WorldWideScience

Sample records for culture prom reunions

  1. Illusory identities and cultural hybridity among the “Sinoi” on Reunion Island

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Sion, Live

    2007-01-01

    Today, most of the Chinese descendants on Reunion have lost the central elements of their ancestral culture and no longer speak Cantonese or Hakka. In this article I propose to examine the question of cultural hybridity and the “return to our roots” among the  Chinese descendants on Reunion, in connection with the problem of ethnic and cultural identity within a Creole society which has been mixed since its inception. On Reunion, actual social structures and interrelations are constantly trav...

  2. Conferences and Family Reunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sutherland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional associations and conferences have similarities with and differences from families and family reunions. This comparison can illustrate some ways professional associations can approach the integration of new members and the planning of conferences in order to facilitate membership development and leadership renewal. Unlike family reunions, professional conferences are not closed events that require a shared culture in order to fully participate; they are events that should show the constant change and development of practice that is representative of the profession – for both members and non-members. Some of the topics explored in the article are: making it easy for outsiders to contribute, considering the tastes of new members, making it easy to volunteer in a meaningful way, and remembering who the future of the organization is. These simple considerations will assist in opening professional associations to new participants and help them to maintain their relevance and vitality over time.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and measurement properties of generic and cancer-related patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for use with cancer patients in Brazil: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albach, Carlos Augusto; Wagland, Richard; Hunt, Katherine J

    2018-04-01

    This systematic review (1) identifies the current generic and cancer-related patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that have been cross-culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese and applied to cancer patients and (2) critically evaluates their cross-cultural adaptation (CCA) and measurement properties. Seven databases were searched for articles regarding the translation and evaluation of measurement properties of generic and cancer-related PROMs cross-culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese that are applied in adult (≥18 years old) cancer patients. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COSMIN checklist. The bibliographic search retrieved 1674 hits, of which seven studies analysing eight instruments were included in this review. Data on the interpretability of scores were poorly reported. Overall, the quality of the CCA process was inconsistent throughout the studies. None of the included studies performed a cross-cultural validation. The evidence concerning the quality of measurement properties is limited by poor or fair methodological quality. Moreover, limited information regarding measurement properties was provided within the included papers. This review aids the selection process of Brazilian Portuguese PROMs for use in cancer patients. After acknowledging the methodological caveats and strengths of each tool, our opinion is that for quality of life and symptoms assessment the adapted FACT-G version and the ESAS could be recommended, respectively. Future research should rely on the already accepted standards of CCA and validation studies.

  4. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Austin, Stephen Fitzgerald; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for anxiety and depressive disorders are an important aspect of measurement-based care. AIM: The aim of the study was to perform a clinimetric analysis of two PROMs scales in patents with depression and anxiety. METHODS: Patients completed...... recruited from two Danish mental health centers with anxiety or depression. The standardization of the SCL-10 and WHO-5 by T-scores indicated that a T-score of 65 corresponding to being moderately in need of treatment and a T-score of 75 to be severely in need of treatment. The coefficient of alpha...... with anxiety or depression undergoing psychotherapy treatment....

  5. reuniones y congresos en Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Dolores Ponce Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La consolidación del turismo de reuniones en la ciudad de Murcia, en un contexto de fuerte competencia, nos conduce a refl exionar sobre su capacidad competitiva en relación a una red urbana de ámbito nacional. El estudio muestra la evolución experimentada por los parámetros cuantitativos básicos y la opinión y pretensiones que tienen a cerca de este producto turístico los principales agentes del sector. Perspectiva imprescindible para establecer relaciones de cooperación y diálogo entre los actores implicados, con el fi n de optimizar, en términos de sostenibilidad, las importantes inversiones realizadas hasta ahora.

  6. Family Reunions: Broadened Kinship, Celebrated Rurality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Menasche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This articletakes family reunions held among peasants as a focus of study. During these events,keycultural categories come to light from which the analyzed group builds up ideas about kinship and also the relations that are implied in it. We observe that, in these cases, there are also indications of specific elements through which people express a valorization of rurality. To carry out this study, we collected data as part of an ethnographic research project conducted at a family reunion and in a rural community settled by German descendent immigrants, located in Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil

  7. PROM and Labour Effects on Urinary Metabolome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Meloni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since pathologies and complications occurring during pregnancy and/or during labour may cause adverse outcomes for both newborns and mothers, there is a growing interest in metabolomic applications on pregnancy investigation. In fact, metabolomics has proved to be an efficient strategy for the description of several perinatal conditions. In particular, this study focuses on premature rupture of membranes (PROM in pregnancy at term. For this project, urine samples were collected at three different clinical conditions: out of labour before PROM occurrence (Ph1, out of labour with PROM (Ph2, and during labour with PROM (Ph3. GC-MS analysis, followed by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, was able to discriminate among the different classes, highlighting the metabolites most involved in the discrimination.

  8. PROM and Labour Effects on Urinary Metabolome: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Alessandra; Palmas, Francesco; Mereu, Rossella; Deiana, Sara Francesca; Fais, Maria Francesca; Mussap, Michele; Ragusa, Antonio; Pintus, Roberta; Fanos, Vassilios; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2018-01-01

    Since pathologies and complications occurring during pregnancy and/or during labour may cause adverse outcomes for both newborns and mothers, there is a growing interest in metabolomic applications on pregnancy investigation. In fact, metabolomics has proved to be an efficient strategy for the description of several perinatal conditions. In particular, this study focuses on premature rupture of membranes (PROM) in pregnancy at term. For this project, urine samples were collected at three different clinical conditions: out of labour before PROM occurrence (Ph1), out of labour with PROM (Ph2), and during labour with PROM (Ph3). GC-MS analysis, followed by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, was able to discriminate among the different classes, highlighting the metabolites most involved in the discrimination. PMID:29511388

  9. Reunion island, laboratory of renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gateaud, P.

    2010-01-01

    Hydro-power, biomass fuel, solar photovoltaic and wind power, are the renewable energy sources that Reunion island (Indian Ocean, FR) is developing to manage the security of its electric power system. In 2009, power generation reached 2618 GWh and was ensured at 67% by imported fossil fuels (47% coal and 20% hydrocarbons) and at 33% by renewable energies (20% hydraulic, 20% bagasse and 2% solar, wind and biogas). Total production capacity of the island reaches 625 MW. The average power used is of about 330 MW. Private companies supply 60% of the production and the remaining 40% are supplied by EdF who owns about 330000 clients. The average consumption of a Reunion inhabitant is 1259 kWh per year (2330 kWh/y for a metropolitan French). (J.S.)

  10. Centro para reuniones, en Karpfenberg, Estiria (Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windbrechtinger, W.

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available The building bas two wings. One of them has two storeys, and a semibasement, and is used as offices. The other wing has a single floor level, and constitutes the Meeting Hall. On entering there is a kind of forecourt, and behind the meeting hall there is a further court, which on special occasions could also be utilized for large meetings. Amusement rooms for television and card and other games are provided in the semibasement: also a photographic laboratory, games stores, washing and boiler room. The ground floor contains the municipal library, a number of offices (an insurance company, the workers' chamber, and the association of nature's friends and rooms for the meetings of political organisations. On the second floor the syndicates have their offices, which include board room, a teaching room, three rooms for guests, the doorman's living quarters, and the necessary services. Finally, the meeting hall section involves a vestibule, the hall itself with accommodation for 300 people, a stage, cafeteria, kitchen, and other auxiliary facilities. The design of this building is rational and straightforward, and is pleasantly in keeping with the surrounding buildings and landscape.El edificio consta de dos alas: una, con dos plantas—destinadas a oficinas—y semisótano; y otra, de una sola planta, en la que está situada la sala de reuniones. Visto el conjunto desde la entrada, aparece una especie de patio delantero, dejando, detrás de la sala, un segundo patio, susceptible de ser utilizado en casos especiales, tales como grandes reuniones, etc. El semisótano agrupa las salas de esparcimiento—juego, televisión, trabajos para entretenimiento—, laboratorio fotográfico y cámara oscura, locales para guardar los utensilios de deporte, aseos, almacén y cuarto de la calefacción. La planta baja contiene la biblioteca municipal, varias oficinas— de una sociedad de seguros, de la cámara de trabajadores, de la asociación de amigos de la

  11. An introduction to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyte, D.G.; Calvert, M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Hove, R. Ten; Tolan, S.; Hill, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is set to rise in physiotherapy. PROMs provide additional 'patient-centred' data which is unique in capturing the patient's own opinion on the impact of their disease or disorder, and its treatment, on their life. Thus, PROMs are increasingly used

  12. Renewable Energy in Reunion: Potentials and Outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddour, Julien; Percebois, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Renewable, environmentally friendly and evenly distributed across the globe, renewable energy (RES for Renewable Energy Resources) is an excellent means of taking up the global energy challenge, i.e. enabling developing countries in the south to make progress without harming the environment. Since it is particularly well suited to an island territory's character and local needs, RE is also an excellent tool that could enable France's overseas Departments and Territories to reduce their energy dependence, preserve their environment and ensure their sustainable development. In Reunion, RES benefit from marked political support and from a very favourable financial and institutional environment, which has allowed the Reunion region to become a national pioneer in the realm of thermal energy and photovoltaics. Nonetheless, RES are not a panacea as they are subject to a number of flaws. It is currently expensive and uncompetitive, intermittent and insufficiently powerful, and not always available to keep up with demand. This explains why RES cannot aspire to be a complete substitute for fossil fuels. The two energy systems complement one another to meet the region's total energy needs. This article also highlights the negative consequences of the support measures for RES (inflated costs and negative prices on the electricity markets) and underscores the need for a complementary energy policy in pricing electricity, as well as effecting energy savings, which must remain our priority. (authors)

  13. [Chikungunya and urban sprawl on Reunion Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoustin, T

    2012-03-01

    The proportion of unsanitary housing in French overseas departments is much higher than in mainland France. Reunion Island is no exception to this fact. Between 80 and 90% of housing in Reunion Island was built by squatters with no legal claim or deed to the property. This has resulted in uncontrolled urban sprawl with living conditions reminiscent of those in developing countries. The absence of adequate drainage systems for sewage and rain water and the lack of properly organized garbage disposal that characterizes these sprawl areas constitutes a particularly favorable breeding ground for vector-borne diseases, especially chikungunya. Thus, implementing measures to control this type of settlement and to relocate of people out of existing sprawl areas constitutes a significant tool to control this epidemiological risk. Up to now, public officials have shown a clear reluctance to intervene in sprawl areas despite good knowledge of their location. On June 26th of this year, a law containing provisions relative to the control of urban sprawl and unsanitary housing in overseas departments and territories will come into effect. This law should provide public officials with the legal basis that has up until now been lacking to take action. Persistence in the "wait-and-see" attitude could lead to condemnation by French or European courts.

  14. Cheetah Reunion - The Challenge of Finding Your Friends Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Shotton, Justine; Wilshin, Simon D; Horgan, Jane; Klein, Rebecca; McKenna, Rick; Wilson, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Animals navigate their environment using a variety of senses and strategies. This multiplicity enables them to respond to different navigational requirements resulting from habitat, scale and purpose. One of the challenges social animals face is how to reunite after periods of separation. We explore a variety of possible mechanisms used to reunite the members of a cheetah coalition dispersed within a large area after prolonged separation. Using GPS data from three cheetahs reuniting after weeks of separation, we determined that 1) the likelihood of purely coincidental reunion is miniscule 2) the reunion occurred in an area not normally frequented 3) with very little time spent in the region in advance of the reunion. We therefore propose that timely encounter of scent markings where paths cross is the most likely mechanism used to aid the reunion.

  15. Cheetah Reunion - The Challenge of Finding Your Friends Again.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Y Hubel

    Full Text Available Animals navigate their environment using a variety of senses and strategies. This multiplicity enables them to respond to different navigational requirements resulting from habitat, scale and purpose. One of the challenges social animals face is how to reunite after periods of separation. We explore a variety of possible mechanisms used to reunite the members of a cheetah coalition dispersed within a large area after prolonged separation. Using GPS data from three cheetahs reuniting after weeks of separation, we determined that 1 the likelihood of purely coincidental reunion is miniscule 2 the reunion occurred in an area not normally frequented 3 with very little time spent in the region in advance of the reunion. We therefore propose that timely encounter of scent markings where paths cross is the most likely mechanism used to aid the reunion.

  16. Amnioinfusion in preterm PROM: effects on amnion and cord histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, A; Andreani, M; Ghidini, A; Verderio, M; Pizzardi, A; Vergani, P; Salafia, C M

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the effects of transabdominal amnioinfusion (TA) on the histology of amnion (A) and umbilical cord (UC). From a cohort of 56 singleton pregnancies with premature rupture of membranes (PROM) at PROM of 18.7 weeks and at delivery of 26.1 weeks, with a latency of 50 days. Compared with subjects who declined the procedure, TA had a beneficial effect on clinical variables, mediated primarily by a longer latency. TA was not associated with identifiable effects on the histologic features of A or UC. A and UC histology is not significantly affected by exposure to saline solution even for prolonged periods of time.

  17. Reunions between adoptees and birth parents: the adoptive parents' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, P R; Campbell, L; Patti, P

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the reactions of adoptive parents to reunions between their adopted children and the children's birth parents. The focus is on how adoptive parents feel the reunion affects the family's integrity. Three types of family responses are identified: (1) closed, (2) divided, and (3) open. Acceptance of the differences between families created by adoption of children and those created by childbirth was a factor in the families' openness. Closed families saw no difference, and reunion suggested to the adults that they had failed as parents. Parents in open families understood the difference in families, saw the children as separate, and felt no threat to their competence as parents. Families' need for boundaries is examined, and the way the concept of family is constructed is discussed. Implications for the practice of adoption are considered.

  18. El turismo de reuniones y negocios en Mallorca

    OpenAIRE

    Binimelis Sebastian, Jaume; Ordinas Garau, Antoni

    2003-01-01

    Los autores analizan la incidencia que el turismo de reuniones y congresos tiene en un espacio de fuerte implantancion turística como es la isla de Mallorca. A partir de encuesta Delphi a los agentes sociales implicados en dicho subsector, valoran las infraestructuras existentes para el desarrollo del turismo de reuniones y además, dibujan el perfil de la demanda existente. Los autores concluyen que, paradójicamente, Mallorca gran resorte turístico, no cuenta con las infraestru...

  19. An introduction to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, D G; Calvert, M; van der Wees, P J; ten Hove, R; Tolan, S; Hill, J C

    2015-06-01

    The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is set to rise in physiotherapy. PROMs provide additional 'patient-centred' data which is unique in capturing the patient's own opinion on the impact of their disease or disorder, and its treatment, on their life. Thus, PROMs are increasingly used by clinicians to guide routine patient care, or for the purposes of audit, and are already firmly embedded in clinical research. This article seeks to summarise the key aspects of PROM use for physiotherapists, both in routine clinical practice and in the research setting, and highlights recent developments in the field. Generic and condition-specific PROMs are defined and examples of commonly used measures are provided. The selection of appropriate PROMs, and their effective use in the clinical and research settings is discussed. Finally, existing barriers to PROM use in practice are identified and recent physiotherapy PROM initiatives, led by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy are explored. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Creating guidance for the use of patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) in clinical palliatieve care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.M. van; Harding, R.; Bausewein, C.; Payne, S.; Higginson, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Routine use of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) in clinical practice can influence care but is not always achieved. One reason for this seems to be a lack of guidance on how to use PROMs in palliative care practice. This project aimed to provide such guidance. Aim(s) and

  1. A systematic review of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) used in child and adolescent burn research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, C; Armstrong-James, L; White, P; Rumsey, N; Pleat, J; Harcourt, D

    2015-03-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) can identify important information about patient needs and therapeutic progress. The aim of this review was to identify the PROMs that are being used in child and adolescent burn care and to determine the quality of such scales. Computerised and manual bibliographic searches of Medline, Social Sciences Index, Cinahl, Psychinfo, Psycharticles, AMED, and HAPI, were used to identify English-language articles using English-language PROMs from January 2001 to March 2013. The psychometric quality of the PROMs was assessed. 23 studies met the entry criteria and identified 32 different PROMs (31 generic, 1 burns-specific). Overall, the psychometric quality of the PROMs was low; only two generic scales (the Perceived Stigmatisation Questionnaire and the Social Comfort Scale) and only one burns-specific scale (the Children Burn Outcomes Questionnaire for children aged 5-18) had psychometric evidence relevant to this population. The majority of PROMs did not have psychometric evidence for their use with child or adolescent burn patients. To appropriately identify the needs and treatment progress of child and adolescent burn patients, new burns-specific PROMs need to be developed and validated to reflect issues that are of importance to this population. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancing rigour in the validation of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs: bridging linguistic and psychometric testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Gwerfyl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong consensus exists for a systematic approach to linguistic validation of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs and discrete methods for assessing their psychometric properties. Despite the need for robust evidence of the appropriateness of measures, transition from linguistic to psychometric validation is poorly documented or evidenced. This paper demonstrates the importance of linking linguistic and psychometric testing through a purposeful stage which bridges the gap between translation and large-scale validation. Findings Evidence is drawn from a study to develop a Welsh language version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and investigate its psychometric properties. The BDI-II was translated into Welsh then administered to Welsh-speaking university students (n = 115 and patients with depression (n = 37 concurrent with the English BDI-II, and alongside other established depression and quality of life measures. A Welsh version of the BDI-II was produced that, on administration, showed conceptual equivalence with the original measure; high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.90; 0.96; item homogeneity; adequate correlation with the English BDI-II (r = 0.96; 0.94 and additional measures; and a two-factor structure with one overriding dimension. Nevertheless, in the student sample, the Welsh version showed a significantly lower overall mean than the English (p = 0.002; and significant differences in six mean item scores. This prompted a review and refinement of the translated measure. Conclusions Exploring potential sources of bias in translated measures represents a critical step in the translation-validation process, which until now has been largely underutilised. This paper offers important findings that inform advanced methods of cross-cultural validation of PROMs.

  3. Reflections on the Fiftieth Reunion of the Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loud, Oliver

    1988-01-01

    A member of the original faculty of the experimental Ohio State University Laboratory High School reflects at a fiftieth reunion of the first graduating class. Students were used as guinea pigs to determine the effects of providing teenagers with liberating, interesting, and customized education from university faculty. (SM)

  4. Ecological interactions in Aedes species on Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagny Beilhe, L; Delatte, H; Juliano, S A; Fontenille, D; Quilici, S

    2013-12-01

    Two invasive, container-breeding mosquito species, Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) and Aedes albopictus (Stegomyia albopicta) (Diptera: Culicidae), have different distribution patterns on Reunion Island. Aedes albopictus occurs in all areas and Ae. aegypti colonizes only some restricted areas already occupied by Ae. albopictus. This study investigates the abiotic and biotic ecological mechanisms that determine the distribution of Aedes species on Reunion Island. Life history traits (duration of immature stages, survivorship, fecundity, estimated finite rate of increase) in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus were compared at different temperatures. These fitness measures were characterized in both species in response to competitive interactions among larvae. Aedes aegypti was drastically affected by temperature, performing well only at around 25 °C, at which it achieved its highest survivorship and greatest estimated rate of increase. The narrow distribution of this species in the field on Reunion Island may thus relate to its poor ability to cope with unfavourable temperatures. Aedes aegypti was also more negatively affected by high population densities and to some extent by interactions with Ae. albopictus, particularly in the context of limited food supplies. Aedes albopictus exhibited better population performance across a range of environmental conditions. Its ecological plasticity and its superior competitive ability relative to its congener may further enhance its invasion success on Reunion Island. © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Application of validity theory and methodology to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs): building an argument for validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Melanie; Elsworth, Gerald R; Osborne, Richard H

    2018-07-01

    Data from subjective patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are now being used in the health sector to make or support decisions about individuals, groups and populations. Contemporary validity theorists define validity not as a statistical property of the test but as the extent to which empirical evidence supports the interpretation of test scores for an intended use. However, validity testing theory and methodology are rarely evident in the PROM validation literature. Application of this theory and methodology would provide structure for comprehensive validation planning to support improved PROM development and sound arguments for the validity of PROM score interpretation and use in each new context. This paper proposes the application of contemporary validity theory and methodology to PROM validity testing. The validity testing principles will be applied to a hypothetical case study with a focus on the interpretation and use of scores from a translated PROM that measures health literacy (the Health Literacy Questionnaire or HLQ). Although robust psychometric properties of a PROM are a pre-condition to its use, a PROM's validity lies in the sound argument that a network of empirical evidence supports the intended interpretation and use of PROM scores for decision making in a particular context. The health sector is yet to apply contemporary theory and methodology to PROM development and validation. The theoretical and methodological processes in this paper are offered as an advancement of the theory and practice of PROM validity testing in the health sector.

  6. Evaluation and demonstration of commercialization potential of CCSI tools within gPROMS advanced simulation platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Adekola [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Schmal, Pieter [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Ramos, Alfredo [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Cano, Alejandro [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Bhattacharyya, Debangsu [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Mebane, David [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Sahinidis, Nikolaos [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chowdhury, Ananya [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Liu, Xiaohui [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States); Bellinghausen, Stefan [Process Systems Enterprise Inc., Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States)

    2017-05-29

    PSE, in the first phase of the CCSI commercialization project, set out to identify market opportunities for the CCSI tools combined with existing gPROMS platform capabilities and develop a clear technical plan for the proposed commercialization activities.

  7. El turismo de reuniones y negocios en Mallorca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Binimelis Sebastian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Los autores analizan la incidencia que el turismo de reuniones y congresos tiene en un espacio de fuerte implantancion turística como es la isla de Mallorca. A partir de encuesta Delphi a los agentes sociales implicados en dicho subsector, valoran las infraestructuras existentes para el desarrollo del turismo de reuniones y además, dibujan el perfil de la demanda existente. Los autores concluyen que, paradójicamente, Mallorca gran resorte turístico, no cuenta con las infraestructuras adecuadas para el desarrollo del turismo congresual. Asimismo, cabe reseñar la opinión unánime entre los agentes y representantes de los diversos sectores turísticos por la cual se confirma el importante papel que podría jugar el sector del turismo de reuniones y negocios respecto a la resolución de diversos retos planteados al conjunto de la actividad turística en Mallorca, como los de la desestacionalización, la desmasificación y la consecución de un mayor gasto diario del turista que visita la isla.

  8. An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of the PROMS Measure of Music Perception Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Richard; Willems, Roel M; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Profile of Music Perception Skills (PROMS) is a recently developed measure of perceptual music skills which has been shown to have promising psychometric properties. In this paper we extend the evaluation of its brief version to three kinds of validity using an individual difference approach. The brief PROMS displays good discriminant validity with working memory, given that it does not correlate with backward digit span (r = .04). Moreover, it shows promising criterion validity (association with musical training (r = .45), musicianship status (r = .48), and self-rated musical talent (r = .51)). Finally, its convergent validity, i.e. relation to an unrelated measure of music perception skills, was assessed by correlating the brief PROMS to harmonic closure judgment accuracy. Two independent samples point to good convergent validity of the brief PROMS (r = .36; r = .40). The same association is still significant in one of the samples when including self-reported music skill in a partial correlation (rpartial = .30; rpartial = .17). Overall, the results show that the brief version of the PROMS displays a very good pattern of construct validity. Especially its tuning subtest stands out as a valuable part for music skill evaluations in Western samples. We conclude by briefly discussing the choice faced by music cognition researchers between different musical aptitude measures of which the brief PROMS is a well evaluated example.

  9. Counsel meetings about the White book on energies; Reunion de concertation sur le livre blanc sur les energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, D

    2003-12-01

    These reunions aim to discuss the opinion of experts on the energy about the law project on the energies, integrated in the White Book. The first reunion concerns the control of the energy demand, the second reunion is devoted to the territory and social solidarities, the renewable energies development and the situation of Corsica and the overseas territories. The third reunion deals with the supply security. (A.L.B.)

  10. [Post nearly Drowning Vibrio alginolyticus Septicemia Acquired in Reunion (Indian Ocean)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaüzère, B-A; Chanareille, P; Vandroux, D

    2016-08-01

    AbstractWe report the first case of Vibrio alginolyticus septicemia in the Indian Ocean (Reunion Island), in a patient (70-year-old-man) with multiple underlying conditions, following a nearly drowning in the lagoon of Reunion. From now on, V. alginolyticus should be considered as a possible agent of septicemia in the Indian Ocean, particularly following marine activities.

  11. Play It Again: Neural Responses to Reunion with Excluders Predicted by Attachment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lars O.; Wu, Jia; Borelli, Jessica L.; Mayes, Linda C.; Crowley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Reunion behavior following stressful separations from caregivers is often considered the single most sensitive clue to infant attachment patterns. Extending these ideas to middle childhood/early adolescence, we examined participants' neural responses to reunion with peers who had previously excluded them. We recorded event-related potentials…

  12. PROMs for pain in adult cancer patients: a systematic review of measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abahussin, Asma A; West, Robert M; Wong, David C; Ziegler, Lucy E

    2018-05-17

    Pain is one of the most devastating symptoms for cancer patients. One-third of patients who experience pain do not receive effective treatment. A key barrier to effective pain management is lack of routine measurement and monitoring of pain. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are recommended for measuring cancer pain. However, evidence to guide the selection of the most appropriate measure to identify and monitor cancer pain is limited. A systematic review of measurement properties of PROMs for pain in cancer patients is needed to identify the best validated measure for adoption to an electronic platform. Systematically review measurement properties of PROMs used for adult cancer patients to measure pain and, as a secondary goal, investigate the evidence of validated mobile health (mHealth) applications used to measure pain (registration number: CRD42017065575). Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL were systematically searched in March 2018 for studies examining measurement properties for PROMs for pain in adult cancer patients. Both of the methodological quality of the studies and their results were appraised using the COSMIN checklist and specific measurement properties criteria respectively. Sixteen studies evaluating eight instruments were included. No studies using a PROM in a mHealth application were identified. The methodological quality of the measurement properties ranged between poor and fair. No instrument showed strong positive evidence for all the evaluated measurement properties. Based on the available evidence, the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) had the strongest evidence to support its selection for the measurement of cancer pain. The BPI-SF was the best performing measure across all proprieties evaluated through COSMIN. Better quality validation studies of PROMs for cancer pain are needed to explore the full range of measurement properties. Utilising mHealth applications for measuring pain for cancer patients is an innovative approach worth

  13. Protocols for Multimedia Systems : 6th International Conference, PROMS 2001 Enschede, The Netherlands, October 17–19, 2001 Proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Nieuwenhuis, Lambert J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the PROMS series of conferences and workshops is to contribute to scientific, strategic, and practical cooperation between research institutes and industrial companies in the area of multimedia protocols. This is also the goal of PROMS 2001. The basic theme of this conference continues

  14. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) following forward planned field-in field IMRT: Results from the Cambridge Breast IMRT trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukesh, Mukesh B.; Qian, Wendi; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Dorling, Leila; Barnett, Gillian C.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles; Twyman, Nicola; Burnet, Neil G.; Wishart, Gordon C.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in breast cancer reduces clinician-assessed breast tissue toxicity including fibrosis, telangectasia and sub-optimal cosmesis. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are also important as they provide the patient’s perspective. This longitudinal study reports on (a) the effect of forward planned field-in-field IMRT (∼simple IMRT) on PROMs compared to standard RT at 5 years after RT, (b) factors affecting PROMs at 5 years after RT and (c) the trend of PROMs over 5 years of follow up. Methods: PROMs were assessed at baseline (pre-RT), 6, 24 and 60 months after completion of RT using global health (EORTC QLQ C30) and 4 breast symptom questions (BR23). Also, 4 breast RT-specific questions were included at 6, 24 and 60 months: change in skin appearance, firmness to touch, reduction in breast size and overall change in breast appearance since RT. The benefits of simple IMRT over standard RT at 5 years after RT were assessed using standard t-test for global health and logistic regression analysis for breast symptom questions and breast RT-specific questions. Clinical factors affecting PROMs at 5 years were investigated using a multivariate analysis. A repeated mixed model was applied to explore the trend over time for each of PROMs. Results: (89%) 727/815, 84%, 81% and 61% patients completed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 24 and 60 months respectively. Patients reported worse toxicity for all four BR23 breast symptoms at 6 months, which then improved over time (p < 0.0001). They also reported improvement in skin appearance and breast hardness over time (p < 0.0001), with no significant change for breast shrinkage (p = 0.47) and overall breast appearance (p = 0.13). At 5 years, PROMs assessments did not demonstrate a benefit for simple IMRT over standard radiotherapy. Large breast volume, young age, baseline surgical cosmesis and post-operative infection were the most important variables to affect PROMs

  15. Promõshlennõje zonõ ohvatil "mjortvõi sezon" / Ain Alvela

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alvela, Ain, 1967-

    2008-01-01

    Arendajad on tehnoparkide rajamise ooterežiimile pannud - ostjaid jaguks, kuid võimalusi napib. Diagramm: Za pjat let stoimost zemli promõshlennogo naznatshenija võrosla v pjat raz; Tabel: Naiboleje dorogaja zemlja - v promparke Lasnamäe. Kommenteerivad Enn Tosso, Nikolai Pitshugov ja Urmas Ahven

  16. An independent psychometric evaluation of the PROMS measure of music perception skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunert, R.; Willems, R.M.; Hagoort, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Profile of Music Perception Skills (PROMS) is a recently developed measure of perceptual music skills which has been shown to have promising psychometric properties. In this paper we extend the evaluation of its brief version to three kinds of validity using an individual difference approach.

  17. Royal london hospital set P28 plans 30th anniversary reunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, Fran

    2013-04-03

    Members of Set P28 at the Royal London Hospital who began their training in February 1980 are planning a reunion on July 27 in London. The venue will be announced later. Email fran-joy@hotmail.com for details.

  18. Autonomic reactivity of children to separation and reunion with foster parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C.; Oosterman, M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether foster children showed different autonomic nervous system activity on separation and reunion than control children. Autonomic nervous system activity in foster children was examined in relation to time in placement and disinhibited attachment. METHOD: The sample

  19. Plasmid marker rescue transformation proceeds by breakage-reunion in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinrauch, Y.; Dubnau, D.

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carrying a plasmid which replicates with a copy number of about 1 was transformed with linearized homologous plasmid DNA labeled with the heavy isotopes 2 H and 15 N, in the presence of 32 Pi and 6-(p-hydroxyphenylazo)-uracil to inhibit DNA replication. Plasmid DNA was isolated from the transformed culture and fractionated in cesium chloride density gradients. The distribution of total and donor plasmid DNA was examined, using specific hybridization probes. The synthesis of new DNA, associated with the integration of donor moiety, was also monitored. Donor-specific sequences were present at a density intermediate between that of light and hybrid DNA. This recombinant DNA represented 1.4% of total plasmid DNA. The latter value corresponded well with the transforming activity (1.7%) obtained for the donor marker. Newly synthesized material associated with plasmid DNA at the recombinant density amounted to a minor portion of the recombinant plasmid DNA. These data suggest that, like chromosomal transformation, plasmid marker rescue transformation does not require replication for the integration of donor markers and, also like chromosomal transformation, proceeds by a breakage-reunion mechanism. The extent of donor DNA replacement of recipient DNA per plasmid molecule of 54 kilobases (27 kilobase pairs) was estimated as 16 kilobases

  20. Origins of Tropospheric Ozone Interannual Variation (IAV) over Reunion: A Model Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Douglass, Anne R.; Olsen, Mark A.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Posny, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Observations from long-term ozonesonde measurements show robust variations and trends in the evolution of ozone in the middle and upper troposphere over Reunion Island (21.1 degrees South Latitude, 55.5 degrees East Longitude) in June-August. Here we examine possible causes of the observed ozone variation at Reunion Island using hindcast simulations by the stratosphere-troposphere Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model for 1992-2014, driven by assimilated Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields. Reunion Island is at the edge of the subtropical jet, a region of strong stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Our analysis implies that the large interannual variation (IAV) of upper tropospheric ozone over Reunion is driven by the large IAV of the stratospheric influence. The IAV of the large-scale, quasi-horizontal wind patterns also contributes to the IAV of ozone in the upper troposphere. Comparison to a simulation with constant emissions indicates that increasing emissions do not lead to the maximum trend in the middle and upper troposphere over Reunion during austral winter implied by the sonde data. The effects of increasing emission over southern Africa are limited tothe lower troposphere near the surface in August-September.

  1. CONDUCCIÓN DE REUNIONES PARA LA OPERACIÓN EFICAZ DE LOS EQUIPOS DE TRABAJO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Franco G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las reuniones son actividades de gran importancia desarrolladas por grupos y equipos para resolver problemas y tomar decisiones para alcanzar en forma efectiva las metas de la organización. En una gran mayoría de casos las reuniones se efectúan sin seguir un proceso sistemático que permita obtener lo mejor de ellas. Por esta razón se miran como una pérdida de tiempo y por consiguiente costosas para la empresa. En este artículo se presenta un conjunto sistemático de actividades para mejorar el desempeño de las reuniones. La utilización de este proceso es un requisito exigible si la compañía desea obtener los mejores resultados de ellas. Aquí se presentan una serie de problemas que ocurren en las reuniones tanto con los grupos de personas como con los individuos y se incluye la forma de resolverlos. Los sistemas de teleconferencia y de tecnologías web se discuten como ayuda para conducir reuniones que de otra manera no se podrían realizar debido a la movilidad de algunos participantes importantes.

  2. Multi-annual energy plan for Reunion Island. Adopted by the plenary assembly of the Regional Council of Reunion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The multi-annual energy plan aims at completing the transition towards an energy system which is more efficient, less wasteful, more diverse and therefore more resilient. It reaffirms France's commitment to reducing energy consumption, particularly energy from fossil fuels. The future of France's energy sector lies in striking a harmonious balance between different energy sources. These strategic decisions will help to meet France's objectives to keep greenhouse gas emissions to a minimum in line with its commitments to the EU and to the Paris Climate Agreement, to protect human health and the environment and to ensure access to energy at a reasonable cost whilst stimulating economic activity and employment. This document is the multi-annual energy plan for Reunion Island (Indian Ocean). It establishes the priority actions for all energy sources with respect to supply control, supply diversification, supply security, development of storage facilities and networks. It covers a first 3-years period (2016-2018) followed by a second 5-years period (2019-2023)

  3. Gestión de Reuniones en los Equipos de Mejora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Puig-Bernabeu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available  Al implantar un sistema de mejora continua en cualquier empresa, uno de los pasos importantes es la creación de Equipos de Mejora. Estos equipos deben realizar reuniones periódicas para tratar de resolver los problemas que surgen a diario, o mejorar sus procedimientos y métodos de trabajo. La gestión de estas reuniones es uno de los problemas por los que fracasa la implantación de la mejora continua. En este documento se indica algunos de los errores que suelen cometerse y que producen un resultado nefasto en la consecución del objetivo de un equipo de mejora. Además, se dan unas pautas de comportamiento a seguir por todos los integrantes del equipo antes y durante el transcurso de las reuniones, con tal de alcanzar unos resultados satisfactorios. 

  4. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing perceived listening effort in hearing loss: protocol for a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Frances L; Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M; Hutchings, Hayley A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In the UK, it is estimated that a disabling hearing loss (HL) affects 1 in 6 people. HL has functional, economic and social-emotional consequences for affected individuals. Intervention for HL focuses on improving access to the auditory signal using hearing aids or cochlear implants. However, even if sounds are audible and speech is understood, individuals with HL often report increased effort when listening. Listening effort (LE) may be measured using self-reported measures such as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). PROMs are validated questionnaires completed by patients to measure their perceptions of their own functional status and well-being. When selecting a PROM for use in research or clinical practice, it is necessary to appraise the evidence of a PROM’s acceptability to patients, validity, responsiveness and reliability. Methods and analysis A systematic review of studies evaluating the measurement properties of PROMs available to measure LE in HL will be undertaken. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and Web of Science will be searched electronically. Reference lists of included studies, key journals and the grey literature will be hand-searched to identify further studies for inclusion. Two reviewers will independently complete title, abstract and full-text screening to determine study eligibility. Data on the characteristics of each study and each PROM will be extracted. Methodological quality of the included studies will be appraised using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, the quality of included PROMs appraised and the credibility of the evidence assessed. A narrative synthesis will summarise extracted data. Ethics and dissemination Ethical permission is not required, as this study uses data from published research. Dissemination will be through publication in peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and the lead author’s doctoral dissertation. Findings may inform the

  5. The PU-PROM: A patient-reported outcome measure for peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Lv, Jing; Liu, Jinchun; Zhang, Yanbo

    2017-12-01

    Patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) conceived to enable description of treatment-related effects, from the patient perspective, bring the potential to improve in clinical research, and to provide patients with accurate information. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a patient-centred peptic ulcer patient-reported outcome measure (PU-PROM) and evaluate its reliability, validity, differential item functioning (DIF) and feasibility. To develop a conceptual framework and item pool for the PU-PROM, we performed a literature review and consulted other measures created in China and other countries. Beyond that, we interviewed 10 patients with peptic ulcers, and consulted six key experts to ensure that all germane parameters were included. In the first item selection phase, classical test theory and item response theory were used to select and adjust items to shape the preliminary measure completed by 130 patients and 50 controls. In the next phase, the measure was evaluated used the same methods with 492 patients and 124 controls. Finally, we used the same population in the second item reselection to assess the reliability, validity, DIF and feasibility of the final measure. The final peptic ulcer PRO measure comprised four domains (physiology, psychology, society and treatment), with 11 subdomains, and 54 items. The Cronbach's α coefficient of each subdomain for the measure was >0.800. Confirmatory factory analysis indicated that the construct validity fulfilled expectations. Model fit indices, such as RMR, RMSEA, NFI, NNFI, CFI and IFI, showed acceptable fit. The measure showed a good response rate. The peptic ulcer PRO measure had good reliability, validity, DIF and feasibility, and can be used as a clinical research evaluation instrument with patients with peptic ulcers to assess their condition focus on treatment. This measure may also be applied in other health areas, especially in clinical trials of new drugs, and may be helpful in clinical

  6. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron-exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions -26 and -17 (c.2281-26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281-6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281-26_-17del leads to complete exon 22 skipping. A novel

  7. Biological Invasions of Geminiviruses: Case Study of TYLCV and Bemisia tabaci in Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péréfarres, Frédéric; Thierry, Magali; Becker, Nathalie; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Reynaud, Bernard; Delatte, Hélène; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years, molecular ecology approaches have proven to be extremely useful to identify and assess factors associated with viral emerging diseases, particularly in economically and socially important tropical crops such as maize (maize streak disease) and cassava (cassava mosaic disease). Molecular ecology approaches were applied in Reunion Island to analyze the epidemic of tomato yellow leaf curl disease, which has been affecting the island since the end of the 1990s. Before the invasive biotype B (currently known as Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species) of Bemisia tabaci spread across the world, Reunion Island (South West Indian Ocean) only hosted an indigenous biotype of B. tabaci, Ms (currently known as Indian Ocean cryptic species). Wild hybrids between invasive and indigenous species were subsequently characterized over multiple generations. Endosymbiont analysis of the hybrid population indicated that matings were non-random. Similarly, while no indigenous begomoviruses have ever been reported on Reunion Island, the two main strains of one of the most damaging and emerging plant viruses in the world, the Mild and Israel strains of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-Mld and TYLCV-IL), were introduced in 1997 and 2004 respectively. While these introductions extensively modified the agricultural landscape of Reunion Island, they also provided an invaluable opportunity to study the ecological and genetic mechanisms involved in biological invasion and competition. PMID:23235470

  8. Anthropometric Evaluations of Body Composition of Undergraduate Students at the University of La Reunion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnus, Evelyne; Bourdon, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    A positive correlation is well established between obesity and the susceptibility to develop metabolic syndrome, a multifactorial disease dramatically associated with an enhanced mortality risk in the developed world. A high prevalence of obesity has recently been described at La Reunion Island, a French department in the Indian Ocean.…

  9. Efficiency in milk production on Reunion Island: Dealing with land scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haese, D' M.F.C.; Speelman, S.; Alary, V.; Tillard, E.; Haese, D' L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze efficiency on dairy farms in Reunion Island, a French overseas district located in the Indian Ocean. On this island, dairy farming is promoted with financial and technical support from the European Union, with the French and local governments aiming at reducing dependency

  10. El turismo MICE : análisis del turismo de reuniones en la ciudad de Cartagena

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Morillo-Velarde, María

    2016-01-01

    Delimitar la relevancia del turismo MICE, conceptualizar los distintos tipos de reuniones que tienen lugar y analizar la situación y perspectivas del turismo de congresos en Cartagena. Facultad de Ciencias de la Empresa Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena

  11. Specific Linguistic Profiles in a Creole-Speaking Area: Children's Speech on Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon-Eyquem, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Linguists use the concept of "diglossia" to describe any sociolinguistic situation where a low-prestige dialect coexists with a high-prestige one and these dialects are used in different social spheres. Recent observations on Reunion Island have challenged this view because people mix French and Creole extensively in the same utterance…

  12. [Lung transplantation in Reunion Island, current situation from January 2005 till May 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C; Allou, N; Schlossmacher, P; Gendry, T; Delay, L; Gazaille, V

    2017-04-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is a therapeutic option for patients with terminal respiratory failure and high risk of mortality in two years. Until now, this activity is not performed in Reunion Island. The candidate potential are thus directed to the metropolitan reference centres causing logistics and financials constraints. This work presents a current situation of the pulmonary transplantation in Reunion Island. This retrospective study includes patients from Reunion Island with respiratory insufficiency who have been transferred to metropolitan centres to apply to LT. The selection was made from January, 2005 till May, 2015. Twenty-nine patients included, aged from 14 to 64 years, were transferred to metropolitan France: 13 patients with cystic fibrosis, 13 patients with pulmonary fibrosis, 1 patients with bronchiectasis, 1 patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 1 patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fifteen patients underwent LT (4 live in Reunion Island, 5 live in metropolitan France and 6 are dead), 1 patient is alive on waiting list, 3 died on the waiting list, 7 patients were refused for transplantation and 3 patients are lost to follow-up. The number of patients transferred for LT increases over 10 years with a maximal incidence in 2013 of 7 repatriated patients including 3 transplanted patients. LT could be performed in half of our patients with possible come back and follow-up on Reunion Island. Indications follow the current trends except an under representation of COPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Plan de gestión del turismo de reuniones para la satisfacción del visitante de Chiclayo

    OpenAIRE

    Serruto Perea, Elvis

    2017-01-01

    El turismo de reuniones adquiere gran importancia en el desarrollo turístico de una ciudad por sus beneficios económicos y sociales. La presente tesis tiene como objetivo diseñar un plan de gestión del turismo de reuniones identificando los recursos turísticos necesarios para lograr la satisfacción del visitante en la ciudad de Chiclayo. Mediante entrevistas a expertos y encuestas realizadas, se logró realizar un análisis de la demanda y oferta para el segmento de turismo de reuniones. La in...

  14. Is it too early to move to full electronic PROM data collection?: A randomized controlled trial comparing PROM's after hallux valgus captured by e-mail, traditional mail and telephone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmen, Leonieke N; Schrier, Joost C M; Scholten, Ruben; Jansen, Justus H W; Koëter, Sander

    2016-03-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROM's) after hallux valgus surgery are used to rate the effectiveness as perceived by the patient. The interpretability of these PROM's is highly dependent on participation rate. Data capture method may be an important factor contributing to the response rate. We investigated the effect on response rate of traditional paper mail, telephone and e-mail PROM's after hallux valgus surgery. All consecutive patients operated between January and September 2013, were identified. Included patients were randomized by envelope in three groups: traditional pen and paper mail, e-mail and telephone. They were asked to fill in a FFI and EQ-5D. Two weeks later non-responders were sent a reminder. Of the 73 included patients, 25 were approached by mail, 24 by e-mail and 24 patients by telephone. The response rate on traditional mail was highest (88%), while response on e-mail was lowest (33%). Response rate on telephone was also high (79%). Response rate on traditional mail and telephone was significantly higher (pmail. Though electronic data collection has enormous potential, this study shows that e-mail yields unacceptable low response rates. It is too early to replace traditional pen-and-paper PROM's by electronic questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs) Conference Oxford 2017: Advances in Patient Reported Outcomes Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, Galina; Valderas, Jose M.; Potter, Caroline; Batchelder, Laurie; A’Court, Christine; Baker, Matthew; Bostock, Jennifer; Coulter, Angela; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Forder, Julien; Fox, Diane; Geneen, Louise; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Jones, Karen; Kelly, Laura; Peters, Michele; Mulhern, Brendan; Labeit, Alexander; Rowen, Donna; Meadows, Keith; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John E.; Knowles, Emma; Keetharuth, Anju; Brazier, John E.; Connell, Janice; Carlton, Jill; Buck, Lizzie Taylor; Ricketts, Thomas; Barkham, Michael; Goswami, Pushpendra; Salek, Sam; Ionova, Tatyana; Oliva, Esther; Fielding, Adele K.; Karakantza, Marina; Al-Ismail, Saad; Collins, Graham P.; McConnell, Stewart; Langton, Catherine; Jennings, Daniel M.; Else, Roger; Kell, Jonathan; Ward, Helen; Day, Sophie; Lumley, Elizabeth; Phillips, Patrick; Duncan, Rosie; Buckley-Woods, Helen; Aber, Ahmed; Jones, Gerogina; Michaels, Jonathan; Porter, Ian; Gangannagaripalli, Jaheeda; Davey, Antoinette; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Haywood, Kirstie; Hansen, Stine Thestrup; Valderas, Jose; Roberts, Deb; Gumber, Anil; Podmore, Bélène; Hutchings, Andrew; van der Meulen, Jan; Aggarwal, Ajay; Konan, Sujith; Price, Andrew; Jackson, William; Bottomley, Nick; Philiips, Michael; Knightley-Day, Toby; Beard, David; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Gooding, Kate; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Valderas, Chema; Wright, Judy; Dalkin, Sonia; Meads, David; Black, Nick; Fawkes, Carol; Froud, Robert; Carnes, Dawn; Price, Andrew; Cook, Jonathan; Dakin, Helen; Smith, James; Kang, Sujin; Beard, David; Griffiths, Catrin; Guest, Ella; Harcourt, Diana; Murphy, Mairead; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Salisbury, Chris; Carlton, Jill; Elliott, Jackie; Rowen, Donna; Gao, Anqi; Price, Andrew; Beard, David; Lemanska, Agnieszka; Chen, Tao; Dearnaley, David P.; Jena, Rajesh; Sydes, Matthew; Faithfull, Sara; Ades, A. E.; Kounali, Daphne; Lu, Guobing; Rombach, Ines; Gray, Alastair; Jenkinson, Crispin; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Holch, Patricia; Holmes, Marie; Rodgers, Zoe; Dickinson, Sarah; Clayton, Beverly; Davidson, Susan; Routledge, Jacqui; Glennon, Julia; Henry, Ann M.; Franks, Kevin; Velikova, Galina; Maguire, Roma; McCann, Lisa; Young, Teresa; Armes, Jo; Harris, Jenny; Miaskowski, Christine; Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Miller, Morven; Ream, Emma; Patiraki, Elizabeth; Geiger, Alexander; Berg, Geir V.; Flowerday, Adrian; Donnan, Peter; McCrone, Paul; Apostolidis, Kathi; Fox, Patricia; Furlong, Eileen; Kearney, Nora; Gibbons, Chris; Fischer, Felix; Gibbons, Chris; Coste, Joel; Martinez, Jose Valderas; Rose, Matthias; Leplege, Alain; Shingler, Sarah; Aldhouse, Natalie; Al-Zubeidi, Tamara; Trigg, Andrew; Kitchen, Helen; Davey, Antoinette; Porter, Ian; Green, Colin; Valderas, Jose M.; Coast, Joanna; Smith, Sarah; Hendriks, Jolijn; Black, Nick; Shah, Koonal; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Ramos-Goni, Juan-Manuel; Kreimeier, Simone; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Brazier, John E.; Mukuria, Clara; Zamora, Bernarda; Parkin, David; Feng, Yan; Bateman, Andrew; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Patton, Thomas; Gutacker, Nils; Shah, Koonal

    2017-01-01

    The proceedings contain 36 papers. The topics discussed include: using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in cancer care; validation of the long-term conditions questionnaire (LTCQ) in a diverse sample of health and social care users in England; the national institutes of health

  16. Diagnóstico estructural de la cadena de valor del turismo de reuniones en La Plata

    OpenAIRE

    Lauman, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    En el transcurso de la obra se realiza un estudio y una evaluación sobre el estado actual en que se encuentran cada uno de los componentes de la cadena de valor de la cual depende el turismo de reuniones en la ciudad de La Plata, para tomar conocimiento de la oferta turística de reuniones existente en la ciudad y poder contribuir a su mejora. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas

  17. The experience of adoptive parents in adoption reunion relationships: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Gabrielle A; Steed, Lyndall G

    2005-04-01

    The issues experienced by adoptive parents when faced with an adult child's searching or reunion relationship with his or her birth family, how adoptive parents place themselves within this process, and the factors that influence their experience at this time were explored in a qualitative study of 21 adoptive parents. Themes derived from semistructured interviews are discussed, and implications for clinical practice and future research are suggested. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Toward Ensuring Health Equity: Readability and Cultural Equivalence of OMERACT Patient-reported Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, Jennifer; Epstein, Jonathan; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Welch, Vivian; Rader, Tamara; Lyddiatt, Anne; Clerehan, Rosemary; Christensen, Robin; Boonen, Annelies; Goel, Niti; Maxwell, Lara J; Toupin-April, Karine; De Wit, Maarten; Barton, Jennifer; Flurey, Caroline; Jull, Janet; Barnabe, Cheryl; Sreih, Antoine G; Campbell, Willemina; Pohl, Christoph; Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Singh, Jasvinder A; Tugwell, Peter S; Guillemin, Francis

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 12 (2014) equity working group was to determine whether and how comprehensibility of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) should be assessed, to ensure suitability for people with low literacy and differing cultures. The English, Dutch, French, and Turkish Health Assessment Questionnaires and English and French Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life questionnaires were evaluated by applying 3 readability formulas: Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook; and a new tool, the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires, developed to assess text quality of questionnaires. We also considered a study assessing cross-cultural adaptation with/without back-translation and/or expert committee. The results of this preconference work were presented to the equity working group participants to gain their perspectives on the importance of comprehensibility and cross-cultural adaptation for PROM. Thirty-one OMERACT delegates attended the equity session. Twenty-six participants agreed that PROM should be assessed for comprehensibility and for use of suitable methods (4 abstained, 1 no). Twenty-two participants agreed that cultural equivalency of PROM should be assessed and suitable methods used (7 abstained, 2 no). Special interest group participants identified challenges with cross-cultural adaptation including resources required, and suggested patient involvement for improving translation and adaptation. Future work will include consensus exercises on what methods are required to ensure PROM are appropriate for people with low literacy and different cultures.

  19. Psychological adjustment of relinquishing mothers before and after reunion with their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J

    1992-06-01

    A main objective of this study was to compare the emotional well-being of mothers who had already experienced a reunion with children relinquished two to four decades ago, with that of mothers who were still awaiting the possibility of such re-contact. A nationwide postal survey was carried out in New Zealand of the relinquishment experiences and subsequent adjustment of 238 women who had been able to re-contact their children and of 206 women who had not as yet made contact. The two subgroups did not differ on two standardised measures of psychological well-being (GHQ-28 and global self esteem). However, the post-reunion women reported significantly greater improvements in their feelings connected with "adoption events", and also reported higher levels of perceived social support than did the pre-reunion women. Women who still lacked any information about their relinquished child showed significantly more negative affect and poorer psychological well-being than those who had at least obtained some non-identifying information.

  20. Mission report of the CRE in Mayotte and in the Reunion Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    This publication reports a mission which aimed at assessing local technical and logistic constraints regarding isolated electric networks, at meeting the main local producers in order to better understand the exploitation peculiarities of production means and their integration into the energy mix of each island, at meeting the main local institutional actors, and at having a glance at the operational implementation of public service missions assigned to EDM and EDF SEI. For each island, the report presents the institutional, economic and social context, and describes the consequences of a very small energy production fleet and of small electricity network on supply quality and safety for Mayotte, and a sufficient but not well distributed production fleet in the Reunion Island. It gives an overview of the expertise developed by Electricite de Mayotte (EDM) and describes the implementation of a governance of energy in the Reunion Island. In the case of Mayotte, it outlines the difficult and sometimes costly application of the European and metropolitan regulation, proposes an overview of actions aimed at energy supply management, and of the development of renewable energies (and notably of the OPERA battery, and of electric vehicles). As far as the Reunion island is concerned, the addressed topics are the TPN tariff management, the shutting down and decommissioning of the Port Ouest plant, and various projects

  1. A new anti-microbial combination prolongs the latency period, reduces acute histologic chorioamnionitis as well as funisitis, and improves neonatal outcomes in preterm PROM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Kim, Sun Min; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Park, Chan-Wook; Park, Joong Shin; Jun, Jong Kwan; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic administration is a standard practice in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Specific anti-microbial agents often include ampicillin and/or erythromycin. Anaerobes and genital mycoplasmas are frequently involved in preterm PROM, but are not adequately covered by antibiotics routinely used in clinical practice. Our objective was to compare outcomes of PROM treated with standard antibiotic administration versus a new combination more effective against these bacteria. A retrospective study compared perinatal outcomes in 314 patients with PROM 23 ng/mL). (1) Patients treated with regimen 2 had a longer median antibiotic-to-delivery interval than those with regimen 1 [median (interquartile range) 23 d (10-51 d) versus 12 d (5-52 d), p acute histologic chorioamnionitis (50.5% versus 66.7%, p hemorrhage (IVH) and cerebral palsy (CP) were significantly lower in patients allocated to regimen 2 than regimen 1 (IVH: 2.1% versus 19.0%, p acute histologic chorioamnionitis/funisitis, and improved neonatal outcomes in patients with preterm PROM. These findings suggest that the combination of anti-microbial agents (ceftriaxone, clarithromycin, and metronidazole) may improve perinatal outcome in preterm PROM.

  2. Beyond empathy, cultivating trust: keys for intercultural reunion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Marandon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available disagreements increases due to intercultural misunderstandings, and the difficulty of reaching a relationship of trust arises. To achieve this climate of trust it is advisable to previously examine certain general, theoretical problems in communication, and, in particular,those posed by intercultural situations. First, he discusses conflict and distinguishes between cognitive and affective conflict, to then go on to the psychosocial conditions of conflict management. What are the factors that condition the success of intercultural exchanges?Communication theories must be reconsidered in such a way that they can explain intercultural interactions. For the author, an intercultural situation is produced from the moment in which people or groups do not share the same universes of meaning and the same forms of expression for these meanings. A proposal for communication as well as for conflict management can be found in the theory of a provisional culture (culture tierce, which allows temporary adjustments to achieve common goals. In the creation of this space, trust plays a central role, since it is necessary in any exchange but, above all, it is crucial in intercultural situations, due to their complexity.

  3. Morphosedimentary evolution of carbonate sandy beaches at decadal scale : case study in Reunion Island , Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabot, Marie-Myriam; Pennober, Gwenaelle; Suanez, Serge; Troadec, Roland; Delacourt, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Global change introduce a lot of uncertainties concerning future trajectory of beaches by directly or indirectly modifying major driving factors. An improved understanding of the past shoreline evolution may help for anticipate future coastline response. However, in tropical environment, studies concerning carbonate beaches dynamics are scarce compared to open sandy beaches. Consequently, coral reef protected beaches morphological adjustment is still poorly understood and long-term evolution rate are poorly quantified in these specific environment. In this context, La Reunion Island, insular department of France located in Indian Ocean, constitute a favoured laboratory. This high volcanic island possesses 25 km of carbonate beaches which experience hydrodynamic forcing specific from tropical environment: cyclonic swell during summer and long period swell during winter. Because of degraded coral reef health and high anthropogenic pressure, 50% of the beaches are in erosion since 1970s. Beach survey has been conducted since 1990s by scientist and are now encompassed as pilot site within a French observatory network which guarantee long-term survey with high resolution observational techniques. Thus, La Reunion Island is one of the rare carbonate beach to be surveyed since 20 years. This study aims to examined and quantify beach response at decadal scale on carbonate sandy beaches of Reunion Island. The study focus on 12 km of beaches from Cap Champagne to the Passe de Trois-Bassins. The analyze of 15 beach profile data originated from historical and DGPS beach topographic data confirm long term trend to erosion. Sediment lost varies between 0.5 and 2 m3.yr-1 since 1998. However longshore current have led to accretion of some part of beach compartment with rate of 0.7 to 1.6 m3.yr-1. Wave climate was examined from in-situ measurement over 15 years and show that extreme waves associated with tropical cyclones and long period swell play a major role in beach dynamics

  4. [History of leprosy in Reunion Island from the beginning of the 18th century until today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaüzere, B A; Aubry, P

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the history of leprosy in Reunion from the early eighteenth century, which long paralleled the slave trace. Lepers were confined to a lazaretto and treated with herbs. Father Raimbault, "doctor" and chaplain of the lepers in the middle of the twentieth century, is still honored today. The improvement in living standards and the use of sulfones finally resulted in the control of leprosy. Nonetheless, from 2005 to 2011, an average of three new cases per year were detected among a population of 800,000 inhabitants.

  5. Surveillance and control of rabies in La Reunion, Mayotte, and Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mayotte and La Reunion islands are currently free of animal rabies and surveillance is performed by the French Human and Veterinary Public Health Services. However, dog rabies is still enzootic in Madagascar with 4 to 10 confirmed human cases each year. The number of antirabies medical centres in Madagascar is still scarce to provide easy access to the local population for post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Furthermore, stray dog populations are considerable and attempts to control rabies by mass campaigns of dog vaccination have not received sufficient attention from the national health authorities. To address these challenges, an expanded program to control rabies needs to be initiated by the Malagasy authorities. PMID:24016204

  6. Turismo de reuniones en la ciudad de Murcia. Un enfoque desde el tejido empresarial involucrado

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce Sánchez, María Dolores

    2007-01-01

    La importancia y dinamismo del turismo de reuniones en el contexto nacional e internacional nos conduce a analizar la capacidad de la ciudad de Murcia para afrontar los retos continuos que le presenta un mercado tan globalizado y competitivo como el actual. Por tanto, esta investigación presenta una aproximación a la situación de la actividad en la ciudad, desde la visión particular de sus beneficiarios directos, empresarios asociados a Murcia Convention Bureau (Oficina de Cong...

  7. Las administraciones ante el turismo de reuniones y congresos en Murcia

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce Sánchez, María Dolores

    2006-01-01

    La consolidación del turismo de reuniones en la ciudad de Murcia, en un contexto de fuerte competencia, nos conduce a refl exionar sobre su capacidad competitiva en relación a una red urbana de ámbito nacional. El estudio muestra la evolución experimentada por los parámetros cuantitativos básicos y la opinión y pretensiones que tienen a cerca de este producto turístico los principales agentes del sector. Perspectiva imprescindible para establecer relaciones de cooperación y diá...

  8. Spatio-temporal forest cover characterisation of mascareignite zones of reunion Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouar, S.

    1998-01-01

    The endo-soils of the reunion island often present a particularity: the presence of a light soil level on surface, of vegetable composition, the mascareignite. In the framework of this study, mascareignite soils have been localized on the wet face of the island and have been compared with those of the dry face. The floristic past of these soils has been reconstituted with the pedo-anthracology tool (charcoal dating and identification). Ages given by the 14 C measures show that the mascareignite genesis is anterior to the human being presence in the island. The study of the actual vegetable cover distribution has been realized by satellite data. (A.L.B.)

  9. PLAN DE GESTIÓN DEL TURISMO DE REUNIONES PARA LA SATISFACCIÓN DEL VISITANTE DE CHICLAYO

    OpenAIRE

    Serruto Perea, Elvis; Universidad San Martín de Porres – Filial Norte, Chiclayo; Cabrera Cabrera, Xiomara; Universidad Señor de Sipán, Lambayeque

    2017-01-01

    El turismo de reuniones adquiere gran importancia en el desarrollo turístico de una ciudad por sus beneficios económicos y sociales. El objetivo de la investigación fue diseñar un plan de gestión del turismo de reuniones identificando los recursos turísticos necesarios que logren la satisfacción del visitante en la ciudad de Chiclayo. Mediante entrevistas a expertos y encuestas realizadas, se logró realizar un análisis de la demanda y oferta para definir las fortalezas, oportunidades, debilid...

  10. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J; Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs), 29 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102) and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331), based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T, and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent "essential" plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world.

  11. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin eLi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs, 28 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102 and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331, based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent ‘‘essential’’ plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world.

  12. Ground-based FTIR retrievals of SF6 on Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minqiang; Langerock, Bavo; Vigouroux, Corinne; Wang, Pucai; Hermans, Christian; Stiller, Gabriele; Walker, Kaley A.; Dutton, Geoff; Mahieu, Emmanuel; De Mazière, Martine

    2018-02-01

    SF6 total columns were successfully retrieved from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements (Saint Denis and Maïdo) on Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E) between 2004 and 2016 using the SFIT4 algorithm: the retrieval strategy and the error budget were presented. The FTIR SF6 retrieval has independent information in only one individual layer, covering the whole of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The trend in SF6 was analysed based on the FTIR-retrieved dry-air column-averaged mole fractions (XSF6) on Reunion Island, the in situ measurements at America Samoa (SMO) and the collocated satellite measurements (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, MIPAS, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS) in the southern tropics. The SF6 annual growth rate from FTIR retrievals is 0.265 ± 0.013 pptv year-1 for 2004-2016, which is slightly weaker than that from the SMO in situ measurements (0.285 ± 0.002 pptv year-1) for the same time period. The SF6 trend in the troposphere from MIPAS and ACE-FTS observations is also close to the ones from the FTIR retrievals and the SMO in situ measurements.

  13. Ground-based FTIR retrievals of SF6 on Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available SF6 total columns were successfully retrieved from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared measurements (Saint Denis and Maïdo on Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E between 2004 and 2016 using the SFIT4 algorithm: the retrieval strategy and the error budget were presented. The FTIR SF6 retrieval has independent information in only one individual layer, covering the whole of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The trend in SF6 was analysed based on the FTIR-retrieved dry-air column-averaged mole fractions (XSF6 on Reunion Island, the in situ measurements at America Samoa (SMO and the collocated satellite measurements (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, MIPAS, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS in the southern tropics. The SF6 annual growth rate from FTIR retrievals is 0.265 ± 0.013 pptv year−1 for 2004–2016, which is slightly weaker than that from the SMO in situ measurements (0.285 ± 0.002 pptv year−1 for the same time period. The SF6 trend in the troposphere from MIPAS and ACE-FTS observations is also close to the ones from the FTIR retrievals and the SMO in situ measurements.

  14. Translating EU renewable energy policy for insular energy systems: Reunion Island's quest for energy autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Sawatzky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the negative impacts of climate change has led to agreement on the need to decarbonise energy systems through the employment of renewable energy. With many national and transnational policies in place, the options available to insular energy systems (IES differ from those of interconnected areas due to fragility in their production and distribution networks. Based on the concepts of policy mobility and translation, this study examines the interplay of EU renewable energy policy and insular governance processes aimed at achieving energy autonomy through renewable energy development. Reunion Island, a French Overseas Department and Region, is used as a case study to examine local energy governance processes, aspects that shape regional translation of national and EU policy, and the potential effects that create structures and pathways of energy transition. The study shows that Reunion Island’s regional Energy Governance Committee has significant application potential as a governance tool in other IES and small islands within the EU, but that renewable energy development is restricted due to national policy measures and path dependent governance structural constraints.

  15. Extreme temporal homogeneity of helium isotopes at Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, D.; Lupton, J.; Condomines, M.

    1990-01-01

    Ocean island basalts (OIBs) have strontium, neodymium and lead isotopic compositions that are different from those of mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) reflecting long-term differences in the chemical characteristics of the respective mantle source reservoirs. The high 3 He/ 4 He ratios at some islands such as Hawaii and Iceland indicate that these basalts come from sources that are less degassed than the source of MORB. Many islands exhibit considerable variability in Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes, but detailed studies of temporal variations in helium isotopes have been restricted to Hawaiian volcanoes - at Mauna Loa, for example, significant variations in 3 He/ 4 He have been found for the past 30,000 years. Here we report on 3 He/ 4 He ratios from Piton de la Fournaise volcano on Reunion Island. No variations are found over the long time of 360,000 years, indicating a remarkable uniformity of 3 He/ 4 He for the (large) mantle source region over this timescale. The He-Sr-Pb systematics at this island may reflect the simultaneous contribution of both recycled materials (perhaps subducted crust) and primitive components to the Reunion source. (author)

  16. LABOUR TERMINATION AND PERINATAL OUTCOME IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH PLACENTA ABRUPTION WITH PPROM AND PROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Kutlesic

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Placenta abruption is an obstetric accident which endangers life and health of both mother and embryo. It is one of the most serious obstetric complications, whose incidence ranges from 4.9-12.9 per 1,000 labours, and according to frequency, it represents the second cause of perinatal death. Retrospective analysis included the interval from 1996 to 2005. Total number of labours was analyzed and it was 32358. In addition, the number of labours complicated by placenta abruption was analyzed, and it was 119 or 0.37%. It analyzed the incidence of placenta abruption according to age of pregnancy and the integrity of embryonic membranes. It is established that there is no statistically significant difference in the incidence of placenta abruption appearing in pregnant women, with and without the disruption of embryonic membranes. The age of pregnant women was also analyzed, and it was found out that the pregnant women with placenta abruption and PPROM were 5 years older than those with placenta abruption without PPROM, and that this difference was very significant. Disruption duration was analyzed as well as the time from the first uterus bleeding to labour. The difference between PPROM and PROM duration was statistically significant, as well as the difference in duration between spontaneous and artificial rupture of embryonic membranes. The way of labour termination was analyzed in pregnant women with verified placenta abruption. In 80% of pregnant women, the labour was terminated by Caesarian section, and only 20% by vaginal labour. Also, the perinatal outcome was analyzed, according to Apgar score in the first and fifth minute. Apgar score showed that out of the total number of abruptions, 7 neonatuses was born dead (11.66%, 13 (21.66% was born in good condition (Apgar score>7, 26 (43.33% was marked with 4-7, while 14 (23.33% was in hard asphyxia (Apgar score 1-5.

  17. Evaluation of measurement properties of self-administered PROMs aimed at patients with non-specific shoulder pain and "activity limitations": a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoomes-de Graaf, M; Scholten-Peeters, G G M; Schellingerhout, J M; Bourne, A M; Buchbinder, R; Koehorst, M; Terwee, C B; Verhagen, A P

    2016-09-01

    To critically appraise and compare the measurement properties of self-administered patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) focussing on the shoulder, assessing "activity limitations." Systematic review. The study population had to consist of patients with shoulder pain. We excluded postoperative patients or patients with generic diseases. The methodological quality of the selected studies and the results of the measurement properties were critically appraised and rated using the COSMIN checklist. Out of a total of 3427 unique hits, 31 articles, evaluating 7 different questionnaires, were included. The SPADI is the most frequently evaluated PROM and its measurement properties seem adequate apart from a lack of information regarding its measurement error and content validity. For English, Norwegian and Turkish users, we recommend to use the SPADI. Dutch users could use either the SDQ or the SST. In German, we recommend the DASH. In Tamil, Slovene, Spanish and the Danish languages, the evaluated PROMs were not yet of acceptable validity. None of these PROMs showed strong positive evidence for all measurement properties. We propose to develop a new shoulder PROM focused on activity limitations, taking new knowledge and techniques into account.

  18. Autonomic functioning in mothers with interpersonal violence-related posttraumatic stress disorder in response to separation-reunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Daniel S; Moser, Dominik A; McCaw, Jaime E; Myers, Michael M

    2014-05-01

    This study characterizes autonomic nervous system activity reactive to separation-reunion among mothers with Interpersonal Violence-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (IPV-PTSD). Heart-rate (HR) and high frequency heart-rate-variability (HF-HRV) were measured in 17 IPV-PTSD-mothers, 22 sub-threshold-mothers, and 15 non-PTSD mother-controls while interacting with their toddlers (12-48 months). Analyses showed IPV-PTSD-mothers having generally lower HR than other groups. All groups showed negative correlations between changes in HR and HF-HRV from sitting- to standing-baseline. During initial separation, controls no longer showed a negative relationship between HR and HF-HRV. But by the second reunion, the negative relationship reappeared. IPV-PTSD- and sub-threshold-mothers retained negative HR/HF-HRV correlations during the initial separation, but stopped showing them by the second reunion. Results support that mother-controls showed a pattern of autonomic regulation suggestive of hypervigilance during initial separation that resolved by the time of re-exposure. PTSD-mothers showed delayed onset of this pattern only upon re-exposure, and were perhaps exhibiting defensive avoidance or numbing during the initial separation/reunion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A discussion support model for a regional dairy-pasture system with an example from Reunion island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidumolu, U.B.; Lubbers, M.T.M.H.; Alary, V.; Lecomte, P.; Keulen, van H.

    2011-01-01

    Reunion Island, situated in the Indian Ocean, presents a unique case study for modelling regional bio-economic parameters of the dairy industry. It is a good example of a closed system for several parameters of the model such as movement of animals, labour, consumption and available land. The

  20. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure?s (PROMs) Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    OpenAIRE

    Croudace, Tim; Brazier, John; Gutacker, Nils; Street, Andrew; Robotham, Dan; Waterman, Samantha; Rose, Diana; Satkunanathan, Safarina; Wykes, Til; Nasr, Nasrin; Enderby, Pamela; Carlton, Jill; Rowen, Donna; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til W...

  1. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Croudace

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til Wykes O3 Examining the change process over time qualitatively: transformative learning and response shift Nasrin Nasr, Pamela Enderby O4 Developing a PROM to evaluate self-management in diabetes (HASMID: giving patients a voice Jill Carlton, Donna Rowen, Jackie Elliott, John Brazier, Katherine Stevens, Hasan Basarir, Alex Labeit O5 Development of the Primary Care Outcomes Questionnaire (PCOQ Mairead Murphy, Sandra Hollinghurst, Chris Salisbury O6 Developing the PKEX score- a multimodal assessment tool for patients with shoulder problems Dominic Marley, James Wilson, Amy Barrat, Bibhas Roy O7 Applying multiple imputation to multi-item patient reported outcome measures: advantages and disadvantages of imputing at the item, sub-scale or score level Ines Rombach, Órlaith Burke, Crispin Jenkinson, Alastair Gray, Oliver Rivero-Arias O8 Integrating Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs into routine primary care for patients with multimorbidity: a feasibility study Ian Porter, Jaheeda Gangannagaripalli, Charlotte Bramwell, Jose M. Valderas O9 eRAPID: electronic self-report and management of adverse-events for pelvic radiotherapy (RT patients Patricia Holch, Susan Davidson, Jacki Routledge, Ann Henry, Kevin Franks, Alex Gilbert, Kate Absolom & Galina Velikova O10 Patient reported outcomes (PROMs based recommendation in clinical guidance for the management of chronic conditions in the United Kingdom Ian Porter, Jose M.Valderas O11 Cross-sectional and

  2. Impact of landsliding on chemical weathering in the volcanic island of Reunion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, E.; Lucas, A.; Bouchez, J.; Sy, A.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Dosseto, A.; Kuessner, M.; Michon, L.; Yokochi, R.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical precipitation regimes allow for strong erosion that creates dramatic landscapes. Understanding and quantifying erosion processes in tropical volcanic islands is important for both scientific challenges (e.g. regarding their implications for global biogeochemical cycles and their links with climate) and societal matters (e.g. socio-economic and ecosystem damages in highly populated areas). Despite the fact that the link between chemical weathering and physical erosion has long been studied, most research has focused on active mountain ranges. Here we use Reunion Island as a natural laboratory to explore this link in a tectonically inactive environment.In Reunion, estimates show that intense erosion rates are mainly due to stochastic bedrock landsliding. Although landslides affect only a small portion of the landscape they supply rivers with huge amounts of fresh broken rocks and organic matter, which are then available for chemical alteration and for transport. In this study, we measured water chemistry of several streams in Reunion and of landslide seepage water sampled on 2 majors landslides ("Grand Éboulis" and "Mahavel", both > 50 yrs old). Seepage samples from Grand Éboulis show high Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) compared to local streams, in agreement with previous observations showing that landslides promote chemical weathering [1]. However, the low TDS of the Mahavel seep water samples compared to local streams, suggest that the impact of landslides on weathering fluxes may strongly depend on the rate at which landslide debris are transferred downstream and their subsequent residence time in the catchment. In order to calculate such sediment transfer rates in Mahavel, we developed an automated photogrammetric workflow allowing for deriving Digital Elevation Models from historical aerial photos. Using the 30 years of images archived at the Institut Geographique National (5 campaigns), we will be able to delineate the extent of landslide debris, to

  3. Dopamine Modulation of Reunion Behavior in Short and Long Term Marmoset Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B. Carp

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available One major neurobiological substrate regulating social processes is dopamine (DA. DA is implicated in social behavior in species as diverse as fish and birds, and has an established role in regulating relationships between mates in socially monogamous rodents. Marmoset monkeys display traits associated with social monogamy including high rates of affiliation, biparental care, distress upon separation, and aggression toward strangers; several of these behavioral patterns change throughout the development of relationships. This temporal change may represent changing demands, as pairs are likely to jointly face new experiences (e.g., parenthood throughout pairing. We investigated the role of DA and pairing length on social behavior during reunion after separation from the mate. Marmosets were removed from their home environment and treated with agonists and antagonists for the D1 and D2 receptor subtypes. They were exposed to a novel environment containing an opposite-sex stranger and their pair mate, and then reunited with their mate in the home enclosure. Marmosets in long term pairs exhibited higher levels of food sharing during reunion than marmosets in short term pairs, with females in long term pairs sharing food more than males; no sex difference was observed in short term pairs. Subjects in short term pairs spent more time grooming their mate than receiving grooming during reunion, while marmosets in long term pairs displayed similar amounts of both initiated and received grooming. DA treatment altered pair-level behavior. When females received either a D2 agonist or antagonist, short term pairs spent less time in proximity, compared to when males received the same treatments. In long term pairs, treatment of females with either a D1 agonist or antagonist resulted in pairs spending less time in social proximity than when males were treated. These findings suggest that the function of the DA system in mate behavior may be similar between

  4. Family Reunion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast gives action steps and reasons to control diabetes, with a focus on African Americans.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/3/2007.

  5. Uveka: a UV exposure monitoring system using autonomous instruments network for Reunion Island citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sébastien, Nicolas; Cros, Sylvain; Lallemand, Caroline; Kurzrock, Frederik; Schmutz, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Reunion Island is a French oversea territory located in the Indian Ocean. This tropical Island has about 840,000 inhabitants and is visited every year by more than 400,000 tourists. On average, 340 sunny days occurs on this island in a whole year. Beyond these advantageous conditions, exposure of the population to ultraviolet radiation constitutes a public health issue. The number of hospitalisations for skin cancer increased by 50% between 2005 and 2010. Health insurance reimbursements due to ophthalmic anomalies caused by the sun is about two million Euros. Among the prevention measures recommended by public health policies, access to information on UV radiation is one of the basic needs. Reuniwatt, supported by the Regional Council of La Reunion, is currently developing the project Uveka. Uveka is a solution permitting to provide in real-time and in short-term forecast (several hours), the UV radiation maps of the Reunion Island. Accessible via web interface and smartphone application, Uveka informs the citizens about the UV exposure rate and its risk according to its individual characteristics (skin phototype, past exposure to sun etc.). The present work describes this initiative through the presentation of the UV radiation monitoring system and the data processing chain toward the end-users. The UV radiation monitoring system of Uveka is a network of low cost UV sensors. Each instrument is equipped with a solar panel and a battery. Moreover, the sensor is able to communicate using the 3G telecommunication network. Then, the instrument can be installed without AC power or access to a wired communication network. This feature eliminates a site selection constraint. Indeed, with more than 200 microclimates and a strong cloud cover spatial variability, building a representative measurement site network in this island with a limited number of instruments is a real challenge. In addition to these UV radiation measurements, the mapping of the surface solar radiation

  6. Electrical structure of Plaine des Sables caldera, Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Schnegg

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available An Audio Magnetotelluric (AMT profile has been carried out across the Plaine des Sables, a former caldera of the active Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island. Located in the Western Indian Ocean, between the Mascarene and Madagascar basins, this basaltic shield volcano originates from the activity of a hot spot. Our aim was to determine the internal structure of the volcano, in particular the shallow electrical properties of an area extending between the old and the new caldera rims. Although several teams had already conducted AMT work in this region a few years ago, there was a need for more a detailed, in depth survey. Our final model displays a noticeable slope of the Plaine des Sables basement oriented toward the present Fournaise summit. This slope is interpreted as resulting from successive landslides toward the ocean. We conclude that this dipping, electrically good conducting layer, probably belongs to the flat layering of an older caldera.

  7. Indian Ocean floor deformation induced by the Reunion plume rather than the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaffaldano, G.; Davies, D. R.; DeMets, C.

    2018-05-01

    The central Indian Ocean is considered the archetypal diffuse oceanic plate boundary. Data from seismic stratigraphy and deep-sea drilling indicate that the contractional deformation of the Indian Ocean lithosphere commenced at 15.4-13.9 Ma, but experienced a sharp increase at 8-7.5 Ma. This has been maintained through to the present day, with over 80% of the shortening accrued over the past 8 Myr. Here we build on previous efforts to refine the form, timing and magnitude of the regional plate-motion changes by mitigating the noise in reconstructed Indian and Capricorn plate motions relative to Somalia. Our noise-mitigated reconstructions tightly constrain the significant speed up of the Capricorn plate over the past 8 Myr and demonstrate that the history of the Indian Ocean floor deformation cannot be explained without this plate-motion change. We propose that the Capricorn plate-motion change is driven by an increase in the eastward-directed asthenospheric flow associated with the adjacent Reunion plume, and quantitatively demonstrate the viability of this hypothesis. Our inference is supported by volcanic age distributions along the Reunion hotspot track, the anomalously high residual bathymetry of the Central Indian Ridge, full-waveform seismic tomography of the underlying asthenosphere and geochemical observations from the Central Indian Ridge. These findings challenge the commonly accepted link between the deformation of the Indian Ocean floor and the Tibetan Plateau's orogenic evolution and demonstrate that temporal variations in upwelling mantle flow can drive major tectonic events at the Earth's surface.

  8. Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer Morgenstern et al.(2008. However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR Bais et al.(2015. Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere Erickson et al.(2015, especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle Hader et al.(2007. It can affect phytoplankton productivity Smith and Cullen(1995. This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007. Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014, which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009. Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E, in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993 and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016

  10. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Kévin; Portafaix, Thierry; Brogniez, Colette; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Bencherif, Hassan; Morel, Béatrice; Pazmino, Andrea; Metzger, Jean Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Duflot, Valentin; Goloub, Philippe; Long, Charles N.

    2018-01-01

    Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR) is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer (Morgenstern et al., 2008). However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR (Bais et al., 2015). Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere (Erickson et al., 2015), especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle (Hader et al., 2007). It can affect phytoplankton productivity (Smith and Cullen, 1995). This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007). Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014), which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009). Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E), in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993) and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016. Only

  11. Investigaciones Terapéuticas en la Lepra: Ensayos con “Promín” o “Promanida'”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ignacio Chala H.

    1948-07-01

    Full Text Available Con propósitos de observar, comprobar y valorar los resultados del "Promín"  o “Promanida” en la lepra, lo aplicarnos en un grupo de veintisiete enfermos seleccionados con criterio clínico y de investigación terapéutica. Iniciamos el estudio en julio de 1946. Ninguno de estos casos había sido tratado antes con otros medicamentos preconizados contra la enfermedad. Como lo he dicho en varias ocasiones, solamente teniendo esta precaución y seleccionando los pacientes para la investigación, podrá juzgarse científicamente de la eficacia terapéutica que puedan tener en los distintos tipos de lepra, las drogas aconsejadas para tratar esa enfermedad. Prescindimos de aquellos cases en los cuales, por lo avanzado del mal, los organismos no estaban en condiciones de reaccionar favorablemente con ninguna medicación.

  12. Psychometric validation of the Spanish version of the USS-PROM questionnaire for patients who undergo anterior urethral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puche-Sanz, I; Martín-Way, D; Flores-Martín, J; Expósito-Ruiz, M; Vicente-Prados, J; Nogueras-Ocaña, M; Tinaut-Ranera, J; Cózar-Olmo, J M

    2016-06-01

    To translate into Spanish and validate the Urethral Stricture Surgery Patient-Reported Outcome Measure (USS-PROM) questionnaire, assessing its psychometric properties and determining its suitability for clinical use in our community. We also assessed the potential changes in ejaculatory function using the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire-Ejaculatory Dysfunction (MSHQ-EjD). A systematic translation of the British version was performed. Patients scheduled for anterior urethral stricture surgery between September 2014 and September 2015 were prospectively included in the study. All patients completed the questionnaire before and after the surgery. We conducted an in-depth psychometric study of the questionnaire. We assessed the responses of a total of 40 patients. The questionnaire showed its validity, presenting an excellent negative correlation between the voiding symptom scores and the maximum flow (r=-0.6, P<.001), and also showed significant improvement in the EQ5D-VAS (visual analogue scale) and the time trade-off. For internal consistency, the Cronbach's alpha was 0.701. For the test-retest reliability, the overall intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.974, and the ICC for each item separately ranged from 0.799 to 0.980. We observed significant improvement in all items regarding urinary symptoms and health-related quality of life (P<.001), thereby demonstrating the response capacity to changing the questionnaire. There were no significant changes in the MSHQ-EjD. The Spanish version of the USS-PROM questionnaire is a valid instrument for quantifying changes in voiding symptoms and the health-related quality of life of patients undergoing anterior urethral surgery. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Sunburn risk among children and outdoor workers in South Africa and Reunion Island coastal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y; Brogniez, Colette; Ncongwane, Katlego P; Sivakumar, Venkataraman; Coetzee, Gerrie; Metzger, Jean-Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Sauvage, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    To estimate potential sunburn risk for schoolchildren and outdoor workers, ground-based ambient solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) measurements were converted into possible child (5% of ambient solar UVR) and outdoor worker (20% of ambient solar UVR) solar UVR exposures by skin type and season for three coastal sites: Durban, Cape Point (South Africa) and Saint Denis (Reunion Island, France). Cumulative daily ambient solar UVR levels were relatively high at all sites, especially during summer, with maximum values of about 67, 57 and 74 Standard Erythemal Dose (SED) (1 SED = 100 J m(-2)) at Durban, Cape Point and Saint Denis respectively. Sunburn risk was evident for both children and outdoor workers, especially those with skin types I and II (extremely to moderately sensitive) during summer, early autumn and/or late spring at all three sites. Although results need to be verified with real-time, instantaneous and nonintegrated personal solar UVR measurements, this understanding of sunburn risk is useful for initiating the development skin cancer prevention and sun protection awareness campaigns in both countries. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. GHI calculation sensitivity on microphysics, land- and cumulus parameterization in WRF over the Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meij, A.; Vinuesa, J.-F.; Maupas, V.

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of different microphysics and dynamics schemes on calculated global horizontal irradiation (GHI) values in the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model is studied. 13 sensitivity simulations were performed for which the microphysics, cumulus parameterization schemes and land surface models were changed. Firstly we evaluated the model's performance by comparing calculated GHI values for the Base Case with observations for the Reunion Island for 2014. In general, the model calculates the largest bias during the austral summer. This indicates that the model is less accurate in timing the formation and dissipation of clouds during the summer, when higher water vapor quantities are present in the atmosphere than during the austral winter. Secondly, the model sensitivity on changing the microphysics, cumulus parameterization and land surface models on calculated GHI values is evaluated. The sensitivity simulations showed that changing the microphysics from the Thompson scheme (or Single-Moment 6-class scheme) to the Morrison double-moment scheme, the relative bias improves from 45% to 10%. The underlying reason for this improvement is that the Morrison double-moment scheme predicts the mass and number concentrations of five hydrometeors, which help to improve the calculation of the densities, size and lifetime of the cloud droplets. While the single moment schemes only predicts the mass for less hydrometeors. Changing the cumulus parameterization schemes and land surface models does not have a large impact on GHI calculations.

  15. Tropospheric ozone climatology at two Southern Hemisphere tropical/subtropical sites, (Reunion Island and Irene, South Africa from ozonesondes, LIDAR, and in situ aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a climatology and trends of tropospheric ozone in the Southwestern Indian Ocean (Reunion Island and South Africa (Irene and Johannesburg. This study is based on a multi-instrumental dataset: PTU-O3 ozonesondes, DIAL LIDAR and MOZAIC airborne instrumentation.

    The seasonal profiles of tropospheric ozone at Reunion Island have been calculated from two different data sets: ozonesondes and LIDAR. The two climatological profiles are similar, except in austral summer when the LIDAR profiles show greater values in the free troposphere, and in the upper troposphere when the LIDAR profiles show lower values during all seasons. These results show that the climatological value of LIDAR profiles must be discussed with care since LIDAR measurements can be performed only under clear sky conditions, and the upper limit of the profile depends on the signal strength.

    In addition, linear trends have been calculated from ozonesonde data at Reunion and Irene. Considering the whole tropospheric column, the trend is slightly positive for Reunion, and more clearly positive for Irene. Trend calculations have also been made separating the troposphere into three layers, and separating the dataset into seasons. Results show that the positive trend for Irene is governed by the lower layer that is affected by industrial pollution and biomass burning. On the contrary, for Reunion Island, the strongest trends are observed in the upper troposphere, and in winter when stratosphere-troposphere exchange is more frequently expected.

  16. Numerical simulations of local circulations and pollution transport over Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lesouëf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of high-resolution (1 km numerical simulations with a limited-area numerical model has been performed over Reunion Island. In the dynamical context of a regular maritime flow perturbed by a major topographic obstacle such as Reunion Island, the objectives are to identify the main atmospheric circulations at local-scale over the island and to improve the understanding of local-scale transport and dispersion of pollutants emitted from local sources. To investigate the effects of topography and land surface heating on low-level flows over the island, simulations representative of austral winter were performed in idealized conditions keeping the radiative forcing plus a background east-south-easterly synoptic flux of varying strengths, typical of the prevailing trade-wind conditions. The numerical experiments show mainly that flow splitting of the trade-wind occurs around the island, with enhanced winds blowing along the coast lines parallel to the synoptic flux, due to the lateral constriction of the flow by the island and resulting Venturi effect. Blocking occurs on the island side facing the trade-wind. The north-western area on the leeside is screened from the trade-wind by high mountains, and this enables the development of diurnal thermally-induced circulations, combining downslope and land-breeze at night, and upslope and sea breeze at daytime. Flow splitting is modulated by radiative convergence toward the island at daytime, and divergence from the island at night. Stronger winds than the large-scale trade-wind occur along the coast at daytime (Venturi effect, whereas at night, the trade-wind flow is pushed few kilometres offshore by divergence of cooled air from the land. At night, the trade-wind flow is pushed few kilometres offshore by divergence of cooled air from the land. Consequently, a number of processes of pollution transport and dispersion have been identified. Vortices in the wake of the island were found to cause

  17. Numerical simulations of local circulations and pollution transport over Reunion Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesouef, D.; Delmas, R. [La Reunion Univ., CNRS/INSU UMR8105 (France). Lab. de l' Atmosphere et des Cyclones; Gheusi, F.; Escobar, J. [Toulouse III Univ., CNRS/INSU UMR5560 (France). Lab. d' Aerologie

    2011-07-01

    A series of high-resolution (1 km) numerical simulations with a limited-area numerical model has been performed over Reunion Island. In the dynamical context of a regular maritime flow perturbed by a major topographic obstacle such as Reunion Island, the objectives are to identify the main atmospheric circulations at local-scale over the island and to improve the understanding of local-scale transport and dispersion of pollutants emitted from local sources. To investigate the effects of topography and land surface heating on low-level flows over the island, simulations representative of austral winter were performed in idealized conditions keeping the radiative forcing plus a background east-south-easterly synoptic flux of varying strengths, typical of the prevailing trade-wind conditions. The numerical experiments show mainly that flow splitting of the trade-wind occurs around the island, with enhanced winds blowing along the coast lines parallel to the synoptic flux, due to the lateral constriction of the flow by the island and resulting Venturi effect. Blocking occurs on the island side facing the trade-wind. The north-western area on the leeside is screened from the trade-wind by high mountains, and this enables the development of diurnal thermally-induced circulations, combining downslope and land-breeze at night, and upslope and sea breeze at daytime. Flow splitting is modulated by radiative convergence toward the island at daytime, and divergence from the island at night. Stronger winds than the large-scale trade-wind occur along the coast at daytime (Venturi effect), whereas at night, the trade-wind flow is pushed few kilometres offshore by divergence of cooled air from the land. At night, the trade-wind flow is pushed few kilometres offshore by divergence of cooled air from the land. Consequently, a number of processes of pollution transport and dispersion have been identified. Vortices in the wake of the island were found to cause counterflow circulation

  18. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) used in adult patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegbusi, Olalekan Lee; Kyte, Derek; Cockwell, Paul; Marshall, Tom; Keeley, Thomas; Gheorghe, Adrian; Calvert, Melanie

    2016-10-12

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with symptoms that can significantly reduce the quality of life (QoL) of patients. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) may facilitate the assessment of the impact of disease and treatment on the QoL, from a patient perspective. PROMs can be used in research and routine clinical practice. A systematic review of studies evaluating the measurement properties of PROMs in adults with CKD will be conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL Plus will be systematically searched from inception. Hand searching of reference lists and citations of included studies will be carried out. 2 reviewers will independently screen the titles and abstracts of all the studies retrieved during the systematic search to determine their eligibility. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist will be used to appraise the methodological quality of the selected studies following the full-text review. Data on the study population, questionnaire characteristics and measurement properties will be extracted from the selected papers. Finally, a narrative synthesis of extracted data will be undertaken. Ethical permissions are not required for this study as data from published research articles will be used. Findings will be disseminated through publication in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at conferences. This systematic review will provide a comprehensive assessment of the measurement properties of PROMs currently available for use in adult patients with CKD and present evidence which may inform the selection of measures for use in research and clinical practice. CRD42016035554. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Emergence of Coxiella burnetii in ruminants on Reunion Island? Prevalence and risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Cardinale

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is a widespread zoonosis that is caused by Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii, and ruminants are identified as the main sources of human infections. Some human cases have been described, but very limited information was available about Q fever in ruminants on Reunion Island, a tropical island in the Indian Ocean. A cross-sectional study was undertaken from March 2011 to August 2012 to assess the Q fever prevalence and to identify the major risk factors of C. burnetii infection in ruminants. A total of 516 ruminants (245 cattle, 137 sheep and 134 goats belonging to 71 farms and localized in different ecosystems of the island were randomly selected. Samples of blood, vaginal mucus and milk were concomitantly collected from females, and a questionnaire was submitted to the farmers. Ticks from positively detected farms were also collected. The overall seropositivity was 11.8% in cattle, 1.4% in sheep and 13.4% in goats. C. burnetii DNA was detected by PCR in 0.81%, 4.4% and 20.1% in cow, sheep and goat vaginal swabs, respectively. C. burnetii shedding in milk was observed in 1% of cows, 0% in sheep and 4.7% in goats. None of the ticks were detected to be positive for C. burnetii. C. burnetii infection increased when the farm was exposed to prevailing winds and when there were no specific precautions for a visitor before entering the farm, and they decreased when a proper quarantine was set up for any introduction of a new ruminant and when the animals returned to the farm at night. MLVA genotyping confirmed the role of these risk factors in infection.

  20. Compassion as the reunion of feminine and masculine virtues in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Kiarash

    2017-01-01

    The central role of the virtue of compassion in the shaping of the professional character of healthcare providers is a well-emphasized fact. On the other hand, the utmost obligation of physicians is to alleviate or eliminate human suffering. Traditionally, according to the Aristotelian understanding of virtues and virtue ethics, human virtues have been associated with masculinity. In recent decades, the founders of the ethics of care have introduced a set of virtues with feminine nature. This paper analyzes the notion of compassion as a common virtue between the traditional/masculine and care/feminine sets of virtues and shows that compassion is a reunion and merging point of both sets of human virtues. This role can be actualized through the development and promotion of compassion as an important part of the character of an ideal physician/healthcare provider. In addition, this paper argues that the notion of compassion can shed light on some important aspects of the contemporary debates on healthcare provider-patient relationship and medical futility. Despite the recent technological and scientific transformations in medicine, the interpersonal relationship between healthcare providers and patients still plays a vital role in pursuing the goals of healthcare. The virtue of compassion plays a central role in the establishment of a trust-based physician-patient relationship. This central role is discernible in the debate of medical futility in which making difficult decisions, depends largely on trust and rapport which are achievable by compassion in the physician and the recognition of this compassion by the patients and their surrogate decision makers.

  1. Centro de reuniones y exposiciones - Los Ángeles (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Luckman, Asociados

    1972-04-01

    Full Text Available Its users, meeting-goers, exhibitors and visitors, find in it —with its well-studied traffic adequately equipped with signals— a basic centre for activities and a stimulus within the commercial life of the city. As well as the main hall which can accommodate 15,000 people, or for banquets, 8,000 seated at tables, there is a smaller hall, 2,232 sq. metres in size, which can also be used for exhibitions, meetings and banquets. The administration and exhibitors' offices, control room, radio, television and press rooms are on the mezzanine floor. This centre has an air about it of humanity, energy and comfort, within an elegant framework.Sus usuarios: asambleístas, expositores y visitantes, encuentran en él (con circulaciones bien estudiadas y adecuadamente señalizadas un Centro básico de actividades y un estímulo dentro de la vida comercial de la ciudad. Además de la sala principal de exposiciones, en la cual se pueden congregar 15.000 personas o celebrar banquetes para 8.000 comensales, hay otra más pequeña, de 2.232 m2, que se puede utilizar asimismo para exposiciones, reuniones y banquetes. Las oficinas de la administración, de los expositores, sala de control, salas para los medios informativos de prensa, radio y TV., están situadas en el entresuelo. Se respira en este Centro un clima humano, activo y agradable, dentro de un marco elegante.

  2. Seasonality of human leptospirosis in Reunion Island (Indian Ocean and its association with meteorological data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Desvars

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is a disease which occurs worldwide but particularly affects tropical areas. Transmission of the disease is dependent on its excretion by reservoir animals and the presence of moist environment which allows the survival of the bacteria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A retrospective study was undertaken to describe seasonal patterns of human leptospirosis cases reported by the Centre National de Références des Leptospiroses (CNRL, Pasteur Institute, Paris between 1998 and 2008, to determine if there was an association between the occurrence of diagnosed cases and rainfall, temperature and global solar radiation (GSR. Meteorological data were recorded in the town of Saint-Benoît (Météo France "Beaufonds-Miria" station, located on the windward (East coast. Time-series analysis was used to identify the variables that best described and predicted the occurrence of cases of leptospirosis on the island. Six hundred and thirteen cases were reported during the 11-year study period, and 359 cases (58.56% were diagnosed between February and May. A significant correlation was identified between the number of cases in a given month and the associated cumulated rainfall as well as the mean monthly temperature recorded 2 months prior to diagnosis (r = 0.28 and r = 0.23 respectively. The predictive model includes the number of cases of leptospirosis recorded 1 month prior to diagnosis (b = 0.193, the cumulated monthly rainfall recorded 2 months prior to diagnosis (b = 0.145, the average monthly temperature recorded 0 month prior to diagnosis (b = 3.836, and the average monthly GSR recorded 0 month prior to diagnosis (b = -1.293. CONCLUSIONS: Leptospirosis has a seasonal distribution in Reunion Island. Meteorological data can be used to predict the occurrence of the disease and our statistical model can help to implement seasonal prevention measures.

  3. Turismo de congresos y reuniones en la ciudad de La Plata: Estado actual, tendencias y posibilidades de desarrollo

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Leandro Javier

    2014-01-01

    Año a año Argentina es elegida como sede de todo tipo de reuniones, una modalidad turística vista como una actividad económica rentable que crece sostenidamente a nivel mundial y nacional. El siguiente trabajo de investigación describe la situación actual de La Plata como ciudad sede de este fenómeno, los diferentes eventos realizados durante el año 2013 y características generales del consumidor principal de este segmento. Se realiza una conceptualización y contextualización del turism...

  4. Las reuniones de personal: una alternativa de comunicación, entre la administracion y el personal docente de una escuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artavia Granados, Jenny María

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo es producto de un proceso de investigación realizado en una escuela de la Dirección Regional de Educación de San Ramón, con el fin de analizar el proceso de comunicación que experimenta el personal docente en las reuniones formales convocadas por la administración del centro escolar; así como en aquellas reuniones informales que se suscitan entre el personal docente. Como parte del desarrollo de la investigación se tomaron en cuenta: los aspectos técnicos que permiten la implementación de las reuniones formales de personal docente, la percepción que tienen los y las docentes de las reuniones formales y la percepción que tienen los y las docentes de las reuniones informales de personal docente. Se plantean también algunas conclusiones y recomendaciones, que contribuyan a mejorar el proceso de comunicación bilateral entre el personal docente y administrativo de un centro educativo, en las reuniones que se implementan.Abstract: This article is the product of a research process in a school of the Dirección Regional de Educación San Ramón, with the purpose of analyzing the communication process the educators face in the formal meetings summoned by the administration of the school center, as well as those informal meetings raised among the educators. As an element of the investigation development some aspects were taken into account: the technical aspects to allow the implementation of educators` perception about the formal and informal meetings. The study also presents some summations and recommendations to improve the bilateral process of communication in the implemented meetings among the educators and the administrative personnel of an educational institution.

  5. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  6. Proměny a konstanty Helfertova psaní o Janáčkovi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2016), s. 237-271 ISSN 1212-0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : Helfert * Janáček * reception of music * discourse analysis * music criticism * methodologies of musical historiography * conceptions of history * writing (écriture) Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage OBOR OECD: Performing arts studies (Musicology, Theater science, Dramaturgy) https://digilib.phil.muni.cz/bitstream/handle/11222.digilib/136152/1_MusicologicaBrunensia_51-2016-2_22.pdf?sequence=1

  7. Evaluating zootechnical and environmental inefficiency for ecological intensification of tropical livestock systems. Case study of Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vayssières

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available According to FAO, animal production would contribute up to 18% to global anthropogenic green house gas (GHG emissions. In the face of an increasing world population and demand in food products, more productive and more environmentally- friendly livestock systems have to be conceived. With that aim, non-renewable energy uses and GHG emissions of main animal productions (dairy cattle, beef cattle, pig, poultry and rabbit were assessed in Reunion tropical island. Based on a method developed in mainland France, energy coefficients and emission factors were redefined to include specificities of the local context and livestock systems. The studied sample comprised 195 farms, i.e. more than 25% of farms overseen by local cooperatives. The study highlights the positive correlation between environmental inefficiency (non renewable energy uses, and GHG emissions per kilogram of animal product and zootechnical inefficiency (quantity of concentrate feed consumed per kilogram of animal product. It is thus possible to intensify ecologically animal productions. Similar studies are rare in countries of the South. Their development supposes even more drastic methodological adaptations than those conducted in Reunion so as to evaluate little- mechanized low-input mixed systems, where livestock activities are multifunctional and use various energy types.

  8. Spatial and temporal heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus density in La Reunion Island: rise and weakness of entomological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Sebastien; Foray, Coralie; Dehecq, Jean-Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index) plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week) and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas) heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better.

  9. Spatial and temporal heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus density in La Reunion Island: rise and weakness of entomological indices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Boyer

    Full Text Available Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better.

  10. [Taxation of traditional rums in French overseas territories and public health: The example of Reunion Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mété, D

    2017-11-01

    France has a complex system for the taxation of alcoholic beverages. In the French overseas territories (FOT), the system includes little-known specificities whose purpose is to preserve the sugar-cane-rum sector, a pillar for the weak economies in these territories. Taxes are reduced for traditional rums produced and sold locally. This favors the marketing of alcoholic spirits at low prices. In metropolitan France, on the contrary, spirits are heavily taxed drinks and their share in consumption is minor. Reunion Island (RI) is a FOT confronted with significant socioeconomic precariousness and with one of the highest national morbidity and mortality rates associated with alcohol abuse. Spirits account for half of the total consumption of pure alcohol, with a strong predominance for local traditional rums. These products are preferentially consumed by vulnerable subjects, often affected by an alcohol-use disorder. This study consists of three parts. First, a comparative analysis of alcoholic beverage prices between RI and mainland France. Second, an analysis of the bibliography on the consequences of preferential consumption of spirits. Third, a literature review on the impact of taxation on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality. In France, the cheapest gram of pure alcohol is found in the FOT. The preferential consumption of spirits is associated with more frequent and more rapid complications. It is correlated with the level of alcoholic psychoses. Taxation is effective in reducing damage caused by the abuse of alcoholic beverages. The World Health Organization recommends the application of a minimum price for alcohol and tax increases. The reduced taxation of the traditional rums of the FOT does not take into account public health data. Its purpose is economic. In RI, it contributes to a high level of consumption of spirits and encourages excess mortality through alcohol abuse. It constitutes an inequality of health for these populations. Changes in this tax

  11. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the performance of a meso-scale NWP model to forecast solar irradiance on Reunion Island for photovoltaic power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalecinski, Natacha; Haeffelin, Martial; Badosa, Jordi; Periard, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Solar photovoltaic power is a predominant source of electrical power on Reunion Island, regularly providing near 30% of electrical power demand for a few hours per day. However solar power on Reunion Island is strongly modulated by clouds in small temporal and spatial scales. Today regional regulations require that new solar photovoltaic plants be combined with storage systems to reduce electrical power fluctuations on the grid. Hence cloud and solar irradiance forecasting becomes an important tool to help optimize the operation of new solar photovoltaic plants on Reunion Island. Reunion Island, located in the South West of the Indian Ocean, is exposed to persistent trade winds, most of all in winter. In summer, the southward motion of the ITCZ brings atmospheric instabilities on the island and weakens trade winds. This context together with the complex topography of Reunion Island, which is about 60 km wide, with two high summits (3070 and 2512 m) connected by a 1500 m plateau, makes cloudiness very heterogeneous. High cloudiness variability is found between mountain and coastal areas and between the windward, leeward and lateral regions defined with respect to the synoptic wind direction. A detailed study of local dynamics variability is necessary to better understand cloud life cycles around the island. In the presented work, our approach to explore the short-term solar irradiance forecast at local scales is to use the deterministic output from a meso-scale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, AROME, developed by Meteo France. To start we evaluate the performance of the deterministic forecast from AROME by using meteorological measurements from 21 meteorological ground stations widely spread around the island (and with altitudes from 8 to 2245 m). Ground measurements include solar irradiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, precipitation and pressure. Secondly we study in the model the local dynamics and thermodynamics that

  13. Challenges to the pair bond: neural and hormonal effects of separation and reunion in a monogamous primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Hinde

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social monogamy at its most basic is a group structure in which two adults form a unit and share a territory. However, many socially monogamous pairs display attachment relationships known as pair bonds, in which there is a mutual preference for the partner and distress upon separation. The neural and hormonal basis of this response to separation from the adult pair mate is under-studied. In this project, we examined this response in male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus, a socially monogamous New World primate. Males underwent a baseline scan, a short separation (48 hours, a long separation (app. two weeks, a reunion with the female pair mate, and an encounter with a female stranger (with nine males completing all five conditions. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured via positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG co-registered with structural MRI, and region of interest analysis was carried out. In addition, plasma was collected and assayed for cortisol, oxytocin (OT, vasopressin (AVP, glucose, and insulin concentrations. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected and assayed for OT and AVP. We used generalized estimating equations to examine significant changes from baseline. Short separations were characterized by decreases in FDG uptake, in comparison to baseline, in the lateral septum (LS, ventral pallidum (VP, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, periaqueductal gray (PAG, and cerebellum, as well as increases in CSF OT, and plasma cortisol and insulin. Long separations differed from baseline in reduced FDG uptake in the central amygdala (CeA, reduced whole brain FDG uptake, increased CSF OT and increased plasma insulin. The response on encounter with a stranger female depended on whether or not the male had previously reproduced with his pair mate, suggesting that transitions to fatherhood contribute to the neurobiology underlying response to a novel female. Reunion with the partner

  14. Spatio-temporal forest cover characterisation of mascareignite zones of reunion Island; Caracterisation spatio-temporelle du couvert vegetal des zones a mascareignite des hauts de l'Ile de la Reunion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouar, S

    1998-07-01

    The endo-soils of the reunion island often present a particularity: the presence of a light soil level on surface, of vegetable composition, the mascareignite. In the framework of this study, mascareignite soils have been localized on the wet face of the island and have been compared with those of the dry face. The floristic past of these soils has been reconstituted with the pedo-anthracology tool (charcoal dating and identification). Ages given by the {sup 14}C measures show that the mascareignite genesis is anterior to the human being presence in the island. The study of the actual vegetable cover distribution has been realized by satellite data. (A.L.B.)

  15. Geoelectrical structure of the central zone of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenat, J.-F.; Fitterman, D.; Jackson, D.B.; Labazuy, P.

    2000-01-01

    A study of the geoelectrical structure of the central part of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion, Indian Ocean) was made using direct current electrical (DC) and transient electromagnetic soundings (TEM). Piton de la Fournaise is a highly active oceanic basaltic shield and has been active for more than half a million years. Joint interpretation of the DC and TEM data allows us to obtain reliable 1D models of the resistivity distribution. The depth of investigation is of the order of 1.5 km but varies with the resistivity pattern encountered at each sounding. Two-dimensional resistivity cross sections were constructed by interpolation between the soundings of the 1D interpreted models. Conductors with resistivities less than 100 ohm-m are present at depth beneath all of the soundings and are located high in the volcanic edifice at elevations between 2000 and 1200 m. The deepest conductor has a resistivity less than 20 ohm-m for soundings located inside the Enclos and less than 60-100 ohm-m for soundings outside the Enclos. From the resistivity distributions, two zones are distinguished: (a) the central zone of the Enclos; and (b) the outer zone beyond the Enclos. Beneath the highly active summit area, the conductor rises to within a few hundred meters of the surface. This bulge coincides with a 2000-mV self-potential anomaly. Low-resistivity zones are inferred to show the presence of a hydrothermal system where alteration by steam and hot water has lowered the resistivity of the rocks. Farther from the summit, but inside the Enclos the depth to the conductive layers increases to approximately 1 km and is inferred to be a deepening of the hydrothermally altered zone. Outside of the Enclos, the nature of the deep, conductive layers is not established. The observed resistivities suggest the presence of hydrated minerals, which could be found in landslide breccias, in hydrothermally altered zones, or in thick pyroclastic layers. Such formations often create perched

  16. Stratospheric ozone climatology and variability over a southern subtropical site: Reunion Island (21° S; 55° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sivakumar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the climatological characteristics of stratospheric ozone observed over Reunion Island using in-situ (ozonesonde and SAOZ and satellite (UARS-HALOE, SAGE-II and TOMS measurements. It uses co-localised ozonesondes (from September 1992 to February 2005 and SAOZ measurements (from January 1993 to December 2004, SAGE-II data from October 1984 to February 1999 (~15 years, HALOE data from January 1991 to February 2005 (~15 years, and NIMBUS/TOMS data from January 1978 to December 2004 (27 years. The satellite measurements correspond to overpasses located nearby Reunion Island (21° S; 55° E. The height profiles of ozone concentration obtained from ozonesonde (0.5–29.5 km show less bias in comparison with the HALOE and SAGE-II measurements. Though, the satellite (HALOE and SAGE-II measurements underestimate the tropospheric ozone, they are in good agreement for the heights above 15 km. The bias between the measurements and the normalized ozone profile constructed from the ozonesonde and SAGE-II satellite measurement shows that the SAGE-II measurements are more accurate than the HALOE measurements in the lower stratosphere. The monthly variation of ozone concentration derived from ozonesonde and HALOE shows a nearly annual cycle with a maximum concentration during winter/spring and minimum concentration during summer/autumn months. The time evolution of total column ozone obtained from TOMS, SAOZ and the one computed from ozonesonde and SAGE-II, exhibits similar behaviour with analogous trends as above. The TOMS variation displays a higher value of total column ozone of about 3–5 DU (10% in comparison with the SAOZ and the integrated ozone from ozonesonde and SAGE-II.

  17. Identifying key demographic parameters of a small island–associated population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Reunion, Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, Vanessa; Fayan, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Photo-identification surveys of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins were conducted from 2009 to 2014 off Reunion Island (55°E33’/21°S07’), in the Indian Ocean. Robust Design models were applied to produce the most reliable estimate of population abundance and survival rate, while accounting for temporary emigration from the survey area (west coast). The sampling scheme consisted of a five-month (June–October) sampling period in each year of the study. The overall population size at Reunion was estimated to be 72 individuals (SE = 6.17, 95%CI = 61–85), based on a random temporary emigration (γ”) of 0.096 and a proportion of 0.70 (SE = 0.03) distinct individuals. The annual survival rate was 0.93 (±0.018 SE, 95%CI = 0.886–0.958) and was constant over time and between sexes. Models considering gender groups indicated different movement patterns between males and females. Males showed null or quasi-null temporary emigration (γ” = γ’ < 0.01), while females showed a random temporary emigration (γ”) of 0.10, suggesting that a small proportion of females was outside the survey area during each primary sampling period. Sex-specific temporary migration patterns were consistent with movement and residency patterns observed in other areas. The Robust Design approach provided an appropriate sampling scheme for deriving island-associated population parameters, while allowing to restrict survey effort both spatially (i.e. west coast only) and temporally (five months per year). Although abundance and survival were stable over the six years, the small population size of fewer than 100 individuals suggested that this population is highly vulnerable. Priority should be given to reducing any potential impact of human activity on the population and its habitat. PMID:28640918

  18. Identifying key demographic parameters of a small island-associated population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Reunion, Indian Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulau, Violaine; Estrade, Vanessa; Fayan, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Photo-identification surveys of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins were conducted from 2009 to 2014 off Reunion Island (55°E33'/21°S07'), in the Indian Ocean. Robust Design models were applied to produce the most reliable estimate of population abundance and survival rate, while accounting for temporary emigration from the survey area (west coast). The sampling scheme consisted of a five-month (June-October) sampling period in each year of the study. The overall population size at Reunion was estimated to be 72 individuals (SE = 6.17, 95%CI = 61-85), based on a random temporary emigration (γ") of 0.096 and a proportion of 0.70 (SE = 0.03) distinct individuals. The annual survival rate was 0.93 (±0.018 SE, 95%CI = 0.886-0.958) and was constant over time and between sexes. Models considering gender groups indicated different movement patterns between males and females. Males showed null or quasi-null temporary emigration (γ" = γ' < 0.01), while females showed a random temporary emigration (γ") of 0.10, suggesting that a small proportion of females was outside the survey area during each primary sampling period. Sex-specific temporary migration patterns were consistent with movement and residency patterns observed in other areas. The Robust Design approach provided an appropriate sampling scheme for deriving island-associated population parameters, while allowing to restrict survey effort both spatially (i.e. west coast only) and temporally (five months per year). Although abundance and survival were stable over the six years, the small population size of fewer than 100 individuals suggested that this population is highly vulnerable. Priority should be given to reducing any potential impact of human activity on the population and its habitat.

  19. Identifying key demographic parameters of a small island-associated population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Reunion, Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violaine Dulau

    Full Text Available Photo-identification surveys of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins were conducted from 2009 to 2014 off Reunion Island (55°E33'/21°S07', in the Indian Ocean. Robust Design models were applied to produce the most reliable estimate of population abundance and survival rate, while accounting for temporary emigration from the survey area (west coast. The sampling scheme consisted of a five-month (June-October sampling period in each year of the study. The overall population size at Reunion was estimated to be 72 individuals (SE = 6.17, 95%CI = 61-85, based on a random temporary emigration (γ" of 0.096 and a proportion of 0.70 (SE = 0.03 distinct individuals. The annual survival rate was 0.93 (±0.018 SE, 95%CI = 0.886-0.958 and was constant over time and between sexes. Models considering gender groups indicated different movement patterns between males and females. Males showed null or quasi-null temporary emigration (γ" = γ' < 0.01, while females showed a random temporary emigration (γ" of 0.10, suggesting that a small proportion of females was outside the survey area during each primary sampling period. Sex-specific temporary migration patterns were consistent with movement and residency patterns observed in other areas. The Robust Design approach provided an appropriate sampling scheme for deriving island-associated population parameters, while allowing to restrict survey effort both spatially (i.e. west coast only and temporally (five months per year. Although abundance and survival were stable over the six years, the small population size of fewer than 100 individuals suggested that this population is highly vulnerable. Priority should be given to reducing any potential impact of human activity on the population and its habitat.

  20. [Internet and video games among students of Reunion Island in 2010: uses, misuses, perceptions and associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricquebourg, M; Bernède-Bauduin, C; Mété, D; Dafreville, C; Stojcic, I; Vauthier, M; Galland, M-C

    2013-12-01

    Describe the uses of Internet and video games and quantify associated problematic uses. Information on student practices concerning the use of the Internet and video games was collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Problematic uses were identified with specific tools (Young criteria and Tejeiro criteria) and with self-evaluative questions. Information on life events with traumatic potential and use of psychoactive substances was also collected. Logistic regression models were applied to identify possible associated factors. Based on a sample of 1119 subjects, this study showed that students in Reunion Island are very concerned by the uses of the Internet and video games (98% and 46% of respondents). The prevalence of problematic use of the Internet accounted for 6% of respondents. Problematic uses of video games involved 8% of students (18% of gamers). Young people seemed unaware of their problematic practices and were seeking informations. The public respondent was also characterized by vulnerable situations (traumatic events induring their lives, consumption of psychoactive substances). Significant associations (with no identified causality) were examined, in particular between problematic uses of Internet and video games, and life events with traumatic potential. These first estimates of the prevalence of problematic use of Internet and video games on Reunion Island are important to promote locally collective awareness about these modern addictions. These results will be used to guide local actions of prevention and care, especially among younger generations. But it is necessary to conduct further work to better identify the factors associated with these problematic uses (determinants, comorbidities addictive…). Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Rayleigh LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) measurements of stratosphere-mesosphere temperature over a southern sub-tropical site, Reunion (20.8° S; 55.5° E): climatology and comparison study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 8105, INSU/CNRS, Universite? de La Reunion, Reunion Island, France 2National Laser Centre (NLC), Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 3Department of Geography, Geoinformatics... 6Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA 7Laboratoire Atmosphe`res Milieux Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), IPSL (UMR 8190), 11, Boulevard d?Alember, 78280, Guyancourt, France Received: 7 January 2011...

  2. Development, content validity, and cross-cultural adaptation of a patient-reported outcome measure for real-time symptom assessment in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vork, L; Keszthelyi, D; Mujagic, Z; Kruimel, J W; Leue, C; Pontén, I; Törnblom, H; Simrén, M; Albu-Soda, A; Aziz, Q; Corsetti, M; Holvoet, L; Tack, J; Rao, S S; van Os, J; Quetglas, E G; Drossman, D A; Masclee, A A M

    2018-03-01

    End-of-day questionnaires, which are considered the gold standard for assessing abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are influenced by recall and ecological bias. The experience sampling method (ESM) is characterized by random and repeated assessments in the natural state and environment of a subject, and herewith overcomes these limitations. This report describes the development of a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) based on the ESM principle, taking into account content validity and cross-cultural adaptation. Focus group interviews with IBS patients and expert meetings with international experts in the fields of neurogastroenterology & motility and pain were performed in order to select the items for the PROM. Forward-and-back translation and cognitive interviews were performed to adapt the instrument for the use in different countries and to assure on patients' understanding with the final items. Focus group interviews revealed 42 items, categorized into five domains: physical status, defecation, mood and psychological factors, context and environment, and nutrition and drug use. Experts reduced the number of items to 32 and cognitive interviewing after translation resulted in a few slight adjustments regarding linguistic issues, but not regarding content of the items. An ESM-based PROM, suitable for momentary assessment of IBS symptom patterns was developed, taking into account content validity and cross-cultural adaptation. This PROM will be implemented in a specifically designed smartphone application and further validation in a multicenter setting will follow. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. BVOCs concentration in the Reunion Island tropical forests and the impact on photooxidants formation during the BIO-MAIDO 2015 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Aurelie; Duflot, Valentin; Tulet, Pierre; Flores, Olivier; Fournel, Jacques; Strasberg, Dominique; Deguillaume, Laurent; Vaitilingom, Mickael; Burnet, Frederic; Bourrianne, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    In March-April 2015 took place an intensive field campaign in the Reunion Island : BIO-MAÏDO 2015 campaign. The main objective of the campaign was to study the interactions between forests, gases, aerosols and clouds in this unique tropical natural science lab (Duflot at al, in prep). During this campaign volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were sampled at different part of the Reunion island. BVOCs (including isoprene, terpenes, and some oxygenated compounds) have different temporal and spatial variations depending on vegetation, on plant species and on environmental factors (ambient temperature, light intensity, air pollution..) (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998, Kesselmeier and Staudt, 1999). BVOCs are important atmospheric constituent of the troposphere. Due to high reactivity they have an important impact on the tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (Granier et al., 2000; Poisson et al., 2000; Pfister et al., 2008), thus thave a significantey influence on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere (Houweling et al., 1998; Taraborrelli et al., 2012) on regional and global scales. BVOCs were studied at different locations: Maido Observatory (2160m) with semi-continous measurement (12 March - 9 April 2015); Tamarins forest; Cryptomeria forest; Primary forest (Belouve) and Mare Longue forest . BVOCs were sampled on adsorbents cartridges containing 250 mg Tenax TA and analysed later with a gas-chromatography-mass spectrometer. Formaldehyde concentrations were determined at the Maido observatory using an AEROLASER 4021 instrument, based on the so called "Hantzsch"-reaction, and with a 30s resolution. Isoprene was the most important BVOCs concentration found in the Reunion Island forest, especially from the endemic Tamarins trees, followed by limonene and alpha-pinene. Formaldehyde at the Maido facility show a strong diurnal variation and a maximum concentration during day-time from 1 to 4 ppbv. The local emission of

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments on the breakage-reunion domain of the DNA gyrase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piton, Jérémie; Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    The breakage-reunion domain of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. One of the four crystal forms obtained belonged to space group C2 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine that is involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target for fluoroquinolone action. The breakage-reunion domain of the A subunit plays an essential role in DNA binding during the catalytic cycle. Two constructs of 53 and 57 kDa (termed GA53BK and GA57BK) corresponding to this domain have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from four crystal forms. The resolution limits ranged from 4.6 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. The best diffracting crystals belonged to space group C2, with a biological dimer in the asymmetric unit. This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the breakage-reunion domain of DNA gyrase from a species containing one unique type II topoisomerase

  5. Cross-cultural and construct validity of the Animated Activity Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peter, Wilfred F; Cw de Vet, Henrika; Boers, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ) assesses activity limitations in patients with hip/knee osteoarthritis (HKOA), and consisting video animations of which patients choose the animation that best matches their own performance. The AAQ has shown good validity and reliability......, and a Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) and performance-based tests. RESULTS: Data of 1239 patients were available. Compared to Dutch (n=279), none of the 17 items showed DIF in English (n=202), French (n=193), 1 item showed uniform DIF in Spanish (n=99) and Norwegian (n=62), and 2 items showed uniform...... with the cross-cultural validity between these countries. With regard to construct validity, the correlations with PROM (0.74) and performance-based tests (0.36-0.68) were partly as expected (> 0.60). CONCLUSION: The AAQ, an innovative tool to measure activity limitations that can be placed on the continuum...

  6. Use of the WOMAC questionnaire in Mumbai and the challenges of translation and cross cultural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogtay, N J; Thatte, U M; Dasgupta, B; Deshpande, S

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are disease specific questionnaires that are being increasingly used in clinical practice and research. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), is a widely used PROM in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. A validated WOMAC was used by us, and significant challenges were faced in administering it as several questions did not have a cultural connect. Functionally equivalent items in the Indian context had then to be used to complete the score. With greater emphasis today on the use of patient-reported outcome measures, and with data from multi-centric studies being pooled, cross-cultural adaptation becomes very important if the pooled data are to be really relevant. In India, with several languages being spoken, and a significant proportion of the population being illiterate, the physician and/ or the impartial witness must provide considerable explanation without attempting to influence the response. The key to the effective and correct use of PROMs thus lies not just in translation, but also in a stepwise validation of the questionnaire, and modification in the context of the country where it is used. Scores like WOMAC are often primary efficacy endpoints in clinical trials; are gaining greater importance to support label claims; have ethical implications, and directly impact regulatory decision making and thus, eventually, evidence-based practice.

  7. Using Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) to promote quality of care and safety in the management of patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney disease (PRO-trACK project): a mixed-methods project protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyegbusi, Olalekan Lee; Kyte, Derek; Cockwell, Paul; Marshall, Tom; Dutton, Mary; Slade, Anita; Marklew, Neil; Price, Gary; Verdi, Rav; Waters, Judi; Sharpe, Keeley; Calvert, Melanie

    2017-06-30

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a major effect on the quality of life and health status of patients and requires accurate and responsive management. The use of electronic patient-reported outcome measures (ePROMs) could assist patients with advanced pre-dialysis CKD, and the clinicians responsible for their care, by identifying important changes in symptom burden in real time. We report the protocol for 'Using Patient-Reported Outcome measures (PROMs) to promote quality of care and safety in the management of patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease' (PRO-trACK) project, which will explore the feasibility and validity of an ePROM system for use in patients with advanced CKD. The project will use a mixed-methods approach in three studies: (1) usability testing of the ePROM system involving up to 30 patients and focusing on acceptability and technical performance/stability; (2) ascertaining the views of patient and clinician stakeholders on the optimal use and administration of the CKD ePROM system-this will involve qualitative face-to-face/telephone interviewing with up to 30 patients or until saturation is achieved, focus groups with up to 15 clinical staff, management and IT team members; (3) psychometric assessment of the system, within a cohort of at least 180 patients with advanced CKD, to establish the measurement properties of the ePROM. This project was approved by the West Midlands Edgbaston Research Ethics Committee (Reference 17/WM/0010) and received Health Research Authority (HRA) approval on 24 February 2017.The findings from this project will be provided to clinicians at the Department of Renal Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospitals, Birmingham (QEHB), NHS England, presented at conferences and to the Kidney Patients' Association, British Kidney Patient Association and the British Renal Society. Articles based on the findings will be written and submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  8. Reuniones, dispersiones. Notas sobre ideas literarias de Tomás Segovia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pascual Gay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo quiere dar cuenta de diferentes ideas expuestas por Tomás Segovia a lo largo de su oficio de escritor en ensayos, cuadernos de notas y entrevistas. Segovia no desarrolló un pensamiento unitario y sistemático, sino que, más bien, desarrolla esas ideas en diferentes contextos, textos y pretextos, pero esas ideas acaban por volver siem - pre a un ideario que otorga una cohesión insospechada en su obra. Además, muchas veces, sin decirlo, deja entrever la tradición literaria y cultural a la que se adscribe y que permea su obra entera.

  9. Implementing a spinosad-based local bait station to control Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in high rainfall areas of Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpoux, Camille; Deguine, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Three species of fruit flies cause serious damage to cucurbit crops on Reunion Island: Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) (Coquillett 1899), Dacus ciliatus (Loew 1901), and Dacus demmerezi (Bezzi 1917). To control them, a program of agroecological management of cucurbit flies has been implemented based on the application of Synéis-appât, especially spot sprays on corn borders. However, the high rainfall on Reunion Island limits the long-term efficiency of the bait; in addition, this method cannot be used for large chayote trellises, because corn borders cannot be planted around them. The aim of this study was to design a bait station adapted to prevailing conditions on Reunion Island. An 'umbrella trap' tested in Taiwan was used as a reference to compare its efficacy with our local bait station. Experiments were conducted in field cages on B. cucurbitae to test different characteristics of bait stations and to construct one using local materials. Results were validated in the field. The attractiveness of the bait station was related mainly to the color of the external surface, yellow being the most attractive color. The efficacy of the bait station with respect to fly mortality was found to be linked to the accessibility of the bait, and direct application of Synéis-appât on the bait station was found to be the most efficient. In the field, B. cucurbitae were more attracted to the local bait station than to the umbrella trap, while the two other fly species displayed equal attraction to both trap types. Our local bait station is a useful alternative to spot sprays of Synéis-appât and is now included in a local pest management program and is well accepted by farmers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  10. [Discovery and follow-up of a lead-poisoning outbreak in a shantytown of Le Port, Reunion Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solet, J-L; Renault, P; Denys, J-C; Teulé, G; Dennemont, R-M; Domonte, F; Garnier, C; Aubert, L; Filleul, L; Polycarpe, D

    2013-08-01

    A national survey conducted in 2008-2009 by the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance for detection of lead impact in childhood identified a high blood lead level in a young boy living in the town of "Le Port", Reunion Island. Previously, cases of lead-poisoning on the island had been exceptional; only a dozen cases were reported in the 1980s in adults, related to the use of lead-containing instruments for food preparations. The family of the index case was invited to participate in screening tests and an environmental investigation was conducted using a standardized questionnaire. Screening was then broadened to the neighborhood of the index case and samples of soil outside the home and in the immediate vicinity were taken. The environmental survey was then extended with soil samples taken from the entire geographical area. Information was then provided to local inhabitants (87 families and 287 people) in order to encourage lead blood testing for all children under six years and all pregnant women living in the area. The index case lived in the neighborhood of "The Oasis", a shantytown of Le Port. The results of soil analysis revealed heterogeneous pollution of superficial soils by lead throughout the area of the shantytown, the highest level recorded (5200mg/kg) reached more than 300 times the background level of the natural soils of the island. The screening identified 76 cases of childhood lead-poisoning (blood lead level greater or equal to 100μg/L) among 148 samples (51%). All cases of blood poisoning involved children under the age of 15 years. The median age of children with a positive test was 5.6 years; the median blood lead level was 196μg/L [102-392μg/L]. The main hypothesis to explain the contamination of the soil in the area of the shantytown is the presence of waste deposits (car batteries) and diffuse activities of metal recovery. The authorities managed to remove all the families from the environmental exposure to lead by

  11. Personality and birth order in monozygotic twins adopted apart: a test of Sulloway's theory; Research Reviews: twin births and cancer risk in mothers, male sexual dysfunction, twin study of ultimatum game behavior; Human Interest: 'The Land of Twins', twin-like reunion-I, twin-like reunion-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2008-02-01

    A brief overview of Sulloway's (1996) theory of birth order and personality is presented. A reared apart twin approach for testing his personality findings regarding openness to experience and conscientiousness in first borns and later borns is described. This is followed by summaries of three recent twin studies. The topics include cancer risk in mother of twins, sexual dysfunction in males and responder behavior during ultimatum games. This article concludes with a discussion of twinning rates and rituals among the Yoruba of western Nigeria, and descriptions of two unusual reunions between siblings and twins.

  12. A Raman lidar at La Reunion (20.8° S, 55.5° E for monitoring water vapour and cirrus distributions in the subtropical upper troposphere: preliminary analyses and description of a future system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoareau

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based Rayleigh lidar has provided continuous observations of tropospheric water vapour profiles and cirrus cloud using a preliminary Raman channels setup on an existing Rayleigh lidar above La Reunion over the period 2002–2005. With this instrument, we performed a first measurement campaign of 350 independent water vapour profiles. A statistical study of the distribution of water vapour profiles is presented and some investigations concerning the calibration are discussed. Analysis regarding the cirrus clouds is presented and a classification has been performed showing 3 distinct classes. Based on these results, the characteristics and the design of a future lidar system, to be implemented at the new Reunion Island altitude observatory (2200 m for long-term monitoring, is presented and numerical simulations of system performance have been realised to compare both instruments.

  13. Prom Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cost is an issue, look for alternatives to spending a lot of money. Expensive doesn't necessarily mean better. Plan ahead for safety Tell family members or a trusted adult what your plans are ahead of time. Make an agreement with friends to check on ...

  14. Human Rights in the Context of Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian Ciongaru

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The human rights understood in the sense of fundamental inalienable rights are therefore considered as universal – they apply to everything and egalitarian exist in two ways: as natural or legal rights, both in the rights doctrine in the international practice within the international law, the global and regional institutions, in the state policies and the activities of non from all over the world regardless of peoples’ cultures. manage the ethnic-cultural communities living on the territory of a state often contributes, in fact, to the separation and not to the reunion of peoples, the ideological and political factors acting rather as division factors whereas the affective spiritual connection exists only between the states having deep similarities. For this purpose, serving justice having as a goal the pres on the social feelings of humanity.

  15. School, society and policy on the island of Reunion. Residual of a French colony to a European outermost region Escuela, sociedad y política en la isla de Reunión. De una colonia francesa residual a una región europea ultraperiférica École, société et politique à l’île de la réunion, d’une colonie française de peuplement à une région européenne ultrapériphérique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul LUCAS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analize the evolution of the colonialist French school policy in the island of Reunion, Indic Ocean, with a slave structure from the I Empire. Studies the first official efforts for the people schooling with the contribution of the religious congregations. Their proposal was the cultural assimilation. Later, the French Third Republic encreases secular assimilation policy. Finally, from 1946, the Reunion Island remains one of the first French empire, and begins to be administrative department of France, and remoteness becomes European territory. It concludes by studying the progress made in the first school, secondary and higher education, in the island of Reunion.El artículo explica la evolución producida en la política escolar de la Francia colonial en la isla de Reunión, en el océano Índico, inicialmente de estructura esclavista. Analiza los primeros esfuerzos escolarizadores con la contribución de las congregaciones religiosas, de decidida asimilación cultural. Más tarde, la III República francesa incrementa su política escolar laica y asimiladora. Finalmente, desde 1946, la isla de Reunión, uno de los restos del I Imperio francés, adopta el formato de departamento administrativo de Francia, y la final conversión en territorio europeo ultraperiférico. Concluye con la valoración de las consecuencias que estas decisiones administrativas provocan en su avance escolar primario, secundario y superior.L'article explique l'évolution de la politique scolaire de la France coloniale sur l'île de la Réunion dans l'Océan Indien esclave structure de départ. Analyse escolarizadores premiers efforts avec la contribution des congrégations religieuses, des acculturés déterminée. Plus tard, la Troisième République française augmente sa politique de l'école laïque et l'assimilation. Enfin, depuis 1946, l'île de la Réunion, l'un des vestiges de l'Empire français, prend la forme d'un service administratif de la France

  16. Structured self-management education maintained over two years in insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes patients: the ERMIES randomised trial in Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debussche Xavier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management education programs can reduce the complications and mortality in type 2 diabetes. The need to structure these programs for outpatient and community care with a vision for long-term maintenance has been recognised. In Reunion Island, an area affected by epidemiological and nutritional transition, diabetes affects 18% of the adult population over 30 years, with major social disparities, poor glycaemic control and frequent cardiovascular complications. Methods/Design ERMIES is a randomised controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of a long-term (2 years structured group self management educational intervention in improving blood glucose in non-recent, insufficiently controlled diabetes. After an initial structured educational cycle carried out blind for the intervention arm, patients will be randomised in two parallel group arms of 120 subjects: structured on-going group with educational intervention maintained over two years, versus only initial education. Education sessions are organised through a regional diabetes management network, and performed by trained registered nurses at close quarters. The educational approach is theoretically based (socio-constructivism, social contextualisation, empowerment, action planning and reproducible, thanks to curricula and handouts for educators and learners. The subjects will be recruited from five hospital outpatient settings all over Reunion Island. The main eligibility criteria include: age ≥18 years, type 2 diabetes treated for more than one year, HbA1c ≥ 7.5% for ≥3 months, without any severe evolving complication (ischaemic or proliferative retinopathy, severe renal insufficiency, coronaropathy or evolving foot lesion, and absence of any major physical or cognitive handicap. The primary outcome measure is HbA1c evolution between inclusion and 2 years. The secondary outcome measures include anthropometric indicators, blood pressure, lipids

  17. Specific management of post-chikungunya rheumatic disorders: a retrospective study of 159 cases in Reunion Island from 2006-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Javelle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since 2003, the tropical arthritogenic chikungunya (CHIK virus has become an increasingly medical and economic burden in affected areas as it can often result in long-term disabilities. The clinical spectrum of post-CHIK (pCHIK rheumatic disorders is wide. Evidence-based recommendations are needed to help physicians manage the treatment of afflicted patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a 6-year case series retrospective study in Reunion Island of patients referred to a rheumatologist due to continuous rheumatic or musculoskeletal pains that persisted following CHIK infection. These various disorders were documented in terms of their clinical and therapeutic courses. Post-CHIK de novo chronic inflammatory rheumatisms (CIRs were identified according to validated criteria. RESULTS: We reviewed 159 patient medical files. Ninety-four patients (59% who were free of any articular disorder prior to CHIK met the CIR criteria: rheumatoid arthritis (n=40, spondyloarthritis (n=33, undifferentiated polyarthritis (n=21. Bone lesions detectable by radiography occurred in half of the patients (median time: 3.5 years pCHIK. A positive therapeutic response was achieved in 54 out of the 72 patients (75% who were treated with methotrexate (MTX. Twelve out of the 92 patients (13% received immunomodulatory biologic agents due to failure of contra-indication of MTX treatment. Other patients mainly presented with mechanical shoulder or knee disorders, bilateral distal polyarthralgia that was frequently associated with oedema at the extremities and tunnel syndromes. These pCHIK musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs were managed with pain-killers, local and/or general anti-inflammatory drugs, and physiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Rheumatologists in Reunion Island managed CHIK rheumatic disorders in a pragmatic manner following the outbreak in 2006. This retrospective study describes the common mechanical and inflammatory pCHIK disorders. We provide a diagnostic

  18. Selective versus non-selective culture medium for group B streptococcus detection in pregnancies complicated by preterm labor or preterm-premature rupture of membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luís Nomura

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify group B streptococcus (GBS colonization rates and compare detection efficiency of selective versus non-selective culture media and anorectal versus vaginal cultures in women with preterm labor and preterm-premature rupture of membranes (PROM. A prospective cohort study of 203 women was performed. Two vaginal and two anorectal samples from each woman were collected using sterile swabs. Two swabs (one anorectal and one vaginal were placed separately in Stuart transport media and cultured in blood-agar plates for 48 hours; the other two swabs were inoculated separately in Todd-Hewitt selective media for 24 hours and then subcultured in blood-agar plates. Final GBS identification was made by the CAMP test. A hundred thrity-two cultures out of 812 were positive. The maternal colonization rate was 27.6%. Colonization rates were 30% for preterm PROM and 25.2% for preterm labor. Todd-Hewitt selective medium detected 87.5% and non-selective medium 60.7% GBS-positive women. Vaginal samples and anorectal samples had the same detection rate of 80.3%. Anorectal selective cultures detected 75% of carriers; 39% of GBS-positive women were detected only in selective medium. A combined vaginal-anorectal selective culture is appropriate for GBS screening in this population, minimizing laboratory costs.

  19. Las ciudades históricas españolas como destinos turísticos. Patrimonio cultural y sistema de acogida local

    OpenAIRE

    Grupo de Investigación

    2006-01-01

    Durante los últimos años se asiste a un totiempo eclipsadas por los destinos de sol y playa. Estas ciudades focalizan buena parte de los flujos de turismo cultural de nuestro país, en especial de un turismo ligado a la contemplación y disfrute del patrimonio histórico. Sin embargo, ciudades históricas y turismo cultural no son realidades equivalentes: por una parte, estas ciudades tienden a potenciarse como destinos incipientes de turismo de reuniones, sobre la base de una dotación creciente ...

  20. Toward a Satellite-Based System of Sugarcane Yield Estimation and Forecasting in Smallholder Farming Conditions: A Case Study on Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Morel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating sugarcane biomass is difficult to achieve when working with highly variable spatial distributions of growing conditions, like on Reunion Island. We used a dataset of in-farm fields with contrasted climatic conditions and farming practices to compare three methods of yield estimation based on remote sensing: (1 an empirical relationship method with a growing season-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index NDVI, (2 the Kumar-Monteith efficiency model, and (3 a forced-coupling method with a sugarcane crop model (MOSICAS and satellite-derived fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. These models were compared with the crop model alone and discussed to provide recommendations for a satellite-based system for the estimation of yield at the field scale. Results showed that the linear empirical model produced the best results (RMSE = 10.4 t∙ha−1. Because this method is also the simplest to set up and requires less input data, it appears that it is the most suitable for performing operational estimations and forecasts of sugarcane yield at the field scale. The main limitation is the acquisition of a minimum of five satellite images. The upcoming open-access Sentinel-2 Earth observation system should overcome this limitation because it will provide 10-m resolution satellite images with a 5-day frequency.

  1. Type 2 diabetes patient education in Reunion Island: perceptions and needs of professionals in advance of the initiation of a primary care management network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcou-Debussche, M; Debussche, X

    2008-09-01

    This study focused on issues in the education of type 2 diabetes patients in primary care on Reunion Island which, in a medical context, is broadly similar to metropolitan France, but with a much greater prevalence of diabetes. The aim was to assess the perceptions, training, reported practices and needs of health care providers in the field of patient education in advance of the initiation of a health care management network for diabetic patients. A total of 74 physicians and 63 nurses completed a detailed questionnaire comprising 52 items divided into six parts: professional activity, initial and postgraduate training, educational practices, objectives of patient education, perceived barriers and prospects for optimization. Educational activities for patients are almost nonexistent. Information and explanations given during a face-to-face encounter with the physician or nurse that combine technical and caring approaches are the main reasons reported for patient education. The obstacles reported by professionals that need to be overcome are limited available time, patient passivity and inadequate staff training. Practitioners and nurses are poorly taught as regards patient education and self-management of chronic diseases. The suggested improvements include professional acknowledgement, more convenient and available tools and improved postgraduate training. Patient education in primary care is still mostly an illusion, with many gaps that hinder education for both patients and professionals. The training of health professionals needs to meet the challenge of chronic diseases by integrating aspects from the fields of education and the social sciences.

  2. Využití měr variability pro nominální proměnné ve vícerozměrné statistické analýze

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanková, Hana; Šulc, Z.; Húsek, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 34-43 ISSN 1336-7420 Grant - others:IGA VŠE(CZ) F4/41/2016 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : míry variability * nominální proměnné * vícerozměrná analýza * míry závislosti * míry podobnosti * shluková analýza * rozhodovací stromy * hodnocení klasifikace * variability measures * nominal variables * multivariate analysis * dependence measures * similarity measures * cluster analysis * decision trees * classification evaluation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://www.ssds.sk/casopis/archiv/2016/fss0116.pdf

  3. Maternal sensitivity and infant attachment security in Korea: cross-cultural validation of the Strange Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mi Kyoung; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen, Nancy; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The present study sought to analyze infant and maternal behavior both during the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) and a free play session in a Korean sample (N = 87) to help understand whether mother-infant attachment relationships are universal or culture-specific. Distributions of attachment classifications in the Korean sample were compared with a cross-national sample. Behavior of mothers and infants following the two separation episodes in the SSP, including mothers' proximity to their infants and infants' approach to the caregiver, was also observed, as was the association between maternal sensitivity observed during free play session and infant security. The percentage of Korean infants classified as secure versus insecure mirrored the global distribution, however, only one Korean baby was classified as avoidant. Following the separation episodes in the Strange Situation, Korean mothers were more likely than mothers in Ainsworth's Baltimore sample to approach their babies immediately and sit beside them throughout the reunion episodes, even when their babies were no longer distressed. Also, Korean babies less often approached their mothers during reunions than did infants in the Baltimore sample. Finally, the link between maternal sensitivity and infant security was significant. The findings support the idea that the basic secure base function of attachment is universal and the SSP is a valid measure of secure attachment, but cultural differences in caregiving may result in variations in how this function is manifested.

  4. Tropospheric ozone profiles by DIAL at Maïdo Observatory (Reunion Island: system description, instrumental performance and result comparison with ozone external data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Duflot

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to recognize the importance of ozone (O3 in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the tropics, a DIAL (differential absorption lidar tropospheric O3 lidar system (LIO3TUR was developed and installed at the Université de la Réunion campus site (close to the sea on Reunion Island (southern tropics in 1998. From 1998 to 2010, it acquired 427 O3 profiles from the low to the upper troposphere and has been central to several studies. In 2012, the system was moved up to the new Maïdo Observatory facility (2160 m a.m.s.l. – metres above mean sea level where it started operation in February 2013. The current system (LIO3T configuration generates a 266 nm beam obtained with the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser sent into a Raman cell filled up with deuterium (using helium as buffer gas, generating the 289 and 316 nm beams to enable the use of the DIAL method for O3 profile measurements. The optimal range for the actual system is 6–19 km a.m.s.l., depending on the instrumental and atmospheric conditions. For a 1 h integration time, vertical resolution varies from 0.7 km at 6 km a.m.s.l. to 1.3 km at 19 km a.m.s.l., and mean uncertainty within the 6–19 km range is between 6 and 13 %. Comparisons with eight electrochemical concentration cell (ECC sondes simultaneously launched from the Maïdo Observatory show good agreement between data sets with a 6.8 % mean absolute relative difference (D between 6 and 17 km a.m.s.l. (LIO3T lower than ECC. Comparisons with 37 ECC sondes launched from the nearby Gillot site during the daytime in a ±24 h window around lidar shooting result in a 9.4 % D between 6 and 19 km a.m.s.l. (LIO3T lower than ECC. Comparisons with 11 ground-based Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometer measurements acquired during the daytime in a ±24 h window around lidar shooting show good agreement between data

  5. Contamination by Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Listeria spp. of most popular chicken- and pork-sausages sold in Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimoulinard, A; Beral, M; Henry, I; Atiana, L; Porphyre, V; Tessier, C; Leclercq, A; Cardinale, E

    2017-06-05

    One of the most popular meat products of the local "cuisine" is sausage composed with 100% chicken or 100% pork. In this study, we aimed to determine the presence of Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Listeria spp. in chicken- and pork-sausages, quantify Salmonella spp. population and identify the factors that could be associated with contamination in the outlets. Two hundred and three batches of pork and chicken sausages were randomly collected from 67 local outlets (supermarkets, groceries and butcher shops). Salmonella spp. was detected in 11.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): [10.0; 13.5]) of samples, Campylobacter spp. in 1.5% [0.7; 4.2] and Listeria monocytogenes in 5.9% [4.4; 7.3]. Most probable number of Salmonella spp. varied between 6cfu per gram to 320cfu per gram. Salmonella serotypes isolated from pork and chicken sausages were S. Typhimurium (45.8%), S. London (20.8%), S. Derby (16.7%), S. Newport (8.33%), S. Blockley (4.2%) and S. Weltevreden (4.17%). Using a logistic (mixed-effect) regression model, we found that Salmonella spp. contamination was positively associated with sausages sold in papers or plastic bags and no control of rodents. Chicken sausages were associated with a decreasing risk of Salmonella contamination. Listeria monocytogenes contamination was positively associated with the presence of fresh rodent droppings in the outlet and negatively when the staff was cleaning regularly their hands with soap and water or water only. All the sampled outlets of Reunion Island were not equivalent in terms of food safety measures. Increasing awareness of these traders remains a cornerstone to limit the presence of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. in sausages, particularly in a tropical context (high temperature and humidity). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution patterns of Anopheles arabiensis breeding sites in La Reunion Island - multi-year trend analysis of historical records from 1996-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lempérière Guy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An often confounding facet of the dynamics of malaria vectors is the aquatic larval habitat availability and suitable conditions under which they can thrive. Here, we investigated the impact of environmental factors on the temporal and spatial distribution of larval habitats of Anopheles arabiensis in different locations on La Reunion Island. Methods A retrospective examination was made from archival data which provided the complete enumeration of An. arabiensis breeding habitats in three distinct geographic zones - extending North-east, West and South of the island over 14 years, from January 1996 to December 2009. Data on the occurrence and the number of active larval habitats at each of a total of 4376 adjacent ellipsoid grid cells (216,506 square meters each were used (1 to provide the geographic extent of breeding site availability from year to year and (2 to analyze associations with prevailing environmental factors, habitat types, and locations. Results Anopheles arabiensis utilized a spectrum of man-made and natural aquatic habitats, most of which were concentrated primarily in the rock pools located in ravines and river fringes, and also in the large littoral marshes and within the irrigated agricultural zones. The numbers of breeding site per sampling grid differed significantly in different parts of the island. In contrast to an originally more widespread distribution across the island in the 1950s, detailed geographic analyses of the data obtained in the period extending from 1996-2009 showed an intriguing clustered distribution of active breeding sites in three discontinuous geographic zones, in which aquatic habitats availability fluctuates with the season and year. Seasonality in the prevalence of anopheles breeding sites suggests significant responsiveness to climatic factors. Conclusions The observed retreat of An. arabiensis distribution range to lower altitudinal zones (

  7. Obraz druhého: příklady z francouzských dějin (kontext a proměny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Sitek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Following text deals with the problems of relationships between the French society and “the other”. The emphasis is put on the context and discourses of political elites during the 19th and 20th century that influenced the creations and the transformations of structured representations not only of “the other” but also of “itself”. “The other” was connected to different menaces and anxiety about “(national identity”, with a cultural and social thread. In this article we propose three examples to demonstrate that perception of “the other” changes during the time in dependence on the context.

  8. FTIR time-series of biomass burning products (HCN, C2H6, C2H2, CH3OH, and HCOOH at Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E and comparisons with model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. A. Jones

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E, situated in the Indian Ocean at about 800 km east of Madagascar, is appropriately located to monitor the outflow of biomass burning pollution from Southern Africa and Madagascar, in the case of short-lived compounds, and from other Southern Hemispheric landmasses such as South America, in the case of longer-lived species. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR solar absorption observations are sensitive to a large number of biomass burning products. We present in this work the FTIR retrieval strategies, suitable for very humid sites such as Reunion Island, for hydrogen cyanide (HCN, ethane (C2H6, acetylene (C2H2, methanol (CH3OH, and formic acid (HCOOH. We provide their total columns time-series obtained from the measurements during August–October 2004, May–October 2007, and May 2009–December 2010. We show that biomass burning explains a large part of the observed seasonal and interannual variability of the chemical species. The correlations between the daily mean total columns of each of the species and those of CO, also measured with our FTIR spectrometer at Reunion Island, are very good from August to November (R ≥ 0.86. This allows us to derive, for that period, the following enhancement ratios with respect to CO: 0.0047, 0.0078, 0.0020, 0.012, and 0.0046 for HCN, C2H6, C2H2, CH3OH, and HCOOH, respectively. The HCN ground-based data are compared to the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, while the data for the other species are compared to the IMAGESv2 model. We show that using the HCN/CO ratio derived from our measurements (0.0047 in GEOS-Chem reduces the underestimation of the modeled HCN columns compared with the FTIR measurements. The comparisons between IMAGESv2 and the long-lived species C2H6 and C2H2 indicate that the biomass burning emissions used in the model (from the GFED3 inventory are probably underestimated in the late September–October period for all years of measurements, and

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a complex formed between the antibiotic simocyclinone D8 and the DNA breakage–reunion domain of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Marcus J.; Flatman, Ruth H.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Maxwell, Anthony; Lawson, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Crystals of a complex formed between the 59 kDa N-terminal fragment of the E. coli DNA gyrase A subunit and the antibiotic simocyclinone D8 were obtained and X-ray data were recorded to a resolution of 2.75 Å. Crystals of a complex formed between the 59 kDa N-terminal fragment of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase A subunit (also known as the breakage–reunion domain) and the antibiotic simocyclinone D8 were grown by vapour diffusion. The complex crystallized with I-centred orthorhombic symmetry and X-ray data were recorded to a resolution of 2.75 Å from a single crystal at the synchrotron. DNA gyrase is an essential bacterial enzyme and thus represents an attractive target for drug development

  10. Comment choisir ce qui aura été? Réflexions sur l’optimisme prométhéen contemporain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wilson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many have invoked the nihilism that is endemic of the age we call the anthropocene. Bernard Stiegler has articulated this sentiment by highlighting how anthropocene films are typically nihi listic, for example, Von Trier’s Melancholia. But if the age is characterized by a cultural pessi mism about the future of human kind, or again about its posthuman supersession, there is also a complementary symptom that corresponds to a strange optimism before the impasses of our age. This optimism, we find it represented in another anthropocene film: Nolan’s Interstellar. This too is a film where the protagonists are faced with a world lacking a future, a world dying under the stresses caused by the human’s exploitation of nature. Here, instead of the mantra ‘Enjoy it while it lasts’, an opposing moral is repeated: ‘Don’t go gentle into that good night, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.’ In the film, Thomas’ poem is a tribute to prometheanism; the death of the earth will not mean the end of human life, it declares, the human will surpass all the limits of its ecosystem, the constraints of space time itself, and become pure hyperdimensional intelligence. The film echoes the superstitious optimism in the promise of technology we now find at the heart of contemporary movements such as accelerationism. This paper assesses the validity of this intrumentalization of optimism, drawing from Leibniz’s concept of compossibility and the cosmological anthropic principle (observer bias.

  11. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  12. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  13. Organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1988-01-01

    Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of sec...

  14. Cultural entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Klamer (Arjo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCultural entrepreneurship is a new character in the cultural sector. This paper characterizes the cultural entrepreneur paying homage to the hermeneutic approach of Don Lavoie and others. The challenge is to render the "cultural" meaningful. An invention is the highlighting of the

  15. Industrial cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    1996-01-01

    The chapter deals with different paradigms andtheories of cultural development. The problem toexplain change and methods to analyse developmentin different cultures are presented and discussed.......The chapter deals with different paradigms andtheories of cultural development. The problem toexplain change and methods to analyse developmentin different cultures are presented and discussed....

  16. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND MANAGEMENT CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Tudor Hobeanu; Loredana Vacarescu Hobeanu

    2010-01-01

    Communication reveals the importance of organizational culture and management culture supported by the remarkable results in economic and social level of organization. Their functions are presented and specific ways of expression levels of organizational culture and ways of adapting to the requirements of the organization's management culture.

  17. Proměny Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Knížová, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    In 1953, Howard R. Bowen gave rise to the debate on social responsibility, and since then it has become very widespread. The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility gained a lot of forms during the second half of the twentieth century and from the university campuses got into practice and also into the Czech Republic. On the background of changing theoretical approaches toward CSR we can see changes of business environment - especially in the change of the conceptualization of the enterpri...

  18. Cultural commons and cultural evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, Giangiacomo

    2010-01-01

    Culture evolves following a process that is akin to biological evolution, although with some significant differences. At the same time culture has often a collective good value for human groups. This paper studies culture in an evolutionary perspective, with a focus on the implications of group definition for the coexistence of different cultures. A model of cultural evolution is presented where agents interacts in an artificial environment. The belonging to a specific memetic group is a majo...

  19. Mística e Teologia: do desencontro moderno à busca de um reencontro contemporâneo (Mystique and Theology: from the modern mismatch to the pursuit of a contemporary reunion DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p854

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceci Maria Costa Baptista Mariani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A condição cultural contemporânea desafia a vivência religiosa. Vivemos um momento de nova demanda: busca-se hoje, uma relação com o dogma e uma vivência religiosa mais livres. Corre-se o risco, todavia, que esse desejo, que é de fato um dos grandes valores de nossa cultura, acabe se satisfazendo com propostas espirituais superficiais. A partir dessa preocupação, e entendendo que a mística, enquanto processo vivido pelo sujeito rumo ao encontro com o Mistério Santo, tem contribuições importantes para essa problemática, procuraremos empreender uma reflexão sobre a relação entre mística e teologia, o desencontro moderno e os sinais de reencontro que já se pode visualizar na atualidade. Refletiremos sobre a marginalização e mística, ocorrida na modernidade, as suspeitas que pairaram sobre os místicos, a divisão entre espiritualidade e teologia que adveio do triunfo do racionalismo e finalmente sobre o novo interesse pela mística que vai se esboçando na teologia contemporânea a partir da afirmação de uma nova concepção de revelação no contexto de renovação conciliar. Palavras-chaves: Mística. Espiritualidade. Teologia.   Abstract Our contemporary cultural condition challenges our religion experience. As a result, we live in a moment of a new spiritual demand: people are seeking a relationship with the dogma and at the same time a less strict religious experience. However, we are taking a risk with this new spiritual desire, which is in fact one of the strongest values in our culture; this might lead to religious satisfaction via superficial spiritual propositions. This concern, along with the mysticism involved in the process of one’s path towards the acceptance of the holy mysticism, has indeed contributed to this issue. We shall reflect upon the relationship between mysticism and theology and its modern mismatch, as well as on the signs of reunion that we can already visualize nowadays. We shall reflect

  20. French translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire and the Brief Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efanov, J I; Shine, J J; Darwich, R; Besner Morin, C; Arsenault, J; Harris, P G; Danino, A M; Izadpanah, A

    2018-04-01

    Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are important clinical devices for evaluating injuries and surgeries of the hand. However, some of the most widely used questionnaires, such as the MHQ and bMHQ, are currently unavailable in French, which prevents them from being used in the French Canadian province of Quebec as well as in other French-speaking nations. We therefore intend to develop valid and culturally adapted French translations of the afore-mentioned questionnaires. Two independent bilingual translators converted all English questionnaires to French. Two distinct translators then translated the French versions back to English in reverse-blinded fashion. Discrepancies between the original and second English versions were examined by a committee of four bilingual healthcare professionals before final French translations of all documents were produced. Thirty patients bilingual in French and English were then asked to complete the original and French versions of the MHQ and bMHQ. Their answers were compared in order to assess the accuracy of our translation. In light of these findings, revised French versions were produced. French versions of the MHQ and bMHQ questionnaires produced metrological qualities of validity and fidelity with an inter-class correlation superior to 0.90 and a kappa coefficient of 0.81 to 1. Clinical applicability revealed the distribution of scores according to disease process was reproducible between the English and French versions. PROM translation requires a rigorous process in order to achieve strong metrological qualities in both the original and translated versions. We produced French translations of the MHQ and bMHQ by abiding to the Beaton method of cross-cultural adaptation of self-reported measures. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. „Kánon“ v českém hudebním dějepisectví a hudební praxi: vznik, funkce a proměny v průběhu let

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gabrielová, Jarmila

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 4 (2013), s. 331-339 ISSN 1335-2458 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : historiography * musicology * Czech music culture Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  2. Culturing Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  3. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  4. Beyond Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the lack of literature relating to cultural differences and school library media programs and reviews the book "Beyond Culture" by Edward T. Hall. Highlights include the population/environment crisis, cultural literacy, the use of technology, and Marshall McLuhan's idea of the global village. (LRW)

  5. Bile culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - bile ... is placed in a special dish called a culture medium to see if bacteria, viruses, or fungi ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Body fluid - anaerobic culture. In: ... . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:225-226. Kim AY, ...

  6. Handling Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieter van Nispen tot Pannerden

    2011-01-01

    The article indicates how companies may prepare for and deal with cultural differences. Because the research base is still rather limited an overall perspective may not be realised. After discussing definitions and concepts of culture, as well as values, cultural differences between states are

  7. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...... Foucault considered a constitutive feature of 20th-century thinking and one that continues to occupy intellectual and cultural debates in the third millennium. A conceptual framework is, nevertheless, necessary, if the humanities are to adequa-tely address city and space – themes that have long been...

  8. Cultural contrast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志

    2016-01-01

    Chinese cultural contains a great number of styles;culture differentiation does not depend on region differentiation.This research would interpret what difference between Hong Kong and Shenzhen.1.Food culture in china Traditional Chinese medicine suggests eating local seasonal fruit and vegetables,as they are most suitable for the body during a particular season.It is also divided food into 3 characteristics:cooling foods,warming foods and balance or

  9. Culture evolves

    OpenAIRE

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A.; Laland, Kevin N.; Stringer, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to...

  10. Manuscript Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What do Mesoamerica, Greece, Byzantium, Island, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Tibet, China and Japan have in common? Like many other cultures of the world, they share a particular form of cultural heritage: ancient handwritten documents. In 2007, scholars from some20 countries around the world gathered...... at the University of Copenhagen for a workshop on manuscripts to compare notes. This event led to the publication of this volume, which brings together16 articles on philological, cultural, and material aspects of manuscripts in search for a common ground across disciplines and cultures....

  11. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  12. Translating patient reported outcome measures: methodological issues explored using cognitive interviewing with three rheumatoid arthritis measures in six European languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewlett, Sarah E.; Nicklin, Joanna; Bode, Christina; Carmona, Loretto; Dures, Emma; Engelbrecht, Matthias; Hagel, Sofia; Kirwan, John R.; Molto, Anna; Redondo, Marta; Gossec, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Cross-cultural translation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is a lengthy process, often performed professionally. Cognitive interviewing assesses patient comprehension of PROMs. The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of cognitive interviewing to assess translations and

  13. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  14. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  15. Connecting Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugegaard, Rikke; Mynster Christensen, Maya

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of cultural dynamics in the area of operations is essential in to the accomplishment of military missions in international operations. The aim of this handbook is to introduce a tool enabling the use of culture as part of the military operational planning process....

  16. Stool Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections and may be identified with a stool culture. Some important examples include: Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and other toxin- ... the toxin-producing C. difficile will be performed. Examples of other less common causes include: ... of stool cultures that are reported as negative usually reflect the ...

  17. Boosting Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Culture makes up an indispensable part of our lives, just like material comfort. It is thought of as an important source of a nation’s vitality and creativity, and constitutes a key factor uniting the nation,while making it distinctive from other countries. It is also said culture is a productiv

  18. Internet culture

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, David

    2013-01-01

    The internet has recently grown from a fringe cultural phenomenon to a significant site of cultural production and transformation. Internet Culture maps this new domain of language, politics and identity, locating it within the histories of communication and the public sphere. Internet Culture offers a critical interrogation of the sustaining myths of the virtual world and of the implications of the current mass migration onto the electronic frontier. Among the topics discussed in Internet Culture are the virtual spaces and places created by the citizens of the Net and their claims to the hotly contested notion of "virtual community"; the virtual bodies that occupy such spaces; and the desires that animate these bodies. The contributors also examine the communication medium behind theworlds of the Net, analyzing the rhetorical conventions governing online discussion, literary antecedents,and potential pedagogical applications.

  19. Avatar Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koda, Tomoko; Ishida, Toru; Rehm, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    and Western designers. The goals of the study were: (1) to investigate cultural differences in avatar expression evaluation and apply findings from psychological studies of human facial expression recognition, (2) to identify expressions and design features that cause cultural differences in avatar facial...... expression interpretation. The results of our study confirmed that (1) there are cultural differences in interpreting avatars’ facial expressions, and the psychological theory that suggests physical proximity affects facial expression recognition accuracy is also applicable to avatar facial expressions, (2......Avatars are increasingly used to express our emotions in our online communications. Such avatars are used based on the assumption that avatar expressions are interpreted universally among all cultures. This paper investigated cross-cultural evaluations of avatar expressions designed by Japanese...

  20. CULTURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana POP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will try to analyse the cultural tourism. We will start by referring to the complex concepts of tourism and culture and to the synergies existing between them. We will define cultural tourism and present its appearance and evolution as well as its importance as a modern form of tourism. We will present the various types of cultural tourism with their characteristics and the specific features of cultural tourists according to their interests. We will also mention that there are advantages and disadvantages for any kind of tourism depending on the position – local communities, companies or tourists. For the future we will refer to the new partnership between UNWTO and UNESCO.

  1. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukraroff, C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of Safety Culture was defined after Chernobyl's nuclear accident in 1986. It has not been exempt from discussion interpretations, adding riders, etc..., over the last 24 years because it has to do with human behavior and performance in the organizations. Safety Culture is not an easy task to define, assess and monitor. The proof of it is that today we still discussing and writing about it. How has been the evolution of Safety Culture at the Juzbado Factory since 1985 to today?. What is the strategy that we will be following in the future. (Author)

  2. Paramilitary Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, James William

    1989-01-01

    Identifies the movie, "Rambo," and "Soldier of Fortune" magazine as artifacts of "paramilitary culture." Contends that they are a social phenomenon which helps legitimate the United States government's rapid escalation of military forces. (MS)

  3. Rectal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an infection of the rectum, such as gonorrhea . It may also be done instead of a ... infection. This may be: Bacterial infection Parasitic enterocolitis Gonorrhea Sometimes a culture shows that you are a ...

  4. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The response to a previous publication by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), indicated a broad international interest in expansion of the concept of Safety Culture, in such a way that its effectiveness in particular cases may be judged. This report responds to that need. In its manifestation, Safety Culture has two major components: the framework determined by organizational policy and by managerial action, and the response of individuals in working within and benefiting by the framework. 1 fig

  5. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  6. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...... how tourism is an agent for social change. The author also offers an original and refreshing way of understanding tourist behaviour through the concept of the "versatile tourist". The book's empirical cases and dialogic framework provide new and deep insights into tourism activities. In his...

  7. Cultured Trash, Not Trash Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiqurrohman Taufiqurrohman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As civilized creature, human actually can manage trash as well as possible although it is often stereotyped as a vain thing. This article gives the proof that trash can be cultured as well so that a society can take benefits from the existence of it. This article parses ways of orderly managing it at schools, in this case two schools in Jepara. The results say that trash can be cultured by having an organization to manage the Trash Bank at schools and to train students to classify and recycle trash then take advantage of it by selling the collected and the recycled trash. It makes trash have good transformation of values, repelling against the prior stereotype. Finally, by taking example from Trash Bank management at schools, human can have so cultured trash that they would not be trapped by trash culture.

  8. Long-Term Effectiveness of a Lifestyle Intervention for the Primary Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in a Low Socio-Economic Community--An Intervention Follow-Up Study on Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fianu, Adrian; Bourse, Léa; Naty, Nadège; Le Moullec, Nathalie; Lepage, Benoît; Lang, Thierry; Favier, François

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention research, evidence for maintenance of risk factor reduction after three years of follow-up is needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of a combined lifestyle intervention aiming at controlling body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC) in non-diabetic, overweight/obese adults living in a low socio-economic community. On Reunion Island, 445 adults living in deprived areas, aged 18-40 and at high-risk for T2D, were included in an intervention versus control trial for primary prevention (2001-2002). The intervention promoted a healthy diet and moderate regular physical activity, through actions strengthening individuals or community and improving living conditions. The control group received a one-shot medical information and nutritional advices. After the end of the trial (2003), 259 of the subjects participated in a follow-up study (2010-2011). The outcomes were the nine-year changes from baseline in BW, body mass index (BMI) and WC measurements, separately. Statistical analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis, using available and imputed datasets. At inclusion, T2D risk factors were prevalent: family history of diabetes in first-degree relatives (42%), women with a personal history of gestational diabetes (11%), total obesity (43%, median BMI 29.1 kg/m²) and central obesity (71%). At follow-up, the adjusted effect on imputed dataset was significant for WC -2.4 cm (95% confidence interval: -4.7 to -0.0 cm, p = 0.046), non-significant for BW -2.2 kg (-4.6 to +0.2 kg, p = 0.073) and BMI -0.81 kg/m² (-1.69 to +0.08 kg/m², p = 0.074). A specific long-term effect was the increased likelihood of reduction in adiposity: BW loss, BMI reduction, and WC reduction were more frequent in the intervention group. In the context of low socio-economic communities, our data support the assumption of long-term effect of lifestyle interventions targeting total obesity and central obesity two

  9. A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    P. Vandermeersch, A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture? In: F. VAN DE VIJVER & G. HUTSCHEMAEKERS (ed.), The Investigation of Culture. Current Issues in Cultural Psychology, Tilburg, Tilburg University Press, 1990, 43-58.

  10. Cultural Resurrection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    "Who are we?Where are we from?"Humans have been pondering these questions since the day they first came into being.One of the ways we preserve memories of the past is through our cul- tural heritage that has been passed on from generation to genera- tion.Intangible cultural heritage,as well as tangible cultural her- itage,is essential to the continuity of human civilization. Since the United Nations Educational,Scientific and Cultural Organization(UNESCO)unveiled the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in 2001,China has had Kunqu opera,Guqin and its music,the art of Uygur Muqam of Xinjiang and the traditional Mongolian folk song Long Song added to UNESCO’s protection list.It is now one of the coun-

  11. Japanese Shame Culture and American Guilt Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Weijie

    2016-01-01

    Culture is an important factor contributing to the success of intercultural communication. In the east and west, there are many different cultures, among which Japanese shame culture and American guilt culture are two typical ones. Influenced by different cultures, these two countries have different characteristics, which reminds us that in intercultural communication culture should be paid much attention to.

  12. Mayan Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter Bent

    1992-01-01

    The social categories « Maya » and « mestizo » habe been applied to denote the Yucatec Mayan people in Mexico. The A. examines the cluster of perceived attributes (schemata) evoked by the terms and how they relate to each other. He shows that there is an incongruency between them along the lines ...... of local and academic categorization, which is an implication of the different social spaces in which they arise. In spite of the incongruency and the cultural plurality evoked by their usage, the A. argues that the people of Yucatec share a single culture....

  13. Information cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouvig, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest a genealogy of the concept of information beyond the 20th century. The article discusses how the concept of information culture might provide a way of formulating such a genealogic strategy. The article approaches this purpose by providing a general...... narrative of premodern information cultures, examining works on early-modern scholars and 18th century savants and discussion of what seems to be a Foucauldian rupture in the conceptualization of information in 19th century England. The findings of the article are situated in the thinking that a genealogy...... of information would reveal that information had specific purposes in specific settings....

  14. Časopis jako dokument doby. Proměna grafického zpracování obálky časopisu Host do domu (1954-1970)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, 1-2 (2014), s. 66-85 ISSN 1211-7390 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Host do domu (A Guest in the House) * visual culture 50s and 60s * literary magazines * graphic design * magazine cover * 20th century Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  15. Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  16. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria or other disease-causing germs grow. A gram stain may also ... any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names ... Charnot-Katsikas A. Specimen collection and handling for diagnosis of infectious diseases. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  17. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...

  18. Grindr Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shield, Andrew DJ

    2018-01-01

    intersections of sexuality with other socio-cultural categories such as race and migration background, but also gender and ability. I find that user experiences with exclusion and discrimination can be related to Grindr’s interface, such as its drop-down menus, the discourses circulated by Grindr users...

  19. Talking Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    When Danish businesses move production abroad, ‘culture’ is often seen as a huge challenge to the successful outcome of cross-border collaboration. Therefore, business leaders often seek information and guidelines of how to cope in the vast amount of literature on culture and intercultural...... communication. Much of this literature is based on functionalist approaches providing the dos and don’ts of intercultural encounters. This involves inter alia conceptualising ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous entity of values, attitudes and norms shared by members of a group, often leading readers...... to adopt dichotomised understandings and discourses about other cultures (see e.g. Hofstede 2001; Jandt 1998; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997). However, experience shows that the world in which intercultural encounters take place is not as simple and easy to categorise as these approaches may suggest...

  20. MARKETING CULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gómez Ramírez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza la definición de "Marketing" Cultural y la adaptación y beneficios del "marketing" tradicional respecto al conjunto de manifestaciones artísticas de las diversas industrias involucradas en el sector cultural o artístico; asimismo, se desagregan los conceptos básicos que lo componen como factor de éxito en dichas empresas. Se hace uso de la exposición de casos específicos para ilustrar la articulación de estos dos conceptos aparentemente contrapuestos, cultura y "marketing", y registra algunas reflexiones para que el lector se involucre en la construcción del concepto aquí presentado.

  1. Family reunion for the UA2 calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2015-01-01

    After many years in CERN’s Microcosm exhibition, the last surviving UA2 central calorimeter module has been moved to Hall 175, the technical development laboratory of the ATLAS Tile Hadronic Calorimeter (Tilecal). The UA2 and ATLAS calorimeters are cousins, as both were designed by Otto Gildemeister. Now side by side, the calorimeters illustrate the progress made in sampling organic scintillator calorimeters over the past 35 years.   The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter prototypes (left) and the UA2 central calorimeter (right) in Hall 175. (Image: Mario Campanelli/ATLAS.) From 1981 to 1990, the UA2 experiment was one of the two detectors on CERN’s flagship accelerator, the SPS. At the heart of the UA2 detector was the central calorimeter. It was made up of 24 slices – each weighing four tonnes – arranged like orange segments around the collision point. These calorimeter slices played a central role in the research carried out by UA2 for the discovery of W bosons...

  2. Cultural neurolinguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross-cultural/crosslinguistic variations in the neural networks of languages. We first briefly describe general brain networks for written and spoken languages. We then discuss language-specific brain regions by highlighting differences in neural bases of different scripts (logographic vs. alphabetic scripts), orthographies (transparent vs. nontransparent orthographies), and tonality (tonal vs. atonal languages). We also discuss neural basis of second language and the role of native language experience in second-language acquisition. In the last section, we outline a general model that integrates culture and neural bases of language and discuss future directions of research in this area.

  3. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  4. La arquitectura cultural. / Cultural architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobos, Jorge

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo releva la Arquitectura Cultural, que es plural y diversa en términos estéticos y conceptuales. Sugiere la apertura a otras dinámicas de comprensión de lo arquitectónico, a otras lógicas de construcción de las ciudades. Para aclarar el concepto se expone un breve ejemplo práctico./This article points out the "cultural architecture", which is plural and diverse in concept and aesthetic terms. It suggests the opening to other dinamics of comprehention of the architectural issue and the building of cities. The article presents a brief empirical example that clarifies the conceptual approach.

  5. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Samani; Elham Saadatian; Natalie Pang; Doros Polydorou; Owen Noel Newton Fernando; Ryohei Nakatsu; Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino Koh

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  6. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  7. Culture Jamming Versus Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardia Acynthia Putri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This literature study researched Adbusters, the anti-commercial organization, and described the organization’s activities and media usage, mainly in the period of 2007-2010, which critized the populer culture. Adbusters is an organization which performs “Culture Jamming”; a rebellious act reacting towards commercialism domination in many aspects including popular culture. Compared to other similar organizations, Adbusters has been executing more various activisms using several media which other organizations do not use. This study used the Adbusters’ official website and blogs as main data sources. The data of Adbusters’ activities and media usage were categorized and analyzed, thus the tendency of its development can be described. This study also analyzed Adbusters’ activity using Media Hegemony Theory and Political Economy Media Theory. The media has been dominated by a certain group that owns politic and economic power, so the information flow has been dominated by them. Media and its contents have been commercialized, thus capitalism and commercialism have been considered as a common system that should run the world. Adbusters has been trying to stop the domination and change the society’s way of thinking into a more critical way of thinking.   Abstrak: Studi literatur ini meneliti tentang Adbusters, sebuah organisasi anti komersial, dengan mendeskripsikan aktivitas serta penggunaan media organisasi tersebut dari tahun 2007-2010 dalam mengkritisi budaya populer. Adbusters adalah organisasi yang melakukan Culture Jamming, aksi perlawanan terhadap dominasi komersialisme di segala aspek termasuk popular culture. Dibandingkan dengan organisasi lain yang serupa, aktivitas Adbusters lebih bervariasi dan menggunakan media-media yang tidak biasa digunakan organisasi lain. Penelitian ini menggunakan situs online resmi Adbusters sebagai sumber data utama. Data mengenai aktivitas dan

  8. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Od zabijáka k lúzrovi. Literární postava jako vyjádření proměny ve vztahu jedince a bytí // From hired killer to loser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lada Hazaiová

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The face of the Colombian literature in the last twenty years has changed and next to the poetics of magical realism new discourses emerged expresing the changing social, cultural and ideological values. One of them represents Fernando Vallejo’s novel Our Lady of Assassins. Another contemporary discourse represents other Colombian writer Sergio Álvarez whose novel 35 dead was published in 2011 in Bogotá, respectively almost 20 years later. He works very similar issues as Vallejo, like urban violence, drug cartels and hired killers, but he also has given life to a special protagonist, called “loser“. The aim of this paper is to compare general features of both protagonists and to suggest that in loser a new type of protagonist has appeared, and not only in the Colombian literature.

  10. Hispanic Culture and Relational Cultural Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Traditional personality theories do not consider the impact of culture on personality development. Yet, to provide culturally relevant services to the increasing Hispanic population in the U.S., more culturally relevant theories must be identified. This paper presents Relational Cultural Theory (RCT) as an alternative model to understanding…

  11. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  12. Culture-lovers and Culture-leavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Huysmans; Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan

    2005-01-01

    Who are the people in the Netherlands with an active interest in cultural heritage and the performing arts, and who prefer to leave these forms of culture alone? Have the size and composition of the groups of 'culture-lovers' and 'culture-leavers' changed since the end of the 1970s? These are the

  13. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhanov Vyacheslav Vladimirovich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.

  14. Perceptions about the coordination and functioning of general group meetings at a psychiatric day hospital Percepciones sobre coordinación y funcionamiento de reuniones del equipo general de un hospital día psiquiátrico Percepções sobre coordenação e funcionamento de reuniões de equipe geral de um hospital-dia psiquiátrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Arthur Scherer

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the activity of coordinating general team meetings at a psychiatric day hospital, its functioning and the feelings these meetings aroused in the researchers. The method adopted to carry out this research was the observation and registration of two observers' perceptions. Twenty-one meetings were studied. The findings and discussion indicate that it would be ideal to diagnose the coordinator's performance, the organizational dynamics and structure, and then manage the malfunction. In that sense, the intervention of an institutional supervisor is suggested. The researchers' feelings were similar to their perceptions about the proceeding of the meeting and about the coordination.La finalidad de este estudio fue investigar la actividad de coordinación de reuniones del equipo general de un hospital-día psiquiátrico, su funcionamiento y los sentimientos que tales reuniones movilizaron en los investigadores. Esta investigación fue realizada mediante la observación y el registro de las percepciones de dos observadores. Fueron estudiadas 21 reuniones. Delante de los hallazgos y la discusión presentada, percibimos que sería ideal hacer un diagnostico del funcionamiento del coordinador, de la dinámica y estructura organizacional y proceder a una gerencia de su mal funcionamiento. En este sentido es sugerida la intervención de un supervisor institucional. Los sentimientos movilizados en los investigadores fueron semejantes a sus percepciones respecto a seguimiento de las reuniones y de la coordinación.O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a condução da coordenação de reuniões de equipe geral de um hospital-dia psiquiátrico, o seu funcionamento e os sentimentos que tais reuniões mobilizaram nos pesquisadores. O método adotado para a execução desta pesquisa foi o da observação e registro das percepções de dois observadores. Foram estudadas 21 reuniões. Considerando os achados e a discussão apresentada

  15. Cultural Competence and the Operational Commander: Moving Beyond Cultural Awareness into Culture-Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karcanes, James A

    2007-01-01

    .... Understanding the different levels of cultural awareness -- cultural consideration, cultural understanding, and cultural competence -- will help usher in a new focus on culture-centric warfare...

  16. Las ciudades históricas españolas como destinos turísticos. Patrimonio cultural y sistema de acogida local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grupo de Investigación

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Durante los últimos años se asiste a un totiempo eclipsadas por los destinos de sol y playa. Estas ciudades focalizan buena parte de los flujos de turismo cultural de nuestro país, en especial de un turismo ligado a la contemplación y disfrute del patrimonio histórico. Sin embargo, ciudades históricas y turismo cultural no son realidades equivalentes: por una parte, estas ciudades tienden a potenciarse como destinos incipientes de turismo de reuniones, sobre la base de una dotación creciente en palacios de congresos, recintos feriales y grandes complejos hoteleros; por otra, el turismo cultural incluye manifestaciones culturales que no siempre tienen cabida en este tipo de ciudades, caso de los festivales o las muestras de arte contemporáneo, o presenta un contexto territorial distinto, como sucede con las rutas y sitios históricos en ámbitos no urbanos (yacimientos arqueológicos, paisajes culturales, etc..

  17. CONNECTION BETWEEN ECONOMICS, CULTURE AND CULTURAL DIPLOMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agil Valiyev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, culture is one of the main feeble factors of economic development.  The leading role of culture in economic development should be argued as multiplied: so, on firstly, as domestic value, on secondly, as a main factor of regional economic development advanced to raised gravity of different regions for residents, tourists and investors, on thirdly, as major parameters of social development based on tolerance, creativity and knowledge. To the different international experiences, culture is main part of economic development in our life. Cultural diversities are combined into a main reason economic development model. The article consist of explainations about the understanding of culture, cultural diplomacy and economics, approach on conflicts between culture and economics, to find how affecting of culture to economic development, the role of culture in economic development of Azerbaijan. The article can be considered as a useful resource  for experts and researchers conducting research in this field.

  18. Cultural Humility and Hospital Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Joshua N; Boan, David; Davis, Don E; Aten, Jamie D; Ruiz, John M; Maryon, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Hospital safety culture is an integral part of providing high quality care for patients, as well as promoting a safe and healthy environment for healthcare workers. In this article, we explore the extent to which cultural humility, which involves openness to cultural diverse individuals and groups, is related to hospital safety culture. A sample of 2011 hospital employees from four hospitals completed measures of organizational cultural humility and hospital safety culture. Higher perceptions of organizational cultural humility were associated with higher levels of general perceptions of hospital safety, as well as more positive ratings on non-punitive response to error (i.e., mistakes of staff are not held against them), handoffs and transitions, and organizational learning. The cultural humility of one's organization may be an important factor to help improve hospital safety culture. We conclude by discussing potential directions for future research.

  19. Karel Chotek a Cerovo: od iniciace k specializaci (causerie k půlstoleté proměně terénního výzkumu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Ducháček

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the monograph on the Slovak village Cerovo, published in 1906 by Karel Chotek, the first professor of ethnography at the Comenius University in Bratislava and the pioneer of qualitative field research in the Austro-Hungarian monarchy and later in Czechoslovakia. Following Lubor Niederle’s demographical data published in the map of the Slovak community living in Hungary, Cerovo, a village in the Hont region, shows Chotek’s first attempt to cover the set of questions related to the monograph’s focus on people in their cultural setting via field research and direct experience. Though still partly immersed in stereotypes related to Czech utilitarian conceptualisation of Slovak collective identity, Chotek’s monograph shows the first step on the way to an ambitious serial (though mostly unfulfilled project of regional monographs, known as Národopis lidu českoslovanského (The Ethnography of Czechoslavic People, 1918–1940. In the early 1950s, working already as a professor of Slavic and general ethnography at the Charles University in Prague since 1931, Chotek returned to Cerovo with an idea of a new, comparative and reconceptualised focus on the same settlement as a half century before. Even though he did not succeed in completing this new monograph, his experience inspired a number of students at the Charles University, who later pursued Chotek’s field research inspiration as important figures of Czech and Slovak ethnography during the rest of the 20 th century (the so-called “Chotek school”. Besides rethinking the events related to the Czecho-Slovak relationship in the formative decade of professional scientific ethnography in Czech lands before World War I and, last but not least, analysing the so far unknown context of Chotek’s second expedition to Cerovo in 1953, the picture of Chotek developing his field research method from a descriptive analysis to a more structured circle of special questions/issues in

  20. Teaching Culture Through Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐婷

    2016-01-01

    Cultural teaching is an issue which is associated with complexity and paradox and also it is a big challenge for faculty. Teaching culture through films has become an important way of cross-cultural teaching This paper focuses on the reasons for teaching culture through films, the value and how it works. And finally it leads out the prospects of cultural teaching through films.

  1. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  2. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  3. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  4. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  5. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Elsevier; 2018:chap 36. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory ...

  6. Lymph node culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  7. Cross-cultural awareness

    OpenAIRE

    БУРЯК Н.Ю.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the importance of cultural awareness for businesspeople when they go abroad. It also gives some cultural advice and factors which are thought to be the most important in creating a culture.

  8. Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Vivian; Tulbert, Beth

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of culturally diverse students are discussed in terms of language, culture, and socioeconomic factors. Meeting the educational needs of culturally diverse students can involve interactive teaming of professionals; parent involvement; and providing appropriate services, assessment, curriculum, and instruction. (JDD)

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF culture Images Pneumococci organism References Karcher DS, McPherson RA. Cerebrospinal, synovial, serous body fluids, and alternative specimens. In: McPherson RA, Pincus ...

  10. Organizations, projects and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Cleeff; Pieter van Nispen tot Pannerden

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to explore and demonstrate the effects of organizational culture on projects, in particular project culture and project management style. Methodology/approach: descriptive and explorative; through students’ groups. Findings: the cultural relationship between organizations, their projects

  11. Themes and time use by participants in general team meetings at a psychiatric day hospital Temas y utilización del tiempo por los participantes de reuniones del equipo general en un hospital día psiquiátrico Temas e utilização do tempo pelos participantes de reuniões de equipe geral em um hospital-dia psiquiátrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Arthur Scherer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This naturalistic study was realized through observation and aimed to characterize general staff meetings held at a day hospital regarding theme and the professionals' participation in the use of time. We observed 21 meetings, during which 144 announcements were made and 46 issues were discussed, with greater participation in discussions by fixed team members. In 18 of these meetings, the discussed themes corresponded to daily situations registered during the weeks preceding the meetings. Our findings reveal that these meetings are inserted in the service on a regular basis. Power relations and differences in experience and technical knowledge between the different professionals seem to contribute to the higher or lower number of announcements and issues presented. As this space favors exchanges, we suggest these meetings to be used in other health services working with assistance teams.La finalidad de este estudio, configurado como una investigación naturalística conducida mediante observación, fue la de caracterizar las reuniones del equipo general de un hospital día respecto a la temática y la participación de los profesionales en la utilización del tiempo. Fueron comunicados 144 avisos y discutidos 46 asuntos en 21 reuniones observadas, con mayor participación del equipo fijo en las discusiones. En 18 de las reuniones estudiadas, los temas discutidos correspondieron a las situaciones diarias registradas durante las semanas antecedentes a las mismas. Los hallazgos muestran que estas reuniones están insertadas regularmente en el servicio. Las relaciones de poder y las diferencias de experiencia y conocimientos técnicos entre los diversos profesionales parecieron contribuir para la mayor o menor colocación de avisos y asuntos. Como son un espacio que favorece cambios, sugerimos la utilización de estas reuniones en otros servicios de salud que trabajen con equipos de atención.O presente estudo, configurado como pesquisa natural

  12. Culture, Liberty and Happiness

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Karma

    2007-01-01

    The author's intention here is to explore mainly the relationship between culture and globalization, and also to a limited extent the ties and differences, if any, between cultural liberty and happiness. This paper attempts to relate the concept of cultural liberty to the idea of Gross National Happiness. The author underlines strongly that the culture discussed is not about the particular culture of Bhutan; it is about culture in general and in abstract. Likewise happiness referred to here i...

  13. How culture affects management?

    OpenAIRE

    Billi, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    The study is about how culture affects management. Culture can have many different meanings. Management has also many different ways to be approached. While doing research about cultures, the study will try to analyze how the culture affects the management. The study starts with a full explanation of the meaning of culture. Some previous analysis and studies are added to illustrate my study on the subject. The effect culture has on management is studied at different levels. The study does not...

  14. Cultural Context and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏

    2009-01-01

    cultural context plays an important role in translation. Because translation is a cross-culture activity, the culture context that influ-ences translating is consisted of both the culture contexts of source language and target language. This article firstly analyzes the concept of context and cultural context, then according to the procedure of translating classifies cultural context into two stages and talks about how they respectively influence translating.

  15. Cultural influences on personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C; Suh, Eunkook M

    2002-01-01

    Ecologies shape cultures; cultures influence the development of personalities. There are both universal and culture-specific aspects of variation in personality. Some culture-specific aspects correspond to cultural syndromes such as complexity, tightness, individualism, and collectivism. A large body of literature suggests that the Big Five personality factors emerge in various cultures. However, caution is required in arguing for such universality, because most studies have not included emic (culture-specific) traits and have not studied samples that are extremely different in culture from Western samples.

  16. Safeguards Culture: Analogies from Safety Culture and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, K.

    2013-01-01

    The terminology of 'safeguards culture' has been used loosely by safeguards experts as an essential element for establishing an organizational environment of stakeholders for the effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards. However, unlike the other two triplet brothers/ sisters of 3S's (Safety, Security, Safeguards), there is no formally established definition of safeguards culture. In the case of safety culture, INSAG (the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group) has extensively dealt with its concept, elaborating its definition and key characteristics, and published its report, INSAG-4, as the IAEA Safety Series 75. On the other hand, security culture has also been defined by AdSec (the Advisory Group on Nuclear Security). In this paper, a provisional definition of safeguards culture is made on the analogies of safety culture and security culture, and an effort is made to describe essential elements of safeguards culture. It is proposed for SAGSI (the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation) to formally consider the definition of safeguards culture and its characteristics. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  17. Cultural Analysis - towards cross-cultural understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestrup, Hans

    The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards an unders......The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards...... a theoretical/abstract proposal for cultural understanding. The second part presents a theoretical/abstract proposal for under-standing intercultural plurality and complexity. The third part provides an empirical model for the analysis of intercultural co-action. Finally, the fourth part present and discusses...

  18. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  19. Convenio "Andres Bello:" Informe Final [de la] Segunda Reunion de Ministros de Educacion de la Region Andina ("Andres Bello" Agreement: Final Report of the Second Meeting of the Andean Region Ministers of Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministros de Educacion de la Region Andina, Lima (Peru).

    This final report of the second meeting of the Andean Region Ministers of Education subscribing to the Andres Bello Agreement on education and culture contains a resume of the individual sessions and the proposals approved during that meeting. The proposals cover various educational problems and issues and begin with the Declaration of Lima which…

  20. Many Forms of Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  1. Reflections on Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lisette

    1999-01-01

    Examines aspects of cross-cultural studies, delineates a concept of culture, explores the interplay of culture and ethics, and analyzes the shifting cultural and economic values as issues that either the economists or the humanists will deal with under the banner of the future global village. (Author/VWL)

  2. Aging in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the empirical studies that test socioemotional aging across cultures. The review focuses on comparisons between Western (mostly North Americans and Germans) and Eastern cultures (mostly Chinese) in areas including age-related personality, social relationships, and cognition. Based on the review, I argue that aging is a meaning-making process. Individuals from each cultural context internalize cultural values with age. These internalized cultural values become goals that guide adult development. When individuals from different cultures each pursue their own goals with age, cultural differences in socioemotional aging occur.

  3. Cultural Capital in Context:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Jæger, Mads Meier

    This paper analyzes the extent to which the effect of cultural capital on academic achievement varies across high- and low-achieving schooling environments. We distinguish three competing theoretical models: Cultural reproduction (cultural capital yields higher returns in high-achieving schooling...... to be higher in low-achieving schooling environments than in high-achieving ones. These results support the cultural mobility explanation and are in line with previous research suggesting that children from low-SES families benefit more from cultural capital than children from high-SES families....... environments than in low-achieving ones), cultural mobility (cultural capital yields higher returns in low-achieving environments), and cultural resources (cultural capital yields the same returns in different environments). We analyze PISA data from six countries and find that returns to cultural capital tend...

  4. Migration, cultural bereavement and cultural identity

    OpenAIRE

    BHUGRA, DINESH; BECKER, MATTHEW A

    2005-01-01

    Migration has contributed to the richness in diversity of cultures, ethnicities and races in developed countries. Individuals who migrate experience multiple stresses that can impact their mental well being, including the loss of cultural norms, religious customs, and social support systems, adjustment to a new culture and changes in identity and concept of self. Indeed, the rates of mental illness are increased in some migrant groups. Mental health practitioners need to be ...

  5. Absorbing the Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Participants at a forum on communication between cultures generate ideas on how China can deal with its growing cultural deficit Five months ago, Ding Wei, Assistant Minister of Culture, described China's deficit in international cultural trade as "huge" at a press conference held by the State Council Information Office. "Our statistics years ago showed that the ratio of imports of cultural products to exports was 10 to 1," he

  6. KEEPING CULTURAL GENES ALIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Shi

    2012-01-01

    China's contemporary culture and the protection of its diverse cultural heritage have become some of the most talked about issues today.Cultural prosperity was put forward as an important objective of the Central Government's national development strategy last year.However,the industrialization and commercialization of China's culture have been both criticized and celebrated.Many scholars believe industrialization and enormous government investment may not be the best means to protect intangible cultural heritage (ICH).

  7. Divergent Cumulative Cultural Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, Chris; Chebib, Jobran

    2016-01-01

    Divergent cumulative cultural evolution occurs when the cultural evolutionary trajectory diverges from the biological evolutionary trajectory. We consider the conditions under which divergent cumulative cultural evolution can occur. We hypothesize that two conditions are necessary. First that genetic and cultural information are stored separately in the agent. Second cultural information must be transferred horizontally between agents of different generations. We implement a model with these ...

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBU MĂDĂLINA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural institution management is to direct the organization to a specific cultural profile purpose, namely production values esthetic sense, artistic, moral, spiritual, distribution, promotion of these values, protection and circulation of cultural heritage. In this regard, an analysis in the diagnosis cultural organizations aims to determine the main strengths and weaknesses, assess the potential and making recommendations focused on the root causes of failures and positive aspects. This paper presents considerations diligence activity Culture House "IL Caragiale "in Ploiesti. The mission of this organization is to contribute to the cultural development of the community by initiating projects and cultural programs, offer development programs and services to meet cultural needs, increase public access to diverse cultural life, providing a constant presence institution circuit local, national, European and international level. Conclusions drawn from the analysis shows that in a world of economic globalization, information and culture in a company in constant change, in a competitive market where there is information readily available means and leisure, but not cultural consistency in a social environment where interest in culture of people is declining, the situation of the population is impaired, the remuneration of staff working in the field of cultural education is demotivating, the funds allocated to culture have grown lately effectively lead a cultural institution is a challenge.

  9. Culture and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    INTRODUCTION The present publication deals with issues of imagination and creativity as a notion, philosophy – and social and cultural form, with point of departure in current debates on visual culture. Whereas these debates cover a large ground, spanning from media studies over design to cultural...... studies, they seldom reflect on the basic fact that visual culture in its present form indicates a huge collective creativity in some capacity, implicating the entire postwar era. From early focuses on the possible social and cultural roles of the image in the 1950s and 60s - e.g. in work of Roland...... and cognitive science. Thus visual culture points to an interesting inroad to - and a possible novel focus on - the image - pictorial representation - as an issue of cultural creativity. For one thing the current interest in visual culture goes along with a surge in concrete interest in culture and creativity...

  10. Characterizing European cultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tieskens, Koen F.; Schulp, Catharina J E; Levers, Christian

    2017-01-01

    intensification and land abandonment. To prevent the loss of cultural landscapes, knowledge on the location of different types of cultural landscapes is needed. In this paper, we present a characterization of European cultural landscapes based on the prevalence of three key dimensions of cultural landscapes......Almost all rural areas in Europe have been shaped or altered by humans and can be considered cultural landscapes, many of which now are considered to entail valuable cultural heritage. Current dynamics in land management have put cultural landscapes under a huge pressure of agricultural...... the three dimensions into a continuous “cultural landscape index” that allows for a characterization of Europe's rural landscapes. The characterization identifies hotspots of cultural landscapes, where all three dimensions are present, such as in the Mediterranean. On the other hand, Eastern and Northern...

  11. Discovering, analyzing and enhancing BPMN models using ProM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalenkova, A.A.; Leoni, de M.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Limonad, L.; Weber, B.

    2014-01-01

    Process mining techniques relate observed behavior to modeled behavior, e.g., the automatic discovery of a process model based on an event log. Process mining is not limited to process discovery and also includes conformance checking and model enhancement. Conformance checking techniques are used to

  12. Mining student capstone projects with FRASR and ProM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poncin, W.; Serebrenik, A.; Brand, van den M.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Capstone projects are commonly carried out at the end of an undergraduate program of study in software engineering or computer science. While traditionally such projects solely focussed on the software product to be developed, in more recent work importance of the development process has been

  13. Terroir and Cultural patrimony: reflections on regional cuisines in Aquitaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Techoueyres

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Today the South West of France is widely renown for its cuisine and gastronomy. This presentation aims at exploring the different ingredients which contribute to the making of the concept of Regional Cuisine. It is based on field work undertaken in Aquitaine: it involved visits to families including 2 and even 3 generations in different areas, with interviews of individuals, observation, discussions. And also interviews with producers of food-products a well as persons in charge of their prom...

  14. What Is so "Cultural" About Cultural Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Albinsson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The term “cultural entrepreneurship” has been increasingly used during the new millennium, mirroring the rapidly growing importance of the “quaternary sector of the economy,” i.e. knowledge-based industries, including culture. Exploration of the literature in which the term “cultural entrepreneurship” is used does not bring a solid, clear-cut, and unambiguous understanding of its definition or meaning. The aim of this paper is to present various uses of the concept and to bring about some clarity in how the concept can be understood. Two overarching uses of the cultural entrepreneurship concept have been found: 1. the anthropologist’s and institutional economist’s use, which indicates the dynamic development of intangible cultural features such as symbols, myths, languages, beliefs, values, norms, rituals, and attitudes in and between societies, and 2. the arts development use, which indicates the dynamic development of cultural services, tangible goods, and individual or collective career promotion. Most authors use a cultural entrepreneurship concept without defining it. Authors could apply more precise definitions by using a quadruple bottom-line framework to position themselves in the nexus of financial, social, artistic, and cultural perspectives.

  15. Une maison de culture (A Culture Center).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlevat, Alain

    1980-01-01

    Describes the "Culture Center" designed by Le Corbusier and located in Firminy, France. The role of the center in arousing intellectual curiosity in people living in a technological age is discussed. The audience of this culture center, young people, and the types of activities directed toward them are described. (AMH)

  16. Culture and emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Brett Q; Mauss, Iris B

    2015-06-01

    While anthropological research has long emphasized cultural differences in whether emotions are viewed as beneficial versus harmful, psychological science has only recently begun to systematically examine those differences and their implications for emotion regulation and well-being. Underscoring the pervasive role of culture in people's emotions, we summarize research that has examined links between culture, emotion regulation, and well-being. Specifically, we focus on two questions. First, how does culture lead individuals to regulate their emotions? And second, how does culture modulate the link between emotion regulation and well-being? We finish by suggesting directions for future research to advance the study of culture and emotion regulation.

  17. Culture Wars in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s high and low culture were brought into sharp conflict i Denmark. In 1961 a Ministry of Culture was established for the first time. The first minister of culture, the social democrat Julius Bomholt, saw art and culture as an important part of education for democracy that should be made...... available to everyone. The general public, however, raised demands for more popular and relaxing entertainment. The confrontation between the cultural elite and popular opinion escalated to a series of veritable culture wars....

  18. Predictors of positive blood culture and deaths among neonates with suspected neonatal sepsis in a tertiary hospital, Mwanza- Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Seni

    2010-06-01

    infection with ESBL (p = 0.008 or MRSA (p = 0.008 isolates. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lethargy, convulsion, inability to feed, cyanosis, PROM and meconium stained liquor are significantly associated with positive blood culture in both early and late onset disease. Mortality and morbidity on neonatal sepsis is high at our setting and is significantly contributed by positive blood culture with multi-resistant gram negative bacteria.

  19. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  20. Plant Tissue Culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Plant tissue culture is a technique of culturing plant cells, tissues and organs on ... working methods (Box 2) and discovery of the need for B vita- mins and auxins for ... Kotte (Germany) reported some success with growing isolated root tips.

  1. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  2. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  3. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  4. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... around the world. The cultural approach to the theory and practice of sport psychological research has been recently articulated in two edited books, Cultural Sport Psychology (Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009) and The Cultural Turn in Sport Psychology (Ryba, Schinke, & Tenenbaum, 2010). The presenters...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...

  5. Developing Cultural Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Fırat Altay

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at emphasizing the issue of teaching of culture in foreign languageteaching. In this respect, the reasons of teaching culture in foreign language classes arefocused on initially. So, the justifications of teaching culture are considered and explainedand by the help of a dialogue. Right after this, ways of developing cultural awareness is takeninto account. At this step, types of courses to develop cultural awareness are dealt with.Developing cultural awareness in class is another aspect to handle. Besides, ways ofdeveloping cultural awareness outside the class are worked on. Whether there are dangers ofusing culture in foreign language class is explained in dangers and problems part. In theconclusion, ideas of the writer on the subject as final remarks are clarified.

  6. Naval Aviation Culture Workshops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubio, Robert V

    2008-01-01

    .... Organizational culture impacts a unit's performance -- for better or for worse. This research defines organizational culture and describes the dynamic relationships among individuals, groups, and leaders. Two case studies (NASA and U.S. Airways...

  7. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nordic cultural policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity......A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity...

  9. Culture and Accounting Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carataș Maria Alina

    2017-01-01

    Besides the financial statements, rules, and calculations, the accounting also impliesprofessional reasoning, and the organizational culture promoted within the firm influences theaccounting decisions. We analyzed and identified several of accounting policies determined by thecorporate governance and organizational culture influence.

  10. Doing Cultural Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Hall, Stuart; Janes, Linda

    What does the Walkman have to do with the 21st century? The long-awaited second edition of this classic textbook takes students on a journey between past and present, giving them the skills do to cultural analysis along the way. Through the notion of the 'circuit of culture', this book teaches st......' for cultural studies. It is an essential classic, reworked for today's students in cultural studies, media studies and sociology....

  11. Urine, faeces and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, M.

    This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology.......This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology....

  12. The Politics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Storey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview over the evolution of thinking about "culture" in the work of Raymond Williams. With the introduction of Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony culture came to be understood as consisting of not only shared, but contested meanings as well. On the basis of this redefinition by Williams, cultural studies was able to delineate culture as the production, circulation, and consumption of meanings that become embodied and embedded in social practice.

  13. Culture, social networks, and information sharing: An exploratory study of Japanese aerospace engineers' information-seeking processes and habits in light of cultural factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuko

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of culture and language on Japanese aerospace engineers' information-seeking processes by both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The Japanese sample consisted of 162 members of the Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences (JSASS). U.S. aerospace engineers served as a reference point, consisting of 213 members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The survey method was utilized in gathering data using self-administered mail questionnaires in order to explore the following eight areas: (1) the content and use of information resources; (2) production and use of information products; (3) methods of accessing information service providers; (4) foreign language skills; (5) studying/researching/collaborating abroad as a tool in expanding information resources; (6) scientific and technical societies as networking tools; (7) alumni associations (school/class reunions) as networking tools; and (8) social, corporate, civic and health/fitness clubs as networking tools. Nine Japanese cultural factors expressed as statements about Japanese society are as follows: (1) information is neither autonomous, objective, nor independent of the subject of cognition; (2) information and knowledge are not readily accessible to the public; (3) emphasis on groups is reinforced in a hierarchical society; (4) social networks thrive as information-sharing vehicles; (5) high context is a predominant form of communication in which most of the information is already in the person, while very little is in the coded, transmitted part of the message; (6) obligations based on mutual trust dictate social behaviors instead of contractual agreements; (7) a surface message is what is presented while a bottom-line message is true feeling privately held; (8) various religious beliefs uphold a work ethic based on harmony; (9) ideas from outside are readily assimilated into its own society. The result of the

  14. Culture Differences and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Language is a part of culture, and plays a very important role in the development of the culture. Some sociologists consider it as the keystone of culture. They believe, without language, culture would not be available. At the same time, language is influenced and shaped by culture, it reflects culture. Therefore, culture plays a very important…

  15. TESOL and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the question of how culture is understood in the Teaching English as a Second/Other-Language (TESOL) profession. Examines the perspectives toward culture implicitly or explicitly expressed in recent "TESOL Quarterly" articles, and concludes that different views of culture exist in the field. (Author/VWL)

  16. Cultural participation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem...

  17. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  18. Deaf Culture. PEPNet Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siple, Linda; Greer, Leslie; Holcomb, Barbra Ray

    2004-01-01

    It often comes as a surprise to people that many deaf people refer to themselves as being members of Deaf culture. The American Deaf culture is a unique linguistic minority that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as its primary mode of communication. This tipsheet provides a description of Deaf culture and suggestions for effective communication.

  19. Selling cultural heritage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis explores the value of cultural and archaeological heritage through a focus on multinational corporations (MNCs) across industries and their involvement with cultural heritage. Research to date has focused mainly on industries where MNCs have a direct impact on cultural or archaeological

  20. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  1. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  2. Resolving conflicting safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slider, J.E.; Patterson, M.

    1993-01-01

    Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of open-quotes safety culture.close quotes This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to open-quotes do the right thingclose quotes even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants

  3. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  4. The Culture of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Marglin

    2009-01-01

    Stephen Marglin examines how the culture of economics has impacted on Third World cultures. He argues that economics is possessed by its own theory of culture based on the market as the organizing principle of life, one that we need to go beyond.

  5. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate…

  7. On personal safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zigen

    1996-01-01

    The paper mainly expounds the personal safety culture, including the following aspects: the attitude to exploration, strict methods and the habit of exchange etc. It points out that straightening the education of safety culture and heightening the level of personal safety culture can get not only high-level safety but also high-level quality

  8. Cross-Cultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    A two-part presentation on cross-cultural communication consists of a discussion of cultural differences in interpersonal communication and an article from a Greek English-language publication concerning telephone use skills in a foreign country. Cultural differences in communication are divided into eight types and illustrated: (1) when to talk;…

  9. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from

  10. Culture in Development

    OpenAIRE

    Shankha Chakraborty; Jon C. Thompson; Etienne B. Yehoue

    2015-01-01

    An anti-capitalist cultural bias, through directed within-family human capital transmission, adversely affects the supply of entrepreneurial talent and risk-taking. This limits economic progress if aggregate productivity is low. When productivity is high, economic incentives can overcome cultural inertia. Though the income level depends on culture, the growth rate in this case does not.

  11. Bourlingue culturelle (Cultural Rambling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieriot, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    Reflects on the meaning of cultural education and activity in France as inspired by the need to establish a new form of cultural dialogue between France and the people of other countries. Problems related to financing cultural activities, reaching various types of audience, and methodology are discussed. (AMH)

  12. Culture and Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDiscourses on culture and development vary according to their conceptions of culture and of development and according to their standpoint. The ‘culture and development’ problematic has typically: (1) arisen from a conception of ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous set of mental

  13. Bio-Culturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The article argues on the basis of analyses of successful films for children that not only cultural determinants but also innate determinats are important, and that film studies should combine cultural studies with cognitive theory, evolutionary theory and neuroscience, an approach that is called...... Bio-culturalism....

  14. What Kind of Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Samson B.

    The question of what should be taught as the cultural component of language instruction is discussed, with special reference to German. A present-directed humanism is urged, with emphasis on the relevance and immediacy of cultural materials. Mistaken and irrelevant directions in the teaching of German culture are discussed in some detail; similar…

  15. A Runyakitara Culture Wiki

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frederick Iraki

    wiki as a tool for Runyakitara culture documentation, collaboration, sharing, ... collaboration in education and research are augmented by technology [2, 10, 11]; ... Runyakitara culture; and section 5 concludes and discusses future work. ..... material which reflects the Runyakitara culture, perspective, and reality; as compared.

  16. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schnyder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods: The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results: As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions: In summary

  17. Culture and Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Anne Marie; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    The literature on cross-cultural negotiation has expanded considerably over the past few decades, but the findings are often ambiguous and sometimes even contradictory. This introduction highlights the critical areas where objections are commonly raised about the relevance of national culture......, the applicability of typologies that treat cultures as static, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. It may not be surprising that studies contradict each other given the ambiguity of the national cultural construct and variations in the context of the negotiating situations that are studied. The articles...... in this issue contribute to deepening our understanding about cross-cultural negotiation processes....

  18. Leadership and Organizational Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽娜

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to explore the relationship between leaders, organizational culture, and national culture. Leaders cre⁃ate“climate of the organization”with six mechanisms. Furthermore, leaders style of management is considerably influenced by their national culture based on Hofstede’s organizational culture theory. Varieties of examples and cases are analyzed to illustrate that leadership beliefs and practices have direct relationship with organizational culture and shape their individualistic communica⁃tion styles and goals that influence to a significant degree in establishing shared values, beliefs and practices among employees within an organization.

  19. Personal Space Across Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh-Olesen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    —constitutes one of the main areas of interest, dividing cultures into either contact or low-contact cultures. Examples of proxetics—human spatial behavior studied in terms of universal spacing patterns and cultural similarities—are presented. Finally, future directions for the study of PS in the digital age...... functions. The integrity zone has no fixed size but varies according to variables such as age, gender, personality, relation, and culture. The key theoretical traditions and models are presented and the field's methodological techniques and measurements are discussed. Proxemics—cultural differences...

  20. Culture and rural health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; Bourke, Lisa; Taylor, Judy; Marley, Julia V; Reid, John; Bracksley, Stacey; Johnson, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    This paper considers the role of culture in rural health, suggesting that the concept and its impacts are insufficiently understood and studied. It reviews some of the ways that culture has been considered in (rural) health, and states that culture is either used ambiguously and broadly - for example, suggesting that there is a rural culture, or narrowly - indeed perhaps interchangeably with ethnicity, for example Aboriginal culture as a unity. The paper notes that, although culture is a dynamic social concept, it has been adopted into a biomedical research paradigm as though it is fixed. Culture is often treated as though it is something that can be addressed simplistically, for example, through cultural sensitivity education. Authors suggest that culture is an unaddressed 'elephant in the room' in rural health, and that exploring cultural differences and beliefs and facing up to cultural differences are vital in understanding and addressing rural health and health system challenges. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. Developing cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi; Turner, deSalle

    2007-01-01

    . Background. Many countries are becoming culturally diverse, but healthcare systems and nursing education often remain mono-cultural and focused on the norms and needs of the majority culture. To meet the needs of all members of multicultural societies, nurses need to develop cultural sensitivity......Title. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students’ experiences of a study abroad programme Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students...... and incorporate this into caregiving. Method. A Gadamerian hermeneutic phenomenological approach was adopted. Data were collected in 2004 by using in-depth conversational interviews and analysed using the Turner method. Findings. Developing cultural sensitivity involves a complex interplay between becoming...

  2. Cultural effects on mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Zapata, Daniel; Slaughter, Virginia; Henry, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    People from other cultural backgrounds sometimes seem inscrutable. We identified a potential cause of this phenomenon in two experiments demonstrating that adults' mental state inferences are influenced by the cultural identity of the target. We adapted White, Hill, Happé, and Frith's (2009) Strange Stories to create matched intra-cultural and cross-cultural mindreading and control conditions. Experiment 1 showed that Australian participants were faster to respond and received higher scores in the intra-cultural mindreading condition relative to the cross-cultural mindreading condition, but performance in the control conditions was equivalent. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern in independent samples of Australian and Chilean participants. These findings have important implications for cross-cultural communication and understanding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-cultural dimensions : organisational culture in Philip Morris, Lietuva

    OpenAIRE

    Grundey, Dainora

    2008-01-01

    Business globalization raised the new priorities for cross-cultural management theory and practice. The goal of this article is according to cross-cultural management and organizational culture theories to propose a new model of organizational culture with cross-cultural dimensions. The objectives of the paper are as follows: a) to disclose the essence of cross-cultural management and organizational culture; b) to carry out the empirical research of organizational culture in a selected Lithua...

  4. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  5. Making Safety Culture a Corporate Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenningsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Safety Culture is something that we have actively worked with in the nuclear industry for a long time. Formally, it has been on the agenda since the Chernobyl accident. However, the work with creating a safe organizational culture can of course be traced back even further in time. Over the years a lot has happened in how we are approaching the concept of safety culture and especially how we look upon the human being as a part of the system and how we as humans interact with the organization and technology. For an organization to have a culture that promotes safety it is essential to create an ownership of safety with all workers within the site. To create this ownership it is vital to have the undivided commitment of the management. It all starts with the fundamental values of the organization. These values must then be concluded in firm expectations of behaviors that apply to all workers and management. This could be referred to as expectation of a Professional Behavior that allows us to live up to the company values. At OKG nuclear power plant, a successful Business Improvement Program was recently carried out with intention to develop and contribute to the maturity of the organization in terms of safety. One of the sub-programs of the program was called Professional Behavior - With purpose of making safety into a corporate culture. At OKG, Safety culture is something that systematically been addressed and worked with since 2004. Even though the Safety Culture program could be considered to already have reached a certain level of maturity the Business Improvement program helped the organization to lay the foundation for further development by clarify expected behaviors that was firmly cemented in to the corporate values.

  6. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A.; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B.; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H.; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions In summary, culture

  7. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  8. Economic impact of cultural tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Zadel, Zrinka; Bogdan, Sinisa

    2013-01-01

    The subject of analysis in the paper is economic impact of cultural tourism and identification of the main factors which directly affect cultural tourism revenues. Most countries do not have a statistical system of monitoring and analysing individual factors of cultural tourism such as the number of arrivals of cultural tourists and consumption of cultural tourists. Therefore, it is hard to assess the economic impact of cultural tourism. In cultural tourism, cultural assets are prepared and p...

  9. Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2013-01-01

    In foreign language education, the teaching of culture remains a hotly debated issue. What is culture? What is its relation to language? Which and whose culture should be taught? What role should the learners' culture play in the acquisition of knowledge of the target culture? How can we avoid essentializing cultures and teaching stereotypes? And…

  10. Nuclear Safeguards Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, T.

    2015-01-01

    The paper will consider safeguards culture both at the IAEA and among member states. It will do so through the lens of organizational culture theory and taking into account developments in safeguards since the Iraq case of the early 1990s. The study will seek to identify the current characteristics of safeguards culture and how it has evolved since the 93+2 programme was initiated, as well as considering the roles of the most important purveyors of such culture, including member states and their national safeguards authorities, the General Conference and Board of Governors, the Director General, the Secretariat as a whole, the Safeguards Department and the inspectorate. The question of what might be an optimal safeguards culture at the Agency and among member states will be investigated, along with the issue of how such a culture might be engendered or encouraged. (author)

  11. Culture and math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Cultural differences have been shown across a number of different cognitive domains from vision, language, and music. Mathematical cognition is another domain that is an integral part of modern society and because there are a fixed number of ways in which many math operations can be performed, it is also an apposite tool for cultural comparisons. This discussion examines the literature on mathematical processing in accordance with culture, summarizing the brain regions involved across various mathematical tasks. In doing so, we provide a clear picture of the anatomical similarities and differences between cultures when performing different math tasks. This information is useful to explore the possibility of enhancement of mathematical skills, where different strategies may be applicable in accordance with culture. It also contributes to the evolutionary development of different math skills and the growing theory that anatomical and behavioral studies must account for the cultural identity of their sample.

  12. Culture, attention, and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Igor; Ellsworth, Phoebe C; Hong, Ying-yi

    2012-02-01

    This research provides experimental evidence for cultural influence on one of the most basic elements of emotional processing: attention to positive versus negative stimuli. To this end, we focused on Russian culture, which is characterized by brooding and melancholy. In Study 1, Russians spent significantly more time looking at negative than positive pictures, whereas Americans did not show this tendency. In Study 2, Russian Latvians were randomly primed with symbols of each culture, after which we measured the speed of recognition for positive versus negative trait words. Biculturals were significantly faster in recognizing negative words (as compared with baseline) when primed with Russian versus Latvian cultural symbols. Greater identification with Russian culture facilitated this effect. We provide a theoretical discussion of mental processes underlying cultural differences in emotion research.

  13. Rumlig kultur / Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    RUMLIG KULTUR / SPATIAL CULTURE præsenterer et humanvidenskabeligt livtag med storbyens erfaringsverden. Emnerne for 21 kapitler spænder fra billedhuggeren Bjørn Nørgaard og boligbyggeriet Bispebjerg Bakke til stedsopfattelsen i moderne guidebøger. Undervjs inddrages bykulturens tænkere såsom Steen...... artikler et forskningsfelt for rumlig kultur, hvori alskens sanse- og refleksionsformer finder sammen. Based in humanistic urban studies as practiced in the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, SPATIAL CULTURE outlines a novel framework for understanding the social...... and cultural environments of the modern and contemporary metropolis. The contributions focus on urban and suburban cultures of Copenhagen, New York, Hong Kong, Berlin and anderswo, demonstrating how the precise analysis of cultural and artistic phenomena informs a multilayered understanding...

  14. Nature/culture/seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place in anthropological categories of "nature" and "culture." Seawater as nature appears as potentiality of form and uncontainable flux; it moves faster than culture - with culture frequently figured through land-based metaphors - even as culture seeks to channel water's (nature's) flow. Seawater as culture manifests as a medium of pleasure, sustenance, travel, disaster. I argue that, although seawater's qualities in early anthropology were portrayed impressionistically, today technical, scientific descriptions of water's form prevail. For example, processes of globalization - which may also be called "oceanization" - are often described as "currents," "flows," and "circulations." Examining sea-set ethnography, maritime anthropologies, and contemporary social theory, I propose that seawater has operated as a “theory machine” for generating insights about human cultural organization. I develop this argument with ethnography from the Sargasso Sea and in the Sea Islands. I conclude with a critique of appeals to water's form in social theory.

  15. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  16. Leveraging organisational cultural capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scheel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Organisational culture discourse mandates a linear approach of diagnosis, measurement and gap analysis as standard practice in relation to most culture change initiatives. Therefore, a problem solving framework geared toward “fixing�? and/or realigning an organisation’s culture is usually prescribed. The traditional problem solving model seeks to identify gaps between current and desired organisational cultural states, inhibiting the discovery of an organisation’s unique values and strengths, namely its cultural capital. In pursuit of discovering and leveraging organisational cultural capital, a descriptive case study is used to show how an Appreciative Inquiry process can rejuvenate the spirit of an organisation as a system-wide inquiry mobilises a workforce toward a shared vision.

  17. Poverty culture and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An individual and social groups do not have to be only affected by poverty in economic way, but in a cultural way as well. There is an expression 'poverty culture', which leads to the development of the theory of cultural deprivation. The use of the term poverty culture implies that behavioral patterns of the poor are adopted through education; adopted behavioral patterns are resistant to changes - and, as it is known, education of people, among other, should imply accepting changes. The inveteracy of the poverty culture implies living your own life, which is secluded from identified and dominant life of the ruling culture. Enforcement of poverty and social-economic conditioning influence the tendencies for specific behavioral patterns.

  18. Cultural Learning Redux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    2016-05-01

    M. Tomasello, A. Kruger, and H. Ratner (1993) proposed a theory of cultural learning comprising imitative learning, instructed learning, and collaborative learning. Empirical and theoretical advances in the past 20 years suggest modifications to the theory; for example, children do not just imitate but overimitate in order to identify and affiliate with others in their cultural group, children learn from pedagogy not just episodic facts but the generic structure of their cultural worlds, and children collaboratively co-construct with those in their culture normative rules for doing things. In all, human children do not just culturally learn useful instrumental activities and information, they conform to the normative expectations of the cultural group and even contribute themselves to the creation of such normative expectations. © 2016 The Author. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Music, culture and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Ramadani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At the time of globalization it is difficult to pretend avoiding music culture and identity from political, cultural and social developments. Thus, it is impossible for the music to be unshakable and to represent national identity by not taking and giving nothing to culture. The dynamics of life and the rapid development of technology make it impossible for the culture to remain unaffected in terms of sharing experiences social experiences. Culture represents our current course, both in terms of politics, also in the social and human aspects. Through the technology it is possible for our children to be equal with children of all other countries, to exchange information and to connect directly with all countries of the world. Musical education is one of the main factors of cultural development and preservation of national identity. Identity consists of everything we posses and reflect. We are those who distinguish from each other and have a common denominator compared to other nations.

  20. The Idealized Cultural Encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene Bull

    Studies into cultural encounters have predominantly taken point of departure in ‘problematic encounters’, in which researchers and participants see cultural difference as an obstacle on the road to harmonious relationships (e.g. in ‘the clash of civilisations,’ or in migration/integration studies......). This paper proposes to study cultural encounters which are organised around ideals of cultural difference as a positive social and political force. The Danish People to People NGO Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke (MS) is build around ideals of equality, co-operation, mutuality and solidarity between people...... and cultures. A prominent feature of the organisation is organised cultural encounters between Northern (predominantly Danish) volunteers and Africans, which takes place at ‘training centres’ both in Denmark and in African countries, such as Kenya or Tanzania. In this paper I will outline the theoretical...

  1. CULTURAL ISSUES IN ECONOMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Meyer

    2012-01-01

    This article has been written with the purpose of attracting attention to the cultural issues, or rather lack of them, in economics. This topic has not been taken frequently into theoretical considerations due to some difficulties, although its practical implications are of great importance. The meaning of institutions which are a part of cultures has been given more coverage in the literature. The following hypothesis is proposed: culture is an important but underestimated component of the e...

  2. The Absence of Culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Norberg, Magnus; Jomer, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This thesis attempts to investigate if national culture still is a factor to consider for large multinational organizations when choosing a supplier, or if the global business environment due to globalization has become so standardized and homogenous that the influence of national culture differences has diminished. Existing academic literature is divided regarding this matter; some studies indicate that the influence of national culture on business relations is subtle while other argues that...

  3. Organizational culture modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Mihaela GHINEA; Constantin BRĂTIANU

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual analysis of organizational culture modeling in the framework of system dynamics. Tom Peters and Robert Waterman demonstrated through their seminal research that organizational culture constitutes one of the most important key success factors in any company trying to achieve excellence in its business. Organizational culture is a strong nonlinear integrator of the organizational intellectual capital acting especially on the emotional knowled...

  4. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture cells for their precious DNA. 1. Streak an a...

  5. Corpora and Cultural Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2017-01-01

    Cultural cognition is, to a great extent, transmitted through language and, consequently, reflected and replicated in language use. Cultural cognition may be instantiated in various patterns of language use, such as the discursive behavior of constructions. Very often, such instantiations can be ...... is addressed. In the third part of the chapter, three case studies are presented – one from Danish and two from English – to illustrate the analysis of cultural conceptualization via corpus-linguistic techniques....

  6. Culture and Rural Development

    OpenAIRE

    Wüpper, David Johannes

    2016-01-01

    History is an important determinant of current economic development. One reason is cultural learning, which includes imitating behaviors from ancestors in order to save individual learning costs. Amongst anthropologists, there is widespread agreement that it is cultural learning that makes humans so adaptive in comparison to other species, which imitate less or worse. Nevertheless, culture also makes humans less adaptive than economists assume for the homo economicus (because humans imitate m...

  7. The culture of soup

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Fasloen

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the way in which our cultures influence our occupations. It looks at how a woman's occupation of cooking and distributing soup is influenced firstly by the broader culture of the community in which she lives; secondly, by her religion; and lastly, by the Cape Malay culture to which she belongs. The information for this paper was gained through two unstructured interviews, which were analysed to identify the aspects of the above that influenced her occupational p...

  8. The Cultural Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Isar, Raj

    2008-01-01

    The world's cultures and their forms of creation, presentation and preservation are deeply affected by globalization in ways that are inadequately documented and understood. The Cultures and Globalization series is designed to fill this void in our knowledge. In this series, leading experts and emerging scholars track cultural trends connected to globalization throughout the world, resulting in a powerful analytic tool-kit that encompasses the transnational flows and scapes of contemporary cu...

  9. Cultural Resource Predictive Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    CR cultural resource CRM cultural resource management CRPM Cultural Resource Predictive Modeling DoD Department of Defense ESTCP Environmental...resource management ( CRM ) legal obligations under NEPA and the NHPA, military installations need to demonstrate that CRM decisions are based on objective...maxim “one size does not fit all,” and demonstrate that DoD installations have many different CRM needs that can and should be met through a variety

  10. Updating cultural capital theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieur, Annick; Savage, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how the analysis of cultural engagement can be elaborated through a reworking of the concept of cultural capital, as originally derived from Bourdieu’s (1984) Distinction. Drawing on detailed studies of the UK and Aalborg, Denmark, we show that despite the weakening of ‘‘high......This paper considers how the analysis of cultural engagement can be elaborated through a reworking of the concept of cultural capital, as originally derived from Bourdieu’s (1984) Distinction. Drawing on detailed studies of the UK and Aalborg, Denmark, we show that despite the weakening...

  11. Religion and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabih, Joshua

    group breaks totally with the existing Arabic Bible translations that they were in the habit of using. In this translation, the previously strenuous relationship between culture and religion is flattened in a binary sets of oppositions between an unaltered Devine message preserved in ancient Bible...... translation of the Holy Scriptures, and address how an originally-American Christian group re-constructs the relationship of religion –universality of one truth and its embodiment in one community of faith – and culture; and specifically, Arabic culture. Culture, in its manifold forms -Jehovah’s witnesses...

  12. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation.......The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...

  13. Korean Screen Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Screen Cultures sets out to redress this imbalance with a broad selection of essays spanning both North and South as well as different methodological approaches, from ethnographic and audience studies to cultural materialist readings. The first section of the book, «The South», highlights popular media...... new approaches to Korean popular culture beyond national borders and includes work on K-pop and Korean television drama. This book is a vital addition to existing scholarship on Korean popular culture, offering a unique view by providing an imaginary unification of the two Koreas negotiated through...

  14. Darwinism and cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-08-05

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different 'grains' of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles.

  15. Culture of salmonid fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stickney, Robert R

    1991-01-01

    .... In recognition of the growing concern that aquaculture development has the potential to negatively impact the natural environment, a chapter on controversies surrounding salmonid culture has been included...

  16. Cultivating Cultural Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esprivalo, Pamela Sue; Forney, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity that addresses cultural differences and diversity through ethnobotany. Offers a multicultural framework designed to develop concepts about plant characteristics and taxonomy. (ASK)

  17. Managing culture in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The pap...... through individual sense-making and mutual learning and adjustment as key to the process of cultural negotiation.......The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The paper...... argues that dynamic aspects of culture as enacted by key individual actors and constructed in a given context are far more relevant and critical for the joint venture’s managerial process. With evidence from four Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, the paper proposes a way of managing culture in IJVs...

  18. Cultural Aspects of Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari D. Maharajh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  19. TOURISM AND CULTURAL REVIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George NICULESCU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the tourism and the cultural revival. Cultural change is a recurrent concern in tourism studies. Host societies frequently remodel their culture following the creation of a tourist resort. But, that does not necessarily imply an acculturating process, since what actually takes place is pragmatic cultural production work in response to the touristic demands that offer consolidated economic alternatives and livelihood. Culture change has been a concern in tourism anthropology studies ever since this field of research established itself, particularly concerning the changes host societies undergo. But that does not necessarily imply the phenomenon is to be analyzed exclusively under the focus of the acculturation paradigm, since researchers often come across the production of new cultural elements of a traditional character among host populations in their attempt to occupy new spaces from which to address the world. in fact, that applies to various social situations where local actors seek to display certain lifestyles and cultural traits in order to draw attention to their ethnic, regional, or national features. Therefore, the object of study no longer focuses on the gradual loss of local and cultural (or ethnic substance, but rather on the relative ethnicity triggered by and among translocal flows that may lead to the deliberate turnaround of different cultural aspects of the host populations. Based on those premises, this article deals with the investigation of a cultural change process, making use of the historic perspective that includes an analysis of the “strategies of cultural mobilization” activated by the social subjects that are constantly recreating themselves in the tourism areas.

  20. Assessment of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, T.; Kavsek, D.

    2006-01-01

    A strong safety culture leads to more effective conduct of work and a sense of accountability among managers and employees, who should be given the opportunity to expand skills by training. The resources expended would thus result in tangible improvements in working practices and skills, which encourage further improvement of safety culture. In promoting an improved safety culture, NEK has emphasized both national and organizational culture with an appropriate balance of behavioural sciences and quality management systems approaches. In recent years there has been particular emphasis put on an increasing awareness of the contribution that human behavioural sciences can make to develop good safety practices. The purpose of an assessment of safety culture is to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. There is, however, no single approach that is suitable for all purposes and which can measure, simultaneously, all the intangible aspects of safety culture, i.e. the norms, values, beliefs, attitudes or the behaviours reflecting the culture. Various methods have their strengths and weaknesses. To prevent significant performance problems, self-assessment is used. Self-assessment is the process of identifying opportunities for improvement actively or, in some cases, weaknesses that could cause more serious errors or events. Self-assessments are an important input to the corrective action programme. NEK has developed questionnaires for safety culture self-assessment to obtain information that is representative of the whole organization. Questionnaires ensure a greater degree of anonymity, and create a less stressful situation for the respondent. Answers to questions represent the more apparent and conscious values and attitudes of the respondent. NEK proactively co-operates with WANO, INPO, IAEA in the areas of Safety Culture and Human

  1. How is culture and cultural development possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the second law of thermodynamics it is difficult to explain any kind of process contributing to enhance order. Culture can be seen as such an ordering process, but then we have to explain how this is possible. In this paper I introduce an attempt to overcome and combine these

  2. Personality in culture, culture in personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I I Kvasova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Personality is a dialectical interconnection between the social and the individual realized via activity, socializing, responsibility towards others, communication. The sense of self-actualization of the personality takes shape in the framework of the given process manifesting itself in various cultural phenomena, especially in art which is to the most extent personalized.

  3. Personality in culture, culture in personality

    OpenAIRE

    I I Kvasova

    2009-01-01

    Personality is a dialectical interconnection between the social and the individual realized via activity, socializing, responsibility towards others, communication. The sense of self-actualization of the personality takes shape in the framework of the given process manifesting itself in various cultural phenomena, especially in art which is to the most extent personalized.

  4. Cultural Collage Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a cultural collage painting project. Three things served as the impetus for this project: (1) a desire for students to explore the theme of "culture"; (2) an appreciation for the photo-montaged, layered images one sees in print media; and (3) noticing that projects from core subject areas hanging on the walls…

  5. Cultural differences in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    corporation. This illustrates how individuals and groups may essentialize cultural differences during intercultural business encounters and how this fixation of cultural traits can be used in social stratification. Originality/value - Originality: Only scant extant research has focused on the active use...

  6. Cultural Competence Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garran, Ann Marie; Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) adopted 10 discrete standards of culturally competent practice which undergird our commitment to diversity and social justice. The concept of intersectionality is newly emerging in social work, though, causing us to reflect on our current conceptualizations of cultural competence.…

  7. Conceptualizing leadership across cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickson, M.W.; Castaño, N.; Magomaeva, A.; den Hartog, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we summarize research on how the meaning of leadership varies systematically across cultures, and describe the conflict in the literature between the quest for universals and the identification of cultural contingencies in leadership theory. We review the literature on the

  8. Culture and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, Neil G; Banissy, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the nature and both environmental and cognitive origins of culturally associated differences in a range of behaviors. This special issue of Cognitive Neuroscience presents six empirical papers investigating diverse categories of potential culturally related effects as well as a review article, all of which provide timely updates of the current state of knowledge in this area.

  9. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  10. FRANCHISING IN CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sitnitskiy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of franchise relations in the sphere of culture in Ukraine is grounded, the author definition of “franchise in culture” as an economic category is proposed and the main advantages and disadvantages of franchising in culture are systematized.

  11. Organizational Culture and Industrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    Drawing on a revised version ofHofstede's theory ofindustrialization and cultural change contained in his explanation of individualism and collectivism, the paper proposes that countries which are in the earlier stages of industrialization have a common culture that governs organizational...

  12. FRANCHISING IN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sitnitskiy

    2013-01-01

    The urgency of franchise relations in the sphere of culture in Ukraine is grounded, the author definition of “franchise in culture” as an economic category is proposed and the main advantages and disadvantages of franchising in culture are systematized.

  13. Measuring Cultural Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patsiurko, Natalka; Campbell, John L.; Hall, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Many claim that national economic success depends upon cultural homogeneity. We collect new time-series data and develop new measures of ethnic, linguistic and religious fractionalization for the OECD countries. We show that cultural diversity may vary by type across countries and over short peri...

  14. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  15. ASPECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebuc Georgiana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years world-wide companies tried to adapt their organizational culture to the external environment and to the new challenges. Recent crises put to the test organizational culture, in the sense that only companies with a strong and versa

  16. Approaches to understand culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Rauner, Felix

    1996-01-01

    Different approaches to understand the concept ofculture are presented and evaluated. The author'sconcept of culture is defined. Different aspectsof the concept are discussed.......Different approaches to understand the concept ofculture are presented and evaluated. The author'sconcept of culture is defined. Different aspectsof the concept are discussed....

  17. Pop Culture in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David Manning, Ed.

    The nature of today's popular culture, its place in American life, and its merit or lack of it are the themes of these essays from "The New York Times Magazine." Introductory essays discuss the use of leisure time, paying the cost of the arts, and whether American society can be considered "cultured." Subsequent essays discuss the nature of radio…

  18. Understanding cultures beyond medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A patient with a terminal illness died of a horrible suicidal attempt and the case provoked deeper learning of how a certain cultural background can lead people to different behaviors. This case study is intended to stimulate more cultural competency–related discussions.

  19. Mental activity and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Gert Jan

    2018-01-01

    How does culture affect mental activity? That question, applied to the design of social agents, is tackled in this chapter. Mental activity acts on the perceived outside world. It does so in three steps: perceive, interpret, select action. We see that when culture is taken into account, objective

  20. Cross-Cultural Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C.; Brislin, Richard W.

    Cross-Cultural psychology refers to the collective efforts of researchers who work among people who live in different societies, with different languages and different forms of government. There are a number of benefits to the study of human behavior which can be accrued by carrying out research in various cultures, largely concerned with better…

  1. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  2. Cultural Diplomacy in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Anthony

    The evolution of European government activities in the sphere of international cultural relations is examined. Section 1 describes the period between World War I and World War II when European governments tried to enhance their prestige and policies by means of cultural propaganda. Section 2 analyzes the period during World War II when the…

  3. Bridging a Cultural Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previdi, Patricia; Belfrage, Mary; Hu, Florence

    2005-01-01

    Playing an active role in a child's education can be especially difficult for parents of English Language Learners (ELL) and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students. Differences in cultural beliefs and language are often barriers to effective parent-school interaction. Such cultural discontinuities between home and school can affect a child's…

  4. Peace, welfare, culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2011-01-01

    and multiculturalism – pitted in opposition. By analytically focusing on “security narratives”, the article details how initial narratives of Muslims as threats to culture, welfare and societal peace merged and morphed to award surprising new roles to the state and multiculturalism. The re-evaluation of cultural...

  5. Culture and weight consciousness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nasser, Mervat

    1997-01-01

    ... of eating disorders. This review is used to highlight the problematic areas in cross-cultural methodologies and to suggest directions for future research. The author also relates the feminist theories that have been put forward to explain the phenomenon of eating disorders in the West to the condition of modern women in many non-western cultures...

  6. Introduction: transnational lesbian cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Heike; Mahn, Churnjeet

    2014-01-01

    This special issue examines the transnational shape and shaping of lesbian lives and cultures in and across China, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It uses the expression "transnational lesbian cultures" to suggest that despite sometimes radically different sociopolitical and cultural contexts, the lived experiences of same-sex desire and their emotional attachments create particular affinities between women who love women, affinities that reach across the distinct cultural and social contexts that shape them. The articles brought together explore lesbian subcultures, film, graphic novels, music, and online intimacies. They show that as a cultural and political signifier and as an analytical tool, lesbian troubles and complicates contemporary sexual politics, not least by revealing some of the gendered structures that shape debates about sexuality in a range of critical, cultural and political contexts. While the individual pieces cover a wide range of issues and concerns-which are often highly specific to the historical, cultural, and political contexts they discuss-together they tell a story about contemporary transnational lesbian culture: one that is marked by intricate links between norms and their effects and shaped by the efforts to resist denial, discrimination, and sometimes even active persecution.

  7. Cultural Keywords in Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    contributes to a global turn in cultural keyword studies by exploring keywords from discourse communities in Australia, Brazil, Hong Kong, Japan, Melanesia, Mexico and Scandinavia. Providing new case studies, the volume showcases the diversity of ways in which cultural logics form and shape discourse...

  8. Translation between cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique de Oliveira Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will question the pertinence of understanding interculturality in terms of translation between cultures. I shall study this hypothesis in two ways : 1 / the cosmopolitan horizon, which the idea of translation may implicate ; 2 / the critique of the premises of unique origin and homogeneity of cultures which this hypothesis makes possible.

  9. Counseling Third Culture Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Carolyn Fox

    Third Culture Kids (TCKs) represent a group of youth who have lived overseas with their families for business, service, or missionary work. The implications of living in multiple cultures, especially during the developmental and formative years of youth, warrant investigation. This study informs the US counseling community about the…

  10. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  11. Linking Norms and Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBreen, J.; Tosto, Di G.; Dignum, F.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to propose a method of modelling the evolution of social norms in different cultural settings. We analyse the role of culture in shaping agents' normative reasoning and hence their behaviour. The general notion of 'value' is discussed from the perspective of the BDI

  12. Primary cultures of astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Sofie C; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    During the past few decades of astrocyte research it has become increasingly clear that astrocytes have taken a central position in all central nervous system activities. Much of our new understanding of astrocytes has been derived from studies conducted with primary cultures of astrocytes...... subsequently found in vivo. Nevertheless, primary cultures of astrocytes are an in vitro model that does not fully mimic the complex events occurring in vivo. Here we present an overview of the numerous contributions generated by the use of primary astrocyte cultures to uncover the diverse functions...... of astrocytes. Many of these discoveries would not have been possible to achieve without the use of astrocyte cultures. Additionally, we address and discuss the concerns that have been raised regarding the use of primary cultures of astrocytes as an experimental model system....

  13. Unity through Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Ethnographic film, Moesgård Film, Royal Anthropological Institute (59 min, 2011) Soanin Kilangit is determined to unite the people and attract international tourism through the revival of culture on Baluan Island in the South Pacific. He organizes the largest cultural festival ever held on the is......Ethnographic film, Moesgård Film, Royal Anthropological Institute (59 min, 2011) Soanin Kilangit is determined to unite the people and attract international tourism through the revival of culture on Baluan Island in the South Pacific. He organizes the largest cultural festival ever held......, performance, identity, cultural politics, exchange, and the impact of the West on traditional societies.”  — Karen Stevenson, American Anthropologist, September 2012...

  14. Music, Meaning and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Widdess

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper situates musical meaning in culture, addressing music as social symbol and as ongoing process of meaning creation. Three examples of non- Western musical practice are used to illustrate the embedding of musical meaning in cultural context. The performance of an Australian Aboriginal song is shown to exemplify the interdependence of song style and social structure as a matrix for the emergence of cultural meanings; an example of North Indian performance is adduced to demonstrate the multi-layered nature of meaning as embodied in musical performance; and an example of collective festival performance from Nepal illustrates ways in which the structure of musical performance can mirror local cultural forms. Each of the three examples lends weight to the idea that music's meanings are often non-linguistic and reflect foundational schemas that are specific to the cultures from the musics are drawn.

  15. Culture as Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    essays, Slavko Kacunko discusses the process art by crossing the disciplines of art history and comparative media-, visual- and -cultural studies. As a first approximation, several historiographical remarks on closed-circuit video installations underline their importance as a core category of process art......A collection of essays 2011-2014 By following, and reproducing, the cultural turn, the rhetoric of cultural mix and hybridism is disseminated today primarily in its crossing of trade barriers. Cultures reduced to their exchange value function as capital - an accumulative, speculative and....... In the second part, the problems of process art, seen as a threshold of art history, are further examined in another retroanalytical step, in which concepts and objects related to `mirror', `frame' and `immediacy' are analyzed as the triple delimitation of visual culture studies. In the third part, previously...

  16. Culture as Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    A collection of essays 2011-2014 By following, and reproducing, the cultural turn, the rhetoric of cultural mix and hybridism is disseminated today primarily in its crossing of trade barriers. Cultures reduced to their exchange value function as capital - an accumulative, speculative and...... essays, Slavko Kacunko discusses the process art by crossing the disciplines of art history and comparative media-, visual- and -cultural studies. As a first approximation, several historiographical remarks on closed-circuit video installations underline their importance as a core category of process art....... In the second part, the problems of process art, seen as a threshold of art history, are further examined in another retroanalytical step, in which concepts and objects related to `mirror', `frame' and `immediacy' are analyzed as the triple delimitation of visual culture studies. In the third part, previously...

  17. Culture and teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Bradley L; Shapiro, Debra L; Lu, Shuye; McGurrin, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    We first review research on culture effects in teams, illustrating that mean levels of team cultural values have main (i.e. direct) effects, indirect effects (i.e. mediated by intervening variables), and moderating influences on team processes and outcomes. Variance in team cultural values or on country of origin (i.e. nationality diversity) also has main effects on team functioning, and we highlight contextual variables that strengthen or weaken these main effects. We next review research examining the effect of variance in team cultural values on global virtual teams, specifically. Finally, we review research on how cultural values shape employees' receptivity to empowering leadership behavior in teams. We conclude by discussing critical areas for future research. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Cultural dimensions of learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  19. AccessCulture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtysson, Bjarki

    of the European Union, and how its cultural policy responds to the changes that the digital paradigm has brought upon the field. The self-publishing features of various Web 2.0 platforms, along with the interactive and distributional potentials that the Internet offers, have given rise to what is referred to here...... in cultural production and consumption. The first part of this works looks at how these changes respond to the field of cultural policy, as well as suggesting a possible culturepolitical reaction in a model which I refer to as access culture. In terms of theoretical approach, the notion of digital cultural...... of YouTube, MySpace, Facebook and Flickr, along with lesser known platforms such as the animated short film Elephants Dream, the BBC's Creative Archive, various Internet artworks and the Internet Archive. I furthermore introduce the copyright system Creative Commons in order to suggest legal, widely...

  20. Kitsch and cultural tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Petroman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The urban area covers a high density of structures developed by man compared to the surrounding areas. Cultural tourism includes, on the one hand, cultural tourism in urban areas – particularly historical towns and cities with cultural sites such as museums or theatres – and, on the other hand, cultural tourism in rural areas – where its main goal is to focus on communities, festivals, rituals, and traditions. From the point of view of the practice of urban or rural cultural tourism, tourists are, in most cases, presented what they wish to see: thus, authenticity can turn into inauthenticity and what is promoted is vulgar art or improper beauty, surrogate art or even pseudo-art – kitsch, represented by souvenirs that have nothing to do with true art.

  1. Organizational climate and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin; Ehrhart, Mark G; Macey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research.

  2. Articulating cultures: socio-cultural experiences of black female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articulating cultures: socio-cultural experiences of black female immigrant students in South African schools 1. ... Gender and Behaviour ... and worrisome issue is that of the erosion of the social and cultural mores of Black3 immigrant students.

  3. Culture, technology, communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles; Sudweeks, Fay

    The first book-length anthology to collect some of the most significant culturally-oriented research and scholarship on CMC from the biennial conference series "Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication" (CATaC). The collection is significant for its contribution towards calling...... attention to the role of culturally-variable dimensions, including communication preferences, in the design, implementation, and use of ICTs - and thereby helping to bring into the mainstream of related scholarship and research (e.g., HCI, etc.) what was then a novel perspective and series of questions...

  4. Astronomy and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Hetherington, Edith

    2009-01-01

    While astronomy is a burgeoning science, with tremendous increases in knowledge every year, it also has a tremendous past, one that has altered humanity's understanding of our place in the universe. The impact of astronomy on culture - whether through myths and stories, or through challenges to the intellectual status quo - is incalculable. This volume in the Greenwood Guides to the Universe series examines how human cultures, in all regions and time periods, have tried to make sense of the wonders of the universe. Astronomy and Culture shows students how people throughout time have struggled

  5. Autonomy, culture and healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Anita Holm

    2018-01-01

    a Scandinavian and mostly a Danish context. A key point of the analysis indicates that a highly efficient health sector may entail an implicit duality: On the one hand, the therapist can relate pragmatically to the patient when engaging in cultural meetings. On the other hand, the therapist may be personally......This article aims to present a theoretical view of how cultural thinking and action in meetings between patient and therapist can be analyzed with special attention to raising awareness of underlying prejudices and preconceptions in such encounters. The examples in the article are all taken from...... challenged when cultural thinking leads to ethical dilemmas....

  6. SYSTEMIC AND CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranka Jeknić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses one by one the neo-liberalism, social-democracy, radicalism and political-islamism, as four typical socio-political and economic attitudes toward individualism and collectivism as cultural dimensions in the contemporary socio-political and economic contex of globalization. The paper points out principal differences between these four standpoints, and after that, makes conclusions and points out some problematic questions in the conection with the cultural and systemic differences. Their comparative analysis is in the connection with new sociological theories of culture: functionalistic orientation, marxistic and postmodernistic.

  7. Organised Cultural Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene Bull; Galal, Lise Paulsen; Hvenegård-Lassen, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue by presenting the concept of organised cultural encounters that are encounters organised to manage and/or transform problems perceived to originate in or include cultural differences. Inspired by Pratt’s conceptualisation of the contact zone, a critical...... perspective on the particular historical and spatial context of any encounter and how this context frames and mediates what takes place during an encounter is applied. While the articles of the issue present different varieties of organised cultural encounters, it is argued that they are not only of the same...

  8. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration...

  9. Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Ethics is caring about people and Safety is caring that no physical harm comes to people.Therefore Safety is a type of Ethical Behavior. Culture: is The Way We Do Things Here.Safety Culture is mixture of organization traditions, values, attitudes and behaviors modeled by Its leaders and internalized by its members that serve to make nuclear safety the overriding priority. Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in Organisations and individuals which established that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance

  10. From Culturalism to Citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Casellas López

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article places the immigrants’ integration issue within the culture-citizenship debate. In order to understand culture as something else than people’s given customs or “essence”, the text begins by analysing the essentialist notion of the term ‘culture’, pointing out some of its deficiencies and risks involved in dealing with such a notion. Drawing on the ethical relativism-universalism continuum, the authors also discuss the drawbacks they see in a culture-centred integration, suggesting instead a citizenship approach based on a multidirectional and dynamic notion –aimed at achieving equal rights for everyone involved, immigrant and native populations alike.

  11. Culture-specific delusions. Sense and nonsense in cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, A D

    1995-06-01

    It can be said that a definition of delusions requires the invocation of cultural understandings, standards of acceptability, as well as conceptions of reality and the forces that animate it. For these reasons, the determination of delusional or normative ideation can only be effected properly within particular cultural contexts. The cross-cultural record suggests that it is difficult to separate the delusional from the cultural; a belief that is patterened and culturally specific is, by definition a cultural, not a delusional belief. One must rely upon particular, relevant local cultural understandings to ascertain when the bounds of culture have been transgressed and meaning has given way to unshareable nonsense.

  12. Media and Culture-building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dehshiri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available First of all, the present study would explain 6-layer dimensions of culture –including beliefs, values, and norms (as the core of culture, and symbols, rituals, and customs, technologies, skills, and innovations (as the culture surface. Then, applying communication theories besides exploring the concept of “culture-building” involving culture-admission (affecting both core and surface of culture and culture-orientation (affecting culture’s surface; it would analyze the cultural affects media has in thoughts, normalizing, symbolizing, socialization, modeling, and innovation. The assessed hypothesis emphasizes that in the core of culture, media play an educational and stabilizing role in culture-admission process, while in the surface of culture –the culture-orientation process- they could transform behaviors and social models.

  13. Cultural Assessments and Campaign Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, James

    2004-01-01

    .... Cultural assessment is a detailed analysis of factors that influence cultural behavior and a summary of the characteristics of the culture of a given population in relation to proposed military operations...

  14. Experiencing Global Culture in Vatel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth; Broillet, Alexandra; John, Claudette

    2015-01-01

    To explore the meaning of “global culture” in a professional communication context, this paper explores the “unsettled” global culture of Vatel, a private business school educating students from nearly 50 different countries for the hospitality industry. This paper explores the role of knowledge...... management in understanding global culture, arguing that the notion of “unsettled” cultures demonstrates how ideologies function in global settings and draw on national “settled” cultural resources. In unpacking different aspects of Vatel's culture this paper questions assumptions built into cultural frames...... of reference by offering a global culture frame, drawing on cultural resources from country based “settled” cultural contexts, and reflects on how global cultural contexts can benefit from a knowledge management approach to this dynamic between “settled” cultural contexts and “unsettled” cultural ideologies...

  15. Culture, Identity and the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtonwood, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Critiques recent versions of pluralism by examining the concepts of culture and identity underlying them. Proposes a model of education that rejects cultural transmission in favor of a transformational curriculum that goes beyond culture. (SK)

  16. Cultural Capital Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieur, Annick; Skjøtt-Larsen, Jakob; Rosenlund, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Based on Danish survey data subjected to correspondence analysis, this article aims at carrying out a critical assessment of Pierre Bourdieu's theory of social differentiation in advanced societies as a multi-dimensional phenomenon. As his theory goes, capital volume (economic + cultural capital......) and capital composition (the relative weight of the two) are the main dimensions of social differentiation, which structure the space of social positions as well as the space of lifestyles. The central discussion of the article concerns the character of cultural capital, and the role it plays in the formation......, as those adhering to the preferences that are most typical for the cultural elite tend to simultaneously avoid or mark distance to popular expressions of taste. Fourth, are there traces of new forms of cultural capital? The study uncovers a cleavage between a global orientation or a form of cosmopolitanism...

  17. Culture in Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács Gabriella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language means also the study of a different culture. This study focuses on the introduction of the topic of culture in language teaching into the curriculum of the subject Language Teaching Methodology for teacher trainees studying at Translation And Interpreting Studies, Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, Faculty of Technical and Human Sciences, Târgu-Mureş. This topic has not been treated separately so far, it has only been discussed implicitly, included in other topics. But we believe that future teachers should have a more thorough theoretical and practical training in terms of what incorporating culture into language teaching implies. For this purpose, we are going to examine and discuss some of the recommendations and principles stated in the specialized literature regarding culture in foreign language teaching and reflect on what the ideal content of a course related to the teaching of this skill should be.

  18. African Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Jarita C; Medupe, R. Thebe; Current Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy research in Africa

    2008-01-01

    Astronomy is the science of studying the sky using telescopes and light collectors such as photographic plates or CCD detectors. However, people have always studied the sky and continue to study the sky without the aid of instruments this is the realm of cultural astronomy. This is the first scholarly collection of articles focused on the cultural astronomy of Africans. It weaves together astronomy, anthropology, and Africa. The volume includes African myths and legends about the sky, alignments to celestial bodies found at archaeological sites and at places of worship, rock art with celestial imagery, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions including ethnomathematics and the creation of calendars. Authors include astronomers Kim Malville, Johnson Urama, and Thebe Medupe; archaeologist Felix Chami, and geographer Michael Bonine, and many new authors. As an emerging subfield of cultural astronomy, African cultural astronomy researchers are focused on training students specifically for do...

  19. Flexible cultural repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Zimmermann, Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of street culture and the risks of offending and victimization in urban marginalized areas, little is known about the role of cultural repertoires for variation in victimization risks among young men not involved in crime. Based on two ethnographic studies, conducted...... independently of the authors in neighbouring township areas of Cape Town, we offer insights into patterns of victimization among young men not involved in crime who live and attend school in the townships. Young men WHO perform decent cultural repertoires are highly exposed to victimization due to their moral...... rejection of crime-involved youth. Young men who perform flexible cultural repertoires, by incorporating and shifting between gang and decent repertoires, experience low victimization due to their adaptation to crime-involved youth. Findings emphasize the importance of detailed investigations of the way...

  20. Culture in constructive remembering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2012-01-01

    an alternative temporal metaphor of remembering as ‘construction’. If we push his metaphor further—with the help of cultural psychology—we can say memory construction is done by agents using cultural ‘tools’ such as language and narrative. In this chapter, Bartlett’s theory is contextualized, elucidated......, critiqued and developed with the help of a number of other thinkers. The ultimate aim of the chapter is to go beyond Bartlett and arrive at a thoroughgoing culturally inclusive psychological theory of remembering. Though Bartlett clearly situated remembering within a social process, he did not provide......The present chapter explores novel ways of thinking about what it means to remember and how precisely culture is involved in this process. Since Plato, the dominant metaphor for conceptualizing memory has been that of a spatial ‘storage’. In contrast to this, Frederic Bartlett advanced...

  1. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    of the structures of the networked urban mobilities and holds the potentials to change the future mobilities. References Bauman, Zygmunt. 2000. Liquid Modernity. Cambridge: Polity. Beck, Ulrich. 1992. Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity (Published in Association with Theory, Culture & Society). London: SAGE......In urban areas sharing cultures, services and economies are rising. People share, rent and recycle their homes, cars, bikes, rides, tools, cloths, working space, knowhow and so on. The sharing culture can be understood as mobilities (Kesselring and Vogl 2013) of goods, values and ideas reshaping...... problems and side effects from concentration of consumption and contamination; and due to the shift from ownership to access it change our basic social cultural norms (Sayer 2005; Sayer 2011) about the ‘good’ life and social status (Freudendal-Pedersen 2007), commons and individuality, responsibility...

  2. Holograms a cultural history

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    Holograms have been in the public eye for over a half-century, but their influences have deeper cultural roots. No other visual experience is quite like interacting with holograms; no other cultural product melds the technological sublime with magic and optimism in quite the same way. As holograms have evolved, they have left their audiences alternately fascinated, bemused, inspired or indifferent. From expressions of high science to countercultural art to consumer security, holograms have represented modernity, magic and materialism. Their most pervasive impact has been to galvanize hopeful technological dreams. This book explores how holograms found a place in distinct cultural settings. Engineers, artists, hippies and hobbyists have played with, and dreamed about, holograms. This book explores the technical attractions and cultural uses of the hologram, how they were shaped by what came before them, and how they have matured to shape our notional futures. Today, holograms are in our pockets (as identity do...

  3. NIGERIAN CULTURAL HERITAGE: PRESERVATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    understanding of Nigerian Cultural heritages, the approach adopted in this chapter is ... among the Yoruba of western Nigeria and other facets of their individual ..... establishment and maintenance of museums and for discovery of heritage ...

  4. Democracy and Cultural Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a theme touched upon in Robert Innis’s article on cultural psych- ology and philosophy, namely how we, within cultural psychology, seem to be undecided about how best to provide value on a societal level. It is discussed how psychology has provided us with several valuable...... tools for examining and understanding our own exist- ence, despite the fact that it is also a field that has seemed to be in one crisis after another since its inception. It is argued that cultural psychology is an intellectual tech- nology that allows us to peek under the hood of society, which...... is of utmost importance in today’s society, where democratic ideals are under severe pressure. Corporations, industries, and privileged individuals exercise increased control over political processes, having created obscure systems by which they operate. It is concluded that cultural psychology needs to find...

  5. America's Cultural Awakening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brents, William B

    2007-01-01

    Although the collapse of the Soviet Union elevated the United States to a hyper superpower status, globalization in terms of modernity, economics, security, and culture would dramatically affect its ascendancy...

  6. Culture in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    overview of the development of discourse analysis and discursive psychology and highlight key philosophical foundations and theoretical assumptions on which discursive psychology and practice of discourse analysis are based. As the examples of discourse analysis, I will demonstrate how culture can......The overall aim of this chapter is to discuss an approach to studying culture by drawing on the project of remembering and reconciliation from a discursive psychology perspective. I demonstrate discourse analysis from research using a case of the Anglo-Japanese reconciliation. I provide a brief...... be studied as a topic of members' concern. In this view, culture is not a matter of the researcher's concern to handle as a causal factor or independent variable. Discursive psychologists study culture as a resource for the participants. Finally, I will discuss the implication of the discursive approach...

  7. Safety culture in transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, V.

    1998-01-01

    'Safety culture' is a wording that appeared first in 1986, during the evaluation of what happened during the Tchernobyl accident. Safety culture is defined in the IAEA 75-INSAG-4 document as the characteristics and attitude which, in organizations and in men behaviours, make that questions related to safety of nuclear power plants benefits, in priority, of the attention that they need in function of their importance. The INSAG-4 document identifies three different elements necessary to the development of the safety culture: commitment of the policy makers, commitment of the managers of the industry, and commitment of individuals. This paper gives examples to show how safety culture is existing in the way Transnucleaire performs the activities in the field of transport of nuclear materials. (author)

  8. Urethral discharge culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can detect sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as gonorrhea and chlamydia . Normal Results A negative culture, or ... in the genital tract. These infections can include gonorrhea or chlamydia. Risks Fainting may occur when the ...

  9. The cultural divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dram......Introduction: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found...... that they are dramatically different. Results: Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved...

  10. Blood Culture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Cultures. Medscape from American Journal of Clinical Pathology [On-line information]. Available online at http://www. ... August 2013. Fisher, M. et. al. (Updated 2013 March 20). Sepsis. ARUP Consult [On-line information]. Available ...

  11. CORPORATE CULTURE AND COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROGOJANU Angela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture is one of those terms that are difficult to express distinctly, but everyone knows it when they sense it. Many articles have been written in recent years about corporate culture, which can be looked at as a system. Inputs include feedback from society, professions, laws, stories, heroes, values on competition or service, etc. Outputs are organizational behaviors, technologies, strategies, image, products, services, appearance, etc. Most organizations don't consciously try to create a certain culture, as it is typically created unconsciously, based on the values of the top management or the founders of an organization. In this paper we try to see whether corporate culture has any influence on competition and if it has, whether it is a positive one or a negative one.

  12. Cultural Behavior Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reece, Douglas A; Taylor, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    .... We considered different training applications and identified a "knock-and-talk" house visitation scenario as representative of scenarios that require cultural awareness on the part of a trainee, yet...

  13. Social and cultural activities

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Club news : Record Club, Ski Club, Dancing Club, Orienteering Club, CERN Women's Club, Concerts Club, Russian Cultural Circle, Yachting Club. Conference : Voyage au coeur d'une flûte de champagne. Exhibition.

  14. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  15. Hanford cultural resources laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act

  16. Para um ecumenismo cultural

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, José Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    O sonho de uma sociedade democrática quer local, quer nacional, quer mundial, passa necessariamente pelo desenvolvimento do ecumenismo cultural que valorize a singularidade, a riqueza e a dignidade da diversidade das culturas humanas. Feito o ecumenismo cultural, o ecumenismo religioso estará facilitado, se entendido como respeito e reconhecimento da dignidade do outro e não fusão ou anulação do outro

  17. Hanford cultural resources laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.K.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

  18. Pleading for Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan GROSU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture designates “the tools through which the human polishes himself and develops his multiple spiritual and physical gifts.” The humans interact and change opinions and become conscious that they belong to a global cultural space and are also “authors of the culture of their own community.” Through these tools human “exerts to disobey the world, humanizes social, family and physical life, through progress of mores and institutions, in the end human, expresses, communicates and keeps in its operas, during the times, its great major experiences, because them to serve the progress… of whole human people.” The human valorizes itself but also contributes to the progress of society. Today we talk about the plurality of culture through which is opened the path to the cultural dissemination and perfection. In this way, the humans get a responsibility towards the cultural progress of their community which is anchored in global community, and then appears the question: “what must be done so that all the humans of the world to participate to cultural gods? It is observed here a “spiritual and moral maturity of humans,” defined as “new humanism”. This new type of humanism is not a simple talk, but it represents a new “type of responsibility towards human and towards history.” In this way, it appears the need of a new type of education because the nowadays human must be prepared to become creator and responsible to integrate in a global culture based on values as “intelligence, will, conscience and human fraternity.”

  19. Cross-cultural advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Пурчельянова, Н. Ю.

    2011-01-01

    The essence of successful advertising is to convince people that a product is meant for them. By purchasing it, they will receive some benefit (lifestyle, status, convenience, etc.). However, when an advertising campaign is taken abroad different values as to what enhances status or gives convenience exist. These differences make the original advertising campaign defunct. It is therefore critical to any cross cultural advertising campaign that an understanding of a particular culture is acqui...

  20. Delegating effectively across cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvie Chevrier; Michaël Viegas-Pires

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This article builds on the contingency approach of global leadership to examine empowerment in a cross-cultural context. Drawing upon an ethnographic research in a French NGO settled in Madagascar, it demonstrates that effective empowerment is not so much a matter of degree -more or less delegation- than a matter of manner. Understanding the cultural representations of role and structure formalization, skill development, collective work and decision-making appeared to ...

  1. Festive Culture of Kryashens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Yu. Khusnutdinova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional festive ritual culture occupies an important position in the life of the Kryashens. The article is based on our own field research conducted in 2014. The purpose of the article is to study traditional holidays and their significance for the Kryashens. The article showed popular traditional Kryashen holidays, their innovations and origins, which go deep into history and are closely intertwined with the culture of neighboring peoples. The methodological base of the study assumes the consideration and the analysis of the traditional festive culture of the Kryashens. The work uses general historical methods: historical-comparative, cultural-anthropological, the method of complex analysis and the discriminative method. The work is also based on the combination of quantitative and qualitative methods: discourse - mass survey through questionnaires, in-depth interviews, focus groups, included monitoring. The article gives a detailed description of each holiday. Kryashen people keep the ancient traditions of their ancestors, combining their Turkic roots and Orthodox culture. During the long parallel development of national holidays, customs and religions, Christianity has become an integral part of the Kryashen spiritual life - this confirms the special significance of Orthodox religious holidays. Also, ethnic-cultural characteristics and the celebration of traditional holidays are of great importance for Kryashens. Particularly honored calendar holidays for the Kryashens are the following ones: Easter, Christmas, Epiphany, Petrov Day (Pitrau, Trinity, Nardugan, Semik, Pokrov. These festive traditions are marked by a certain important value and stability in the cultural environment of the Tatarstan Kryashens. The materials of the article can be useful for ethnologists, social and cultural anthropologists, and everyone interested in this topic.

  2. Cultural Image of Animal Words

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓海燕

    2017-01-01

    This paper,after introducing the definition and forms of cultural image,focuses on the detailed comparison and analysis of cultural image of animal words both in English and in Chinese from four aspects,that is,same animal word,same cultural image;same animal word,different cultural images;different animal words,same cultural image;different animal words,different cultural images.

  3. Cultural Journalism and Cultural Critique in a changing Media Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    This special issue addresses a topic of journalism studies that has previously been somewhat neglected but which has gained increasing scholarly attention since the mid-2000s: the coverage and evaluation of art and culture, or what we term “cultural journalism and cultural critique.......” In this introduction, we highlight three issues that serve to frame the study of cultural journalism and cultural critique more generally and the eight articles of this special issue more specifically: (1) the constant challenge of demarcating cultural journalism and cultural critique, including the interrelations...... of “journalism” and “critique”; (2) the dialectic of globalisation’s cultural homogenisation, on the one hand, and the specificity of local/national cultures, on the other; and (3) the digital media landscape seen in terms of the need to rethink, perhaps even redefine cultural journalism and cultural critique...

  4. Cultural mediation in museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  5. Cultural realities of being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cultural Realities of Being offers a dialogue between academic activity and everyday lives by providing an interface between several perspectives on human conduct. Very often, academic pursuits are arcane and obscure for ordinary people, this book will attempt to disentangle these dialogues, lift...... fresh light on the everyday events presented in the text. Cultural Realities of Being will be essential reading for those studying Cross Cultural Psychology as well as those interested in social representation and identity......., lifting everyday discourse and providing a forum for advancing discussion and dialogue. Nandita Chaudhary, S. Anandalakshmy and Jaan Valsiner bring together contributors from the field of cultural psychology to consider how people living within social groups, regardless of how liberal, are guided...... of cultural psychology. The book builds upon rich cultural traditions present in India, and precisely because of this focus, the book has much larger implications and relevance to the field and aims to orient the academic reader from around the world to viewing India and Indian society as a valuable area...

  6. Overview of security culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulanya, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear Security culture concept has been aggressively promoted over the past several years as a tool to improve the physical protection of the nuclear and radioactive materials due to growing threats of catastrophic terrorism and other new security challenges. It is obvious that, the scope of nuclear security and the associated cultures need to be extended beyond the traditional task of protecting weapons-usable materials. The role of IAEA is to strengthen the nuclear security framework globally and in leading the coordination of international activities in this field. Therefore all governments should work closely with the IAEA to take stronger measures to ensure the physical protection, the safety and security of the nuclear and radioactive materials. In the effort to reflect this new realities and concerns, the IAEA in 2008 came up with the document, the Nuclear Security Culture, Nuclear Security Series No. 7, Implementing Guide to the member states which urged every member state to take appropriate measures to promote security culture with respect to nuclear and radioactive materials. The document depicted this cultural approach as the way to protect individual, society and the environment. Among other things, the document defined nuclear security culture as characteristics and attitudes in organizations and of individuals which establishes that, nuclear security issues receives attention warranted by their significance. (au)

  7. Cross-Cultural Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Minelgaite Snaebjornsson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing low participation of women in global leadership calls for more research in this field. In this article, we set out to include gendered expectations toward leader behavior as part of cross-cultural leadership theory. Building on an existing body of research, we focus on propositions about the effects of gendered expectations on the leader, from the followers’ standpoint. The consideration of gendered effects from the follower standpoint is an under-researched area in leadership literature, and it is even more rarely to be found in empirical data. In every culture, there are certain expectations toward leaders of the two genders that influence their behavior. In this article, we will attempt to answer the following question: How does perceived leader behavior and gendered behavior relate to national culture and actual leader behavior? We present a conceptual model that seeks to incorporate gendered expectations into cross-cultural leadership as an answer. Moreover, we provide a conceptual guideline toward operationalization of the model. The model includes the potential of dissonance between male expectations as a dominating leadership role and female leadership. This might serve as an explanation as to why in some cases women are not seen as successful as men when they adopt a masculine leadership style. The article seeks to advance cross-cultural leadership theory by focusing on expected gendered leadership behavior. Our ideas and model could eventually contribute to the advancement of leadership theory, as well as contributing to gender studies, cross-cultural leadership, and business communication.

  8. Cultural Competence and the Operational Commander: Moving Beyond Cultural Awareness into Culture-Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karcanes, James A

    2007-01-01

    The term "cultural awareness" serves as the new favorite Department of Defense buzzword but fails in its definition to adequately articulate the complexity of culture and the high level of cultural...

  9. Madurese cultural communication approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmawan, A.; Aji, G. G.; Mutiah

    2018-01-01

    Madura is a tribe with a cultural entity influenced by the ecological aspect and Madurese people. Assessing Madurese culture cannot be separated from the relation of society and ecological aspects that form the characteristics of Madura culture. Stereotypes of Madurese include a stubborn attitude, and carok or killing as a problem solving. On the other hand, Madurese are known to be inclusive, religious, and hardworking. The basic assumption is that the ecological conditions in Madura also shape the social and cultural life of the Madurese. Therefore, judging the Madurese cannot just be seen from a single event only. Moreover, the assessment only focuses on Madurese violence and disregards their structure and social aspects. Assessing Madura culture as a whole can explain the characteristics of Madurese community. According Hofstede culture is a characteristic mindset and perspective of individuals or groups of society in addressing a distinguished life. These differences distinguish individuals from others, or one country to the other. According to Hofstede to be able to assess the culture can be explained by four dimensions namely, individualism-collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity-femininity and power distance. The method used in this research is a case study. The Result is Madurese classified collectivism can be viewed from the pattern of settlements called kampong meji. Madurese can be classified into low and high uncertainty avoidance. the power distance for the Madurese is classified as unequally or there is a distance of power based on social groups. The element of masculinity of the Madurese is shown to be found when the earnestness of work.

  10. Storytelling and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper uses a five-part model of nuclear safety as the basis for discussion of how the oral culture in an organization contributes to (or can potentially undermine) the understanding of safety, the commitment to safe practices and the formation of group identity which is the product of effective cultural leadership. It explores some differences between oral and literate forms of expression, how these interact, and why both are essential parts of nuclear safety culture. It looks at how oral forms impact safety culture, and how by understanding the power of the oral culture leaders can be more effective in shaping people’s understanding and commitment to the essential practices of nuclear safety. Oral forms of expression in cultures are highly stable because they are repeated as “stories” and as ritualistic patterns. They are the only forms of language that “live inside us”, so they are essential for things such as communicating principles and forming a sense of group identity. Oral forms can be exceptionally long-lasting and can (and do) influence cultures sometimes decades after they first come into being. In other words, (and for good and bad) they have an exceptional ability to survive change. This is because oral stories are like magic flowers. Every time the story is told its seeds spring out and scatter, and are planted in every hearer. Then any one of those listeners can carry the story forwards into the future and retell it so another magic flower is born. Compelling stories are therefore always alive, they only die when they are replaced with a more compelling story.

  11. Cultural universals: So what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elaine Botha

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the elusive "cultural universal s” in a variety of academic disciplines has been motivated b y the spectre of relativism in its diverse guises. The problem of relativism has been thrust upon us inter alia by the inability of our epistemological models to account for social and cultural, moral and cognitive diversity and to provide us with criteria by means of which to judge aberrations like ideologies. Contrary to the general trend I would like to argue that it is not the spectre of relativism in its various guises which necessitates the search for cultural universals, nor is this the only motivation for a Christian to argue in favour of the recognition of cultural universals. Various authors have suggested that such universal structures do exist; that they condition human and societal behaviour and that it would in principle be possible to construct a theory of these structural universals or a "biogrammar" or "geography ” of the universal cultural acquisition device of humankind (cf. Harre,1976, 32; Johnson, 1987: xxxvii ; Tige r and Fox, 1974:17,30. Cross -cu ltural research in both psychology and anthropology has pointed to the existence of such traits, and in recent philosophical discussions Apel and others have pointed to the necessity of recognizing the existence of some sort of " transcendentalia" . These arguments emphasize elements that are common to diverse approaches to the problem of cultural universals. Christian scholars could accept most of these arguments as valid and yet argue in favour of a very specifically modified version of the notion of cultural universals. This essay attempts to develop such a position.

  12. Bridging Culture On-Line: Strategies for Teaching Cultural Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, M. Cecilia; Struthers, Roxanne

    2002-01-01

    An online cross-cultural health course for nurses sought to provide access to cultural experiences by culturally congruent use of a minority visiting scholar and required participation in cultural enrichment activities. Course and faculty evaluations were designed to be appropriate for the asynchronous environment. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  13. Examining Cultural Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Negotiation Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Kevin S.; Feyerherm, Ann; Gu, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    International negotiation failures are often linked to deficiencies in negotiator cross-cultural capabilities, including limited understanding of the cultures engaged in the transaction, an inability to communicate with persons from different cultural backgrounds, and limited behavioral flexibility to adapt to culturally unfamiliar contexts.…

  14. Culture Analysis: The Interaction of Organizational and National Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Arnoldovna Makarchenko

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the interaction between organizational culture factors. A comparative analysis of the Russian and Argentine companies culture using different methods shows the impact of the national mentality in organizational culture. The thesis is the need to introduce the term "regional culture" in relation to modern Russia.

  15. Family Counseling: Cultural Sensitivity, Relativism, and the Cultural Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Kathleen M.

    1998-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity, cultural relativism, and the cultural defense are defined and described. Each concept is addressed in terms of its relationship to couple and family counseling. The role of counselor must be broadened and deepened to include the role of cultural broker. (Author/EMK)

  16. Creating Cultural Consumers: The Dynamics of Cultural Capital Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisida, Brian; Greene, Jay P.; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The theories of cultural reproduction and cultural mobility have largely shaped the study of the effects of cultural capital on academic outcomes. Missing in this debate has been a rigorous examination of how children actually acquire cultural capital when it is not provided by their families. Drawing on data from a large-scale experimental study…

  17. The effect of cultural interaction on cumulative cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Wataru

    2014-07-07

    Cultural transmission and cultural evolution are important for animals, especially for humans. I developed a new analytical model of cultural evolution, in which each newborn learns cultural traits from multiple individuals (exemplars) in parental generation, individually explores around learned cultural traits, judges the utility of known cultural traits, and adopts a mature cultural trait. Cultural evolutionary speed increases when individuals explore a wider range of cultural traits, accurately judge the skill level of cultural traits (strong direct bias), do not strongly conform to the population mean, increase the exploration range according to the variety of socially learned cultural traits (condition dependent exploration), and make smaller errors in social learning. Number of exemplars, population size, similarity of cultural traits between exemplars, and one-to-many transmission have little effect on cultural evolutionary speed. I also investigated how cultural interaction between two populations with different mean skill levels affects their cultural evolution. A population sometimes increases in skill level more if it encounters a less skilled population than if it does not encounter anyone. A less skilled population sometimes exceeds a more skilled population in skill level by cultural interaction between both populations. The appropriateness of this analytical method is confirmed by individual-based simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear safety culture based on the organizational and individual culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingxi; Ren Ou

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear safety culture is used increasingly and developed by countries that have nu- clear plants all over the world, since the term 'safety culture' was first introduced by IAEA in 1986. Enterprises culture reflects many terms in an enterprise, such as management level and staff quality. The safety culture is the center in a nuclear enterprises culture, and relates directly to the safety and outstanding achievement of operation. This paper discusses the nuclear safety culture from the viewpoints of the organizational and individual cultures. (authors)

  19. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  20. Citizenship and cultural diversity in agenda of cultural policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Silva Dorneles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a discussion paper which aims to contribute to the systematization of studies, concepts and practices on cultural policies which have been developed in previous years in Brazil and are orienting cultural actions and public programs in the country, also influencing the Occupational Therapy. Citizenship and Cultural Diversity are concepts under construction and are part of the of the agenda of cultural policies and as well as the reflections and practices of various occupational therapists who are acting in a constant dialogue with the cultural area by means of the formation in cultural management, cultural mapping, programs and grant projects aimed to promote inventive identities, traditional communities, native populations, urban mobility, and cultural networks and exchange initiatives, among others. The article presents the process of this conceptual construction and the constitution of experiences aiming the democratization of the culture in the history of Brazilian cultural public policies, over which are being discussed approach paths and possibilities for Occupational Therapy.

  1. Management of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.

    2004-01-01

    The strengthening of safety culture in an organization has become an increasingly important issue for nuclear industry. A high level of safety performance is essential for business success in intensely competitive global environment. This presentation offers a discussion of some principles and activities used in enhancing safety performance and appropriate safety behaviour at the Krsko NPP. Over the years a number of events have occurred in nuclear industry that have involved problems in human performance. A review of these and other significant events has identified recurring weaknesses in plant safety culture and policy. Focusing attention on the strengthening of relevant processes can help plants avoid similar undesirable events. The policy of the Krsko NPP is that all employees concerned shall constantly be alert to opportunities to reduce risks to the lowest practicable level and to achieve excellence in plant safety. The most important objective is to protect individuals, society and the environment by establishing and maintaining an effective defense against radiological hazard in the nuclear power plant. It is achieved through the use of reliable structures, components, systems, and procedures, as well as plant personnel committed to a strong safety culture. The elements of safety culture include both organizational and individual aspects. Elements commonly included at the organizational level are senior management commitment to safety, organizational effectiveness, effective communication, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages identification and resolution of safety issues. Elements identified at the individual level include personal accountability, a questioning attitude, communication, procedural adherence, etc.(author)

  2. Uterine culture in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, D

    1984-05-01

    A guarded, sterile swab is used to obtain samples for uterine culture. With the mare in stocks, the tail bandage and the perineum washed, the culture rod is introduced into the vagina with a gloved hand. After the rod is guided through the cervix, the guard cap is dislodged and the swab is rubbed along the endometrium, after which the rod is extracted. Samples for uterine culture should only be obtained during full estrus. Swabs should be directly plated onto agar within 2 hours of collection. Blood agar is appropriate for initial screening, but use of specialized types of agar expedites identification of microbes. Plates are incubated at 37 C and inspected for growth every 12 hours. The type and number of bacterial colonies should be coupled with the history and clinical signs in deciding on the necessity and type of treatment. Pure, heavy bacterial growth is usually accompanied by clinical signs of infection. Interpretation of the significance of moderate bacterial growth may be aided by cytologic examination of endometrial smears, made by rolling the swab onto a glass slide and staining with Diff - Quik . Large numbers of neutrophils indicate the need for antibiotic therapy. Mixed bacterial growth and variable numbers of neutrophils usually indicate faulty sampling technic. Microaerophilic or anaerobic cultures may aid diagnosis in cases of equivocal aerobic culture results.

  3. Culture and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dezhu; Ng, Yew-Kwang; Lian, Yujun

    Culture is an important factor affecting happiness. This paper examines the predictive power of cultural factors on the cross-country differences in happiness and explores how different dimensions of cultural indices differ in their effects on happiness. Our empirical results show that the global leadership and organizational behavior effectiveness nine culture indices are all significantly related with happiness. Out of these nine indices, power distance (PDI) and gender egalitarianism (GEI) play the most important and stable role in determining subjective well-being (SWB). We further examine the relative importance of the various variables in contributing to the R-squared of the regression. The results show that PDI is the most important, accounting for 50 % of the contributions to R-squared of all variables, or equalling the combined contributions of income, population density and four other traditional variables. The contribution of GEI is 37.1 %, also well surpassing other variables. Our results remain robust even taking account of the different data for culture and SWB.

  4. Teaching Japanese Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Shamoon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Japanese popular culture has arrived on American college campuses as never before. Student interest in Japanese manga (comic books, anime (animated films and television shows, and video games drives much of the enrollment in Japanese courses and Japanese majors and minors. In response to student interest, as well as the establishment of popular culture as a topic of serious academic scholarship, the demand for courses on Japanese popular culture has never been higher. Yet the number of scholars specializing in the study of popular culture is still relatively small. This can potentially create problems, as faculty teach outside their expertise, and perhaps face an uncomfortable situation in which the students know more about the topic than the professor. In this article, I will offer some suggestions and advice for faculty creating a popular culture course for the first time, based on my experiences teaching undergraduates at the University of Notre Dame. The course I developed reflects my background in Japanese literature and film, and is but one example of many possible approaches to the topic. The sample syllabus and list of resources at the end of this article provide citations for all text and media sources mentioned.

  5. Suicide and Western culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Saxby; McArthur, Milford

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the cultural roots and transmission of Western suicide and suicidal behaviour. We explored a period of antiquity (mythical Greece-61 CE) and selected accounts of 10 prominent suicides. The precipitating circumstances were tabulated and an assessment made of the most likely attendant emotions. The same process was followed for a recent period (1994-2008), from which 10 suicides were identified. The precipitating circumstances and the attendant emotions were compared. These circumstances and emotions were then compared to statements commonly encountered in clinical practice from people demonstrating suicidal behaviour. Finally, we looked for evidence that these stories (and the response models) had entered Western culture. Precipitating circumstances, loss of a loved one, actual or imminent execution or imprisonment, other losses and public disgrace, and the negative emotions of shame, guilt, fear, anger, grief and sorrow were common to both historical periods. These circumstances and emotions are similar to those commonly expressed by people who have demonstrated suicidal behaviour. There was a clear record (literature, visual arts) of these stories forming part of our cultural heritage. Models of maladaptive responses to certain adverse circumstances are part of Western culture. Suicide as a response to certain circumstances and negative emotions can be traced back more than 2000 years. Cultural change will be necessary to minimize suicide.

  6. Cultural tourism is in context of mass culture

    OpenAIRE

    Гарбар, Г. А.

    2014-01-01

    Philosophic analysis of tourist activity within mass culture is carried out in the thesis. Cultural tourism within mass culture is more than orientation on cultural values, it is the understanding of peculiar cultural values within the context of generally accepted ones, confirmation of tourist activity peculiarities.Having reviewed tourism as a coherent system, the facts about impact of tourism on the society development are determined, potential development zones are identified, which are a...

  7. CULTURE, CULTURE LEARNING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES: TOWARDS A PEDAGOGICAL FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Levy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to improve approaches to the learning and teaching of culture using new technologies by relating the key qualities and dimensions of the culture concept to elements within a pedagogical framework. In Part One, five facets of the culture concept are developed: culture as elemental; culture as relative; culture as group membership; culture as contested; and culture as individual (variable and multiple. Each perspective aims to provide a focus for thinking about culture, and thereby to provide a valid and useful point of departure for thinking about the practice of culture learning and teaching with new technologies. The referenced literature draws from a broad range of disciplines and definitions of culture. In Part Two, five projects are chosen to represent relevant technologies currently in use for culture learning: e-mail, chat, a discussion forum and a Web-based project. Each project is used to illustrate facets of the culture concept discussed in Part One with a view to identifying key elements within a pedagogical framework that can help us respond effectively to the challenge of culture learning and teaching utilising new technologies. Thus the goal is to align fundamental qualities of the culture concept with specific pedagogical designs, tasks and technologies.

  8. Culture from the Bottom Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  9. How Culture Shock Affects Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, LaRay M.

    The paper defines the term "culture shock" and discusses the changes that this state can make in a person's behavior. Culture shock refers to the emotional and physiological reaction of high activation that is brought about by sudden immersion in a new culture. Because one's own culture shields one from the unknown and reduces the need to make…

  10. ALICE's adventures in cultural computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Bartneck, C.; Salem, B.I.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the paradigm of cultural computing, different cultures need different approaches to address the cultural determinants that strongly influences our way of thinking, feeling and worldview in general. For the western culture, our answer to this need is an artistic and interactive installation

  11. Learning Cultures in Further Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Phil; Anderson, Graham; Colley, Helen; Davies, Jenny; Diment, Kim; Scaife, Tony; Tedder, Mike; Wahlberg, Madeleine; Wheeler, Eunice

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of learning cultures in English Further Education (FE), as revealed in the Transforming Learning Cultures in FE (TLC) research project. In it, we describe four characteristics of a generic FE learning culture: the significance of learning cultures in every site; the significance of the tutor in influencing site…

  12. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  13. Globalization, culture and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melluish, Steve

    2014-10-01

    This article outlines the cultural and psychological effects of globalization. It looks at the impact of globalization on identity; ideas of privacy and intimacy; the way we understand and perceive psychological distress; and the development of the profession of psychology around the world. The article takes a critical perspective on globalization, seeing it as aligned with the spread of neoliberal capitalism, a tendency towards cultural homogenization, the imposition of dominant 'global north' ideas and the resultant growing inequalities in health and well-being. However, it also argues that the increased interconnectedness created by globalization allows for greater acknowledgement of our common humanity and for collective efforts to be developed to tackle what are increasingly global problems. This requires the development of more nuanced understandings of cultural differences and of indigenous psychologies.

  14. Class, Culture and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2013-01-01

    Even though contemporary discussions of class have moved forward towards recognizing a multidimensional concept of class, empirical analyses tend to focus on cultural practices in a rather narrow sense, that is, as practices of cultural consumption or practices of education. As a result......, discussions within political sociology have not yet utilized the merits of a multidimensional conception of class. In light of this, the article suggests a comprehensive Bourdieusian framework for class analysis, integrating culture as both a structural phenomenon co-constitutive of class and as symbolic...... practice. Further, the article explores this theoretical framework in a multiple correspondence analysis of a Danish survey, demonstrating how class and political practices are indeed homologous. However, the analysis also points at several elements of field autonomy, and the concluding discussion...

  15. Cultural differences in risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Yeong Kim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We compared South Koreans with Australians in order to characterize cultural differences in attitudes and choices regarding risk, at both the individual and group levels. Our results showed that Australians, when assessed individually, consistently self-reported higher preference for risk than South Koreans, regardless of gender. The data revealed that South Koreans, regardless of gender composition, were willing to take greater risks when making decisions in group decision-making situations than when they were alone. This is a different pattern from that seen in the Australian sample, in which a risky shift was noted only among males. This difference was attributed to the influence of various cultural orientations (independent vs. interdependent relationship styles. This study also provides a discussion of the implications of these results in terms of cultural differences in attitudes and decisions regarding risk.

  16. Culture in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    As engineers today often work in intercultural projects and contexts, intercultural competences must be part of the learning objectives in engineering educations. Cultural aspects of engineering education should not just be treated as a question of appropriate communication and teaching: cultural...... aspects are basically part of engineering discipli¬nes, work challenges as well as the contextual elements in engineering curriculum [1,2]. This is reflected in the aims of the CDIO programme [3,4]; however, the programme, as well as the teaching practises, undoubtedly needs to further develop approaches...... to cultural aspects in engineering education. Hence the key-question of this paper is how CDIO support the development of intercultural competences in engineering education. The paper explores the implementation of CDIO in an intercultural arctic engineering programme in Greenland that since 2001 has been...

  17. Cultural War of Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cultural War of Values: The Proliferation of Moral Identities In the Danish Public Sphere Peter Hervik (Aalborg University) This chapter looks at the drastic shift in the construction of minority others that came with the emergence of neo-nationalism, neo-racism and radical right populism...... in the post-1989 world. Through an analysis of a political philosophy launched in Denmark in the 1990s called the “Cultural War of Values”, I show that the moral identities proliferating in the Danish public sphere are fundamentally anti-political correct, anti-multiculturalist, and anti......-Marxist as confrontation is also directed at political adversaries. Thus, the chapter’s key argument is that the social construction of thick minority identities can only be understood in relation to the cultural war of value strategy aimed at domestic political opponents....

  18. Cultural Orientation and Interdisciplinarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie Søndergaard

    2004-01-01

    I begin the article with an account of the background to the German debate on ‘Literaturwissenschaft als Kulturwissenschaft’, including the introduction of the concept of ’cultural orientation’ as a strategy for achieving interdisciplinarity. This is followed by a consideration of the discussion ...... of the object of literary studies as a way of defining the disciplinarity or identity of literary studies. Finally I summarize some of the characteristics of culturally orientated literary studies.......I begin the article with an account of the background to the German debate on ‘Literaturwissenschaft als Kulturwissenschaft’, including the introduction of the concept of ’cultural orientation’ as a strategy for achieving interdisciplinarity. This is followed by a consideration of the discussion...

  19. Embodied Cultures of Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    and material artifacts. The paper target the complex relationship between the moving, sensing body and the material and built environment of infrastructures and mobility modes in order to explore what norms, and meanings, and everyday life mobility cultures are being produced and re-produced in this process....... A particular emphasis is put on how mobilities produce and re-produce norms, meanings and cultures in relation to the Everyday life perspective. By looking into walking, running, cycling, driving and mass transit mobilities different modes of embodied mobility is identified. The theoretical framework is based...... and interaction (Lynch). The argument is thus that understanding embodied cultures of mobilities from the vantage point of this paper lend is self to new interpretations, explorations and understandings of what it means to move within and between other social agents in particular material and physical...

  20. [Time, cultures, and coexistence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchardus, M; Glorieux, I; Scheys, M

    1987-06-01

    "In this essay, the authors try to illustrate the relevance of the sociology of time for the study of migration and inter-cultural relations. It is argued that by taking the time-dimension more explicitly into account, our insights in the dynamics of these relations can be [improved].... In connection with international migration processes, this relationship appears to be influenced by at least six different factors: 1) the sudden transition from a rural to an urban, industrial environment; 2) the perspective of the return to the homeland; 3) the confrontation with the culture of the host country and with other migrants' cultures; 4) the religious, ideological and political developments in the homeland; 5) the reactions of the host country and the problems these create; 6) the minority position of the migrants." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  1. Kamikazes and cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Hermanson, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Is cultural evolution needed to explain altruistic selfsacrifice? Some contend that cultural traits (e.g. beliefs, behaviors, and for some "memes") replicate according to selection processes that have "floated free" from biology. One test case is the example of suicide kamikaze attacks in wartime Japan. Standard biological mechanisms-such as reciprocal altruism and kin selection-might not seem to apply here: The suicide pilots did not act on the expectation that others would reciprocate, and they were supposedly sacrificing themselves for country and emperor, not close relatives. Yet an examination of both the historical record and the demands of evolutionary theory suggest the kamikaze phenomenon does not cry out for explanation in terms of a special non-biological selection process. This weakens the case for cultural evolution, and has interesting implications for our understanding of altruistic self-sacrifice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Accelerating the culture change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunk, S W; Panetta, J; Wooten, J

    1996-11-01

    Exide Electronics, a major supplier of uninterruptible power system equipment, embarked on a journey of changing a culture to improve quality, enhance customer responsiveness, and reduce costs. This case study examines the evolution of change over a period of seven years, with particular emphasis on the most recent years, 1992 through 1995. The article focuses on the Raleigh plant operations and describes how each succeeding year built on the successes and fixed the shortcomings of the prior years to accelerate the culture change, including corrective action and continuous improvement processes, organizational structures, expectations, goals, achievements, and pitfalls. The real challenge to changing the culture was structuring a dynamic approach to accelerate change! The presentation also examines how the evolutionary process itself can be created and accelerated through ongoing communication, regular feedback of progress and goals, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance.

  3. The Cultural Heritage of Interculturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Peterson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the cultural heritage of inter-cultural contexts, which have had profound impact over long time. It takes its departure in antique and culturally complex environments in the eastern Mediterranean. One millennium later corresponding inter-cultural conditions are explored in the western part of the Mediterranean. Both cases demonstrated their wide and long lasting influences on posterity. The cultural heritage implied the deep effects of cross-fertilization and ensuing cultural enrichment as the conflation of several well-endowed cultures took place. A similar, more powerful outcome followed the Radical Enlightenment in Leiden around 1650s and in Vienna some centuries later.

  4. Cultural Topology of Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Andryukhina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The man in the modern culture faces the challenge of either being creative or forced to leave the stage, which reflects the essential basics of life. The price of lost opportunities, caused by mental stereotypes and encapsulation, is gradually rising. The paper reveals the socio-cultural conditions and the necessary cultural topology of creativity development, as well as the man’s creative potential in the 21st century. The content of the creativity concept is specified along with the phenomenon of its fast expansion in the modern discourse. That results from the global spreading of numerous creative practices in various spheres of life, affecting the progress directions in economics, business, industrial technologies, labor, employment and social stratification. The author emphasizes the social features of creativity, the rising number of, so called, creative class, and outlines the two opposing strategies influencing the topology modification of the social and cultural environment. The first one, applied by the developed countries, facilitates the development of the creative human potential, whereas the other one, inherent in our country, holds that a creative person is able to make progress by himself. However, for solving the urgent problem of innovative development, the creative potential of modern Russia is not sufficient, and following the second strategy will result in unrealized social opportunities and ever lasting social and cultural situation demanding further investment. According to the author, to avoid such a perspective, it is necessary to overcome the three deeply rooted archetypes: the educational disciplinary centrism, organizational absolutism and cultural ostracism. 

  5. Cultural Topology of Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Andryukhina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The man in the modern culture faces the challenge of either being creative or forced to leave the stage, which reflects the essential basics of life. The price of lost opportunities, caused by mental stereotypes and encapsulation, is gradually rising. The paper reveals the socio-cultural conditions and the necessary cultural topology of creativity development, as well as the man’s creative potential in the 21st century. The content of the creativity concept is specified along with the phenomenon of its fast expansion in the modern discourse. That results from the global spreading of numerous creative practices in various spheres of life, affecting the progress directions in economics, business, industrial technologies, labor, employment and social stratification. The author emphasizes the social features of creativity, the rising number of, so called, creative class, and outlines the two opposing strategies influencing the topology modification of the social and cultural environment. The first one, applied by the developed countries, facilitates the development of the creative human potential, whereas the other one, inherent in our country, holds that a creative person is able to make progress by himself. However, for solving the urgent problem of innovative development, the creative potential of modern Russia is not sufficient, and following the second strategy will result in unrealized social opportunities and ever lasting social and cultural situation demanding further investment. According to the author, to avoid such a perspective, it is necessary to overcome the three deeply rooted archetypes: the educational disciplinary centrism, organizational absolutism and cultural ostracism. 

  6. What is culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Breznik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the pressure of applicability of research and a problem-solving approach, contemporary scientific practices often fail to define their “object of knowledge” and to reflect upon their own work. It may therefore be good to ask a naïve question: What is culture? In the art world, the arts often function as the last ideological fortress. In scientific research, an analogous role is played by the notion of culture as a gradual “process of civilisation” that moves people by the means of self-restraint and refinement towards civilisation and away from barbarism. The historical and contemporary cases examined in the article show that there is no transtemporal culture with an a priori positive and “progressive” social role. The concept of culture cannot be separated from: (1 the establishment of financial institutions in the Renaissance, when patronage of the arts helped to “legalise” the most profitable and then-forbidden practice of usury; (2 the transformation of class war into cultural difference via the refinement of the Renaissance carnival; (3 the establishment of general access to education in the 20th century, which, in itself, could not abolish social inequalities, but to the contrary integrated educated people into the reproduction of social inequalities; (4 the establishment of the world art system in the 21st century, when the “capitalist welfare state” replaced the “social welfare state.” From these examples we can draw the conclusion that culture is rather a “Trojan Horse” that can at times work as a destructive social force.

  7. Hydroponics or soilless culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H. D.

    1963-01-01

    Historically, hydroponics is not a new field; plant physiologists have known and used it for some 100 years. Inevitably, some enthusiasts got carried away.Claims were made of enormous potential yields; skyscraper tops were said to be capable of producing enough food for all of their occupants; and closets, basements, garages, etc. were wishfully converted into fields for hydroponic culture. Numerous publications on the subject appeared during this period. Basic requirements for hydropinc techniques are given along with examples of where soilless culture has been used commercially.

  8. Quake warnings, seismic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Huggins, Tom; Miles, Scott; Otegui, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Since 1990, nearly one million people have died from the impacts of earthquakes. Reducing those impacts requires building a local seismic culture in which residents are aware of earthquake risks and value efforts to mitigate harm. Such efforts include earthquake early warning (EEW) systems that provide seconds to minutes notice of pending shaking. Recent events in Mexico provide an opportunity to assess performance and perception of an EEW system and highlight areas for further improvement. We have learned that EEW systems, even imperfect ones, can help people prepare for earthquakes and build local seismic culture, both beneficial in reducing earthquake-related losses.

  9. Brain, body and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay sketches out a biocultural theory of religion which is based on an expanded view of cognition that is anchored in brain and body (embrained and embodied), deeply dependent on culture (enculturated) and extended and distributed beyond the borders of individual brains. Such an approach...... uniquely accommodates contemporary cultural and neurobiological sciences. Since the challenge that the study of religion faces, in my opinion, is at the interstices of these sciences, I have tried to develop a theory of religion which acknowledges the fact. My hope is that the theory can be of use...

  10. CULTURE AND CORRUPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihut Ioan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available National culture and the organization’s management are interdependent systems of values, which generate human performances that can reach levels of excellence. But, in certain crises situations, generated and supported by turbulent economic frames, by the transition from one economic system to another, the cultures specific to the organizations’ management become vulnerable. In such conditions, when an economic system is chaotically dismantled, as it happened to the communist one, “an organized anarchy” appears, a system which is good for some individuals and interest groups that assimilates rapidly the deficiencies specific to a “marginal culture”.

  11. Global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    As stated in the Nuclear Safety Review 1996, three components characterize the global nuclear safety culture infrastructure: (i) legally binding international agreements; (ii) non-binding common safety standards; and (iii) the application of safety standards. The IAEA has continued to foster the global nuclear safety culture by supporting intergovernmental collaborative efforts; it has facilitated extensive information exchange, promoted the drafting of international legal agreements and the development of common safety standards, and provided for the application of safety standards by organizing a wide variety of expert services

  12. Patient Safety Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg

    of health care professional’s behaviour, habits, norms, values, and basic assumptions related to patient care; it is the way things are done. The patient safety culture guides the motivation, commitment to and know-how of the safety management, and how all members of a work place interact. This thesis......Patient safety is highly prioritised in the Danish health care system, never the less, patients are still exposed to risk and harmed every day. Implementation of a patient safety culture has been suggested an effective mean to protect patients against adverse events. Working strategically...

  13. Framing financial culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm; Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.

    2014-01-01

    between competing frames leads to the conclusion that this political “blame game” is related to struggles over how to define the scandal, how to conceptualize its causes, and policy recommendations. Banks may have lost the battle of “Liborgate,” but the war over the meaning of financial culture is far...... from over. Originality/value – The paper is theoretically and methodologically original in its combination of the theories of framing and stasis, and it provides analytical insights into how sense is made of financial culture in the wake of the financial crisis....

  14. Late Modern Play Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Helle Skovbjerg

    2008-01-01

    and the Danish University of Education (among others) have been working with different kind of products, all referred to as PlAYWARE. Playware combines modern technology and knowledge about play culture in order to produce playful experiences for its players. This paper will exemplify how the concept of play can...... from one generation to the next. Because older children are no longer present as younger children grow up, the traditional "cultural leaders" are gone. They have taken with them much of the inspiration for play as well as important knowledge about how to organise a game. In that sense we can say...

  15. Culture and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Bradley, B G

    1993-03-01

    The painstaking and always tentative effort to discover the universal characteristics of the human species differs in motive and attitude according to the arrogant anxiety-abating need for each of us to impose our own cultural categories upon others. When stemming from Europe this is seen by some as a form of psychiatric imperialism, by others as the fallacy of universalism and the primary of culture. Evidence from Papua New Guinea and other groups elsewhere show quite clearly that the noetic domains of those groups with different languages are so organized that the notion of a universal consensual science cannot be sustained.

  16. Raymond Williams and local cultures

    OpenAIRE

    B Longhurst

    1991-01-01

    In this paper it is maintained that Raymond Williams's writings on culture are of great importance to current developments in cultural geography. His work is periodised into three stages and its different subject matters identified. An interpretation of Williams's theory of culture is offered which places particular emphasis on his concepts of 'structure of feeling' and 'knowable community'. The creative tension between Williams's holistic treatment of culture and his stress on cultural strug...

  17. On viewing culture as situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    cultural contexts. Bazerman, Charles. (1988): Shaping Written Knowledge: The Genre & Activity of the Experimental Article in Science. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.   Hall, Edward T. (1976). Beyond Culture. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press. Hofstede, Geert. Culture's Consequences: International...... Differences in Work-Related Values. Abr. ed. Newbury Park: Sage Publications, 1984. ---. Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2001. ---. Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. New York: Mc...

  18. CHALLENGES IN CROSS CULTURAL ADVERTISING

    OpenAIRE

    Yuni Retnowati

    2016-01-01

    At first, marketing practitioners and academics consider standardized approaches to marketing and advertising strategies in globalization, and then some studies proved that the standardization of advertising across culture is not valid. Therefore, cross cultural advertising takes local culture into account when conveying messages in advertisements. Cross cultural understanding is very important in order to produce successful localized advertising that would reflect the cultural values and nor...

  19. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  20. Organizational culture in ICT companies

    OpenAIRE

    Pilík, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with problematic of organizational culture with emphasis on organizational culture in ICT companies. Main goal of this thesis is to develop own framework for influencing organizational culture in ICT companies. The introductory part sums up an overview of definitions of culture and organizational culture in chronological order. Evaluation of definitions from the author's perspective is also part of the opening chapter. The main part of thesis focuses on proposing framework f...

  1. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  2. Development of self in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Human beings are inherently cultural beings – growing up in an environment that is steeped in culture and developing our self-construal accordingly. The new psychology book series Self in culture in mind (SICIM) gathers current research perspectives on this issue. This first volume, Development...... and in different cultural settings, while concurrently illustrating the diversity of empirical methods that are appropriate for studying culture-mind-mediation....

  3. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  4. Organizational Culture In Perspective Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Safriadi, Supriadi Hamdat, Munsi Lampe, Musran Munizu

    2016-01-01

    - This article describes the anthropological perspective in the study of the organization, particularly related to the culture of the organization. Organizational culture is a reflection of the organization itself. Anthropology as a science that covers the study of culture takes an important role in the development of cultural studies organization. An ethnographic approach that looks at the phenomenon based on what the owner or the perpetrator of culture will provide a positive contributio...

  5. O processo de cuidar da pessoa que sofreu queimaduras: significado cultural atribuído por familiares El proceso de cuidar de personas que sufrieron quemadura: significado cultural atribuido por familiares The process of delivering care to a burned person: cultural meaning attributed by relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Aparecida Rossi

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo etnográfico foram identificar o significado cultural atribuído por familiares à participação no processo de cuidar da pessoa ultima de queimadura; identificar as estratégias de cuidado que os familiares focalizam frente à participação no cuidado. Os dados foram coletados mediante entrevistas semi-estruturadas com 25 familiares de clientes que sofreram queimaduras, admitidos em uma Unidade de Queimados e observações participantes. Os resultados mostram que o significado cultural atribuído por familiares de pessoas vítimas queimaduras ao processo de cuidar tem duas dimensões: a física e a moral e gera principalmente medo.Los objetivos fueron investigar los significados culturales atribuidos por familiares a la participación en el proceso de cuidar de personas víctimas de quemadura; identificar las estratégias que los familiares enfocan en su participación en el cuidado. Los datos fueron colectados a través de entrevistas semi-estructuradas con 25 familiares de clientes quemados admitidos en una Unidad de Quemados y a través de observaciones participantes realizadas durante el período de visitas y en reuniones con familiares de clientes. Los resultados de este estudio muestran que la perspectiva de cuidar de una persona que sufrió una quemadura tiene dos dimensiones: la física y la moral, y genera principalmente miedo.This study aimed at investigating the cultural meanings attributed by relatives to their participation in the process of delivering care to burned people; identifying the care strategies focused on by relatives during their participation in the care process. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews with 25 relatives of burned patients admitted in a Unit for Burned and by participant observation. The results of this study show that the perspective of giving care to a burned person has two dimensions: a physical dimension and a moral one; and generates mainly fear.

  6. Report of scientific meeting; Compte rendu de reunion scientifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herino, R.; Delville, R. [Mission pour la Science et la Technologie, Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the two days organized in November 2005 on the energy and the nano-technologies and focused on the energy storage and distribution. After a presentation of the context, it takes stock on the different projects presented. The second part details the program and offers an abstract of each presentation. (A.L.B.)

  7. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  8. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CULTURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrinka Zadel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of analysis in the paper is economic impact of cultural tourism and identification of the main factors which directly affect cultural tourism revenues. Most countries do not have a statistical system of monitoring and analysing individual factors of cultural tourism such as the number of arrivals of cultural tourists and consumption of cultural tourists. Therefore, it is hard to assess the economic impact of cultural tourism. In cultural tourism, cultural assets are prepared and placed on the tourist market, i.e. cultural resources are transformed into cultural tourism products. The main objective is fulfilling tourists' needs, and achieving positive effects which includes economic effects. Identification of the economic impact of cultural tourism is important because cultural resources have an inestimable value for the local community. Tourism valorisation should be used in order to achieve the necessary maximum effects with minimum negative impacts which tourism may leave on cultural resources. The objective of the paper is to identify the economic contribution of cultural tourism in the Republic of Croatia and to propose a model of identification of economic impact of cultural tourism.

  9. Culture, Personality, Health, and Family Dynamics: Cultural Competence in the Selection of Culturally Sensitive Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2010-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity and cultural competence in the selection of culturally sensitive treatments is a requisite for effective counseling practice in working with diverse clients and their families, particularly when clients present with health issues or medical problems. Described here is a strategy for selecting culturally sensitive treatments…

  10. Mediated Cultural Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    generations. Acts of mass violence also construct a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories that are mediated through stories: retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated in contemporary documentary or fiction films. In these processes of retelling acts...

  11. Journal of Cultural Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Cultural Studies was established in 1999 as an independent tool for research development in Africa. It is published by the Nigerian Group for the Study of African ... Sexual Harassment in the Workplace: A Case for Linguistic and Sexual Politics? EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  12. Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  13. Safety culture in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado Gonzalez, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, there are describe the activities already accomplished and the activities planned to be executed by the licensee and the regulator with the aim to develop, maintain and strength Safety Culture in all the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant activities. (author)

  14. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  15. Bone culture research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Nicola C.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments described are aimed at exploring PTH regulation of production of collagenase and protein inhibitors of collagenase (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases, TIMP-1 and -2) by osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells under conditions of weightlessness. The results of this work will contribute to information as to whether a microgravity environment alters the functions and responsiveness of the osteoblast. The objectives of the Bone Culture Research (BCR) experiment are: to observe the effects of microgravity on the morphology, rate of proliferation, and behavior of the osteoblastic cells, UMR 106-01; to determine whether microgravy affects the hormonal sensitivity of osteroblastic cells; and to measure the secretion of collagenase and its inhibitors into the medium under conditions of microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: the osteoblast-like cells, UMR-106-01, will be cultured in four NASDA cell culture chambers; two chambers will be subjected to microgravity on SL-J; two chambers will remain on the ground at KSC as ground controls but subjected to an identical set of culture conditions as on the shuttle; media will be changed four times; twice the cells will receive the hormone parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and media collected; cells will be photographed under conditions of microgravity; and media and photographs will be analyzed upon return to determine whether functions of the cells changed.

  16. Multiculturalisme et culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    . On epistemological grounds, these approaches would assimilate cultures to closed ensembles with strictly defined contours and content. On political grounds, such a conception faces three types of objections. It would favor the propagation of stereotypes, influence the balance of power within communities and alter...

  17. Cultures et organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.; Hofstede, G.J.; Minkov, M.

    2010-01-01

    La coopération interculturelle, une question de survie Véritable atlas des valeurs culturelles, paru en 18 langues, Cultures et organisations est le fruit de plus de 40 ans de recherches menées dans plus de 100 pays. Il est aujourd'hui le livre de référence des chercheurs, universitaires et

  18. Immediation (Cultures of Immediacy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2018-01-01

    with a complex interplay of social-, security-, science- and economy-related issues. The growing interest in immediation confirms its status as a new but as yet underestimated paradigm for the arts, sciences and humanities which calls for a future-focused inquiry into the cultures of immediacy. However...

  19. Two cultures - one symbol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Shostak

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the question of similarities in the approach to the multilevel symbolism in Slav and Native American cultures. Ambivalent symbol of the snake is analyzed in the frame of mythological thinking. At the end the author comes to the conclusion that elements of mythological thinking are still present in everyday life and influence human behavior levels

  20. Storytelling and German Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Connie S. Eigenmann

    The genre of fairytales, one structured form of storytelling, has been labeled "Marchen." German culture is orally transmitted in this generic form, and can be traced to a collection of 210 fairytales, the Grimm brothers'"Kinder-und Taus-Marchen," first published shortly after 1800. For this study, research questions were posed…