densities relative to Galactic and are quite soft in nature, with no strong correlation between the amount of detected soft and hard emission. At peak, jetted events have an X-ray to optical ratio $\\gg$1, while non-jetted events have a ratio $\\sim$1, which suggests that these events undergo reprocessing at different rates. X-ray TDEs have lo...

  1. A socio-cognitive strategy to address farmers' tolerance of high risk work: Disrupting the effects of apprenticeship of observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Joan M; Westneat, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Why do generations of farmers tolerate the high-risk work of agricultural work and resist safe farm practices? This study presents an analysis inspired by empirical data from studies conducted from 1993 to 2012 on the differing effects of farm safety interventions between participants who live or work on farms and those who don't, when both were learning to be farm safety advocates. Both groups show statistically significant gains in knowledge and behavioral change proxy measures. However, non-farm participants' gains consistently outstripped their live/work farm counterparts. Drawing on socio-cultural perspectives, a grounded theory qualitative analysis focused on identifying useful constructs to understand the farmers' resistance to adopt safety practices. Understanding apprenticeships of observation and its relation to experiential learning over time can expose sources of deeply anchored beliefs and how they operate insidiously to promote familiar, albeit unsafe farming practices. The challenge for intervention-prevention programs becomes how to disrupt what has been learned during these apprenticeships of observation and to address what has been obscured during this powerful socialization process. Implications focus on the design and implementation of farm safety prevention and education programs. First, farm safety advocates and prevention researchers need to attend to demographics and explicitly explore the prior experiences and background of safety program participants. Second, farm youth in particular need to explore, explicitly, their own apprenticeships of observations, preferably through the use of new social media and or digital forms of expression, resulting in a story repair process. Third, careful study of the organization of work and farm experiences and practices need to provide the foundations for intervention programs. Finally, it is crucial that farm safety programs understand apprenticeships of observation are generational and ongoing over time

  2. Climate-induced boreal forest change: Predictions versus current observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Amber J.; Tchebakova, Nadezda M.; French, Nancy H. F.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Shugart, Herman H.; Stocks, Brian J.; Sukhinin, Anatoly I.; Parfenova, E. I.; Chapin, F. Stuart; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2007-04-01

    For about three decades, there have been many predictions of the potential ecological response in boreal regions to the currently warmer conditions. In essence, a widespread, naturally occurring experiment has been conducted over time. In this paper, we describe previously modeled predictions of ecological change in boreal Alaska, Canada and Russia, and then we investigate potential evidence of current climate-induced change. For instance, ecological models have suggested that warming will induce the northern and upslope migration of the treeline and an alteration in the current mosaic structure of boreal forests. We present evidence of the migration of keystone ecosystems in the upland and lowland treeline of mountainous regions across southern Siberia. Ecological models have also predicted a moisture-stress-related dieback in white spruce trees in Alaska, and current investigations show that as temperatures increase, white spruce tree growth is declining. Additionally, it was suggested that increases in infestation and wildfire disturbance would be catalysts that precipitate the alteration of the current mosaic forest composition. In Siberia, 7 of the last 9 yr have resulted in extreme fire seasons, and extreme fire years have also been more frequent in both Alaska and Canada. In addition, Alaska has experienced extreme and geographically expansive multi-year outbreaks of the spruce beetle, which had been previously limited by the cold, moist environment. We suggest that there is substantial evidence throughout the circumboreal region to conclude that the biosphere within the boreal terrestrial environment has already responded to the transient effects of climate change. Additionally, temperature increases and warming-induced change are progressing faster than had been predicted in some regions, suggesting a potential non-linear rapid response to changes in climate, as opposed to the predicted slow linear response to climate change.

  3. Climate-Induced Boreal Forest Change: Predictions versus Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Amber J.; Tchebakova, Nadezda M.; French, Nancy H. F.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Shugart, Herman H.; Stocks, Brian J.; Sukhinin, Anatoly I.; Parfenova, E. I.; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    For about three decades, there have been many predictions of the potential ecological response in boreal regions to the currently warmer conditions. In essence, a widespread, naturally occurring experiment has been conducted over time. In this paper, we describe previously modeled predictions of ecological change in boreal Alaska, Canada and Russia, and then we investigate potential evidence of current climate-induced change. For instance, ecological models have suggested that warming will induce the northern and upslope migration of the treeline and an alteration in the current mosaic structure of boreal forests. We present evidence of the migration of keystone ecosystems in the upland and lowland treeline of mountainous regions across southern Siberia. Ecological models have also predicted a moisture-stress-related dieback in white spruce trees in Alaska, and current investigations show that as temperatures increase, white spruce tree growth is declining. Additionally, it was suggested that increases in infestation and wildfire disturbance would be catalysts that precipitate the alteration of the current mosaic forest composition. In Siberia, five of the last seven years have resulted in extreme fire seasons, and extreme fire years have also been more frequent in both Alaska and Canada. In addition, Alaska has experienced extreme and geographically expansive multi-year outbreaks of the spruce beetle, which had been previously limited by the cold, moist environment. We suggest that there is substantial evidence throughout the circumboreal region to conclude that the biosphere within the boreal terrestrial environment has already responded to the transient effects of climate change. Additionally, temperature increases and warming-induced change are progressing faster than had been predicted in some regions, suggesting a potential non-linear rapid response to changes in climate, as opposed to the predicted slow linear response to climate change.

  4. Disrupted coupling of gating charge displacement to Na+ current activation for DIIS4 mutations in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Wentao; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Cannon, Stephen C

    2014-08-01

    Missense mutations at arginine residues in the S4 voltage-sensor domains of NaV1.4 are an established cause of hypokalemic periodic paralysis, an inherited disorder of skeletal muscle involving recurrent episodes of weakness in conjunction with low serum K(+). Expression studies in oocytes have revealed anomalous, hyperpolarization-activated gating pore currents in mutant channels. This aberrant gating pore conductance creates a small inward current at the resting potential that is thought to contribute to susceptibility to depolarization in low K(+) during attacks of weakness. A critical component of this hypothesis is the magnitude of the gating pore conductance relative to other conductances that are active at the resting potential in mammalian muscle: large enough to favor episodes of paradoxical depolarization in low K(+), yet not so large as to permanently depolarize the fiber. To improve the estimate of the specific conductance for the gating pore in affected muscle, we sequentially measured Na(+) current through the channel pore, gating pore current, and gating charge displacement in oocytes expressing R669H, R672G, or wild-type NaV1.4 channels. The relative conductance of the gating pore to that of the pore domain pathway for Na(+) was 0.03%, which implies a specific conductance in muscle from heterozygous patients of ∼ 10 µS/cm(2) or 1% of the total resting conductance. Unexpectedly, our data also revealed a substantial decoupling between gating charge displacement and peak Na(+) current for both R669H and R672G mutant channels. This decoupling predicts a reduced Na(+) current density in affected muscle, consistent with the observations that the maximal dV/dt and peak amplitude of the action potential are reduced in fibers from patients with R672G and in a knock-in mouse model of R669H. The defective coupling between gating charge displacement and channel activation identifies a previously unappreciated mechanism that contributes to the reduced

  5. Satellite observations of an annual cycle in the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available years of along-track altimetry and merged altimetry and close to 7 years of high frequency Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations. While the position and width of the Agulhas Current’s dynamical core do not display an annual cycle, the geostrophic...

  6. The CAWSES Global Observing Campaign on Tides: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W. E.; Gerding, M.; Goncharenko, L.; Keckhut, P.; Marsh, D.; Oberheide, J.; Rao, D. N.; Scheer, .; Singer, W.

    2007-05-01

    The CAWSES Global Tidal Campaign was initiated to encourage collaboration between satellite and ground based observations and to identify features in various observation types consistent with specific components. This project is one of several sponsored under Theme 3, Atmospheric Coupling Processes, of the international Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System program (CAWSES, a SCOSTEP sponsored program). The overall goal of the campaign is to provide global data sets for several concentrated time periods over the next few years which includes coordinated ground-based and satellite measurements and modeling efforts. To unambiguously resolve the tidal components present in the Earth's atmosphere requires spatial and temporal sampling sufficient to resolve wavenumbers up to at least 5 and periods down to 4.8 hours every two to three days. Neither satellite or ground based observations on their own are capable of achieving these goals. Interpretation of tidal signatures in different observables (for example wind and temperature) is complicated by the fact the the associated latitudinal structures are typically different. A global network is required to allow these structures to be examined. Three campaign periods have been sceduled to date. The first tidal campaign took place from September 1 to October 31, 2005 and this year two campaigns, March 1 to April 31, and June 1 to August 15 are planned. The first of these latter campaigns will concentrate on the global tidal structures during equinox and their evolution and variability during this time period. The second of these campaigns will address the tidal structures during solstice conditions. Strong hemispheric asymmetries are know to develop in the structure of the migrating diurnal tide and it is of interest to determine the form of other components. These campaigns will allow the characterization of the heating sources, tidal components (migrating and nonmigrating), and tidal effects from the surface of the

  7. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    While projects of governance by transparency have become widespread over the past decades, theyare usually investigated and theorized in isolation from the wider field of visibility and surveillancein which they are embedded. Building on theories of governance, visibility and surveillance...... appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices...... of surveillance produce new forms of governing, potentiallywidening the space of manoeuvring for corporations....

  8. Disruptive behavior in preschool children: distinguishing normal misbehavior from markers of current and later childhood conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji S; Tillman, Rebecca; Luby, Joan L

    2015-03-01

    To investigate which disruptive behaviors in preschool were normative and transient vs markers of conduct disorder, as well as which disruptive behaviors predicted the persistence of conduct disorder into school age. Data from a longitudinal study of preschool children were used to investigate disruptive behaviors. Caregivers of preschoolers ages 3.0-5.11 years (n = 273) were interviewed using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment to derive the following diagnostic groups: conduct disorder, externalizing disorder without conduct disorder, internalizing disorder without externalizing disorder, and healthy. At school age, participants were again assessed via an age-appropriate diagnostic interview. Logistic and linear regression with pairwise group comparisons was used to investigate clinical markers of preschool conduct disorder and predictors of school age conduct disorder. Losing one's temper, low-intensity destruction of property, and low-intensity deceitfulness/stealing in the preschool period were found in both healthy and disordered groups. In contrast, high-intensity argument/defiant behavior, both low- and high-intensity aggression to people/animals, high-intensity destruction of property, high-intensity deceitfulness/stealing, and high-intensity peer problems were markers of preschool conduct disorder and predictors of school age conduct disorder. Inappropriate sexual behavior was not a marker for preschool conduct disorder but was a predictor of school age conduct disorder. These findings provide a guide for primary care clinicians to help identify preschoolers with clinical conduct disorder and those who are at risk for persistent conduct disorder in childhood. Preschoolers displaying these symptoms should be targeted for mental health assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  10. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  11. Inter-machine comparison of the termination phase and energy conversion in tokamak disruptions with runaway current plateau formation and implications for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Esposito, B.; Riccardo, V.; FTU; DIII-D Teams; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-08-01

    The termination of the current and the loss of runaway electrons following runaway current plateau formation during disruptions have been investigated in the JET, DIII-D and FTU tokamaks. Substantial conversion of magnetic energy into runaway kinetic energy, up to ˜10 times the initial plateau runaway kinetic energy, has been inferred for the slowest current terminations. Both modelling and experiment suggest that, in present devices, the efficiency of conversion into runaway kinetic energy is determined to a great extent by the characteristic runaway loss time, τdiff, and the resistive time of the residual ohmic plasma after the disruption, τres, increasing with the ratio τdiff/τres. It is predicted that, in large future devices such as ITER, the generation of runaways by the avalanche mechanism will play an important role, particularly for slow runaway discharge terminations, increasing substantially the amount of energy deposited by the runaways onto the plasma-facing components by the conversion of magnetic energy of the runaway plasma into runaway kinetic energy. Estimates of the power fluxes on the beryllium plasma-facing components during runaway termination in ITER indicate that for runaway currents of up to 2 MA no melting of the components is expected. For larger runaway currents, minimization of the effects of runaway impact on the first wall requires a reduction in the kinetic energy of the runaway beam before termination and, in addition, high plasma density ne and low ohmic plasma resistance (long τres) to prevent large conversion of magnetic into runaway kinetic energy during slow current terminations.

  12. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  13. Observed residual currents off the Changjiang (Yangtze) River mouth in summertime of 1959 and 1982

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建荣; 戚定满; 肖成猷

    2004-01-01

    Data taken in two large scale ocean observations in China in summer 1959 and 1982 were used to analyze the residual current off the Changjiang (Yangtze) River mouth. The currents at surface off the mouth in July 1959 and 1982 flow northeastward and eastward due to the river discharge, the current speed was larger in1982 than in 1959. All the bottom currents flow landward due to baroclinic effect. The surface current was controlled by the river runoff and the Taiwan Warm Current (TWC). A return current at surface off the mouth was observed in September 1959. In general, the bottom currents were controlled by the TWC in most study area in addition to the runoff near the mouth. Although driven by 3-D model with the monthly averaged forces (river discharge, wind stress, baroclinic effect, open boundary water volume flux and tidal mixing) in August, the simulated circulations were basically consistent with the observed ones with episodic time manner.

  14. Observational evidence for remote forcing of the west India coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Suresh, I.; Shankar, D.; Sundar, D.; Jayakumar, S.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Pednekar, P.S.

    remote and local forcing in observations. Using field measurements (current, sea level, and wind) for a month during March-April 2003 off Goa in the near-coast regime of the West India Coastal Current (WICC), we show that the current was driven by local...

  15. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter with gravitational wave observations: tidal deformability and tidal disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    We study how to extract information on the neutron star equation of state from the gravitational wave signal emitted during the coalescence of a binary system composed by two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We use Post-Newtonian templates which include the tidal deformability parameter and, when tidal disruption occurs before merger, a frequency cut-off. Assuming that this signal is detected by Advanced LIGO/Virgo or ET, we evaluate the uncertainties on these parameters using different data analysis strategies based on the Fisher matrix approach, and on recently obtained analytical fits of the relevant quantities. We find that the tidal deformability is more effective than the stellar compactness to discriminate among different possible equations of state.

  16. Localized surface disruptions observed by InSAR during strong earthquakes in Java and Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, M.

    2010-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data spanning strong earthquakes on the islands of Java and Hawai‘i in 2006 reveal patches of subsidence and incoherence indicative of localized ground failure. Interferograms spanning the 26 May 2006 Java earthquake suggest an area of about 7.5 km2 of subsidence (~2 cm) and incoherence south of the city of Yogyakarta that correlates with significant damage to housing, high modeled peak ground accelerations, and poorly consolidated geologic deposits. The subsidence and incoherence is inferred to be a result of intense shaking and/or damage. At least five subsidence patches on the west side of the Island of Hawai‘i, ranging 0.3–2.2 km2 in area and 3–8 cm in magnitude, occurred as a result of a pair of strong earthquakes on 15 October 2006. Although no felt reports or seismic data are available from the areas in Hawai‘i, the Java example suggests that the subsidence patches indicate areas of amplified earthquake shaking. Surprisingly, all subsidence areas in Hawai‘i were limited to recent, and supposedly stable, lava flows and may reflect geological conditions not detectable at the surface. In addition, two ‘a‘ā lava flows in Hawai‘i were partially incoherent in interferograms spanning the earthquakes, indicating surface disruption as a result of the earthquake shaking. Coearthquake incoherence of rubbly deposits, like ‘a‘ā flows, should be explored as a potential indicator of earthquake intensity and past strong seismic activity.

  17. Free Fatty Acid Effects on the Atrial Myocardium: Membrane Ionic Currents Are Remodeled by the Disruption of T-Tubular Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P O'Connell

    Full Text Available Epicardial adiposity and plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFAs are elevated in atrial fibrillation, heart failure and obesity, with potentially detrimental effects on myocardial function. As major components of epicardial fat, FFAs may be abnormally regulated, with a potential to detrimentally modulate electro-mechanical function. The cellular mechanisms underlying such effects of FFAs are unknown.To determine the mechanisms underlying electrophysiological effects of palmitic (PA, stearic (SA and oleic (OA FFAs on sheep atrial myocytes.We used electrophysiological techniques, numerical simulations, biochemistry and optical imaging to examine the effects of acutely (≤ 15 min, short-term (4-6 hour or 24-hour application of individual FFAs (10 μM on isolated ovine left atrial myocytes (LAMs.Acute and short-term incubation in FFAs resulted in no differences in passive or active properties of isolated left atrial myocytes (LAMs. 24-hour application had differential effects depending on the FFA. PA did not affect cellular passive properties but shortened (p<0.05 action potential duration at 30% repolarization (APD30. APD50 and APD80 were unchanged. SA had no effect on resting membrane potential but reduced membrane capacitance by 15% (p<0.05, and abbreviated APD at all values measured (p≤0.001. OA did not significantly affect passive or active properties of LAMs. Measurement of the major voltage-gated ion channels in SA treated LAMs showed a ~60% reduction (p<0.01 of the L-type calcium current (ICa-L and ~30% reduction (p<0.05 in the transient outward potassium current (ITO. A human atrial cell model recapitulated SA effects on APD. Optical imaging showed that SA incubated for 24 hours altered t-tubular structure in isolated cells (p<0.0001.SA disrupts t-tubular architecture and remodels properties of membrane ionic currents in sheep atrial myocytes, with potential implications in arrhythmogenesis.

  18. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  19. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay angry, or avoid fights altogether? Your children model themselves on you. Departures and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family ...

  20. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  1. Current systematic carbon-cycle observations and the need for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciais, P.; Dolman, A. J.; Bombelli, A.; Duren, R.; Peregon, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Miller, C.; Gobron, N.; Kinderman, G.; Marland, G.; Gruber, N.; Chevallier, F.; Andres, R. J.; Balsamo, G.; Bopp, L.; Bréon, F.-M.; Broquet, G.; Dargaville, R.; Battin, T. J.; Borges, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Butler, J.; Canadell, J. G.; Cook, R. B.; DeFries, R.; Engelen, R.; Gurney, K. R.; Heinze, C.; Heimann, M.; Held, A.; Henry, M.; Law, B.; Luyssaert, S.; Miller, J.; Moriyama, T.; Moulin, C.; Myneni, R. B.; Nussli, C.; Obersteiner, M.; Ojima, D.; Pan, Y.; Paris, J.-D.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Plummer, S.; Quegan, S.; Raymond, P.; Reichstein, M.; Rivier, L.; Sabine, C.; Schimel, D.; Tarasova, O.; Valentini, R.; Wang, R.; van der Werf, G.; Wickland, D.; Williams, M.; Zehner, C.

    2014-07-01

    A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The paper is addressed to scientists, policymakers, and funding agencies who need to have a global picture of the current state of the (diverse) carbon observations. We identify the current state of carbon observations, and the needs and notional requirements for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy-relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests, and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote-sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with ground-based data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in situ and remotely sensed data at much higher

  2. In Situ Observations of Ion Scale Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retino, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Greco, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Canu, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a statistical study of ion-scale current sheets in turbulent space plasma. The study was performed using in situ measurements from the Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. Intermittent structures were identified using the Partial Variance of Increments method. We studied the distribution of the identified structures as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high (>3) and low (3) structures that accounted for ~20% of the total. Those current sheets have high magnetic shear (>90 degrees) and were observed mostly in close proximity to the bow shock with their numbers reducing towards the magnetopause. Enhancement of the estimated electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  3. Complex state variable- and disturbance observer-based current controllers for AC drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal, Mehmet; Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    , extracted by a disturbance observer and then injected into the current controller. In this study, a revised version of a disturbance observer-based controller and a well known complex variable model-based design with a single set of complex pole are compared in terms of design aspects and performance...... of the parameter and the cross-coupling effect. Moreover, it provides a better performance, smooth and low noisy operation with respect to the complex variable controller....... of the stator current. In order to improve the current control performance an alternative current control strategy was proposed previously aiming to avoid the undesired cross-coupling and non-linearities between the state variables. These effects are assumed as disturbances arisen in the closed-loop path...

  4. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Amol; D Shankar; V Fernando; A Mukherjee; S G Aparna; R Fernandes; G S Michael; S T Khalap; N P Satelkar; Y Agarvadekar; M G Gaonkar; A P Tari; A Kankonkar; S P Vernekar

    2014-07-01

    We present current data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored on the continental slope off the west coast of India. The data were collected at four locations (roughly at Kanyakumari, Kollam, Goa, and Mumbai) extending from ∼7° to ∼20° N during 2008–2012. The observations show that a seasonal cycle, including an annual cycle, is present in the West India Coastal Current (WICC); this seasonal cycle, which strengthens northward, shows considerable interannual variability and is not as strongly correlated along the coast as in climatologies based on ship drifts or the altimeter. The alongshore decorrelation of theWICC is much stronger at intraseasonal periods, which are evident during the winter monsoon all along the coast. This intraseasonal variability is stronger in the south. A striking feature of the WICC is upward phase propagation, which implies an undercurrent whose depth becomes shallower as the season progresses. There are also instances when the phase propagates downward. At the two southern mooring locations off Kollam and Kanyakumari, the cross-shore current, which is usually associated with eddy-like circulations, is comparable to the alongshore current on occasions. A comparison with data from the OSCAR (Ocean Surface Currents Analyses Real-time) data product shows not only similarities, but also significant differences, particularly in the phase. One possible reason for this phase mismatch between the ADCP current at 48 m and the OSCAR current, which represents the current in the 0–30 m depth range, is the vertical phase propagation. Current products based on Ocean General Circulation Models like ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II) and GODAS (Global Ocean Data Assimilation System) show a weaker correlation with the ADCP current, and ECCO2 does capture some of the observed variability.

  5. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Fernando, V.; Mukherjee, A.; Aparna, S. G.; Fernandes, R.; Michael, G. S.; Khalap, S. T.; Satelkar, N. P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M. G.; Tari, A. P.; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present current data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored on the continental slope off the west coast of India. The data were collected at four locations (roughly at Kanyakumari, Kollam, Goa, and Mumbai) extending from ˜ 7° to ˜ 20°N during 2008-2012. The observations show that a seasonal cycle, including an annual cycle, is present in the West India Coastal Current (WICC); this seasonal cycle, which strengthens northward, shows considerable interannual variability and is not as strongly correlated along the coast as in climatologies based on ship drifts or the altimeter. The alongshore decorrelation of the WICC is much stronger at intraseasonal periods, which are evident during the winter monsoon all along the coast. This intraseasonal variability is stronger in the south. A striking feature of the WICC is upward phase propagation, which implies an undercurrent whose depth becomes shallower as the season progresses. There are also instances when the phase propagates downward. At the two southern mooring locations off Kollam and Kanyakumari, the cross-shore current, which is usually associated with eddy-like circulations, is comparable to the alongshore current on occasions. A comparison with data from the OSCAR (Ocean Surface Currents Analyses Real-time) data product shows not only similarities, but also significant differences, particularly in the phase. One possible reason for this phase mismatch between the ADCP current at 48 m and the OSCAR current, which represents the current in the 0-30 m depth range, is the vertical phase propagation. Current products based on Ocean General Circulation Models like ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II) and GODAS (Global Ocean Data Assimilation System) show a weaker correlation with the ADCP current, and ECCO2 does capture some of the observed variability.

  6. Rip current evidence by hydrodynamic simulations, bathymetric surveys and UAV observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido; Aucelli, Pietro; Budillon, Giorgio; De Stefano, Massimo; Di Luccio, Diana; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Montella, Raffaele; Mucerino, Luigi; Sica, Mario; Pennetta, Micla

    2017-09-01

    The prediction of the formation, spacing and location of rip currents is a scientific challenge that can be achieved by means of different complementary methods. In this paper the analysis of numerical and experimental data, including RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft systems) observations, allowed us to detect the presence of rip currents and rip channels at the mouth of Sele River, in the Gulf of Salerno, southern Italy. The dataset used to analyze these phenomena consisted of two different bathymetric surveys, a detailed sediment analysis and a set of high-resolution wave numerical simulations, completed with Google EarthTM images and RPAS observations. The grain size trend analysis and the numerical simulations allowed us to identify the rip current occurrence, forced by topographically constrained channels incised on the seabed, which were compared with observations.

  7. Space Technology 5 Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Wang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a constellation mission consisting of three microsatellites. It provides the first multipoint magnetic field measurements in low Earth orbit, which enables us to separate spatial and temporal variations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using the ST5 data. We examine the field-aligned current observations during and after a geomagnetic storm and compare the magnetic field profiles at the three spacecraft. The multipoint data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures, commonly embedded within large-scale current sheets, are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in approx.10 min time scales. On the other hand, the data also show that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approx.1 min for mesoscale currents and approx.10 min for large-scale currents. These temporal features are very likely associated with dynamic variations of their charge carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of mesoscale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  8. In situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient RF Photocathode Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Jiahang; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (a.k.a. dark current) in high gradient RF photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 um) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Dark current from the cathode has been observed to be dominated by several separated strong emitters. The field enhancement factor, beta, of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The post scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometer (WLI) surface examinations reveal the origins of ~75% strong emitters overlap with the spots where rf breakdown have occurred.

  9. In Situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient rf Photocathode Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (˜100 μ m ) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L -band photocathode gun operating at ˜100 MV /m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ˜75 % strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  10. Entanglement between Two Distant Observables of Quantum Current as the Mechanism of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jeong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, it will be demonstrated that entanglement between two distant observables of quantum electron current enables electromagnetic radiation of free-electron lasers even though the amplified quadrature and the radiated quadrature are out of phase. This is supported by the previously observed sub-Poisson photon intensity fluctuations in the coherent spontaneous harmonic radiation generated by an infrared free-electron laser.

  11. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  12. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  13. Politisk disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på.......Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på....

  14. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  15. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  16. Satellite Observations of the Brazil and Falkland Currents - 1975 to 1976 and 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    suggesting a wave phase speed of 25 km day"’ with the waves travelling in the same direction as the Brazil Current. To a stationary observer, the...cruise 16 XBT and CTD data were obtained by D. GEORGI and S. JACOBS. REFERENCES BALECH E. (1949) Estudio critico de las corrientes marines del Litoral

  17. Seasonal and interannual variability in the Mozambique Channel from moored current observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075005700; van der Werf, P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483193X; Ullgren, J.E.; van Aken, H.M.; van Leeuwen, P.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102655758; de Ruijter, W.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068476760

    2010-01-01

    Direct observations from an array of current meter moorings across the Mozambique Channel in the south-west Indian Ocean are presented covering a period of more than 4 years. This allows an analysis of the volume transport through the channel, including the variability on interannual and seasonal

  18. Model and performance of current sensor observers for a doubly fed induction generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Yang, Chao; Hu, Yaogang

    2014-01-01

    a MATLAB/Simulink software platform under the conditions of active power change of doubly fed induction generators and grid voltage dip fault. Furthermore, the robustness of the proposed current observer is investigated when the doubly fed induction generator rotor resistance is changed. Results show...

  19. An observational study of a shallow gravity current triggered by katabatic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adachi

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations from a wind profiler and a meteorological tower are utilized to study the evolution of a gravity current that passed over the Meteorological Research Institute's (MRI field site in Tsukuba, Japan. The gravity current was created by katabatic flow originating on the mountainous slopes west of the field site. The passage of the shallow current was marked by a pronounced pressure disturbance and was accompanied by vertical circulations seen in the tower and profiler data. Direct vertical-beam measurements are difficult, especially at low heights during high-gradient events like density currents. In this study vertical velocities from the profiler are derived from the four oblique beams by use of the Minimizing the Variance of the Differences (MVD method. The vertical velocities derived from the MVD method agree well with in situ vertical velocities measured by a sonic anemometer on the tower.

    The gravity current is analyzed with surface observations, the wind profiler/RASS and tower-mounted instruments. Observations from the profiler/RASS and the tower-mounted instruments illustrate the structure of the gravity current in both wind and temperature fields. The profiler data reveal that there were three regions of waves in the vertical velocity field: lee-type waves, a solitary wave and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. The lee-type waves in the head region of the gravity current seem to have been generated by the gravity current acting as an obstacle to prefrontal flow. The solitary wave was formed from the elevated head of the gravity current that separated from the feeder flow. Profiler vertical-motion observations resolve this wave and enable us to classify it as a Benjamin-Davis-Ono (BDO type solitary wave. The ducting mechanism that enabled the solitary wave to propagate is also revealed from the wind profiler/RASS measurements. The combination of high-resolution instruments at the MRI site allow us to

  20. Structure and evolution of the current sheet by multi-spacecraft observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geophysics; Russell, C.T. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics; Gosling, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    On April 22, 1979, from 0840 to 1018 UT, ISEE 1, ISEE 2 and IMP 8 were all in or near the magnetotail current sheet at 17 Re, 16 Re and 35 Re respectively while ISEE 3 monitored the solar wind 206 Re upstream of the Earth. A global perspective of the four spacecraft observations and of the ground magnetic records is presented in this paper. The hyperbolic tangent current sheet model of Harris has been used to calculate the current sheet thickness and to analyze the plasma distribution in the vertical direction. It is found that during this event the current sheet thickness varied from 2.5 Re to 1.5 Re for northward IMF but thinned abruptly to 0.5 Re when the IMF turned southward.

  1. Wave glider observations of surface winds and currents in the core of Typhoon Danas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, S.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of surface winds and currents is essential to understand oceanic responses to tropical cyclones. We used a new platform, a Wave Glider (Liquid Robotics) to observe air-sea processes during a typhoon, equivalent to a category 4-hurricane, at peak strength, near Okinawa, Japan. Surface winds showed strong asymmetry in both speed and direction, faster fore than aft. Rotations of surface winds and currents were not coupled; currents rotated clockwise in the wake of the typhoon eye after passage of rapid wind rotations. Wind work was mostly done ahead of the eye, amplifying prior inertial motions with a phase shift. Wind-induced energy was nearly balanced with an increase in estimated kinetic energy of the upper ocean current, relative to prior inertial oscillations. This study provides a newer, more complete view of actual atmosphere-ocean interactions in a typhoon.

  2. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  3. Observational Study on Current Sheet of Magnetic Reconnection in Two Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang-wei, Cai; Ning, Wu; Jun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The coronal magnetic configuration behind coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can commonly be stretched severely, thus to push the magnetic fields with opposite polarities to approach each other, and to form a current sheet of magnetic reconnection. The current sheet in solar eruptions is not only an important region to convert the magnetic free energy into thermal energy, plasma kinetic energy, and energetic particle beams, but also plays a role to connect CMEs and flares. In the CME events of 2003 January 3 and 2003 November 4, the development of current sheet has been observed in both cases. We have investigated the dynamic features and physical properties of current sheet in the two events, based on the data of LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) and UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) on board of SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), and the Hα data from BBSO (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and YNAO (Yunnan Astronomical Observatory). The existence of ions with a high degree of ionization, such as Fe+17 and Si+11, indicates a high temperature up to 3×106 ∼5×106 K in the region of current sheet. A direct measurement shows that the thickness of current sheet varies between 1.3×104 and 1.1×105 km, which increases first and then decreases with time. Using the CHIANTI code (v.7.1), we have further calculated the average values of electron temperature and corresponding emission measure (EM) respectively to be 3.86×106 K and 6.1×1024 cm-5 in the current sheet of the 2003 January 3 event. We also find that the current sheet twisted forth and back quasi-periodically during the eruption event on 2003 November 4 by analyzing the observational data from SOHO/UVCS.

  4. In situ observations of ion scale current sheet and associated electron heating in Earth's magnetosheath turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retinò, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in thin current sheets that form in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that turbulent reconnection contributes to the dissipation of magnetic field energy and results in particle heating and non-thermal acceleration. Yet in situ measurements are required to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at those scales. The Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock is a turbulent near-Earth environment that offers a privileged environment for such a study. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets by using Cluster data. We studied the distribution of the current sheets as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high shear (θ > 90 degrees) and low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. Enhancement of electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  5. Disruption of murine Hexa gene leads to enzymatic deficiency and to neuronal lysosomal storage, similar to that observed in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, M; Marchand, P; Akli, S; Sheardown, S A; Puech, J P; Kress, C; Gressens, P; Nassogne, M C; Beccari, T; Muggleton-Harris, A L

    1995-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by beta-hexosaminidase A deficiency and leads to death in early childhood. The disease results from mutations in the HEXA gene, which codes for the alpha chain of beta-hexosaminidase. The castastrophic neurodegenerative progression of the disease is thought to be a consequence of massive neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and related glycolipids in the brain and nervous system of the patients. Fuller understanding of the pathogenesis and the development of therapeutic procedures have both suffered from the lack of an animal model. We have used gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells to disrupt the mouse Hexa gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele mimic several biochemical and histological features of human Tay-Sachs disease. Hexa-/- mice displayed a total deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A activity, and membranous cytoplasmic inclusions typical of GM2 gangliosidoses were found in the cytoplasm of their neurons. However, while the number of storage neurons increased with age, it remained low compared with that found in human, and no apparent motor or behavioral disorders could be observed. This suggests that the presence of beta-hexosaminidase A is not an absolute requirement of ganglioside degradation in mice. These mice should help us to understand several aspects of the disease as well as the physiological functions of hexosaminidase in mice. They should also provide a valuable animal model in which to test new forms of therapy, and in particular gene delivery into the central nervous system.

  6. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 1: current-induced mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Irish, James D.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2016-10-01

    Field observations of current profiles and temperature, salinity, and density structure were used to examine vertical mixing within two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine. The first is located in 21 m water depth (sea level to rim), nearly circular in shape with a 45 m rim diameter and 12 m rim-to-bottom relief. The second is located in 25 m water depth, more elongated in shape with an approximately 80 m (36 m) major (minor) axis length at the rim, and 17 m relief. Hourly averaged current profiles were acquired from bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed on the rim and center of each pockmark over successive 42 h periods in July 2011. Conductivity-temperature-depth casts at the rim and center of each pockmark show warmer, fresher water in the upper water column, evidence of both active and fossil thermocline structure 5-8 m above the rim, and well-mixed water below the rim to the bottom. Vertical velocities show up- and down-welling events that extend into the depths of each pockmark. An observed temperature change at both the rim and center occurs coincident with an overturning event below the rim, and suggests active mixing of the water column into the depths of each pockmark. Vertical profiles of horizontal velocities show depth variation at both the center and rim consistent with turbulent logarithmic current boundary layers, and suggest that form drag may possibly be influencing the local flow regime. While resource limitations prevented observation of the current structure and water properties at a control site, the acquired data suggest that active mixing and overturning within the sampled pockmarks occur under typical benign conditions, and that current flows are influenced by upstream bathymetric irregularities induced by distant pockmarks.

  7. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 1: current-induced mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Irish, James D.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-02-01

    Field observations of current profiles and temperature, salinity, and density structure were used to examine vertical mixing within two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine. The first is located in 21 m water depth (sea level to rim), nearly circular in shape with a 45 m rim diameter and 12 m rim-to-bottom relief. The second is located in 25 m water depth, more elongated in shape with an approximately 80 m (36 m) major (minor) axis length at the rim, and 17 m relief. Hourly averaged current profiles were acquired from bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed on the rim and center of each pockmark over successive 42 h periods in July 2011. Conductivity-temperature-depth casts at the rim and center of each pockmark show warmer, fresher water in the upper water column, evidence of both active and fossil thermocline structure 5-8 m above the rim, and well-mixed water below the rim to the bottom. Vertical velocities show up- and down-welling events that extend into the depths of each pockmark. An observed temperature change at both the rim and center occurs coincident with an overturning event below the rim, and suggests active mixing of the water column into the depths of each pockmark. Vertical profiles of horizontal velocities show depth variation at both the center and rim consistent with turbulent logarithmic current boundary layers, and suggest that form drag may possibly be influencing the local flow regime. While resource limitations prevented observation of the current structure and water properties at a control site, the acquired data suggest that active mixing and overturning within the sampled pockmarks occur under typical benign conditions, and that current flows are influenced by upstream bathymetric irregularities induced by distant pockmarks.

  8. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 1: current-induced mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Irish, James D.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Field observations of current profiles and temperature, salinity, and density structure were used to examine vertical mixing within two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine. The first is located in 21 m water depth (sea level to rim), nearly circular in shape with a 45 m rim diameter and 12 m rim-to-bottom relief. The second is located in 25 m water depth, more elongated in shape with an approximately 80 m (36 m) major (minor) axis length at the rim, and 17 m relief. Hourly averaged current profiles were acquired from bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed on the rim and center of each pockmark over successive 42 h periods in July 2011. Conductivity–temperature–depth casts at the rim and center of each pockmark show warmer, fresher water in the upper water column, evidence of both active and fossil thermocline structure 5–8 m above the rim, and well-mixed water below the rim to the bottom. Vertical velocities show up- and down-welling events that extend into the depths of each pockmark. An observed temperature change at both the rim and center occurs coincident with an overturning event below the rim, and suggests active mixing of the water column into the depths of each pockmark. Vertical profiles of horizontal velocities show depth variation at both the center and rim consistent with turbulent logarithmic current boundary layers, and suggest that form drag may possibly be influencing the local flow regime. While resource limitations prevented observation of the current structure and water properties at a control site, the acquired data suggest that active mixing and overturning within the sampled pockmarks occur under typical benign conditions, and that current flows are influenced by upstream bathymetric irregularities induced by distant pockmarks.

  9. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...

  10. IMF By-Related Cusp Currents Observed from the Ørsted Satellite and from Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauning, P.; Primdahl, Fritz; Watermann, J.

    2001-01-01

    from ground-based magnetic observations to define the structure and location of cusp currents and their dependencies on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Example cases illustrate the close relation between IMF B-gamma-related FAC and horizontal ionospheric currents in the cusp region. Our...... statistical analysis defines for the noon region the variations in FAC latitude with IMF B-Z. Comparisons with the statistical cusp location indicate that the more equatorward region of IMF B-gamma-while the more B related FAC is located on field lines closing at the dayside poleward FAC are on "open" field...

  11. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  12. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; Huang, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Kai-Hui

    2015-05-11

    This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Electric current in flares ribbons: from the standard model in 3D to observations

    CERN Document Server

    Janvier, Miho; Bommier, V; Schmieder, B; Démoulin, P; Pariat, E

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents for the first time a quantification of the photospheric electric current ribbon evolutions during an eruptive flare, accurately predicted by the standard 3D flare model. The standard flare model in 3D has been developed with the MHD code OHM, which models the evolution of an unstable flux rope. Through a series of paper, the model has been successful in explaining observational characteristics of eruptive flares, as well as the intrinsic 3D reconnection mechanism. Such a model also explains the increase of the photospheric currents as a consequence of the evolution of the coronal current layer where reconnection takes place. The photospheric footprints of the 3D current layer reveal a ribbon shape structure. In the present paper, the evolution of the current density is analyzed for the X-class flare that occurred on 15/02/2011 in AR 11158. We first describe the structural evolution of the high vertical current density regions derived with the UNNOFIT inversion code from magnetograms (HMI, e...

  15. Drifter Observations Of Wave-Current Evolution Through The San Francisco Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, D. W.; Herbers, T. H.; Janssen, T. T.; McIntyre, S.; Jessen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean waves approaching the Golden Gate, the narrow strait connecting the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean, are affected by refraction over the San Francisco Bar and the strong tidal currents in the area. During ebb tides, when currents through the Golden Gate can exceed 2.5 m/s, the approach to San Francisco Bay is characterized by focusing and steepening of the incident wave field on the opposing current jet. These dynamics are not uncommon in coastal inlets and are known to present hazardous navigation conditions. The strong inhomogeneity and enhanced nonlinearity of the waves can result in deviations from non-Gaussian statistics and changes in the likelihood of extreme waves. However, since observations of wave-current dynamics are so difficult to make with conventional instruments, these dynamics remain still poorly understood. In this work we present the development and testing of a compact, low-cost, Wave-Resolving Drifter (WRD), designed to resolve the wave orbital surface motions and surface drifts in high-energy areas. The WRDs consist of a 30cm buoy equipped with an off-the-shelf GPS receiver and a three-axis accelerometer. The combined GPS-accelerometer package is functionally equivalent to a conventional pitch-roll (or PUV) wave height and direction instrument, but at a fraction of the price. In our presentation we will discuss results from several WRD array deployments in the San Francisco Bight during high-energy conditions with strong ebb currents. The buoys are shown to resolve the surface waves and surface drift with remarkable accuracy and allow the analysis of the evolution of the wave group structure over the opposing current. To obtain statistical results for currents and waves, WRDs were released in clusters (ensemble) from which shoaling effects over the bar and wave-current interaction can be identified.

  16. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Seaton, Daniel B; Darnel, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    We present AIA observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014~February~25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand km thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between $8-10\\,\\mathrm{MK}$. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was $M_{A} \\approx 0.004-0.007$, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  17. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Bartz, Allison E.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2017-02-01

    We present Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014 February 25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand kilometers thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between 8 and 10 MK. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was MA ≈ 0.004–0.007, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  18. Ukrainian Virtual Observatory: Current Status and Perspectives of Development of Joint Archives of Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.; Virun, N. V.; Kashuba, S. G.; Pikhun, A. I.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Mazhaev, A. E.; Kazantseva, L. V.; Shlyapnikov, A. A.; Shulga, A. V.; Zolotukhina, A. V.; Sergeeva, T. P.; Miroshnichenko, A. P.; Andronov, I. L.; Breus, V. V; Virnina, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The current state of the observational data archives of seven observatories of Ukraine which were created from 1898 to 2010 is considered in respect to their suitability for including into the Ukrainian Virtual Observatory (UkrVO) database. In accordance with a current UkrVO conception approved by the Ukrainian Astronomical Association, the database of astro negatives is the main scientific component of the UkrVO. The database will include all the photo plates accumulated in Ukraine and combine them into the Joint Digitized Archive (JDA). This will provide for a user an easy access to textual data and images using web interface and a corresponding search engine. The data archives obtained from CCD and radio observations in Ukraine are also discussed as scientific components of the UkrVO. Some prospects of the JDA development are formulated.

  19. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavio...

  20. The primacy of residential quality in urban creation. A current observation of a recurring notion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    As a current observation this contribution intends to situate origins of the notion of the primacy of residential quality in urban creation in a historical context before May ’68 and to show the relevance and actuality of this concept in emerging contemporary projective urban architectural practices. This is done through a retrospective re–reading of a major research contribution of architectural residential sociology elaborated by Henri Raymond and his team of ISU directed by Henri Lefebvre....

  1. Observed wintertime tidal and subtidal currents over the continental shelf in the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruixiang; Chen, Changsheng; Xia, Huayong; Beardsley, Robert C.; Shi, Maochong; Lai, Zhigang; Lin, Huichan; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Changjian; Xu, Qichun; Ding, Yang; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Synthesis analyses were performed to examine characteristics of tidal and subtidal currents at eight mooring sites deployed over the northern South China Sea (NSCS) continental shelf in the 2006-2007 and 2009-2010 winters. Rotary spectra and harmonic analysis results showed that observed tidal currents in the NSCS were dominated by baroclinic diurnal tides with phases varying both vertically and horizontally. This feature was supported by the CC-FVCOM results, which demonstrated that the diurnal tidal flow over this shelf was characterized by baroclinic Kelvin waves with vertical phase differences varying in different flow zones. The northeasterly wind-induced southwestward flow prevailed over the NSCS shelf during winter, with episodic appearances of mesoscale eddies and a bottom-intensified buoyancy-driven slope water intrusion. The moored current records captured a warm-core anticyclonic eddy, which originated from the southwestern coast of Taiwan and propagated southwestward along the slope consistent with a combination of β-plane and topographic Rossby waves. The eddy was surface-intensified with a swirl speed of >50 cm/s and a vertical scale of ˜400 m. In absence of eddies and onshore deep slope water intrusion, the observed southwestward flow was highly coherent with the northeasterly wind stress. Observations did not support the existence of the permanent wintertime South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC). The definition of SCSWC, which was based mainly on thermal wind calculations with assumed level of no motion at the bottom, needs to be interpreted with caution since the observed circulation over the NSCS shelf in winter included both barotropic and baroclinic components.

  2. Disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Viglia, Giampaolo; Werthner, H.; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of disrupting innovations has generated significant market changes, modifying the dominant logic and affecting the strategic positioning of companies. This structural change is affecting market structure, the networks and the services that tourism players are supposed to use (Gretzel et al. 2015). One can also refer to the notion of digital infrastructure, which provides a nice framework that connects the different stakeholders, their relations as well as internal dynamics. At t...

  3. Disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Viglia, Giampaolo; H. Werthner; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of disrupting innovations has generated significant market changes, modifying the dominant logic and affecting the strategic positioning of companies. This structural change is affecting market structure, the networks and the services that tourism players are supposed to use (Gretzel et al. 2015). One can also refer to the notion of digital infrastructure, which provides a nice framework that connects the different stakeholders, their relations as well as internal dynamics. At t...

  4. Analysis of Equatorial Currents Observed by Eastern Indian Ocean Cruises in 2010 and 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xue-Zhi; LI Yi-Neng; PENG Shi-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    Hydrographic and direct current measurements were made in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean in May 2010 and April 2011 as part of the Eastern Indian Ocean Cruises (EIOC) organized by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology (SCSIO). Analyses of the shipdrift Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data in- dicate that the equatorial currents observed in May 2010 are characterized by a strongly eastward surface current (Wyrtki Jets, WJs) with a maximum velocity of 0.9 m s-1, while that observed in April 2011 is weak and without a consistent direction. The strongly eastward WJ transports the surface water eastward, resulting in a deeper upper mixed layer, as shown in the temperature and salinity pro- files. However, it was found that the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) in the Eastern Indian Ocean is strong in April 2011 and weak in May 2010. The EUC was located approximately at the position of the thermocline, and it had higher salinity (up to approximately 35.5 psu) than the upper and lower waters.

  5. Sharp burnout failure observed in high current-carrying double-walled carbon nanotube fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Toth, Geza; Wei, Jinquan; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Wei; Ci, Lijie; Vajtai, Robert; Endo, Morinobu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the current-carrying capability and the high-current-induced thermal burnout failure modes of 5-20 µm diameter double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers made by an improved dry-spinning method. It is found that the electrical conductivity and maximum current-carrying capability for these DWNT fibers can reach up to 5.9 × 105 S m - 1 and over 1 × 105 A cm - 2 in air. In comparison, we observed that standard carbon fiber tended to be oxidized and burnt out into cheese-like morphology when the maximum current was reached, while DWNT fiber showed a much slower breakdown behavior due to the gradual burnout in individual nanotubes. The electron microscopy observations further confirmed that the failure process of DWNT fibers occurs at localized positions, and while the individual nanotubes burn they also get aligned due to local high temperature and electrostatic field. In addition a finite element model was constructed to gain better understanding of the failure behavior of DWNT fibers.

  6. Changing circumstances, disrupting habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Wendy; Witt, Melissa Guerrero; Tam, Leona

    2005-06-01

    The present research investigated the mechanisms guiding habitual behavior, specifically, the stimulus cues that trigger habit performance. When usual contexts for performance change, habits cannot be cued by recurring stimuli, and performance should be disrupted. Thus, the exercising, newspaper reading, and TV watching habits of students transferring to a new university were found to survive the transfer only when aspects of the performance context did not change (e.g., participants continued to read the paper with others). In some cases, the disruption in habits also placed behavior under intentional control so that participants acted on their current intentions. Changes in circumstances also affected the favorability of intentions, but changes in intentions alone could not explain the disruption of habits. Furthermore, regardless of whether contexts changed, nonhabitual behavior was guided by intentions.

  7. Three-dimensional model-observation comparison in the Loop Current region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosburg, K. C.; Donohue, K. A.; Chassignet, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution ocean models are required for hurricane and oil spill pathway predictions, and to enhance the dynamical understanding of circulation dynamics. Output from the 1/25° data-assimilating Gulf of Mexico HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM31.0) is compared to daily full water column observations from a moored array, with a focus on Loop Current path variability and upper-deep layer coupling during eddy separation. Array-mean correlation was 0.93 for sea surface height, and 0.93, 0.63, and 0.75 in the thermocline for temperature, zonal, and meridional velocity, respectively. Peaks in modeled eddy kinetic energy were consistent with observations during Loop Current eddy separation, but with modeled deep eddy kinetic energy at half the observed amplitude. Modeled and observed LC meander phase speeds agreed within 8% and 2% of each other within the 100 - 40 and 40 - 20 day bands, respectively. The model reproduced observed patterns indicative of baroclinic instability, that is, a vertical offset with deep stream function leading upper stream function in the along-stream direction. While modeled deep eddies differed slightly spatially and temporally, the joint development of an upper-ocean meander along the eastern side of the LC and the successive propagation of upper-deep cyclone/anticylone pairs that preceded separation were contained within the model solution. Overall, model-observation comparison indicated that HYCOM31.0 could provide insight into processes within the 100 - 20 day band, offering a larger spatial and temporal window than observational arrays.

  8. Laboratory observations of saline and turbidity currents flowing in U-shaped flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnaro, M.; Bolla Pittaluga, M.

    2013-12-01

    Saline and turbidity currents belong to the large family of gravity currents. Due to the difficulties to predict and observe these kinds of phenomena, especially turbidity currents, we developed an experimental apparatus able to reproduce these currents in our Marchi Environmental Laboratory (Genova, Italy). The experiments were performed in a large U-shaped flume, 30 m long, characterized by a constant curvature bend (radius of 2.5 m) joining two straight reaches approximately 12 m long. The flume has a rectangular cross section 0.6 m wide and 0.5 m deep. Inside the flume we made a uniform concrete bottom slope (0.005), which proceeds from the inlet section along the first straight track and finishes 3 m after the bend exit. For each experiment we have been able to measure density distribution and velocity profiles along the vertical in different cross section. Density measurements were obtained using two ranks of siphons that sample the currents at different heights. Velocity was acquired with the DOP2000 ultrasound velocimeter; we measured longitudinal component in the straight reach of the flume, and both longitudinal and transversal velocity in the curved reach. We performed 30 experiments by changing the inlet conditions: primary defining the nature of the currents, saline or sediment laden, then varying two of the main parameters governing the currents: the density of the mixture and the flow discharge. The former covered a range between 1003 and 1023 kg/m^3 and the flow discharge ranged between 0.5 to 4.0 l/s. Both of these parameters influence the densimetric Froude Number, and allowed us to reproduce both subcritical and supercritical flow. In each experiment water entrainment from above was negligible hence the current was able to attain a quasi-uniform configuration in the first straight reach, whereby the longitudinal velocity and the thickness of the current were approximately constant. By varying the inlet conditions, it was possible to observe the

  9. Observed seasonal and intraseasonal variability of the East India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Mukherjee; D Shankar; V Fernando; P Amol; S G Aparna; R Fernandes; G S Michael; S T Khalap; N P Satelkar; Y Agarvadekar; M G Gaonkar; A P Tari; A Kankonkar; S Vernekar

    2014-08-01

    We present data from three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored off Cuddalore (12°N), Kakinada (16.5°N), and Gopalpur (19°N) on the continental slope of the western Bay of Bengal and one mooring on the slope of the northern bay (89°E, 19°N; referred to as being located at Paradip). The data were collected during May 2009 to March 2013 and the observations show that the seasonal cycle, which includes the annual cycle, the semi-annual cycle, and a peak around 120 days, dominates the observed variability of the East India Coastal Current (EICC). Spectral analysis suggests that the 120-day peak dominates the seasonal variability at Paradip and is strong at Gopalpur and Kakinada. The annual cycle is coherent along the western boundary of the bay, i.e., the east coast of India, but with significant phase differences between moorings. At the semi-annual and 120-day periods, the alongshore coherence is weaker. Intraseasonal variability is weaker than the seasonal cycle, particularly at Cuddalore and Paradip, and it exhibits seasonality: the strongest intraseasonal variation is during spring (February–April). Peaks around 12 and 20–22 days are also seen at Gopalpur, Kakinada, and Cuddalore. A striking feature of the currents is the upward phase propagation, but there are also instances when phase propagates downward. The much lower vertical phase speed in the top ∼100 m at Cuddalore leads to a distinct undercurrent at this location; at other locations, the undercurrent, though it exists often, is not as striking. During spring, however, the EICC tends to flow poleward (eastward) at Cuddalore, Kakinada, and Gopalpur (Paradip) over the top ∼300 m, which is the maximum depth to which observations were made. The cross-shore component of the EICC is much weaker than the alongshore component at Cuddalore and, except for a few bursts during spring, at Kakinada and Gopalpur. It is only at Paradip, on the slope of the northern boundary, that significant

  10. Observed seasonal and intraseasonal variability of the East India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Shankar, D.; Fernando, V.; Amol, P.; Aparna, S. G.; Fernandes, R.; Michael, G. S.; Khalap, S. T.; Satelkar, N. P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M. G.; Tari, A. P.; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S.

    2014-08-01

    We present data from three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored off Cuddalore (12∘N), Kakinada (16.5∘N), and Gopalpur (19∘N) on the continental slope of the western Bay of Bengal and one mooring on the slope of the northern bay (89∘E, 19∘N; referred to as being located at Paradip). The data were collected during May 2009 to March 2013 and the observations show that the seasonal cycle, which includes the annual cycle, the semi-annual cycle, and a peak around 120 days, dominates the observed variability of the East India Coastal Current (EICC). Spectral analysis suggests that the 120-day peak dominates the seasonal variability at Paradip and is strong at Gopalpur and Kakinada. The annual cycle is coherent along the western boundary of the bay, i.e., the east coast of India, but with significant phase differences between moorings. At the semi-annual and 120-day periods, the alongshore coherence is weaker. Intraseasonal variability is weaker than the seasonal cycle, particularly at Cuddalore and Paradip, and it exhibits seasonality: the strongest intraseasonal variation is during spring (February-April). Peaks around 12 and 20-22 days are also seen at Gopalpur, Kakinada, and Cuddalore. A striking feature of the currents is the upward phase propagation, but there are also instances when phase propagates downward. The much lower vertical phase speed in the top ˜100 m at Cuddalore leads to a distinct undercurrent at this location; at other locations, the undercurrent, though it exists often, is not as striking. During spring, however, the EICC tends to flow poleward (eastward) at Cuddalore, Kakinada, and Gopalpur (Paradip) over the top ˜300 m, which is the maximum depth to which observations were made. The cross-shore component of the EICC is much weaker than the alongshore component at Cuddalore and, except for a few bursts during spring, at Kakinada and Gopalpur. It is only at Paradip, on the slope of the northern boundary, that significant

  11. NTT, Spitzer and Chandra spectroscopy of SDSSJ095209.56+214313.3: the most luminous coronal-line supernova ever observed, or a stellar tidal disruption event ?

    CERN Document Server

    Komossa, S; Rau, A; Dopita, M; Gal-Yam, A; Greiner, J; Zuther, J; Salvato, M; Xu, D; Lü, H; Saxton, R; Ajello, M

    2009-01-01

    The galaxy SDSSJ0952+2143 showed remarkable emission-line properties first reported in 2008 (paper I), which are the consequence of a powerful high-energy flare. Here we report follow-up observations of SDSSJ0952+2143, and discuss outburst scenarios in terms of stellar tidal disruption by a SMBH, peculiar variability of an AGN, and a supernova explosion. The optical spectrum of SDSSJ0952+2143 exhibits several peculiarities: an exceptional ratio of [FeVII] transitions over [OIII], a dramatic decrease by a factor of 10 of the highest-ionization lines, a very unusual and variable Balmer line profile including a triple-peaked narrow component with two unresolved horns, and a large Balmer decrement. The MIR emission measured with the Spitzer IRS in the narrow 10-20mu band is extraordinarily luminous (3.5 x 10^{43} erg\\s). The IRS spectrum shows a bump around ~11mu and an increase towards longer wavelengths, reminiscent of silicate emission. The strong MIR excess over the NIR implies the dominance of relatively col...

  12. Data assimilation in the low noise, accurate observation regime with application to the Kuroshio current

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2012-01-01

    On-line data assimilation techniques such as ensemble Kalman filters and particle filters tend to loose accuracy dramatically when presented with an unlikely observation. Such an observation may be caused by an unusually large measurement error or reflect a rare fluctuation in the dynamics of the system. Over a long enough span of time it becomes likely that one or several of these events will occur. In some cases they are signatures of the most interesting features of the underlying system and their prediction becomes the primary focus of the data assimilation procedure. The Kuroshio current that runs along the eastern coast of Japan is an example of just such a system. It undergoes infrequent but dramatic changes of state between a small meander during which the current remains close to the coast of Japan, and a large meander during which the current bulges away from the coast. Because of the important role that the Kuroshio plays in distributing heat and salinity in the surrounding region, prediction of th...

  13. Observations of Thin Current Sheets in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Magnetic Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dorelli, J.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Karimabadi, H.; Mozer, F.; Wendel, D. E.; TenBarge, J.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2013-12-01

    A recent analysis of 450 vec/s resolution data from the STAFF search-coil magnetometer on board Cluster has revealed, for the first time, the presence of thin current sheets and discontinuities from the proton Larmor scale down to the electron Larmor scale in the solar wind. This is in the range of scales where a cascade of energy consistent with highly oblique kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations (KAW), eventually dissipated by electron Landau damping, has been detected. The current sheets have been found to have a size between 20-200 km, indicating that they are very localized. We will compare the observations with results coming from 2D Hall MHD, Gyrokinetic, and full Particle-in-Cell turbulence simulations. Preliminary work has highlighted promising qualitative agreement between the properties of the structures observed in the Cluster data and the current sheets generated in the simulations. With the aim of investigating the role played by those structures in dissipating the magnetic energy in the solar wind, E●J has been computed within each magnetic discontinuity. This has been made possible via a combined analysis of both STAFF-SC magnetic field data and the electric field data from the Electric Fields and Wave instrument (EFW). We describe procedures used to reduce the noise in the EFW data. The results obtained represent an effort to clarify the processes involved in the dissipation of magnetic energy in the solar wind.

  14. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations in the southern Caspian Sea: shelf currents and flow field off Freidoonkenar Bay, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghaffari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of offshore bottom-mounted ADCP measurements and wind records carried out from August to September 2003 in the coastal waters off Freidoonkenar Bay (FB in the south Caspian Sea (CS are examined in order to characterize the shelf motion, the steady current field and to determine the main driving forces of currents on the study area. Owing to closed basin and absence of the astronomical tide, the atmospheric forcing plays an important role in the flow field of the CS. The lasting regular sea breeze system is present almost throughout the year that performs motive force in diurnal and semi-diurnal bands similar to tides in other regions. In general, current field in the continental shelf could be separated into two distinguishable schemes, which in cross-shelf direction is dominated by high frequencies (1 cpd and higher frequencies, and in along-shelf orientation mostly proportional to lower frequencies in synoptic weather bands. Long-period wave currents, whose velocities are much greater than those of direct wind-induced currents, are dominating the current field in the continental shelf off FB. The propagation of the latter could be described in terms of shore-controlled waves that are remotely generated and travel across the shelf in the southern CS. It has also been shown that long term displacements in this area follow the classic cyclonic, circulation pattern in the southern CS.

  15. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations in the southern Caspian Sea: shelf currents and flow field off Feridoonkenar Bay, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghaffari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of offshore bottom-mounted ADCP measurements and wind records carried out from August to September 2003 in the coastal waters off Feridoon-kenar Bay (FB in the south Caspian Sea (CS are examined in order to characterize the shelf motion, the steady current field and to determine the main driving forces of currents on the study area. Owing to closed basin and absence of the astronomical tide, the atmospheric forcing plays an important role in the flow field of the CS. The lasting regular sea breeze system is present almost throughout the year. This system performs the forcing in diurnal and semi-diurnal bands similar to tides in other regions. In general, current field in the continental shelf could be separated into two distinguishable schemes, which in cross-shelf direction is dominated by high frequencies (1 cpd and higher frequencies, and in along-shelf orientation mostly proportional to lower frequencies in synoptic weather bands. Long-period wave currents, whose velocities are much greater than those of direct wind-induced currents, dominates the current field in the continental shelf off FB. The propagation of the latter could be described in terms of shore-controlled waves that are remotely generated and travel across the shelf in the southern CS. It has also been shown that long term displacements in this area follow the classic cyclonic, circulation pattern in the southern CS.

  16. Investigation of sounding rocket observations of field-aligned currents and electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Moen, J.; Lynch, K. A.; Heavisides, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Strangeway et al. [2005] and other authors have concluded that the establishment of the ambipolar field by the deposition of energy from soft electron precipitation is a significant driver of type-2 ion upflows. Likewise, Clemmons et al. [2008] and Zhang et al. [2012] proposed processes by which soft electron precipitation may play a role in heating neutrals and contribute to neutral upwelling. In both situations the thermal ionospheric electron population plays a crucial role in both generation of the ambipolar field and in collisional energy exchange with the atmosphere through a variety of processes. In this study we examine the dynamics of the electron population, specifically the temperature, in a slightly different context - focusing on the auroral downward current region (DCR). In many cases auroral DCRs may be depleted of plasma, which sets up interesting conditions involving thermoelectric heat fluxes (which flow upward - in the opposite direction from the current), adiabatic expansion due to the high (upward) speed of the electrons carrying the downward current, heat exchange from ions which have elevated temperatures due to frictional heating, and direct frictional heating of the electrons. A detailed understanding of the electron temperature in auroral DCRs is necessary to make quantitative statements about recombination, upflow, cavitation and a host of other processes relevant to ion outflow. In this study, we compare in situ rocket observations of electron temperature, density, and current densities with predictions from the Zettergren and Semeter [2012] model in an attempt to better understand the dynamics and relationships between these parameters in DCRs.

  17. Current models of the observable consequences of cosmic reionization and their detectability

    CERN Document Server

    Iliev, Ilian T; Pen, Ue-Li; Bond, J Richard; Shapiro, Paul R

    2007-01-01

    A number of large current experiments aim to detect the signatures of the Cosmic Reionization at redshifts z>6. Their success depends crucially on understanding the character of the reionization process and its observable consequences and designing the best strategies to use. We use large-scale simulations of cosmic reionization to evaluate the reionization signatures at redshifted 21-cm and small-scale CMB anisotropies in the best current model for the background universe, with fundamental cosmological parameters given by WMAP 3-year results (WMAP3). We find that the optimal frequency range for observing the ``global step'' of the 21-cm emission is 120-150 MHz, while statistical studies should aim at 140-160 MHz, observable by GMRT. Some strongly-nongaussian brightness features should be detectable at frequencies up to ~190 MHz. In terms of sensitivity-signal trade-off relatively low resolutions, corresponding to beams of at least a few arcminutes, are preferable. The CMB anisotropy signal from the kinetic S...

  18. An Improved Ocean Observing System for Coastal Louisiana: WAVCIS (WAVE-CURRENT-SURGE Information System )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Stone, G. W.; Gibson, W. J.; Braud, D.

    2005-05-01

    WAVCIS is a regional ocean observing and forecasting system. It was designed to measure, process, forecast, and distribute oceanographic and meteorological information. WAVCIS was developed and is maintained by the Coastal Studies Institute at Louisiana State University. The in-situ observing stations are distributed along the central Louisiana and Mississippi coast. The forecast region covers the entire Gulf of Mexico with emphasis on offshore Louisiana. By using state-of-the-art instrumentation, WAVCIS measures directional waves, currents, temperature, water level, conductivity, turbidity, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, Meteorological parameters include wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature visibility and humidity. Through satellite communication links, the measured data are transmitted to the WAVCIS laboratory. After processing, they are available to the public via the internet on a near real-time basis. WAVCIS also includes a forecasting capability. Waves, tides, currents, and winds are forecast daily for up to 80 hours in advance. There are a number of numerical wave and surge models that can be used for forecasts. WAM and SWAN are used for operational purposes to forecast sea state. Tides at each station are predicted based on the harmonic constants calculated from past in-situ observations at respective sites. Interpolated winds from the ETA model are used as input forcing for waves. Both in-situ and forecast information are available online to the users through WWW. Interactive GIS web mapping is implemented on the WAVCIS webpage to visualize the model output and in-situ observational data. WAVCIS data can be queried, retrieved, downloaded, and analyzed through the web page. Near real-time numerical model skill assessment can also be performed by using the data from in-situ observing stations.

  19. LASCO White-Light Observations of Eruptive Current Sheets Trailing CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David F.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    Many models of eruptive flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a current sheet connecting the ejecting CME flux rope with a magnetic loop arcade. However, there is very limited observational information on the properties and evolution of these structures, hindering progress in understanding eruptive activity from the Sun. In white-light images, narrow coaxial rays trailing the outward-moving CME have been interpreted as current sheets. Here, we undertake the most comprehensive statistical study of CME-rays to date. We use SOHO/LASCO data, which have a higher cadence, larger field of view, and better sensitivity than any previous coronagraph. We compare our results to a previous study of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) CMEs, in 1984 - 1989, having candidate magnetic disconnection features at the CME base, about half of which were followed by coaxial bright rays. We examine all LASCO CMEs during two periods of minimum and maximum activity in Solar Cycle 23, resulting in many more events, ˜130 CME-rays, than during SMM. Important results include: The occurrence rate of the rays is ˜11 % of all CMEs during solar minimum, but decreases to ˜7 % at solar maximum; this is most likely related to the more complex coronal background. The rays appear on average 3 - 4 hours after the CME core, and are typically visible for three-fourths of a day. The mean observed current sheet length over the ray lifetime is ˜12 R_{⊙}, with the longest current sheet of 18.5 R_{⊙}. The mean CS growth rates are 188 km s^{-1} at minimum and 324 km s^{-1} at maximum. Outward-moving blobs within several rays, which are indicative of reconnection outflows, have average velocities of ˜350 km s^{-1} with small positive accelerations. A pre-existing streamer is blown out in most of the CME-ray events, but half of these are observed to reform within ˜1 day. The long lifetime and long lengths of the CME-rays challenge our current understanding of the evolution of the magnetic

  20. The Angola Current and its seasonal variability as observed at 11°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopte, Robert; Brandt, Peter; Dengler, Marcus; Claus, Martin; Greatbatch, Richard J.

    2016-04-01

    The eastern boundary circulation off the coast of Angola has been described only sparsely to date. The region off Angola, which connects the equatorial Atlantic and the Angola-Benguela upwelling regime, is of particular interest to understand the relative importance of transient equatorial versus local forcing of the observed variability in the coastal upwelling region. For the first time multi-year velocity observations of the Angola Current at 11°S are available. From July 2013 to November 2015 a bottom shield equipped with an ADCP had been deployed at 500m water depth, accompanied by a mooring sitting on the 1200m-isobath with an ADCP being installed at 500m depth. Both upward-looking instruments measured the current speed up to about 50m below the sea surface. During the deployment period the Angola Current was characterized by a weak southward mean flow of 5-8 cm/s at 50m depth (slightly stronger at the in-shore mooring position), with the southward current penetrating down to about 200m depth. The alongshore velocity component reveals a pronounced seasonal variability. It is dominated by 120-day, semi-annual, and annual oscillations with distinct baroclinic structures. Here we apply a reduced gravity model of the tropical Atlantic for the first five baroclinic modes forced with interannually varying wind stress to investigate the seasonal variability along the equatorial and coastal waveguides. In the equatorial Atlantic the 120-day, semi-annual, and annual oscillations are associated with resonant basin modes of the 1st, 2nd, and 4th baroclinic mode, respectively. These basin modes are composed of equatorial Kelvin and Rossby waves as well as coastally trapped waves. The reduced gravity model is further used to study the respective role of the remote equatorial forcing, more specifically the influence of equatorial basin modes via coastally trapped waves, and the local forcing for the observed seasonal variability and associated baroclinic structure of the

  1. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenda, S; Wolf, M J; Beckmann, D

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100  μV/K, much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  2. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India coastal current on the continental slope.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Fernando, V.; Mukherjee, A.; Aparna, S.G.; Fernandes, R.; Michael, G.S.; Khalap, S.T.; Satelkar, N.P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M.G.; Tari, A.P.; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S.

    between the Arabian Sea, a concentration basin, and the Bay of Bengal, a dilution basin (Jensen 2001; Han et al. 2001) and plays a major role in the region’s climate (see, for example, the reviews by Schott and McCreary 2001; Schott et al. 2009). The WICC... to the regional climate and marine living resources imply that it is important to be able to describe its variability and understand what causes the observed variability. In the rest of this introduction, we review our current state of knowledge of the WICC. We...

  3. Numerical simulation of the observed near-surface East India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Shankar, D.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Vinayachandran, P. N.

    2017-08-01

    We simulate the East India Coastal Current (EICC) using two numerical models (resolution 0.1° × 0.1°), an oceanic general circulation model (OGCM) called Modular Ocean Model and a simpler, linear, continuously stratified (LCS) model, and compare the simulated current with observations from moorings equipped with acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed on the continental slope in the western Bay of Bengal (BoB). We also carry out numerical experiments to analyse the processes. Both models simulate well the annual cycle of the EICC, but the performance degrades for the intra-annual and intraseasonal components. In a model-resolution experiment, both models (run at a coarser resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° ) simulate well the currents in the equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO), but the performance of the high-resolution LCS model as well as the coarse-resolution OGCM, which is good in the EICC regime, degrades in the eastern and northern BoB. An experiment on forcing mechanisms shows that the annual EICC is largely forced by the local alongshore winds in the western BoB and remote forcing due to Ekman pumping over the BoB, but forcing from the EIO has a strong impact on the intra-annual EICC. At intraseasonal periods, local (equatorial) forcing dominates in the south (north) because the Kelvin wave propagates equatorward in the western BoB. A stratification experiment with the LCS model shows that changing the background stratification from EIO to BoB leads to a stronger surface EICC owing to strong coupling of higher order vertical modes with wind forcing for the BoB profiles. These high-order modes, which lead to energy propagating down into the ocean in the form of beams, are important only for the current and do not contribute significantly to the sea level.

  4. Current problems of dynamics of moons of planets and binary asteroids based on observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanov, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The general approach to studying the dynamics of moons of planets and asteroids consists in developing more and more accurate models of motion based on observational data. Not only the necessary ephemerides, but also some physical parameters of planets and moons are obtained this way. It is demonstrated in the present study that progress in this field is driven not only by the increase in accuracy of observations. The accuracy of ephemerides may be increased by expanding the observation time interval. Several problems arise on the way toward this goal. Some of them become apparent only when the procedure of observational data processing and use is examined in detail. The method used to derive astrometric data by processing the results of photometric observations of mutual occultations and eclipses of planetary moons is explained below. The primary contribution to the error of astrometric results is produced by the unaccounted noise level in photometric readings and the inaccuracy of received values of the albedo of moons. It is demonstrated that the current methods do not allow one to eliminate the noise completely. Extensive additional photometric measurements should be performed at different angles of rotation of moons and in different spectral bands of the visible wavelength range in order to obtain correct values of the albedo of moons. Many new distant moons of the major planets have been discovered in the early 21st century. However, the observations of these moons are scarce and were performed over short time intervals; as a result, some of the moons were lost. The necessity of further observations of these Solar System bodies is pointed out in the present study. Insufficient knowledge of asteroid masses is an obstacle to improving the accuracy of the ephemerides of Mars. The basic method for determining the masses of large asteroids consists in analyzing their influence on the motion of Mars, the Earth, and spacecraft. The masses of more than 100 large

  5. Spectroscopic observations of evolving flare ribbon substructure suggesting origin in current sheet waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.; Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    A flare ribbon is the chromospheric image of reconnection at a coronal current sheet. The dynamics and structure of the ribbon can thus reveal properties of the current sheet, including motion of the reconnecting flare loops. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the evolution of a flare ribbon at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These reveal small-scale substructure in the ribbon, which manifest as oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these we find the best support for some form of elliptical wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer mission developed and operated by Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. This work is supported by contract 8100002702 from Lockheed Martin to Montana State University, a Montana Space Grant Consortium fellowship, and by NASA through HSR.

  6. Current Efforts in European Projects to Facilitate the Sharing of Scientific Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredel, Henning; Rieke, Matthes; Maso, Joan; Jirka, Simon; Stasch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is intended to provide an overview of currently ongoing efforts in European projects to facilitate and promote the interoperable sharing of scientific observation data. This will be illustrated through two examples: a prototypical portal developed in the ConnectinGEO project for matching available (in-situ) data sources to the needs of users and a joint activity of several research projects to harmonise the usage of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement standards for providing access to marine observation data. ENEON is an activity initiated by the European ConnectinGEO project to coordinate in-situ Earth observation networks with the aim to harmonise the access to observations, improve discoverability, and identify/close gaps in European earth observation data resources. In this context, ENEON commons has been developed as a supporting Web portal for facilitating discovery, access, re-use and creation of knowledge about observations, networks, and related activities (e.g. projects). The portal is based on developments resulting from the European WaterInnEU project and has been extended to cover the requirements for handling knowledge about in-situ earth observation networks. A first prototype of the portal was completed in January 2017 which offers functionality for interactive discussion, information exchange and querying information about data delivered by different observation networks. Within this presentation, we will introduce the presented prototype and initiate a discussion about potential future work directions. The second example concerns the harmonisation of data exchange in the marine domain. There are many organisation who operate ocean observatories or data archives. In recent years, the application of the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) technology has become more and more popular to increase the interoperability between marine observation networks. However, as the SWE standards were intentionally designed in a domain independent manner

  7. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...

  8. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  9. Observation of self-magnetic field relaxations in Bi2223 and Y123 HTS tapes after over-current pulse and DC current operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallouli, M.; Sun, J.; Chikumoto, N.; Otabe, E. S.; Shyshkin, O.; Charfi-Kaddour, S.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2016-07-01

    The development of power transmission lines based on long-length HTS tapes requires the production of high quality tapes. Due to fault conditions, technical mistakes and human errors during the operation of a DC power transmission line, an over-current pulse, several times larger than the rated current, could occur. To study the effect of such over-current pulses on the transport current density distribution in the HTS tapes, we simulated two start-up scenarios for one BSCCO and two YBCO tapes. The first start-up scenario is an initial over-current pulse during which the transport current was turned on rapidly, rising to 900 A during the first milliseconds, then reduced to a 100 A DC current. The second start-up scenario is normal operation, and involved increasing the transport current slowly from 0 A to 100 A at a rate of 1 A/s. For both scenarios, we then measured the vertical component of the self-magnetic field by means of a Hall probe above the tape, and afterward, by solving a linear equation of the inverse problem we obtain the current density profiles. We observe a change of the self-magnetic field above the edge of the BSCCO and YBCO tapes during 30 min after the 5 ms of over-current pulse and during the normal operation. The current density profiles are peaked in the centre for over-current pulse, and more peaked around the edge of the HTS tape for normal operation, which means that the limited time over-current pulse changes the current density profiles of the HTS tapes. We observe also a loop of current for YBCO tapes and we show the role of the HTS tape stabilizer.

  10. Observation of ocean current response to 1998 Hurricane Georges in the Gulf of Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The ocean current response to a hurricane on the shelf-break is examined. The study area is the DeSoto Canyon in the northeast Gulf of Mexico, and the event is the passage of 1998 Hurricane Georges with a maximum wind speed of 49 m/s. The data sets used for analysis consist of the mooring data taken by the Field Program of the DeSoto Canyon Eddy Intrusion Study, and simultaneous winds observed by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Moored Buoy 42040. Time-depth ocean current energy density images derived from the observed data show that the ocean currents respond almost immediately to the hurricane with important differences on and offthe shelf. On the shelf, in the shallow water of 100 m, the disturbance penetrates rapidly downward to the bottom and forms two energy peaks, the major peak is located in the mixed layer and the secondary one in the lower layer. The response dissipates quickly after external forcing disappears. Off the shelf, in the deep water, the major disturbance energy seems to be trapped in the mixed layer with a trailing oscillation; although the disturbance signals may still be observed at the depths of 500 and 1 290 m. Vertical dispersion analysis reveals that the near-initial wave packet generated off the shelf consists of two modes. One is a barotropic wave mode characterized by a fast decay rate of velocity amplitude of 0.020 s-1, and the other is baroclinic wave mode characterized by a slow decay rate of 0.006 9 s-1. The band-pass-filtering and empirical function techniques are employed to the frequency analysis. The results indicate that all frequencies shift above the local inertial frequency. On the shelf, the average frequency is 1.04fin the mixed layer, close to the diagnosed frequency of the first baroclinic mode, and the average frequency increases to 1.07fin the thermocline.Off the shelf, all frequencies are a little smaller than the diagnosed frequency of the first mode. The average frequency decreases from 1

  11. Control of disruption-generated runaway plasmas in TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Taylor, G.; Medley, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Many disruptions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Meade and the TFTR Group 1991 Proc. Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (Washington, DC, 1990) vol 1 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 9-24) produced populations of runaway electrons which carried a significant fraction of the original plasma current. In this paper, we describe experiments where, following a disruption of a low-beta, reversed-shear plasma, currents of up to 1 MA carried mainly by runaway electrons were controlled and then ramped down to near zero using the ohmic transformer. In the longer lasting runaway plasmas, events resembling Parail-Pogutse instabilities were observed.

  12. Exposure to modern, widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals and their effect on the reproductive potential of women: an overview of current epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwacka, Anetta; Zamkowska, Dorota; Radwan, Michał; Jurewicz, Joanna

    2017-07-31

    Growing evidence indicates that exposure to widespread, environmental contaminants called endocrine disruptors (EDCs) negatively affects animal and human reproductive health and has been linked to several diseases including infertility. This review aims to evaluate the impact of environmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals [phthalates, parabens, triclosan, bisphenol A (BPA), organochlorine (PCBs) and perfluorinated (PFCs) compounds] on the reproductive potential among women, by reviewing most recently published literature. Epidemiological studies focusing on EDCs exposure and reproductive potential among women for the last 16 years were identified by a search of the PUBMED, MEDLINE, EBSCO and TOXNET literature databases. The results of the presented studies show that exposure to EDCs impacts the reproductive potential in women, measured by ovarian reserve and by assisted reproductive technology outcomes. Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals decrease: (i) oestradiol levels (BPA); (ii) anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations (PCBs); (iii) antral follicle count (BPA, parabens, phthalates); (iv) oocyte quality (BPA, triclosan, phthalates, PCBs); (v) fertilization rate (PFCs, PCBs); (vi) implantation (BPA, phthalates, PCBs); (vii) embryo quality (triclosan, PCBs, BPA); (viii) rate of clinical pregnancy and live births (parabens, phthalates). The studies were mostly well-designed and used prospective cohorts with the exposure assessment based on the biomarker of exposure. Considering the suggested health effects, more epidemiological data is urgently needed to confirm the presented findings.

  13. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  14. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an International Observational Study (EPAGE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froehlich, F; Harris, JK; Wietlisbach, V;

    2006-01-01

    in endoscopy centers internationally. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient. RESULTS: 6004 patients were......BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice...... included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 % received no sedation. Sedation agents most commonly used were midazolam (47 %) and opioids (33 %). Pulse oximetry was done during colonoscopy in 77 % of patients, blood...

  15. Direct observation of chiral currents and magnetic reflection in atomic flux lattices

    CERN Document Server

    An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of studying topologically nontrivial phases with the precision and control of atomic physics has driven the development of many techniques for engineering artificial magnetic fields and spin-orbit interactions in atomic gases. Recently, the idea of engineering nontrivial topology through the use of discrete internal (or external) atomic states as effective "artificial dimensions" has garnered attraction for its versatility and promise of immunity from sources of heating. Here, we directly engineer tunable artificial gauge fields through the local control of tunneling phases in an effectively two-dimensional manifold of discrete atomic momentum states. We demonstrate the ability to engineer homogeneous artificial gauge fields of arbitrary value, directly imaging the site-resolved dynamics of induced chiral currents. We furthermore engineer the first inhomogeneous artificial gauge fields for cold atoms, enabling the observation of magnetic reflection of atoms incident upon a step-like variation of ...

  16. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2016-08-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  17. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2017-01-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  18. Nonlinear Gulf Stream Interaction with the Deep Western Boundary Current System: Observations and a Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, David E.; Mehra, Avichal; Haney, Robert L.; Bowman, Malcolm J.; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2003-01-01

    Gulf Stream (GS) separation near its observed Cape Hatteras (CH) separation location, and its ensuing path and dynamics, is a challenging ocean modeling problem. If a model GS separates much farther north than CH, then northward GS meanders, which pinch off warm core eddies (rings), are not possible or are strongly constrained by the Grand Banks shelfbreak. Cold core rings pinch off the southward GS meanders. The rings are often re-absorbed by the GS. The important warm core rings enhance heat exchange and, especially, affect the northern GS branch after GS bifurcation near the New England Seamount Chain. This northern branch gains heat by contact with the southern branch water upstream of bifurcation, and warms the Arctic Ocean and northern seas, thus playing a major role in ice dynamics, thermohaline circulation and possible global climate warming. These rings transport heat northward between the separated GS and shelf slope/Deep Western Boundary Current system (DWBC). This region has nearly level time mean isopycnals. The eddy heat transport convergence/divergence enhances the shelfbreak and GS front intensities and thus also increases watermass transformation. The fronts are maintained by warm advection by the Florida Current and cool advection by the DWBC. Thus, the GS interaction with the DWBC through the intermediate eddy field is climatologically important.

  19. The inconsistency between proton charge exchange and the observed ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Evans, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The equatorial pitch-angle distributions of ring-current ions observed during a storm recovery phase at L values between 3 and 4 are compared with the pitch-angle distributions predicted by proton charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. Large disagreements are found, and three alternative explanations are explored. (1) A strong proton source acts to mask the effects of charge exchange. It is believed that the required strong continual source with a unique pitch-angle and energy dependence is unrealistic at these low L values. (2) Presently accepted neutral hydrogen density models have densities well over an order of magnitude too large for a storm recovery phase. No evidence is known to support the required large errors in the densities. (3) The ring current at particle energies not exceeding 50 keV was dominated by some ion species other than protons during the storm recovery phase. Such ions must have much longer lifetimes for charge exchange with hydrogen than do protons. This alternative is strongly favored, with He(+) being an attractive candidate.

  20. ST5 Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents and Its Implication to the Cross-Polar Cap Pedersen Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total R1 currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  1. Vortex disruption by magnetohydrodynamic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    In an electrically conducting fluid, vortices stretch out a weak, large-scale magnetic field to form strong current sheets on their edges. Associated with these current sheets are magnetic stresses, which are subsequently released through reconnection, leading to vortex disruption, and possibly even destruction. This disruption phenomenon is investigated here in the context of two-dimensional, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. We derive a simple order of magnitude estimate for the magnetic stresses --- and thus the degree of disruption --- that depends on the strength of the background magnetic field (measured by the parameter $M$, a ratio between the Alfv\\'en speed and a typical flow speed) and on the magnetic diffusivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number $\\mbox{Rm}$). The resulting estimate suggests that significant disruption occurs when $M^{2}\\mbox{Rm} = O(1)$. To test our prediction, we analyse direct numerical simulations of vortices generated by the breakup of unstable shear flo...

  2. Observation of Transient Overcritical Currents in YBCO Thin Films using High-Speed Magneto-Optical Imaging and Dynamic Current Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Frederick S.; Pan, Alexey V.; Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of transient current distributions in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films were investigated during and immediately following an external field ramp, using high-speed (real-time) Magneto-Optical Imaging and calculation of dynamic current profiles. A number of qualitatively unique and previously unobserved features are seen in this novel analysis of the evolution of supercurrent during penetration. As magnetic field ramps up from zero, the dynamic current profile is characterized by strong peaks, the magnitude of which exceed the conventional critical current density (as determined from static current profiles). These peaks develop close to the sample edges, initially resembling screening currents but quickly growing in intensity as the external field increases. A discontinuity in field and current behaviour is newly observed, indicating a novel transition from increasing peak current toward relaxation behaviour. After this transition, the current peaks move toward the centre of the sample while reducing in intensity as magnetic vortices penetrate inward. This motion slows exponentially with time, with the current distribution in the long-time limit reducing to the expected Kim-model profile. PMID:28067331

  3. Observation of Transient Overcritical Currents in YBCO Thin Films using High-Speed Magneto-Optical Imaging and Dynamic Current Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Frederick S; Pan, Alexey V; Golovchanskiy, Igor A; Fedoseev, Sergey A; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2017-01-09

    The dynamics of transient current distributions in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films were investigated during and immediately following an external field ramp, using high-speed (real-time) Magneto-Optical Imaging and calculation of dynamic current profiles. A number of qualitatively unique and previously unobserved features are seen in this novel analysis of the evolution of supercurrent during penetration. As magnetic field ramps up from zero, the dynamic current profile is characterized by strong peaks, the magnitude of which exceed the conventional critical current density (as determined from static current profiles). These peaks develop close to the sample edges, initially resembling screening currents but quickly growing in intensity as the external field increases. A discontinuity in field and current behaviour is newly observed, indicating a novel transition from increasing peak current toward relaxation behaviour. After this transition, the current peaks move toward the centre of the sample while reducing in intensity as magnetic vortices penetrate inward. This motion slows exponentially with time, with the current distribution in the long-time limit reducing to the expected Kim-model profile.

  4. Observation of Transient Overcritical Currents in YBCO Thin Films using High-Speed Magneto-Optical Imaging and Dynamic Current Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Frederick S.; Pan, Alexey V.; Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of transient current distributions in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7‑δ thin films were investigated during and immediately following an external field ramp, using high-speed (real-time) Magneto-Optical Imaging and calculation of dynamic current profiles. A number of qualitatively unique and previously unobserved features are seen in this novel analysis of the evolution of supercurrent during penetration. As magnetic field ramps up from zero, the dynamic current profile is characterized by strong peaks, the magnitude of which exceed the conventional critical current density (as determined from static current profiles). These peaks develop close to the sample edges, initially resembling screening currents but quickly growing in intensity as the external field increases. A discontinuity in field and current behaviour is newly observed, indicating a novel transition from increasing peak current toward relaxation behaviour. After this transition, the current peaks move toward the centre of the sample while reducing in intensity as magnetic vortices penetrate inward. This motion slows exponentially with time, with the current distribution in the long-time limit reducing to the expected Kim-model profile.

  5. Variability of the currents in the Luzon Strait during spring of 2002 obtained from observations and satellite geostrophic currents and spectral analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN YaoChu; LIAO GuangHong; WANG HuiQun; LOU RuYun; CHEN Hong

    2009-01-01

    The structure and variability of the currents in the Luzon Strait during spring of 2002 are studied, based on the current measurements at the average position of the mooring station (20°49'57"N, 120°48'12"E) from 03 17 to 04 15, 2002, satellite geostrophic currents in the Luzon Strait, and the spectral analyses, using the maximum entropy method. The subtidal currents at the mooring station show de-creased amplitudes downward with an anti-cyclonic rotation, suggesting that the currents enter and exit the South China Sea in the upper and intermediate layers, respectively. The vertical structure of the currents in the Luzon Strait suggests strongly the sandwiched structure of the LST, even though the bottom part of the profile is not resolved by the observational grid. The spectral analyses show the following periods of significant spectral peaks: (1) the tidal currents variability in the vertical direction; (2) the period about 4-6 d for the two cases of frequency f>0 and f0 and f<0 at the 200, 500 and 800 m levels, namely the Luzon Strait currents exhibit significant synoptical variability throughout the water column up to 800 m deep. Both direct current measurements and in situ hydrographic and satellite survey suggest no Kuroshio loop current in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002.

  6. Constraining Cluster Disruption in M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Adamo, A.; Bastian, N.; Fouesneau, M.

    2014-09-01

    Currently two contrasting models have been put forward to explain cluster disruption. These models are known as Mass Independent Disruption (MID) and Mass Dependent Disruption (MDD) models. Here we will shortly introduce the two models and present the latest observational results obtained in the field. We will focus on the results achieved us- ing the new and unprecedented Hubble Space Telescope-WFC3 dataset of the face-on, spiral galaxy M83. The dataset, composed of 7 different fields, covers the galaxy up to a radius of ˜8 kpc, and is used to construct one of the most complete and systematic star cluster catalogues for a galaxy in the local universe. The cluster properties were estimated comparing the photometry (NUV and optical) with Single Stellar Population (SSP) models. If the age distribution is approximated by a single power-law, we find indices between -0.6 and 0 for the seven fields (independently of the binning used), finding a systematic trend with the local environment. Additionally, our results are inconsistent with the expected slope of ˜1 from the MID model, showing to be flatter. The combination of our results with the M31 galaxy (The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury program), and the LMC (Baumgardt et al. 2013), is starting to guide the global understanding on star cluster disruption, and how these systems are strongly correlated with the local environment where they were formed.

  7. Exploring tidewater glacier retreat using past and current observations at Columbia Glacier, Alaska. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neel, S.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Howat, I. M.; Conway, H.; Columbia Glacier Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Since fulfilling Austin Post’s prediction of impending retreat in the late 1970s, Columbia Glacier has repeatedly surprised both casual and careful observers with its ability for rapid change. Over the last three decades, Columbia Glacier has lost approximately 18 km of its original 66 km length, while thinning by approximately 50% at the present terminus. The total ice volume lost to the Gulf of Alaska Estimates upwards of 120 km3 constrain the total ice volume lost to the Gulf of Alaska. Recently, the terminus supported a ~1.5 km long floating tongue for over than a year, contradicting the common assumption that the mechanical properties of temperate ice prohibit flotation over sustained time intervals. The rich history of study offers an opportunity to better understand tidewater glacier retreat, and a valuable analog to the dynamic instability underway at several ice sheet outlet glaciers. Current research aims to improve processing resolution of existing aerial photographic data, while complimenting the 30-year photogrammetric record with a suite of field observations. Recent instrumentation includes: oblique time lapse and still imagery, semi-permanent GPS, airborne radar, mass balance, passive seismology and LiDAR. This presentation will focus on innovative methods developed in recent field seasons, sharing insight each has provided into the retreat process . 1The Columbia Glacier Consortium consists of: Fabian Walter (SIO), Kenichi Matsuoka (NPI), Ben Smith (UW), Ethan Welty (CU-Boulder), Chris Larsen (UAF), Dave Finnegan (CRREL), Dan McNamara (USGS), Yushin Ahn (OSU), Julie Markus (OSU), Adam LeWinter (EIS).

  8. A Comparative Study of Dark Energy Constraints from Current Observational Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Mukherjee, Pia

    2012-01-01

    We examine how dark energy constraints from current observational data depend on the analysis methods used: the analysis of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), and that of galaxy clustering data. We generalize the flux-averaging analysis method of SNe Ia to allow correlated errors of SNe Ia, in order to reduce the systematic bias due to weak lensing of SNe Ia. We find that flux-averaging leads to larger errors on dark energy and cosmological parameters if only SN Ia data are used. When SN Ia data (the latest compilation by the SNLS team) are combined with WMAP 7 year results (in terms of our Gaussian fits to the probability distributions of the CMB shift parameters), the latest Hubble constant (H_0) measurement using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and gamma ray burst (GRB) data, flux-averaging of SNe Ia increases the concordance with other data, and leads to significantly tighter constraints on the dark energy density at z=1, and the cosmic curvature \\Omega_k. The galaxy clustering measurements of H(z=0.35)r_s(z_...

  9. Arctic Observing Network Data Management: Current Capabilities and Their Promise for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.; Fetterer, F.; Moore, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    CADIS (the Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service) serves as the data management, discovery and delivery component of the Arctic Observing Network (AON). As an International Polar Year (IPY) initiative, AON comprises 34 land, atmosphere and ocean observation sites, and will acquire much of the data coming from the interagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH). CADIS is tasked with ensuring that these observational data are managed for long term use by members of the entire Earth System Science community. Portions of CADIS are either in use by the community or available for testing. We now have an opportunity to evaluate the feedback received from our users, to identify any design shortcomings, and to identify those elements which serve their purpose well and will support future development. This presentation will focus on the nuts-and-bolts of the CADIS development to date, with an eye towards presenting lessons learned and best practices based on our experiences so far. The topics include: - How did we assess our users' needs, and how are those contributions reflected in the end product and its capabilities? - Why did we develop a CADIS metadata profile, and how does it allow CADIS to support preservation and scientific interoperability? - How can we shield the user from metadata complexities (especially those associated with various standards) while still obtaining the metadata needed to support an effective data management system? - How can we bridge the gap between the data storage formats considered convenient by researchers in the field, and those which are necessary to provide data interoperability? - What challenges have been encountered in our efforts to provide access to federated data (data stored outside of the CADIS system)? - What are the data browsing and visualization needs of the AON community, and which tools and technologies are most promising in terms of supporting those needs? A live demonstration of the current

  10. Evolution of the current system during solar wind pressure pulses based on aurora and magnetometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ebihara, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Imajo, Shun; Li, Wen; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated evolution of ionospheric currents during sudden commencements using a ground magnetometer network in conjunction with an all-sky imager, which has the advantage of locating field-aligned currents much more accurately than ground magnetometers. Preliminary (PI) and main (MI) impulse currents showed two-cell patterns propagating antisunward, particularly during a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Although this overall pattern is consistent with the Araki (solar wind sources of magnetospheric ultra-low-frequency waves. Geophysical monograph series, vol 81. AGU, Washington, DC, pp 183-200, 1994. doi: 10.1029/GM081p0183) model, we found several interesting features. The PI and MI currents in some events were highly asymmetric with respect to the noon-midnight meridian; the post-noon sector did not show any notable PI signal, but only had an MI starting earlier than the pre-noon MI. Not only equivalent currents but also aurora and equatorial magnetometer data supported the much weaker PI response. We suggest that interplanetary shocks impacting away from the subsolar point caused the asymmetric current pattern. Additionally, even when PI currents form in both pre- and post-noon sectors, they can initiate and disappear at different timings. The PI currents did not immediately disappear but coexisted with the MI currents for the first few minutes of the MI. During a southward IMF, the MI currents formed equatorward of a preexisting DP-2, indicating that the MI currents are a separate structure from a preexisting DP-2. In contrast, the MI currents under a northward IMF were essentially an intensification of a preexisting DP-2. The magnetometer and imager combination has been shown to be a powerful means for tracing evolution of ionospheric currents, and we showed various types of ionospheric responses under different upstream conditions.

  11. Observational evidence of seasonality in the timing of loop current eddy separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cody A.; Leben, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Observational datasets, reports and analyses over the time period from 1978 through 1992 are reviewed to derive pre-altimetry Loop Current (LC) eddy separation dates. The reanalysis identified 20 separation events in the 15-year record. Separation dates are estimated to be accurate to approximately ± 1.5 months and sufficient to detect statistically significant LC eddy separation seasonality, which was not the case for previously published records because of the misidentification of separation events and their timing. The reanalysis indicates that previously reported LC eddy separation dates, determined for the time period before the advent of continuous altimetric monitoring in the early 1990s, are inaccurate because of extensive reliance on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) imagery. Automated LC tracking techniques are used to derive LC eddy separation dates in three different altimetry-based sea surface height (SSH) datasets over the time period from 1993 through 2012. A total of 28-30 LC eddy separation events were identified in the 20-year record. Variations in the number and dates of eddy separation events are attributed to the different mean sea surfaces and objective-analysis smoothing procedures used to produce the SSH datasets. Significance tests on various altimetry and pre-altimetry/altimetry combined date lists consistently show that the seasonal distribution of separation events is not uniform at the 95% confidence level. Randomization tests further show that the seasonal peak in LC eddy separation events in August and September is highly unlikely to have occurred by chance. The other seasonal peak in February and March is less significant, but possibly indicates two seasons of enhanced probability of eddy separation centered near the spring and fall equinoxes. This is further quantified by objectively dividing the seasonal distribution into two seasons using circular statistical techniques and a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated

  12. Observed features of temperature, salinity and current in central Chukchi Sea during the summer of 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yan; LIU Na; CHEN Hongxia; TENG Fei; LIN Lina; WANG Huiwu

    2015-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, the fifth CHINARE Arctic Expedition was carried out, and a submersible mooring system was deployed in M5 station located at (69°30.155'N,169°00.654'W) and recovered 50d later. A set of temperature, salinity and current profile records was acquired. The characteristics of these observations are analyzed in this paper. Some main results are achieved as below. (1) Temperature generally decreases while salinity generally increases with increasing depth. The average values of all records are 2.98℃ and 32.21 psu. (2) Salinity and temperature are well negatively correlated, and the correlation coefficient between them is –0.84. However, they did not always vary synchronously. Their co-variation featured different characters during different significant periods. (3) The average velocity for the whole water column is 141 mm/s with directional angle of 347.1°. The statistical distribution curve of velocity record number gets narrower with increasing depth. More than 85% of the recorded velocities are northward, and the mean magnitudes of dominated northward velocities are 100–150 mm/s. (4) Rotary spectrum analysis shows that motions with low frequency take a majority of energy in all layers. The most significant energy peaks for all layers are around 0.012 cph (about 3.5 d period), while the tidal motion in mooring area is nonsignificant. (5) Velocities in all layers feature similar and synchronous temporal variations, except for the slight decrease in magnitude and leftward twist from top to bottom. The directions of velocity correspond well to those of surface wind. The average northward volume transport per square meter is 0.1–0.2 m3/s under southerly wind, but about –0.2 m3/s during northerly wind burst.

  13. 环境污染对几类水生无脊椎动物内分泌功能扰乱的研究现状%Current status of environmental endocrine disruption in selected aquatic invertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enmin ZOU

    2003-01-01

    近年来,在环境毒理学这门边缘学科中又诞生了一个新的领域,即环境污染对内分泌功能的扰乱.研究发现,许多人工合成的杀虫剂和工业化合物能够扰乱脊椎动物的内分泌功能,这些化合物也存在于水环境中.近年来,这些环境有机污染物是否对水生无脊椎动物的内分泌功能同样具有扰乱作用成了环境内分泌学这个新领域的热点之一.由于近年来的研究侧重于腔肠动物、轮虫、软体动物、甲壳动物及棘皮动物,因此,本文主要介绍有关环境污染物对这几类水生无脊椎动物内分泌功能扰乱的研究进展.另外,对环境污染对水生无脊椎动物内分泌扰乱这个研究热点的现状以及今后的发展方向进行了评述.在从事环境污染对无脊椎动物内分泌功能影响的研究时,研究者必须意识到无脊椎动物和脊椎动物在内分泌机制上的差异,不可随意地在这两大类动物类群之间互相引伸研究结果.%Endocrine disruption by environmental contaminants has recently emerged as a new subdiscipline of environmental toxicology. Aquatic environments are increasingly contaminated with various anthropogenic chemicals,many of which are capable of disrupting endocrine functions of vertebrates. Where aquatic invertebrates are concerned, most of the recent reports are concerned with the impact of organic xenobiotics on endocrine functions in cnidarians, rotifers, mollusks, crustaceans and echinoderms. This review provides an overview of the current status of this research on endocrine disruption in these invertebrates. Suggestions for future research directions in the field of invertebrate endocrine disruption are also presented. Because of the disparities between the endocrine systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, care must be exercised in extrapolating to invertebrates, particularly the non-deuterostome invertebrates, the results of endocrine disruption studies with vertebrates

  14. Highly intense lightning over the oceans: Estimated peak currents from global GLD360 observations

    OpenAIRE

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Said, R. K.; Cohen, M. B

    2013-01-01

    We present the ?rst global distribution of the average estimated peak currents in negative lightning ?ashes using 1 year of continuous data from the Vaisala global lightning data set GLD360. The data set, composed of 353 million ?ashes, was compared with the National Lightning Detection NetworkTM for peak current accuracy, location accuracy, and detection ef?ciency. The validation results demonstrated a mean (geometric mean) peak current magnitude error of 21% (6%), a median lo...

  15. Onset conditions for disruptions during VDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Janardhan; Gerhardt, Stefan; Boozer, Allen; NSTX Team

    2011-10-01

    The Vertical Displacement Event, VDE, evolves on a slow timescale relative to the ideal MHD Alfvenic timescale. At some point the kink mode is strongly destabilized, leading to the final disruption. In most cases this occurs when q-edge is slightly less than two. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are often observed, well before the disruption. The evolution of the plasma during the VDE is modeled as a sequence of shrinking equilibria, where the core current profile remains constant so that the safety-factor at the axis, q-axis, remains fixed and the q-edge systematically decreases. Stability analysis shows that the plasma is indeed stable or has a small growth-rate until q- edge drops below 2, at which point the growth-rate rises rapidly, approaching γTA = 1 . The kink mode is characterized by m / n = 2 / 1 , where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers. The surface currents associated with the MHD perturbation are computed. These may be related to the non-axisymmetric component of the halo currents and may be providing stability at modest growth-rates. This model is compared with observations on NSTX. This manuscript has been authored by Princeton University and collaborators under Contract Number(s) DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. THEMIS multispacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with symmetric boundary conditions and a large guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Fujimoto, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    2017-08-01

    We report three spacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with a guide field of unity, with THEMIS D (THD) and THEMIS E (THE)/THEMIS A (THA) observing oppositely directed reconnection exhausts, indicating the presence of an X line between the spacecraft. The near-constant convective speed of the magnetosheath current sheet allowed the direct translation of the observed time series into spatial profiles. THD observed asymmetries in the plasma density and temperature profiles across the exhaust, characteristics of symmetric reconnection with a guide field. The exhausts at THE and THA, on the other hand, were not the expected mirror image of the THD exhaust in terms of the plasma and field profiles. They consisted of a main outflow at the center of the current sheet, flanked by oppositely directed flows at the two edges of the current sheet, suggesting the presence of a second X line, whose outflow wraps around the outflow from the first X line.

  17. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Temporal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from STS. The data demonstrate that masoscale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of about 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are about I min for meso-scale currents and about 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  18. Space Technology 5 Multi-Point Observations of Temporal Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Wang, Yongli; Slavin, James A.; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from ST5. The data demonstrate that meso-scale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of approximately 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approximately 1 min for meso-scale currents and approximately 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  19. Disruptive visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, R M

    2002-10-01

    Numerous advanced technologies, both medical and nonmedical, are emerging faster than their social, behavioral, political, moral, and ethical implications can be understood. Some of these technologies will fundamentally challenge the practice of surgery: human cloning, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, intelligent robotics, nanotechnology, suspended animation, regeneration, and species prolongation. Because of the rapidity of change, the current status of these emerging technologies with their specific moral and ethical issues must be addressed at this time by the new generation of surgeons, or we must all face the consequences of an uncontrolled and unprepared future.

  20. Statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet:Cluster observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.REME; E.LUCEK

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the flapping motion of the earth’s magnetotail current sheet is one of the most important problems in the magnetotail dynamics.Using Cluster data,we make a statistical research on the motion properties of the magnetotail current sheet of 2001 and 2003.We calculate the velocities of the magnetotail current sheet using new methods and obtain the distribution of the magnetotail current sheet velocities in the X-Y plane in GSE coordinate system.Our results show that although most of the current sheets were propagating toward the tail flanks and those of the exceptions lay in dusk side,which is consistent with previous studies,the proportions of the current sheet which were propagating toward midnight (where |YGSE|=0) were higher than those in previous studies.Motions of the current sheet in the middle area (|YGSE|<8 Re) of the magnetotail are investigated.Relatively high value of the Z component of the velocity further confirms that the middle area of the magnetotail might be a source region for the motion of the current sheets which were propagating towards the tail flanks.According to our case studies,the way the current sheets propagated toward midnight area differs significantly from that toward dusk and dawn side,from which we infer that there might be two different kinds of current sheet motions originated from different sources.The statistical results of this paper may give some clues for further studies on the origin of the flapping motion of the magnetotail current sheet.

  1. Variability of the currents in the Luzon Strait during spring of 2002 obtained from observations and satellite geostrophic currents and spectral analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The structure and variability of the currents in the Luzon Strait during spring of 2002 are studied, based on the current measurements at the average position of the mooring station (20°49′57"N, 120°48′12"E) from March 17 to April 15, 2002, satellite geostrophic currents in the Luzon Strait, and the spectral analyses, using the maximum entropy method. The subtidal currents at the mooring station show de-creased amplitudes downward with an anti-cyclonic rotation, suggesting that the currents enter and exit the South China Sea in the upper and intermediate layers, respectively. The vertical structure of the currents in the Luzon Strait suggests strongly the sandwiched structure of the LST, even though the bottom part of the profile is not resolved by the observational grid. The spectral analyses show the following periods of significant spectral peaks: (1) the tidal currents variability in the vertical direction; (2) the period about 4-6 d for the two cases of frequency f >0 and f<0 at the 200 and 500 m levels, but at the 800 m level only for the case of f >0; (3) The fluctuation in the period range is about 2-3 days for the two cases of f >0 and f<0 at the 200, 500 and 800 m levels, namely the Luzon Strait currents exhibit significant synoptical variability throughout the water column up to 800 m deep. Both direct current measurements and in situ hydrographic and satellite survey suggest no Kuroshio loop current in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002.

  2. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    Three satellite-tracked drifting buoys released in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean followed the path of the current moving westward approximately zonally in the vicinity of 10 degrees S latitude. On nearing the east coast of Africa...

  3. Real-Time Observation of Antimicrobial Polycation Effects on Escherichia coli: Adapting the Carpet Model for Membrane Disruption to Quaternary Copolyoxetanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Zolotarskaya, Olga Y; Nair, Sithara S; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Ohman, Dennis E; Wynne, Kenneth J; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2016-03-29

    Real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used for analyzing effects of the antimicrobial polycation copolyoxetane P[(C12)-(ME2Ox)-50/50], C12-50 on the membrane of a model bacterium, Escherichia coli (ATCC# 35218). AFM imaging showed cell membrane changes with increasing C12-50 concentration and time including nanopore formation and bulges associated with outer bacterial membrane disruption. A macroscale bactericidal concentration study for C12-50 showed a 4 log kill at 15 μg/mL with conditions paralleling imaging (1 h, 1x PBS, physiological pH, 25 °C). The dramatic changes from the control image to 1 h after introducing 15 μg/mL C12-50 are therefore reasonably attributed to cell death. At the highest concentration (60 μg/mL) further cell membrane disruption results in leakage of cytoplasm driven by detergent-like action. The sequence of processes for initial membrane disruption by the synthetic polycation C12-50 follows the carpet model posited for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). However, the nanoscale details are distinctly different as C12-50 is a synthetic, water-soluble copolycation that is best modeled as a random coil. In a complementary AFM study, chemical force microscopy shows that incubating cells with C12-50 decreased the hydrophobicity across the entire cell surface at an early stage. This finding provides additional evidence indicating that C12-50 polycations initially bind with the cell membrane in a carpet-like fashion. Taken together, real time AFM imaging elucidates the mechanism of antimicrobial action for copolyoxetane C12-50 at the single cell level. In future work this approach will provide important insights into structure-property relationships and improved antimicrobial effectiveness for synthetic amphiphilic polycations.

  4. Small spatial scale field aligned currents in middle and low latitudes as observed by the CHAMP satellite and verification of their current circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, K.; Iyemori, T.; Luhr, H.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetic field observation by the CHAMP satellite shows the global and frequent appearance of small scale (1-5 nT) magnetic fluctuations with period around a few tens seconds along the satellites. They have the following characteristics. 1. The signal is perpendicular to the geomagnetic main field, and the amplitude of the zonal component is larger than that of the meridional component. 2. Around the dip equator, as the latitude becomes lower, the period and amplitudes of the two components perpendicular to the main field respectively tend to become longer and smaller (to nearly zero on the dip equator). 3. The amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations on the dayside is larger than that on the night side by around one order in magnitude, which highly correlates to the electric conductivity of the ionospheric dynamo layer. 4. The amplitude shows symmetry about the magnetic dip equator which indicates a magnetic conjugacy to a certain extent. 5. The amplitude shows almost no dependence on the solar wind parameters such as the IMF cone angle nor the solar wind speed, which strongly suggests no association with the Pc3 micro pulsation. 6. The amplitude also shows almost no dependence on the geomagnetic activity. 7. The amplitude has a clear seasonal dependence with topographical characteristics. They can be interpreted as the spatial structure of small scale field-aligned currents generated by the ionospheric dynamo driven by atmospheric gravity waves propagating from the lower atmosphere. The mechanism is the following; first, the gravity waves generated by the lower atmospheric disturbance propagate to the ionosphere; the neutral winds oscillate, cause ionospheric dynamo and Pedersen and Hall currents flow; because the dynamo region is finite, the currents cause polarized electric fields; and the polarized electric fields propagate along the geomagnetic filed as Alfven waves accompanied by field-aligned currents, at the same time, the ionospheric currents divert to

  5. Airglow Observation with IMAP/ VISI on the International Space Station: Current status and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI) of the IMAP mission was launched successfully by H-IIB/HTV3 on July 21 2012. At this moment HTV3 is docked onto the International Space Station (ISS), and VISI is scheduled to be installed on the exposed facility within a week. VISI will be operated in the nightside hemisphere in the range of +/- 51 deg. GLAT, and measure the airglow emissions of OI at 630 nm, the OH Meinel band at 730 nm and the O2 atmospheric band (0-0) at 762 nm at an altitude of ~400 km with typical spatial resolution of 16 - 50 km. Since the influence of cloud reflections of moonlight is overlapped with the airglow pattern in the visible wavelength range, the precise subtraction of the cloud influence is a key issue of this mission. Therefore, a simulation work to study on how much the surface albedo on the cloud top will affect the data is critically important. The height profiles of volume emission rates were estimated for O2 and OH airglows with the MSIS models, and then the airglow intensities were integrated along the line-of-sight direction. The cloud pattern was estimated based on the realistic data measured with a geostationary climate satellite. The simulation result shows that for OH Meinel at 730 nm, the moonlight reflection during the first/last quarter will increase the brightness of the airglow by factor of 1.5-2 and ~5 for full moon phase. Meanwhile, for O2 atmospheric band (0-0) at 762 nm, the simulation result shows that there's no significant (structured) background, even during the full moon phase. We will report the quantitative effect of cloud albedo on the airglow pattern, and discuss the physical parameters those expected to be derived from the VISI data. Concerning on the operation of VISI, we will carry out the initial function check by the middle of August, and start nominal observation within a few months. Thus, we will also report the current status and initial result of VISI.

  6. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  7. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total RI currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of approx. 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  8. Field-aligned current observed on ISEE-2 in the innermagnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐荣栏; 王左丁; 谢榴香; 杨龙

    1995-01-01

    Field-aligned currents in the inner magnetosphere arc studied by using ISEE-2 magnetometer da-la, A method is proposed to calculate ×B with single-satellite data. From the morphology of ×B in time (or L). a lot of large fluctuations are found in ×B near L = 5.5RE corresponding to the field-aligned currents. Statistical study shows that the field-aligned current in the inner magnetosphere is a function of B, L, MLT and AL. The region of the projections of ×B along the magnetic field line onto the ionosphere is not symmetrical for the geomagnetic pole. The inner boundary is independent of the geomagnetic disturbance, but during substorms the outer boundary shifts equatorward. The spatial distribution of the in- and out-flowing currents is complicated. The region-1-and-2 system is hardly distinguishable.

  9. Observation of Current Structures at Type-III ELM Onset on EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Naulin, Volker; Xu, G.

    In far scrape-o layer (SOL), alternating negative and positive burst structures in ion saturation current were detected at the onset of each type-III edge localized mode (ELM) on EAST. Different from the fast streaming phenomenon reported previously, one subsequent positive burst structure appears...... led generated by scrape-off layer current can ultimately trigger the ELM through the coupling with MHD modes inside the separatrix....

  10. Long-term observations of Alaska Coastal Current in the northern Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabeno, Phyllis J.; Bell, Shaun; Cheng, Wei; Danielson, Seth; Kachel, Nancy B.; Mordy, Calvin W.

    2016-10-01

    The Alaska Coastal Current is a continuous, well-defined system extending for ~1700 km along the coast of Alaska from Seward, Alaska to Samalga Pass in the Aleutian Islands. The currents in this region are examined using data collected at >20 mooring sites and from >400 satellite-tracked drifters. While not continuous, the mooring data span a 30 year period (1984-2014). Using current meter data collected at a dozen mooring sites spread over four lines (Seward, Gore Point, Kennedy and Stevenson Entrances, and the exit to Shelikof Strait) total transport was calculated. Transport was significantly correlated with alongshore winds, although the correlation at the Seward Line was weak. The largest mean transport in the Alaska Coastal Current occurred at Gore Point (1.4×106 m3 s-1 in winter and 0.6×106 m3 s-1 in summer), with the transport at the exit to Shelikof Strait (1.3×106 m3 s-1 in winter and 0.6×106 m3 s-1 in summer) only slightly less. The transport was modified at the Seward Line in late summer and fall by frontal undulations associated with strong river discharge that enters onto the shelf at that time of year. The interaction of the Alaska Coastal Current and tidal currents with shallow banks in the vicinity of Kodiak Archipeligo and in Kennedy-Stevenson Entrance results in mixing and prolonged primary production throughout the summer.

  11. Runaway electron generation during disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Chen, Z. Y.; Dong, Y. B.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhuang, H. D.; Huang, D. W.; Gao, X.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic study of disruption-generated runaway electrons has been performed in the J-TEXT tokamak. During the intended disruption by the argon injection in J-TEXT, the runaway electron plateau is more easily obtained with a higher loop voltage and shorter onset time of high loop voltage. Magnetic fluctuations are observed at the beginning of the current quench during the disruptions. The generated runaway electron (RE) current is larger at a lower level of magnetic fluctuation. Experimental evidence supporting that the theory of hot tail RE generation might be playing a role has also been found. With higher temperature before the disruption, more REs are generated via the hot tail mechanism during the thermal quench. By increasing the hot tail RE generation by increasing the temperature, an obvious RE plateau is observed even with a low toroidal magnetic field (1.2 T).

  12. Current desires of conspecific observers affect cache-protection strategies in California scrub-jays and Eurasian jays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Ljerka; Legg, Edward W; Brecht, Katharina F; Lange, Florian; Deininger, Chantal; Mendl, Michael; Clayton, Nicola S

    2017-01-23

    Many corvid species accurately remember the locations where they have seen others cache food, allowing them to pilfer these caches efficiently once the cachers have left the scene [1]. To protect their caches, corvids employ a suite of different cache-protection strategies that limit the observers' visual or acoustic access to the cache site [2,3]. In cases where an observer's sensory access cannot be reduced it has been suggested that cachers might be able to minimise the risk of pilfering if they avoid caching food the observer is most motivated to pilfer [4]. In the wild, corvids have been reported to pilfer others' caches as soon as possible after the caching event [5], such that the cacher might benefit from adjusting its caching behaviour according to the observer's current desire. In the current study, observers pilfered according to their current desire: they preferentially pilfered food that they were not sated on. Cachers adjusted their caching behaviour accordingly: they protected their caches by selectively caching food that observers were not motivated to pilfer. The same cache-protection behaviour was found when cachers could not see on which food the observers were sated. Thus, the cachers' ability to respond to the observer's desire might have been driven by the observer's behaviour at the time of caching.

  13. Summertime coastal current reversal opposing offshore forcing and local wind near the middle east coast of Korea: Observation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Hyoung; Chang, Kyung-Il; Nam, SungHyun

    2016-07-01

    A 6 year long current measurement at a buoy station off the middle east coast of Korea reveals an equatorward reversal of coastal current in summer opposing poleward local wind stress and offshore boundary current. The current reversal extends about 40 km offshore from the coast and is concurrent with warming and freshening of water column. Estimates of the depth-averaged alongshore momentum balance suggest a major balance between the alongshore pressure gradient and the lateral friction. Sources of the pressure gradient for the summertime current reversal are identified as the alongshore buoyancy gradient driven by the wind curl gradient and the prevalence of warmer and lower salinity water in the north. Alongshore pressure gradient and velocity induced by the wind curl gradient are quantified, which yields the observed seasonal current reversal.

  14. An Isopycnic Coordinate Numerical Model of the Agulhas Current with Comparison to Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    text 71 Numerical modeling of the Agulhas Current in a limited domain begun by Boudra and Chassignet (1988) is extended. First, five experiments...satellite SST images are of limited use after the rings have propagated into the Atlantic. Recently, however, satellite measurements of sea surface height...eddy activity occurs just southeast of the African tip. 49 -- 1. 13.3 CMISEC MOODL -mcW¢c 1 13.3 CMISEC CURRENT METER -- is CM’IC A REGIONAL MOO)FI. OF

  15. Direct observation of current-induced conductive path in colossal-electroresistance manganite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wengang; Zhu, Yinyan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hao; Du, Kai; Zhang, Kai; Kou, Yunfang; Shao, Jian; Wang, Wenbin; Hou, Denglu; Dong, Shuai; Yin, Lifeng; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Manganites are known to often show colossal electroresistance (CER) in addition to colossal magnetoresistance. The (La1-yP ry) 1 -xC axMn O3 (LPCMO) system has a peculiar CER behavior in that little change of magnetization occurs. We use a magnetic force microscope to uncover the CER mechanism in the LPCMO system. In contrast to the previous belief that current reshapes the ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) domains, we show that the shape of the FMM domains remain virtually unchanged after passing electric current. Instead, it is the appearance of a tiny fraction of FMM "bridges" that is responsible for the CER behavior.

  16. Experimental observations of stray current effects on steel fibres embedded in mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, A.O.S.; Carsana, M.; Geiker, M.R.;

    2013-01-01

    It is known that stray direct current can cause corrosive damage over time to bar reinforced concrete, but knowledge on the consequences to steel fibre reinforced concrete is limited. This paper presents analyses and corresponding results from an experimental program (parametric study) investigat...

  17. Current Awareness Services--Observations of the Past and Present, and Implications for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, Michael J.

    1976-01-01

    A brief history of the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Library's current awareness service shows the progression from manual participation, to an on-line system, and finally to access of the State University of New York's Automatic MEDLARS service. (Author)

  18. Observed low-frequency currents in the deep mid-Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Sundar, D.

    . MEaxz (1984) A 40- to 60-day oscillation in the source region of the Somali current during 1976. Journal of Geophysical Research, 89, 711-715. NAIR R. R., V. ITrEKKOT, S. J. MANGININI, V. RAMASWAMY, B. HAAKE, E. T. DEGENS, B. N. DESAI and S. Homo...

  19. Sleep disruption in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: prevalence, severity, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S L; Evans, Bryan; Jeong, Jiyeon M; Gonzalez, Brian D; Johnston, Laura; Nelson, Ashley M; Kesler, Shelli; Phillips, Kristin M; Barata, Anna; Pidala, Joseph; Palesh, Oxana

    2014-10-01

    Sleep disruption is common among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, with over 50% of recipients experiencing sleep disruption pre-transplant, with up to 82% of patients experiencing moderate to severe sleep disruption during hospitalization for transplant and up to 43% after transplant. These rates of sleep disruption are substantially higher than what we see in the general population. Although sleep disruption can be distressing to patients and contribute to diminished quality of life, it is rarely discussed during clinical visits. The goal of the current review is to draw attention to sleep disruption and disorders (ie, insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome) as a clinical problem in HCT in order to facilitate patient education, intervention, and research. We identified 35 observational studies published in the past decade that examined sleep disruption or disorders in HCT. Most studies utilized a single item measure of sleep, had small sample size, and included heterogeneous samples of patients. Six studies of the effects of psychosocial and exercise interventions on sleep in HCT have reported no significant improvements. These results highlight the need for rigorous observational and interventional studies of sleep disruption and disorders in HCT recipients..

  20. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  1. Adaptive current compensation with nonlinear disturbance observer for single-sided linear induction motor considering dynamic eddy-effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jiang-ming; CHEN Te-fang; CHEN Chun-yang

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive current compensation control for a single-sided linear induction motor (SLIM) with nonlinear disturbance observer was developed. First, to maintaint-axis secondary component flux constant with consideration of the specially dynamic eddy-effect (DEE) of the SLIM, a instantaneously tracing compensation ofm-axis current component was analyzed. Second, adaptive current compensation based on Taylor-discretization algorithm was proposed. Third, an effective kind of nonlinear disturbance observer (NDOB) was employed to estimate and compensate the undesired load vibrations, then the robustness of the control system could be guaranteed. Experimental verification of the feasibility of the proposed method for an SLIM control system was performed, and it showed that the proposed adaptive compensation scheme with NDOB could significantly promote speed dynamical response and minimize speed ripple under the conditions of external load coupled vibrations and unavoidable feedback control variables measured errors, i.e., current and speed.

  2. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  3. High latitude currents in the 0600 to 0900 MLT sector - Observations from Viking and DMSP-F7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.; Zanetti, L. J.; Erlandson, R. A.; Hardy, D. A.; Rich, F. J.; Acuna, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field and charged-particle data acquired on March 25, 1986 by the Viking and DMSP-F7 satellites, as they traversed the dawn sector auroral zone on nearly antiparallel trajectories within 40 min of each oher, are analyzed. Magnetic field measurements by Viking at 0850 MLT and by DMSP at 0630 MLT indicate the presence of a large-scale earthward-directed region 1 Birkeland current and an upward-flowing region 2 current. Both satellites also observed a third Birkeland current adjacent to and poleward of the region 1 system with opposite flow. This poleward system is about 0.5 deg invariant latitude wide and has a current density comparable to the region 1 and 2 systems. The highest-latitude current is identified as region 0. Its charged-particle signatures were used to infer field line mapping to the equatorial plane.

  4. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Xue-Mei

    2015-01-01

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of \\textit{Cassini} to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun.

  5. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xue-Mei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing (China); Xie, Yi [Nanjing University, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Space Navigation and Position Techniques, Shanghai (China); Nanjing University, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-15

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of Cassini to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun. (orig.)

  6. An observational study of the western boundary currents in the Indian and South Atlantic Oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsoni, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we have investigated different aspects of the WBCs in the Indian and South Atlantic Oceans, based on observational data sampled both in situ and from satellites. In October 2010 an array of five moorings were deployed off eastern Madagascar, nominally at 23S, as part of the “INdian-AT

  7. Observed tidal currents on the continental shelf off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subeesh, M.P.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Fernando, V.; Agarwadekar, Y.; Khalap, S.T.; Satelkar, N.P.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    . The observations extended over a 6-month period (March–August), which includes two seasons, pre-monsoon (March–April) and southwest (SW) monsoon (May–August) during 2008, 2009 and 2011. Tidal ellipses, constructed for M2 and K1 constituents...

  8. Eddies on the boundary between the Kuroshio current and coastal waters observed by HF ocean surface radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, A.

    2016-02-01

    The HF ocean surface radar (HFOSR) is one of the powerful tools to measure the ocean current parameters like surface currents. Three observations of the Kuroshio current in the Tokara straight using HFOSR had done by the National Institute of Information and Comunications Technology (NICT: the former name is the Communications Research Laboratory). The first-order echoes on Doppler spectra of HFOSR shows broaden and splitting shape in the region of the border between the Kuroshio currents and coastal waters. The surface velocity maps show the existence of eddy on the border. The investigation of the mechanism of broadening first order-echoes by Nadai (2006) revealed that the modulation of wave fields from surface currents like eddy is the cause of broadening and the measured current fields also influenced the modulated wave fields. Moreover, Nadai (2006) also suggested that the influence is able to reduce using the average of two radial velocities extracted by the first-order echoes. In this paper, the results of current field observation around the border between the Kuroshio current and coastal waters are presented. Many small scale eddies are observed at the border of the Kuroshio current and coastal waters. The typical radius of the eddies is about 10km. Usury the observation of such a small scale eddy is difficult, but the eddies with same scale are observed by airborne synthetic aperture radar in the same area at different time. The eddies shows strong rotation as the typical tangential speed is about 1m/s. While the typical speed of the Kuroshio current is about 1.5m/s, the typical speed of the eddy movements is about 0.7m/s. No eddies generated in the radar coverage, but one or two eddies entered in the radar coverage a day. Therefore the origin of these eddies will exist in the upstream area of the radar coverage. Using the compensation method for the influence of the modulated wave field suggested by Nadai (2006), the eddies shows weak divergence. It is

  9. Observational constraints on cluster evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, S.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833347

    2008-01-01

    Current observational constraints on the dynamical evolution of star clusters are reviewed. Theory and observations now agree nicely on the mass dependency and time scales for disruption of young star clusters in galactic disks, but many problems still await resolution. The origin of the mass

  10. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  11. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    indicate that the assimilation of satellite observations significantly improves NAAPS aerosol forecasting capability and reliability. To fully utilize...method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime x using artificial light sources. Nighttime x retrievals from the newly-developed method are...Kemper, T. Craig, I. Ginis , Evaluation of Maine aerosol production simulated using the WaveWatchlll prognostic Wave Model coupled to the Community

  12. Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS): Past, current, and future activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshutinsky, A.; Steele, M.; Timmermans, M.-L.

    2016-06-01

    The overall goal of the Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS) community activities reported in this special issue is to enhance understanding of processes and mechanisms driving Arctic Ocean marine and sea ice changes, and the consequences of those changes especially in biogeochemical and ecosystem studies. Major 2013-2015 FAMOS accomplishments to date are: identification of consistent errors across Arctic regional models; approaches to reduce these errors, and recommendations for the most effective coupled sea ice-ocean models for use in fully coupled regional and global climate models. 2013-2015 FAMOS coordinated analyses include many process studies, using models together with observations to investigate: dynamics and mechanisms responsible for drift, deformation and thermodynamics of sea ice; pathways and mechanisms driving variability of the Atlantic, Pacific and river waters in the Arctic Ocean; processes of freshwater accumulation and release in the Beaufort Gyre; the fate of melt water from Greenland; characteristics of ocean eddies; biogeochemistry and ecosystem processes and change, climate variability, and predictability. Future FAMOS collaborations will focus on employing models and conducting observations at high and very high spatial and temporal resolution to investigate the role of subgrid-scale processes in regional Arctic Ocean and coupled ice-ocean and atmosphere-ice-ocean models.

  13. Quintessence versus phantom dark energy: the arbitrating power of current and future observations

    CERN Document Server

    Novosyadlyj, B; Durrer, R; Pelykh, V

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the possibility to distinguish between quintessence and phantom scalar field models of dark energy using observations of luminosity distance moduli of SNe Ia, CMB anisotropies and polarization, matter density perturbations and baryon acoustic oscillations. None of the present observations can decide between quintessence or phantom scalar field models at a statistically significant level: for each model a set of best-fit parameters exists, which matches all data with similar goodness of fit. We compare the relative differences of best-fit model predictions with observational uncertainties for each type of data and we show that the accuracy of SNe Ia luminosity distance data is far from the one necessary to distinguish these types of dark energy models, while the CMB data (WMAP, SPT and Planck) are close to being able to distinguish them. Also a significant improvement of the large-scale structure data (e.g. Euclid or BigBOSS) will enable us to decide between quintessence and phantom dark energy.

  14. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  15. Thermally stimulated current observation of trapping centers in undoped GaSe layered single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasanly, N.M.; Salihoglu, Oe. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics; Aydinli, A. [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics; Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Undoped p-GaSe layered single crystals were grown using Bridgman technique. Thermally stimulated current measurements in the temperature range of 10-300 K were performed at a heating rate of 0.18 K/s. The analysis of the data revealed three trap levels at 0.02, 0.10 and 0.26 eV. The calculation for these traps yielded 8.8 x 10{sup -27}, 1.9 x 10{sup -25}, and 3.2 x 10{sup -21} cm{sup 2} for capture cross sections and 3.2 x 10{sup 14}, 1.1 x 10{sup 16}, and 1.2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} for the concentrations, respectively. (orig.)

  16. Electric double layer effect on observable characteristics of the tunnel current through a bridged electrochemical contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Medvedev, I.G.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and electrical conductivity of redox molecules in conducting media (aqueous or other media) acquire increasing importance both as novel single-molecule science and with a view on molecular scale functional elements. Such configurations require full and independent....../overpotential relation shows a maximum at a position which depends on the ionic strength. It is shown, in particular, that the dependence of the maximum position on the bias voltage may be nonmonotonous. Approximate expressions for the limiting value of the slope of the current/overpotential dependence and the width...... of the maximum on the bias voltage are also given and found to depend strongly on both the Debye screening and the position of the redox group in the tunnel gap, with diagnostic value in experimental data analysis....

  17. Observed air-sea interactions in tropical cyclone Isaac over Loop Current mesoscale eddy features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes, Benjamin; Shay, Lynn K.; Brewster, Jodi K.

    2016-12-01

    Air-sea interactions during the intensification of tropical storm Isaac (2012) into a hurricane, over warm oceanic mesoscale eddy features, are investigated using airborne oceanographic and atmospheric profilers. Understanding these complex interactions is critical to correctly evaluating and predicting storm effects on marine and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, wind-driven mixing and transport of suspended matter throughout the water column, and oceanic feedbacks on storm intensity. Isaac strengthened as it moved over a Loop Current warm-core eddy (WCE) where sea surface warming (positive feedback mechanism) of ∼0.5 °C was measured over a 12-h interval. Enhanced bulk enthalpy fluxes were estimated during this intensification stage due to an increase in moisture disequilibrium between the ocean and atmosphere. These results support the hypothesis that enhanced buoyant forcing from the ocean is an important intensification mechanism in tropical cyclones over warm oceanic mesoscale eddy features. Larger values in equivalent potential temperature (θE = 365   ∘K) were measured inside the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) over the WCE, where the vertical shear in horizontal currents (δV) remained stable and the ensuing cooling vertical mixing was negligible; smaller values in θE (355   ∘K) were measured over an oceanic frontal cyclone, where vertical mixing and upper-ocean cooling were more intense due to instability development in δV . Thus, correctly representing oceanic mesoscale eddy features in coupled numerical models is important to accurately reproduce oceanic responses to tropical cyclone forcing, as well as the contrasting thermodynamic forcing of the HBL that often causes storm intensity fluctuations over these warm oceanic regimes.

  18. Wall force produced during disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  19. Current Sounding Capability From Satellite Meteorological Observation With Ultraspectral Infrared Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. The intent of the measurement of tropospheric thermodynamic state and trace abundances is the initialization of climate models and the monitoring of air quality. The NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), designed to support the development of future satellite temperature and moisture sounders, aboard high altitude aircraft has been collecting data throughout many field campaigns. An advanced retrieval algorithm developed with NAST-I is now applied to satellite data collected with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the Aqua satellite launched on 4 May 2002 and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite launched on October 19, 2006. These instruments possess an ultra-spectral resolution, for example, both IASI and NAST-I have 0.25 cm-1 and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm-1. The retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to

  20. Current and Density Observations of Packets of Nonlinear Internal Waves on the Outer New Jersey Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    continental shelf 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF... decimal day. The number of events observed at each location is shown. Case/day Al A2 A3 A4 SI S2 Level tow 1/170.3 2 2 2 II/170.7 3 3 3 3 II1...Klymak and Mourn 2003: Dewey and Crawford 1988). Richardson number Ri calculations based on the den- sity profiles from the siring moorings (SI, S2) and

  1. Bottom currents observed in and around a submarine valley on the continental slope of the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lunyu; Xiong, Xuejun; Li, Xiaolong; Shi, Maochong; Guo, Yongqing; Chen, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Bottom currents at about 1000 m depth in and around a submarine valley on the continental slope of the northern South China Sea were studied by a 14-month long experiment from July 2013 to September 2014. The observations reveal that bottom currents are strongly influenced by the topography, being along valley axis or isobaths. Power density spectrum analysis shows that all the currents have significant peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies. Diurnal energy is dominant at the open slope site, which is consistent with many previous studies. However, at the site inside the valley the semi-diurnal energy dominates, although the distance between the two sites of observation is quite small (11 km) compared to a typical horizontal first-mode internal tide wavelength (200 km). We found this phenomenon is caused by the focusing of internal waves of certain frequencies in the valley. The inertial peak is found only at the open slope site in the first deployment but missing at the inside valley site and the rest of the deployments. Monthly averaged residual currents reveal that the near-bottom currents on the slope flow southwestward throughout the year except in August and September, 2013, from which we speculate that this is a result of the interaction between a mesoscale eddy and the canyon/sag topography. Currents inside the valley within about 10 mab basically flow along slope and in the layers above the 10 mab the currents are northwestward, that is, from the deep ocean to the shelf. The monthly mean current vectors manifest an Ekman layer-like vertical structure at both sites, which rotate counter-clockwise looking from above.

  2. Bottom Currents Observed in and Around a Submarine Valley on the Continental Slope of the Northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lunyu; XIONG Xuejun; LI Xiaolong; SHI Maochong; GUO Yongqing; CHEN Liang

    2016-01-01

    Bottom currents at about 1000m depth in and around a submarine valley on the continental slope of the northern South China Sea were studied by a 14-month long experiment from July 2013 to September 2014. The observations reveal that bottom currents are strongly influenced by the topography, being along valley axis or isobaths. Power density spectrum analysis shows that all the currents have significant peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies. Diurnal energy is dominant at the open slope site, which is consistent with many previous studies. However, at the site inside the valley the semi-diurnal energy dominates, although the distance between the two sites of observation is quite small (11km) compared to a typical horizontal first-mode internal tide wavelength (200km). We found this phenomenon is caused by the focusing of internal waves of certain frequencies in the valley. The inertial peak is found only at the open slope site in the first deployment but missing at the inside valley site and the rest of the de-ployments. Monthly averaged residual currents reveal that the near-bottom currents on the slope flow southwestward throughout the year except in August and September, 2013, from which we speculate that this is a result of the interaction between a mesoscale eddy and the canyon/sag topography. Currents inside the valley within about 10mab basically flow along slope and in the layers above the 10mab the currents are northwestward, that is, from the deep ocean to the shelf. The monthly mean current vectors manifest an Ek-man layer-like vertical structure at both sites, which rotate counter-clockwise looking from above.

  3. Current Directions in Adding Value to Earth Observation Products for Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Natural resource managers and infrastructure planners face increasingly complex challenges, given competing demands for resources and changing conditions due to climate and land use change. These pressures create demand for high-quality, timely data; for both one-time decision support and long-term monitoring; and for techniques to articulate the value of resources in monetary and nonmonetary terms. To meet the need for data, the U.S. government invests several billion dollars per year in Earth observations collected from satellite, airborne, terrestrial, and ocean-based systems. Earth observation-based decision support is coming of age; user surveys show that these data are used in an increasing variety of analyses. For example, since the U.S. Department of the Interior/U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 2008 free and open data policy for the Landsat satellites, downloads from the USGS archive have increased from 20,000 Landsat scenes per year to 10 million per year and climbing, with strong growth in both research and decision support fields. However, Earth observation-based decision support still poses users a number of challenges. Many of those Landsat downloads support a specialized community of remote sensing scientists, though new technologies promise to increase the usability of remotely sensed data for the larger GIS community supporting planning and resource management. Serving this larger community also requires supporting the development of increasingly interpretive products, and of new approaches to host and update products. For example, automating updates will add value to new essential climate variable products such as surface water extent and wildfire burned area extent. Projections of future urbanization in the southeastern U.S. are most useful when long-term land cover trends are integrated with street-level community data and planning tools. The USGS assessment of biological carbon sequestration in vegetation and shallow soils required a significant

  4. Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE: Review of observations and current understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE are very strong radar echoes primarily studied in the VHF wavelength range from altitudes close to the polar summer mesopause. Radar waves are scattered at irregularities in the radar refractive index which at mesopause altitudes is effectively determined by the electron number density. For efficient scatter, the electron number density must reveal structures at the radar half wavelength (Bragg condition for monostatic radars; ~3 m for typical VHF radars. The question how such small scale electron number density structures are created in the mesopause region has been a longstanding open scientific question for almost 30 years. This paper reviews experimental and theoretical milestones on the way to an advanced understanding of PMSE. Based on new experimental results from in situ observations with sounding rockets, ground based observations with radars and lidars, numerical simulations with microphysical models of the life cycle of mesospheric aerosol particles, and theoretical considerations regarding the diffusivity of electrons in the ice loaded complex plasma of the mesopause region, a consistent explanation for the generation of these radar echoes has been developed. The main idea is that mesospheric neutral air turbulence in combination with a significantly reduced electron diffusivity due to the presence of heavy charged ice aerosol particles (radii ~5–50 nm leads to the creation of structures at spatial scales significantly smaller than the inner scale of the neutral gas turbulent velocity field itself. Importantly, owing to their very low diffusivity, the plasma structures acquire a very long lifetime, i.e., 10 min to hours in the presence of particles with radii between 10 and 50 nm. This leads to a temporal decoupling of active neutral air turbulence and the existence of small scale plasma structures and PMSE and thus readily explains observations proving the absence of neutral air turbulence at

  5. Key science issues after MESSENGER and current observation plans of BepiColombo MMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Go; Hayakawa, Hajime; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Little had been known about the Hermean magnetosphere until MESSENGER explored the region. The region is formed as the weak planetary magnetic field stands against the intense solar wind in the close proximity of the Sun. Various prediction had been given by noting the difference in the parameters from the well-studied terrestiral magnetosphere of a similar setting and scaling the well-knowns to the Hermean environment. MESSENGER results, however, show a wide varieity of phenomena that are out of the scope of what one could have reasonably argued. The micro-magnetosphere of Mercury is much more dynamic than one had predicted. BepiColombo MMO, the JAXA spacecraft of the BepiColombo Mercury exploration mission which will be launched in 2018 and will arrive at Mercury in 2025, is equipped to study the space environment of the planet Mercury. BepiColombo MMO is mainly designed for plasma observations and is expected to extract essential elements of space plasma physics that become visible in the Hermean environment. MMO has large constraints on science operations, such as thermal issue and limited telemetry rate. Due to the thermal issue each science instrument cannot always be turned on. In addition, due to the low telemetry rate in average, only a part ( 20-30%) of science mission data with high resolution can be downlinked. Therefore, in order to maximize the scientific results and outcomes to be achieved by MMO, we are now working to optimize the science observation and downlink plans in detail. Here we review MESSENGER results and how MMO will contribute to deepen our understanding of space plasmas by addressing the puzzles raised by MESSEGNER.

  6. The impact of the ocean observing system on estimates of the California current circulation spanning three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew M.; Jacox, Michael G.; Crawford, William J.; Laughlin, Bruce; Edwards, Christopher A.; Fiechter, Jérôme

    2017-08-01

    Data assimilation is now used routinely in oceanography on both regional and global scales for computing ocean circulation estimates and for making ocean forecasts. Regional ocean observing systems are also expanding rapidly, and observations from a wide array of different platforms and sensor types are now available. Evaluation of the impact of the observing system on ocean circulation estimates (and forecasts) is therefore of considerable interest to the oceanographic community. In this paper, we quantify the impact of different observing platforms on estimates of the California Current System (CCS) spanning a three decade period (1980-2010). Specifically, we focus attention on several dynamically related aspects of the circulation (coastal upwelling, the transport of the California Current and the California Undercurrent, thermocline depth and eddy kinetic energy) which in many ways describe defining characteristics of the CCS. The circulation estimates were computed using a 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system, and our analyses also focus on the impact of the different elements of the control vector (i.e. the initial conditions, surface forcing, and open boundary conditions) on the circulation. While the influence of each component of the control vector varies between different metrics of the circulation, the impact of each observing system across metrics is very robust. In addition, the mean amplitude of the circulation increments (i.e. the difference between the analysis and background) remains relatively stable throughout the three decade period despite the addition of new observing platforms whose impact is redistributed according to the relative uncertainty of observations from each platform. We also consider the impact of each observing platform on CCS circulation variability associated with low-frequency climate variability. The low-frequency nature of the dominant climate modes in this region allows us to track through time the

  7. Evaluating Current and Future Rangeland Health in the Great Basin Ecoregion Using NASA Earth Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essoudry, E.; Wilson, K.; Ely, J.; Patadia, N.; Zajic, B.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Schmidt, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Basin ecoregion in the western United States represents one of the last large expanses of wild lands in the nation and is currently facing significant challenges due to human impacts, drought, invasive species encroachment such as cheatgrass, and climate change. Rangelands in the Great Basin are of important ecological and economic significance for the United States; however, 40% of public rangelands fail to meet required health standards set by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This project provided a set of assessment tools for researchers and land managers that integrate remotely-sensed and in situ datasets to quantify and mitigate threats to public lands in the Great Basin ecoregion. The study area, which accounts for 20% of the total Great Basin ecoregion, was analyzed using 30 m resolution data from Landsat 8. Present conditions were evaluated from vegetation indices, landscape features, hydrological processes, and atmospheric conditions derived from the remotely-sensed data and validated with available in situ ground survey data, provided by the BLM. Rangeland health metrics were developed and landscape change drivers were identified. Subsequently, projected climate conditions derived from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) were used to forecast the impact of changing climatic conditions within the study area according to the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 projections. These forecasted conditions were used in the Maximum Entropy Model (MaxEnt) to predict areas at risk for rangeland degradation on 30 year intervals for 2040, 2070, and 2100. Finally, vegetation health risk maps were provided to the project partners to aid in future land management decisions in the Great Basin ecoregion. These tools provide a low cost solution to assess landscape conditions, provide partners with a metric to identify potential problematic areas, and mitigate serious threats to the ecosystems.

  8. Global Simulations of the March 17, 2013 Storm: Importance of Boundary Conditions in Reproducing Ring Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Jordanova, V.; Larsen, B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Welling, D. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2013-12-01

    As modeling capabilities become increasingly available for the study of inner magnetospheric dynamics, the models' boundary conditions remain a crucial controlling factor in reproducing observations. In this study, we use the kinetic Ring current-Atmosphere Interaction Model (RAM) two-way coupled with the global MHD model BATS-R-US to study the evolution of the ring current and its feedback to the ionospheric electrodynamics during the March 17, 2013 storm. The MHD code solves fluid quantities and provides the inner magnetosphere code with plasma sheet plasma, which is the primary source for the development of the ring current. In this study, we examine the effect of different boundary conditions in specifying the plasma sheet plasma source on reproducing observations of the inner magnetospheric/subauroral region, such as in-situ observations (e.g., flux, magnetic fields, and electric fields) from Van Allen Probes (RBSP), field-aligned currents from AMPERE, and global convection maps from SuperDARN. These different boundary settings include a Maxwellian distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, a Kappa distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, and a bi-Maxwellian distribution with anisotropic pressures passed from the MHD code. Results indicate that a Kappa distribution at the boundary of RAM leads to a better ring current flux prediction than that with a Maxwellian distribution assumption, as well as a more realistic spatial distribution of ion anisotropy, which is important in driving electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The anisotropic pressure coupling between the kinetic code and the MHD code with a bi-Maxwellian function significantly improves the agreement with observations, especially the Dst index prediction.

  9. Measuring parent-child mutuality: a review of current observational coding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Allyson; Rinaldi, Christina M

    2015-01-01

    Mutuality is defined as a smooth, back-and-forth positive interaction consisting of mutual enjoyment, cooperation, and responsiveness. The bidirectional nature of mutuality is an essential component to the parent-child relationship since a high quality parent-child mutual relationship is crucial to encouraging children's positive socialization and development (S. Lollis & L. Kuczynski, 1997; E.E. Maccoby, 2007). Several coding systems have been developed in recent years to assess this distinct and crucial aspect of the parent-child relationship. The present article reviews the following four mutuality coding schemes: the Parent-Child Interaction System (K. Deater-Deckard, M.V. Pylas, & S. Petrill, 1997), the Mutually Responsive Orientation Scale (N. Aksan, G. Kochanska, & M.R. Ortmann, 2006), the Caregiver-Child Affect, Responsiveness, and Engagement Scale (C.S. Tamis-LeMonda, P. Ahuja, B. Hannibal, J.D. Shannon, & M. Spellmann, 2002), and the Synchrony and Control Coding Scheme (J. Mize & G.S. Pettit, 1997). The review will focus on observational coding schemes available to researchers interested a central element of quality parent-child relationships in the early years.

  10. Design of Nonlinear Robust Rotor Current Controller for DFIG Based on Terminal Sliding Mode Control and Extended State Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As to strong nonlinearity of doubly fed induction generators (DFIG and uncertainty of its model, a novel rotor current controller with nonlinearity and robustness is proposed to enhance fault ride-though (FRT capacities of grid-connected DFIG. Firstly, the model error, external disturbances, and the uncertain factors were estimated by constructing extended state observer (ESO so as to achieve linearization model, which is compensated dynamically from nonlinear model. And then rotor current controller of DFIG is designed by using terminal sliding mode variable structure control theory (TSMC. The controller has superior dynamic performance and strong robustness. The simulation results show that the proposed control approach is effective.

  11. [The management of atrial fibrillation and characteristics of its current care in outpatients. AFABE observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-García, Emmanuel; Clua-Espuny, Josep Lluís; Bosch-Príncep, Ramón; López-Pablo, Carlos; Lechuga-Durán, Iñigo; Gallofré-López, Miquel; Panisello-Tafalla, Anna; Lucas-Noll, Jorgina; Queralt-Tomas, Maria Lluisa

    2014-02-01

    To provide insights into the characteristics and management of outpatients when their atrial fibrillation (AF) was first detected: diagnosis, treatment and follow-up in the context of the public health system. AFABE is an observational, multicentre descriptive study with retrospective data collection relating to the practice patterns, management and initial strategies of treatment of patients with diagnosed AF in the context of primary care, emergency and cardiologists of the public health system. Primary and Specialist care. Baix Ebre region. Tarragona. Spain. A representative sample of 182 subjects > 60-year-old with AF who have been randomized, recruited among the registered patients with AF in 22 primary care centres in the area of the study. Demographic data, comorbidities (AF), CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS_BLED scores, and practice patterns results between Primary Care and referral services. A total of 182 patients were included (mean age 78.5 SD:7.3 years; 50% women). Most patients (68.3% 95%CI; 60.3-76.3) had the first contact in Primary Care, of which 56.3% (95%CI; 45.2-66.0) were sent to Hospital Emergency Department where 72.7% (95%CI: 63.5-79.0) of the oral anticoagulation and 58.4% (95%CI: 49.4-66.9) of antiarrhytmic treatments were started. More than half (55.9%:95%CI; 47.2-64.7, of patients with permanent AF were followed-up by the Cardiology department. Most patients with newly diagnosed AF made a first contact with Primary Care, but around half were sent to Hospital Emergency departments, where they were treated with an antiarrhythmic and/or oral anticoagulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Infectious bronchitis in Brazilian chickens: current data and observations of field service personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EN Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The infectious bronchitis virus (IBV was detected for the first time in Brazil by Hipólito in 1957 in chickens sold life in the municipal market of Belo Horizonte, MG, when commercial poultry production was just starting in that country. The Massachusetts (Mass serotype was identified. However, the clinical disease was only observed in 1975, when poultry production was intensely growing. The extensive outbreak produced the classical condition in layers and breeders, affecting egg production and quality, whereas broilers presented respiratory and "nephritis-nephrosis" signs. The disease rapidly spread to all poultry-producing regions in the country, and in 1979, both the imports and the manufacturing of live vaccines against IB strains Mass, H120 and H52, were licensed. In 1980, inactivated vaccines were introduced. Molecular techniques, particularly PCR, started to bed in the identification of IBV. A retrospective analysis showed that, up to 1989, the main IBV strain circulating in Brazil was Mass. However, other studies shows the presence of a wide diversity of IBV strains in Brazil since the first strains were isolated, even before vaccination was introduced. Most researchers agree that the incidence of IBV different from Mass has increased, including of exclusively Brazilian genotypes, different from those described in other countries. Indeed, during the last few years, the number of genotypical variants has been much higher than that of the classical Mass serotype. Clinically, in addition of the classic presentations, atypical forms such as testicular atrophy and stones in the epidydimis associated to low fertility have been described. Serological techniques started to be used in vaccination monitoring and as a diagnostic tool. Serological response standards were developed, and have shown to be very useful to determine the expected profile in vaccination programs and when clinical disease is suspected. However, the immuno-enzymatic test

  13. Evidence for a current sheet forming in the wake of a Coronal Mass Ejection from multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations

    OpenAIRE

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ray-like features observed by coronagraphs in the wake of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are sometimes interpreted as the white light counterparts of current sheets (CSs) produced by the eruption. The 3D geometry of these ray-like features is largely unknown and its knowledge should clarify their association to the CS and place constraints on CME physics and coronal conditions. With this study we test these important implications for the first time. An example of such a post-CME ray was observ...

  14. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope during a Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 {R}⊙ from the Sun’s center in the Fe 171 Å line. The Fe 171 Å line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed coronal mass ejection (CME) had a core with a spiral—flux rope—structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70,000 K, observed in He 304 Å line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 Å line). Such a structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We interpreted the Y-structure as a hot envelope of the current sheet and hot reconnection outflows. The Y-structure had a thickness of 6.0 Mm. Its length increased over time from 79 Mm to more than 411 Mm.

  15. Ozone sonde cell current measurements and implications for observations of near-zero ozone concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vömel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory measurements of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC ozone sonde cell current using ozone free air as well as defined amounts of ozone reveal that background current measurements during sonde preparation are neither constant as a function of time, nor constant as a function of ozone concentration. Using these background currents in the processing of ECC data may lead to operator dependent uncertainties and may frequently lead to artificially low ozone concentrations in the upper tropical troposphere. Based on these laboratory measurements an improved cell current to partial pressure conversion is proposed, which removes operator dependent variability in the background reading, and possible artifacts in this measurement. Data from the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX have been reprocessed using the improved background treatment based on these laboratory measurements. In the reprocessed data set near-zero ozone events no longer occur. At Samoa, Fiji, Tahiti, and San Cristóbal, nearly all near-zero ozone concentrations occur in soundings with larger background currents. To a large extent, these events are no longer observed in the reprocessed data set using the improved background treatment.

  16. Ozone sonde cell current measurements and implications for observations of near-zero ozone concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vömel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory measurements of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC ozone sonde cell current using ozone free air as well as defined amounts of ozone reveal that background current measurements during sonde preparation are neither constant as a function of time, nor constant as a function of ozone concentration. Using a background current, measured at a defined timed after exposure to high ozone may often overestimate the real background, leading to artificially low ozone concentrations in the upper tropical troposphere, and may frequently lead to operator dependent uncertainties. Based on these laboratory measurements an improved cell current to partial pressure conversion is proposed, which removes operator dependent variability in the background reading and possible artifacts in this measurement. Data from the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX have been reprocessed using the improved background treatment based on these laboratory measurements. In the reprocessed data set near-zero ozone events no longer occur. At Samoa, Fiji, Tahiti, and San Cristóbal, nearly all near-zero ozone concentrations occur in soundings with larger background currents. To a large extent, these events are no longer observed in the reprocessed data set using the improved background treatment.

  17. A case for change: disruption in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Marc J; Maurer, Ralph; Wartman, Steven A; Sachs, Benjamin P

    2014-09-01

    Disruptive technologies allow less expensive and more efficient processes to eventually dominate a market sector. The academic health center's tripartite mission of education, clinical care, and research is threatened by decreasing revenues and increasing expenses and is, as a result, ripe for disruption. The authors describe current disruptive technologies that threaten traditional operations at academic health centers and provide a prescription not only to survive, but also to prosper, in the face of disruptive forces.

  18. DSP-Based Sensorless Speed Control of a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor using Sliding Mode Current Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Askour

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, experimental results of 3-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM sensorless speed control are presented. To estimate the rotor position, a sliding mode current observer (SMCO was implemented. This observer estimates the back emfs of the motor in the stationary reference frame using only the measured voltages and currents of the motor. These emfs were utilized to obtain the rotor position. The speed of the motor was calculated by differentiating the rotor position angle. The stability of the proposed SMCO was verified using Lyapunov method to determine the observer gain. The saturation function was adopted in order to reduce the chattering phenomenon caused by the SMCO. A vector control method was employed to achieve the sensorless drive system. The control application was developed in C/C++ language and implemented using the Texas Instruments TMS320LF2812 digital signal processor (DSP. This new processor enables intelligent control for motors. We used to test the drive the MCK2812 which is a professional development kit available from Technosoft Company. The theoretical finding is validated with experimental results that show the effectiveness of the real-time implementation.

  19. Current Sheet Structures Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope During A Flux Rope Eruption on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Ssergey

    2016-01-01

    We use the TESIS EUV telescope to study the current sheet signatures observed during flux rope eruption. The special feature of the TESIS telescope was its ability to image the solar corona up to a distance of 2 $R_\\odot$ from the Sun's center in the Fe 171 \\AA\\ line. The Fe 171 \\AA\\ line emission illuminates the magnetic field lines, and the TESIS images reveal the coronal magnetic structure at high altitudes. The analyzed CME had a core with a spiral-flux rope-structure. The spiral shape indicates that the flux rope radius varied along its length. The flux rope had a complex temperature structure: cold legs (70 000 K, observed in He 304 \\AA\\ line) and a hotter core (0.7 MK, observed in Fe 171 \\AA\\ line). Such structure contradicts the common assumption that the CME core is a cold prominence. When the CME impulsively accelerated, a dark double Y-structure appeared below the flux rope. The Y-structure timing, location, and morphology agree with the previously performed MHD simulations of the current sheet. We...

  20. Je pense donc je fais: transcranial direct current stimulation modulates brain oscillations associated with motor imagery and movement observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Morgan Lapenta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Motor system neural networks are activated during movement imagery, observation and execution, with a neural signature characterized by suppression of the Mu rhythm. In order to investigate the origin of this neurophysiological marker, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS modifies Mu rhythm oscillations during tasks involving observation and imagery of biological and non-biological movements. We applied tDCS (anodal, cathodal and sham in 21 male participants (mean age 23.8+3.06, over the left M1 with a current of 2mA for 20 minutes. Following this, we recorded the EEG at C3, C4 and Cz and surrounding C3 and C4 electrodes. Analyses of C3 and C4 showed significant effects for biological vs. non-biological movement (p=0.005, and differential hemisphere effects according to the type of stimulation (p=0.04 and type of movement (p=0.02. Analyses of surrounding electrodes revealed significant interaction effects considering type of stimulation and imagery or observation of biological or non-biological movement (p=0.03. The main findings of this study were (i Mu desynchronization during biological movement of the hand region in the contralateral hemisphere after sham tDCS; (ii polarity-dependent modulation effects of tDCS on the Mu rhythm, i.e. anodal tDCS led to Mu synchronization while cathodal tDCS led to Mu desynchronization during movement observation and imagery (iii specific focal and opposite inter-hemispheric effects, i.e. contrary effects for the surrounding electrodes during imagery condition and also for inter-hemispheric electrodes (C3 vs. C4. These findings provide insights into the cortical oscillations during movement observation and imagery. Furthermore it shows that tDCS can be highly focal when guided by a behavioral task.

  1. Period-doubling bifurcation cascade observed in a ferromagnetic nanoparticle under the action of a spin-polarized current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horley, Paul P., E-mail: paul.horley@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Chihuahua/Monterrey, 120 Avenida Miguel de Cervantes, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Kushnir, Mykola Ya. [Yuri Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynsky str., 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Morales-Meza, Mishel [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. (CIMAV), Chihuahua/Monterrey, 120 Avenida Miguel de Cervantes, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Sukhov, Alexander [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rusyn, Volodymyr [Yuri Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynsky str., 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2016-04-01

    We report on complex magnetization dynamics in a forced spin valve oscillator subjected to a varying magnetic field and a constant spin-polarized current. The transition from periodic to chaotic magnetic motion was illustrated with bifurcation diagrams and Hausdorff dimension – the methods developed for dissipative self-organizing systems. It was shown that bifurcation cascades can be obtained either by tuning the injected spin-polarized current or by changing the magnitude of applied magnetic field. The order–chaos transition in magnetization dynamics can be also directly observed from the hysteresis curves. The resulting complex oscillations are useful for development of spin-valve devices operating in harmonic and chaotic modes.

  2. The Canadian Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP Mission: Current Status and Planned Observations and Data Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A W Yau

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP is a Canadian small-satellite mission dedicated to the study of polar ion outflows and related magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes in the topside ionosphere. Scheduled for launch in 2009, it will carry eight scientific instruments, including imaging plasma and neutral particle sensors, magnetometers, dual-frequency GPS receivers, CCD cameras, a radio wave receiver and a beacon transmitter, for in-situ particle, field, and current measurements and auroral imaging and radio measurements. We present an overview of the e-POP mission, its current status and plan of observations and data distribution during the operation phase of the mission.

  3. Asymmetry in patient-related information disrupts pre-anesthetic patient briefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Joerg; Kupfer, Anja; Jurack, Babette; Reuter, Ulrike; Wrigge, Herrmann; Friese, Steffen; Thieme, Volker

    2013-10-04

    If one party has more or better information than the other, an information asymmetry can be assumed. The aim of the study was to identify the origin of incomplete patient-related preoperative information, which led to disruptions and losses of time during pre-anaesthetic patient briefing. We hypothesized that lower employees' educational level increases the amount of disruptive factors. A prospective observational study design was used. Patient selection was depending on the current patient flow in the area of the clinic for pre-anesthetic patient briefing. Data were collected over a period of 8 weeks. A stopwatch was used to record the time of disruptive factors. Various causes of time losses were grouped to facilitate statistical evaluation, which was performed by using the U-test of Mann and Whitney, Chi-square test or the Welch-t-test, as required. Out of 221 patients, 130 patient briefings (58.8%) had been disrupted. Residents were affected more often than consultants (66% vs. 47%, p = 0.008). Duration of disruptions was independent of the level of training and lasted about 2,5 minutes and 10% of the total time of patient briefing. Most time-consuming disruptive factors were missing study results, incomplete case histories, and limited patient compliance. Disruptions during pre-anesthetic patient briefings that were caused by patient-related information asymmetry are common and account for a significant loss of time. The resultant costs justify investments in appropriate personnel allocation.

  4. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  5. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  6. Simultaneous prenoon and postnoon observations of three field-aligned current systems from Viking and DMSP-F7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P. T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Elphinstone, R. D.; De La Beauijardie, O.; Blomberg, L. G.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial structure of dayside large-scale field-aligned current (FAC) systems is examined by using Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) data. We focus on four events in which the satellites simultaneously observed postnoon and prenoon three FAC systems: the region 2, the region 1, and the mantle (referred to as midday region O) systems, from equatorward to poleward. These events provide the most solid evidence to date that the midday region O system is a separate and unique FAC system, and is not an extension of the region 1 system from other local times. The events are examined comprehensively by making use of a mulit-instrumental data set, which includes magnetic field, particle flux, electric field, auroral UV image data from the satellites, and the Sondrestrom convection data. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Region 2 currents flow mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPD) at their poleward edge. (2) The region 1 system is located in the core part of the auroral oval and is confined in a relatively narrow range in latitude which includes the convection reversal. The low-latitude boundary layer, possibly including the outer part of the plasma sheet, and the external cusp are the major source regions of dayside region 1 currents. (2) Midday region O currents flow on open field lines and are collocated with the shear of antisunward convection flows with velocites decreasing poleward. On the basis of these results we support the view that both prenoon and postnoon current systems consist of the three-sheet structure when the disctortion ofthe convection pattern associated with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y) is small and both morningside and eveningside convection cells are crescent-shaped. We also propose that the midday region O and a part of the region 1 systems are closely coupled to the same source.

  7. Currents in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002: observation and computation by modified inverse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yaochu; LOU Ruyun; LIU Yonggang; SU Jilan; WANG Kangshan; CHEN Hong

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the current measurements at 200,500 and 800 m from moored current meters with the time series data from March 17 to April 15 at the mooring station (20°49′57″N, 120°48' 12″E ) and the hydrographic data obtained in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002 cruise, the circulation in the investigated area is computed by using the modified inverse method. The major observed results are as follows: (1) the average velocity and the flow direction in the observing days are (47.4 cm/s, 346°) at the 200 m level. The aver age velocity in the observing days is (20.3 cm/s, 350°) at the 500 m level. These mean that the Kuroshio intrudes into the South Chin Sea to flow northwestward through the Luzon Strait at 200 and 500 m levels. (2) The average velocity in the observing days is (1.2cm/s, 35°) at the 800 m level, I. E., its direction is northeastward. This means that the flow condition at the 800 m level very differs from that at the 200 and 500 m levels. (3) There is the high density and cold water (HDCW) in the middle of western part of in the investigated region, and its center is located near the hydrological station 3 at Section A. (4) There is the lower density and warm water (LDWW) in the southeastern part of investigated region. (5) The currents in April 2002 are stronger than those in March 2002.The major computed results are as follows: (1) The northwestward and southeastward VTs through Section B are 32.48×106 m3/s (inclusive of VT ofanticyclonic eddy) and 3.34×106m3/s, respectively. The net northwestward VT through Section B in the investigated area is about 29.14×106 m3/s. (2) The eastern and western VTs through Section A are about 16.71× 106 and 8.57×106 m3/s, respectively. Thus,the net eastward VT through Section A is about 8.14×106 m3/s. (3) The net northward VT through Section M is about 24.68×106 m3/s.(4) After about 24.68×106 m3/s flows through Section M, most of it, about 16.54×106 m3/s, flows northward through the

  8. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Cluster Observation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves around Magnetic Null Point in Thin Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-You; Deng, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Meng; Yuan, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Jing-Fang; Lin, Xi; Lin, Min-Hui; Fu, Song

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) are observed in the vicinity of the magnetic null of the widely studied magnetic reconnection taking place at the near-earth tail when current sheet becomes dramatic thinning during substorm time on 1 October 2001. We use the Imada method for the 2-D reconnection model and study the characteristics of ESWs near the X-line region and the magnetic null points. The result shows that the amplitude of the observed ESWs in the vicinity of X-line region ranges from 0.1 mV/m to 5 mV/m, and the amplitude is larger near the magnetic null points. The generation mechanism and the role of ESWs associated with magnetic reconnection are also discussed.

  9. EISCAT radar observations of enhanced incoherent scatter spectra; their relation to red aurora and field-aligned currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N. (EISCAT, Kiruna (Sweden)); Haeggstroem, I. (IRF, Kiruna (Sweden)); Kaila, K. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland)); Rietveld, M.T. (EISCAT, Ramfjordmoen (Norway))

    1991-06-01

    Enhancements of one, or both, of the ion-acoustic peaks of incoherent scatter spectra in the auroral ionosphere have been observed with the EISCAT UHF and VHF radars. All occurrences for which optical data are available show these events to coincide with active, unusually intense, red auroral forms in the vicinity of the radar beam at high altitudes. Both the optical and the radar signatures are expected to be caused by large fluxes of low energy electrons. Analyses of the measured spectra, in which the electron drift speed is estimated, imply field-aligned current densities up to several mA m{sup {minus}2}. The vertically-directed VHF observations from {approximately}1,000 km altitude reveal that the spectral enhancements, which are transient features in field-aligned measurements, can exist for up to several minutes.

  10. Signal of right-handed currents using $B\\to K^*\\ell^+\\ell^-$ observables at the kinematic endpoint

    CERN Document Server

    Karan, Anirban; Nayak, Abinash Kumar; Sinha, Rahul; Browder, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    The decay mode $B\\to K^*\\ell^+\\ell^-$ is one of the most promising modes to probe physics beyond the standard model (SM), since the angular distribution of the decay products enable measurement of several constraining observables. LHCb has recently measured these observables using $3\\,fb^{-1}$ of data as a binned function of $q^2$, the dilepton invariant mass squared. We show that LHCb data implies a $5\\sigma$ overall signal for new physics and provides unambiguous evidence for right-handed currents, which are absent in the SM. These conclusions are derived in the maximum $q^2$ limit and are free from hadronic corrections. Our approach differs from other approaches that probe new physics at low $q^2$ as it does not require estimates of hadronic parameters but relies instead on heavy quark symmetries that are reliable at the maximum $q^2$ kinematic endpoint.

  11. Field-aligned currents observed by MMS in the near-Earth plasma sheet during large-scale substorm dipolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Giles, Barbara; Le Contel, Olivier; Stawarz, Julia; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During substorms significant energy conversion has been reported to take place at the sharp dipolarization front in the flow braking region where the probability of observing bursty bulk flows (BBFs) significantly drops. On 10 August 2016, MMS traversed the pre-midnight near-Earth plasma sheet when dipolarization disturbances were detected in an extended nightside local time region by Cluster, Geotail, GOES 13, 14 and 15, and the Van Allen Probes. In an expanding plasma sheet during the dipolarization, MMS detected sub-ion scale field-aligned current layers that are propagating both Earthward (equatorward) as well as tailward (outward). These multi-scale multi-point observations enable a unique investigation of both the meso-scale evolution of the disturbances and the detailed kinetic structures of the fronts and boundaries relevant to the dipolarizations.

  12. Field current tracing control of a BSG based on sliding mode current observer%BSG电机励磁电流观测器跟踪控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余腾伟; 王旭东

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the nonlinearities of belt driven starter generator' s (BSG) excitation winding driving circuit and a variety of interference outside the engine compartment, making it difficult for conventional PWM strategy to achieve the optimal output current. According to the sliding mode control theory, a sliding mode observer approach is proposed, and the mathematical module of BSG field windings' driven system is established, utilizing advantages that including good control robustness to conduct online setting. Simulation and experimental results show that the step response time is about 10 ms, and the maximum overshoot is less than 5% . What' s more, the method enhances the systems self adaptive capacity, improves the startup performance of BSG-hybrid cars, and has good current tracking performance, and low costing.%针对弱混合动力汽车中带式驱动启动发电机(BSG)的励磁绕组驱动电路存在的非线性问题,以及发动机舱各种外部干扰导致传统的PWM技术难以使控制电流输出达到最优的问题,依据滑模变结构控制理论,采用电流观测器的方法,建立BSG电机励磁绕组驱动系统的数学模型,给出电流观测器的控制算法,利用滑模变结构控制鲁棒性好的优势对BSG电机励磁电流进行在线整定.仿真和试验结果表明,该方法的阶跃响应时间为10 ms,跟踪电流最大超调小于5%,增强了系统的自适应能力,提高了BSG混合动力轿车启动性能,并且具有较好的电流跟踪效果,降低了成本.

  13. An Optimal PR Control Strategy with Load Current Observer for a Three-Phase Voltage Source Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Dou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inverter voltage control is an important task in the operation of a DC/AC microgrid system. To improve the inverter voltage control dynamics, traditional approaches attempt to measure and feedforward the load current, which, however, needs remote measurement with communications in a microgrid system with distributed loads. In this paper, a load current observer (LCO based control strategy, which does not need remote measurement, is proposed for sinusoidal signals tracking control of a three-phase inverter of the microgrid. With LCO, the load current is estimated precisely, acting as the feedforward of the dual-loop control, which can effectively enlarge the stability margin of the control system and improve the dynamic response to load disturbance. Furthermore, multiple PR regulators are applied in this strategy conducted in a stationary  frame to suppress the transient fluctuations and the total harmonic distortion (THD of the output voltage and achieve faster transient performance compared with traditional dual-loop control in a rotating dq0 frame under instantaneous change of various types of load (i.e., balanced load, unbalanced load, and nonlinear load. The parameters of multiple PR regulators are analyzed and selected through the root locus method and the stability of the whole control system is evaluated and analyzed. Finally, the validity of the proposed approach is verified through simulations and a three-phase prototype test system with a TMS320F28335 DSP.

  14. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini Aguirre, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaker, F.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to 3.01 ×1 020 protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the 4-30 MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is 1.55 ×1 0-38 cm2 with a 68% confidence interval of (1.22 ,2.20 )×1 0-38 cm2 at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of 2.01 ×1 0-38 cm2 .

  15. Wind-driven changes of surface current, temperature, and chlorophyll observed by satellites north of New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Léger, Fabien; Messié, Monique; Dutrieux, Pierre; Menkes, Christophe; Eldin, Gérard

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations of wind, sea level and derived currents, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll are used to expand our understanding of the physical and biological variability of the ocean surface north of New Guinea. Based on scarce cruise and mooring data, previous studies differentiated a trade wind situation (austral winter) when the New Guinea Coastal Current (NGCC) flows northwestward and a northwest monsoon situation (austral summer) when a coastal upwelling develops and the NGCC reverses. This circulation pattern is confirmed by satellite observations, except in Vitiaz Strait where the surface northwestward flow persists. We find that intraseasonal and seasonal time scale variations explain most of the variance north of New Guinea. SST and chlorophyll variabilities are mainly driven by two processes: penetration of Solomon Sea waters and coastal upwelling. In the trade wind situation, the NGCC transports cold Solomon Sea waters through Vitiaz Strait in a narrow vein hugging the coast. Coastal upwelling is generated in westerly wind situations (westerly wind event, northwest monsoon). Highly productive coastal waters are advected toward the equator and, during some westerly wind events, toward the eastern part of the warm pool. During El Niño, coastal upwelling events and northward penetration of Solomon Sea waters combine to influence SST and chlorophyll anomalies.

  16. Auroral current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere: comparison of theoretical models with Cassini and HST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The first simultaneous observations of fields and plasmas in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere and UV images of the conjugate auroral oval were obtained by the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST in January 2007. These data have shown that the southern auroral oval near noon maps to the dayside cusp boundary between open and closed field lines, associated with a major layer of upward-directed field-aligned current (Bunce et al., 2008. The results thus support earlier theoretical discussion and quantitative modelling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004, that suggests the oval is produced by electron acceleration in the field-aligned current layer required by rotational flow shear between strongly sub-corotating flow on open field lines and near-corotating flow on closed field lines. Here we quantitatively compare these modelling results (the "CBO" model with the Cassini-HST data set. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement between model and data, the principal difference being that the model currents are too small by factors of about five, as determined from the magnetic perturbations observed by Cassini. This is suggested to be principally indicative of a more highly conducting summer southern ionosphere than was assumed in the CBO model. A revised model is therefore proposed in which the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen conductivity is increased by a factor of four from 1 to 4 mho, together with more minor adjustments to the co-latitude of the boundary, the flow shear across it, the width of the current layer, and the properties of the source electrons. It is shown that the revised model agrees well with the combined Cassini-HST data, requiring downward acceleration of outer magnetosphere electrons through a ~10 kV potential in the current layer at the open-closed field line boundary to produce an auroral oval of ~1° width with UV emission intensities of a few tens of kR.

  17. Seasonal Suspended Particles Distribution Patterns in Western South Yellow Sea Based on Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jianchao; LI Guangxue; XU Jishang; QIAO Lulu; DONG Ping; DING Dong; LIU Shidong

    2015-01-01

    An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) observation site was set up in the Western South Yellow Sea from 2012 to 2013 to study the local suspended particle matters (SPM) distribution pattern. The SPM concentration could be semi-quantitatively represented by backscatter intensity (Sv), converted by the echo intensity (EI) of ADCP. Results show two types of SPM in the water column: the quasi-biological SPM and quasi-mineral SPM. The quasi-biological SPM mainly exists in summer half year and is con-centrated above the thermocline. It has periodically diurnal variations with high concentration at night and low concentration in the daytime. The quasi-mineral SPM is located in lower part of the water column, with similar relation to monthly tidal current variation all year round. However, the daily quasi-mineral SPM distribution patterns vary between summer and winter half year. The sunlight is thought to be the origin factor leading to the diurnally vertical motion of the biological features, which might cause the diurnalSv variation. Unlike in winter half year when tidal current is relatively single driving force of the monthly SPM pattern, the high speed current near the thermocline is also responsible for the concentration of quasi-mineral SPM in summer half year. The sediment input difference between summer and winter half year contribute to the varied daily variation of quasi-mineral SPM with re-suspended SPM in winter and sediments from Yellow Sea Mud Area (YSMA) in summer. The seasonal variations in hydrodynamics, water structure and heavy-wind incidents are the primary factors influencing the differential seasonal SPM distribution patterns.

  18. Sub-mesoscale Eddies and Their Propagation Paths in Long Bay, SC Observed in HF Radar Surface Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahl, D.; Voulgaris, G.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-mesoscale eddies on the shoreward front of the Gulf Stream (GS) are thought to play a critical role in controlling cross-shelf transport and momentum flux in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) but cannot be observed continuously from satellites due to cloud cover. Non-linear eddies have the ability to trap and transport water as they propagate, which make them a potential source of cross-shelf transport. Long Bay, SC, just downstream of the Charleston Bump is the area of highest eddy activity in the SAB. Surface currents in Long Bay have been observed since 2012 using HF radars. The accuracy of three eddy detection methods (Okubo-Weiss, Vector-geometry, Winding-angle) are compared in this area of high shear on the shoreward front of the GS. The Okubo-Weiss parameter does not perform well in this area due to the high shear environment where eddies propagate. The Vector-Geometry method has good successful detection rates but suffers in shape analysis from inaccurate Stream Function contours in this area due to divergent surface currents. The Winding-Angle method performs well and was used to detect eddies and their propagation paths in Long Bay for years 2013 and 2014. Detected eddies propagate predominantly along-shelf, with cyclonic (anticyclonic) eddies propagating downstream (upstream) with respect the GS. Few eddies with the ability to trap and transport water propagating in the across-shelf direction were observed, leading to the conclusion that most of the influence of these eddies is confined to the shoreward front of the GS, near the shelf break.

  19. Overview of the Cassini In-Situ Observations of Auroral Field-Aligned Currents During the 2013 Saturn Aurora Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, E. J.; Badman, S. V.; Cowley, S. W.; Dougherty, M. K.; Gurnett, D. A.; Jinks, S.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nichols, J. D.; Provan, G.; Pryor, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Saturn Aurora Campaign 2013 is a coordinated effort to provide a clearer understanding of Saturn's auroral emissions at multiple wavelengths in the upper atmosphere, and their associated magnetospheric signatures and dynamics. Structures such as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are known to play a significant role in the modulation of Saturn's auroral emissions via abrupt changes in the dynamic pressure associated with forward shocks at the start of the CIR compression regions. Recent observations from the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn have also taught us that the 'magnetosphere oscillations' observed in magnetic field perturbations in the northern and southern hemispheres, which are associated with the SKR modulations in each hemisphere, also significantly modulate the magnetosphere and auroral emissions. Here we present an overview of the in situ magnetosphere measurements during the campaign, along with an overview of the solar wind conditions upstream of Saturn inferred from the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) emissions. We will discuss evidence of the high-latitude field-aligned currents and plasma boundaries (e.g. the open-closed field line (or related) boundary) from the magnetic field data, plasma signatures and/or auroral hiss observations (using the Cassini magnetometer-MAG, the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument-MIMI, and the Radio Plasma Wave Science-RPWS instruments respectively). We will attempt to characterise the morphology and variability (e.g. co-latitude, intensity) of the current system(s) from both the knowledge of the northern or southern magnetosphere oscillation phase (according to the location of the spacecraft) and the inferred solar wind conditions. We will compare these results with available IR/UV auroral images from the campaign.

  20. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  1. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  2. Disrupting Ethnography through Rhizoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Masny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates principles of ethnography in education proposed by Mills and Morton: raw tellings, analytic pattern, vignette and empathy. This article adopts a position that is uncomfortable, unconventional and interesting. It involves a deterritorialization/ rupture of ethnography in education in order to reterritorialize a different concept: rhizoanalysis, a way to position theory and data that is multilayered, complex and messy. Rhizoanalysis, the main focus of this article is not a method. It is an approach to research conditioned by a reality in which Deleuze and Guattari disrupt representation, interpretation and subjectivity. In this article, Multiple Literacies Theory, a theoretical and practical framework, becomes a lens to examine a rhizomatic study of a Korean family recently arrived to Australia and attending English as a second language classes. Observations and interviews recorded the daily lives of the family. The vignettes were selected by reading data intensively and immanently through a process of palpation, an innovative approach to educational research. Rhizoanalysis proposes to abandon the given and invent different ways of thinking about and doing research and what might happen when reading data differently, intensively and immanently, through Multiple Literacies Theory. Rhizoanalysis, a game-changer in the way research can be conducted, affords a different lens to tackle issues in education through research.

  3. High resolution modelling and observation of wind-driven surface currents in a semi-enclosed estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, S.; Hartnett, M.; McKinstry, A.; Ragnoli, E.; Nagle, D.

    2012-04-01

    offline coupling with the wind forecast models. Modelled surface currents show good correlation with CODAR observed currents and the resolution of the surface wind data is shown to be important for model accuracy.

  4. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  5. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  6. Longitudinal association between marital disruption and child BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5-14, over the 1986-2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before-after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption.

  7. Evidence of the Relationship between the Emerging Magnetic Fields, Electric Currents, and Solar Flares Observed on May 10, 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Livshits, M A; Myshyakov, I I; Rudenko, G V

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed multi-wavelength observations and magnetic-field data for the solar flare of May 10, 2012 (04:18 UT) and have detected a sign inversion of the signal in the line-of-sight magnetic measurements in the umbra of a small spot. This effect is associated, at least partly, with the emergence of a new magnetic field. Almost at the same time, a burst of hard X-rays was recorded, and a wave in the vacuum ultraviolet (EUV) range (a "sunquake") was generated due to the impact of the disturbance in the energy release range on the photosphere. At the beginning of the event, a sigmoid flare was recorded, but it did not spread, as it usually does, along the polarity inversion (neutral) line. SDO/HMI full-vector measurements were used to extrapolate the AR 11476 magnetic field to the corona, and the distribution of vertical currents $j_z$ in the photosphere was obtained. The distribution of currents in the active region shows that the relationship between them and the occurrence of flares is very intricate. W...

  8. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  9. First observation of neutral current proton electron scattering at the square root of s = 300 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takuya

    1993-02-01

    Neutral current proton electron scattering at center of mass energy 295 GeV was observed for the first time, using the newly built proton electron collider HERA (Hadron Elektron Ring Anlage) and the general purpose detector ZEUS. The distributions of Q(sup 2), Bjorken-x(x), and Bjorken-y(y) were compared with the expectation based on the standard electroweak theory and QCD. Regarding the investigation of high-Q(sup 2) region, an event of Q(sup 2) approximately 1000 GeV(exp 2) was observed for the first time. From the x-distribution of the events, a limit on the mass and the coupling of an exotic s-channel resonance of a quark-lepton system (leptoquark) was obtained. The mass limit is 72 GeV (97 GeV) at 95% confidence level for a scalar type leptoquark with a left-handed (right-handed) electromagnetic coupling to ordinary leptons. The leptoquark is assumed to be weak-isoscalar. To realize this experiment, a uranium scintillator sandwich type calorimeter was developed. Equal response to electrons and hadrons (e/h = 1), which is essential for the good energy resolution for hadrons, has been achieved. One of the main characteristics of this calorimeter is a possibility of calibration utilizing its own uranium radioactivity. The grain variation of each channel can be detected with an accuracy of plus or minus one percent.

  10. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  11. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18–19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1 the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2 the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3 the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4 the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5 CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in

  12. ECR离子源引出束流周期性波动研究%Observation of Burst Frequency in Extracted ECR Ion Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.S.Taki; P.R.Sarma; A.G.Drentje; T.Nakagawa; P.K.Ray; R.K.Bhandari

    2007-01-01

    Earlier we reported an ion current jump which was observed at a fixed negative biased disc potential in the 6.4GHz ECR ion source at VECC,Kolkata.In a recent experiment with neon ions.we measured the time spectra of the ion current and observed the presence of a burst frequency in the kilohertz range.This frequency shows a correlated jump with the ion current jump described above.Another interesting feature is that the observed burst frequency shows a good linear correlation with the extracted ion current.The higher the ion current,the higher is the burst frequency.This means that current per burst is a constant factor;when there are more number of bursts,the current also increases.

  13. A Sharp Boundary Model of Nonaxisymmetric Vertical Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2010-11-01

    A semi-analytic sharp boundary model of a nonaxisymmetric vertical disruption event (VDE) in a vertically elongated tokamak plasma is developed. The model is used to simulate nonaxisymmetric VDEs with a wide range of different plasma equilibrium and vacuum vessel parameters. These simulations yield poloidal halo current fractions and toroidal peaking factors that are similar to those seen in experiments. The simulations also reproduce the experimentally observed inverse scaling between the current fraction and the peaking factor. The peak poloidal halo current density is found to correlate strongly with the reciprocal of the minimum edge safety-factor attained during the disruption. The peak vertical force per unit area acting on the vacuum vessel is observed to have a strong correlation with the equilibrium toroidal plasma current at the onset of the disruption, but is also seen to increase with increasing vacuum vessel conductivity relative to the SOL plasma. Finally, the peak horizontal force is found to be largely determined by the plasma beta prior to the disruption.

  14. Tidal disruption event demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  15. Anomalous diurnal variation of atmospheric potential gradient and air-Earth current density observed at Maitri, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva, K.; Gurubaran, S.; Williams, E. R.; Kamra, A. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Guha, A.; Selvaraj, C.; Nair, K. U.; Dhar, Ajay

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this paper is to explore the mechanisms operating over Maitri (70.76°S, 11.74°E, 117 m above mean sea level), a coastal Antarctic station, that produce an anomalous fair-weather diurnal pattern of the atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG) and air-Earth current density (AEC). The anomaly in the diurnal variations of AEC and the PG is displaying an ostensible minimum at 10 UT and a diminished response to the thunderstorm over the African continent in the 14-16 UT time frame. The data sets (2005-2014, except 2012) of the PG, and to some extent, AEC, from Maitri, are used to explore this anomaly. It follows that the fair-weather electrical phenomena over Maitri can be ascribed to global electrified convection on the one hand and to regional phenomena like convection due to the replacement of warm air by katabatic winds on the other hand. The katabatic winds originate on the polar plateau and blow from 130° at Maitri which are likely to transport various elements from the mountain slopes, and space charge from the polar plateau is expected to produce various disturbances in the PG and AEC monitored over the coastal Antarctica. This mechanism may be responsible for peaks in the early UT hours and also for the anomalous behavior of atmospheric electrical parameters observed at Maitri. Maitri data are compared with that of Carnegie cruise and Vostok to explain the source of anomaly.

  16. Field-aligned current associated with low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by the CHAMP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we give two examples of low-latitude plasma blobs accompanied by linearly polarized perpendicular magnetic deflections which imply that associated field-aligned currents (FACs have a 2-D sheet structure located at the blob walls. The estimated FAC density is of the order of 0.1 μA/m2. The direction of magnetic deflections points westward of the magnetic meridian and there is a linear correlation between perpendicular and parallel variations. All these properties are similar to those of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs. According to CHAMP observations from August 2000 to July 2004, blobs show except for these two good examples no clear signatures of 2-D FAC sheets at the walls. Generally, perpendicular magnetic deflections inside blobs are weaker than inside EPBs on average. Our results are consistent with existing theories: if a blob exists, (1 a significant part of EPB FAC will be closed through it, exhibiting similar perpendicular magnetic deflection inside EPBs and blobs, (2 the FAC closure through blobs leads to smaller perpendicular magnetic deflection at its poleward/downward side, and (3 superposition of different FAC elements might result in a complex magnetic signature around blobs.

  17. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing...... and genistein, a mixture of phytoestrogens, and a mixture of environmentally relevant estrogenic EDCs of various origins. Moreover, mixtures of antiandrogenic chemicals were investigated. These include a mixture of pesticides and a mixture of environmentally relevant anti-androgenic EDCs of various origins...

  18. The disruption management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  19. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Extant research on external knowledge search and open innovation assumes that collaborators are aligned in their strategic interests towards solving innovation problems. However, disruptive innovation is known to threaten the competitive advantage of incumbent firms, thereby creating a potential...... conflict of interest between these firms and their collaborators. This paper explores the extent to which strategic interests influence joint problem solving in both complementary and disruptive technologies by analyzing the effects of incumbent collaboration. The analysis disentangles inability...... and strategic intent to find that non-incumbents experience suppression of problem solving likelihood within disruptive technologies when incumbent collaborators are not strategically committed. The paper contributes to extant theory by showing the influence of firms’ underlying strategic interests...

  20. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Endocrine disrupting chemicals – probability of adverse environmental effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some information about current state of knowledge of the risk due to exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. Endocrine disruptors are defined as chemicals substances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and wildlife. Exposure to EDCs in animals models correlate positively with an increased incidence of malformations of genital tract, on neoplasmas, obesity, alternations on male and female reproduction and changes in neuroendocrinology and behavior. Results from animal models, human clinical observations and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant risk to public health.

  2. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavior in physicians as aberrant behavior manifested through personal interaction with physicians , hospital personnel , health care professionals , patients , family members or others which interferes with patient care or could reasonably be expected to interfere with the process of delivering quality care. 2 Common forms of disruptive behaviors generally seen amongst young doctors are use of abusive language , yelling or shouting at patients , colleagues and subordinate staff , showing in disciplined behavior and at times indulging in physical abuse. 3 - 4 STUDY DESIGN : Study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital where 614 health care professionals participated which included 108 doctors 432 nurs ing staff and 74 paramedical staff METHOD : Data collection was done by semi structured pretested questionnaire and was entered in Microsoft Excel and analyzed for frequency and percentages . RESULTS : 64 % doctor , 66% nursing staff and 50% of the paramedicals answered that they have seen doctors showing disruptive behavior at one time or the other . Not all the doctors show disruptive behavior but this type of aberrant behavior is seen mainly in2 - 3 percent of doctors only. While answering to the que stion as to the type of disruptive behavior , 57% health care professionals reported that commonest form of disruptive behavior noticed by them amongst doctors was yelling or shouting on junior staff , patients and colleagues . 47% answered that doctors with disruptive behavior do not follow laid down orders or

  3. Cationic peptide exposure enhances pulsed-electric-field-mediated membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Kennedy

    Full Text Available The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF's ability to disrupt plasma membranes.We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI, in real time. Based on an individual cell's PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1-2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected.Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with current advancements in cell targeting techniques will be

  4. Simulation study of disruption characteristics in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkyu; Kim, J. Y.; Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F.

    2012-10-01

    A detailed simulation study of disruption in KSTAR had been performed using the Tokamak Simulation Code(TSC) [1] during the initial design phase of KSTAR [2]. Recently, however, a partial modification in the structure of passive plate was made in relation to reduce eddy current and increase the efficiency of control of vertical position. A substantial change can then occur in disruption characteristics and plasma behavior during disruption due to changes in passive plate structure. Because of this, growth rate of vertical instability is expected to be increased and eddy current and its associated electomagnetic force are expected to be reduced. To check this in more detail, a new simulation study is here given with modified passive plate structure of KSTAR. In particular, modeling of vertical disruption that is vertical displacement event (VDE) was carried out. We calculated vertical growth rate for a drift phase of plasma and electromagnetic force acting on PFC structures and compared the results between in a new model and an old model. [4pt] [1] S.C. Jardin, N. Pomphrey and J. Delucia, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).[0pt] [2] J.Y. Kim, S.Y. Cho and KSTAR Team, Disruption load analysis on KSTAR PFC structures, J. Accel. Plasma Res. 5, 149 (2000).

  5. Ozone sonde cell current measurements and implications for observations of near-zero ozone concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    H. Vömel; K. Diaz

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozone sonde cell current using ozone free air as well as defined amounts of ozone reveal that background current measurements during sonde preparation are neither constant as a function of time, nor constant as a function of ozone concentration. Using a background current, measured at a defined timed after exposure to high ozone may often overestimate the real background, leading to artificially low ozone concentrations i...

  6. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from ST5. The data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of about 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are about 1 min for meso-scale currents and about 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  7. The Structure of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica; Roberts, Bethan; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) frequently co-occur. Comorbidity of these 2 childhood disruptive behavior domains has not been satisfactorily explained at either a structural or etiological level. The current study evaluated a bifactor model, which allows for a "g" factor in addition to…

  8. The Structure of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica; Roberts, Bethan; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) frequently co-occur. Comorbidity of these 2 childhood disruptive behavior domains has not been satisfactorily explained at either a structural or etiological level. The current study evaluated a bifactor model, which allows for a "g" factor in addition to…

  9. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls' disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent- and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years.…

  10. Impact and mitigation of disruptions with the ITER-like wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnen, M.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Flanagan, J.; Gerasimov, S. N.; Hartmann, N.; Hender, T. C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kiptily, V.; Kruezi, U.; Matthews, G. F.; Morris, J.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Sieglin, B.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2013-09-01

    Disruptions are a critical issue for ITER because of the high thermal and magnetic energies that are released on short timescales, which results in extreme forces and heat loads. The choice of material of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) can have significant impact on the loads that arise during a disruption. With the ITER-like wall (ILW) in JET made of beryllium in the main chamber and tungsten in the divertor, the main finding is a low fraction of radiation. This has dropped significantly with the ILW from 50-100% of the total energy being dissipated during disruptions in CFC wall plasmas, to less than 50% on average and down to just 10% for vertical displacement events (VDEs). All other changes in disruption properties and loads are consequences of this low radiation: long current quenches (CQs), high vessel forces caused by halo currents and toroidal current asymmetries as well as severe heat loads. Temperatures close to the melting limit have been locally observed on upper first wall structures during deliberate VDE and even at plasma currents as low as 1.5 MA and thermal energy of about 1.5 MJ only. A high radiation fraction can be regained by massive injection of a mixture of 10% Ar with 90% D2. This accelerates the CQ thus reducing the halo current and sideways impulse. The temperature of PFCs stays below 400 °C. MGI is now a mandatory tool to mitigate disruptions in closed-loop operation for currents at and above 2.5 MA in JET.

  11. Observations of wind-generated waves on variable current. [laboratory ocean dynamics for water wave generator research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S. R.; Huang, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory measurements utilizing a laser probe are made for the slopes of wind waves generated on both positive and negative currents at different values of fetch. The data are then processed electronically to yield an average wave-slope spectrum in frequency space with 128 degrees of freedom. These spectra are used to obtain the growth of the spectral components at various frequency bands for increasing wind and different values of fetch and current. The results indicate that the growth of these components is not monotonic with the frictional wind speed, but rather exhibits an 'overshoot' phenomena at lower values of frictional wind speed, and in addition, displays a significant effect due to current. The peak location and spectral intensity of the spectra also show strong influence by the current condition. This results in the rms surface slope value increasing with negative current and decreasing with positive current. The results agree qualitatively with some theoretical predictions. The potential use of the current-induced effects as a means for remote sensing of ocean current is also briefly discussed.

  12. Observing Magnetic and Current Profiles of the Night side and Terminator of Mars through the Mars Global Surveyor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, N.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fogle, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mars has no global magnetic field. Changes in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can impact the upper atmosphere and induce currents in the ionosphere of Mars. During aerobraking maneuvers, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) made over 1000 passes through Mars's ionosphere. During these passes, MGS measured the local magnetic field. From these measurements, we can determine the ionospheric currents. We restrict our analysis to passes where the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. This restriction, along with some assumptions about the gradients in the magnetic field, allows us to estimate the horizontal ionospheric currents. Additionally, we focus on the magnetic field data acquired over regions above negligible crustal magnetic fields in order to simplify the analysis. At a maximum altitude of 250 km, the Mars map was segmented to 30 by 30 degrees east longitude and latitude for analysis. We find that on the night side, where the solar zenith angle (SZA) lies between 130 to 180 degrees, only 4% of the data (out of a total of 52 profiles) is usable for computing currents, that is the radial component of the magnetic field is nearly zero. We also find that near the terminator, where the SZA lies between 50 to 130 degrees, an average of 2% of the magnetic field profiles (out of 1905) are usable to compute currents. This implies that currents are rarely horizontal (as required by our assumptions) in these regions. The currents computed from these profiles can give us insights into how the changing solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field can affect the upper atmosphere of Mars. For example, induced currents can lead to Joule heating of the atmosphere potentially modifying the neutral dynamics.

  13. Direct observation of current-induced motion of a 3D vortex domain wall in cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2017-05-08

    The current-induced dynamics of 3D magnetic vortex domain walls in cylindrical Co/Ni nanowires are revealed experimentally using Lorentz microscopy and theoretically using micromagnetic simulations. We demonstrate that a spin-polarized electric current can control the reversible motion of 3D vortex domain walls, which travel with a velocity of a few hundred meters per second. This finding is a key step in establishing fast, high-density memory devices based on vertical arrays of cylindrical magnetic nanowires.

  14. Search and Disrupt

    OpenAIRE

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts. The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improv...

  15. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 microns dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (rh?=?0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60? (greater than 10(exp 5) km in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 microns image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing approximately 5.2?×?10(exp 10) kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  16. ADDING CONTEXT TO JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEYS WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE 21 cm RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, A. P.; Morales, M. F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lidz, A.; Malloy, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sutter, P. M., E-mail: beards@phys.washington.edu [INFN - National Institute for Nuclear Physics via Valerio 2, I-34127, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-02-20

    Infrared and radio observations of the Epoch of Reionization promise to revolutionize our understanding of the cosmic dawn, and major efforts with the JWST, MWA, and HERA are underway. While measurements of the ionizing sources with infrared telescopes and the effect of these sources on the intergalactic medium with radio telescopes should be complementary, to date the wildly disparate angular resolutions and survey speeds have made connecting proposed observations difficult. In this paper we develop a method to bridge the gap between radio and infrared studies. While the radio images may not have the sensitivity and resolution to identify individual bubbles with high fidelity, by leveraging knowledge of the measured power spectrum we are able to separate regions that are likely ionized from largely neutral, providing context for the JWST observations of galaxy counts and properties in each. By providing the ionization context for infrared galaxy observations, this method can significantly enhance the science returns of JWST and other infrared observations.

  17. 太阳爆发过程中的大尺度磁重联电流片:理论和观测%Large-Scale Reconnecting Current Sheets in Solar Eruptions: Theories and Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宁; 李燕; 沈呈彩; 林隽

    2012-01-01

    从理论和观测两个方面来介绍和讨论出现在太阳爆发过程中的磁重联电流片及其物理本质和动力学特征.首先介绍在理论研究和理论模型中,磁重联电流片是如何在爆发磁结构当中形成并发展的,对观测研究有什么指导意义.然后介绍观测工作是从哪几个方面对理论模型预测的电流片进行证认和研究的.第三,将介绍观测研究给出了哪些过去所没有能够预期的结果,这些结果对深入研究耀斑-CME电流片以及其中的磁重联过程的理论工作有什么重要的、挑战性的意义.第四,讨论最新的与此有关的理论研究和数值实验.最后,对未来的研究方向和重要课题进行综述和展望.%Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process with a rich variety of aspects and applications in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas. It is at the core of many dynamic phenomena in the universe, including solar eruptions, geomagnetic substorms, and tokamak disruption. Most of the universe is in the form of a plasma threaded by a magnetic field. When twisted or sheared, the field lines may reconnect rapidly, converting magnetic energy into heat and kinetic energy. Because these phenomena often occur in environments of very high electric conductivity, the process of energy conversion is usually confined to a small local region, such as an X-type neutral point, a current sheet, or a quasi-separatrix layer. It is traditionally expected that the current sheet is too thin to be observable since its thickness is believed to be roughly the proton Larmor radius, which is about tens of meters in the coronal environment. This view is based on magnetic reconnection on small scales in the laboratory or on quasi-static process in space (with timescale of tens of hours or even a few days). This could be true as well in the solar eruption in the case that the classical Spitzer resistivity dominates the diffusion process. However, CME/fiare current

  18. Electromagnetic analysis of ITER diagnostic equatorial port plugs during plasma disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y., E-mail: yzhai@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Feder, R.; Brooks, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ulrickson, M. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pitcher, C.S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, St Paul lez Durance (France); Loesser, G.D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Disruption loads on ITER diagnostic equatorial port plugs are extracted. ► Upward major disruption produces the largest radial moment and radial force on diagnostic first walls and diagnostic shield modules. ► Large eddy currents on supporting rails, keys and water pipes are observed during disruption. -- Abstract: ITER diagnostic port plugs perform many functions including structural support of diagnostic systems under high electromagnetic loads while allowing for diagnostic access to the plasma. The design of diagnostic equatorial port plugs (EPP) are largely driven by electromagnetic loads and associate responses of EPP structure during plasma disruptions and VDEs. This paper summarizes results of transient electromagnetic analysis using Opera 3d in support of the design activities for ITER diagnostic EPP. A complete distribution of disruption loads on the diagnostic first walls (DFWs), diagnostic shield modules (DSMs) and the EPP structure, as well as impact on the system design integration due to electrical contact among various EPP structural components are discussed.

  19. Direct observation of current in type-I edge-localized-mode filaments on the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.;

    2011-01-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas in the high confinement regime are regularly subjected to relaxation oscillations, termed edge localized modes (ELMs), leading to large transport events. Present ELM theories rely on a combined effect of edge current and the edge pressure gradients which result in in...

  20. Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel D; Schideman, Lance C; King, Daniel A; Freund, Jonathan B

    2014-12-01

    Microbubbles were added to an algal solution with the goal of improving cell disruption efficiency and the net energy balance for algal biofuel production. Experimental results showed that disruption increases with increasing peak rarefaction ultrasound pressure over the range studied: 1.90 to 3.07 MPa. Additionally, ultrasound cell disruption increased by up to 58% by adding microbubbles, with peak disruption occurring in the range of 10(8)microbubbles/ml. The localization of energy in space and time provided by the bubbles improve efficiency: energy requirements for such a process were estimated to be one-fourth of the available heat of combustion of algal biomass and one-fifth of currently used cell disruption methods. This increase in energy efficiency could make microbubble enhanced ultrasound viable for bioenergy applications and is expected to integrate well with current cell harvesting methods based upon dissolved air flotation.

  1. Study of the origin and structure of a nocturnal atmospheric density current from observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ander Arrillaga, Jon; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Density currents are flows generated when a dense fluid passes through a less dense surrounding, under the influence of gravity. They usually appear as a consequence of sea-breeze circulations, thunderstorm outflows or katabatic flows. Density currents acquire a particular relevance during nocturnal stable situations, as their onset causes a significant turbulence increase (both from buoyancy and shear) and they occasionally produce turbulence intermittency through the formation of gravity waves. In this work, the arrival of a density current on 23 September 2015 is analysed in the CIBA site (Spain), which is located in the Spanish Northern Plateau, approximately 200 km away from the sea and 100 km away from the closest mountain ranges. Previous studies at this location associated similar nocturnal events with daytime sea breeze in the eastern Cantabrian coast [1]. Micrometeorological measurements from sonic anemometers and different sensors at multiple levels up to 100 m agl provide a solid database. In this specific case, the outbreak of the density current occurs 2 hours after sunset, causing an abrupt increase of the wind speed and a significant weakening of the surface-based thermal inversion. Besides, turbulent parameters and fluxes such as the friction velocity, the sensible heat flux and the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) are sharply altered with its arrival. The latter, indeed, increases by two orders of magnitude and the Multi Resolution Flux Decomposition (MRFD) of this and other turbulent variables gives the approximate size of the contributing eddies. Furthermore, simulations with the WRF model, which is tested for different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) schemes and the topo_wind option for complex topography [2], give meaningful information about the vertical structure and origin of this density current. [1] Udina, M., Soler, M.R., Viana, S. & Yagüe, C. (2013). Model simulation of gravity waves triggered by a density current. Q J R Meteorol Soc, 139

  2. Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

  3. Solar Radio Observation using Callisto Spectrometer at Sumedang West Java Indonesia: Current Status and Future Development Plan in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, T.; Sitompul, P.; Batubara, M.; Harjana, T.; Yatini, C. Y.; Monstein, C.

    2016-04-01

    Sumedang Observatory (6.91°S, 107,84°E) was established in 1975 and is one of the solar observation facilities of the Space Science Center of Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN), located around 40 km, east part of Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. Several instrumentations for solar and space observation such as optical telescopes, radio solar spectrograph, flux gate magnetometer, etc. are operated there, together with an ionosphere sounding system (ionosonde) that was set up later. In July 2014, a standard Callisto (Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) spectrometer was installed at Sumedang Observatory for solar radio activity monitoring. Callisto has been developed in the framework of IHY2007 and ISWI, supported by UN and NASA. Callisto spectrometer has observation capability in the frequency range of 45-870 MHz. The Callisto spectrometer receives signal by using a set of 21 elements log-periodic antenna, model CLP5130-1N, pointed to the Sun and equipped with a low noise pre-amplifier. With respect to the Radio Frequency Interferences (RFI) measurements, the Callisto spectrometer is operated individually in frequency ranges of 45-80 MHz and 180-450 MHz. Observation status and data flow are monitored in on-line from center office located in Bandung. The data was transferred to central database at FHNW (Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz) server every 15 minutes to appear on e-Callisto network subsequently. A real time data transfer and data processing based on Python software also has been developed successfully to be used as an input for Space Weather Information and Forecasting Services (SWIFtS) provided by LAPAN. On 5th November 2014, Callisto spectrometer at Sumedang observed the first clear solar radio event, a solar radio burst type II corresponding to a coronal mass ejection (CME), indicated by a strong X-ray event of M7.9 that was informed on by Space Weather

  4. Disruptive Space Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Jim

    2004-01-01

    In 1997 "The Innovator’s Dilemma" by Clayton M. Christensen became a popular book in the small satellite and launch vehicle communities. But like the weather, every one talks about “Disruptive Technology” but few do anything about it. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, people were looking for “Paradigm Shifts,” and since the resurrection of Donald Rumsfeld, a recent watchword has been “Transformational Technology.” But today’s buzzword is now “Responsive Space Systems.”

  5. Disruption - Access cards service

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We would like to inform you that between 10 November and 15 December 2014, the access cards service in Building 55 will be disrupted, as the GS Department has decided to improve the facilities for users of this building. During the work, you will find the registration, biometric registration and dosimeter exchange services on the second floor of Building 55 and the vehicle sticker service on the ground floor along with the access cards service. We thank you for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  6. Celibacy and Family Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaletdinov B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Causes for celibacy, divorces and successful marriage are discussed in the article. Absence of true love and inability to build and keep it are the main reasons for family disruption. Amorousness, immature love and various forms of false or flawed love substitute the true feeling. It is caused by increased women’s independence, loss of mutual understanding and trust (due to infidelity or jealousy, incompatibility of characters or values. Celibacy is often conditioned by physical disability, revaluation of freedom and independence, huge requirements to partners, consumer attitude to life, infertility, alcohol and drug abuse, abnormalities in personality and sexuality.

  7. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  8. Constraints on the Formation of Double Neutron Stars from the Observed Eccentricities and Current Limits on Merger Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, M.; Belczynski, K.; Bulik, T.; Gladysz, W.

    2017-03-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse supernovae (CCSN) from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of σ = 265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs and then modify this distribution by changing σ toward smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with σ = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both observational constraints simultaneously. The models with low kicks after CCSN for binaries with the second NS forming through core collapse SN are marginally consistent with the observations. This means that either 14 observed DNSs are not representative of the intrinsic Galactic population, or that our modeling of DNS formation needs revision.

  9. From geospatial observations of ocean currents to causal predictors of spatio-economic activity using computer vision and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florin; Ayache, Stephane; Escalera, Sergio; Baró Solé, Xavier; Capponi, Cecile; Panciatici, Patrick; Guyon, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    The big data transformation currently revolutionizing science and industry forges novel possibilities in multi-modal analysis scarcely imaginable only a decade ago. One of the important economic and industrial problems that stand to benefit from the recent expansion of data availability and computational prowess is the prediction of electricity demand and renewable energy generation. Both are correlates of human activity: spatiotemporal energy consumption patterns in society are a factor of both demand (weather dependent) and supply, which determine cost - a relation expected to strengthen along with increasing renewable energy dependence. One of the main drivers of European weather patterns is the activity of the Atlantic Ocean and in particular its dominant Northern Hemisphere current: the Gulf Stream. We choose this particular current as a test case in part due to larger amount of relevant data and scientific literature available for refinement of analysis techniques. This data richness is due not only to its economic importance but also to its size being clearly visible in radar and infrared satellite imagery, which makes it easier to detect using Computer Vision (CV). The power of CV techniques makes basic analysis thus developed scalable to other smaller and less known, but still influential, currents, which are not just curves on a map, but complex, evolving, moving branching trees in 3D projected onto a 2D image. We investigate means of extracting, from several image modalities (including recently available Copernicus radar and earlier Infrared satellites), a parameterized representation of the state of the Gulf Stream and its environment that is useful as feature space representation in a machine learning context, in this case with the EC's H2020-sponsored 'See.4C' project, in the context of which data scientists may find novel predictors of spatiotemporal energy flow. Although automated extractors of Gulf Stream position exist, they differ in methodology

  10. Disruptive coloration in woodland camouflage: evaluation of camouflage effectiveness due to minor disruptive patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selj, Gorm K.; Heinrich, Daniela H.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from an observer based photosimulation study of generic camouflage patterns, intended for military uniforms, where three near-identical patterns have been compared. All the patterns were prepared with similar effective color, but were different in how the individual pattern patches were distributed throughout the target. We did this in order to test if high contrast (black) patches along the outline of the target would enhance the survivability when exposed to human observers. In the recent years it has been shown that disruptive coloration in the form of high contrast patches are capable of disturbing an observer by creating false edges of the target and consequently enhance target survivability. This effect has been shown in different forms in the Animal Kingdom, but not to the same extent in camouflaged military targets. The three patterns in this study were i) with no disruptive preference, ii) with a disruptive patch along the outline of the head and iii) with a disruptive patch on the outline of one of the shoulders. We used a high number of human observers to assess the three targets in 16 natural (woodland) backgrounds by showing images of one of the targets at the time on a high definition pc screen. We found that the two patterns that were thought to have a minor disruptive preference to the remaining pattern were more difficult to detect in some (though not all) of the 16 scenes and were also better in overall performance when all the scenes were accounted for.

  11. Exploring the relationship between retrieval disruption from collaboration and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-07-01

    When people recall together in a collaborative group they recall less than their potential. This phenomenon of collaborative inhibition is explained in terms of retrieval disruption. However, collaborative recall also re-exposes individuals to items recalled by others that they themselves might otherwise have forgotten. This re-exposure produces post-collaborative benefits in individual recall. The current study examined whether reduced retrieval disruption during group recall is related not only to less collaborative inhibition, but also to greater post-collaborative recall benefits. To test this we devised a paradigm to calculate the extent to which each individual experienced retrieval disruption during group recall. We also included two types of collaborative groups, one of which was expected to experience greater retrieval disruption than the other. Results suggest that the relationship between retrieval disruption and recall performance depends on the level at which retrieval disruption is measured. When retrieval disruption was assessed at the individual level, then minimising retrieval disruption was associated with higher recall (i.e., less collaborative inhibition and greater post-collaborative individual recall). However, when retrieval disruption was assessed at the group level there was no relationship with recall. Furthermore, the findings from this design suggest a role of cross-cueing in modulating group recall levels.

  12. Constraints from atmospheric CO2 and satellite-based vegetation activity observations on current land carbon cycle trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zaehle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial ecosystem models used for Earth system modelling show a significant divergence in future patterns of ecosystem processes, in particular carbon exchanges, despite a seemingly common behaviour for the contemporary period. An in-depth evaluation of these models is hence of high importance to achieve a better understanding of the reasons for this disagreement. Here, we develop an extension for existing benchmarking systems by making use of the complementary information contained in the observational records of atmospheric CO2 and remotely-sensed vegetation activity to provide a firm set of diagnostics of ecosystem responses to climate variability in the last 30 yr at different temporal and spatial scales. The selection of observational characteristics (traits specifically considers the robustness of information given the uncertainties in both data and evaluation analysis. In addition, we provide a baseline benchmark, a minimum test that the model under consideration has to pass, to provide a more objective, quantitative evaluation framework. The benchmarking strategy can be used for any land surface model, either driven by observed meteorology or coupled to a climate model. We apply this framework to evaluate the offline version of the MPI-Earth system model's land surface scheme JSBACH. We demonstrate that the complementary use of atmospheric CO2 and satellite based vegetation activity data allows to pinpoint specific model failures that would not be possible by the sole use of atmospheric CO2 observations.

  13. Data assimilation of physical and chlorophyll a observations in the California Current System using two biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Song, Hajoon; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Fiechter, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Biogeochemical numerical models coupled to physical ocean circulation models are commonly combined with data assimilation in order to improve the models' state or parameter estimates. Yet much still needs to be learned about important aspects of biogeochemical data assimilation, such as the effect of model complexity and the importance of more realistic model formulations on assimilation results. In this study, 4D-Var-based state estimation is applied to two biogeochemical ocean models: a simple NPZD model with 4 biogeochemical variables (including 1 phytoplankton, 1 zooplankton) and the more complex NEMURO model, containing 11 biogeochemical variables (including 2 phytoplankton, 3 zooplankton). Both models are coupled to a 3-dimensional physical ocean circulation model of the U.S. west coast based on the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS). Chlorophyll satellite observations and physical observations are assimilated into the model, yielding substantial improvements in state estimates for the observed physical and biogeochemical variables in both model formulations. In comparison to the simpler NPZD model, NEMURO shows a better overall fit to the observations. The assimilation also results in small improvements for simulated nitrate concentrations in both models and no apparent degradation of the output for other unobserved variables. The forecasting skill of the biogeochemical models is strongly linked to model performance without data assimilation: for both models, the improved fit obtained through assimilation degrades at similar relative rates, but drops to different absolute levels. Despite the better performance of NEMURO in our experiments, the choice of model and desired level of complexity should depend on the model application and the data available for assimilation.

  14. Observational Study Of The Pacific Western Boundary Currents And The Indonesian Throughflow by the CAS Strategic Priority Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, D.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The warm pool in the western Pacific Ocean has significant impact on the evolution of ENSO and the East Asian monsoon. Ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean and in Indonesian seas plays an important role in the interannual climate variations and predictability of the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean. A major observational program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences is recently launched to study the western Pacific Ocean circulation and the warm pool to test these scientific hypotheses. The physical oceanography project called the "Western Pacific Ocean Circulation and the Warm Pool Variability" is by far the largest and the most intensive observational program in history in the western Pacific ocean study. In this talk, the background and scientific hypotheses of the project, the observational design in the western Pacific Ocean, Indonesian seas, and the eastern Indian Ocean region, and some preliminary results of the program will be presented. The talk serves to encourage more scientists to collaborate in the studies of the ocean circulation and climate in the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans.

  15. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  16. Hippocampal-dependent neurocognitive impairment following cranial irradiation observed in pre-clinical models: current knowledge and possible future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Wolfgang A; Gökhan, Şölen; Gulinello, Maria E; Brodin, N Patrik; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F; Guha, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the literature for studies pertaining to impaired adult neurogenesis leading to neurocognitive impairment following cranial irradiation in rodent models. This compendium was compared with respect to radiation dose, converted to equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to allow for direct comparison between studies. The effects of differences between animal species and the dependence on animal age as well as for time after irradiation were also considered. One of the major sites of de novo adult neurogenesis is the hippocampus, and as such, this review also focuses on assessing evidence related to the expression and potential effects of inflammatory cytokines on neural stem cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and whether this correlates with neurocognitive impairment. This review also discusses potential strategies to mitigate the detrimental effects on neurogenesis and neurocognition resulting from cranial irradiation, and how the rationale for these strategies compares with the current outcome of pre-clinical studies.

  17. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies.

  18. Current status of the Essential Variables as an instrument to assess the Earth Observation Networks in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonda, Palma; Maso, Joan; Bombelli, Antonio; Plag, Hans Peter; McCallum, Ian; Serral, Ivette; Nativi, Stefano Stefano

    2016-04-01

    ConnectinGEO (Coordinating an Observation Network of Networks EnCompassing saTellite and IN-situ to fill the Gaps in European Observations" is an H2020 Coordination and Support Action with the primary goal of linking existing Earth Observation networks with science and technology (S&T) communities, the industry sector, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and Copernicus. The project will end in February 2017. Essential Variables (EVs) are defined by ConnectinGEO as "a minimal set of variables that determine the system's state and developments, are crucial for predicting system developments, and allow us to define metrics that measure the trajectory of the system". . Specific application-dependent characteristics, such as spatial and temporal resolution of observations and data quality thresholds, are not generally included in the EV definition. This definition and the present status of EV developments in different societal benefit areas was elaborated at the ConnectinGEO workshop "Towards a sustainability process for GEOSS Essential Variables (EVs)," which was held in Bari on June 11-12, 2015 (http://www.gstss.org/2015_Bari/). Presentations and reports contributed by a wide range of communities provided important inputs from different sectors for assessing the status of the EV development. In most thematic areas, the development of sets of EVs is a community process leading to an agreement on what is essential for the goals of the community. While there are many differences across the communities in the details of the criteria, methodologies and processes used to develop sets of EVs, there is also a considerable common core across the communities, particularly those with a more advanced discussion. In particular, there is some level of overlap in different topics (e.g., Climate and Water), and there is a potential to develop an integrated set of EVs common to several thematic areas as well as specific ones that satisfy only one community. The thematic areas with

  19. A method for f0F2 monitoring over Spain using the El Arenosillo digisonde current observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Miro

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere monitoring implies: observations, prediction and mapping of ionospheric parameters. A case with one available (El Arenosillo ionosonde is considered. Some statistical methods for f0F2 short-term (1-24 h in advance prediction are compared. The analysis of multi-dimensional regression for Df0F2 (relative deviation from running median with Ap, F10.7 and previous Df0F2 observations has shown that inclusion of additional terms with Ap and F10.7 improves the prediction accuracy for lead time more than 15 h. For lead time 1-6 h a linear regression with earlier observed Df0F2 provides the f0F2 forecast with Relative Mean Deviation (RMD 6-11%. This is acceptable from a practical point of view. A 24-h forecast can be done with RMD 10-11%. Multi-regressional methods provide better prediction accuracy than the usual 10-day running median or quasi-inertial method based on such median. Hourly f0F2 values may be used to calculate the effective index R12eff used as input to the ITU-R monthly median model. This allows the ITU-R model to "breathe" following hour-to-hour f0F2 variations. Then standard surfering methods may be applied for f0F2 mapping over the whole area. The f0F2 mapping accuracy based on the hourly R12eff index is shown to be 9-11% depending on solar activity level.

  20. Constraining Annual Water Balance Estimates with Basin-Scale Observations from the Airborne Snow Observatory during the Current Californian Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, K.; Painter, T. H.; Marks, D. G.; Hedrick, A. R.; Deems, J. S.; Patterson, V.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the great unknowns in mountain hydrology is how much water is stored within a seasonal snowpack at the basin scale. Quantifying mountain water resources is critical for assisting with water resource management, but has proven elusive due to high spatial and temporal variability of mountain snow cover, complex terrain, accessibility constraints and limited in-situ networks. The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO, aso.jpl.nasa.gov) uses coupled airborne LiDAR and spectrometer instruments for high resolution snow depth retrievals which are used to derive unprecedented basin-wide estimates of snow water mass (snow water equivalent, SWE). ASO has been operational over key basins in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California since 2013. Each operational year has been very dry, with precipitation in 2013 at 75% of average, 2014 at 50% of average and 2015 - the lowest snow year on record for the region. With vastly improved estimates of the snowpack water content from ASO, we can now for the first time conduct observation-based mass balance accounting of surface water in snow-dominated basins, and reconcile these estimates with observed reservoir inflows. In this study we use ASO SWE data to constrain mass balance accounting of basin annual water storages to quantify the water contained within the snowpack above the Hetch Hetchy water supply reservoir (Tuolumne River basin, California). The analysis compares and contrasts annual snow water volumes from observed reservoir inflows, snow water volume estimates from ASO, a physically based model that simulates the snowpack from meteorological inputs and a semi-distributed hydrological model. The study provides invaluable insight to the overall volume of water contained within a seasonal snowpack during a severe drought and how these quantities are simulated in our modelling systems. We envisage that this research will be of great interest to snowpack modellers, hydrologists, dam operators and water managers worldwide.

  1. The East Greenland Current and its impacts on the Nordic Seas: observed trends in the past decade

    OpenAIRE

    Rudels, B.; M. Korhonen; Budeus, G.; Beszczynska-Moller, A.; Schauer, U.; Nummelin, A.; Quadfasel, D.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2012-01-01

    For the past 30 years, it has been known that dense waters are created in the Arctic Ocean. However, before the late 1980s, observations indicated that Arctic Ocean deep waters only modified the deep water in the Greenland Sea, which was still thought of as the major source of dense water. In the mid-1990s, this picture began to fade. The deep convection in the Greenland Sea weakened and only Arctic Intermediate Water was formed. A deep salinity maximum was reinforced and a temperature max...

  2. Constraints on the formation of double neutron stars from the observed eccentricities and current limits on merger rates

    CERN Document Server

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Bulik, Tomasz; Gladysz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse SN from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of sigma=265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs et al. (2005) and then modify this distribution by changing the velocity dispersion towards smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with sigma = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both obs...

  3. Nitration of Norcorrolatonickel(II): First Observation of a Diatropic Current in a System Comprising a Norcorrole Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhihong; Li, Xiaofang; Stępień, Marcin; Chmielewski, Piotr J

    2016-03-14

    A one-pot reaction of 5,14-bis(mesityl)-norcorrolatonickel(II) with isoamyl nitrite under mild reaction conditions resulted in the consecutive formation of 3-nitro-, 3,12-dinitro- and 3,16-dinitro-, 3,7,12-trinitro-, and 3,7,12,16-tetranitro-norcorrolatonickel(II) in 50-80% yield. The substituted macrocycles retained their antiaromatic character. The observed regioselectivity of the substitution was analyzed by comparing the relative energies of the DFT energy-optimized models of the radical or arenium cationic intermediates that can be formed upon reaction with NO2. The nitrated systems were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry, NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, cyclic voltammetry, and DFT calculations. A significant and systematic cathodic shift of the redox couples was observed to correlate with an increasing number of the NO2 group. A decrease of the LUMO energies in the tri- and tetra-nitrated products stabilizes mono- and bis-reduced complexes of these ligands. The reduction takes place on the macrocycle rather than on the metal ion leading to the consecutive formation of stable paramagnetic monoanion radicals and water-soluble diamagnetic dianions with an aromatic character, which were revealed by ESR and (1)H NMR measurements, respectively. The electronic structures of the reduced forms were analyzed by extensive TD-DFT calculations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Sustainable Disruption Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar

    an increasingly expensive resource, and it is being consumed in vast amounts by the transportation industry. The single largest expense for both airlines and shipping companies is fuel, which exceeds both labour costs and capital expenditure. This thesis addresses how fuel considerations can be taken into account...... management fits in to the larger scope of optimization related processes in an airline and provides a brief survey of these. The thesis goes into more detail with disruption management and does as its main contribution describe how this can be combined with flight planning. Flight planning is the calculation...... of the horizontal and vertical flight path, which an aircraft should follow in order to get from airport A to airport B. The objective of this calculation is typically to minimize fuel consumption, while satisfying airspace regulations. To the knowledge of the author the work in this thesis represents the first...

  5. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-05-25

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity.

  6. Gap Filling of the CALYPSO HF Radar Sea Surface Current Data through Past Measurements and Satellite Wind Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gauci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency (HF radar installations are becoming essential components of operational real-time marine monitoring systems. The underlying technology is being further enhanced to fully exploit the potential of mapping sea surface currents and wave fields over wide areas with high spatial and temporal resolution, even in adverse meteo-marine conditions. Data applications are opening to many different sectors, reaching out beyond research and monitoring, targeting downstream services in support to key national and regional stakeholders. In the CALYPSO project, the HF radar system composed of CODAR SeaSonde stations installed in the Malta Channel is specifically serving to assist in the response against marine oil spills and to support search and rescue at sea. One key drawback concerns the sporadic inconsistency in the spatial coverage of radar data which is dictated by the sea state as well as by interference from unknown sources that may be competing with transmissions in the same frequency band. This work investigates the use of Machine Learning techniques to fill in missing data in a high resolution grid. Past radar data and wind vectors obtained from satellites are used to predict missing information and provide a more consistent dataset.

  7. The characteristics of railway service disruption: implications for disruption management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, D; Dadashi, N

    2017-03-01

    Rail disruption management is central to operational continuity and customer satisfaction. Disruption is not a unitary phenomenon - it varies by time, cause, location and complexity of coordination. Effective, user-centred technology for rail disruption must reflect this variety. A repertory grid study was conducted to elicit disruption characteristics. Construct elicitation with a group of experts (n = 7) captured 26 characteristics relevant to rail disruption. A larger group of operational staff (n = 28) rated 10 types of rail incident against the 26 characteristics. The results revealed distinctions such as business impact and public perception, and the importance of management of the disruption over initial detection. There were clear differences between those events that stop the traffic, as opposed to those that only slow the traffic. The results also demonstrate the utility of repertory grid for capturing the characteristics of complex work domains. Practitioner Summary: The aim of the paper is to understand how variety in rail disruption influences socio-technical design. It uses repertory grid to identify and prioritise 26 constructs, and group 10 disruption types, identifying critical factors such as whether an incident stops or merely slows the service, and business reputation.

  8. Initial results on the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields observed from the DE-2 satellite in the field-aligned current regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Farthing, W. H.; Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Initial results of the electric and magnetic field observations from the DE-2 satellite show a remarkably good correlation between the north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field in many passes of the field-aligned current regions. For a dayside cusp pass on August 15, 1981 the coefficient of correlation between these components was 0.996. A preliminary inspection of the available data from the first 6 months of the DE operation indicates that the similarity between the electric and magnetic field signatures of the field-aligned currents is a commonly observed feature at all local times. This high correlation is interpreted to be an indication that the closure of the field-aligned current is essentially meridional. When the correlation between these components is not good, the closure current is likely to be flowing along the auroral belt. When the correlation between the electric and magnetic fields is high, it is possible to estimate the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity from the observed field components.

  9. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  10. Action spectrum for photochemical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) disruption in an in vivo monkey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sabarinathan, Ranjani; Bubel, Tracy; Williams, David R.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of RPE disruption and autofluorescence (AF) photobleaching at light levels below the ANSI photochemical maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (Morgan et al., 2008) indicates a demand to modify future light safety standards to protect the retina from harm. To establish safe light exposures, we measured the visible light action spectrum for RPE disruption in an in vivo monkey model with fluorescence adaptive optics retinal imaging. Using this high resolution imaging modality can provide insight into the consequences of light on a cellular level and allow for longitudinal monitoring of retinal changes. The threshold retinal radiant exposures (RRE) for RPE disruption were determined for 4 wavelengths (460, 488, 544, and 594 nm). The anaesthetized macaque retina was exposed to a uniform 0.5° × 0.5° field of view (FOV). Imaging within a 2° × 2° FOV was performed before, immediately after and at 2 week intervals for 10 weeks. At each wavelength, multiple RREs were tested with 4 repetitions each to determine the threshold for RPE disruption. For qualitative analysis, RPE disruption is defined as any detectable change from the pre exposure condition in the cell mosaic in the exposed region relative to the corresponding mosaic in the immediately surrounding area. We have tested several metrics to evaluate the RPE images obtained before and after exposure. The measured action spectrum for photochemical RPE disruption has a shallower slope than the current ANSI photochemical MPE for the same conditions and suggests that longer wavelength light is more hazardous than other measurements would suggest.

  11. Large-scale atmospheric circulation and local particulate matter concentrations in Bavaria - from current observations to future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christoph; Weitnauer, Claudia; Brosy, Caroline; Hald, Cornelius; Lochbihler, Kai; Siegmund, Stefan; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) may have distinct adverse effects on human health. Spatial and temporal variations in PM10 concentrations reflect local emission rates, but are as well influenced by the local and synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions. Against this background, it can be furthermore argued that potential future climate change and associated variations in large-scale atmospheric circulation and local meteorological parameters will probably provoke corresponding changes in future PM10 concentration levels. The DFG-funded research project „Particulate matter and climate change in Bavaria" aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between daily and monthly PM10 indices at different Bavarian urban stations and the corresponding large-scale atmospheric circulation as well as local meteorological conditions. To this end, several statistical downscaling approaches have been developed for the period 1980 to 2011. PM10 data from 19 stations from the air quality monitoring network (LÜB) of the Bavarian Environmental Agency (LfU) have been utilized as predictands. Large-scale atmospheric gridded data from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data base and local meteorological observational data provided by the German Meteorological Service (DWD) served as predictors. The downscaling approaches encompass the synoptic downscaling of daily PM10 concentrations and several multivariate statistical models for the estimation of daily and monthly PM10, i.e.monthly mean and number of days exceeding a certain PM10 concentration threshold. Both techniques utilize objective circulation type classifications, which have been optimized with respect to their synoptic skill for the target variable PM10. All downscaling approaches have been evaluated via cross validation using varying subintervals of the 1980-2011 period as calibration and validation periods respectively. The most suitable - in terms of model skill determined from cross

  12. Enzymatic cell disruption of microalgae biomass in biorefinery processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuez, Marie; Mahdy, Ahmed; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-10-01

    When employing biotechnological processes for the procurement of biofuels and bio-products from microalgae, one of the most critical steps affecting economy and yields is the "cell disruption" stage. Currently, enzymatic cell disruption has delivered effective and cost competitive results when compared to mechanical and chemical cell disruption methods. However, the introduction of enzymes implies additional associated cost within the overall process. In order to reduce this cost, autolysis of microalgae is proposed as alternative enzymatic cell disruption method. This review aims to provide the state of the art of enzymatic cell disruption treatments employed in biorefinery processes and highlights the use of endopeptidases. During the enzymatic processes of microalgae life cycle, some lytic enzymes involved in cell division and programmed cell death have been proven useful in performing cell lysis. In this context, the role of endopeptidases is emphasized. Mirroring these natural events, an alternative cell disruption approach is proposed and described with the potential to induce the autolysis process using intrinsic cell enzymes. Integrating induced autolysis within biofuel production processes offers a promising approach to reduce overall global costs and energetic input associated with those of current cell disruption methods. A number of options for further inquiry are also discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hot Super Earths: disrupted young jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Recent {\\em Kepler} observations revealed an unexpected abundance of "hot" Earth-size to Neptune-size planets in the inner $0.02-0.2$ AU from their parent stars. We propose that these smaller planets are the remnants of massive giant planets that migrated inward quicker than they could contract. We show that such disruptions naturally occur in the framework of the Tidal Downsizing hypothesis for planet formation. We find that the characteristic planet-star separation at which such "hot disruptions" occur is $R \\approx 0.03-0.2$ AU. This result is independent of the planet's embryo mass but is dependent on the accretion rate in the disc. At high accretion rates, $\\dot M \\simgt 10^{-6}\\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryo is unable to contract quickly enough and is disrupted. At late times, when the accretion rate drops to $\\dot M \\simlt 10^{-8} \\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryos migrate sufficiently slow to not be disrupted. These "late arrivals" may explain the well known population of hot jupiters. If type I migration reg...

  14. Analytical Model and Characteristics of Current-Observer-Based Induction Motor Speed-Sensorless Vector Control System Taking into Account Iron Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Mineo; Xu, Fujin; Tsuruda, Yasutaka; Hamasaki, Shin-Ichi

    We have proposed a current-observer-based speed-sensorless vector control system that is in a rotating reference frame and takes into account iron loss. By deriving a linear model and by computing the trajectories of poles and zeros, the system stability on various parameters such as operating points, observer gain, controller gain and stator resistance has been investigated. Furthermore, an exact analytical model including PWM control, dead time and non-ideal features of power devices is developed. The characteristic improvement and stability limit of the proposed system are discussed by simulation and experiment.

  15. On Alfvenic Waves and Stochastic Ion Heating with 1Re Observations of Strong Field-aligned Currents, Electric Fields, and O+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra

    2008-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling makes it a very dynamic region having similar fundamental processes to those within the auroral regions. With Polar passing through the cusp at 1 Re in the Spring of 1996, we observe a strong correlation between ion heating and broadband ELF (BBELF) emissions. This commonly observed relationship led to the study of the coupling of large field-aligned currents, burst electric fields, and the thermal O+ ions. We demonstrate the role of these measurements to Alfvenic waves and stochastic ion heating. Finally we will show the properties of the resulting density cavities.

  16. Endocrine disrupters. The case of estrogen xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Olea Serrano

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest of the scientific community in chemical substances able to alter the hormone balance –endocrine disrupters- has grown with increasing evidence of the consequences for animal populations of exposure to these substances. As has occurred on previous occasions, observational data on animal populations have been sufficiently suggestive to cause concerns among clinicians that similar effects may be produced in human populations. Although data on the effects on populations of animals are more easily generated than those on individuals, clinical observations on human individuals alongside the few existing epidemiological studies have shown a certain parallelism. Indeed, in vitro and in vivo models have been able to designate many chemical compounds as hormonal mimics, including both natural and human-produced compounds to which there are exposure risks. The present work reviews the conceptual premises of endocrine disruption and the development of the use of this term.

  17. Models of field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substorm variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Volkov

    Full Text Available We have used the global numerical model of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere-protonosphere system to simulate the electric-field, ion- and electron-temperature and -concentration variations observed by EISCAT during the substorm event of 25 March 1987. In our previous studies we adopted the model input data for field-aligned currents and precipitating electron fluxes to obtain an agreement between observed and modelled ionospheric variations. Now, we have calculated the field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substrom variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT. The calculations of the field-aligned currents have been performed by means of numerical integration of the time-dependent continuity equation for the cold magnetospheric electrons. This equation was added to the system of the modelling equations including the equation for the electric-field potential to be solved jointly. In this case the inputs of the model are the spatial and time variations of the electric-field potential at the polar-cap boundaries and those of the cold magnetospheric electron concentration which have been adopted to obtain the agreement between the observed and modelled ionospheric variations for the substorm event of 25 March 1987. By this means it has been found that during the active phase of the substorm the current wedge is formed. It is connected with the region of the decreased cold magnetospheric electron content travelling westwards with a velocity of about 1 km s–1 at ionospheric levels.

  18. Evaluation of Water Treatment Methods for Endocrine Disrupting Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S. M.; Murray, K. E.

    2006-05-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have caught recent attention as one of the major concerns in the environment. They are known to interfere with the activity of growth-related hormones and usually, as a result, cause disruption in normal functioning of the body. The compounds currently classified as EDCs range from a variety of both natural and synthetic organic compounds and also some heavy metals. Most of these compounds are used in household, pharmaceutical, industrial, agricultural activities, the consumption or usage of which increases with population. There is a lack of detailed chemical and biological analysis as to what concentrations each of these EDCs pose harmless to the environment because of the large number of the suspected compounds. However, several published reports have established that endocrine disruption is observed in aquatic species due to chronic exposure to concentrations of some EDCs as low as a few ng/l. Conventional water treatment facilities do not usually suffice to remove EDCs in concentrations below 1 ng/l. Available technologies for removal of EDCs include adsorption, degradation and membrane treatment. The removal rates, however, are dependant on the properties of the compound, such as molecular weight, water- octanol partition coefficient and vapor pressure; physiochemical conditions of the matrix such as, redox and temperature conditions; type and dose of degrading agent and the concentration of the EDCs. Since, EDCs comprise a vast variety of compounds, their response to each of these treatment methods will be different and hence it is plausible that a single treatment technique will not be sufficient to remove the EDCs to very low concentrations. Based on our review of existing water treatment methods, we believe that a sequential treatment technique that consists of an adsorption, a degradation and finally a fine membrane treatment, each optimized for favorable, efficient and inexpensive removal may be required to remove

  19. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  20. Disruptive behaviour in the perioperative setting: a contemporary review

    OpenAIRE

    Villafranca, Alexander; Hamlin, Colin; Enns, Stephanie; Jacobsohn, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Disruptive behaviour, which we define as behaviour that does not show others an adequate level of respect and causes victims or witnesses to feel threatened, is a concern in the operating room. This review summarizes the current literature on disruptive behaviour as it applies to the perioperative domain. Source Searches of MEDLINE®, Scopus™, and Google books identified articles and monographs of interest, with backreferencing used as a supplemental strategy. Principal findings Much o...

  1. Managing Port-Related Supply Chain Disruptions: A Conceptual Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shan Loh

    2014-04-01

    This paper synthesizes the current literature into a management model that seeks to target operational deficiencies at ports. The management model is operationalized in three tiers, from the top management level to the front-line employees, with characteristics from risk management, business continuity management and quality management theories. The proposed model serves as a universal guide in assisting port management in managing port-related disruptions and seeks to reduce the occurrences of port-related supply chain disruption threats.

  2. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  3. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  4. Establishment and Assessment of Plasma Disruption and Warning Databases from EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Robert, Granetz; Xiao, Bingjia; Li, Jiangang; Yang, Fei; Li, Junjun; Chen, Dalong

    2016-12-01

    Disruption database and disruption warning database of the EAST tokamak had been established by a disruption research group. The disruption database, based on Structured Query Language (SQL), comprises 41 disruption parameters, which include current quench characteristics, EFIT equilibrium characteristics, kinetic parameters, halo currents, and vertical motion. Presently most disruption databases are based on plasma experiments of non-superconducting tokamak devices. The purposes of the EAST database are to find disruption characteristics and disruption statistics to the fully superconducting tokamak EAST, to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions, to explore the influence of disruption on superconducting magnets and to extrapolate toward future burning plasma devices. In order to quantitatively assess the usefulness of various plasma parameters for predicting disruptions, a similar SQL database to Alcator C-Mod for EAST has been created by compiling values for a number of proposed disruption-relevant parameters sampled from all plasma discharges in the 2015 campaign. The detailed statistic results and analysis of two databases on the EAST tokamak are presented. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2014GB103000)

  5. Interpreting Debris from Satellite Disruption in External Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sackett, Penny D.; Bullock, James S.

    2001-08-01

    We examine the detectability and interpretation of debris trails caused by satellite disruption in external galaxies using semianalytic approximations for the dependence of streamer length, width, and surface brightness on satellite and primary galaxy characteristics. The semianalytic method is tested successfully against N-body simulations and then applied to three representative astronomical applications. First, we show how streamer properties can be used to estimate mass-to-light ratios Υ and streamer ages of totally disrupted satellites, and we apply the method to the stellar arc in NGC 5907. Second, we discuss how the lack of observed tidal debris around a satellite can provide an upper limit on its mass-loss rate and, as an example, derive the implied limits on mass-loss rates for M32 and NGC 205 around Andromeda. Finally, we point out that a statistical analysis of streamer properties might be applied to test and refine cosmological models of hierarchical galaxy formation, and we use the predicted debris from a standard Λ cold dark matter realization to test the feasibility of such a study. Using the Local Group satellites and the few known examples of debris trails in the Galaxy and in external systems, we estimate that the best current techniques could characterize the brightest (RCELT and OWL may allow fainter trails to be detected routinely and thus may be used for statistical studies such as those required for tests of galaxy formation.

  6. Interception and disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Given sufficient warning we might try to avert a collision with a comet or asteroid by using beamed energy or by using the kinetic energy of an interceptor rocket. If motivated by the opportunity to convert the object into a space asset, perhaps a microgravity mine for construction materials or spacecraft fuels, we might try a rendezvous to implant a propulsion system of some sort. But the most cost-effective means of disruption is a nuclear explosive. In this paper, I discuss optimal tactics for terminal intercept, which can be extended to remote-interdiction scenarios as well. I show that the optimal mass ratio of an interceptor rock carrying a nuclear explosive depends mainly on the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the assailant-object closing velocity. I compare the effectiveness of stand-off detonation, surface burst, and penetration, for both deflection and pulverization, concluding that a penetrator has no clear advantage over a surface-burst device for deflection, but is a distinctly more capable pulverizer. The advantage of a stand-off device is to distribute the impulse more evenly over the surface of the object and to prevent fracture, an event which would greatly complicate the intercept problem. Finally, I present some results of a model for gravitationally bound objects and obtain the maximum non-fracturing deflection speed for a variety of object sizes and structures. For a single engagement, I conclude that the non-fracturing deflection speed obtainable with a stand-off device is about four times the speed obtainable with a surface-burst device. Furthermore, the non-fracturing deflection speed is somewhat dependent on the number of competent components of the object, the speed for a 13 component object being about twice that for a 135 component object.

  7. A Simple Ideal MHD Model of Vertical Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2008-11-01

    A simple model of axisymmetric vertical disruption events (VDEs) in tokamaks is presented in which the halo current force exerted on the vacuum vessel is calculated directly from linear, marginally stable, ideal-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stability analysis. The basic premise of the model is that the halo current force modifies pressure balance at the edge of the plasma, and therefore also modifies ideal-MHD plasma stability. In order to prevent the ideal vertical instability, responsible for the VDE, from growing on the very short Alfv'en time- scale, the halo current force must adjust itself such that the instability is rendered marginally stable. The model predicts halo currents which are similar in magnitude to those observed experimentally. An approximate non-axisymmetric version of the model is developed in order to calculate the toroidal peaking factor of the halo current force.

  8. A simple ideal magnetohydrodynamical model of vertical disruption events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    2009-01-01

    A simple model of axisymmetric vertical disruption events (VDEs) in tokamaks is presented in which the halo current force exerted on the vacuum vessel is calculated directly from linear, marginally stable, ideal-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stability analysis. The basic premise of the model is that the halo current force modifies pressure balance at the edge of the plasma, and therefore also modifies ideal-MHD plasma stability. In order to prevent the ideal vertical instability, responsible for the VDE, from growing on the very short Alfvén time scale, the halo current force must adjust itself such that the instability is rendered marginally stable. The model predicts halo currents which are similar in magnitude to those observed experimentally. An approximate nonaxisymmetric version of the model is developed in order to calculate the toroidal peaking factor for the halo current force.

  9. Disruption scenarios, their mitigation and operation window in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, M.; Shimada, M.; Fujieda, H.; Gribov, Yu.; Ioki, K.; Kawano, Y.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Lukash, V.; Ohmori, J.

    2007-04-01

    The impacts of plasma disruptions on ITER have been investigated in detail to confirm the robustness of the design of the machine to the potential consequential loads. The loads include both electro-magnetic (EM) and heat loads on the in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel. Several representative disruption scenarios are specified based on newly derived physics guidelines for the shortest current quench time as well as the maximum product of halo current fraction and toroidal peaking factor arising from disruptions in ITER. Disruption simulations with the DINA code and EM load analyses with a 3D finite element method code are performed for these scenarios. Some margins are confirmed in the EM load on in-vessel components due to induced eddy and halo currents for these representative scenarios. However, the margins are not very large. The heat load on various parts of the first wall due to the vertical movement and the thermal quench (TQ) is calculated with a 2D heat conduction code based on the database of heat deposition during disruptions and simulation results with the DINA code. For vertical displacement event, it is found that the beryllium (Be) wall does not melt during the vertical movement, prior to the TQ. Significant melting is anticipated for the upper Be wall and the tungsten divertor baffle due to TQ after the vertical movement. However, its impact could be substantially mitigated by implementing a reliable detection system of the vertical movement and a mitigation system, e.g. massive noble gas injection. Some melting of the upper Be wall is anticipated at major disruptions. At least several tens of unmitigated disruptions must be considered even if an advanced prediction/mitigation system is implemented. With these unmitigated disruptions, the loss of the Be layer is expected to be within ap30-100 µm/event out of a 10 mm thick Be first wall.

  10. Tidal disruption of inviscid protoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Roche showed that equilibrium is impossible for a small fluid body synchronously orbiting a primary within a critical radius now termed the Roche limit. Tidal disruption of orbitally unbound bodies is a potentially important process for planetary formation through collisional accumulation, because the area of the Roche limit is considerably larger then the physical cross section of a protoplanet. Several previous studies were made of dynamical tidal disruption and different models of disruption were proposed. Because of the limitation of these analytical models, we have used a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to model the tidal disruption process. The code is basically the same as the one used to model giant impacts; we simply choose impact parameters large enough to avoid collisions. The primary and secondary both have iron cores and silicate mantles, and are initially isothermal at a molten temperature. The conclusions based on the analytical and numerical models are summarized.

  11. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  12. Persistent forecasting of disruptive technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council

    ...) and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) tasked the Committee for Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies with providing guidance and insight on how to build a persistent forecasting system to predict, analyze, and reduce the impact...

  13. Tidal disruption of a star in the Schwarzschild spacetime: Relativistic effects in the return rate of debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Roseanne M.; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by an improved multiwavelength observational coverage of the transient sky, we investigate the importance of relativistic effects in disruptions of stars by nonspinning black holes (BHs). This paper focuses on calculating the ballistic rate of return of debris to the BH as this rate is commonly assumed to be proportional to the light curve of the event. We simulate the disruption of a low mass main sequence star by BHs of varying masses (105,106,107M⊙) and of a white dwarf by a 105M⊙ BH. Based on the orbital energy as well as angular momentum of the debris, we infer the orbital distribution and estimate the return rate of the debris following the disruption. We find two signatures of relativistic disruptions: a gradual rise as well as a delayed peak in the return rate curves relative to their Newtonian analogs. Assuming that the return rates are proportional to the light curves, we find that relativistic effects are in principle measurable given the cadence and sensitivity of the current transient sky surveys. Accordingly, using a simple model of a relativistic encounter with a Newtonian parametric fit of the peak leads to an overestimate in the BH mass by a factor of ˜few×0.1 and ˜few in the case of the main sequence star and white dwarf tidal disruptions, respectively.

  14. Tidal disruption of a star in the Schwarzschild spacetime: relativistic effects in the return rate of debris

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Roseanne M

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by an improved multi-wavelength observational coverage of the transient sky, we investigate the importance of relativistic effects in close encounters of stars with non-spinning black holes (BHs). We simulate the disruption of a low mass main sequence star by BHs of varying masses ($10^5,10^6,10^7 M_\\odot$) and disruption of a white dwarf by a $10^5 M_\\odot$ BH. Based on the orbital energy as well as angular momentum of the debris, we infer the orbital distribution and estimate the return rate of the debris following the disruption. We find two key signatures of relativistic disruptions: an early rise as well as a delayed peak in the return rate curves relative to their Newtonian analogs. Assuming that these features can be traced in tidal disruption light curves, we find that relativistic effects are in principle measurable given the cadence and sensitivity of the current transient sky surveys. Accordingly, an attempt to model a relativistic encounter with the light curve based on a Newtonian calcu...

  15. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  16. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-21

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  17. Contribution of the Endocrine Perspective in the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Franssen, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    to low doses of tenths or hundreds of chemicals since prenatal life, causation is most difficult to demonstrate and justifies a translational approach using animal models. Studies in rodents indicate an exquisite sensitivity of neuroendocrine endpoints to EDCs. Altogether, the data from both human......Debate makes science progress. In the field of endocrine disruption, endocrinology has brought up findings that substantiate a specific perspective on the definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the role of the endocrine system and the endpoints of hormone and EDC actions among other...... that the increasing burden of EDCs could be an explanation. In fact, pubertal timing currently shows complex changes since advancement of some manifestations of puberty (e.g. breast development) and no change or delay of others (e.g. menarche, pubic hair development) can be observed. In a human setting with exposure...

  18. Combined exposure to endocrine disrupting pesticides impairs parturition and causes pup mortality in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille Reimer; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    Risk assessment is currently based on the no observed adverse effect level (NOAELs) for single compounds. Humans are exposed to a mixture of chemicals and epidemiological studies have reported some associations between endocrine disrupting effects and combined exposure to certain pesticides....... Although laboratory animal studies have shown that some endocrine disrupting pesticides can affect reproduction and sexual differentiation, individual pesticides may appear to be present in human tissues at too low levels to cause concern for adverse reproductive effects. However, recent studies in our...... to five pesticides, i.e. procymidone, mancozeb, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and prochloraz. Common features for the three azole fungicides are that they increase gestational length possibly because of an increase in progesterone levels in dams. Groups of 8 time-mated Wistar rats (HanTac:WH) were gavaged...

  19. First observation of the neutral current nuclear excitation sup 12 C(. nu. ,. nu. ') sup 12 C sup * (1 sup + ,1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmann, B.; Burtak, F.; Finckh, E.; Glombik, A.; Hanika, T.; Kretschmer, W.; Meyer, R.; Schilling, F. (Physikalisches Inst., Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany)); Booth, N.E. (Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)); Dodd, A. (Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)); Drexlin, G.; Eberhard, V.; Gemmeke, H.; Giorginis, G.; Grandegger, W.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Maschuw, R.; Plischke, P.; Raupp, F.; Wochele, J.; Wolf, J.; Woelfle, S.; Zeitnitz, B. (Inst. fuer Kernphysik 1, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany) Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany)); Edgington, J.A.; Gorringe, T.; Malik, A.; Seligmann, B. (Physics Dept., Queen Mary and Westfield Coll., London (United Kingdom)); KARMEN Collaboration

    1991-09-19

    The neutral current nuclear excitation {sup 12}C({nu}, {nu}'){sup 12}C* (1{sup +}, 1; 15.1 MeV) has been observed for the first time. For {nu}{sub e} and anti {nu}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +}-decay at rest the flux averaged cross section was determined to be ({sigma}{sub NC})({nu}{sub e}+anti n{sub {mu}})>=(10.8{plus minus}5.1 (stat.) {plus minus}1.1 (syst.))x10{sup -42} cm{sup 2}. (orig.).

  20. Observation and investigation of a dynamic inflection point in current-voltage curves for roll-to-roll processed polymer photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Lilliedal, Mathilde Raad

    2010-01-01

    Inflection point behaviour is often observed in the current-voltage (IV) curve of polymer and organic solar cells. This phenomenon is examined in the context of flexible roll-to-roll (R2R) processed polymer solar cells in a large series of devices with a layer structure of: PET-ITO-ZnO-P3HT......:PCBM-PEDOT:PSS-Ag. The devices were manufactured using a combination of slot-die coating and screen printing; they were then encapsulated by lamination using a polymer based barrier material. All manufacturing steps were carried out in ambient air. The freshly prepared devices showed a consistent inflection point in the IV...

  1. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  2. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bethan A; Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls.

  3. The impact of disruptive innovations in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of "disruptive innovations," which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potential framework for developing strategies to improve quality and control costs associated with musculoskeletal care. The introduction of mobile fluoroscopic imaging systems, the development of the Surgical Implant Generation Network intramedullary nail for treatment of long bone fractures in the developing world, the expanding role and contributions of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the orthopaedic team, and the rise of ambulatory surgery centers are all examples of disruptive innovations in the field of orthopaedics. Although numerous cultural and regulatory barriers have limited the widespread adoption of these "disruptive innovations," we believe they represent an opportunity for clinicians to regain leadership in health care while at the same time improving quality and access to care for patients with musculoskeletal disease.

  4. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are reconstructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  5. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are re-constructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  6. Linear MHD stability analysis of post-disruption plasmas in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleynikova, K.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Aleynikov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the plasma current can be replaced by a runaway electron (RE) current during plasma disruptions in ITER. In this case the post-disruption plasma current profile is likely to be more peaked than the pre-disruption profile. The MHD activity of such plasma will affect the runaway electron generation and confinement and the dynamics of the plasma position evolution (Vertical Displacement Event), limiting the timeframe for runaway electrons and disruption mitigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the influence of the possible RE seed current parameters on the onset of the MHD instabilities. By varying the RE seed current profile, we search for subsequent plasma evolutions with the highest and the lowest MHD activity. This information can be applied to a development of desirable ITER disruption scenario.

  7. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear de-excitation $\\gamma$-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwai, E; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Taylor, I J; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasi-elastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear de-excitation \\gamma-rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to $3.01 \\times 10^{20}$ protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the 4-30 MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 55.7, which includes an estimated 17.3 background events. The background is primarily non-quasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is $1.35 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ with a 68% confidence interval of $(1.06, 1.94) \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theor...

  8. A polymeric colchicinoid prodrug with reduced toxicity and improved efficacy for vascular disruption in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crielaard BJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bart J Crielaard1, Steffen van der Wal1, Twan Lammers2, Huong Thu Le1, Wim E Hennink1, Raymond M Schiffelers1, Gert Storm1, Marcel HAM Fens11Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany The first two authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Colchicinoids are very potent tubulin-binding compounds, which interfere with microtubule formation, giving them strong cytotoxic properties, such as cell mitosis inhibition and induction of microcytoskeleton depolymerization. While this makes them promising vascular disrupting agents (VDAs in cancer therapy, their dose-limiting toxicity has prevented any clinical application for this purpose. Therefore, colchicinoids are considered attractive lead molecules for the development of novel vascular disrupting nanomedicine. In a previous study, a polymeric colchicinoid prodrug that showed favorable hydrolysis characteristics at physiological conditions was developed. In the current study, this polymeric colchicinoid prodrug was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its toxicity and vascular disrupting potential. Cell viability studies with human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as an in vitro measure for colchicine activity, reflected the degradation kinetics of the prodrug accordingly. Upon intravenous treatment, in vivo, of B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice with colchicine or with the polymeric colchicinoid prodrug, apparent vascular disruption and consequent tumor necrosis was observed for the prodrug but not for free colchicine at an equivalent dose. Moreover, a five-times-higher dose of the prodrug was well tolerated, indicating reduced toxicity. These findings demonstrate that the polymeric colchicinoid prodrug has a substantially improved efficacy/toxicity ratio compared with that of colchicine, making it a promising VDA for cancer therapy

  9. Observations of an early Agulhas current retroflection event in 2001: A temporary cessation of inter-ocean exchange south of Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aken, H. M.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Rouault, M.; Whittle, C.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2013-02-01

    The exchange of heat and salt between the South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean, at the southern terminus of the Agulhas current, forms a crucial link in the global ocean circulation. It has been surmised that upstream retroflections in this current could produce temporary interruptions to the exchange, but that their impact would depend on the vertical extent of such retroflections and on their duration. The fortuitous presence at sea of a research vessel has now enabled us to investigate such an episode at subsurface levels in combination with remote sensing of the sea surface. We present here the first in situ evidence that an upstream or early retroflection can extend to a depth of well over 750 m and last for 5 months. This event was likely triggered upstream by the happenstance of two Natal Pulses, large cyclonic eddies inshore of the Agulhas current. These eddies short-circuited the Agulhas with its Return current, leading to the shedding of three large Agulhas rings in quick succession. The arrival of a third cyclonic eddy when the Retroflection was still quite retracted did not lead to another ring shedding event. The resulting early retroflection may have had the effect of stalling the shedding of Agulhas rings and their motion towards the Cape Basin. However, these early retroflections are too scarce to allow generic statements on their generation or consequences, and the relation with large-scale environmental factors. It is likely that the observed withdrawal of the retroflection into the Transkei Basin is a fortuitous result of a series of contingent interactions.

  10. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  11. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  12. Current status of the global change observation mission - water SHIZUKU (GCOM-W) and the advanced microwave scanning radiometer 2 (AMSR2) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takashi; Kachi, Misako; Kasahara, Marehito

    2016-10-01

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W) or "SHIZUKU" in 18 May 2012 (JST) from JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center. The GCOM-W satellite joins to NASA's A-train orbit since June 2012, and its observation is ongoing. The GCOM-W satellite carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2). The AMSR2 is a multi-frequency, total-power microwave radiometer system with dual polarization channels for all frequency bands, and successor microwave radiometer to the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) loaded on the NASA's Aqua satellite. The AMSR-E kept observation in the slower rotation speed (2 rotations per minute) for cross-calibration with AMSR2 since December 2012, its operation ended in December 2015. The AMSR2 is designed almost similarly as the AMSR-E. The AMSR2 has a conical scanning system with large-size offset parabolic antenna, a feed horn cluster to realize multi-frequency observation, and an external calibration system with two temperature standards. However, some important improvements are made. For example, the main reflector size of the AMSR2 is expanded to 2.0 m to observe the Earth's surface in higher spatial resolution, and 7.3-GHz channel is newly added to detect radio frequency interferences at 6.9 GHz. In this paper, we present a recent topic for the AMSR2 (i.e., RFI detection performances) and the current operation status of the AMSR2.

  13. SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

    2015-01-01

    Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

  14. Early Labour Market Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Philip

    Work interruptions related to birth are expected to affect mothers’ wages directly through changes in the formation of human capital. This effect is proposed to be exceptionally strong for young adult childbearing women who are about to start their working careers. This study investigates whether...... the long-term socioeconomic problems experienced by women with first childbirth before turning 26 are a reflection of pre-existing disadvantages or are a consequence of the childbearing timing? The purpose is furthermore to observe whether a new combination of the best practices of earlier studies...

  15. The Emergence of Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    We study the influence of technological efficiency and organizational inertia on the emergence of competition when firms decide myopically. Using an agent-based computer simulation model, we observe the competitive reaction of a former monopolist to the advent of a new competitor. While the entrant uses a new technology, the monopolist is free either to stick to his former technology or to switch to the new one. We find that?irrespective of details regarding the demand side?a change of indust...

  16. Effect of plasma disruption on superconducting magnet in EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junjun, E-mail: lijunjun73@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 230031 Hefei (China); Wang, Qiuliang [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100190 Beijing (China); Li, Jiangang; Wu, Yu; Qian, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 230031 Hefei (China)

    2013-10-15

    For the safe operation of Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with higher plasma performance discharge in future, it is important to study the effect of plasma disruption on central solenoid (CS) coils. The outlet temperature rise of CS1-6 coils measured in experiment is analyzed. It is found that the outlet temperature rise of CS1-6 coils caused by plasma disruption cannot be observed in experimental data, because the effect of plasma disruption on outlet of CS coils is a small value, and the discretization error of experimental data is bigger than this value. In addition, the maximum temperature of CS coils during the plasma discharge is simulated by SAITOKPF code, and it appears that the maximum temperature of CS coils increases a little in the plasma disruption, but the temperature rise is a small quantity.

  17. Lightning Attachment to Wind Turbines in Central Kansas: Video Observations, Correlation with the NLDN and in-situ Peak Current Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Cummins, K. L.; Hutchinson, M.; Nag, A.

    2012-12-01

    Lightning attachment to tall objects has been studied for decades. The attachment of lightning to electric power transmission towers in elevated terrain has driven much of the quantitative assessment of lightning characteristics in the 1970's and 80's. This has led to the understanding that in flat terrain, the probability of upward-initiated lightning is negligible for tower heights less than 100 m. For tower heights greater than 100, the probability increases roughly linearly with the log of height, reaching 100% at a height of 400 m. Additionally, the probability of upward initiation increases when the object resides on locally-elevated terrain. Over the last decade, there has been renewed interest in the study of lightning attachment to tall objects in general, and wind turbines in particular, following the establishment of large "wind farms" in lightning-prone regions. In this study, we present video observations, radiation magnetic field, and in-situ peak current measurements of lightning from an ongoing field program in a large wind farm in north-central Kansas, located in the U.S. Central Great Plains. The terrain variations within the wind farm are small rolling hills with peak variations on the order of 25 m. All turbines had a turbine hub height of 80 m, and a blade tip maximum height of 125 m. Two digital video camera systems (60 fields-per-second) were configured to self-trigger 2-second video sequences using a sequential-field-subtraction scene analysis (ufo-Capture). The two cameras had a common field of view that included 8 of the wind turbines. Nearby NLDN sensors were configured to record information that allows reconstruction of magnetic field waveforms within the bandwidth of the NLDN sensors. Some of the turbines were equipped with semi-quantitative in-situ peak current measuring devices. To date, more than 100 cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes have terminated within the perimeter of the wind farm. Video observations of flashes that attached to

  18. Pest management programmes in vineyards using male mating disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Ally R; Zahavi, Tirtza; Gordon, Dvora; Anshelevich, Leonid; Harel, Miriam; Ovadia, Shmulik; Dunkelblum, Ezra

    2007-08-01

    Israeli vine growers have been reluctant to adopt the mating disruption technique for control of the European vine moth, Lobesia botrana Den. & Schiff. Since the chemically controlled honeydew moth, Cryptoblabes gnidiella Mill., coexists with the European vine moth, growers have maintained that the use of mating disruption would fail to bring about a significant reduction in pesticide use. In this study, the efficacy of mating disruption techniques against C. gnidiella was tested, as well as the effect of these methods on pesticide use and damage to clusters when the method was employed against both of the pests in wine grapes. Comparisons were made between plots treated with (1) L. botrana mating disruption pheromone, (2) L. botrana and C. gnidiella mating disruption pheromones and (3) control plots. A significant difference in the number of clusters infested with the developmental stages of the moths was seen between pheromone-treated plots and controls, while no such difference was observed between plots treated with one versus two pheromones. A similar pattern was observed in the number of insecticide applications; the greatest number of applications was used in control plots, followed by plots treated with L. botrana mating disruption pheromone and by plots treated with pheromones against both pests, in which no pesticides were applied.

  19. Tidal disruption of inviscid planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, A. P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of previous efforts' demonstration that strongly dissipative planetesimals are immune to tidal disruption, an examination is presently conducted of the complementary case of inviscid planetesimals arising from collisions that are sufficiently energetic to entirely melt the resulting planetesimal and debris. The tidal disruption is numerically simulated by means of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Cameron and Benz (1991), concentrating on the tidal disruption of 0.01 earth-mass planetesimals passing by the earth with variations in the impact parameter at perigee and velocity at infinity. The SPH models show that tidal forces during a close encounter can efficiently convert orbital angular momentum into spin angular momentum, thereby initiating equatorial mass-shedding to inviscid planetesimals that have been spun up beyond the limit of rotational stability.

  20. Market Susceptibility Toward Disruptive Business Model Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Dover, Oliver; Nord, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the conditional factors indicating market susceptibility toward disruptive innovation. There is a need to separate the different forms of disruptive innovation into segments targeting; technology, product or business model disruption. The concepts are fundamentally different and the literature to date is very one sided toward disruptive technology/product innovation. A shortage of studies on disruptive business model innovation has been discovered. This study therefore pr...

  1. CURRENT ISSUES REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently public concern has increased regarding industrial and environmental substances that may have adverse hormonal effects in human and wildlife populations. This concern has also been expanded to include antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the presence of various antibiotics a...

  2. Disrupting Traditions: Swimming against the Current of Adolescent Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnabis, Debi; Upton, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology have aggravated the generations-old problem of bullying in schools. In this article, the authors attend to the impact of social media on bullying and advocate an approach to teaching anti-bullying that incorporates a project-based learning approach for young adolescents. Process drama as a model of learning and the use of…

  3. Observed variability in the upper layers at the Equator, 90°E in the Indian Ocean during 2001-2008, 1: zonal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R. R.; Horii, T.; Masumoto, Y.; Mizuno, K.

    2016-06-01

    The observed variability of zonal currents (ZC) at the Equator, 90°E shows a strong seasonal cycle in the near-surface 40-350 m water column with periodic east-west reversals most pronounced at semiannual frequency. Superposed on this, a strong intraseasonal variability of 30-90 day periodicity is also prominently seen in the near-surface layer (40-80 m) almost throughout the year with the only exception of February-March. An eastward flowing equatorial undercurrent (EUC) is present in the depth range of 80-160 m during March-April and October-November. The observed intraseasonal variability in the near-surface layer is primarily determined by the equatorial zonal westerly wind bursts (WWBs) through local frictional coupling between the zonal flow in the surface layer and surface zonal winds and shows large interannual variability. The eastward flowing EUC maintained by the ZPG set up by the east-west slope of the thermocline remotely controlled by the zonal wind (ZW) and zonally propagating wave fields also shows significant interannual variability. This observed variability on interannual time scales appears to be controlled by the corresponding variability in the alongshore winds off the Somalia coast during the preceding boreal winter, the ZW field along the equator, and the associated zonally propagating Kelvin and Rossby waves. The salinity induced vertical stratification observed in the near-surface layer through barrier layer thickness (BLT) effects also shows a significant influence on the ZC field on intraseasonal time scale. Interestingly, among all the 8 years (2001-2008), relatively weaker annual cycle is seen in both ZC in the 40-350 m water column and boreal spring sea surface temperature (SST) only during 2001 and 2008 along the equator caused through propagating wave dynamics.

  4. Observation and investigation of a dynamic inflection point in current-voltage curves for roll-to-roll processed polymer photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Lilliedal, Mathilde Raad

    2010-01-01

    Inflection point behaviour is often observed in the current-voltage (IV) curve of polymer and organic solar cells. This phenomenon is examined in the context of flexible roll-to-roll (R2R) processed polymer solar cells in a large series of devices with a layer structure of: PET-ITO-ZnO-P3HT...... that the findings are applicable to various other device structures based on semiconducting oxides. The findings may have influences on the possibilities and scale-up of polymer solar technologies.......:PCBM-PEDOT:PSS-Ag. The devices were manufactured using a combination of slot-die coating and screen printing; they were then encapsulated by lamination using a polymer based barrier material. All manufacturing steps were carried out in ambient air. The freshly prepared devices showed a consistent inflection point in the IV...

  5. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  6. Formation and termination of runaway beams in ITER disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2017-06-01

    A self-consistent analysis of the relevant physics regarding the formation and termination of runaway beams during mitigated disruptions by Ar and Ne injection is presented for selected ITER scenarios with the aim of improving our understanding of the physics underlying the runaway heat loads onto the plasma facing components (PFCs) and identifying open issues for developing and accessing disruption mitigation schemes for ITER. This is carried out by means of simplified models, but still retaining sufficient details of the key physical processes, including: (a) the expected dominant runaway generation mechanisms (avalanche and primary runaway seeds: Dreicer and hot tail runaway generation, tritium decay and Compton scattering of γ rays emitted by the activated wall), (b) effects associated with the plasma and runaway current density profile shape, and (c) corrections to the runaway dynamics to account for the collisions of the runaways with the partially stripped impurity ions, which are found to have strong effects leading to low runaway current generation and low energy conversion during current termination for mitigated disruptions by noble gas injection (particularly for Ne injection) for the shortest current quench times compatible with acceptable forces on the ITER vessel and in-vessel components ({τ\\text{res}}∼ 22~\\text{ms} ). For the case of long current quench times ({τ\\text{res}}∼ 66~\\text{ms} ), runaway beams up to  ∼10 MA can be generated during the disruption current quench and, if the termination of the runaway current is slow enough, the generation of runaways by the avalanche mechanism can play an important role, increasing substantially the energy deposited by the runaways onto the PFCs up to a few hundreds of MJs. Mixed impurity (Ar or Ne) plus deuterium injection proves to be effective in controlling the formation of the runaway current during the current quench, even for the longest current quench times, as well as in decreasing

  7. Disruption Management in Passenger Transportation - from Air to Tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 10 years there has been a tremendous growth in air transportation of passengers. Both airports and airspace are close to saturation with respect to capacity, leading to delays caused by disruptions. At the same time the amount of vehicular trac around and in all larger cities...... of the world has show a dramatic increase as well. Public transportation by e.g. rail has come into focus, and hence also the service level provided by suppliers ad public transportation. These transportation systems are likewise very vulnerable to disruptions. In the airline industry there is a long tradition...... operations are becoming available. The use of advanced planning and recovery methods in the railway industry currently gains momentum. The current paper gives a short overview over the methods used for planning and disruption management in the airline industry. The situation regarding railway optimization...

  8. Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic...fold lower than that needed to thoroughly disrupt biofilms in the current investigation. A previous study of α-amylase applied to S. aureus biofilms...Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Open Microbiology Journal, 2011. 5: p. 21-31. 36. Wu, J.A., et al., Lysostaphin disrupts Staphylococcus aureus and

  9. NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies. The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.

  10. Combined exposure to endocrine disrupting pesticides impairs parturition, causes pup mortality and affects sexual differentiation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Risk assessment is currently based on the no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for single compounds. Humans are exposed to a mixture of chemicals and recent studies in our laboratory have shown that combined exposure to endocrine disrupters can cause adverse effects on male sexual development......, even though the doses of the single compounds are below their individual NOAELs for anti-androgenic effects. Consequently, we have initiated a large project where the purpose is to study mixture effects of endocrine disrupting pesticides at low doses. In the initial range-finding mixture studies, rats...... were gavaged during gestation and lactation with five doses of a mixture of the fungicides procymidone, mancozeb, epoxyconazole, tebuconazole and prochloraz. The mixture ratio was chosen according to the doses of each individual pesticide that produced no observable effects on pregnancy length and pup...

  11. Jogging Can Modify Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jill I.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging was used to modify disruptive behavior as part of the classroom routine for 12 learning disabled elementary-grade boys. The number of incidents of each of five negative behaviors were reduced by half following the 10-minute jogging routine. (SBH)

  12. Strategic network disruption and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, Britta; De Jaegher, K.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    We study a game between a network designer, who uses costly links to connect nodes in a network, and a network disruptor who tries to disrupt the resulting network as much as possible by deleting either nodes or links. For low linking costs networks with all nodes in symmetric positions are a best r

  13. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally…

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Ocean Prediction Through Observation Modeling and Analysis (OPTOMA) project, 26 September 1984 - 16 July 1985 (NODC Accession 9600075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from September 26, 1984 to July 16, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  15. Assessing nodule detection on lung cancer screening CT: the effects of tube current modulation and model observer selection on detectability maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. M.; Noo, F.; McMillan, K.; Young, S.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening using low dose CT has been shown to reduce lung cancer related mortality and been approved for widespread use in the US. These scans keep radiation doses low while maximizing the detection of suspicious lung lesions. Tube current modulation (TCM) is one technique used to optimize dose, however limited work has been done to assess TCM's effect on detection tasks. In this work the effect of TCM on detection is investigated throughout the lung utilizing several different model observers (MO). 131 lung nodules were simulated at 1mm intervals in each lung of the XCAT phantom. A Sensation 64 TCM profile was generated for the XCAT phantom and 2500 noise realizations were created using both TCM and a fixed TC. All nodules and noise realizations were reconstructed for a total of 262 (left and right lungs) nodule reconstructions and 10 000 XCAT lung reconstructions. Single-slice Hotelling (HO) and channelized Hotelling (CHO) observers, as well as a multislice CHO were used to assess area-under-the-curve (AUC) as a function of nodule location in both the fixed TC and TCM cases. As expected with fixed TC, nodule detectability was lowest through the shoulders and leveled off below mid-lung; with TCM, detectability was unexpectedly highest through the shoulders, dropping sharply near the mid-lung and then increasing into the abdomen. Trends were the same for all model observers. These results suggest that TCM could be further optimized for detection and that detectability maps present exciting new opportunities for TCM optimization on a patient-specific level.

  16. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  17. Comparing modeled and observed changes in mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica between the Last Glacial Maximum and current climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Samuel [University of Siena, Graduate School in Polar Sciences, Siena (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Environmental Sciences, Milano (Italy); Cornell University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mahowald, Natalie M. [Cornell University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ithaca, NY (United States); Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Environmental Sciences, Milano (Italy); Winckler, Gisela [Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Mineral dust aerosols represent an active component of the Earth's climate system, by interacting with radiation directly, and by modifying clouds and biogeochemistry. Mineral dust from polar ice cores over the last million years can be used as paleoclimate proxy, and provide unique information about climate variability, as changes in dust deposition at the core sites can be due to changes in sources, transport and/or deposition locally. Here we present results from a study based on climate model simulations using the Community Climate System Model. The focus of this work is to analyze simulated differences in the dust concentration, size distribution and sources in current climate conditions and during the Last Glacial Maximum at specific ice core locations in Antarctica, and compare with available paleodata. Model results suggest that South America is the most important source for dust deposited in Antarctica in current climate, but Australia is also a major contributor and there is spatial variability in the relative importance of the major dust sources. During the Last Glacial Maximum the dominant source in the model was South America, because of the increased activity of glaciogenic dust sources in Southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego and the Southernmost Pampas regions, as well as an increase in transport efficiency southward. Dust emitted from the Southern Hemisphere dust source areas usually follow zonal patterns, but southward flow towards Antarctica is located in specific areas characterized by southward displacement of air masses. Observations and model results consistently suggest a spatially variable shift in dust particle sizes. This is due to a combination of relatively reduced en route wet removal favouring a generalized shift towards smaller particles, and on the other hand to an enhanced relative contribution of dry coarse particle deposition in the Last Glacial Maximum. (orig.)

  18. Introduction to the DISRUPT postprandial database: subjects, studies and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kim G; Clarke, Dave T; Murray, Peter; Lovegrove, Julie A; O'Malley, Brendan; Minihane, Anne M; Williams, Christine M

    2010-03-01

    Dysregulation of lipid and glucose metabolism in the postprandial state are recognised as important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to create a comprehensive, standardised database of postprandial studies to provide insights into the physiological factors that influence postprandial lipid and glucose responses. Data were collated from subjects (n = 467) taking part in single and sequential meal postprandial studies conducted by researchers at the University of Reading, to form the DISRUPT (DIetary Studies: Reading Unilever Postprandial Trials) database. Subject attributes including age, gender, genotype, menopausal status, body mass index, blood pressure and a fasting biochemical profile, together with postprandial measurements of triacylglycerol (TAG), non-esterified fatty acids, glucose, insulin and TAG-rich lipoprotein composition are recorded. A particular strength of the studies is the frequency of blood sampling, with on average 10-13 blood samples taken during each postprandial assessment, and the fact that identical test meal protocols were used in a number of studies, allowing pooling of data to increase statistical power. The DISRUPT database is the most comprehensive postprandial metabolism database that exists worldwide and preliminary analysis of the pooled sequential meal postprandial dataset has revealed both confirmatory and novel observations with respect to the impact of gender and age on the postprandial TAG response. Further analysis of the dataset using conventional statistical techniques along with integrated mathematical models and clustering analysis will provide a unique opportunity to greatly expand current knowledge of the aetiology of inter-individual variability in postprandial lipid and glucose responses.

  19. Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

    2014-01-01

    25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

  20. "Ain't Misbehavin": Towards a Developmentally-Specified Nosology for Preschool Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Tolan, Patrick H.; Leventhal, Bennett L.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing consensus that disruptive behavior disorders and syndromes (DBDs) are identifiable in preschool children. There is also concomitant recognition of the limitations of the current DBD nosology for distinguishing disruptive behavior symptoms from the normative misbehavior of early childhood. In particular, there appears to be…

  1. Utilization of Superheroes Social Skills to Reduce Disruptive and Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Handley, Roderick D.; Radley, Keith C.; Cavell, Hannah J.

    2016-01-01

    The current pilot study investigated the effectiveness of the Superheroes Social Skills program in decreasing disruptive and aggressive behavior of elementary-age students with high-incidence disabilities. Six students in a self-contained classroom, identified as displaying high rates of disruptive and aggressive behavior toward peers, were…

  2. Cumulative Effects of Mothers' Risk and Promotive Factors on Daughters' Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the ways in which the accumulation of maternal factors increases or reduces risk for girls' disruptive behavior during preadolescence. In the current study, maternal risk and promotive factors and the severity of girls' disruptive behavior were assessed annually among girls' ages 7-12 in an urban community sample (N = 2043).…

  3. Profiles of Disruptive Behavior across Early Childhood: Contributions of Frustration Reactivity, Physiological Regulation, and Maternal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Kathryn A.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.

    2008-01-01

    Disruptive behavior, including aggression, defiance, and temper tantrums, typically peaks in early toddlerhood and decreases by school entry; however, some children do not show this normative decline. The current study examined disruptive behavior in 318 boys and girls at 2, 4, and 5 years of age and frustration reactivity, physiological…

  4. Microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies is improved by avoiding mechanical cell disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonero, Franck; Nava, Gerardo M.; Benefiel, Ann C.; Greenberg, Eugene; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2011-01-01

    Currently, standard protocols for microbial DNA extraction from intestinal tissues do not exist. We assessed the efficiency of a commercial kit with and without mechanical disruption. Better quality DNA was obtained without mechanical disruption. Thus, it appears that bead-beating is not required for efficient microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies. PMID:21820015

  5. Examining whether dental therapists constitute a disruptive innovation in US dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L

    2011-10-01

    Dental therapists-midlevel dental providers who are roughly analogous to nurse practitioners in medicine-might constitute a disruptive innovation within US dentistry. Proponents tend to claim that dental therapists will provide more equitable access to dental care; opponents tend to view them from a perspective that focuses on retaining the current attributes of the dental profession. Therapists display traits similar to those of disruptive innovations: their attributes are different from dentists', they may not initially be valued by current dental patients, they may appeal to current dental underutilizers, and they may transform the dental delivery system. Whether dental therapists constitute a disruptive innovation will only be determined retrospectively.

  6. Ground level observations of relativistic solar particles on Oct 29th, 2015: Is it a new GLE on the current solar cycle?

    CERN Document Server

    Augusto, C R A; de Oliveira, M N; Nepomuceno, A A; Fauth, A C

    2016-01-01

    On Oct. 29th, 2015, the Earth crossed through a fold in the heliospheric current sheet. This is called a "solar sector boundary crossing". Under this circumstances, a large coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred at 2:24 UT, behind the west limb on the sun. Therefore, the boundary crossing occurred when in the blast's nearby environment was filled with energetic particles accelerated by the CME shock waves, spacecraft measurements (ACE and GOES) have shown that in such a case, protons with energies at least up to 30 MeV were stored within the range of the sector boundary. Thus, a fraction of the solar energetic particles (SEP) from CME, reached Earth around 03:00 UT in the aftermath of the solar blast, reaching the condition of an S1 (minor) radiation storm level. The effect at ground level was a small increase in the counting rate in some ground based detectors, such as the South Pole Neutron Monitor (NM) and a sharp peak observed in the counting rate in the New-Tupi detector in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Thule...

  7. Disruptive behaviour in the perioperative setting: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafranca, Alexander; Hamlin, Colin; Enns, Stephanie; Jacobsohn, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Disruptive behaviour, which we define as behaviour that does not show others an adequate level of respect and causes victims or witnesses to feel threatened, is a concern in the operating room. This review summarizes the current literature on disruptive behaviour as it applies to the perioperative domain. Searches of MEDLINE(®), Scopus™, and Google books identified articles and monographs of interest, with backreferencing used as a supplemental strategy. Much of the data comes from studies outside the operating room and has significant methodological limitations. Disruptive behaviour has intrapersonal, interpersonal, and organizational causes. While fewer than 10% of clinicians display disruptive behaviour, up to 98% of clinicians report witnessing disruptive behaviour in the last year, 70% report being treated with incivility, and 36% report being bullied. This type of conduct can have many negative ramifications for clinicians, students, and institutions. Although the evidence regarding patient outcomes is primarily based on clinician perceptions, anecdotes, and expert opinion, this evidence supports the contention of an increase in morbidity and mortality. The plausible mechanism for this increase is social undermining of teamwork, communication, clinical decision-making, and technical performance. The behavioural responses of those who are exposed to such conduct can positively or adversely moderate the consequences of disruptive behaviour. All operating room professions are involved, with the rank order (from high to low) being surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists, and "others". The optimal approaches to the prevention and management of disruptive behaviour are uncertain, but they include preventative and professional development courses, training in soft skills and teamwork, institutional efforts to optimize the workplace, clinician contracts outlining the clinician's (and institution's) responsibilities, institutional policies that are monitored and

  8. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  9. Optimal Disruption of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The collection of all the strongly connected components in a directed graph, among each cluster of which any node has a path to another node, is a typical example of the intertwining structure and dynamics in complex networks, as its relative size indicates network cohesion and it also composes of all the feedback cycles in the network. Here we consider finding an optimal strategy with minimal effort in removal arcs (for example, deactivation of directed interactions) to fragment all the strongly connected components into tree structure with no effect from feedback mechanism. We map the optimal network disruption problem to the minimal feedback arc set problem, a non-deterministically polynomial hard combinatorial optimization problem in graph theory. We solve the problem with statistical physical methods from spin glass theory, resulting in a simple numerical method to extract sub-optimal disruption arc sets with significantly better results than a local heuristic method and a simulated annealing method both...

  10. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  11. Disruptive behavior and clinical outcomes: perceptions of nurses and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Alan H; O'Daniel, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Providing safe, error-free care is the number-one priority of all health care professionals. Excellent outcomes have been associated with procedural efficiency, the implementation of evidence-based standards, and the use of tools designed to reduce the likelihood of medical error (such as computerized medication orders and bar-coded patient identification). But the impact of work relationships on clinical outcomes isn't as well documented. The current survey was designed as a follow-up to a previous VHA West Coast survey that examined the prevalence and impact of physicians' disruptive behavior on the job satisfaction and retention of nurses (see "Nurse-Physician Relationships: Impact on Nurse Satisfaction and Retention," June 2002). Based on the findings of that survey and subsequent comments on it, the follow-up survey examined the disruptive behavior of both physicians and nurses, as well as both groups' and administrators' perceptions of its effects on providers and its impact on clinical outcomes. Surveys were distributed to 50 VHA hospitals across the country, and results from more than 1,500 survey participants were evaluated. Nurses were reported to have behaved disruptively almost as frequently as physicians. Most respondents perceived disruptive behavior as having negative or worsening effects, in both nurses and physicians, on stress, frustration, concentration, communication, collaboration, information transfer, and workplace relationships. Even more disturbing was the respondents' perceptions of negative or worsening effects of disruptive behavior on adverse events, medical errors, patient safety, patient mortality, the quality of care, and patient satisfaction. These findings suggest that the consequences of disruptive behavior go far beyond nurses' job satisfaction and morale, affecting communication and collaboration among clinicians, which may well, in turn, have a negative impact on clinical outcomes. Strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and

  12. Radio transients from stellar tidal disruption by massive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole provides us with a rare glimpse of these otherwise dormant beasts. It has long been predicted that the disruption will be accompanied by a thermal `flare', powered by the accretion of bound stellar debris. Several candidate disruptions have been discovered in this manner at optical, UV and X-ray wavelengths. Here we explore the observational consequences if a modest fraction of the accretion power is channeled into an ultra-relativistic outflow. We show that a relativistic jet decelerates due to its interaction with the interstellar medium at sub-parsec distances from the black hole. Synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated by the reverse shock powers a bright radio-infrared transient that peaks on a timescale ~1 yr after disruption. Emission from the forward shock may be detectable for several years after the peak. Deep radio follow-up observations of tidal disruption candidates at late times can test for the presence of relativistic ejecta....

  13. HOW TO IDENTIFY DISRUPTIVE NEW BUSINESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Robles

    2015-01-01

    In almost any industry, the most dramatic stories of growth and success were launched from a platform of disruptive innovation (Christensen et al., 2002). The probability of creating a successful, new growth business is 10 times greater if the innovators pursue a disruptive strategy rather than a sustaining one. Genuinely disruptive innovations are the ones that result in the creation of entirely new markets and business models. Few companies have introduced these innovations. Disruptive inno...

  14. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  15. Cross-tail current evolution during substorm dipolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine evolution of the cross-tail current during substorm current disruption/dipolarization using observations from two satellites in the near-Earth magnetotail at the downtail distances of 8–9 RE. By choosing times when these two satellites are separated, mainly in the north–south distance in the tail current sheet, precise determination of current density in the layer embedded between these satellites can be obtained with Ampère's law. Two such events are examined and several common features are found. The current densities in the layer embedded by the two satellites were reduced by ~ 40–70% during substorm dipolarization. The changes in current densities have the fast kinetic timescale, i.e., in seconds, implying a kinetic process for current disruption/dipolarization. The estimated power within the current layer was mainly dissipative in the dawn–dusk direction and mainly dynamo in the Sun–tail direction that is needed to drive the north–south substorm current system in the ionosphere. Remote sensing of the energization site with the ion sounding technique shows that the energization site was initially earthward of the satellite and moved down the tail at later times. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurred intermittently during the disturbance interval. These features provide important clues to the substorm onset process.

  16. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra, Y.; Yang, S.-J.S.; Singh, P.; Prajogo, D.; O'Neill, P.; Rahman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on emergi

  17. Disruption and Distinctiveness in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    "Disruption"--while an evocative word triggering feelings of anxiety and perhaps even fear--also signals renewal and growth. The Higher Education (HE) sector in England has experienced some profound disruption over the years, and yet has emerged stronger and renewed in many ways. The impact of recent disruptive forces, from fees to the…

  18. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  19. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra, Y.; Yang, S.-J.S.; Singh, P.; Prajogo, D.; O'Neill, P.; Rahman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on

  20. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  1. Observation of Multiple Reconnections during Self-organization Process of High Temperature Fusion Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Munsat, T.; Donné, A. J. H.; Spakman, G. W.; Textor Team

    2011-10-01

    Images of a high resolution 2-D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic shows evidence of multiple magnetic reconnection processes during the internal disruption of a high temperature tokamak plasmas. The disruption induces magnetic self-organization of the toroidal plasma being accompanied by successive or simultaneous multiple layer reconnection. The degree of asymmetric deformation of the internal magnetic structure (m/n=1/1 mode) prior to temperature crash influences the outcome of the disruptive behavior. The observation is critical for the building block of first principle theoretical modeling of the sawtooth oscillation in current driven toroidal plasmas and the understandings can be applied to the impulsive disruptive behavior in flares of the solar, accretion disk and stellar coronae, Earth magnetospheric storms, and controlled fusion. Work supported by the NRF of Korea, the US DOE, the NWO of the Netherlands, and the EURATOM-FOM association.

  2. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  3. Vestibular loss disrupts daily rhythm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T; Mauvieux, B; Bulla, J; Quarck, G; Davenne, D; Denise, P; Philoxène, B; Besnard, S

    2015-02-01

    Hypergravity disrupts the circadian regulation of temperature (Temp) and locomotor activity (Act) mediated through the vestibular otolithic system in mice. In contrast, we do not know whether the anatomical structures associated with vestibular input are crucial for circadian rhythm regulation at 1 G on Earth. In the present study we observed the effects of bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) on the daily rhythms of Temp and Act in semipigmented rats. Our model of vestibular lesion allowed for selective peripheral hair cell degeneration without any other damage. Rats with BVL exhibited a disruption in their daily rhythms (Temp and Act), which were replaced by a main ultradian period (τ <20 h) for 115.8 ± 68.6 h after vestibular lesion compared with rats in the control group. Daily rhythms of Temp and Act in rats with BVL recovered within 1 wk, probably counterbalanced by photic and other nonphotic time cues. No correlation was found between Temp and Act daily rhythms after vestibular lesion in rats with BVL, suggesting a direct influence of vestibular input on the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Our findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system has an influence on daily rhythm homeostasis in semipigmented rats on Earth, and raise the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Cool Core Disruption in Abell 1763

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Randall, Scott W.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Sabry, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra archival observation of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1763. A model-subtracted image highlighting excess cluster emission reveals a large spiral structure winding outward from the core to a radius of ~950 kpc. We measure the gas of the inner spiral to have significantly lower entropy than non-spiral regions at the same radius. This is consistent with the structure resulting from merger-induced motion of the cluster’s cool core, a phenomenon seen in many systems. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the system has experienced significant disruption since the initial dynamical encounter that set the sloshing core in motion. Along the major axis of the elongated ICM distribution we detect thermal features consistent with the merger event most likely responsible for cool core disruption. The merger-induced transition towards non-cool core status will be discussed. The interaction between the powerful (P1.4 ~ 1026 W Hz-1) cluster-center WAT radio source and its ICM environment will also be discussed.

  5. Current observation on Aedes mosquitoes: A survey on implication of dengue infection, human lifestyle and preventive measure among Malaysia resident in urban and sub-urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminodin Sumayyah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the current knowledge level and information on Aedes mosquitoes and dengue among Penang resident in urban (Sungai Dua and sub- urban areas (Batu Maung. Methods: The questionnaire comprises of twenty-three questions, surveyed on 202 respondents regarding socio-demographic, the observation of general Aedes’ mosquito behaviour, dengue infection threat, preventive measures against mosquitoes and lifestyle (on usage of artificial light in changing the behaviour of Aedes mosquitoes. Results: The respondents in sub-urban Batu Maung showed less knowledge level regarding Aedes mosquitoes as compared to respondents in urban Sungai Dua. There was a positive association between biting frequency of mosquitoes with the lifestyle of respondents (in relation to the light use, the use of personal protection and fogging operations conducted by the Ministry of Health. There is a positive relationship between the knowledge of preferred mosquitoes resting place and the respondent aged between 17 to 24 (78.2% in sub-urban Batu Maung. Urban Sungai Dua respondents showed a significant relation between the use of lights and the resting places for Aedes mosquitoes. The preventive measures chosen by both sub-distinct areas against mosquitobites were significantly affected by the biting time and the mosquitoes biting frequency (P < 0.05. Conclusions: In this study, we concluded that there is a direct link between the knowledge of the Aedes biting frequency with dengue infection, human lifestyle on the light use and preventive measures against mosquitoes. However, the level of knowledge is poor on the subject of Aedes mosquitoes and dengue for both urban and sub-urban respondents.

  6. Chrono-nutrition: a review of current evidence from observational studies on global trends in time-of-day of energy intake and its association with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoosawi, S; Vingeliene, S; Karagounis, L G; Pot, G K

    2016-11-01

    The importance of the circadian rhythm in regulating human food intake behaviour and metabolism has long been recognised. However, little is known as to how energy intake is distributed over the day in existing populations, and its potential association with obesity. The present review describes global trends in time-of-day of energy intake in the general population based on data from cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal cohorts. Evidence of the association between time-of-day of energy intake and obesity is also summarised. Overall, there were a limited number of cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal cohorts that provided data on time-of-day of energy intake. In the identified studies, a wide variation in time-of-day of energy intake was observed, with patterns of energy distribution varying greatly by country and geographical area. In relation to obesity, eight cross-sectional surveys and two longitudinal cohorts were identified. The association between time-of-day of energy intake and obesity varied widely, with several studies reporting a positive link between evening energy intake and obesity. In conclusion, the current review summarises global trends in time-of-day of energy intake. The large variations across countries and global regions could have important implications to health, emphasising the need to understand the socio-environmental factors guiding such differences in eating patterns. Evidence of the association between time-of-day of energy intake and BMI also varied. Further larger scale collaborations between various countries and regions are needed to sum data from existing surveys and cohorts, and guide our understanding of the role of chrono-nutrition in health.

  7. Observation of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam Using the NOvA Prototype Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Enrique Arrieta [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The NOνA is a long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. It will study the oscillations between muon and electron neutrinos through the Earth. NOνA consists of two detectors separated by 810 km. Each detector will measure the electron neutrino content of the neutrino (NuMI) beam. Differences between the measurements will reveal details about the oscillation channel. The NOνA collaboration built a prototype detector on the surface at Fermilab in order to develop calibration, simulation, and reconstruction tools, using real data. This 220 ton detector is 110 mrad off the NuMI beam axis. This off-axis location allows the observation of neutrino interactions with energies around 2 GeV, where neutrinos come predominantly from charged kaon decays. During the period between October 2011 and April 2012, the prototype detector collected neutrino data from 1.67 × 1020 protons on target delivered by the NuMI beam. This analysis selected a number of candidate charged current muon neutrino events from the prototype data, which is 30% lower than predicted by the NOνA Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis suggests that the discrepancy comes from an over estimation of the neutrino flux in the Monte Carlo simulation, and in particular, from neutrinos generated in charged kaon decays. The ratio of measured divided by the simulated flux of muon neutrinos coming from charged kaon decays is: 0.70+0.108 -0.094. The NOνA collaboration may use the findings of this analysis to introduce a more accurate prediction of the neutrino flux produced by the NuMI beam in future Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans.

  9. Disruptive Effects of Contingent Food on High-Probability Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Crawford, Michelle A.; Borrero, John C.; Nguyen, Linda; Leon-Enriquez, Yanerys; Carreau-Webster, Abbey B.; DeLeon, Iser G.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of food contingent on 10 s of consecutive toy engagement resulted in a decrease in engagement and a corresponding increase in other responses that had been previously reinforced with food. Similar effects were not observed when tokens exchangeable for the same food were delivered, suggesting that engagement was disrupted by the…

  10. Current, temperature, backscatter, and other data from bottom instrument packages deployed from the RV Oceanus and other platforms in support of sediment transport observation in the Middle Atlantic Bight from 11 December 1975 to 30 October 1980 (NODC Accession 0066005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A series of studies to assess environmental hazards to petroleum development in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Long-term observations of currents and near-bottom...

  11. Real-time current, wave, temperature, salinity, and meteorological data from Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) buoys, 11/30/2003 - 12/7/2003 (NODC Accession 0001259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) collected real-time data with buoy-mounted instruments (e.g., accelerometers and Acoustic Doppler Current...

  12. Seawater temperature and salinity observed from the CORC1 and CORC2 moorings in the southern California Current (NE Pacific) from 2008-09-20 to 2012-11-14 (NCEI Accession 0137858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity observations from instruments on the CORC1 and CORC2 moorings in the southern California Current, part of the CORC project (Consortium on...

  13. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  14. From Digital Disruption to Business Model Scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Thomsen, Peter Poulsen

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the terms disruption, digital disruption, business models and business model scalability. It illustrates how managers should be using these terms for the benefit of their business by developing business models capable of achieving exponentially increasing returns to scale...... will seldom lead to business model scalability capable of competing with digital disruption(s)....... as a response to digital disruption. A series of case studies illustrate that besides frequent existing messages in the business literature relating to the importance of creating agile businesses, both in growing and declining economies, as well as hard to copy value propositions or value propositions that take...

  15. Circadian clock disruption in neurodegenerative diseases: Cause and effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Steven Musiek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance of the circadian system, manifested as disrupted daily rhythms of physiologic parameters such as sleep, activity, and hormone secretion, has long been observed as a symptom of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer Disease. Circadian abnormalities have generally been considered consequences of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests, however, that circadian disruption might actually contribute to the neurodegenerative process, and thus might be a modifiable cause of neural injury. Herein we will review the evidence implicating circadian rhythms disturbances and clock gene dysfunction in neurodegeneration, with an emphasis on future research directions and potential therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Observations of an early Agulhas current retroflection event in 2001: A temporary cessation of inter-ocean exchange south of Africa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, H.M.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.; Rouault, M.; Whittle, C.; de Ruijter, W.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The exchange of heat and salt between the South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean, at the southern terminus of the Agulhas current, forms a crucial link in the global ocean circulation. It has been surmised that upstream retroflections in this current could produce temporary interruptions to the

  17. Observations of an early Agulhas current retroflection event in 2001: A temporary cessation of inter-ocean exchange south of Africa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, H.M.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.; Rouault, M.; Whittle, C.P.; de Ruijter, W.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The exchange of heat and salt between the South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean,at the Southern terminus of the Agulhas current, forms a crucial link in the global ocean circulation. It has been surmised that upstream retroflections in this current could produce temporary interruptions to the

  18. Relativistic jet activity from the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Ghisellini, G; Mangano, V; Zhang, B; Page, K L; Eracleous, M; Romano, P; Sakamoto, T; Falcone, A D; Osborne, J P; Campana, S; Beardmore, A P; Breeveld, A A; Chester, M M; Corbet, R; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Esposito, P; Evans, P A; Fugazza, D; Gelbord, J M; Hiroi, K; Holland, S T; Huang, K Y; Im, M; Israel, G; Jeon, Y; Jeon, Y-B; Jun, H D; Kawai, N; Kim, J H; Krimm, H A; Marshall, F E; P Mészáros; Negoro, H; Omodei, N; Park, W-K; Perkins, J S; Sugizaki, M; Sung, H-I; Tagliaferri, G; Troja, E; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Usui, R; Antonelli, L A; Barthelmy, S D; Cusumano, G; Giommi, P; Melandri, A; Perri, M; Racusin, J L; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Gehrels, N

    2011-08-24

    Supermassive black holes have powerful gravitational fields with strong gradients that can destroy stars that get too close, producing a bright flare in ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions from stellar debris that forms an accretion disk around the black hole. The aftermath of this process may have been seen several times over the past two decades in the form of sparsely sampled, slowly fading emission from distant galaxies, but the onset of the stellar disruption event has not hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of a bright X-ray flare from the extragalactic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source increased in brightness in the X-ray band by a factor of at least 10,000 since 1990 and by a factor of at least 100 since early 2010. We conclude that we have captured the onset of relativistic jet activity from a supermassive black hole. A companion paper comes to similar conclusions on the basis of radio observations. This event is probably due to the tidal disruption of a star falling into a supermassive black hole, but the detailed behaviour differs from current theoretical models of such events.

  19. Rates of stellar tidal disruption as probes of the supermassive black hole mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas C.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) due to two-body relaxation are calculated using a large galaxy sample (N ≈ 200) in order to explore the sensitivity of the TDE rates to observational uncertainties, such as the parametrization of galaxy light profiles and the stellar mass function. The largest uncertainty arises due to the poorly constrained occupation fraction of SMBHs in low-mass galaxies, which otherwise dominate the total TDE rate. The detection rate of TDE flares by optical surveys is calculated as a function of SMBH mass and other observables for several physically motivated models of TDE emission. We also quantify the fraction of galaxies that produce deeply penetrating disruption events. If the majority of the detected events are characterized by super-Eddington luminosities (such as disc winds, or synchrotron radiation from an off-axis relativistic jet), then the measured SMBH mass distribution will tightly constrain the low-end SMBH occupation fraction. If Eddington-limited emission channels dominate, however, then the occupation fraction sensitivity is much less pronounced in a flux-limited survey (although still present in a volume-complete event sample). The SMBH mass distribution of the current sample of TDEs, though highly inhomogeneous and encumbered by selection effects, already suggests that Eddington-limited emission channels dominate. Even our most conservative rate estimates appear to be in tension with much lower observationally inferred TDE rates, and we discuss several possible resolutions to this discrepancy.

  20. Parents’ Education, Personality, and Their Children’s Disruptive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (1 to understand the effects of parents' education and personality aspects on child disruptive behavior, (2 to know the correlation between the parents' personality aspects (N-Deference, N-Succorance, NDominance and N-Aggression and the children' disruptive behavior. A quantitative approach to the correlational design was employed. Three variables were studied, namely parents' education and personality as the independent variables and child disruptive behavior as the independent variable. The applied instruments are questionnaires, (2 personality test (EPPS, and (3 observation with time and interval samplings approach. The population is from Magelang, Indonesia, while the participants are 100 children at the age of 5 – 7 years and their parents. The results show that (1 there are some effects of parents' education and personality on child disruptive behavior, and (2 aggressive aspects of the parents' personality gave great effects on child disruptive behavior, followed by the succorance, deference, and at the lowest level, the dominance aspects

  1. Tidal Decay and Disruption of Short-Period Gaseous Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Brian; Peacock, Sarah; Arras, Phil; Penev, Kaloyan

    2016-01-01

    Many gaseous exoplanets in short-period orbits are on the verge or are in the process of tidal disruption. Moreover, orbital stability analysis shows tides can drive many hot Jupiters to spiral toward their host stars. Thus, the coupled processes of orbital evolution and tidal disruption likely shape the observed distribution of close-in exoplanets and may even be responsible for producing some of the short-period rocky planets. However, the exact outcome for a disrupting planet depends on its internal response to mass loss, and the accompanying orbital evolution can act to enhance or inhibit the disruption process. In this study, we apply the fully-featured and robust Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite to model Roche-lobe overflow (RLO) of short-period gaseous planets. We show that, although the detailed evolution may depend on several properties of the planetary system, it is largely determined by the core mass of the disrupting gas giant. In particular, we find that the orbital ex...

  2. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    How do professions respond to fast-moving technological changes? Disruptive innovations overturn expectations about how markets function and develop, and they often raise moral, legal and scientific concerns among professionals. Sudden technological changes can result in a state of professional...... recent revision to the Tobacco Products Directive. Medical and public health professionals that control tobacco issues were challenged by a coalition of e-cigarette industry representatives, e-cigarette users, and liberal politicians. The challengers drew on the contending norm of harm reduction...

  3. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  4. Incumbent response to disruptive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    changes, however successful in minor business model adaptions. An implication hereof is that the business model concept as such has low predictive power in explaining success and failure and is in the need of an operationalization. In addition, the article discusses the relationship between technological...... in relation to disruptive change. In relation to technical change the case company has successfully in transferred its technology from one generation to the next during more than 20 years. In relation to business model change the case company has been proactive but not successful in major business model...... innovation and business innovation....

  5. Randomization of Group Contingencies and Reinforcers To Reduce Classroom Disruptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Lea A.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Jenson, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of randomizing both contingencies for reinforcement and reinforcers to decrease classroom disruptive behavior in five adolescent students with serious emotional disorder. Results reveal that the percentage of observed intervals of disruptive behaviors decreased immediately and dramatically in all students. (Contains 24…

  6. Friend Influence on Early Adolescent Disruptive Behavior in the Classroom: Teacher Emotional Support Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Huiyoung; Ryan, Allison M.

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated how the level of disruptive behavior and friend influence on disruptive behavior varies across classrooms in relation to teacher emotional support. Data were collected from 48 fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms (N = 879 students) and included classroom observations at Wave 1 and student reports of their disruptive…

  7. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  8. An Analytic Criterion for Turbulent Disruption of Planetary Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C.

    2017-03-01

    Mean motion commensurabilities in multi-planet systems are an expected outcome of protoplanetary disk-driven migration, and their relative dearth in the observational data presents an important challenge to current models of planet formation and dynamical evolution. One natural mechanism that can lead to the dissolution of commensurabilities is stochastic orbital forcing, induced by turbulent density fluctuations within the nebula. While this process is qualitatively promising, the conditions under which mean motion resonances can be broken are not well understood. In this work, we derive a simple analytic criterion that elucidates the relationship among the physical parameters of the system, and find the conditions necessary to drive planets out of resonance. Subsequently, we confirm our findings with numerical integrations carried out in the perturbative regime, as well as direct N-body simulations. Our calculations suggest that turbulent resonance disruption depends most sensitively on the planet–star mass ratio. Specifically, for a disk with properties comparable to the early solar nebula with α ={10}-2, only planet pairs with cumulative mass ratios smaller than ({m}1+{m}2)/M≲ {10}-5∼ 3{M}\\oplus /{M}ȯ are susceptible to breaking resonance at semimajor axis of order a∼ 0.1 {au}. Although turbulence can sometimes compromise resonant pairs, an additional mechanism (such as suppression of resonance capture probability through disk eccentricity) is required to adequately explain the largely non-resonant orbital architectures of extrasolar planetary systems.

  9. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  10. Moored current meter and wind recorder measurement near Point Conception, California: The 1983 OPUS Observations, from 01 April 1983 to 29 July 1983 (NODC Accession 8600041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The OPUS (Organization of Persistent Upwelling Structures) program deployed two current meter (VMCM) moorings near Point Conception, California, during April - July...

  11. Use of external metabolizing systems when testing for endocrine disruption in the T-screen assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Nellemann, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Although, it is well-established that information on the metabolism of a substance is important in the evaluation of its toxic potential, there is limited experience with incorporating metabolic aspects into in vitro tests for endocrine disrupters. The aim of the current study was a) to study different in vitro systems for biotransformation of ten known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs): five azole fungicides, three parabens and 2 phthalates, b) to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDs to bind and activate the thyroid receptor (TR) in the in vitro T-screen assay after biotransformation and c) to investigate the endogenous metabolic capacity of the GH3 cells, the cell line used in the T-screen assay, which is a proliferation assay used for the in vitro detection of agonistic and antagonistic properties of compounds at the level of the TR. The two in vitro metabolizing systems tested the human liver S9 mix and the PCB-induced rat microsomes gave an almost complete metabolic transformation of the tested parabens and phthalates. No marked difference the effects in the T-screen assay was observed between the parent compounds and the effects of the tested metabolic extracts. The GH3 cells themselves significantly metabolized the two tested phthalates dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). Overall the results and qualitative data from the current study show that an in vitro metabolizing system using liver S9 or microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic and toxicokinetic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.

  12. Reconnection in thin current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; Pucci, Fulvia; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in nature and laboratory, but the question of reconnection speed and initial trigger have remained mysterious. How is fast magnetic energy release triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas?It has been shown that a tearing mode instability can grow on an ideal timescale, i.e., independent from the the Lundquist number, once the current sheet thickness becomes thin enough, or rather the inverse aspect ratio a/L reaches a scale a/L~S-1/3. As such, the latter provides a natural, critical threshold for current sheets that can be formed in nature before they disrupt in a few Alfvén time units. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection extended to simple viscous and kinetic models and we propose a possible scenario for the transition to explosive reconnection in high-Lundquist number plasmas, that we support with fully nonlinear numerical MHD simulations of a collapsing current sheet.

  13. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  14. An observational European study on clinical outcomes associated with current management strategies for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ENERGIB-Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Zeynel

    2012-01-01

    This observational, retrospective cohort study assessed outcomes of the current management strategies for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in several European countries (Belgium, Greece, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey) (NCT00797641; ENERGIB). Turkey contributed 23 sites to this study. Adult patients (≥18 years old) consecutively admitted to hospital and who underwent endoscopy for overt non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, melena or hematochezia, with other clinical/laboratory evidence of acute upper GI blood loss) were included in the study. Data were collected from patient medical records regarding bleeding continuation, re-bleeding, pharmacological treatment, surgery, and mortality during a 30-day follow-up period. A total of 423 patients (67.4% men; mean age: 57.8 ± 18.9 years) were enrolled in the Turkish study centers, of whom 96.2% were admitted to hospital with acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. At admission, the most common symptom was melena (76.1%); 28.6% of patients were taking aspirin, 19.9% were on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 7.3% were on proton pump inhibitors. The most common diagnoses were duodenal (45.2%) and gastric (27.7%) ulcers and gastritis/gastric erosions (26.2%). Patients were most often managed in general medical wards (45.4%). A gastrointestinal team was in charge of treatment in 64.8% of cases. Therapeutic procedures were performed in 32.4% of patients during endoscopy. After the endoscopy, most patients (94.6%) received proton pump inhibitors. Mean (SD) hospital stay was 5.36 ± 4.91 days. The cumulative proportions of continued bleeding/re-bleeding, complications and mortality within 30 days of the non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode were 9.0%, 5.7% and 2.8%, respectively. In the Turkish sub-group of patients, the significant risk factors for bleeding continuation or re-bleeding were age >65 years, presentation with hematemesis or shock

  15. Ecumenismo: perspectiva eclesiológica, das grandes rupturas ao debate ecumênico atual (Ecumenism: ecclesiological perspective, of major disruptions to the current ecumenical debate - DOI: 10.5752/ P.2175-5841.2011v9n20p127

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Ribeiro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O rompimento da Igreja Católica com a Igreja Ortodoxa em 1054 gerou sofrimento, mas o maior impacto foi a unicidade rompida pela Reforma Protestante, da qual surgiram as Igrejas Luterana, Reformada, Anglicana e as oriundas dos anabatistas no século XVI. O movimento ecumênico atual surgiu na Conferência Mundial de Missão 1910, que reuniu 1200 delegados para debater fé e comunhão. A celebração do centenário pôs o ecumenismo, o diálogo, a diferença, a expressão e a comunhão na agenda. O século XX viu surgir o Conselho Mundial de Igrejas, o Concílio Vaticano II, a chegada dos Pentecostais à América Latina, os movimentos populares e as Teologias da Libertação. O sofrimento das populações latino-americanas, sua experiência de fé e sua caminhada histórica desenvolveram a confiança como resposta ao desafio da convivência. O Ensaio conclui com o documento Chamado Comum e a visão do teólogo luterano Walter Altmann, moderador do Conselho Mundial de Igrejas.Palavras-chave: Ecumenismo, Missão, Edimburgo, América Latina AbstractDisruption of the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church in 1054 caused suffering, but the biggest impact was the unity broken by the Protestant Reformation, from which came the Lutheran, Reformed and Anglican churches and the resulting of the Anabaptists in the sixteenth century. The current ecumenical movement emerged in World Mission Conference 1910, which gathering 1200 delegates to discuss faith and fellowship. The centennial celebration put ecumenism, dialogue, difference, expression and communion on the agenda. The twentieth century saw the World Council of Churches, Vatican II, the arrival of Pentecostals in Latin America, popular movements and Theologies of liberation. The plight of Latin American populations, their experience of faith and historic journey have developed the confidence as answer to the challenge of coexistence. The Essay concludes with a document A Common Call and the

  16. Assessment of three approaches for regulatory decision making on pesticides with endocrine disrupting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx-Stoelting, P; Niemann, L; Ritz, V; Ulbrich, B; Gall, A; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Pfeil, R; Solecki, R

    2014-12-01

    Recent EU legislation has introduced endocrine disrupting properties as a hazard-based "cut-off" criterion for the approval of active substances as pesticides and biocides. Currently, no specific science-based approach for the assessment of substances with endocrine disrupting properties has been agreed upon, although this new legislation provides interim criteria based on classification and labelling. Different proposals for decision making on potential endocrine disrupting properties in human health risk assessment have been developed by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and other regulatory bodies. All these frameworks, although differing with regard to hazard characterisation, include a toxicological assessment of adversity of the effects, the evaluation of underlying modes/mechanisms of action in animals and considerations concerning the relevance of effects to humans. Three options for regulatory decision making were tested upon 39 pesticides for their applicability and to analyze their potential impact on the regulatory status of active substances that are currently approved for use in Europe: Option 1, based purely on hazard identification (adversity, mode of action, and the plausibility that both are related); Option 2, based on hazard identification and additional elements of hazard characterisation (severity and potency); Option 3, based on the interim criteria laid down in the recent EU pesticides legislation. Additionally, the data analysed in this study were used to address the questions, which parts of the endocrine system were affected, which studies were the most sensitive and whether no observed adverse effect levels were observed for substance with ED properties. The results of this exercise represent preliminary categorisations and must not be used as a basis for definitive regulatory decisions. They demonstrate that a combination of criteria for hazard identification with additional criteria of hazard characterisation

  17. Multiple tidal disruption flares in the active galaxy IC 3599

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; Colpi, M; Lodato, G; D'Avanzo, P; Evans, P A; Moretti, A

    2015-01-01

    Tidal disruption events occur when a star passes too close to a massive black hole and it is totally ripped apart by tidal forces. Alternatively, if the star does not get close enough to the black hole to be totally disrupted, a less dramatic event might happen with the star surviving the encounter and loosing only a small fraction of its mass. In this situation if the stellar orbit is bound and highly eccentric, just like some stars in the centre of our own Galaxy, repeated flares should occur. When the star approaches the black hole tidal radius at periastron, matter might be stripped resulting in lower intensity outbursts recurring once every orbital period. We report on Swift observations of a recent bright flare from the galaxy IC 3599 hosting a middle-weight black hole, where a possible tidal disruption event was observed in the early 1990s. By light curve modelling and spectral fitting we can consistently account for the events as the non-disruptive tidal stripping of a star into a highly eccentric orb...

  18. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce;

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption...... not intimately familiar with the topic of endocrine disruption and therefore susceptible to false generalizations of bias and subjectivity....

  19. A Theoretical Model of Flow Disruptions for the Anesthesia Team During Cardiovascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquet, Albert; Cohen, Tara; Diljohn, Fawaaz; Cabrera, Jennifer; Reeves, Scott; Shappell, Scott

    2017-07-03

    This investigation explores flow disruptions observed during cardiothoracic surgery and how they serve to disconnect anesthesia providers from their primary task. We can improve our understanding of this disengagement by exploring what we call the error space or the accumulated time required to resolve disruptions. Trained human factors students observed 10 cardiac procedures for disruptions impacting the anesthesia team and recorded the time required to resolve these events. Observations were classified using a human factors taxonomy. Of 301 disruptions observed, interruptions (e.g., those events related to alerts, distractions, searching activity, spilling/dropping, teaching moment, and task deviations) accounted for the greatest frequency of events (39.20%). The average amount of time needed for each disruption to be resolved was 48 seconds. Across 49.87 hours of observation, more than 4 hours were spent resolving disruptions to the anesthesia team's work flow. By defining a calculable error space associated with these disruptions, this research provides a conceptual metric that can serve in the identification and design of targeted interventions. This method serves as a proactive approach for recognizing systemic threats, affording healthcare workers the opportunity to mitigate the development and incidence of preventable errors precedently.

  20. Performance evaluation of interconnected logistics networks confronted to hub disruptions

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This paper investigates performance of interconnected logistics networks confronted to disruptions at hub level. With traditional supply chain network design, companies define and optimize their own logistics networks, resulting in current logistics systems being a set of independent heterogeneous logistics networks. The concept of PI aims to integrate independent logistics networks into a global, open, interconnected system. Prior research has shown that the new organ...

  1. Rotation Induced Disruption of Cohesive Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Lana, Diego; Scheeres, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    We use a Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) code to study the evolution of self-gravitating cohesive granular aggregates that are spun to disruption as a proxy to "rubble-pile" asteroids. Calculations have shown that the fine regolith in asteroids and molecular Van der Waals forces together may act as a cohesive matrix that provides enough structural strength to hold small NEAs together even at the observed high spin rates. With this in mind we have implemented cohesive forces between the large 10 m) particles that form our aggregates; its strength being controlled by the mean particle size of the matrix. The addition of rolling friction also has allowed us to obtain cohesionless aggregates with friction angles of at least 35° as measured by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. A series of experiments were run with the code, keeping the size, density and number of grains constant while increasing the cohesive strength of the matrix holding the grains in place. It can be shown, through a scaling analysis, that when the cohesive strength between rubble pile components is increased by a factor of f, that the effective size of the asteroid being modeled will decrease by a factor of 1/√f. To evaluate this we ran a series of 12 cases with increasing cohesive strength, effectively modeling rubble piles of size from 0.1 km up to 100 km with a constant cohesive strength of 25 Pa. Some of our main results are as follows: 1. results from simulations are compatible with a simple model of asteroid strength that predicts, in the cohesion dominated case, that the spin rate for fission is inversely proportional to the size of the asteroid; 2. aggregates may disrupt by shedding or fission, depending on the cohesive strength and the size of the aggregate (shape and heterogeneity factors have not yet been considered); 3. disruption by fission is more likely for small aggregates than for larger aggregates with the same cohesive strength. Further results with spherical and a

  2. Discovery of transient infrared emission from dust heated by stellar tidal disruption flares

    CERN Document Server

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Krolik, Julian H; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-01-01

    Stars that pass within the Roche radius of a supermassive black hole will be tidally disrupted, yielding a sudden injection of gas close to the black hole horizon which produces an electromagnetic flare. A few dozen of these flares have been discovered in recent years, but current observations provide poor constraints on the bolometric luminosity and total accreted mass of these events. Using images from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have discovered transient 3.4 micron emission from several previously known tidal disruption flares. The observations can be explained by dust heated to its sublimation temperature due to the intense radiation of the tidal flare. From the break in the infrared light curve we infer that this hot dust is located ~0.1 pc from the supermassive black hole. Since the dust has been heated by absorbing UV and (potentially) soft X-ray photons of the flare, the reprocessing light curve yields an estimate of the bolometric flare luminosity. For the flare PTF-09ge, we in...

  3. Runaway electron beam generation and mitigation during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Decker, J.; Drewelow, P.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P. C.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Giacomelli, L.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lomas, P. J.; Manzanares, A.; De Aguilera, A. Martin; Matthews, G. F.; Mlynář, J.; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Perez von Thun, C.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A. E.; Sips, G.; Sozzi, C.; contributors, JET

    2015-09-01

    Disruptions are a major operational concern for next generation tokamaks, including ITER. They may generate excessive heat loads on plasma facing components, large electromagnetic forces in the machine structures and several MA of multi-MeV runaway electrons. A more complete understanding of the runaway generation processes and methods to suppress them is necessary to ensure safe and reliable operation of future tokamaks. Runaway electrons were studied at JET-ILW showing that their generation dependencies (accelerating electric field, avalanche critical field, toroidal field, MHD fluctuations) are in agreement with current theories. In addition, vertical stability plays a key role in long runaway beam formation. Energies up to 20 MeV are observed. Mitigation of an incoming runaway electron beam triggered by massive argon injection was found to be feasible provided that the injection takes place early enough in the disruption process. However, suppressing an already accelerated runaway electron beam in the MA range was found to be difficult even with injections of more than 2 kPa.m3 high-Z gases such as krypton or xenon. This may be due to the presence of a cold background plasma weakly coupled to the runaway electron beam which prevents neutrals from penetrating in the electron beam core. Following unsuccessful mitigation attempts, runaway electron impacts on beryllium plasma-facing components were observed, showing localized melting with toroidal asymmetries.

  4. Disrupting Entanglement of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement in thermofield double states of strongly coupled CFTs by analyzing two-sided Reissner-Nordstrom solutions in AdS. The central object of study is the mutual information between a pair of regions, one on each asymptotic boundary of the black hole. For large regions the mutual information is positive and for small ones it vanishes; we compute the critical length scale, which goes to infinity for extremal black holes, of the transition. We also generalize the butterfly effect of Shenker and Stanford to a wide class of charged black holes, showing that mutual information is disrupted upon perturbing the system and waiting for a time of order $\\log E/\\delta E$ in units of the temperature. We conjecture that the parametric form of this timescale is universal.

  5. Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants.

  6. Tumor vascular disruption using various radiation types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Bevelacqua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure with various radiation types and radionuclides is investigated. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for photons and 4He ions suggest that low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides can deposit sufficient absorbed dose to disrupt a tumor’s vascular structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel. Candidate radionuclides uniformly distributed in microspheres are theoretically investigated with respect to their vascular disruption potential and to offer an alternative to 90Y microsphere therapy. Requisite activities of candidate low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides to facilitate vascular disruption are calculated.

  7. Observations of an early Agulhas current retroflection event in 2001: a temporary cessation of inter-ocean exchange south of Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Aken, HM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available in this current could produce temporary interruptions to the exchange, but that their impact would depend on the vertical extent of such retroflections and on their duration. The fortuitous presence at sea of a research vessel has now enabled us to investigate...

  8. Observational evidence from direct current measurements for propagation of remotely forced waves on the shelf off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Aparna, S.G.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Fernando, V.; Shetye, S.R.; Mukherjee, A.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Khalap, S.; Satelkar, N.P.

    QuikSCAT wind data, we show that the contribution of remote forcing to the shelf West Indian Coastal Current (WICC) is significant even when the local alongshore wind is strong, as during the summer-monsoon onset during May–June, and forces a strong...

  9. Girls' Disruptive Behavior and its Relationship to Family Functioning: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneman, Leoniek M; Loeber, Rolf; Hipwell, Alison E; Koot, Hans M

    2009-06-01

    Although a number of reviews of gender differences in disruptive behavior and parental socialization exist, we extend this literature by addressing the question of differential development among girls and by placing both disruptive behavior and parenting behavior in a developmental framework. Clarifying the heterogeneity of development in girls is important for developing and optimizing gender-specific prevention and treatment programs. In the current review, we describe the unique aspects of the development of disruptive behavior in girls and explore how the gender-specific development of disruptive behavior can be explained by family linked risk and protective processes. Based on this review, we formulate a gender-specific reciprocal model of the influence of social factors on the development of disruptive behavior in girls in order to steer further research and better inform prevention and treatment programs.

  10. Effects of disruptive surgeon behavior in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons are the physician group most commonly identified as "disruptive physicians." The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual model of the results of disruptive surgeon behavior and to identify the coping strategies used by perioperative staff. Perspectives of 19 individuals of diverse occupations in the perioperative setting were drawn together using a grounded theory methodology. Effects of disruptive behavior described by participants included shift in attention from the patient to the surgeon, increased mistakes during procedures, deterrence from careers in surgery, and diminished respect for surgeons. Individual coping strategies employed in the face of intimidation include talking to colleagues, externalizing the behavior, avoidance of perpetrators, and warning others. Using grounded theory analysis, we were able to elucidate the impact of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment. This conceptual model may be used to understand and counter the negative effects of manipulation and intimidation of hospital staff and trainees and to build on current programmatic strengths to improve surgical environments and training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disrupted Working Memory Circuitry in Adolescent Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Eckfeld

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia (SZ consistently show deficits in spatial working memory (WM and associated atypical patterns of neural activity within key WM regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC and parietal cortices. However, little research has focused on adolescent psychosis (AP and potential age-associated disruptions of WM circuitry that may occur in youth with this severe form of illness. Here we utilized each subject’s individual spatial WM capacity to investigate task-based neural dysfunction in 17 patients with AP (16.58 ± 2.60 years old as compared to 17 typically developing, demographically comparable adolescents (18.07 ± 3.26 years old. AP patients showed lower behavioral performance at higher WM loads and lower overall WM capacity compared to healthy controls. Whole-brain activation analyses revealed greater bilateral precentral and right postcentral activity in controls relative to AP patients, when controlling for individual WM capacity. Seed-based psychophysiological interaction (PPI analyses revealed significantly greater co-activation between the left dlPFC and left frontal pole in controls relative to AP patients. Significant group-by-age interactions were observed in both whole-brain and PPI analyses, with AP patients showing atypically greater neural activity and stronger coupling between WM task activated brain regions as a function of increasing age. Additionally, AP patients demonstrated positive relationships between right dlPFC neural activity and task performance, but unlike healthy controls, failed to show associations between neural activity and out-of-scanner neurocognitive performance. Collectively, these findings are consistent with atypical WM-related functioning and disrupted developmental processes in youth with AP.

  12. Axonal disruption in white matter underlying cortical sulcus tau pathology in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong Hee; Gangolli, Mihika; Stein, Thor; Alvarez, Victor; McKee, Ann; Brody, David L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. One of the primary defining neuropathological lesions in CTE, based on the first consensus conference, is the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in gray matter sulcal depths. Post-mortem CTE studies have also reported myelin loss, axonal injury and white matter degeneration. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE is restricted to post-mortem neuropathological analysis. We hypothesized that high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI might be useful for detecting white matter microstructural changes directly adjacent to gray matter tau pathology. To test this hypothesis, formalin-fixed post-mortem tissue blocks from the superior frontal cortex of ten individuals with an established diagnosis of CTE were obtained from the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation brain bank. Advanced diffusion MRI data was acquired using an 11.74 T MRI scanner at Washington University with 250 × 250 × 500 µm(3) spatial resolution. Diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and generalized q-sampling imaging analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Following MRI acquisition, tissue sections were tested for phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity in gray matter sulcal depths. Axonal disruption in underlying white matter was assessed using two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis of myelin black gold staining. A robust image co-registration method was applied to accurately quantify the relationship between diffusion MRI parameters and histopathology. We found that white matter underlying sulci with high levels of tau pathology had substantially impaired myelin black gold Fourier transform power coherence, indicating axonal microstructural disruption (r = -0.55, p = 0.0015). Using diffusion tensor MRI, we found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was modestly (r = 0.53) but significantly (p = 0.0012) correlated

  13. Listening to Shells: Galaxy Masses from Disrupted Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Kyle; Sanderson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to measure the dynamical mass of an individual galaxy is limited by the radial extent of the luminous tracers of its potential. For elliptical galaxies, it is difficult to go much beyond two effective radii using integrated light. Appealing to particle tracers like globular clusters has allowed for mass measurements out to ten effective radii. The extended atomic-gas disks of spiral galaxies allow one to measure rotation curves well beyond the optical disk to a few effective radii; however, such mass measurements are limited to a single plane and can often be confused by warps. As surface-brightness limits have pushed ever deeper, the revealed abundance of disrupted satellites in galaxy halos may present a unique opportunity for determining the enclosed mass at very large radii (more than five effective radii), provided our technology is up to the challenge. Here, we discuss the prospect of using integrated light spectroscopy of tidal shells to measure the masses of individual galaxies at redshifts of up to 0.1. Our study considers the limitations of current and projected instrumentation on 4-, 10-, and 30-meter class telescopes. The observational constraints are indeed very stringent, requiring both high sensitivity (with V-band surface brightness limits below 25 mag per square arsecond) and high spectral resolution (R>10k), whereas spatial resolution is effectively irrelevant. Bigger is not necessarily better for our application because of the limited field-of-view (FOV) of large telescopes, which dramatically limits their total grasp. We find the two most-promising setups are (1) a large FOV (1 square arcminute) integral-field unit (IFU) on a 4-meter class telescope and (2) a multiplexed suite of small FOV (10 square arcseconds) IFUs on a 10- or 30-meter class telescope. Two prospective instruments that may meet these requirements are WEAVE, an instrument currently planned for the William Herschel Telescope at La Palma, and an OPTIMOS

  14. Classroom discipline skills and disruption rate: A correlational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropik, Melonie Jane

    Very little has been done to quantify the relationship between the frequency with which teachers use discipline skills and disruption rate in high school settings. Most of the available research that examined this relationship empirically was done in elementary schools, while a few studies examined the junior high school setting. The present research examined whether the use of ten specific discipline skills were related to the rate of disruption in suburban high school science classrooms. The ten skills were selected based on their prevalence in the theoretical literature and the strength of the relationships reported in empirical studies of elementary and junior high classrooms. Each relationship was tested directionally at alpha = .01. The maximum experimentwise Type I error rate was .10. Disruption rate was measured by trained observers over five class periods in the Fall of the school year. The frequency of performing the ten skills was assessed using a student survey developed for this study. The ten skills were: (1) beginning class on time, (2) using routines, (3) waiting for student attention before speaking, (4) giving clear directions, (5) presenting material fast enough to hold students' attention, (6) requiring students to remain seated, (7) appearing confident, (8) stopping misbehavior quickly, (9) checking for student attentiveness, and (10) teaching to the bell. Appearing confident (r = --.697, p = .004) and quickly stopping misbehavior (r = --.709, p = .003) were significantly negatively related to disruption rate. The effect sizes for the confidence and stopping misbehavior variables were .49 and .50, respectively. At least half of the variation in disruption rate was attributable to the difference in the frequency of appearing confident and stopping misbehavior quickly. The eight other relationships produced nonsignificant results. The results raise questions about whether theories developed from observational and anecdotal evidence gathered in

  15. Viewgraphs presented at the ASDEX/DOE workshop on disruptions in divertor tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granetz, R.; Gruber, O.; Zohm, H. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The emphasis of this year`s ASDEX/DOE workshop was on disruptions in diverted tokamaks. The meeting was held here at MIT on 14--15 March. It is particularly appropriate that MIT hosted the workshop this year, since Alcator C-Mod had just recently completed its very first run campaign, and disruptions are one of the key areas of research in our program. There were a total of 14 speakers, with participants from IPP (Garching), CRPP (Lausanne), Culham, General Atomics, PPPL, Sandia, ORNL, the ITER JCT, and MIT. The subjects addressed included statistical analysis of disruption probabilities in ASDEX, modelling of the vertical axisymmetric plasma motion in DIII-D, impact of disruptions on the design of the ITER divertors, modelling of runaway electrons, and TSC calculations of disruption-induced currents and forces in TPX, etc. One item of particular interest to us was the experimental correlation of halo current magnitude with plasma current on ASDEX-Upgrade. The data indicates at least a linear, and possibly even a quadractic dependence. This has important implications for Alcator C-Mod, since it would predict halo currents of order 1 MA or more at full performance. At the conclusion of the talks, an informal discussion of disruption databases was held, primarily for the purpose of helping us develop a useful one for C-Mod.

  16. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption is b...

  17. Network Formation under the Threat of Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, B.

    2013-01-01

    The studies in this thesis are focused on the impact the presence of a network disruptor has on network formation models. In particular, we build two theoretical models to study the effect of network disruption on network formation and test the effect network disruption has on equilibrium selection

  18. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert ...

  19. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Julie Jespersen; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss...

  20. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…