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Sample records for culture infectious dose

  1. Characterization of infectious dose and lethal dose of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Douglas; Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to infect a host is a key trait of a virus, and differences in infectivity could put one virus at an evolutionary advantage over another. In this study we have quantified the infectivity of two strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) that are known to differ in fitness and virulence. By exposing juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hosts to a wide range of virus doses, we were able to calculate the infectious dose in terms of ID50 values for the two genotypes. Lethal dose experiments were also conducted to confirm the virulence difference between the two virus genotypes, using a range of virus doses and holding fish either in isolation or in batch so as to calculate LD50values. We found that infectivity is positively correlated with virulence, with the more virulent genotype having higher infectivity. Additionally, infectivity increases more steeply over a short range of doses compared to virulence, which has a shallower increase. We also examined the data using models of virion interaction and found no evidence to suggest that virions have either an antagonistic or a synergistic effect on each other, supporting the independent action hypothesis in the process of IHNV infection of rainbow trout.

  2. Resident microbiota affect Bordetella pertussis infectious dose and host specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Feaga, Heather A; Park, Jihye; Muse, Sarah J; Safi, Chetan Y; Rolin, Olivier Y; Young, Sarah E; Harvill, Eric T

    2014-03-01

    Before contacting host tissues, invading pathogens directly or indirectly interact with host microbiota, but the effects of such interactions on the initial stages of infection are poorly understood. Bordetella pertussis is highly infectious among humans but requires large doses to colonize rodents, unlike a closely related zoonotic pathogen, Bordetella bronchiseptica, raising important questions about the contributions of bacterial competition to initial colonization and host selection. We observed that <100 colony-forming units (CFU) of B. bronchiseptica efficiently infected mice and displaced culturable host microbiota, whereas 10 000 CFU of B. pertussis were required to colonize murine nasal cavities and did not displace host microorganisms. Bacteria isolated from murine nasal cavities but not those from the human lower respiratory tract limited B. pertussis growth in vitro, indicating that interspecies competition may limit B. pertussis colonization of mice. Further, a broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment delivered before B. pertussis inoculation reduced the infectious dose to <100 CFU, and reintroduction of single Staphylococcus or Klebsiella species was sufficient to inhibit B. pertussis colonization of antibiotic-treated mice. Together, these results reveal that resident microorganisms can prevent B. pertussis colonization and influence host specificity, and they provide rationale for manipulating microbiomes to create more-accurate animal models of infectious diseases.

  3. Effect of infectious dose and season on development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Chriél, Mariann; Jensen, Trine H; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Høiby, Niels; Hammer, Anne Sofie

    2013-07-01

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia is an acute and fatal disease of farmed mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pathogenesis of this disease has not yet been resolved. Mink are the only animals known to be susceptible to acute, contagious, and fatal lung infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between dose-response and season of infection and to clarify whether Danish mink are carriers of P. aeruginosa on their nasal mucosa during the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia. To elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease, an infectious dose-response trial was carried out on adult mink and mink kits, both in the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia (November) as well as out of season (July). It proved difficult to infect mink via the intra-nasal route. Only 4 out of 60 infected mink developed clinical disease and were euthanized, all of them in November, illustrating that predisposing factors in the mink itself and not infectious dose might be crucial for disease development. We were able to culture P. aeruginosa from the nasal cavity of the clinically healthy experimental mink 8 d after inoculation. This indicated that the mink can carry P. aeruginosa on their nasal mucosa without developing the disease. It was not possible, however, to culture P. aeruginosa from the nasal cavity of clinically healthy mink obtained from farms in November, which indicates that the organism is not a normal part of the nasal mucosal flora of mink.

  4. Immune Subversion and Quorum-Sensing Shape the Variation in Infectious Dose among Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Abby, Sophie S.; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Dionisio, Francisco; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to understand the mechanisms used by pathogenic bacteria to exploit human hosts. These mechanisms are very diverse in the detail, but share commonalities whose quantification should enlighten the evolution of virulence from both a molecular and an ecological perspective. We mined the literature for experimental data on infectious dose of bacterial pathogens in humans (ID50) and also for traits with which ID50 might be associated. These compilations were checked and complemented with genome analyses. We observed that ID50 varies in a continuous way by over 10 orders of magnitude. Low ID50 values are very strongly associated with the capacity of the bacteria to kill professional phagocytes or to survive in the intracellular milieu of these cells. Inversely, high ID50 values are associated with motile and fast-growing bacteria that use quorum-sensing based regulation of virulence factors expression. Infectious dose is not associated with genome size and shows insignificant phylogenetic inertia, in line with frequent virulence shifts associated with the horizontal gene transfer of a small number of virulence factors. Contrary to previous proposals, infectious dose shows little dependence on contact-dependent secretion systems and on the natural route of exposure. When all variables are combined, immune subversion and quorum-sensing are sufficient to explain two thirds of the variance in infectious dose. Our results show the key role of immune subversion in effective human infection by small bacterial populations. They also suggest that cooperative processes might be important for successful infection by bacteria with high ID50. Our results suggest that trade-offs between selection for population growth-related traits and selection for the ability to subvert the immune system shape bacterial infectiousness. Understanding these trade-offs provides guidelines to study the evolution of virulence and in particular the micro-evolutionary paths

  5. Determination of the Infectious Dose of Helicobacter pylori during Primary and Secondary Infection in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Hansen, Lori M.; Canfield, Don R.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine the infectious dose of Helicobacter pylori during primary and secondary infection in the rhesus monkey and to determine whether preinoculation acid suppression is necessary to produce colonization. Mixed inoculation with three human-derived strains showed that H. pylori J166 is particularly adapted to colonization of rhesus monkeys, since it outcompeted two other strains. The minimum infectious dose of H. pylori J166 was 104 bacteria in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-fre...

  6. Lithium chloride inhibits the coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sally M; Tarpey, Ian; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Hiscox, Julian A

    2007-04-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a major economic pathogen of domestic poultry that, despite vaccination, causes mortality and significant losses in production. During replication of the RNA genome there is a high frequency of mutation and recombination, which has given rise to many strains of IBV and results in the potential for new and emerging strains. Currently the live-attenuated vaccine gives poor cross-strain immunity. Effective antiviral agents may therefore be advantageous in the treatment of IBV. Lithium chloride (LiCl) is a potent inhibitor of the DNA virus herpes simplex virus but not RNA viruses. The effect of LiCl on the replication of IBV was examined in cell culture using two model cell types; Vero cells, an African Green monkey kidney-derived epithelial cell line; and DF-1 cells, an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblast cell line. When treated with a range of LiCl concentrations, IBV RNA and protein levels and viral progeny production were reduced in a dose-dependent manner in both cell types, and the data indicated that inhibition was a cellular rather than a virucidal effect. Host cell protein synthesis still took place in LiCl-treated cells and the level of a standard cellular housekeeping protein remained unchanged, indicating that the effect of LiCl was specifically against IBV.

  7. Mycobacterium ulcerans low infectious dose and mechanical transmission support insect bites and puncturing injuries in the spread of Buruli ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John R; Mangas, Kirstie M; Porter, Jessica L; Marcsisin, Renee; Pidot, Sacha J; Howden, Brian; Omansen, Till F; Zeng, Weiguang; Axford, Jason K; Johnson, Paul D R; Stinear, Timothy P

    2017-04-01

    Addressing the transmission enigma of the neglected disease Buruli ulcer (BU) is a World Health Organization priority. In Australia, we have observed an association between mosquitoes harboring the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and BU. Here we tested a contaminated skin model of BU transmission by dipping the tails from healthy mice in cultures of the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans. Tails were exposed to mosquito (Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti) blood feeding or punctured with sterile needles. Two of 12 of mice with M. ulcerans contaminated tails exposed to feeding A. notoscriptus mosquitoes developed BU. There were no mice exposed to A. aegypti that developed BU. Eighty-eight percent of mice (21/24) subjected to contaminated tail needle puncture developed BU. Mouse tails coated only in bacteria did not develop disease. A median incubation time of 12 weeks, consistent with data from human infections, was noted. We then specifically tested the M. ulcerans infectious dose-50 (ID50) in this contaminated skin surface infection model with needle puncture and observed an ID50 of 2.6 colony-forming units. We have uncovered a biologically plausible mechanical transmission mode of BU via natural or anthropogenic skin punctures.

  8. Mycobacterium ulcerans low infectious dose and mechanical transmission support insect bites and puncturing injuries in the spread of Buruli ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Wallace

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the transmission enigma of the neglected disease Buruli ulcer (BU is a World Health Organization priority. In Australia, we have observed an association between mosquitoes harboring the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and BU. Here we tested a contaminated skin model of BU transmission by dipping the tails from healthy mice in cultures of the causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans. Tails were exposed to mosquito (Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti blood feeding or punctured with sterile needles. Two of 12 of mice with M. ulcerans contaminated tails exposed to feeding A. notoscriptus mosquitoes developed BU. There were no mice exposed to A. aegypti that developed BU. Eighty-eight percent of mice (21/24 subjected to contaminated tail needle puncture developed BU. Mouse tails coated only in bacteria did not develop disease. A median incubation time of 12 weeks, consistent with data from human infections, was noted. We then specifically tested the M. ulcerans infectious dose-50 (ID50 in this contaminated skin surface infection model with needle puncture and observed an ID50 of 2.6 colony-forming units. We have uncovered a biologically plausible mechanical transmission mode of BU via natural or anthropogenic skin punctures.

  9. Highly efficient full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (strain TN) infectious culture system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Jensen, Sanne B

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of end stage liver disease worldwide. In the United States, most HCV-related disease is associated with genotype 1 infection, which remains difficult to treat. Drug and vaccine development was hampered by inability to culture......) culture systems in Huh7.5 cells. Here, we developed a highly efficient genotype 1a (strain TN) full-length culture system. We initially found that the LSG substitutions conferred viability to an intergenotypic recombinant composed of TN 5' untranslated region (5'UTR)-NS5A and JFH1 NS5B-3'UTR; recovered...... with 8 changes (designated TN cell-culture derived, TNcc) replicated efficiently and released infectious particles of ∼5 log(10) focus-forming units per mL; passaged TNcc did not require additional changes. IFN-α and directly acting antivirals targeting the HCV protease, NS5A, and NS5B, each inhibited...

  10. [The preparation phosprenyl suppresses diarrhea and cattle infectious rhinotracheitis virus multiplication in sensitive cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozherelkov, S V; Belousova, R V; Danilov, L L; Deeva, A V; Mal'tsev, S D; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fosprenil suppressed the multiplication of cattle diarrhea virus in calf coronary vessel cell culture. Added to the culture of infected cells in a dose of 200 mg, the drug decreased the virus titer 30-fold in comparison with infected control cultures. Antiviral activity of fosprenil towards infective rhinotracheitis virus multiplication was still higher: in a dose of 100 mg it decreased the virus titer in fetal calf lung culture 100-fold in comparison with the control. Moreover, the cytopathogenic effects of the viruses in infected cultures were 24-48 h delayed under the effect of fosprenil in comparison with infected control cultures. These results recommend fosprenil for the treatment of cattle viral diseases.

  11. Quantitative analysis of particles, genomes and infectious particles in supernatants of haemorrhagic fever virus cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund Kjell-Olof

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on the replication of viral haemorrhagic fever viruses is not readily available and has never been analysed in a comparative approach. Here, we compared the cell culture growth characteristics of haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFV, of the Arenaviridae, Filoviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Flavivridae virus families by performing quantitative analysis of cell culture supernatants by (i electron microscopy for the quantification of virus particles, (ii quantitative real time PCR for the quantification of genomes, and (iii determination of focus forming units by coating fluorescent antibodies to infected cell monolayers for the quantification of virus infectivity. The comparative analysis revealed that filovirus and RVFV replication results in a surplus of genomes but varying degrees of packaging efficiency and infectious particles. More efficient replication and packaging was observed for Lassa virus, and Dengue virus resulting in a better yield of infectious particles while, YFV turned out to be most efficient with only 4 particles inducing one FFU. For Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV a surplus of empty shells was observed with only one in 24 particles equipped with a genome. The complete particles turned out to be extraordinarily infectious.

  12. Imaging-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for infectious spondylitis: Factors affecting culture positivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Si Yoon; Kwon, Jong Won [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the variable factors affecting the results of percutaneous needle biopsies for infectious spondylitis. In all, 249 patients who underwent both MRI and percutaneous needle biopsies due to a suspicion of infectious spondylitis were evaluated with respect to the following factors: the usage of antibiotics before the procedure, the location of the biopsy, the guiding equipment used, the experience level of the operators, and the number of biopsies performed. The positivity of culture in cases of treated with antibiotics (16.3%) before the biopsy was lower than in the untreated cases (30.5%) (p = 0.004). Biopsies performed at the abscess (43.5%) and with fluoroscopic guidance (27.8%) showed higher culture positivity as well. The experience level of the operators and the number of biopsies had no effect on culture positivity. The usage of antibiotics before the biopsy, the biopsy's location, and the guiding equipment used affect the culture positivity, while the experience levels of the operators and the number of biopsies do not have an effect.

  13. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection.

  14. Effect of infectious dose and season on development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Chriél, Mariann; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia is an acute and fatal disease of farmed mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pathogenesis of this disease has not yet been resolved. Mink are the only animals known to be susceptible to acute, contagious, and fatal lung infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The purpose...... of this study was to investigate the correlation between dose-response and season of infection and to clarify whether Danish mink are carriers of P. aeruginosa on their nasal mucosa during the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia. To elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease, an infectious dose-response trial...... was carried out on adult mink and mink kits, both in the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia (November) as well as out of season (July). It proved difficult to infect mink via the intra-nasal route. Only 4 out of 60 infected mink developed clinical disease and were euthanized, all of them in November...

  15. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  16. Extended Perioperative Antibiotic Coverage in Conjunction with Intraoperative Bile Cultures Decreases Infectious Complications after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Amir H.; Jackson, Terence; Barati, Mehdi; Eghbalieh, Babak; Siegel, Kelly A.; Siegel, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bile contamination from the digestive tract is a well-known risk factor for postoperative complications. Despite the literature concerning prevalence of bacterobilia and fungobilia in patients with biliary pathologies, there are no specific recommendations for perioperative antimicrobial coverage for biliary/pancreatic procedures. We evaluated the effect of at least 72 hours of perioperative broad spectrum antibiotic coverage on outcomes of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Materials and Methods. A retrospective review of all patients at Case Medical Center of Case Western Reserve University undergoing PD procedure, from 2006 to 2011, was performed (n = 122). Perioperative data including demographics, comorbidities, biliary instrumentation, antibiotic coverage, culture results, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Propensity score matching method was used to match the patients according to duration of antibiotic coverage into two groups: 72 hours (A72) and 24 hours (A24). Results. Longer broad spectrum antibiotic coverage in group A72 resulted in significantly less surgical site infections after PD, compared to routine 24 hours of perioperative antibiotics in group A24. This study did not reveal a statistically significant decrease in postoperative fungal infections in patients receiving preoperative antifungals. Conclusion. Prolonged perioperative antibiotic therapy in conjunction with intraoperative bile cultures decreases the short-term infectious complications of PD, with no significant increase in Clostridium difficile colitis incidence. PMID:27147813

  17. Genetic mutations in live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses following single or dual in vitro infection of tracheal organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christopher; Bennett, Sarah; Forrester, Anne; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-12-01

    Despite regular co-vaccination of two different strains of live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses, little is known about possible mutations in these viruses following vaccination. As an alternative to chicks, this study used an in vitro infection model to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the part-S1 gene of two live infectious bronchitis virus vaccine strains (793B and Massachusetts) following single or dual inoculation onto tracheal organ cultures. Results indicate that viral titres reduced over the duration of the study; conversely, the amount of detected infectious bronchitis virus genome increased. Results demonstrate a greater number of non-synonymous SNPs in both vaccine strains when they are co-inoculated, compared with the single inoculations. The influence of the increased SNP and hydrophobic properties of the translated proteins on the vaccine viruses' virulence is unknown.

  18. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillot, Régis; Klontz, Karl C; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen.

  19. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  20. Comparison of administration of single dose ceftriaxone for elective caesarean section before skin incision and after cord clamping in preventing post-operative infectious morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaranjini, S; Veena, P; Rani, Reddi

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of ceftriaxone before skin incision and after cord clamping in preventing post-operative infectious morbidity and neonatal outcome in elective caesarean section and to determine the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis before skin incision on neonatal outcome. Our study was a randomised controlled trial conducted among 874 women undergoing elective caesarean section from October 2010 to July 2012. These women were randomly categorised into two groups with 437 women in each group. Group 1 received single dose of ceftriaxone 1 g intravenously 15-45 min before skin incision. Group 2 received the antibiotic after cord clamping. Primary outcome measures were maternal post-operative infectious morbidities like surgical site wound infection, febrile morbidity, endometritis, urinary tract infections and neonatal sepsis. Results were analysed using Chi-square test and unpaired t test. Surgical site wound infection occurred in 3 women in group 1 (0.7%) and 6 women in group 2 (1.4%). Fever occurred in 9 women in group 1 (2.1%) and 5 in group 2 (1.1%) with the p value of 0.419, not statistically significant. Urinary tract infection occurred in 9 women in group 1 (2.1%) and 7 women in group 2 (1.6%) with the p value of 0.801. None of the women in either group developed endometritis. About 20 neonates [10 neonates (2.3%) in group 1 and 10 neonates (2.3%) in group 2] required NICU admission after caesarean delivery. The reasons for admission were respiratory distress, prematurity and congenital anomaly. About 0.9% of neonates in group 1 and 1.8% in group 2 developed neonatal sepsis with positive blood culture (p = 0.388). Timing of administration of prophylactic antibiotics for elective caesarean section either before skin incision or after cord clamping did not have significant difference in the occurrence of post-operative infectious morbidity. No adverse neonatal outcome was observed in women who received the antibiotic before skin incision.

  1. Characterization of an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus carrier cell culture with resistance to superinfection with heterologous viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Inmaculada; Galiana, Antonio; Falcó, Alberto; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2011-04-21

    A state of persistence of a non susceptible fish cell line with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was established in vitro by experimental infection. The persistently infected culture showed sustained production of infectious virus and could be continuously passaged for months. A distinct feature of this culture is that only a very small fraction of the cells harbours virus replication, in contrast to other reported IPNV-persistently infected cells from salmonid fish, where nearly all the cells express viral antigens. In spite of the small number of detectable IPNV-infected cells, the carrier culture shows resistance to superinfection with homologous as well as heterologous viruses. Temperature shift-up experiments indicate that viral interference is due to continuous replication of IPNV in the culture. Quantitation of Mx gene expression suggested that the interference phenomenon could be mediated by the activation of the interferon (IFN) system. However, conditioned medium from the IPNV-infected cell cultures only marginally protected other cells against VHSV infection, indicating that other type I IFN-independent mechanism may be underlying the resistance of the persistently infected culture to infection with heterologous viruses. Our study defines a novel in vitro model of IPNV persistence and contributes to the understanding of the widespread distribution of aquabirnaviruses in marine and fresh water environments by establishing a carrier state in non susceptible fish species.

  2. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  3. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  4. Improved Risk Analysis by Dual Direct Detection of Total and Infectious Cryptosporidium Oocysts on Cell Culture in Combination with Immunofluorescence Assay▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalancette, Cindy; Di Giovanni, George D.; Prévost, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    The inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocysts is a main driver in the selection of water treatment disinfection strategies, and microbial risk analysis provides a sound basis for optimizing water treatment processes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 1622/23 provides an estimate of the total oocyst count; however, it cannot be used directly for risk assessment, as it does not determine the fraction of infectious oocysts. Improved assessment of the risk for designated sources or in treated water requires evaluation of the total number of oocysts and an estimate of their infectivity. We developed a dual direct detection method using differential immunofluorescent staining that allows detection of both oocysts and cell culture infection foci for each sample. Using Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, various pH levels, proteases, and gastroenteric compounds and substrates were assessed to determine their abilities to enhance the number of infection foci. The results showed that the key trigger for oocyst stimulation was acidification. Addition of a low concentration of d-glucose (50 mM) to the infection media increased rates of infectivity, while a higher dose (300 mM) was inhibitory. The total number of oocysts in each sample was determined by counting the oocysts remaining on a cell monolayer and the oocysts recovered from cell monolayer washes during processing using a simple filtration technique. With the dual direct detection on cell culture with immunofluorescence assay method, it is now possible to determine the numbers of total and infectious oocysts for a given sample in a single analysis. Direct percentages of infectivity are then calculated, which allows more accurate assessments of risk. PMID:19933339

  5. Production of infectious genotype 1b virus particles in cell culture and impairment by replication enhancing mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pietschmann

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV replicons, studies of the intracellular steps of the viral replication cycle became possible. These RNAs are capable of self-amplification in cultured human hepatoma cells, but save for the genotype 2a isolate JFH-1, efficient replication of these HCV RNAs requires replication enhancing mutations (REMs, previously also called cell culture adaptive mutations. These mutations cluster primarily in the central region of non-structural protein 5A (NS5A, but may also reside in the NS3 helicase domain or at a distinct position in NS4B. Most efficient replication has been achieved by combining REMs residing in NS3 with distinct REMs located in NS4B or NS5A. However, in spite of efficient replication of HCV genomes containing such mutations, they do not support production of infectious virus particles. By using the genotype 1b isolate Con1, in this study we show that REMs interfere with HCV assembly. Strongest impairment of virus formation was found with REMs located in the NS3 helicase (E1202G and T1280I as well as NS5A (S2204R, whereas a highly adaptive REM in NS4B still allowed virus production although relative levels of core release were also reduced. We also show that cells transfected with the Con1 wild type genome or the genome containing the REM in NS4B release HCV particles that are infectious both in cell culture and in vivo. Our data provide an explanation for the in vitro and in vivo attenuation of cell culture adapted HCV genomes and may open new avenues for the development of fully competent culture systems covering the therapeutically most relevant HCV genotypes.

  6. Robust HCV Genotype 3a Infectious Cell Culture System Permits Identification of Escape Variants With Resistance to Sofosbuvir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez Almeida, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte S.; Gottwein, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    barrier to resistance for sofosbuvir, whereas resistance to this DAA can be induced in genotype 3a. We therefore isolated HCV genotype 3a variants with reduced sensitivity to sofosbuvir, with increased fitness and with cross-resistance to other NS5B inhibitors. These findings indicate that sofosbuvir......Background & Aims Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) effectively eradicate chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, although HCV genotype 3a is less responsive to these drugs. We aimed to develop genotype 3a infectious cultures and study the effects of inhibitors of NS5A and NS5B and resistance...... with increasing concentrations of sofosbuvir was used to promote selection of HCV-resistant variants. Results We engineered a DBN3a variant with 17 substitutions (DBN3acc) that had replication and propagation kinetics in Huh7.5 cells comparable with prototype J6/JFH1. The adaptive mutations also produced culture...

  7. Evaluation of the matrix effect of thermophilic anaerobic digestion on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus using real-time PCR and viral cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tiejun; Bowlby, Evelyn; Tong, Yupin; Wu, John T Y; Wong, Lester; Tower, Robert J; Pang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomei

    2012-04-01

    The matrix effect of the thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) process on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) was evaluated. Viral cell culture and real-time PCR were used for assessing removal of the viral infectivity and degradation of viral DNA, respectively. Results showed that the TAD-derived matrix alone can inactivate the virus and destroy the nucleic acid helix core of ILTV in a time-and- dose-dependent manner. No cytopathogenic effect (CPE) was observed in the cells exposed to ILTV pre-treated with TAD matrix for 1.5h in experiment 1 and for 16h in experiment 2. There was a significant statistical difference between TAD matrix treated and non-treated cultures (p<0.001, Chi-test). Amplifiable ILT viral DNA was reduced 2.27 log by 1.5h-treatment and was not present by 16h-treatment with TAD matrix, indicating complete viral DNA fragmentation. The TAD process is an environmentally friendly way for disposing of poultry biowaste and carcasses.

  8. Comparison of Assays for Sensitive and Reproducible Detection of Cell Culture-Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, George D.; Rochelle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the three most commonly used assays for detecting Cryptosporidium sp. infections in cell culture: immunofluorescent antibody and microscopy assay (IFA), PCR targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific DNA, and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific mRNA. Monolayers of HCT-8 cells, grown in 8-well chamber slides or 96-well plates, were inoculated with a variety of viable and inactivated oocysts to assess assay performance. All assays detected infection with low doses of flow cytometry-enumerated Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, including infection with one oocyst and three oocysts. All methods also detected infection with Cryptosporidium hominis. The RT-PCR assay, IFA, and PCR assay detected infection in 23%, 25%, and 51% of monolayers inoculated with three C. parvum oocysts and 10%, 9%, and 16% of monolayers inoculated with one oocyst, respectively. The PCR assay was the most sensitive, but it had the highest frequency of false positives with mock-infected cells and inactivated oocysts. IFA was the only infection detection assay that did not produce false positives with mock-infected monolayers. IFA was also the only assay that detected infections in all experiments with spiked oocysts recovered from Envirochek capsules following filtration of 1,000 liters of treated water. Consequently, cell culture with IFA detection is the most appropriate method for routine and sensitive detection of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in drinking water. PMID:22038611

  9. Persistence of the tissue culture origin vaccine for infectious laryngotracheitis virus in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Silvana H Santander; Nuñez, Luis F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a respiratory disease of great importance that causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Its control is based on biosecurity procedures and vaccination programs that use live attenuated vaccines such as tissue culture origin (TCO), chicken embryo origin (CEO), and vectored vaccines. However, problems have been reported, such as the reversion of virulence, virus latency, and field virus outbreaks. Several molecular techniques have been developed to differentiate between the field and vaccine strains. This study was conducted to determine the presence of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in Brazil from 2012 to 2014. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was used to detect and differentiate ILTV strains; DNA sequencing and predictive RFLP analysis were also used for this purpose. Molecular analysis detected the presence of ILTV in 15 samples that were characterized as strains of TCO vaccine origin. This study showed that the ILTV TCO vaccine strain has been circulating in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil since its introduction during the 2002 outbreak.

  10. Efficient infectious cell culture systems of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) prototype strains HCV-1 and H77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The first discovered and sequenced hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and the first in vivo infectious HCV clones originated from the HCV prototype strains HCV-1 and H77, respectively, both widely used in research of this important human pathogen. In the present study, we developed...... mutations (HCV1cc) replicated efficiently in Huh7.5 cells and produced supernatant infectivity titers of 10(4.0) focus-forming units (FFU)/ml. Eight of these mutations were identified from passaged HCV-1 viruses, and the A970T/I1312V/C2419R/A2919T mutations were essential for infectious particle production......-adapted full-length TN viruses and a common NS3 helicase mutation (S1368P) derived from viable H77C and HCV-1 5-5A recombinants, initiated replication and culture adaptation of H77C containing LSG and TNcc(1a)-adaptive mutations. An H77C recombinant harboring 19 mutations (H77Ccc) replicated and spread...

  11. Purification of infectious canine parvovirus from cell culture by affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); N. Juntti; J.S. Teppema; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractImmuno affinity chromatography with virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, directed to the haemagglutinating protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was used to purify and concentrate CPV from infected cell culture. The procedure was monitored by testing the respective fractions in an infe

  12. Transcriptional profiles of chicken embryo cell cultures following infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Handberg, K.J.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    -host interaction, we measured steady-state levels of transcripts from 28 cellular genes of chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures infected with IBDV vaccine stain Bursine-2 during a 7-day infection course by use of the quantitative real-time RT-PCR SYBR green method. Of the genes tested, 21 genes (IRF-1, IFN 1...

  13. Social structure, infectious diseases, disasters, secularism, and cultural change in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Igor; Varnum, Michael E W

    2015-03-01

    Why do cultures change? The present work examined cultural change in eight cultural-level markers, or correlates, of individualism in the United States, all of which increased over the course of the 20th century: frequency of individualist themes in books, preference for uniqueness in baby naming, frequency of single-child relative to multichild families, frequency of single-generation relative to multigeneration households, percentage of adults and percentage of older adults living alone, small family size, and divorce rates (relative to marriage rates). We tested five key hypotheses regarding cultural change in individualism-collectivism. As predicted by previous theories, changes in socioeconomic structure, pathogen prevalence, and secularism accompanied changes in individualism averaged across all measures. The relationship with changes in individualism was less robust for urbanization. Contrary to previous theories, changes in individualism were positively (as opposed to negatively) related to the frequency of disasters. Time-lagged analyses suggested that only socioeconomic structure had a robust effect on individualism; changes in socioeconomic structure preceded changes in individualism. Implications for anthropology, psychology, and sociology are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism.

  15. [Effect of Low Dose of Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus in Attenuated Vaccine on SPF Chicken Body Weight and Vaccine Immune Antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lichun; Li, Xiaohan; Ren, Zhihao; Li, Yang; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In order to observe the effect of the immune and weight of chickens after use the attenuated vaccine with low dose of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV). In this study, the effects of low dose of CIAV on the weight of SPF chickens and NDV antibody production were observed by simulated experiments. The results showed that 10 EID50 and 5 EID50 CIAV per plume attenuated NDV vaccines were used to cause the weight loss of SPF chickens. Compared with the use of the non contaminated vaccine group, it has significant difference. And NDV antibody levels compared with the use of the non contaminated groups also decreased after use the vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. It has significant difference. A certain proportion of CIAV antibody positive was detected at the beginning of the second week after use the NDV vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. The detection of a high proportion of CIAV nucleic acid was detected in the first week after the use of a contaminated vaccine. The results of the study demonstrate the effects of CIAV pollution on the production and immune function of SPF chickens, and it is suggested that increasing the detection of viral nucleic acid can help save time and improve the detection rate in the detection of exogenous virus contamination by SPF chicken test method.

  16. Growth, feed intake and immune responses of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to low infectious doses of ectoparasite (Cryptocaryon irritans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Dan, Xue-Ming; Sun, Peng; Shi, Zhao-Hong; Gao, Quan-Xin; Peng, Shi-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2014-01-01

    To explore the effect of low-dose Cryptocaryon irritans infection on growth, feeding and antiparasitic immunity of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), this study utilized C. irritans at concentrations of 5500 theronts/fish (Group I, 1/10 of 96 h LC50) or 11,000 theronts/fish (Group II) to infect E. coioides weighing 38 g on average at week 0, 2 and 4, respectively. Food consumption was recorded daily; the fish were weighed weekly; serum immobilizing titer (SIT), and acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), lysozyme (LZM) activity were recorded every 2 weeks; the fish were treated with lethal dose (70,000 theronts/fish) of C. irritans in the 8th week and death number were recorded. The result shows that in the 1st week after the first infection, the fish's weight gain (WG), length gain (LG), and specific growth rate (SGR) dropped as parasite dose increased, and WG, SGR values were negative; while, after the 2nd and the 3rd infection, no significant differences were detected among the three groups. These results indicated that the 1st infection affected the fish most, while the following infections were protected by some immunity. In the 3rd, 7th, and 8th week, condition factor (CF) increased with the increased infectious dose, indicating that the parasite affected body length more than body weight. As the experiment went on, accumulated food consumption (AFC) of all three groups steadily grew (control > Group I > Group II). But on the 2nd day after the first infection, daily food consumption (DFC) of Group I and II significantly dropped, the decline of Group II was greater than that of Group I, DFC recovered in the following week, with Group I earlier than Group II. After the 2nd infection, DFC of Group I and II dropped again, Group II still dropped more than Group I, and both groups recovered on the 3rd day after infection. The 3rd infection caused no significant difference in week food consumption (WFC). These

  17. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  18. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus and Taura Syndrome Virus in Penaeus Vannamei Cultured in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are two important shrimp viruses in cultured shrimp in America. These two viruses were transmitted to China at the beginning of the 21st century. In this study, 214 shrimp samples of Penaeus vannamei were collected from seven different areas of China and tested by PCR for IHHNV and TSV infection. The results showed that there were a high prevalence of IHHNV (65.42%) and low prevalence of TSV (3.27%) in the tested samples. Several samples were found to be co-infected with these two viruses. A 3 kb fragment of 7 positive IHHNV samples and a structure protein region (ORF2) of three TSV positive samples were amplified and sequenced. The sequence comparison indicated that both IHHNV and TSV sequenced in China have a low genetic variations compared with the prototype IHHNV and TSV from Hawaii. Phylogenetic analysis showed that TSV isolates were clustered into two groups, Asia and America group, which was genetically correlated to geographic distribution.

  19. Moles of a Substance per Cell Is a Highly Informative Dosing Metric in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskey, Claire M; van 't Erve, Thomas J; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The biological consequences upon exposure of cells in culture to a dose of xenobiotic are not only dependent on biological variables, but also the physical aspects of experiments e.g. cell number and media volume. Dependence on physical aspects is often overlooked due to the unrecognized ambiguity in the dominant metric used to express exposure, i.e. initial concentration of xenobiotic delivered to the culture medium over the cells. We hypothesize that for many xenobiotics, specifying dose as moles per cell will reduce this ambiguity. Dose as moles per cell can also provide additional information not easily obtainable with traditional dosing metrics. Here, 1,4-benzoquinone and oligomycin A are used as model compounds to investigate moles per cell as an informative dosing metric. Mechanistic insight into reactions with intracellular molecules, differences between sequential and bolus addition of xenobiotic and the influence of cell volume and protein content on toxicity are also investigated. When the dose of 1,4-benzoquinone or oligomycin A was specified as moles per cell, toxicity was independent of the physical conditions used (number of cells, volume of medium). When using moles per cell as a dose-metric, direct quantitative comparisons can be made between biochemical or biological endpoints and the dose of xenobiotic applied. For example, the toxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone correlated inversely with intracellular volume for all five cell lines exposed (C6, MDA-MB231, A549, MIA PaCa-2, and HepG2). Moles per cell is a useful and informative dosing metric in cell culture. This dosing metric is a scalable parameter that: can reduce ambiguity between experiments having different physical conditions; provides additional mechanistic information; allows direct comparison between different cells; affords a more uniform platform for experimental design; addresses the important issue of repeatability of experimental results, and could increase the translatability of

  20. Moles of a Substance per Cell Is a Highly Informative Dosing Metric in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Doskey

    Full Text Available The biological consequences upon exposure of cells in culture to a dose of xenobiotic are not only dependent on biological variables, but also the physical aspects of experiments e.g. cell number and media volume. Dependence on physical aspects is often overlooked due to the unrecognized ambiguity in the dominant metric used to express exposure, i.e. initial concentration of xenobiotic delivered to the culture medium over the cells. We hypothesize that for many xenobiotics, specifying dose as moles per cell will reduce this ambiguity. Dose as moles per cell can also provide additional information not easily obtainable with traditional dosing metrics.Here, 1,4-benzoquinone and oligomycin A are used as model compounds to investigate moles per cell as an informative dosing metric. Mechanistic insight into reactions with intracellular molecules, differences between sequential and bolus addition of xenobiotic and the influence of cell volume and protein content on toxicity are also investigated.When the dose of 1,4-benzoquinone or oligomycin A was specified as moles per cell, toxicity was independent of the physical conditions used (number of cells, volume of medium. When using moles per cell as a dose-metric, direct quantitative comparisons can be made between biochemical or biological endpoints and the dose of xenobiotic applied. For example, the toxicity of 1,4-benzoquinone correlated inversely with intracellular volume for all five cell lines exposed (C6, MDA-MB231, A549, MIA PaCa-2, and HepG2.Moles per cell is a useful and informative dosing metric in cell culture. This dosing metric is a scalable parameter that: can reduce ambiguity between experiments having different physical conditions; provides additional mechanistic information; allows direct comparison between different cells; affords a more uniform platform for experimental design; addresses the important issue of repeatability of experimental results, and could increase the

  1. Infectious complications in 126 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, R; Solá, C; Maroto, P; Tabernero, J M; Brunet, J; Verger, G; Valentí, V; Cancelas, J A; Ojeda, B; Mendoza, L; Rodríguez, M; Montesinos, J; López-López, J J

    1999-01-01

    The effect of an extensive prophylactic antimicrobial regimen was prospectively assessed in 126 patients after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBSC. They received ciprofloxacin (500 mg/12 h), acyclovir (200 mg/6 h), and itraconazole (200 mg/12 h) orally until neutrophil recovery. Febrile patients received i.v. imipenem (500 mg/6 h) to which vancomycin and amikacin were added if fever persisted for 2-3 and 5 days, respectively. Amphotericin B lipid complex was further given on day 7 or 8 of fever. Median times for a neutrophil count of >0.5 x 10(9)/l and a platelet count of >20 x 10(9)/l were 9 and 11 days. Severe neutropenia (<0.1 x 10(9)/l) lasted for a median of 5 days in which 72% of febrile episodes and 50% of cases of bacteremia occurred. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 30 of 40 episodes of bacteremia, 25 of which were caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Clinical foci were the intravascular catheter in 35 cases, respiratory infection in 11, cellulitis in two, anal abscess in one, and neutropenic enterocolitis in one. The high incidence of febrile episodes (94%) and bacteremias (31%) may be due to the lack of efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis and the persistence of a 5-day period of severe neutropenia.

  2. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  3. Dose responses for Colletotrichum lindemuthianum elicitor-mediated enzyme induction in French bean cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R A; Dey, P M; Murphy, D L; Whitehead, I M

    1981-03-01

    The induction of L-phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and flavanone synthase in French bean cell suspension cultures in response to heat-released elicitor from cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is highly dependent upon elicitor concentration. The elicitor dose-response curve for PAL induction shows two maxima at around 17.5 and 50 μg elicitor carbohydrate per ml culture, whereas the flavanone synthase response shows one maximum at around 100 μg ml(-1). The PAL response is independent of the elicitor concentration present during the lag phase of enzyme induction; if the initial elicitor concentration is increased after 2 h by addition of extra elicitor, or decreased by dilution of the cultures, the dose response curves obtained reflect the concentration of elicitor present at the time of harvest. PAL induction is not prevented by addition of methyl sugar derivatives to the cultures; α-methyl-D-glucoside, itself a weak elicitor of PAL activity, elicits a multiphasic PAL response when increasing concentrations are added in the presence of Colletotrichum elicitor. Eight fractions with different monosaccharide compositions, obtained from the crude elicitor by gel-filtration, each elicit different dose-responses for PAL induction; the response to unfractionated elicitor is not the sum of the response to the isolated fractions. There is no correlation between the ability of the fractions to induce PAL in the cultures and their ability to act as elicitors of isoflavonoid phytoalexin accumulation in bean hypocotyls.

  4. Experimental Rhodococcus equi and equine infectious anemia virus DNA vaccination in adult and neonatal horses: effect of IL-12, dose, and route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, R H; Stone, D M; Hines, M T; Alperin, D C; Littke, M H; Leib, S R; Leach, S E; Hines, S A

    2007-10-23

    Improving the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce potent Type1/Th1 responses against intracellular pathogens in large outbred species is essential. Rhodoccocus equi and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) are two naturally occurring equine pathogens that also serve as important large animal models of neonatal immunity and lentiviral immune control. Neonates present a unique challenge for immunization due to their diminished immunologic capabilities and apparent Th2 bias. In an effort to augment R. equi- and EIAV-specific Th1 responses induced by DNA vaccination, we hypothesized that a dual promoter plasmid encoding recombinant equine IL-12 (rEqIL-12) would function as a molecular adjuvant. In adult horses, DNA vaccines induced R. equi- and EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, and EIAV-specific CTL and tetramer-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes. These responses were not enhanced by the rEqIL-12 plasmid. In neonatal foals, DNA immunization induced EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, but not CTL. The R. equi vapA vaccine was poorly immunogenic in foals even when co-administered with the IL-12 plasmid. It was concluded that DNA immunization was capable of inducing Th1 responses in horses; dose and route were significant variables, but rEqIL-12 was not an effective molecular adjuvant. Additional work is needed to optimize DNA vaccine-induced Th1 responses in horses, especially in neonates.

  5. Performing diagnostics, especially blood cultures, on-time for infectious patients reduces length of stay and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, JH; Lo Ten Foe, J. R.; Sinha, B; Nannan Panday, P; Hendrix, R; Postma, MJ; Friedrich, AW

    2015-01-01

    Objectives As an academic center, the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands receives large numbers of patients with (complex) infectious problems. It is imperative that the correct diagnostics are performed on time for these patients in order to correctly diagnose them and treat the

  6. Neutropenia induced in outbred mice by a simplified low-dose cyclophosphamide regimen: characterization and applicability to diverse experimental models of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapata Ana X

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For its low cost and ease of handling, the mouse remains the preferred experimental animal for preclinical tests. To avoid the interaction of the animal immune system, in vivo antibiotic pharmacodynamic studies often employ cyclophosphamide (CPM to induce neutropenia. Although high doses (350–450 mg/kg are still used and their effects on mouse leukocytes have been described, a lower dose (250 mg/kg is widely preferred today, but the characteristics and applicability of this approach in outbred mice have not been determined. Methods Fifteen female ICR mice were injected intraperitoneally with 150 and 100 mg/kg of CPM on days 1 and 4, respectively. Blood samples (~160 μL were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus of each mouse on days 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 11. Leukocytes were counted manually and the number of granulocytes was based on microscopic examination of Wright-stained smears. The impact of neutropenia induced by this method was then determined with a variety of pathogens in three different murine models of human infections: pneumonia (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, meningoencephalitis (S. pneumoniae, and the thigh model (S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis. Results The basal count of leukocytes was within the normal range for outbred mice. On day 4, there was an 84% reduction in total white blood cells, and by day 5 the leukopenia reached its nadir (370 ± 84 cells/mm3. Profound neutropenia (≤10 neutrophils/mm3 was demonstrated at day 4 and persisted through days 5 and 6. Lymphocytes and monocytes had a 92% and 96% decline between days 1 and 5, respectively. Leukocytes recovered completely by day 11. Mice immunosupressed under this protocol displayed clinical and microbiological patterns of progressive and lethal infectious diseases after inoculation in different organs with diverse human pathogens. Conclusion A CPM total dose of 250 mg/kg is sufficient to induce

  7. Robust full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 2a and 2b infectious cultures using mutations identified by a systematic approach applicable to patient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, but treatment options are limited. Basic HCV research required for vaccine and drug development has been hampered by inability to culture patient isolates, and to date only the JFH1 (genotype 2a) recombinant...... replicates spontaneously in hepatoma cells and releases infectious virus. A JFH1 chimera with the 5' end through NS2 from another genotype 2a strain, J6, had enhanced infectivity. However, the full-length J6 clone (J6CF), which we previously found to be fully functional in vivo, was replication incompetent...... of the genetically divergent isolate J8 (genotype 2b), which differed from the J6 nucleotide sequence by 24%. The most efficient recombinant, J8cc, had nine adaptive mutations and was genetically stable after viral passage. The availability of these robust JFH1-independent genotype 2a and 2b culture systems...

  8. Icodextrin does not impact infectious and culture-negative peritonitis rates in peritoneal dialysis patients: a 2-year multicentre, comparative, prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vychytil, Andreas; Remón, César; Michel, Catherine; Williams, Paul; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana; Marrón, Belén; Vonesh, Ed; van der Heyden, Synke; Divino Filho, Jose C

    2008-11-01

    Icodextrin is a glucose polymer derived by hydrolysis of cornstarch. The different biocompatibility profile of icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions may have a positive influence on peritoneal host defence. Furthermore, cases of sterile peritonitis potentially associated with icodextrin have been reported. The primary objective of this multicentre, longitudinal, observational, non-interventional, prospective cohort study, which included 722 PD patients, was to evaluate the incidence of overall peritonitis in patients treated with icodextrin-containing PD solutions (Extraneal) used during one long-dwell exchange/day compared with those treated with non-icodextrin-containing PD solutions. The secondary objective was to determine if culture-negative peritonitis rates differed between patients treated with icodextrin from two independent manufacturers. All peritonitis episodes were assessed by a Steering Committee in a blind manner. There was no significant difference between icodextrin-treated and control patients in the adjusted overall, culture-positive or culture-negative peritonitis rates. When stratified by the icodextrin supplier, there was no significant difference in the adjusted rate of culture-negative peritonitis episodes between groups. Subjects receiving icodextrin as part of their PD regimen experienced neither a higher rate of culture-negative peritonitis nor a lower rate of infectious peritonitis compared with non-icodextrin users. There was no significant influence of the icodextrin raw material supplier on peritonitis rates.

  9. Icodextrin does not impact infectious and culture-negative peritonitis rates in peritoneal dialysis patients: a 2-year multicentre, comparative, prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vychytil, Andreas; Remón, César; Michel, Catherine; Williams, Paul; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana; Marrón, Belén; Vonesh, Ed; van der Heyden, Synke; Filho, Jose C. Divino

    2008-01-01

    Background. Icodextrin is a glucose polymer derived by hydrolysis of cornstarch. The different biocompatibility profile of icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions may have a positive influence on peritoneal host defence. Furthermore, cases of sterile peritonitis potentially associated with icodextrin have been reported. Methods. The primary objective of this multicentre, longitudinal, observational, non-interventional, prospective cohort study, which included 722 PD patients, was to evaluate the incidence of overall peritonitis in patients treated with icodextrin-containing PD solutions (Extraneal™) used during one long-dwell exchange/day compared with those treated with non-icodextrin-containing PD solutions. The secondary objective was to determine if culture-negative peritonitis rates differed between patients treated with icodextrin from two independent manufacturers. All peritonitis episodes were assessed by a Steering Committee in a blind manner. Results. There was no significant difference between icodextrin-treated and control patients in the adjusted overall, culture-positive or culture-negative peritonitis rates. When stratified by the icodextrin supplier, there was no significant difference in the adjusted rate of culture-negative peritonitis episodes between groups. Conclusion. Subjects receiving icodextrin as part of their PD regimen experienced neither a higher rate of culture-negative peritonitis nor a lower rate of infectious peritonitis compared with non-icodextrin users. There was no significant influence of the icodextrin raw material supplier on peritonitis rates. PMID:18556747

  10. Dose-dependent DNA ruptures induced by the procarcinogen dimethylnitrosamine on primary rat liver cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T; López-Revilla, R; Villa-Treviño, S

    1979-08-01

    The effect of certain procarcinogens, among which demethylnitrosamine (DMN) is included, has been difficult to detect in several short-term assays. An alternative system, in which DMN effects could be easily quantitated, might be useful in studies of chemical carcinogenesis and environmental contamination. To develop such a system, we tested the possibility of measuring the amount of breakage produced by DMN on radiolabeled DNA of primary liver cultures. Rat liver cells were isolated 20 to 24 hr after partial hepatectomy, cultured, and pulse labeled in vitro with [3H]thymidine. Radioactively labeled cultures were treated with DMN or with the direct carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and then lysed directly onto alkaline sucrose gradients. DMN and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine caused a dose-dependent reduction in the molecular weight of DNA, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine being approximately 1000 times more potent than DMN. DNA breaks appeared to be carcinogen specific and not due to cell death since treatment with high doses of cycloheximide, a noncarcinogenic hepatotoxic, was without significant effect. Our data indicate that detection of DNA breaks constitutes a more sensitive assay of DMN effects than does unscheduled DNA synthesis in primary liver cultures. Therefore, it could be useful to extend our work to determine the general applicability of quantitation of DNA breaks in liver cells as a short-term assay for the identification of possible carcinogens and procarcinogens.

  11. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  12. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking ...

  13. Infectious Aortitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, F Daniel; Jamison, Bruce M; Hibbert, Benjamin

    2016-09-28

    Aortitis is broadly divided into infectious and non-infectious etiologies, each with distinct treatment implications. We present the case of a patient who sustained a type A aortic dissection during urgent coronary angiography for acute coronary syndrome. Clinical findings and events during the procedure raised suspicion for an underlying vascular disorder; however, the diagnosis of staphylococcal aortitis was not made until pathological examination of resected tissue. Clues to the diagnosis of infectious aortitis noted throughout the patient's clinical course are detailed as are potential consequences of diagnostic delays and treatment decisions, underscoring the difficulties in recognizing and managing the condition. In addition, we describe a previously unreported complication of cardiac catheterization in the setting of an infectious aortopathy.

  14. Viable but not culturable forms of Legionella pneumophila generated after heat shock treatment are infectious for macrophage-like and alveolar epithelial cells after resuscitation on Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epalle, Thibaut; Girardot, Françoise; Allegra, Séverine; Maurice-Blanc, Cécile; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of legionellosis is transmitted to human through aerosols from environmental sources and invades lung's macrophages. It also can invade and replicate within various protozoan species in environmental reservoirs. Following exposures to various stresses, L. pneumophila enters a non-replicative viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state. Here, we evaluated whether VBNC forms of three L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains (Philadelphia GFP 008, clinical 044 and environmental RNN) infect differentiated macrophage-like cell lines (U937 and HL-60), A549 alveolar cells and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. VBNC forms obtained following shocks at temperatures ranging from 50 to 70 °C for 5 to 60 min were quantified using a flow cytometric assay (FCA). Their loss of culturability was checked on BCYE agar medium. VBNC forms were systematically detected upon a 70 °C heat shock for 30 min. When testing their potential to resuscitate upon amoebal infection, VBNC forms obtained after 30 min at 70 °C were re-cultivated except for the clinical strain. No resuscitation or cell lysis was evidenced when using U937, HL-60, or A549 cells despite the use of various contact times and culture media. None of the strains tested could infect A. polyphaga, macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells after a 60-min treatment at 70 °C. However, heat-treated VBNC forms were able to infect macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells following their resuscitation on A. polyphaga. These results suggest that heat-generated VBNC forms of L. pneumophila (i) are not infectious for macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells in vitro although resuscitation is still possible using amoeba, and (ii) may become infectious for human cell lines following a previous interaction with A. polyphaga.

  15. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of "Omics" sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency testing: the influence of serotype, type of adjuvant, valency, fractionation method, and virus culture on the dose-response curve in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Syed M; Bouma, Annemarie; van den Broek, Jan; Stegeman, Arjan; Chénard, Gilles; Dekker, Aldo

    2008-11-25

    The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between vaccine potency (amount of PD50 per dose) and fraction of clinically protected cattle following homologous challenge with infectious foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, and to determine the effect of method of fractionation, serotype, type of adjuvant, valency and type of virus culture on the dose-response curve. Data from 297 potency tests of FMD vaccines, comprising 4004 vaccinated cattle, performed at the FMD vaccine production facility in the Netherlands, were used for the present study. A generalised linear mixed effect model was used to analyse the results. Our study showed that the relation between FMD vaccine potency and fraction protected was also affected by the serotype and type of adjuvant. No common level of protection could be assigned to all FMD vaccines with the same amount of PD50 per dose, this information is essential when designing a new standard FMD vaccines control.

  17. A study of vehicles for dosing rodent whole embryo culture with non aqueous soluble compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine-Rauch, Karen A; Zhang, Qin; Kleinman, Mark; Lawton, Richard; Welsh, Michael J

    2004-05-01

    In rodent whole embryo culture (WEC), finding vehicles for non-aqueous-soluble compounds has been problematic due to developmental toxicity associated with many solvents. The purpose of this study was to identify alternative vehicles for insoluble compounds. In WEC, we evaluated carrier solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glycerol as well as the solvents, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, for relative teratogenicity and delivery of the insoluble teratogen, all-trans retinoic acid (RA). At a concentration of glycerol carrier solutions were not teratogenic, although both inhibited robust formation of yolk sac vasculature. Both solutions delivered RA to the cultured rat embryos at higher doses. In summary, all four solvents/solutions may have utility as vehicles dependent upon the chemical properties of the compound to be solubilized.

  18. Infectious haemolytic anaemia causes jaundice outbreaks in seawater-cultured coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P A; Larenas, J; Contreras, J; Cassigoli, J; Venegas, C; Rojas, M E; Guajardo, A; Pérez, S; Díaz, S

    2006-12-01

    In the last 9 years, epizootics of an icterus condition has affected coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), reared in seawater cages in southern regions of Chile. At necropsy, fish from field cases exhibited signs of jaundice accompanied by pale light-brown livers and dark spleens. Histopathological and haematological results indicated that these fish presented haemolytic anaemia. After microbiological examination no bacterial or viral agents could be identified as aetiological agents of this disease. In an infectivity trial, coho salmon, Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), were inoculated intraperitoneally with a filtrate of an organ homogenate (0.45 microm) from a diseased coho salmon and held for 60 days in tanks supplied with fresh water. The disease was only reproduced in coho salmon in which mortalities, beginning at day 23 post-inoculation (p.i.), reached a cumulative value of 24% at day 27 p.i. This condition was transmitted to non-inoculated cohabiting coho salmon suggesting that it is a waterborne disease. Thus, this icteric condition is caused by an infectious form of haemolytic anaemia, probably of viral aetiology, and coho salmon are more susceptible than either Atlantic salmon or rainbow trout.

  19. INFECTIOUS DISEASES ARE SLEEPING MONSTERS: Conventional and culturally adapted new metaphors in a corpus of abstracts on immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hidalgo Downing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the role played by metaphor in a corpus of sixty abstracts on immunology from Scientific American. We focus on the distinction between conventional metaphors and culturally adapted new metaphors and discuss the role played by metaphor choice in the communicative purposes of the abstracts and their register features. We argue that one of the main strategies used to attract the reader‘s attention is the combination of highly conventionalized metaphors, which occur more frequently in the corpus, together with what we call “culturally adapted new metaphors”, which display different degrees of creativity and are less frequent in the corpus. Conventional metaphors typically reinforce the world view shared by the scientific community and introduce basic ideas on the subject of immunology. Culturally adapted new metaphors include a cline from slightly new perspectives of conventional models, to highly creative uses of metaphor. Culturally adapted new metaphors appeal primarily to a general readership and not to the scientific community, as they tap human emotions and mythic constructions. These play a crucial role in the abstracts, as they contribute to persuasive and didactic communicative functions in the text.

  20. Antiviral Activity of Ctn[15-34], A Cathelicidin-Derived Eicosapeptide, Against Infectious Myonecrosis Virus in Litopenaeus vannamei Primary Hemocyte Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Girão, P R N; Falcão, C B; Rocha, I R C B; Lucena, H M R; Costa, F H F; Rádis-Baptista, G

    2017-02-16

    The shrimp farming has been converted into a mature aquaculture industry dealing with over millions of metric tonnes of processed commodities. Nevertheless, the global shrimp productions are constantly threatened by disease outbreaks, mainly triggered by rapidly disseminating viruses. Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) is one of these epizootic agents affecting shrimp production in Brazil, of which no treatment exists. Herein, the antiviral activity against IMNV of an eicosapeptide, named Ctn[15-34], derived from a member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides, was demonstrated. Cultures of hemocytes from Litopenaeus vannamei were established that support IMNV replication and infectivity titration. The cytotoxic effect of IMNV in culture and the in vitro anti-IMNV activity of Ctn[15-34] were assessed using a high-sensitive fluorescent-based method in combination with quantitative PCR. The Ctn[15-34] (shrimp hemocytes. This study reported for the first time the replication of IMNV in vitro and the employment of a straightforward methodology to assess cell viability and viral/antiviral activities. In addition, it provided the basis for the development of the anti-infective multi-effector Ctn[15-34] eicosapeptide and analogs as components of antiviral formulations against shrimp viral diseases.

  1. The Effect of Different Dosing Schedules of Intravitreal Sirolimus, a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitor, in the Treatment of Non-Infectious Uveitis (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Soliman, Mohamed Kamel; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Do, Diana V; Sepah, Yasir J

    2016-08-01

    To determine if two different doses of intravitreal sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, can decrease inflammation and is safe in eyes with non-infectious posterior, intermediate, or panuveitis in the Sirolimus as a Therapeutic Approach UVEitis: Protocol-2 (SAVE-2) Study. SAVE-2 is a prospective randomized, phase II, open-label interventional clinical trial conducted at 4 clinical centers in the United States. Eligible subjects were randomized into one of two treatments. Group 1 received 440µg of intravitreal sirolimus in study eyes on days 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150; group 2 received 880µg of intravitreal sirolimus on days 0, 60, and 120. Fellow eyes were also eligible to receive sirolimus (of opposite dose to that of study eye). Primary endpoint of the study was at month 6 (M6). 24 subjects have been randomized in SAVE-2 and are included in the analysis. Vitreous haze decreased by ≥2 steps in 63.6% and 50% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively at M6 (p=0.695). Mean change in best-corrected visual acuity for subjects was +3.66 and -2.91 ETDRS letters in group 1 and 2, respectively. Among subjects with macular edema at baseline (n=13), the mean change in foveal thickness was -89.42µm in group 1 and +81.5µm in group 2 at M6. Both low and high doses of intravitreal sirolimus were found to decrease vitreous haze in eyes with non-infectious uveitis. Low dose (440µg) sirolimus administered monthly may be more efficacious in reducing uveitic macular edema than high dose (880µg) administered every 2 months.

  2. Study on application of high doses plasmodium berghei in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, L. M.; De Santis, M.; Davila, J.; Foinquinos, A.; Salcedo, E.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2012-02-01

    Malaria, one of the most important infection disease problems in the world, is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. This disease is responsible for hundreds of the millions of clinical cases and more than one million deaths per year, for this reason, malaria is a priority and the WHO estimates that half of the world population is at risk. In this work we study how the absorbed dose inactivates the parasite (Plasmodium berghei) in rodent model (BALB/c mice), by applying X-ray irradiation. The dose was increased from 10 to 50 Gy in parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) with merozoite stage using in vitro short cultures. Also the reduction of the irradiation effect was determined by intra-peritoneal inoculations of irradiated parasites. Afterwards, the parasitaemia was assessed daily on smears made from tail blood and stained with Giemsa's reagent. Besides, the effect of irradiation was evaluated using an immunological test as indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The results of this study showed that the most effective radiation for inactivation of parasites is about 50 Gy and the immunofluorescence pattern showed a different distribution of the fluorescence on parasites. These results showed direct correlation between the effect of irradiated parasites and parasitaemia in the group of mice infected with RBC after 50 Gy irradiation. Our results indicated that the threshold is between 30 to 50 Gy to inactivate the parasites.

  3. Analysis of functional differences between hepatitis C virus NS5A of genotypes 1-7 in infectious cell culture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Prentoe, Jannick; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2012-01-01

    directly-acting antiviral compounds. NS5A is important for replication and virus production, but has not been studied for most HCV genotypes. We studied the function of NS5A using infectious NS5A genotype 1-7 cell culture systems, and through reverse genetics demonstrated a universal importance...... of the amphipathic alpha-helix, domain I and II and the low-complexity sequence (LCS) I for HCV replication; the replicon-enhancing LCSI mutation S225P attenuated all genotypes. Mutation of conserved prolines in LCSII led to minor reductions in virus production for the JFH1(genotype 2a) NS5A recombinant, but had...... greater effects on other isolates; replication was highly attenuated for ED43(4a) and QC69(7a) recombinants. Deletion of the conserved residues 414-428 in domain III reduced virus production for most recombinants but not JFH1(2a). Reduced virus production was linked to attenuated replication in all cases...

  4. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  5. Simulation of TGF-Beta Activation by Low-Dose HZE Radiation in a Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    High charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei comprised in the galactic cosmic rays are main contributors to space radiation risk. They induce many lesions in living matter such as non-specific oxidative damage and the double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered key precursors of early and late effects of radiation. There is increasing evidence that cells respond collectively rather than individually to radiation, suggesting the importance of cell signaling1. The transforming growth factor (TGF ) is a signaling peptide that is expressed in nearly all cell type and regulates a large array of cellular processes2. TGF have been shown to mediate cellular response to DNA damage3 and to induce apoptosis in non-irradiated cells cocultured with irradiated cells4. TFG molecules are secreted by cells in an inactive complex known as the latency-associated peptide (LAP). TGF is released from the LAP by a conformational change triggered by proteases, thrombospondin-1, integrins, acidic conditions and .OH radical5. TGF then binds to cells receptors and activates a cascade of events mediated by Smad proteins6, which might interfere with the repair of DNA. Meanwhile, increasingly sophisticated Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have appeared recently in the literature7 and can be applied to study the interaction of molecules with receptors. These BD computer models have contributed to the elucidation of signal transduction, ligand accumulation and autocrine loops in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EFGR) system8. To investigate the possible roles of TGF in an irradiated cell culture, our Monte-Carlo simulation codes of the radiation track structure9 will be used to calculate the activation of TFG triggered by .OH produced by low doses of HZE ions. The TGF molecules will then be followed by a BD algorithm in a medium representative of a cell culture to estimate the number of activated receptors.

  6. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Kiyohito; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Matsuoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Takashi; Fujiki, Yoshishige (Asahi University School of Dentistry, Gifu (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F/sub 1/ strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 {mu}M cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 {mu}M Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author).

  7. Differential outcomes of Zika virus infection in Aedes aegypti orally challenged with infectious blood meals and infectious protein meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jang S; Lyons, Amy C; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Park, So Lee; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2017-01-01

    infection in mosquitoes. Infectious whole blood meals and infectious bovine serum albumin meals containing ZIKV were orally presented to two different groups of Ae. aegypti through membrane feeding. At 7 and 14 days post infection, infectious viruses were detected and viral dissemination from gut to other mosquito tissues was analyzed in orally challenged mosquitoes with 50% tissue culture infectious dose method on Vero76 cells. Zika virus infection was significantly impaired among mosquitoes orally challenged with infectious protein meals as compared to infectious whole blood meals. These results indicate the importance of the blood meal in the infection process of arboviruses in mosquitoes. It provides the basis for future studies to identify critical components in the blood of vertebrate hosts that facilitate arbovirus infection in mosquitoes.

  8. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Salvadego de Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS. For each medium, six groups (n=4 were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX. S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p<0.05. We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity.

  9. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity. PMID:27293967

  10. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity.

  11. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  12. Immunogenicity of One Dose of Vero Cell Culture-Derived Japanese Encephalitis (JE) Vaccine in Adults Previously Vaccinated with Mouse Brain-Derived JE Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    Naval Health Research Center Immunogenicity of One Dose of Vero Cell Culture-derived Japanese Encephalitis (JE) Vaccine in Adults Previously...www.elsev ier .com/ locate /vacc ine mmunogenicity of one dose of Vero cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis JE) vaccine in adults...derived Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine (JE-VC) as a booster among individuals who previously received inactivated mouse brain-derived

  13. Small doses, big troubles: modeling growth dynamics of organisms affecting microalgal production cultures in closed photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forehead, Hugh I; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    The destruction of mass cultures of microalgae by biological contamination of culture medium is a pervasive and expensive problem, in industry and research. A mathematical model has been formulated that attempts to explain contaminant growth dynamics in closed photobioreactors (PBRs). The model simulates an initial growth phase without PBR dilution, followed by a production phase in which culture is intermittently removed. Contaminants can be introduced at any of these stages. The model shows how exponential growth from low initial inocula can lead to "explosive" growth in the population of contaminants, appearing days to weeks after inoculation. Principal influences are contaminant growth rate, PBR dilution rate, and the size of initial contaminant inoculum. Predictions corresponded closely with observed behavior of two contaminants, Uronema sp. and Neoparamoeba sp., found in operating PBRs. A simple, cheap and effective protocol was developed for short-term prediction of contamination in PBRs, using microscopy and archived samples.

  14. Exposure to low-dose bisphenol A impairs meiosis in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model: a physiotoxicogenomic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazan Ali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bisphenol A (BPA is one of the most widespread chemicals in the world and is suspected of being responsible for male reproductive impairments. Nevertheless, its molecular mode of action on spermatogenesis is unclear. This work combines physiology and toxicogenomics to identify mechanisms by which BPA affects the timing of meiosis and induces germ-cell abnormalities. METHODS: We used a rat seminiferous tubule culture model mimicking the in vivo adult rat situation. BPA (1 nM and 10 nM was added to the culture medium. Transcriptomic and meiotic studies were performed on the same cultures at the same exposure times (days 8, 14, and 21. Transcriptomics was performed using pangenomic rat microarrays. Immunocytochemistry was conducted with an anti-SCP3 antibody. RESULTS: The gene expression analysis showed that the total number of differentially expressed transcripts was time but not dose dependent. We focused on 120 genes directly involved in the first meiotic prophase, sustaining immunocytochemistry. Sixty-two genes were directly involved in pairing and recombination, some of them with high fold changes. Immunocytochemistry indicated alteration of meiotic progression in the presence of BPA, with increased leptotene and decreased diplotene spermatocyte percentages and partial meiotic arrest at the pachytene checkpoint. Morphological abnormalities were observed at all stages of the meiotic prophase. The prevalent abnormalities were total asynapsis and apoptosis. Transcriptomic analysis sustained immunocytological observations. CONCLUSION: We showed that low doses of BPA alter numerous genes expression, especially those involved in the reproductive system, and severely impair crucial events of the meiotic prophase leading to partial arrest of meiosis in rat seminiferous tubule cultures.

  15. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  16. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  17. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2016-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (ND) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) have been much investigated for their toxicity at high doses, little is known about their biological activity at low concentrations. Here we report the biphasic dose response of ND and SiO2-NP in modulating normal human facial skin fibroblasts (FSF1) in culture. ND and SiO2-NP at low concentration (up to 0.5 μg/ml) had beneficial effects on FSF1 in terms of increasing their proliferation and metabolic activity. Exposure of FSF1 cells to low levels of NP enhanced their wound healing ability in vitro and slowed down aging during serial passaging as measured by maintenance of youthful morphology, reduction in the rate of loss of telomeres, and the over all proliferative characteristics. Furthermore, NP treatment induced the activation of Nrf2- and FOXO3A-mediated cellular stress responses, including an increased expression of heme oxygenease (HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells.

  18. Pressure-driven microfluidic perfusion culture device for integrated dose-response assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in the various stages of drug discovery. Advances in microfluidic systems over the past two decades have enabled them to become a powerful tool for cell-based assays to achieve both reliability and high throughput. The interface between the micro-world and macro-world is important in industrial assay processes. Therefore, microfluidic cell-based assays using pressure-driven liquid handling are an ideal platform for integrated assays. The aim of this article is to review recent advancements in microfluidic cell-based assays focusing on a pressure-driven perfusion culture device. Here, we review the development of microfluidic cell-based assay devices and discuss the techniques involved in designing a microfluidic network, device fabrication, liquid and cell manipulation, and detection schemes for pressure-driven perfusion culture devices. Finally, we describe recent progress in semiautomatic and reliable pressure-driven microfluidic cell-based assays.

  19. Diagnostic vitrectomy for infectious uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeroudi, Abdallah; Yeh, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The identification of an infectious or noninfectious uveitis syndrome is important to determine the range of therapeutic and prognostic implications of that disease entity. Diagnostic dilemmas arise with atypical history, atypical clinical presentations, inconclusive diagnostic workup, and persistent or worsened inflammation despite appropriate immunosuppression. More invasive intraocular testing is indicated in these situations particularly in infectious uveitis where a delay in treatment may result in worsening of the patient’s disease and a poor visual outcome. Laboratory analysis of vitreous fluid via diagnostic pars plana vitrectomy is an important technique in the diagnostic armamentarium, but the most important aspects of sample collection include rapid processing, close coordination with an ophthalmic pathology laboratory, and directed testing on this limited collected sample. Culture and staining has utility in bacterial, fungal, and nocardial infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis has shown promising results for bacterial endophthalmitis and infection with mycobacterium tuberculosis whereas PCR testing for viral retinitides and ocular toxoplasmosis has a more established role. Antibody testing is appropriate for toxoplasmosis and toxocariasis, and may be complementary to PCR for viral retinitis. Masquerade syndromes represent neoplastic conditions that clinically appear as infectious or inflammatory conditions and should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. Diagnostic vitrectomy and chorioretinal biopsy are thus critical tools for the management of patients in whom an infectious etiology of uveitis is suspected. PMID:24613892

  20. Microbiological and therapeutic challenges in infectious spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed-Petersen, Casper; Dragsted, Casper

    2013-01-01

    The microbiological diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis is often difficult to establish and the disease requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. We analyzed the medical records of 100 patients admitted for infectious spondylodiscitis from 2006 to 2011 with an emphasis on (1) the diagnostic...... utility of blood cultures and invasive biopsies in the microbiological diagnosis, (2) clinical features differentiating Staphylococcus aureus infections from those with other aetiologies, and (3) evaluation of the outcome of the antimicrobial therapy....

  1. Investigative modalities in infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Noopur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard recommended guidelines for diagnosis of infectious keratitis do exist. Based on an extensive Medline literature search, the various investigative modalities available for aiding the diagnosis of microbial keratitis have been reviewed and described briefly. Preferred practice patterns have been outlined and the importance of routine pre-treatment cultures in the primary management of infectious keratitis has been highlighted. Corneal scraping, tear samples and corneal biopsy are few of the specimens needed to carry out the investigative procedures for diagnosis and for initiating therapy in cases of microbial keratitis. In bacterial, fungal and amoebic keratitis, microscopic examination of smears is essential for rapid diagnosis. Potassium hydroxide (KOH wet mount, Gram′s stain and Giemsa stain are widely used and are important for clinicians to start empirical therapy before microbial culture results are available. The usefulness of performing corneal cultures in all cases of suspected infectious keratitis has been well established. In cases of suspected viral keratitis, therapy can be initiated on clinical judgment alone. If a viral culture is needed, scrapings should directly be inoculated into the viral transport media. In vivo confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct to slit lamp bio-microscopy for supplementing diagnosis in most cases and establishing early diagnosis in many cases of non-responding fungal and amoebic keratitis. This is a non-invasive, high resolution technique which allows rapid detection of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites and fungal hyphae in the cornea long before laboratory cultures give conclusive results. Other new modalities for detection of microbial keratitis include molecular diagnostic techniques like polymerase chain reaction, and genetic finger printing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

  2. Doses of corrective phosphating in land rice high in first year of culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Lange

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of phosphorus levels in coverage of the morphological and productive components in rice plant upland. The study was conducted in the municipality of Alta Floresta - MT, in the agricultural year 2007/2008 in a randomized block design with five treatments (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1 of P2O5 following the recommendations of Sousa et al., (2006 , with four replications. They evaluated the length between node, plant height, stem diameter, number of tillers, number of panicles, number of grains per panicle, percentage of grains " full ", weight of 100 grains and grain yield . The match only had no influence on weight of 100 grains and length from node. The highest yield was obtained in corrective dose of 168 kg ha-1 of P2O5.

  3. Dose verification by OSLDs in the irradiation of cell cultures; Verificacion de dosis mediante OSLDs, en la irradiacion de cultivos celulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meca C, E. A.; Bourel, V. [Ce. De. Te. Centro Especializado en Terapia Radiante, Viamonte 1861, C1056 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Notcovich, C.; Duran, H., E-mail: edarmeca@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnologia, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    The determination of value of irradiation dose presents difficulties when targets are irradiated located in regions where electronic equilibrium of charged particle is not reached, as in the case of irradiation -in vitro- of cell lines monolayer-cultured, in culture dishes or flasks covered with culture medium. The present study aimed to implement a methodology for dose verification in irradiation of cells in culture media by optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry (OSLD). For the determination of the absorbed dose in terms of cell proliferation OSL dosimeters of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) were used, which were calibrated to the irradiation conditions of culture medium and at doses that ranged from 0.1 to 15 Gy obtained with a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Intercomparison measurements were performed with an ionization chamber of 6 cm{sup 3}. Different geometries were evaluated by varying the thicknesses of solid water, air and cell culture medium. The results showed deviations below 2.2% when compared with the obtained doses of OSLDs and planning system used. Also deviations were observed below 3.4% by eccentric points of the irradiation plane, finding homogeneous dose distribution. Uncertainty in the readings was less than 2%. The proposed methodology contributes a contribution in the dose verification in this type of irradiations, eliminating from the calculation uncertainties, potential errors in settling irradiation or possible equipment failure with which is radiating. It also provides certainty about the survival curves to be plotted with the experimental data. (Author)

  4. Low Doses of Celecoxib Stimulate Human Endometrium Growth in A Three-Dimensional Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rasool Khazaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The endometrium plays a pivotal role in implantation and pregnancy. CyclooxygenaseII (COX-2 has an important function in biological processes such as cellproliferation and inflammation. Celecoxib is a selective inhibitor of COX-2 with numerouspharmacologic functions. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects ofcelecoxib on the human endometrium in a three-dimensional (3D culture model.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, normal human endometria (n=10obtained from reproductive age women were cut into 1×1 mm sections. Endometrialexplants were placed between two layers of fibrin gel. To create the fibrin gel, we poureda thin layer of fibrinogen solution [3 mg/ml in medium 199 (M199] into each well of a24-well culture dish and added thrombin enzyme. Endometrial fragments were placed inthe center of each well and covered with a second layer of fibrinogen solution. M199 supplementedwith L-glutamine, fetal bovine serum (FBS, 5% and antibiotics were addedto each well. The media in each experimental well contained either1, 10 or 50 μM ofcelecoxib. At the end of the study, we calculated endometrial tissue growth changes byscoring methods and determined the percentage of angiogenesis. Data were analyzed bythe Kruskal-Wallis method. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: The growth scores were as follows: control (1.37 ± 0.16, 1 μM (1.96 ± 0.28,10 μM (2.01 ± 0.25, and 50 μM (1.17 ± 0.14 celecoxib, all of which were significantlydifferent. The angiogenesis percentages were: 25.56 ± 6.72% (control, 31.98 ± 6.18% (1μM, 42.67 ± 7.27% (10 μM and 23.44 ± 4.03% (50 μM, which were not significantlydifferent from each other.

  5. Florfenicol residues in Rainbow Trout after oral dosing in recirculating and flow-through culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Hess, Karina R.; Bernady, Jeffry A.; Gaikowski, M. P.; Whitsel, Melissa; Endris, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaflor is a feed premix for fish containing the broad spectrum antibacterial agent florfenicol (FFC) incorporated at a ratio of 50% (w/w). To enhance the effectiveness of FFC for salmonids infected with certain isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum causing coldwater disease, the FFC dose must be increased from the standard 10 mg·kg−1 body weight (BW)·d−1 for 10 consecutive days. A residue depletion study was conducted to determine whether FFC residues remaining in the fillet tissue after treating fish at an increased dose would be safe for human consumption. Groups of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (total n = 144; weight range, 126–617 g) were treated with FFC at 20 mg·kg−1 BW·d−1 for 10 d in a flow-through system (FTS) and a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) each with a water temperature of ∼13°C. The two-tank RAS included a nontreated tank containing 77 fish. Fish were taken from each tank (treated tank, n = 16; nontreated tank, n = 8) at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120, 240, 360, and 480 h posttreatment. Florfenicol amine (FFA) concentrations (the FFC marker residue) in skin-on fillets from treated fish were greatest at 12 h posttreatment (11.58 μg/g) in the RAS and were greatest at 6 h posttreatment (11.09 μg/g) in the FTS. The half-lives for FFA in skin-on fillets from the RAS and FTS were 20.3 and 19.7 h, respectively. Assimilation of FFC residues in the fillets of nontreated fish sharing the RAS with FFC-treated fish was minimal. Florfenicol water concentrations peaked in the RAS-treated tank and nontreated tanks at 10 h (453 μg/L) and 11 h (442 μg/L) posttreatment, respectively. Monitoring of nitrite concentrations throughout the study indicated the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the RAS biofilter was minimally impacted by the FFC treatment.

  6. Relative resistance of Pacific salmon to infectious salmon anaemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, J.B.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a major disease of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, caused by an orthomyxovirus (ISAV). Increases in global aqua culture and the international movement of fish made it important to determine if Pacific salmon are at risk. Steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and chum, O. keta, Chinook, O. tshawytscha, coho, O. kisutch, and Atlantic salmon were injected intraperitoneally with a high, medium, or low dose of a Norwegian strain of ISAV. In a second challenge, the same species, except chum salmon, were injected with a high dose of either a Canadian or the Norwegian strain. Average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 1 was 12% in the high dose group, 20% in the medium dose group and 16% in the low dose group. The average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 2 was 98%. No signs typical of ISA and no ISAV-related mortality occurred among any of the groups of Oncorhynchus spp. in either experiment, although ISAV was reisolated from some fish sampled at intervals post-challenge. The results indicate that while Oncorhynchus spp. are quite resistant to ISAV relative to Atlantic salmon, the potential for ISAV to adapt to Oncorhynchus spp. should not be ignored.

  7. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 13 Chapter 14 Annex Viral Meningitis Fungal Meningitis Parasitic ... How it Spreads Non–infectious meningitis causes include: Cancers Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) Certain drugs Head injury ...

  8. Effect of low doses γ-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Ahmed, Osama K.; El-Desouky, Wael

    2011-09-01

    Effect of various γ-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H 2O 2 and O 2-). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture.

  9. The Important Role of Lipid Raft-Mediated Attachment in the Infection of Cultured Cells by Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Beaudette Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huichen; Huang, Mei; Yuan, Quan; Wei, Yanquan; Gao, Yuan; Mao, Lejiao; Gu, Lingjun; Tan, Yong Wah; Zhong, Yanxin; Liu, Dingxiang; Sun, Shiqi

    2017-01-01

    Lipid raft is an important element for the cellular entry of some viruses, including coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). However, the exact role of lipid rafts in the cellular membrane during the entry of IBV into host cells is still unknown. In this study, we biochemically fractionated IBV-infected cells via sucrose density gradient centrifugation after depleting plasma membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or Mevastatin. Our results demonstrated that unlike IBV non-structural proteins, IBV structural proteins co-localized with lipid raft marker caveolin-1. Infectivity assay results of Vero cells illustrated that the drug-induced disruption of lipid rafts significantly suppressed IBV infection. Further studies revealed that lipid rafts were not required for IBV genome replication or virion release at later stages. However, the drug-mediated depletion of lipid rafts in Vero cells before IBV attachment significantly reduced the expression of viral structural proteins, suggesting that drug treatment impaired the attachment of IBV to the cell surface. Our results indicated that lipid rafts serve as attachment factors during the early stages of IBV infection, especially during the attachment stage. PMID:28081264

  10. Studies with equine infectious anemia virus: transmission attempts by mosquitoes and survival of virus on vector mouthparts and hypodermic needles, and in mosquito tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D L; Issel, C J; Steelman, C D; Adams, W V; Benton, C V

    1981-09-01

    Biological and mechanical transmission trials with Psorophora columbiae (Dyar and Knab) and Aedes sollicitans (Walker) and ponies acutely infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were negative. The EIAV antigen was detected by radioimmunoassay in Ae sollicitans immediately after the mosquitoes had fed on an acutely ill pony, but not 14 days after feeding. Psorophora columbiae mosquitoes had detectable EIAV antigen as determined by radioimmunoassay 24 hours after they fed on an acutely ill pony; this antigen was not detected again until 6 days after feeding and was still detected 14 days after feeding. The EIAV was detected on hypodermic needles held at 25 C for 96 hours, but was not detected 120 hours after the needles were dipped in solutions of EIAV. The virus was detected on the mouthparts of mosquitoes for 1 hour after they had fed on an EIAV-rich medium, but was not detected 4 hours after feeding. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say ovarian cells maintained the infectivity of EIAV for 10 weekly passages, but no evidence for virus multiplication was obtained.

  11. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  12. Applicability of integrated cell culture quantitative PCR (ICC-qPCR) for the detection of infectious adenovirus type 2 in UV disinfection studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human adenovirus is relatively resistant to UV radiation and has been used as a conservative testing microbe for evaluations of UV disinfection systems as components of water treatment processes. In this study, we attempted to validate the applicability of integrated cell culture...

  13. Applicability of integrated cell culture quantitative PCR (ICC-qPCR) for the detection of infectious adenovirus type 2 in UV disinfection studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human adenovirus is relatively resistant to UV radiation and has been used as a conservative testing microbe for evaluations of UV disinfection systems as components of water treatment processes. In this study, we attempted to validate the applicability of integrated cell culture...

  14. Evaluation of the suitability of six host genes as internal control in real-time RT-PCR assays in chicken embryo cell cultures infected with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Bang, Dang Duong; Handberg, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    -time RT-PCR is needed to a suitable internal control. We thus investigated the expression pattern of six chicken genes, including P-actin, 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, glyceral dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin, in chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures...... and GAPDH had a lower expression level in CE cell cultures. Also, beta-actin showed no significant variation in both normalized and non-normalized assays and virus dose-independent of inoculation, while other genes did. beta-Actin was further successfully used as an internal control to quantitate Bursine-2...... virus-specific RNA load in CE cell cultures. Thus, beta-actin was suggested as a suitable internal control in studying gene expression as well as virus-specific RNA load in CE cell after IBDV infection....

  15. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency testing: the influence of serotype, type of adjuvant, valency, fractionation method, and virus culture on the dose-response curve in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamal, S.M.; Bouma, A.; Broek, van den J.; Stegeman, J.A.; Chenard, G.; Dekker, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between vaccine potency (amount of PD50 per dose) and fraction of clinically protected cattle following homologous challenge with infectious foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus, and to determine the effect of method of fractionation, serotype, typ

  16. Rectal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 283. Haines CF, Sears CL. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ... PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 22. Read More Cryptosporidium enteritis Fecal culture Proctitis Review Date 5/11/2016 ...

  17. Infectious abortions in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakanjac Slobodanka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abortions in pigs can be caused by infectious or non-infectious factors About 38% of all diagnosed abortions in pigs were caused by infectious agents. Consequences of infection can be early embryonal deaths or abortions which occur after the 40th day following conception. Causes of abortions include different species of viruses (parvoviruses, enteroviruses pseudorabies viruses, PRRS or bacteria (Brucella, Leptospira, and others. A precise diagnosis is imperative for therapy and prevention of abortions in pigs, and it is necessary to apply measures to prevent reproductive disorders in pigs.

  18. Ghetto poverty and pollution in Egypt: a deadly threat for western countries caused by new and infectious mutants. A cultural, social and microbiological synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassili, J H; Baradaeus, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Egypt, whose soil germinated the first civilization, monotheism, refined ethics and culture of sharing the abundance of extracted natural resources among its populace became the crucible proliferating de-novo genotypes of organic and moral maladies. The enigma is these mutations are synchronized by several factors, namely; failing medical health, if there is any, abundant filth, cultural bankruptcy, over population, dogmatic militarism, societal deprivation and characterization, etc. These domineering ingredients fossilized Egypt as of 1952 coup in an irrevocable national apoptosis, together with the crippled social justice and imbalanced distribution of wealth among Egyptians, rates of bacterial and viral evolution to second generation resistant to known medical interventions are expected to exponentially accelerate. Therefore, it deemed essential to elaborate on pollution and psychosis-induced inflammations and grievous crimes evoked by dogmatic cults at the breeding source, e.g., ghettos and sporadic locations of the homeless in Cairo, Alexandria and Upper Egyptian villages. While this second generation of viral and bacterial diseases could labor plagues threatening the precariously maintained so-called social fabric of Middle Eastern countries, that are uniquely segregating its populace according to their dogmatic affiliations and soaked into intolerance, it would definitely compromise the integrity of the expensively managed medical care system of developed countries.

  19. Infectious Agents and Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these agents on subsequent risk of cancer. There are currently ... tween genetic and environmental factors (that include infectious agents) .... opment of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lym- phoma. However .... Lung cancer i. Skin cancers ...

  20. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye)

    OpenAIRE

    Angelos, JA

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The...

  1. Highly efficient infectious cell culture of three HCV genotype 2b strains and sensitivity to lead protease, NS5A, and polymerase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Santseharay; Li, Yi-Ping; Brun Jensen, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    , we succeeded in generating DH8, J8, and DH10 viruses with authentic sequences in the regions targeted by lead direct acting antivirals. NS5B inhibitors Sofosbuvir, Mericitabine, and BI207127 had activity against 1a (strain TN), 2a (strains JFH1 and J6), and the 2b strains, whereas VX-222...... systems can be established by using consensus clones with defined mutations. Lead protease and NS5A inhibitors, as well as polymerase inhibitors Sofosbuvir, Mericitabine, and BI207127, show cross-activity against full-length 1a, 2a, and 2b viruses, but important sensitivity differences exist......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a genetically diverse virus with multiple genotypes exhibiting remarkable differences, particularly in drug susceptibility. Drug and vaccine development will benefit from high-titer HCV cultures mimicking the complete viral life cycle, but such systems only exist...

  2. Emergent infectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairallah Moncef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management.

  3. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In children, infectious discitis (D) and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD) are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric D and SD. It is highlighted that particular attention must be paid to the identification of the causative infectious agent and its sensitivity to antibiotics, remembering that traditional culture frequently leads to negative results and modern molecular methods can significantly increase the detection rate. Several different bacterial pathogens can cause D and SD, and, in some cases, particularly those due to Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., the appropriate choice of drug is critical to achieve cure. PMID:27070599

  4. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Principi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In children, infectious discitis (D and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric D and SD. It is highlighted that particular attention must be paid to the identification of the causative infectious agent and its sensitivity to antibiotics, remembering that traditional culture frequently leads to negative results and modern molecular methods can significantly increase the detection rate. Several different bacterial pathogens can cause D and SD, and, in some cases, particularly those due to Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., the appropriate choice of drug is critical to achieve cure.

  5. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A

    2015-03-01

    As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The discoveries of Mor bovoculi and reports of IBK associated with Mycoplasma spp without concurrent Mor bovis or Mor bovoculi have raised new questions into the roles that other organisms may play in IBK pathogenesis.

  6. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using comp...

  7. Effect of low doses {gamma}-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S., E-mail: lbltg@yahoo.com [Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, P.O. Box 12613, Gamma st, Giza, Cairo (Egypt); Ahmed, Osama K. [Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, P.O. Box 12613, Gamma st, Giza, Cairo (Egypt); El-Desouky, Wael [Biochemistry Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-09-15

    Effect of various {gamma}-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup -}). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture. - Highlights: > We model effects of {gamma}-irradiation on rosemary callus. > Highly changes of chemical contents, oxidative burst and antioxidant enzymes. > Treatments positively enhanced secondary products.

  8. Eosinophilia in Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Elise M; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-08-01

    In determining the etiology of eosinophilia, it is necessary to consider the type of patient, including previous travel and exposure history, comorbidities, and symptoms. In this review, we discuss the approach to the patient with eosinophilia from an infectious diseases perspective based on symptom complexes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Infectious uveitis in Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhard SB

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Engelhard,1 Zeina Haddad,1 Asima Bajwa,1 James Patrie,2 Wenjun Xin,2 Ashvini K Reddy1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: To report the causes, clinical features, and outcomes of infectious uveitis in patients managed in a mid-Atlantic tertiary care center.Methods: Retrospective, observational study of infectious uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014.Results: Seventy-seven of 491 patients (15.7% were diagnosed with infectious uveitis (mean age 58 years, 71.4% female, 76.6% Caucasian. The mean follow-up was 5 years. Anterior uveitis was the most common anatomic classification (39 patients, 50.6% followed by panuveitis (20 patients, 26.0% and posterior uveitis (18 patients, 23.4%. The most common infectious etiology was herpetic anterior uveitis (37 patients, 48.1% followed by toxoplasma uveitis (14 patients, 18.2%. The most prevalent viral pathogen was varicella-zoster virus (21 patients, 27.3% followed by herpes simplex virus (20 patients, 26.0%. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN was diagnosed in 14 patients (18.2%. Aqueous humor yielded an etiologic diagnosis in seven (50% of ARN patients, four of whom tested positive for cytomegalovirus and three for varicella-zoster virus. On presentation, 43 patients (55.8% had a visual acuity (VA better than 20/40 and 17 (22.1% had a VA worse than 20/200. VA at the final follow-up was better than 20/40 in 39 patients (50.6% and worse than 20/200 in 22 patients (28.6%. In all, 16 (20.8% and 10 (13.0% patients required cataract and vitrectomy surgery, respectively. A total of 14 patients (18.2% were on glaucoma topical treatment and four (5.2% required glaucoma surgery.Conclusion: The most common type of infectious uveitis seen over the study period was herpetic anterior uveitis secondary to varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus, found to be most prevalent in patients

  10. Vasculitis and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, R; Biondi, G

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis usually presents without a well-known underline cause (idiopathic vasculitis), nevertheless, it is sometimes possible to find out one or more causative agents (secondary vasculitis). Nowadays, thanks to the increasing amount of precise diagnostic tools, a piece of idiopathic vasculitis is reclassified as associated with probable etiology, which can be set off by several factors, such as infections. Infections are considered to be the most common cause of secondary vasculitis. Virtually, every infectious agent can trigger a vasculitis by different mechanisms which can be divided in two main categories: direct and indirect. In the former, infectious agents destroy directly the vascular wall leading, eventually, to a subsequent inflammatory response. In the latter, indirect form, they stimulate an immune response against blood vessels. Different infectious agents are able to directly damage the vascular wall. Among these, it is possible to recognize Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus spp, Salmonella spp, Treponema spp, Rickettsia spp, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2, and many others which have a peculiar tropism for endothelial cells. Conversely, another group of microbial agents, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, Hepatits B Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and others, trigger vasculitis in the indirect way. This is due to the fact that they can share epitopes with the host or modify self-antigens, thus leading to a cross-self reaction of the immune system. These mechanism, in turn, leads to immunological responses classified as type I-IV by Gell-Coombs. Nevertheless, it is difficult to strictly separate the direct and indirect forms, because most infectious agents can cause vasculitis in both ways (mixed forms). This paper will analyze the link between infectious agents and vasculitis, focusing on direct and indirect secondary vasculitis, and on a group of probable infection-related idiopathic vasculitis, and finally

  11. Inactivation of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Tsutsumi, Takamasa (Animal Quarantine Service, Yokohama (Japan)); Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1990-10-01

    Radiation inactivation of Infectious Boivne Rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus was investigated by suspending in a commercial preparation medium (c.p.m.) or IBR antibody free serum and irradiated at room temperature or dry ice frozen condition. Normal pooled serum was also analysed by electrophoresis with cellulose acetate membrane after irradiation at frozen and non-frozen condition. The virus inactivation was determined by MDBK cell line which 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) was calculated by Behrens Kaerber method. D{sub 10} value at non-frozen condition in serum was obtained as 1.1-1.2 kGy and that in c.p.m. was 1.3-1.4 kGy. On the other hand, D{sub 10} value was increased to 3.4-3.6 kGy in serum and 3.9 kGy in c.p.m. at frozen condition. On the irradiation effect of bovine serum, four peaks of albumin, {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}-globulin fraction were obtained from non-irradiation and irradiated serum up to 2 kGy at non-frozen condition by electrophoresis. More than 4 kGy irradiation, the peaks of globulin fractions became not clear and at more than 8 kGy, changed to one large peak. On the other hand, these changes of electrophoretic patterns were not observed even at 30 kGy irradiation in frozen condition. From these results, necessary dose was decided as 20-25 kGy at frozen condition for inactivation of IBR virus in serum. (author).

  12. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP.

  13. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy – Results of a Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP. PMID:28122053

  14. 76 FR 39041 - Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 RIN 1218-AC46 Infectious Diseases AGENCY... exposure to infectious diseases. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these meetings to explore... your request to: (781) 674-7200, and label it ``Attention: OSHA Infectious Diseases Stakeholder...

  15. Methods and terminology used in cell-culture studies of low-dose effects of matrix constituents of polymer resin-based dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Bo W; Örtengren, Ulf; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; Sørensen, Karen K; Michelsen, Vibeke B

    2016-12-01

    General comprehension of terms and confounding factors associated with in vitro experiments can maximize the potential of in vitro testing of substances. In this systematic review, we present an overview of the terms and methods used to determine low-dose effects of matrix constituents in polymer resin-based dental materials in cell-culture studies and discuss the findings in light of how they may influence the comprehension and interpretation of results. Articles published between 1996 and 2015 were identified by searches in the Scopus, Web of Science, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase databases using keywords associated with low-dose effects, polymer resin-based materials, in vitro parameters, and dental materials. Twenty-nine articles were included. Subtoxic (n = 11), sublethal (n = 10), and nontoxic (n = 6) were the terms most commonly used to describe the low-dose effects of methacrylates. However, definition of terms varied. Most (82%) studies employed only one method to define the exposure scenario, and no agreement was seen between studies on the use of solvents. Prophylactic use of antibiotics was widespread, and mycoplasma screening was not reported. In conclusion, cell-culture conditions and tests used to define exposure scenarios have changed little in the last decades, despite development in recommendations. Nomenclature alignment is needed for a better understanding of possible biohazards of methacrylates. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; CHEUNG Ning; TIAN Bei; WEI Wen-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-infectious endophthalmitis was reported to occur after cataract surgery or intravitreal injections.This study reported a series of patients having non-infectious endophthalmitis after pars plana vitrectomy in the same two operation rooms during the same period to estimate the risk factors for non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy.Methods Medical records of patients who presented with severe non-infectious endophthalmitis following vitrectomy between May 13 and June 8,2011,were reviewed.The presenting symptoms and signs were collected,including visual acuity,intraocular pressure,cornea and anterior chamber activity.The treatments and results of microbiology examination were also recorded and analyzed.Results Ten patients were identified with severe non-infectious endophthalmitis,presenting 1 day after pars plana vitrectomy.Three eyes (30%) had previous intraocular surgeries,four (40%) had proliferative diabetic retinopathy,and one (10%) got pars plana vitrectomy combinded with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.All the patients were initially treated with topical and/or oral steroids.Only two patients had intravenous antibiotics because of the atypical presentation.One eye had paracentesis because of high intraocular pressure and the aqueous sample was sent for microbiological examination.The culture of the aqueous,air in the operation room,the swab from hand of surgeons,infusion fluid,and vitrectomy effluent were all negative for bacteria and fungi.The inflammation regressed rapidly after the initial treatment.Conclusions Intraocular surgery history,poor general health status,longer operation time,and more surgical procedures are the risk factors for non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy.It responds well to steroids.

  17. Histopathology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological examination of tissue biopsies for the identification of infectious organisms is a very important diagnostic tool. Conventional culture confirmation of tissue biopsies often fail to identify any pathogen as, first of all, invariably most of the tissue samples that are collected and sent for culture isolation are inappropriately collected in formalin, which prevents pathogen growth in culture media. Inadequate processing like grinding, etc. further hinders isolation. Presence of inhibitors like dead tissue debris, fibers, etc. also delays isolation. Microbiologists often lack expertise in identifying infectious pathogens directly from tissue biopsies by microscopic visualization. This review therefore acquaints microbiologists with the various methods available for detecting infectious agents by using histological stains. On histopathological examination of the tissue biopsy once, it is determined that a disease is likely to be due to an infection and has characterized the inflammatory response and hence associated microorganisms should be thoroughly looked for. Although some microorganisms or their cytopathic effects may be clearly visible on routine haematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections, additional histochemical stains are often needed for their complete characterization. Highly specific molecular techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and nucleic acid amplification, may be needed in certain instances to establish the diagnosis of infection. Through appropriate morphologic diagnoses and interlaboratory communication and collaboration, direct microscopic visualization of tissue samples can thus be very helpful in reaching a correct and rapid diagnosis.

  18. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Zimmerman

    2001-01-01

    There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health intera...

  19. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    oxygenease HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells...

  20. Infectious diseases in end-stage liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases sustain impairment to immune systems, which worsens over time. These defects in their host defense lead to risks of bacterial infections and increased morbidity. Providers should have heightened surveillance for infectious diseases and suspect one with any acute change in status. Patient history may reveal rare infections and allow initiation of early appropriate therapy. There should be a low threshold for obtaining diagnostic cultures and peritoneal fluid samples and discussing possible causes with an infectious diseases consultant or a microbiology laboratory. These maneuvers will maximize therapy in patients at high risk for death due to infectious disease.

  1. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  2. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Applications for High-Throughput Screening of Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, James R

    2016-02-01

    When acoustic droplet ejection technology was first introduced for high-throughput applications, it was used primarily for dispensing compounds dissolved in DMSO. The high precision and accuracy achieved for low-volume transfers in this application were noted by those working outside of the compound management area, and interest was generated in expanding the scope of the technology to include other liquid types. Later-generation instruments included calibrations for several aqueous buffers that were applicable to the life sciences. The High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research has made use of this range of liquid calibrations for the Infectious Disease Program. The original calibration for DMSO has allowed the preparation of assay-ready plates that can be sent to remote locations. This process was used as part of the collaboration between Southern Research and Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to develop high-throughput screening for biological safety level 4 containment and to provide compounds for two pilot screens that were run there with BSL-4-level pathogens. The aqueous calibrations have been instrumental in miniaturizing assays used for infectious disease, such as qPCR, tissue culture infectious dose 50, and bacterial motility, to make them compatible with HTS operations.

  3. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, T. M.

    1930-01-01

    The virus of infectious myxomatosis of rabbits (Sanarelli) induces multiple lesions in the skin, lymph glands, tunica vaginalis,epididymis, testicle, spleen, and lungs. Growth and destruction of cells in the epidermis overlying the myxomatous masses leads to the formation of vesicles. Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in affected epidermal cells. Occasionally, similar inclusions are seen in other involved epithelial cells. The nature of the inclusions is an open question. In the myxomatous masses situated in the subcutaneous and other tissues, evidences of alteration and growth of certain cells are observed. PMID:19869741

  4. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  5. [Infectious colitis. Endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dive, C

    1986-11-01

    Colon and rectum localizations of an disease or a parasitosis depend essentially on the nature of the pathogenous agent and the host resistance. Acute enterocolitis is secondary to enterotoxinogenous germs (such as cholera vibrio), invasive germs (such as shigella), penetrating germs (such as salmonella); viruses are seldom concerned. Parasitic colitis include mostly amibiasis and bilharziosis. Infectious and parasitic enterocolitis may be transmitted sexually. On the other hand, certain venereal diseases have intestinal manifestations. Finally, in AIDS, timely gastro-intestinal infections develop. The diagnosis rests on endoscopy, histological examination and biological and parasitological samplings.

  6. Globalization and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the nature of the health challenges created by globalization and proposes new forms of international cooperation to confront them. The discussion of global health challenges includes both the transfer of health risks, with an emphasis on infectious diseases, and the international dissemination of health opportunities, including the transfer of knowledge and technology. The authors argue that the health-related challenges and opportunities of an increasingly interdependent world demand new forms of international cooperation. The authors suggest the promotion of 3 elements that, in their essence, contain the idea of collaboration: exchange, evidence, and empathy.

  7. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Teresa; Randell, Susan; Moore, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) frequently results in death in cats. It is caused by a mutated, highly contagious coronavirus, and it is more common in indoor cats in multicat households. A complex interaction between the coronavirus and the feline immune system causes disseminated vasculitis, which is the hallmark of FIP. New tests are being developed, but the antemortem diagnosis of FIP continues to be difficult and frustrating. Current treatments are crude and involve supportive care and immunosuppression. Minimizing exposure is the best method of preventing infection.

  8. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  9. Studies on Infectious Mononucleosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncas, J.; Chagnon, A.; Pavilanis, V.

    1966-01-01

    Viral studies were carried out on throat swabs, rectal swabs and washed white blood cells from 27 cases of infectious mononucleosis (positive Paul-Bunnell-David-sohn test), and from 22 controls. Four cytopathic agents were isolated in the test group, two of which were readily subcultured for at least three successive passages. Three cytopathic agents were recovered in the control group, two of which have been identified as adenovirus type 5 and adenovirus type 3. The unidentified agents tested so far are sensitive to ether and to pH 3. The results of acridine-orange staining and the immunofluorescence technique, using a conjugated control serum and two conjugated convalescent infectious mononucleosis sera, indicate that the isolated agent or agents in the test group are RNA-type agents with a cytoplasmic cycle of development. The overall results of this study lead the authors to suspect a respiratory syncytial-like myxovirus as the as yet unidentified agent which they recovered. ImagesFig. 1aFig. 1bFig. 1cFig. 1dFig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 3aFig. 3bFig. 3cFig. 3dFig. 3eFig. 3f PMID:4952899

  10. [Globalization and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a phenomenon characteristic of present times. It can be considered in various aspects: economic, environmental changes, demographic changes, as well as the development of new technologies. All these aspects of globalization have a definite influence on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. Economic aspects ofglobalization are mainly the trade development, including food trade, which has an impact on the spread of food-borne diseases. The environmental changes caused by intensive development of industry, as a result of globalization, which in turn affects human health. The demographic changes are mainly people migration between countries and rural and urban areas, which essentially favors the global spread of many infectious diseases. While technological advances prevents the spread of infections, for example through better access to information, it may also increase the risk, for example through to create opportunities to travel into more world regions, including the endemic regions for various diseases. The phenomenon ofglobalization is also closely associated with the threat of terrorism, including bioterrorism. It forces the governments of many countries to develop effective programs to protect and fight against this threat.

  11. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  12. A Low Ethanol Dose Affects all Types of Cells in Mixed Long-Term Embryonic Cultures of the Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz; Rosendahl, Sofi

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effect of the '1-drink-a-day' lifestyle is suggested by studies of cardiovascular health, and this recommendation is increasingly followed in many countries. The main objective of this study was to determine whether this pattern of ethanol use would be detrimental to a pregnant woman....... We exposed a primary culture of rat cerebellum from embryonic day 17 (corresponding to second trimester in humans) to ethanol at a concentration of 17.6 mM which is roughly equivalent to one glass of wine. Acutely, there was no change in cell viability after 5 or 8 days of exposure relative...... to control. By 11 days, a reduction in the number of viable cells was observed without an accompanying change in caspase-3 activity (marker of apoptotic cell death), suggesting changes in cell proliferation. As the proportion of nestin-positive cells was higher in the ethanol-treated cultures after 5 days...

  13. Pseudothrombocytopenia associated with infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, A T; Chao, T Y; Chen, Y C

    2003-01-01

    A 22-year-old man was hospitalized for assessment of thrombocytopenia and fever. Examination showed that he had infectious mononucleosis and moderately severe thrombocytopenia that was asymptomatic. Examination of blood smears revealed that the thrombocytopenia was caused by the clumping of platelets. We made a diagnosis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia after excluding other infectious mononucleosis-related mechanisms of thrombocytopenia. When the patient recovered from infectious mononucleosis 2 months later, his thrombocytopenia improved, and no platelet clumping in peripheral blood smears was noted. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia should always be considered as a possible cause of reported low platelet counts, even in patients with infectious mononucleosis and splenomegaly.

  14. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  15. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyagari A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic on intestinal mucosa and pharmacological effect on gut motility. The antibiotics most frequently associated with C. difficile associated diarrhoea are clindamycin, cephalosporin, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Clinical presentation may vary from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis and pseudomembranous colitis associated with high morbidity and mortality. The most sensitive and specific diagnostic test for C. difficile infection is tissue culture assay for cytotoxicity of toxin B. Commercial ELISA kits are available. Though less sensitive, they are easy to perform and are rapid. Withdrawal of precipitating antibiotic is all that is needed for control of mild to moderate cases. For severe cases of AAD, oral metronidazole is the first line of treatment, and oral vancomycin is the second choice. Probiotics have been used for recurrent cases.

  16. Survival of the salmonid viruses infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPNV) in ozonated, chlorinated, and Untreated waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Nelson, Nancy C.; Smith, Cathy A.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone and chlorine inactivation curves were determined in three water types at 10 °C for the fish pathogenic viruses infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPNV). In phosphate-buffered, distilled water (PBDW) an ozone dose of 0.01 mg/L for 30 or 60 s inactivated IHNV or IPNV, respectively, suspended at a tissue culture 50% infective dose (TCID50) of 104–105/mL. In hard (120 mg/L as CaCO3) and soft water (30 mg/L) lake waters, an ozone application rate of 70 mg∙h−1∙L−1 for 10 min destroyed IHNV. IPNV inactivation in hard water required 90 mg∙O3∙h−1∙L−1 for 10 min but only a 30-s contact time in soft water. The IPNV was also somewhat more resistant to chlorine. In PBDW, a residual of 0.1 mg/L with contact times of 30 and 60 s, respectively, destroyed IHNV and IPNV. In soft lake water IHNV was destroyed within 5 min at 0.5 mg/L, while in hard water a 10-min contact time was required. For IPNV disinfection in soft water, 0.2 mg/L for 10 min was sufficient but this chlorine residual had essentially no effect on IPNV in hard water. Increasing this dose to 0.7 mg/L destroyed IPNV in hard water within 2 min. In untreated waters, IPNV was stable for at least 8 wk in either distilled, soft, or hard lake waters. However, IHNV survived only about 2 wk in distilled and 7 wk in the soft or hard lake waters. We suggest the serious consideration of ozone as a fish disease control agent. Key words: ozone, chlorine disinfection, fish pathogens, viruses

  17. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  18. Response of cupuassu embryonic axes (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum.) to salts concentration, sucrose doses and culture medium renewal

    OpenAIRE

    FERREIRA MARIA DAS GRAÇAS RODRIGUES; NINAMANGO CÁRDENAS FERNANDO ENRIQUE; CARVALHO CARLOS HENRIQUE SIQUEIRA DE; CARNEIRO ANDRÉA ALMEIDA; DAMIÃO FILHO CARLOS FERREIRA

    2002-01-01

    Foram estudados os efeitos da concentração de sais, doses de sacarose e freqüência de renovação do meio de cultura para o desenvolvimento de eixos embrionários de cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum.). Testaram-se 2 concentrações de sais MS (100 e 50%), 2 níveis de sacarose (1,5 e 3%) e 3 freqüências de renovação dos meios (sem renovação, renovação aos 30 e aos 60 dias), com os meios acrescidos de ANA (0,5 mg/L) e BAP (0,3 mg/L.), semi-solidificados com ágar 0,7% e pH 5,7. Observou-se que a...

  19. Dose-dependent differential effect of hemin on protein synthesis and cell proliferation in Leishmania donovani promastigotes cultured in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayanta K Pal; Manisha Joshi-Purandare

    2001-06-01

    Leishmania donovani requires an exogenous source of heme for growth and transformation. In in vitro culture of the free-living promastigotes, exogenously added hemin enhances cell proliferation. In this investigation, the question of the function of heme with particular reference to protein synthesis and cell proliferation has been addressed. The results of in vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated that hemin (10 M) alone is suitable for supporting optimum level of protein synthesis, and thereby cell proliferation of promastigotes to an extent that it can replace fetal bovine serum. However, in situ labelling experiments along with Western blots revealed that high concentration of hemin (50 M) reduced the level of protein synthesis in general and of -tubulin in particular with a concomitant induction of hsp90, and induced consequent morphological changes that are observed during in situ transformation of promastigotes in mammalian macrophages. These results therefore suggest that sudden exposure to high concentration of heme in mammalian macrophages may be one of the key factors that trigger promastigote to amastigote transformation in L. donovani. Furthermore, hemin with its dual characteristic could be used as a tool to understand molecular mechanism of cell proliferation and transformation in these parasites.

  20. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  1. Effect of ultra-low-dose estriol and lactobacilli vaginal tablets (Gynoflor®) on inflammatory and infectious markers of the vaginal ecosystem in postmenopausal women with breast cancer on aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, G; Bellen, G; Neven, P; Grob, P; Prasauskas, V; Buchholz, S; Ortmann, O

    2015-10-01

    This study was a detailed microscopic analysis of the changes of vaginal microflora characteristics after application of 0.03 mg estriol-lactobacilli combination on the vaginal ecosystem in postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) survivors on aromatase inhibitors (AI) with severe atrophic vaginitis. A total of 16 BC women on AI applied daily one vaginal tablet of Gynoflor® for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of three tablets weekly for 8 weeks. During four follow up visits a smear from the upper lateral vaginal wall was analysed by phase contrast microscopy at 400 times magnification in order to classify the lactobacillary grades(LBG), bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC), proportional number of leukocytes and evidence of parabasal cells and epitheliolysis. LBG improved from 81% LBG-III at entry to 88% LBG-I&IIa after 2 weeks of initial therapy, which further improved upon follow up (p vaginal use of ultra-low dose estriol and lactobacilli results in rapid and enduring improvement of all markers of the vaginal microflora and epithelial vaginal cell quality in women with breast cancer on AI with dyspareunia. Candida may develop soon after its use, but rapidly disappears again upon their prolonged use. Due to its excellent safety profiles and clinical efficacy we recommend this product as first choice in women on AI with severe dyspareunia.

  2. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2007-01-01

    , and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the Danish......: A total of 104 cases of multiple sclerosis were observed during 556,703 person-years of follow-up, corresponding to a standardized incidence ratio of 2.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-2.75). The risk of multiple sclerosis was persistently increased for more than 30 years after infectious mononucleosis...... and uniformly distributed across all investigated strata of sex and age. The relative risk of multiple sclerosis did not vary by presumed severity of infectious mononucleosis. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of multiple sclerosis is increased in persons with prior infectious mononucleosis, regardless of sex, age...

  3. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Fonville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90-99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV, a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks

  4. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hui; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2015-01-01

    A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90–99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV), a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI) particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI) particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks, most likely by

  5. Simvastatin Results in a Dose-Dependent Toxic Effect on Spiral Ganglion Neurons in an In Vitro Organotypic Culture Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Leitmeyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, an enzyme necessary for the production of mevalonate. They are widely used as cholesterol-lowering drugs. However, conflicting data about the effect of statins on neuronal cells has been published. To explore the effect of simvastatin on spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs, SG explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of simvastatin. In addition, SG explants were treated with mevalonate and with the combination of simvastatin and mevalonate. SGN number, length of the neurites, area of nonneuronal supporting cells, and neuronal survival were analyzed. Simvastatin treatment results in a significant dose-dependent decrease of SG neurite number, length of neurites, area of supporting cells, and SG neuronal survival compared to control. Interestingly, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin increased SG neuronal survival compared to simvastatin treatment only. However, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin did not influence SG neurite number, length of neurites, and area of supporting cells compared to simvastatin treatment only. Our results suggest a neurotoxic effect of simvastatin on SGNs in vitro. Neurotoxicity seems to be at least partially mediated by the mevalonate pathway. Therefore, caution is warranted to use simvastatin as a potential otoprotective drug.

  6. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn [Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists.

  7. Dose-Dependent Effects on Sphingoid Bases and Cytokines in Chickens Fed Diets Prepared with Fusarium Verticillioides Culture Material Containing Fumonisins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Grenier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In chickens, the effect of mycotoxins, especially fumonisins (FB, in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT is not well documented. Thus, this study in broiler chicks determined the effects of consuming diets prepared with Fusarium verticillioides culture material containing FB on intestinal gene expression and on the sphinganine (Sa/sphingosine (So ratio (Sa/So; a biomarker of FB effect due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. Male broilers were assigned to 6 diets (6 cages/diet; 6 birds/cage from hatch to 20 days containing 0.4, 5.6, 11.3, 17.5, 47.8, or 104.8 mg FB/kg diet. Exposure to FB altered the Sa/So ratio in all tissues analyzed, albeit to varying extents. Linear dose-responses were observed in the kidney, jejunum and cecum. The liver and the ileum were very sensitive and data fit a cubic and quadratic polynomial model, respectively. Gene expression in the small intestine revealed low but significant upregulations of cytokines involved in the pro-inflammatory, Th1/Th17 and Treg responses, especially at 10 days of age. Interestingly, the cecal tonsils exhibited a biphasic response. Unlike the sphingolipid analysis, the effects seen on gene expression were not dose dependent, even showing more effects when birds were exposed to 11.3 mg FB/kg. In conclusion, this is the first report on the disruption of the sphingolipid metabolism by FB in the GIT of poultry. Further studies are needed to reach conclusions on the biological meaning of the immunomodulation observed in the GIT, but the susceptibility of chickens to intestinal pathogens when exposed to FB, at doses lower than those that would cause overt clinical symptoms, should be addressed.

  8. Infectious laryngotracheitis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hidalgo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT herpesvirus continues to cause outbreaks of respiratory disease in chickens world-wide. Sporadic cases of ILT occur in all classes of birds, including hobby/show/game chickens, broilers, heavy breeders, and commercial laying hens. These epornitics of ILT tend to occur where there are large populations of naïve, unvaccinated birds, i.e., in concentrated areas of broiler production. ILT virus can be transmitted through (a chickens with acute upper respiratory tract disease, (b latently infected "carrier" fowls, and (c fomites and contaminated persons. Chicken flocks which are endemic infected with ILT virus occur only in some regions of countries or even in particular multiple-age production farms. In these cases modified live vaccines are actually used, even though these biological products, as well as wild ILTV strains, can establish latent infections. In the case of heavy breeders and laying hens, which are typically vaccinated against ILT, sporadic cases are often related to errors in vaccine application and to biosecurity failures.

  9. Effects of different dose endothelin-1 on expession of peroxisome proliferator-γ in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengli Di; Xiaolin Niu; Jin Wei; Nanping Wang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of endothlin- 1 (ET- 1 ) on vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs ) proliferation and the expression of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ (PPAR-γ) in VSMCs. Methods: VSMCs of 16-week-old wistar rats thoracic aorta were cultured. VSMCs were treated by ET-1 for 48 h and observed of the proliferation by MTT. The expression of PPAR-γmRNA and protein in cultured VSMCs treated by different concentration of ET-1 for 48 h was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot.Results: Compared with control group, VSMCs treated by ET-1 proliferated with the increase concentration of ET-1. There was significant differences among different groups ( P < 0.01). Meanwhile, the expression of PPAR-γ both in mRNA and in protein levels deceased. The expression of PPAR-γ in VSMCs was gradually decreased along with the increase concentration of ET-1. There was significant differences among different groups ( P <0.01). Compared with control group, the expression of both PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ in ET-1 treated groups were lower( P < 0.01). Conclusion: ET-1 could induce VSMCs proliferation and the expression of PPAR-γ in VSMCs, which demonstrates that high dose ET-1 obviously weakens the function of PPAR-γ to increase VSMCs proliferation.

  10. Infectious Diseases in the Homeless

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-26

    In this podcast, Ted Pestorius speaks with Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director for Minority and Women’s Health at CDC about an article in September 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases on infectious diseases in the homeless. There are an estimated 100 million homeless people worldwide today, and this number is likely to grow. The homeless population is vulnerable to many diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Dr. McDonald discusses why this population is so vulnerable.  Created: 8/26/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/27/2008.

  11. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    OpenAIRE

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages.

  12. Direct recovery of infectious Pestivirus from a full-length RT-PCR amplicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Hoffmann, Bernd;

    2008-01-01

    , and the resulting RNA transcripts were electroporated into ovine cells. Infectious virus was obtained after one cell culture passage. The rescued viruses had a phenotype similar to the parental Border Disease virus strain. Therefore, direct generation of infectious pestiviruses from full-length RT-PCR cDNA products...

  13. Phylogeography of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurath, G.; Garver, K.A.; Troyer, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen that infects wild and cultured salmonid fish throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. IHNV causes severe epidemics in young fish and can cause disease or occur asymptomatically in adults. In a broad survey of 323...... influencing IHNV evolution may have included ocean migration ranges of their salmonid host populations and anthropogenic effects associated with fish culture....

  14. Coronavirus avian infectious bronchitis virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavanagh, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), the coronavirus of the chicken (Gallus gallus), is one of the foremost causes of economic loss within the poultry industry, affecting the performance of both meat-type and egg-laying birds...

  15. Infectious Agents Trigger Trophic Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Julia C; Ripple, William J

    2017-09-01

    Most demonstrated trophic cascades originate with predators, but infectious agents can also cause top-down indirect effects in ecosystems. Here we synthesize the literature on trophic cascades initiated by infectious agents including parasitoids, pathogens, parasitic castrators, macroparasites, and trophically transmitted parasites. Like predators, infectious agents can cause density-mediated and trait-mediated indirect effects through their direct consumptive and nonconsumptive effects respectively. Unlike most predators, however, infectious agents are not fully and immediately lethal to their victims, so their consumptive effects can also trigger trait-mediated indirect effects. We find that the frequency of trophic cascades reported for different consumer types scales with consumer lethality. Furthermore, we emphasize the value of uniting predator-prey and parasite-host theory under a general consumer-resource framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y.; Kimura-Kuroda, J. [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I. [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  17. Microbiology and epidemiology of infectious spinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Se-Jin; Choi, Seung-Won; Youm, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Ha, Ho-Gyun; Yi, Jin-Seok

    2014-07-01

    . Many previous studies in Korea usually reported that tuberculous spondylitis is the predominant infection. However, in our study, the number of pyogenic infection was 3 times greater than that of tuberculous spinal disease. Etiological agents were identified in a half of all infectious spinal disease. For better outcomes, we should try to identify the causative microorganism before antibiotic therapy and make every effort to improve the result of culture and biopsy.

  18. Carbon nanotubes in drug delivery: focus on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to address the challenges of combating infectious agents by both minimizing toxicity by dose reduction of standard therapeutics and allowing a multiple payload capacity to achieve both targeted activity and combating infectious strains, resistant strains in particular. One of their unique characteristics is the network of carbon atoms in the nanometer scale, allowing the creation of nano-channels via cellular membranes. This review focuses on the characterization, development, integration and application of carbon nanotubes as nanocarrier-based delivery systems and their appropriate design for achieving the desired drug delivery results in the different areas of infectious diseases. While a more extensive toxicological and pharmacological profile must be obtained, this review will focus on existing research and pre-clinical data concerning the potential use of carbon nanotubes.

  19. Chronopharmacokinetics of once daily dosed aminoglycosides in hospitalized infectious patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maarseveen, Erik; Man, Wai Hong; Proost, Johannes; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daniël

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: hospitalized patients with serious infections treated with aminoglycosides are at risk of developing nephrotoxicity. Previous clinical studies have shown that the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in humans follow a circadian rhythm. Therefore, the time of administration could have imp

  20. Chronopharmacokinetics of once daily dosed aminoglycosides in hospitalized infectious patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maarseveen, Erik; Man, Wai Hong; Proost, Johannes; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background hospitalized patients with serious infections treated with aminoglycosides are at risk of developing nephrotoxicity. Previous clinical studies have shown that the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in humans follow a circadian rhythm. Therefore, the time of administration could have impo

  1. IDBD: infectious disease biomarker database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, In Seok; Ryu, Chunsun; Cho, Ki Joon; Kim, Jin Kwang; Ong, Swee Hoe; Mitchell, Wayne P; Kim, Bong Su; Oh, Hee-Bok; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers enable early diagnosis, guide molecularly targeted therapy and monitor the activity and therapeutic responses across a variety of diseases. Despite intensified interest and research, however, the overall rate of development of novel biomarkers has been falling. Moreover, no solution is yet available that efficiently retrieves and processes biomarker information pertaining to infectious diseases. Infectious Disease Biomarker Database (IDBD) is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering known infectious disease biomarkers. IDBD is a community annotation database, utilizing collaborative Web 2.0 features, providing a convenient user interface to input and revise data online. It allows users to link infectious diseases or pathogens to protein, gene or carbohydrate biomarkers through the use of search tools. It supports various types of data searches and application tools to analyze sequence and structure features of potential and validated biomarkers. Currently, IDBD integrates 611 biomarkers for 66 infectious diseases and 70 pathogens. It is publicly accessible at http://biomarker.cdc.go.kr and http://biomarker.korea.ac.kr.

  2. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF INFECTIOUS EXANTHEMAS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    D. Yu. Ovsyannikov

    2015-01-01

    The lecture is devoted to the problem of differential diagnosis of infectious exanthemas in children. Information about differential-diagnostic sings of infectious and non-infectious exanthemas is present. Differential diagnosis is proposed on the basis of morphological elements identified in objective research. Presents possible infectious and non-infectious causes of rashes which are characterized by different primary (spot, papula, blister, knob, knot, bubble, abscess, bladder) and seconda...

  3. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF INFECTIOUS EXANTHEMAS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Ovsyannikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to the problem of differential diagnosis of infectious exanthemas in children. Information about differential-diagnostic sings of infectious and non-infectious exanthemas is present. Differential diagnosis is proposed on the basis of morphological elements identified in objective research. Presents possible infectious and non-infectious causes of rashes which are characterized by different primary (spot, papula, blister, knob, knot, bubble, abscess, bladder and secondary (scale, erosion, ulcer morphological elements.

  4. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. E. MacPhee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters.

  5. Inhibition of gamma-ray dose-rate effects by D/sup 2/O and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A.M.; Tanaka, O.; Matsudaira, H.

    1984-06-01

    Effects of deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) and 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on cell proliferation and survival were studied in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells under growing conditions and after acute and low-dose-rate irradiation at about 0.1 to 0.4 Gy/hr of ..gamma.. rays. Growth of irradiated and unirradiated cells was inhibited by 45% D/sub 2/O but not by 3-aminobenzamide at 10mM, except for treatments longer than 30 hr. The presence of these agents either alone or in combination during irradiation at low dose rates suppressed almost totally the decrease in cell killing due to the decrease in dose rate. Among other inhibitors tested, theobromine and theophylline were found to be effective in eliminating the dose-rate effects of ..gamma.. rays. Possible mechanisms underlying the inhibition are discussed.

  6. Lacrimal Duct Occlusion Is Associated with Infectious Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guigang; Guo, Jingmin; Liu, Rong; Hu, Weikun; Xu, Lingjuan; Wang, Juan; Cai, Subo; Zhang, Hong; Zhu, Yingting

    2016-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of lacrimal duct obstruction in patients with infectious keratitis, and the necessity of lacrimal duct dredge in the treatment of human infectious keratitis. Methodology/Principle Findings: The design is prospective, non-control case series. Thirty-one eyes from twenty-eight continuous patients with infectious keratitis were included in this study. The presence/absence of lacrimal duct obstruction was determined by the lacrimal duct irrigation test. The diagnosis of infectious keratitis was made based on clinical manifestations, cornea scraping microscopic examination and bacterial/fungus culture. Diagnosis of viral keratitis was set up based on the recurrent history, deep neovascularization and typical outlook of the cornea scar. The treatment of keratitis included drugs, eye drops or surgery, while treatment of chronic dacryocystitis was lacrimal duct dredging with supporting tube implantation surgery. In the thirty-one eyes with infectious keratitis, fifteen suffered from fungal keratitis (48%), two bacterial keratitis (6%), and fourteen viral keratitis (45%). Eleven eyes (35%) from ten patients with infectious keratitis also suffered from lacrimal duct obstruction. In those cases, six eyes also suffered from lower canalicular obstruction, three nasolacrimal duct obstruction and chronic dacryocystitis, one a combination of upper and lower canalicular obstruction, one upper canalicular obstruction. After local and systemic applications of anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory drugs, twenty-eight eyes (90%) recovered within three weeks, while the ulceration of three patients required the lacrimal duct dredging and supporting tube implantation surgery for the healing. Conclusions: Herein, we first report that the prevalence of infectious keratitis is closely correlated to the occurrence of lacrimal duct obstruction. When both confirmed, simultaneous treatment of keratitis and lacrimal duct obstruction

  7. Infectious endocarditis caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L; Gopalaswamy, C; Kim, B S; Patel, C; Freiberg, K

    1985-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a very uncommon cause of infectious endocarditis. The organism was first described in 1912. Thjotta and Sydnes reported its isolation in pure culture from a long standing abscess which had developed after tooth extraction. Subsequently this organism was found to be part of the normal flora, and the organism was defined as a slow growing, fastidious gram negative bacillus. Carbon dioxide is essential for the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Approximately 50 cases of endocarditis due to A. actinomycetemcomitans have been reported since the first case reported in 1964. The purpose of this report is to document a case of endocarditis due to A. actinomycetemcomitans and to stress the value of the echocardiogram in the assessment of patients with endocarditis.

  8. GSM-900MHz at low dose temperature-dependently downregulates α-synuclein in cultured cerebral cells independently of chaperone-mediated-autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terro, Faraj; Magnaudeix, Amandine; Crochetet, Marion; Martin, Ludovic; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Wilson, Cornelia-M; Yardin, Catherine; Leveque, Philippe

    2012-02-26

    The expanding use of GSM devices has resulted in public concern. Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a way for protein degradation in the lysosomes and increases under stress conditions as a cell defense response. α-synuclein, a CMA substrate, is a component of Parkinson disease. Since GSM might constitute a stress signal, we raised the possibility that GSM could alter the CMA process. Here, we analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to a low GSM-900MHz dose on apoptosis and CMA. Cultured cerebral cortical cells were sham-exposed or exposed to GSM-900MHz at specific absorption rate (SAR): 0.25W/kg for 24 h using a wire-patch cell. Apoptosis was analyzed by DAPI stain of the nuclei and western blot of cleaved caspase-3. The expression of proteins involved in CMA (HSC70, HSP40, HSP90 and LAMP-2A) and α-synuclein were analyzed by western blot. CMA was also quantified in situ by analyzing the cell localization of active lysosomes. 24 h exposure to GSM-900MHz resulted in ∼0.5°C temperature rise. It did not induce apoptosis but increased HSC70 by 26% and slightly decreased HSP90 (GSM-generated temperature rise. The GSM-induced changes in HSC70, HSP90 and α-synuclein are most likely linked to temperature rise. We did not observe any immediate effect on cell viability. However, the delayed and long term consequences (protective or deleterious) of these changes on cell fate should be examined.

  9. Emerging Infectious Diseases Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-26

    Byron Breedlove, managing editor of the EID Journal, discusses his approach to cover art.  Created: 7/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/26/2017.

  10. 75 FR 24835 - Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... healthcare and social assistance sector as a whole had 16.5 million employees.\\1\\ Healthcare workplaces can... that dealt with the negative impact of non-compliance with hand hygiene on the transmission of... on occupationally-acquired infectious diseases (e.g., Federal, State, provider network, or...

  11. Validation of Laboratory-Developed Molecular Assays for Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Molecular technology has changed the way that clinical laboratories diagnose and manage many infectious diseases. Excellent sensitivity, specificity, and speed have made molecular assays an attractive alternative to culture or enzyme immunoassay methods. Many molecular assays are commercially available and FDA approved. Others, especially those that test for less common analytes, are often laboratory developed. Laboratories also often modify FDA-approved assays to include different e...

  12. Infectious pathogens and bronchiolitis outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Camargo, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common early childhood illness and an important cause of morbidity, it is the number one cause of hospitalization among US infants. Bronchiolitis is also an active area of research, and recent studies have advanced our understanding of this illness. Although it has long been the conventional wisdom that the infectious etiology of bronchiolitis does not affect outcomes, a growing number of studies have linked specific pathogens of bronchiolitis (e.g., rhinovirus) to short- and long-term outcomes, such as future risk of developing asthma. The authors review the advent of molecular diagnostic techniques that have demonstrated diverse pathogens in bronchiolitis, and they review recent studies on the complex link between infectious pathogens of bronchiolitis and the development of childhood asthma.

  13. Human Coronavirus 229E Remains Infectious on Common Touch Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Little, Zoë R; Keevil, C William

    2015-11-10

    The evolution of new and reemerging historic virulent strains of respiratory viruses from animal reservoirs is a significant threat to human health. Inefficient human-to-human transmission of zoonotic strains may initially limit the spread of transmission, but an infection may be contracted by touching contaminated surfaces. Enveloped viruses are often susceptible to environmental stresses, but the human coronaviruses responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) have recently caused increasing concern of contact transmission during outbreaks. We report here that pathogenic human coronavirus 229E remained infectious in a human lung cell culture model following at least 5 days of persistence on a range of common nonbiocidal surface materials, including polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon; PTFE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. We have shown previously that noroviruses are destroyed on copper alloy surfaces. In this new study, human coronavirus 229E was rapidly inactivated on a range of copper alloys (within a few minutes for simulated fingertip contamination) and Cu/Zn brasses were very effective at lower copper concentration. Exposure to copper destroyed the viral genomes and irreversibly affected virus morphology, including disintegration of envelope and dispersal of surface spikes. Cu(I) and Cu(II) moieties were responsible for the inactivation, which was enhanced by reactive oxygen species generation on alloy surfaces, resulting in even faster inactivation than was seen with nonenveloped viruses on copper. Consequently, copper alloy surfaces could be employed in communal areas and at any mass gatherings to help reduce transmission of respiratory viruses from contaminated surfaces and protect the public health. Respiratory viruses are responsible for more deaths globally than any other infectious agent. Animal coronaviruses that "host jump" to humans result in

  14. [Genomic medicine and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellay, Jacques

    2014-05-07

    Relentless progress in our knowledge of the nature and functional consequences of human genetic variation allows for a better understanding of the protracted battle between pathogens and their human hosts. Multiple polymorphisms have been identified that impact our response to infections or to anti-infective drugs, and some of them are already used in the clinic. However, to make personalized medicine a reality in infectious diseases, a sustained effort is needed not only in research but also in genomic education.

  15. Acute tonsillitis at infectious patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Finogeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 1824 patients with diphtheria treated in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital Botkin (St. Petersburg in 1993 – 1994, and more than 500 patients referred to the clinic with a diagnosis of «angina». Based on published data and our own research observations investigated the etiology of acute tonsillitis. Bacterial tonsillitis should be treated with antibiotics, and this is important aetiological interpretation of these diseases. Streptococcal tonsillitis should always be a sore throat syndrome as a diagnostic sign of support. For other forms of lymphoma lesion of the tonsils should not be defined as «angina», and called «tonsillitis». Аngina as β-hemolytic streptococcus group A infection is recognized as the leader in the development of rheumatic fever. On the basis of a large clinical material briefly analyzed the clinical manifestations of various forms of diphtheria with membranous tonsillitis. Also presented with a syndrome of infectious diseases as tonsillitis, therapeutic and surgical «mask» of infectious diseases.

  16. Proactive strategies to avoid infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Richard J; Case, Trevor I; Oaten, Megan J

    2011-12-12

    Infectious disease exerts a large selective pressure on all organisms. One response to this has been for animals to evolve energetically costly immune systems to counter infection, while another--the focus of this theme issue--has been the evolution of proactive strategies primarily to avoid infection. These strategies can be grouped into three types, all of which demonstrate varying levels of interaction with the immune system. The first concerns maternal strategies that function to promote the immunocompetence of their offspring. The second type of strategy influences mate selection, guiding the selection of a healthy mate and one who differs maximally from the self in their complement of antigen-coding genes. The third strategy involves two classes of behaviour. One relates to the capacity of the organisms to learn associations between cues indicative of pathogen threat and immune responses. The other relates to prevention and even treatment of infection through behaviours such as avoidance, grooming, quarantine, medicine and care of the sick. In humans, disease avoidance is based upon cognition and especially the emotion of disgust. Human disease avoidance is not without its costs. There is a propensity to reject healthy individuals who just appear sick--stigmatization--and the system may malfunction, resulting in various forms of psychopathology. Pathogen threat also appears to have been a highly significant and unrecognized force in shaping human culture so as to minimize infection threats. This cultural shaping process--moralization--can be co-opted to promote human health.

  17. Dentigenous infectious foci – a risk factor of infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska-Spychala, Beata; Sokalski, Jerzy; Grajek, Stefan; Jemielity, Marek; Trojnarska, Olga; Choroszy-Król, Irena; Sójka, Anna; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Dentigenous, infectious foci are frequently associated with the development of various diseases. The role of such foci in the evolution of endocarditis still remains unclear. This article presents the concluding results of an interdisciplinary study verifying the influence of dentigenous, infectious foci on the development of infective endocarditis. Material/Methods The study subjects were 60 adult patients with history of infective endocarditis and coexistent acquired heart disease, along with the presence at least 2 odontogenic infectious foci (ie, 2 or more teeth with gangrenous pulp and periodontitis). The group had earlier been qualified for the procedure of heart valve replacement. Swabs of removed heart valve tissue with inflammatory lesions and blood were then examined microbiologically. Swabs of root canals and their periapical areas, of periodontal pockets, and of heart valves were also collected. Results Microbial flora, cultured from intradental foci, blood and heart valves, fully corresponded in 14 patients. This was accompanied in almost all cases by more advanced periodontitis (2nd degree, Scandinavian classification), irrespective of the bacterial co-occurrence mentioned. In the remaining patients, such consistency was not found. Conclusions Among various dentigenous, infectious foci, the intradental foci appear to constitute a risk factor for infective endocarditis. PMID:22293883

  18. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages. PMID:8523576

  19. MRI evaluation of infectious and non-infectious synovitis: preliminary studies in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, P.J.; DiPietro, M.A.; Teo, E.L.H.J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Londy, F. [Division of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chrisp, C.E. [Unit of Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Doi, K. [Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Background. Literature on magnetic resonance imaging (MR) evaluation of inflammatory joint effusions is sparse. Objective. To describe an animal model for studying infectious and non-infectious joint effusions with magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods. Ten rabbit knees with septic arthritis and four with talc synovitis were imaged with MR. Contralateral knees injected with saline served as controls. Fat saturation T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were assessed for joint effusion, and periarticular and adjacent intraosseous increased signal or enhancement. Each knee was cultured and underwent pathologic examination. Results. Both Staphylococcus aureus and talc produced effusions in all knees. The degree of periarticular signal and enhancement was greater in infected knees than talc-injected knees. No abnormal enhancement was seen within bone. Pathologic examination showed a greater degree of inflammation and joint destruction in the infected knees, but no evidence of osteomyelitis. Conclusion. A greater degree of abnormal signal and enhancement seen on MR suggests a more vigorous inflammatory process, as seen with septic arthritis. In spite of advanced septic arthritis, no enhancement was evident within bone, suggesting that enhancement within bone is not an expected finding in isolated septic arthritis and should raise concern for osteomyelitis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 15 refs.

  20. Multidrug resistant bacteriuria before percutaneous nephrolithotomy predicts for postoperative infectious complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant; Shi, William; Liss, Michael; Raheem, Omer; Wenzler, David; Schallhorn, Craig; Kiyama, Linsday; Lakin, Charles; Ritter, Michele; Sur, Roger L

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) uropathogens are increasing in prevalence and may contribute to significant morbidity after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We investigate the presence of MDR bacteriuria and occurrence of postoperative infectious complications in patients who underwent PCNL at our institution. Retrospective review was performed of 81 patients undergoing PCNL by a single surgeon (RLS) between 2009 and 2013. Patient demographics, comorbidities, stone parameters on imaging, and microbial data were compiled. MDR organisms were defined as resistant to three or more of the American Urological Association Best Practice Statement antimicrobial classes for PCNL. Postoperative complications were graded by Clavien score and European Association of Urology infection grade. Univariate comparisons were analyzed between patients with and without a postoperative infectious complication. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine significant predictor variables for postoperative infectious complications. Of the 81 patients undergoing PCNL, 41/81 (51%) had positive preoperative urine culture, 24/81 (30%) had positive MDR urine culture, and 16/81 (19%) had a postoperative infectious complication. Multivariate analysis revealed a positive preoperative MDR urine culture significantly increased the risk of postoperative infectious complication (odds ratio [OR]=4.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.134-17.8, P=0.016). The presence of more than one access tract during PCNL also predicted for infectious complications (OR=7.5, 95% CI 2.13-26.4, P=0.003) Of the 16 patients with a postoperative infection 3 (18%) had postoperative urine cultures discordant with the preoperative urine cultures. Our institution demonstrated a relatively high prevalence of MDR bacteriuria in patients undergoing PCNL and that MDR is a significant risk factor for postoperative infectious complications despite appropriate preoperative antibiotics. Further investigations regarding

  1. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  2. Long amplicon (LA)-qPCR for the discrimination of infectious and noninfectious phix174 bacteriophages after UV inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Johannes; Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Eggers, Jutta; Tiehm, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Waterborne viruses are increasingly being considered in risk assessment schemes. In general, virus detection by culture methods is time consuming. In contrast, detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is more rapid and therefore, more suitable for monitoring. At present, qPCR lacks the essential ability for discriminating between infectious and non-infectious viruses, thus limiting its applicability for monitoring disinfection processes. In this study, a method was developed to quantify UV inactivation by long amplicon (LA)-qPCR. Bacteriophage phiX174 was used as a surrogate for human pathogenic viruses. A qPCR protocol was developed with new sets of primers, resulting in amplicon lengths of 108, 250, 456, 568, 955, 1063, 1544, and 1764 nucleotides. The log reduction of gene copies increased with increasing amplicon length. Additional treatment with the intercalating dye, PMA, had no effect, indicating that the bacteriophage capsids were not damaged by low pressure UV irradiation. A qPCR of nearly the complete genome (approx. 5000 nucleotides) showed similar results to the plaque assay. The log reduction in qPCR correlates with [specific amplicon length x UV dose]. The normalized DNA effect constant can be applied to calculate phiX174 inactivation based on qPCR detection.

  3. Inhibitory effect of mycophenolic acid on the replication of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquí, Laura; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2008-12-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) remain two of the most important pathogens of farmed trout worldwide. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an inhibitor of cellular inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme that catalyzes an essential step in the biosynthesis of GTP. In this report, the antiviral activity of MPA against IPNV and VHSV in cell culture was assessed. Cell viability, virus yield, protein and RNA synthesis determinations were used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of MPA. MPA caused a dose-dependent inhibition of IPNV and VHSV replication. It was found that MPA had a particularly potent effect against IPNV, inhibiting the production of infectious virus more than 10(5)-fold. MPA was also highly effective in preventing viral protein synthesis. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure viral RNA in cells infected by IPNV or VHSV to evaluate the inhibitory capacity of MPA as well as to compare MPA to the established antiviral drug ribavirin. MPA showed a good efficacy in decreasing accumulation of viral RNA at low concentrations. Finally, time of addition and wash out experiments suggested that MPA may have a dual mechanism of action, targeting both a cell and a viral function. This study provides evidence that MPA can function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug for use in therapy of rainbow trout diseases.

  4. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  5. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  6. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M H; Brightman, A H; Fenwick, B W; Rider, M A

    1998-01-01

    The economic impact of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) warrants continued investigation of the mechanisms by which Moraxella bovis survives on and colonizes the corneal surface. Virulent strains of M bovis produce hemolysin and exhibit different plasmid profiles than nonvirulent strains. Interactions among host, environment, vector, season, and concurrent infection influence the prevalence of IBK. Mycoplasma sp. or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus may enhance or hasten the disease process. The manifestations of IBK may range from mild conjunctivitis to severe ulceration, corneal perforation, and blindness. Treatment of IBK is dictated by economic considerations, intended animal use, and feasibility of administration. Antibiotic therapy is aimed at achieving drug concentrations in tears to meet or exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration for prolonged periods. At present, IBK is not a preventable disease. Affected animals must be separated from the herd and vector control vigorously instituted. Carrier animals must be identified and removed from the herd. Vaccination trials have been unsuccessful because of pili antigen cross-reactivity, variable strains, and uncontrolled environmental factors. Recent investigations have determined that M bovis may utilize host iron sources via iron-repressible outer membrane proteins and siderophores for growth. Elucidation of normal defense mechanisms of the bovine eye may lead to new strategies to enhance the immune response against M bovis.

  7. Resultados preliminares da utilização de cultivos de anéis de traquéia para o estudo de estirpes brasileiras do vírus da bronquite infecciosa das galinhas A preliminary use of tracheal organ cultures for evaluating Brazilian infectious bronchitis virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O.B. Epiphanio

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal organ cultures (TOC were prepared and used for evaluating four Brazilian isolates of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. IBV field isolates and vaccine strains were titrated in TOC and results compared to those from chicken embrionated eggs. Serum neutralization (SN employing IBV strain-specific serum was performed for evaluating relationships between isolates. Titration results of tests performed in TOC or eggs were in mutual agreement and were considered for validating the adapted TOC methodology as alternative for virological studies in our laboratory. Sera specific to M41 (Massachusetts or A5968 (Connecticut did neutralize their respective IBV strains only. Field strains 208 and 29-78 specific sera did neutralize Massachusetts serotype strains M41 and H120, but PM2 serum did only M41. Strain PM4 specific serum did not neutralize any of the reference IBV analyzed, including M41, A5968 and H120 and may indicate that the isolate is serologically different from the Massachusetts serotype, currently adopted for vaccine strains in Brazil.

  8. Application value of blood culture combined with serum procalcitonin and CRP in diagnosing infectious fever patients%血培养联合降钙素原和 C-反应蛋白在对急性感染性发热患者诊断中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾辉; 李卓成; 林宝虹

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨血培养联合降钙素原和 C-反应蛋白检测在急诊感染性发热患者诊断中的应用价值。方法回顾性分析本院急诊科126例血培养阳性急性发热患者及123例血培养阴性急性发热患者采血当日 CRP 和 PCT 测定结果,并对两组数据进行比较,数据采用 SPSS 16.0软件进行统计分析。结果126例血培养阳性患者 CRP 和 PCT 的阳性率分别为100.0%和100.0%,测定值为26.9~256.8和0.25~98.6;123例血培养阴性患者 CRP 和 PCT 的阳性率为95.5%和15.4%,测定值为1.2~126.8和0.02~0.98。血培养阳性组 PCT 测定值明显高于血培养阴性组,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01),血培养阳性组CRP 测定值明显高于血培养阴性组,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01)。结论PCT 与 CRP 可作为血流感染的监测指标,血培养联合 PCT 和 CRP 对细菌感染的早期诊断有指导意义。%Objective To evaluate the application value of the blood culture combined with the detection of serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein(CRP)in diagnosing infectious fever patients.Methods The PCT and CRP detection results on the blood sampling day in 126 cases of fever with positive blood culture and 123 cases of fever with negative blood culture in the emergency department were retrospectively analyzed,and the two sets of data were compared and statistically analyzed by the SPSS 16.0 soft-ware.Results The positive rates of CRP and PCT in 126 cases of positive blood culture were 100% and 100%,the detection values were 26.9-256.8 and 0.25-98.6,the positive rates of CRP and PCT in 123 cases of negative blood culture 95.5% and 15.4% re-spectively,the detection values were 1 .2-126.8 and 0.02-0.98.The PCT and CRP detection values in the positive blood culture group were significantly higher than those in the negative blood culture group,the difference was statistically significant(P <0.01). Conclusion

  9. Unmet Diagnostic Needs in Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Anne J.; Hersh, Adam L.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Ince, Dilek; Polgreen, Philip M.; Hanson, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis is critical to providing appropriate care in infectious diseases. New technologies for infectious disease diagnostics are emerging, but gaps remain in test development and availability. The Emerging Infections Network surveyed Infectious Diseases physicians to assess unmet diagnostic needs. Responses reflected the urgent need to identify drug-resistant infections and highlighted the potential for early diagnosis to improve antibiotic stewardship. Information gained from this survey can help inform recommendations for new diagnostic test development in the future. PMID:25456043

  10. The influence of various doses of phosphorus and of the addition of calcium or potassium fertilization upon the yield of tomatoes in Wrocław hydroponic culture using two intensities of light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gumicka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out with phosphate fertilization of tomatoes in hydroponic culture. It has been proved that an additional dose of phosphorus given during the second cluster bloom, caused an yield increase. The optimal dose is 12 g of superphosphate (16% P2O5 per plant. The "green back" symptoms did not appear in these conditions. The parallel additional applying of calcium or potassium gave a decrease of the yield. When the light intensity was lowered to about 50%, the yield has decreased by half. In these conditions an additional applying of calcium (0,4 g CaCO3 and phosphorus (1g superphosphate annulated the negative influence of the low light intensity.

  11. The Infectiousness of Tuberculosis Patients Coinfected with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escombe, A. Roderick; Moore, David A. J; Gilman, Robert H; Pan, William; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Martínez, Carlos; Caviedes, Luz; Sheen, Patricia; Gonzalez, Armando; Noakes, Catherine J; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A

    2008-01-01

    Background The current understanding of airborne tuberculosis (TB) transmission is based on classic 1950s studies in which guinea pigs were exposed to air from a tuberculosis ward. Recently we recreated this model in Lima, Perú, and in this paper we report the use of molecular fingerprinting to investigate patient infectiousness in the current era of HIV infection and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. Methods and Findings All air from a mechanically ventilated negative-pressure HIV-TB ward was exhausted over guinea pigs housed in an airborne transmission study facility on the roof. Animals had monthly tuberculin skin tests, and positive reactors were removed for autopsy and organ culture for M. tuberculosis. Temporal exposure patterns, drug susceptibility testing, and DNA fingerprinting of patient and animal TB strains defined infectious TB patients. Relative patient infectiousness was calculated using the Wells-Riley model of airborne infection. Over 505 study days there were 118 ward admissions of 97 HIV-positive pulmonary TB patients. Of 292 exposed guinea pigs, 144 had evidence of TB disease; a further 30 were tuberculin skin test positive only. There was marked variability in patient infectiousness; only 8.5% of 118 ward admissions by TB patients were shown by DNA fingerprinting to have caused 98% of the 125 characterised cases of secondary animal TB. 90% of TB transmission occurred from inadequately treated MDR TB patients. Three highly infectious MDR TB patients produced 226, 52, and 40 airborne infectious units (quanta) per hour. Conclusions A small number of inadequately treated MDR TB patients coinfected with HIV were responsible for almost all TB transmission, and some patients were highly infectious. This result highlights the importance of rapid TB drug-susceptibility testing to allow prompt initiation of effective treatment, and environmental control measures to reduce ongoing TB transmission in crowded health care settings. TB infection control must be

  12. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  13. DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICATION OF ICTERIC IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ya. Chernobrovkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of infectious diseases for general practitioners is always a difficult process. The spectrum of clinical entities when jaundice may develop is unusually wide. First of all doctor must exclude or confirm infectious nature of the jaundice, which is dictated primarily by epidemiological rules. This report contains clinical and epidemiological characteristics of key diseases causing jaundice syndrome. Authors conducted analysis based on the data of the 18th department of the Moscow Infectious Hospital № 1 for the years 2014-2015 and revealed how common infectious diseases causing jaundice syndrome are.

  14. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are recurrent Respiratory infections Bone and joint infections Tuberculosis (TB) Acquired Immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) Hepatitis Meningitis Where Can I Find A Pediatric Infectious Diseases ...

  15. Dental caries: an infectious and transmissible disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, Page W; Li, Yihong; Dasanayake, Ananda

    2005-05-01

    By definition, dental caries is an infectious and transmissible disease because it is caused by bacteria colonizing the tooth surfaces. Unlike most infectious diseases affecting humans, caries is the result of an imbalance of the indigenous oral biota rather than a nonindigenous, exogenous pathogen. The introduction of refined sugar into modern society's diet has tipped the balance from health to disease. New insight into the natural history of the leading cariogenic bacteria, the mutans streptococci, may contribute ways to control or prevent this infectious disease. Here, we use the host-parasite model as a platform for viewing the pathogenicity of the caries process in contrast to other infectious diseases.

  16. [Effectiveness of cefotaxime in pediatric infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, M; Tasaki, T; Kusunoki, Y; Yoshioka, H; Hiramoto, A; Sanae, N; Tsuchida, A; Maruyama, S; Mukai, N; Takahashi, Y

    1985-01-01

    Cefotaxime (CTX) was administered to 117 pediatric patients. Although 26 of these patients were excluded from the clinical evaluation of the study because other antimicrobial agents were given concomitantly with CTX or because no infectious diseases were proved, these cases were evaluated for adverse effects of the drug. The remaining 91 cases were evaluated for clinical effect; pneumonia in 56 cases, septicemia in 5, suspected septicemia in 5, meningitis (aseptic cases included) in 3, urinary tract infection in 5 and other diseases in 17. No pathogenic organisms were identified in any of the pneumonia cases, even either by bacterial culture or other laboratory test methods. Pathogens of septicemia were E. coli in 3 cases, K. pneumoniae in 1 and E. agglomerans in 1. Those of urinary tract infections were E. coli in 3 cases, a mixed infection of S. aureus and an unidentified species of Gram-negative rods in 1, and unknown in 1. Clinical effectiveness rates of CTX were 78.6% in pneumonia and 100% in septicemia, suspected septicemia and urinary tract infections. One patient with purulent meningitis caused by H. influenzae was also treated with CTX successfully. Adverse reactions and abnormal laboratory findings were observed in 12 cases (12/117 = 10.3%); rash in 2 cases, vomiting in 1, abdominal pain in 1, diarrhea in 5, granulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia in 1, eosinophilia in 3 and elevation of liver enzymes (GOT and LDH) in 1.

  17. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck;

    2014-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use....... The technique of both transthoracic echocardiography and transoesophageal echocardiography has been markedly improved across the last decades and most recently three-dimensional real-time echocardiography has been introduced in the management of endocarditis patients. Echocardiography depicts structural changes...... with conventional CT (SPECT/CT). Of these methods, (18)F-FDG PET-CT carries the best promise for a future role in endocarditis. But there are distinct limitations with both SPECT/CT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT which should not be neglected. MRI and spiral CT are methods primarily used in the search for extra cardial...

  18. A Survey of Dutch Expert Opinion on Climatic Drivers of Infectious Disease Risk in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Mia Akin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is considered to be a significant influence for infectious disease risk in Western Europe. Climatic and non-climatic developments act together resulting in current and future infectious disease risk. This study uses a survey to explore Dutch expert perspectives on climate change induced infectious disease risk. The results show that the experts consider temperature change, precipitation change, humidity change, and climate change induced habitat change to be relatively important for water-related infectious disease risk, vector-borne disease risk excluding zoonoses, and the risk of zoonoses. The climatic drivers are seen as relatively less important for food-related infectious disease risk. The experts rate many non-climatic drivers to be highly important for infectious disease risk. Comparatively, the majority of the non-climatic drivers assessed are seen as more important than climate change drivers. The degree of uncertainty in the future development of climatic drivers is viewed as moderate to high, and for non-climatic drivers mostly as moderate. An analysis of subsamples based on professional backgrounds reveals differences in experts’ opinions for e.g., socio-cultural drivers, and similarities. Diversity and consensus amongst expert perspectives on climate change and infectious diseases can have implications for policy. Further research to uncover and compare prevailing perspectives is necessary.

  19. Trial of high-dose Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Jensen, T G; Hansen, H L

    1988-01-01

    In a randomised study of 558 children in an urban African community, the protective effect of the Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) measles vaccine given in a dose of 40,000 plaque forming units from the age of 4 months was compared with the effects of a standard dose (6000 tissue culture infectious units......) of Schwarz measles vaccine given from the age of 9 months. During two years of follow-up, all 14 clinical cases of measles occurred in the Schwarz group; 10 of the children contracted measles before vaccination and 4 after measles vaccination. Thus the EZ vaccine provided significant protection against...... measles both before and after the usual age of vaccination. Among the children who were exposed to measles at home, those given EZ vaccine were better protected than either unvaccinated children or those given the Schwarz vaccine....

  20. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  1. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  2. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  3. An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Infectious Diseases and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Jenifer; Byrd, Melanie

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the course "Infectious Diseases and History" which is designed for freshman and sophomore students. Aims to teach about infectious diseases, develop skills of using libraries and computer resources, and develop oral and written communication skills. Focuses on tuberculosis as an example of an instructional approach and…

  4. Empowering African genomics for infectious disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folarin, Onikepe A; Happi, Anise N; Happi, Christian T

    2014-11-07

    At present, African scientists can only participate minimally in the genomics revolution that is transforming the understanding, surveillance and clinical treatment of infectious diseases. We discuss new initiatives to equip African scientists with knowledge of cutting-edge genomics tools, and build a sustainable critical mass of well-trained African infectious diseases genomics scientists.

  5. Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    Polyxeni Potter discusses the art used on the covers of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 4/4/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  6. Breeding against infectious diseases in animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashidi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases in farm animals are of major concern because of animal welfare, production costs, and public health. Farms undergo huge economic losses due to infectious disease. The costs of infections in farm animals are mainly due to production losses, treatment of infected animals, and

  7. Oral antibiotic treatment of left-sided infectious endocarditis verified by 16S-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Louise E; Tønder, Niels; Hansen, Thomas Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of infectious endocarditis (IE) comprises intravenously administered antibiotic medications given at high doses for 4-6 weeks--sometimes even longer. Approximately 50% of patients referred to tertiary care centres require additional surgical intervention. At present there are few papers...

  8. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  9. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review of cases in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dominic

    2010-11-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a painful ocular disease affecting cattle worldwide. The publications documenting this condition focus on what is the accepted cause of IBK--Moraxella bovis. This article draws on experience and recorded data made at the time of the initial examination and follow-up visits. Laboratory culture of ocular swabs was undertaken where appropriate. Diagnosis of IBK is usually based on clinical signs, environment, and history. Misdiagnosis of the organisms involved is a genuine possibility. This article focuses on recent outbreaks of bovine ocular disease in the United Kingdom in three counties over a 12-month period.

  10. Sputum Microscopy With Fluorescein Diacetate Predicts Tuberculosis Infectiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M; Tovar, Marco A; Bravard, Marjory A; Valencia, Teresa; Montoya, Rosario; Quino, Willi; D'Arcy, Nikki; Ramos, Eric S; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2017-09-01

    Sputum from patients with tuberculosis contains subpopulations of metabolically active and inactive Mycobacterium tuberculosis with unknown implications for infectiousness. We assessed sputum microscopy with fluorescein diacetate (FDA, evaluating M. tuberculosis metabolic activity) for predicting infectiousness. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was quantified in pretreatment sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis using FDA microscopy, culture, and acid-fast microscopy. These 35 patients' 209 household contacts were followed with prevalence surveys for tuberculosis disease for 6 years. FDA microscopy was positive for a median of 119 (interquartile range [IQR], 47-386) bacteria/µL sputum, which was 5.1% (IQR, 2.4%-11%) the concentration of acid-fast microscopy-positive bacteria (2069 [IQR, 1358-3734] bacteria/μL). Tuberculosis was diagnosed during follow-up in 6.4% (13/209) of contacts. For patients with lower than median concentration of FDA microscopy-positive M. tuberculosis, 10% of their contacts developed tuberculosis. This was significantly more than 2.7% of the contacts of patients with higher than median FDA microscopy results (crude hazard ratio [HR], 3.8; P = .03). This association maintained statistical significance after adjusting for disease severity, chemoprophylaxis, drug resistance, and social determinants (adjusted HR, 3.9; P = .02). Mycobacterium tuberculosis that was FDA microscopy negative was paradoxically associated with greater infectiousness. FDA microscopy-negative bacteria in these pretreatment samples may be a nonstaining, slowly metabolizing phenotype better adapted to airborne transmission.

  11. Global climate and infectious disease: The cholera paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-12-20

    Historically, infectious diseases have had a profound effect on human populations, including their evolution and cultural development. Despite significant advances in medical science, infectious diseases continue to impact human populations in many parts of the world. Emerging diseases are considered to be those infections that either are newly appearing in the population or are rapidly increasing in incidence or expanding in geographic range. Emergence of disease is not a simple phenomenon, mainly because infectious diseases are dynamic. Most new infections are not caused by truly new pathogens but are microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and helminths) that find a new way to enter a susceptible host and are newly recognized because of recently developed, sensitive techniques. Human activities drive emergence of disease and a variety of social, economic, political, climatic, technological, and environmental factors can shape the pattern of a disease and influence its emergence into populations. For example, travel affects emergence of disease, and human migrations have been the main source of epidemics throughout history. Trade caravans, religious pilgrimage, and military campaigns facilitated the spread of plague, smallpox, and cholera. Global travel is a fact of modern life and, equally so, the continued evolution of microorganisms; therefore, new infections will continue to emerge, and known infections will change in distribution, frequency, and severity. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Interference of infectious bursal disease virus on antibody production against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WM Cardoso

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has the objective of verifying the interference of infectious bursal disease virus in the antibody production against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus. The experiment was carried out with 640 day-old-chicks from a 42 weeks old hen flock. The birds were separated into eight experimental groups (n=80/group and were submitted to different combinations of vaccinations, with live vaccines, to Newcastle disease, avian infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease with diverse combinations of days of vaccination. We verified that the utilization of polyvalent vaccinal programs have a different efficacy comparing to monovalent vaccinations when Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease vaccinations are applied. This way, the use of vaccinations to infectious bursal disease in polyvalent vaccinal programs is desirable due to improvement of NDV response with the presence of IBV by the probable reduction of interference of IBV under NDV.

  13. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  14. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Vos, Fidel J; Janssen, Marcel J R; van Dijk, Arie P J; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2013-07-01

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was 39% and specificity was 93%. The positive predictive value was 64% and negative predictive value was 82%. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18%, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50% (p = 0.181). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies.

  15. Recombinant Moraxella bovoculi cytotoxin-ISCOM matrix adjuvanted vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A; Lane, V Michael; Ball, Louise M; Hess, John F

    2010-03-01

    A randomized, blinded, controlled field trial was conducted during summer 2006 in a northern California, USA, herd of beef cattle to evaluate the efficacy of a recombinant Moraxella bovoculi cytotoxin subunit vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK; pinkeye). A convenience sample comprised of 127 steers were administered a subcutaneous dose of either adjuvant alone (ISCOM matrices; control group) or recombinant M. bovoculi cytotoxin carboxy terminus adjuvanted with ISCOM matrices (MbvA group) and were boostered 21 days later. The steers were examined once weekly for 15 weeks for evidence of IBK. No significant difference in the cumulative proportion of corneal ulcerations was detected between groups. Compared to the control calves, the MbvA vaccinates had significantly higher increases in serum neutralizing titers to M. bovoculi hemolysin between week 0 and week 6. The prevalence of M. bovis isolations was higher from ulcerated eyes of calves vaccinated with MbvA as compared to control calves. Vaccination of calves against the carboxy terminus of M. bovoculi RTX toxin resulted in significant increases in serum hemolysin neutralizing titers and may modulate organism type cultured from ulcerated eyes of calves in herds where both M. bovis and M. bovoculi exist. Use of M. bovoculi antigens alone in vaccines to prevent IBK may not be beneficial in herds where IBK is associated with both M. bovoculi and M. bovis.

  16. Subclinical Shed of Infectious Varicella zoster Virus in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Mehta, Satish K.; Schmid, D. Scott; Gilden, Donald H.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosol borne varicella zoster virus (VZV) enters the nasopharynx and replicates in tonsillar T-cells, resulting in viremia and varicella (chickenpox). Virus then becomes latent in cranial nerve, dorsal root and autonomic nervous system ganglia along the entire neuraxis (1). Decades later, as cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines (4), latent VZV can reactivate to produce zoster (shingles). Infectious VZV is present in patients with varicella or zoster, but shed of infectious virus in the absence of disease has not been shown. We previously detected VZV DNA in saliva of astronauts during and shortly after spaceflight, suggesting stress induced subclinical virus reactivation (3). We show here that VZV DNA as well as infectious virus in present in astronaut saliva. VZV DNA was detected in saliva during and after a 13-day spaceflight in 2 of 3 astronauts (Fig. panel A). Ten days before liftoff, there was a rise in serum anti-VZV antibody in subjects 1 and 2, consistent with virus reactivation. In subject 3, VZV DNA was not detected in saliva, and there was no rise in anti-VZV antibody titer. Subject 3 may have been protected from virus reactivation by having zoster boost in cell-medicated immunity to VZV (2). No VZV DNA was detected in astronaut saliva months before spaceflight, or in saliva of 10 age/sex-matched healthy control subjects sampled on alternate days for 3 weeks (88 saliva samples). Saliva taken 2-6 days after landing from all 3 subjects was cultured on human fetal lung cells (Fig. panel B). Infectious VZV was recovered from saliva of subjects 1 and 2 on the second day after landing. Virus specificity was confirmed by antibody staining and DNA analysis which showed it to be VZV of European descent, common in the US (5). Further, both antibody staining and DNA PCR demonstrated that no HSV-1 was detected in any infected culture. This is the first report of infectious VZV shedding in the absence of clinical disease. Spaceflight presents a uniquely stressful

  17. [Infectious aetiologies of travelers' diarrhoea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, J-D; Garrabé, E

    2007-11-01

    Traveler's diarrhoea (TD) occurs in 20 to 60% of European or North-American travelers in intertropical areas. Following return from endemic zone, malaria must always be evocated in front of febrile diarrhoea. Many causative infectious agents are involved in TD and their frequency may vary according to destination and seasons. The main agents involved in TD are Escherichia coli pathovars (especially enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative E. coli) followed by enteroinvasive bacteria (Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica), enteric viruses (norovirus, rotavirus) and protozoa (Gardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum et Entamoeba histolytica). The development of molecular biology methods as PCR may allow us to evaluate the relative frequency of these agents and especially of viral agents in TD. Protozoa and microsporidia are more frequently isolated in persistent and chronic TD, especially in compromised patients. A complete etiological research in routine microbiology laboratories is difficult and time-consuming, related to the high diversity of causative agents and the need for specific methods. Implementation of laboratory diagnosis is highly recommended when diarrhoea is associated with fever or presence of blood in stools, immunosuppression, antibiotic treatment (Clostridium difficile toxins) or in case of persistent/chronic diarrhoea. According to the high frequency of acquired antibiotic-resistance in enteric bacteria, an antibiogram must be performed for all causative bacterial agents.

  18. [CHRONIC DIARRHEA OF INFECTIOUS ETIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán F G, Gustavo

    1997-01-01

    Chronic Diarrhea syndrome is due to several causes. In LatinAmericen countries, infectious and parasitic etiology is frequent. Withinthese infections, the following has been determined: parasitic and enterobacterial agents, overpopulation of bacteria syndrome in the upper small bowel (SOBIA, abbreviation for Síndrome de Sobrepoblación Bacteriana del Intestino Delgado Alto), intestinal TBC, and AIDS. In these processes, the precipitating factor may be unique or multifactor; or there could also exist a tendency towards pathologies for these infections. There has been evidence of SOBIA cases without associated factor in Latin American countries. A study made in Peru shows SOBIA cases in 30 percent of chronic diarrhea.In chronic diarrhea cases, and even more, in those diarrheas of infectiousetiology, a complete study should be made, considering the several factorsthat generate diarrhea in a same one case, such as the mechanisms ofimmunodeficiency, neurological, endocrinemetabolic, and others associated with intestinal infections. This approach will be helpful to make a complete diagnosis and apply timely treatment.

  19. INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF MOTHER AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF NEWBORNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markovsky V. D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence in pregnant woman foci of latent, chronic infection of any localization is an important cause of various complications during pregnancy, childbirth, a wide range of perinatal pathology. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of mother infectious diseases on the anthropometric parameters of newborns. The authors set up an experiment on WAG rats on modeling subacute (prolonged peritonitis in females in order to study the influence of this infectiousinflammatory process in the organism of mother on the anthropometric parameters of newborns. The study found that the presence of infectious-inflammatory diseases in mother is not always leads to inflammatory changes in the placenta, but involutive- degenerative and dyscirculatory changes are taking place in all cases. In newborns from mothers with infectious pathology revealed significantly reduced anthropometric parameters in comparison with newborns from healthy mothers. Anthropometric parameters of newborns from mothers with infectious pathology depend on the infective dose (the higher the dose of agent, the less neonatal anthropometric parameters. Negative influence of infectious extragenital pathology of mother on newborn anthropometric parameters requires improving the quality of pregravidal training aimed at early detection and sanitation of foci of infection.

  20. Infectious causes of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam

    2014-12-01

    Investigators have long suspected the role of infection in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Evidence of infectious associations with SIDS is accentuated through the presence of markers of infection and inflammation on autopsy of SIDS infants and isolates of some bacteria and viruses. Several observational studies have looked into the relation between seasonality and incidence of SIDS, which often showed a winter peak. These all may suggest an infectious aetiology of SIDS. In this review we have summarised the current literature on infectious aetiologies of SIDS by looking at viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental factors which are believed to be associated with SIDS.

  1. PharmaSat: drug dose response in microgravity from a free-flying integrated biofluidic/optical culture-and-analysis satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Parra, Macarena; Niesel, David; Piccini, Matthew; Ly, Diana; McGinnis, Michael; Kudlicki, Andrzej; Hines, John W.; Timucin, Linda; Beasley, Chris; Ricks, Robert; McIntyre, Michael; Friedericks, Charlie; Henschke, Michael; Leung, Ricky; Diaz-Aguado, Millan; Kitts, Christopher; Mas, Ignacio; Rasay, Mike; Agasid, Elwood; Luzzi, Ed; Ronzano, Karolyn; Squires, David; Yost, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    We designed, built, tested, space-qualified, launched, and collected telemetered data from low Earth orbit from Pharma- Sat, a 5.1-kg free flying "nanosatellite" that supported microbial growth in 48 microfluidic wells, dosed microbes with multiple concentrations of a pharmaceutical agent, and monitored microbial growth and metabolic activity using a dedicated 3-color optical absorbance system at each microwell. The PharmaSat nanosatellite comprised a structure approximately 10 x 10 x 35 cm, including triple-junction solar cells, bidirectional communications, power-generation and energy- storage system, and a sealed payload 1.2-L containment vessel that housed the biological organisms along with the fluidic, optical, thermal, sensor, and electronic subsystems. Growth curves for S. cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) were obtained for multiple concentrations of the antifungal drug voriconazole in the microgravity conditions of low Earth orbit. Corresponding terrestrial control experiments were conducted for comparison.

  2. Phylogeography of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Anderson, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen that infects wild and cultured salmonid fish throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. IHNV causes severe epidemics in young fish and can cause disease or occur asymptomatically in adults. In a broad survey of 323 IHNV field isolates, sequence analysis of a 303 nucleotide variable region within the glycoprotein gene revealed a maximum nucleotide diversity of 8.6 %, indicating low genetic diversity overall for this virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three major virus genogroups, designated U, M and L, which varied in topography and geographical range. Intragenogroup genetic diversity measures indicated that the M genogroup had three- to fourfold more diversity than the other genogroups and suggested relatively rapid evolution of the M genogroup and stasis within the U genogroup. We speculate that factors influencing IHNV evolution may have included ocean migration ranges of their salmonid host populations and anthropogenic effects associated with fish culture.

  3. Phylogeography of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A; Troyer, Ryan M; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Anderson, Eric D

    2003-04-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdoviral pathogen that infects wild and cultured salmonid fish throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. IHNV causes severe epidemics in young fish and can cause disease or occur asymptomatically in adults. In a broad survey of 323 IHNV field isolates, sequence analysis of a 303 nucleotide variable region within the glycoprotein gene revealed a maximum nucleotide diversity of 8.6 %, indicating low genetic diversity overall for this virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three major virus genogroups, designated U, M and L, which varied in topography and geographical range. Intragenogroup genetic diversity measures indicated that the M genogroup had three- to fourfold more diversity than the other genogroups and suggested relatively rapid evolution of the M genogroup and stasis within the U genogroup. We speculate that factors influencing IHNV evolution may have included ocean migration ranges of their salmonid host populations and anthropogenic effects associated with fish culture.

  4. Global Climate Change and Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EK Shuman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is occurring as a result of warming of the earth’s atmosphere due to human activity generating excess amounts of greenhouse gases. Because of its potential impact on the hydrologic cycle and severe weather events, climate change is expected to have an enormous effect on human health, including on the burden and distribution of many infectious diseases. The infectious diseases that will be most affected by climate change include those that are spread by insect vectors and by contaminated water. The burden of adverse health effects due to these infectious diseases will fall primarily on developing countries, while it is the developed countries that are primarily responsible for climate change. It is up to governments and individuals to take the lead in halting climate change, and we must increase our understanding of the ecology of infectious diseases in order to protect vulnerable populations.

  5. A Holistic View of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himgauri K. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Guide to Diseases, Causative Agents, and Surveillance; Lisa A. Beltz; (2011. Jossey-Bass, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. San Francisco, CA. 700 pages.

  6. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  7. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  8. Sibship structure and risk of infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Present understanding of increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related infectious mononucleosis among children of low birth order or small sibships is mainly based on old and indirect evidence. Societal changes and methodological limitations of previous studies call for new data...... sibship structure into account. RESULTS: A total of 12,872 cases of infectious mononucleosis were observed during 35.3 million person-years of follow-up. Statistical modelling showed that increasing sibship size was associated with a reduced risk of infectious mononucleosis and that younger siblings...... of blood donors followed up retrospectively for self-reported infectious mononucleosis. CONCLUSIONS: Younger siblings, and to a lesser degree older siblings, seem to be important in the transmission of EBV within families. Apparently the dogma of low birth order in a sibship as being at the highest risk...

  9. Infectious optic neuropathies: a clinical update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahloun, Rim; Abroug, Nesrine; Ksiaa, Imen; Mahmoud, Anis; Zeghidi, Hatem; Zaouali, Sonia; Khairallah, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of optic neuropathy causing visual impairment of varying severity have been reported in association with a wide variety of infectious agents. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious conditions is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular findings. Diagnosis is confirmed by serologic testing and polymerase chain reaction in selected cases. Treatment of infectious optic neuropathies involves the use of specific anti-infectious drugs and corticosteroids to suppress the associated inflammatory reaction. The visual prognosis is generally good, but persistent severe vision loss with optic atrophy can occur. This review presents optic neuropathies caused by specific viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal diseases. PMID:28539795

  10. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    McMichael, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental c...

  11. [Fever of unknown origin. Infectious causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, B; Schneidewind, A; Hanses, F; Birkenfeld, G; Müller-Schilling, M

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases remain one of the most important causes of fever of unexplained origin (FUO). We review the spectrum of infectious diseases in the different clinical situations of patients with FUO, namely in classical FUO, in patients with HIV infection, in health care-associated or nosocomial FUO, and in immunocompromised patients with FUO. The most important question is which clinical features make a specific disease a candidate to cause FUO.

  12. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Principi; Susanna Esposito

    2016-01-01

    In children, infectious discitis (D) and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD) are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagno...

  13. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jo-Ann; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a Rhabdovirus that causes significant disease in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and rainbow and steelhead trout (O. mykiss). IHNV causes necrosis of the haematopoietic tissues, and consequently it was named infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This virus is waterborne and may transmit horizontally and vertically through virus associated with seminal and ovarian fluids. The clinical signs of disease and diagnosis; pathology; pathophysiology; and control strategies against IHNV are discussed.

  14. Acute Infectious Morbidity in Multiple Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Dotters-Katz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Physiologic and immunologic changes in pregnancy result in increased susceptibility to infection. These shifts are more pronounced in pregnancies complicated by multiple gestation. The objective of this study was to determine the association between multiple gestation and risk of infectious morbidity. Study Design. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2008–2010 was used to identify pregnant women during admission for delivery with International Classification of Diseases codes. Logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for demographic data, preexisting medical conditions, and acute medical and infectious complications for women with multiple versus singleton gestations. Results. Among women with multiple gestation, 38.4 per 1,000 women had an infectious complication compared to 12.8 per 1,000 women with singletons. The most significant infectious morbidity associated with multiple gestation was intestinal infections, pyelonephritis, influenza, and pneumonia. After controlling for confounding variables, infectious complications at delivery persisted for women with multiples, though the association was dependent on mode of delivery. Conclusions. Women with multiple gestations are at increased risk for infectious morbidity identified at the time of delivery. This association was diminished among women who had a cesarean suggesting that operative delivery is not responsible for this association.

  15. Early infections in patients undergoing high-dose treatment with stem cell support: a comparison of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, A O; Arpi, M.; Gang, U.J.O.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infections are life-threatening complications in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support (HDT). Knowledge of the infectious pathogens is essential to make a safe outpatient setting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 208 patients treated with HDT...... related mortality was similar between the groups. Conclusion: The frequency of isolated pathogens, positive blood cultures, and the diversity of pathogens were higher in MM patients as compared to NHL patients. However, this did not translate into higher transplantation-related mortality, probably because...

  16. Platelet satellitism in infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaj, Renata; Sikiric, Dubravka; Skerk, Visnja

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet satellitism is a phenomenon of unknown etiology of aggregating platelets around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and other blood cells which causes pseudothrombocytopenia, visible by microscopic examination of blood smears. It has been observed so far in about a hundred cases in the world. Case subject and methods Our case involves a 73-year-old female patient with a urinary infection. Biochemical serum analysis (CRP, glucose, AST, ALT, ALP, GGT, bilirubin, sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, creatinine) and blood cell count were performed with standard methods on autoanalyzers. Serum protein fractions were examined by electrophoresis and urinalysis with standard methods on autoanalyzer together with microscopic examination of urine sediment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood culture and urine culture tests were performed with standard methods. Results Due to typical pathological values for bacterial urinary infection, the patient was admitted to the hospital. Blood smear examination revealed phenomenon, which has persisted for three weeks after the disease has been cured. Blood smears with EDTA as an anticoagulant had platelet satellitism whereas the phenomenon was not observed in tubes with different anticoagulants (Na, Li-heparin) and capillary blood. Discussion We hypothesize that satellitism was induced by some immunological mechanism through formation of antibodies which have mediated platelets binding to neutrophil membranes and vice versa. Unfortunately we were unable to determine the putative trigger for this phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the second case of platelet satellitism ever described in Croatia. PMID:26110042

  17. Isolation of infectious Zika virus from saliva and prolonged viral RNA shedding in a traveller returning from the Dominican Republic to Italy, January 2016

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Berto, Alessandro; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We report the isolation of infectious Zika virus (ZIKV) in cell culture from the saliva of a patient who developed a febrile illness after returning from the Dominican Republic to Italy, in January 2016...

  18. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  19. Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Kenneth; Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Geographic and cross-national variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war is a subject of great interest. Previous theory on this variation has focused on the influence on human behaviour of climate, resource competition, national wealth, and cultural characteristics. We present the parasite-stress model of intrastate conflict, which unites previous work on the correlates of intrastate conflict by linking frequency of the outbreak of such conflict, including civil war, to the intensity of infectious disease across countries of the world. High intensity of infectious disease leads to the emergence of xenophobic and ethnocentric cultural norms. These cultures suffer greater poverty and deprivation due to the morbidity and mortality caused by disease, and as a result of decreased investment in public health and welfare. Resource competition among xenophobic and ethnocentric groups within a nation leads to increased frequency of civil war. We present support for the parasite-stress model with regression analyses. We find support for a direct effect of infectious disease on intrastate armed conflict, and support for an indirect effect of infectious disease on the incidence of civil war via its negative effect on national wealth. We consider the entanglements of feedback of conflict into further reduced wealth and increased incidence of disease, and discuss implications for international warfare and global patterns of wealth and imperialism.

  20. Detoxification of azo dyes mediated by cell-free supernatant culture with manganese-dependent peroxidase activity: effect of Mn2+ concentration and H2O2 dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Elsa; Urra, Johana; Vásquez, Carlos; Palma, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    White-rot fungi (WRF) are capable of degrading complex organic compounds such as lignin, and the enzymes that enable these processes can be used for the detoxification of recalcitrant organopollutants. The aim of this study is to evaluate a system based on the use of an in vitro ligninolytic enzyme for the detoxification of recalcitrant dye pollutants. The dyes selected for investigation were the anionic and cationic commercial azo dyes, basic blue 41 (BB41), acid black 1 (AB1), and reactive black 5 (RB5). A supernatant, cell-free culture of WRF with manganese peroxidase activity was used to investigate its degradative capacity under various conditions, and concentrations of cofactors, H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+). The assays were carried out using a 2(2) experimental designs whose variables were concentration of Mn(2+) (33 and 1,000 μM) and semicontinuous dosage of the H(2)O(2) (0.02 and 0.10 μmol) added at a frequency of 0.2 min(-1). The response variables analyzed were the efficiency and the initial rate of the decolorization process. The dye concentrations considered ranged from 10 to 200 mg L(-1). AB1 and RB5 were decolorized over the entire interval of concentrations studied; reaching efficiencies between 15 and 95%. Decolorization of up to 100 mg L(-1), BB41 had less than 30% efficiency. The decay of the concentration of AB1 was interpreted by two-stage kinetics model, with the exception of the condition of 33 μM Mn(2+)-0.02 μmol of H(2)O(2) in which only one stage was observed. For all assays performed with 33 μM Mn(2+), the initial rate of the decolorization process was found to be dependent on the dosage of H(2)O(2). The results of this study can be applied to the development bioreactors for the degradation of recalcitrant pollutants from the textile industry and may be used as a model for expanding the use of extracellular enzyme supernatants in bioremediation. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  1. Disease resistance and immune-relevant gene expression in golden mandarin fish, Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner, infected with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus-like agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, G W; White, S L; Dahms, H U; Jeong, H D; Kim, J H

    2014-12-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), family Iridoviridae, genus Megalocytivirus, may cause high mortality rates such as those seen in mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi. ISKNV has attracted much attention due to the possible environmental threat and economic losses it poses on both cultured and wild populations. We have investigated the pathogenicity of ISKNV-like agent Megalocytivirus, isolated from infected pearl gourami, in golden mandarin fish, Siniperca scherzeri - a member of the Percichthyidae family - and in another Percichthyidae species, S. chuatsi. Fish were challenged with four different doses of ISKNV-like agent Megalocytivirus (1, 10, 100 or 1000 μg per fish) over a 30-day period, and cumulative fish mortalities were calculated for each group. No significant mortality was observed for fish challenged with the lowest dose (1 μg per fish) relative to a control group. However, all other challenged groups showed 100% mortality over a 30-day period in proportion to the challenge dose. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure mRNA expression levels for six immune-related genes in golden mandarin fish following ISKNV-like agent challenge. mRNA expression levels for IRF1, Mx, viperin and interleukin 8 significantly increased, while mRNA levels for IRF2 and IRF7 remained constant or declined during the challenge period.

  2. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification of infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rodrigo; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Camacho, Manuel V; Soto, Claudio

    2012-06-28

    Prions are proteinaceous infectious agents responsible for the transmission of prion diseases. The lack of a procedure for cultivating prions in the laboratory has been a major limitation to the study of the unorthodox nature of this infectious agent and the molecular mechanism by which the normal prion protein (PrP(C)) is converted into the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)). Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), described in detail in this protocol, is a simple, fast and efficient methodology to mimic prion replication in the test tube. PMCA involves incubating materials containing minute amounts of infectious prions with an excess of PrP(C) and boosting the conversion by cycles of sonication to fragment the converting units, thereby leading to accelerated prion replication. PMCA is able to detect the equivalent of a single molecule of infectious PrP(Sc) and propagate prions that maintain high infectivity, strain properties and species specificity. A single PMCA assay takes little more than 3 d to replicate a large amount of prions, which could take years in an in vivo situation. Since its invention 10 years ago, PMCA has helped to answer fundamental questions about this intriguing infectious agent and has been broadly applied in research areas that include the food industry, blood bank safety and human and veterinary disease diagnosis.

  3. A comprehensive infectious disease management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Alex; Farley, John D

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electronic management system is now an essential tool for the successful management and monitoring of those affected by communicable infectious diseases (Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV, hepatitis C - HEP C) during the course of the treatment. The current methods which depend heavily on manual collecting, compiling and disseminating treatment information are labor-intensive and time consuming. Clinics specialized in the treatment of infectious diseases use a mix of electronic systems that fail to interact with each other, result in data duplication, and do not support treatment of the patient as a whole. The purpose of the Infectious Disease Management System is to reduce the administrative overhead associated with data collection and analysis while providing correlation abilities and decision support in accordance with defined treatment guidelines. This Infectious Disease Management System was developed to: Ensure cost effectiveness by means of low software licensing costs, Introduce a centralized mechanism of collecting and monitoring all infectious disease management data, Automate electronic retrieval of laboratory findings, Introduce a decision support mechanism as per treatment guidelines, Seamlessly integrate of application modules, Provide comprehensive reporting capabilities, Maintain a high level of user friendliness.

  4. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  5. 78 FR 58322 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee (MID-B...: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

  6. [Celioscopic cholecystectomy. 2 cases of infectious complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, F; Fayeulle, V; Peillon, C; Roullée, N; Koning, E; Bénozio, M; Testart, J; Humbert, G

    1994-06-11

    Despite the low morbidity and mortality of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, trauma and infection have been reported. Such complications can produce a misleading clinical picture, as in two cases we observed. Case 1. A symptomatic 56-year-old female patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During the operation, the gall bladder ruptured and the contents had to be aspirated from the abdominal cavity. The patient complained of hepatalgia 2 weeks after the operation, then was not seen again for more than 1 year when fever and hepatalgia did not respond to symptomatic treatment. An inter-hepato-renal collection (6 cm in diameter) was punctured under echography. Aspirate culture yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Adapted antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful and surgery was required to empty the abscess then remove a fibrous conjunctive tissue formation. Case 2. A 55-year-old female patient with a history of complete remission after mammectomy for breast cancer underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in 1991. Two days after the operation, fever (39 degrees C) was accompanied by abdominal defence. Biliary peritonitis due to imperfect suture of the bile duct was repaired followed by peritoneal lavage-drainage. Per-operative blood samples revealed type 6 Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite adapted parenteral antibiotics, fever persisted at 39 degrees C and intense jaundice was observed. A second laparoscopy 14 days later showed inflammatory narrowing of the main bile duct which was drained into a small bowel loop. Eight days later computed tomography revealed multiple abscess in the liver. Transparietal cholangiography was performed and showed that the contrast medium entered the abscesses via the biliary canals. The state of sepsis persisted, jaundice worsened and hepatic encephalopathy developed with obnubilation and flapping tremor. After 1 month of general antibiotherapy, no improvement was seen on computed tomography images and needle biopsy of an abscess led to the

  7. Global Dynamics of Infectious Disease with Arbitrary Distributed Infectious Period on Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current epidemic models assume that the infectious period follows an exponential distribution. However, due to individual heterogeneity and epidemic diversity, these models fail to describe the distribution of infectious periods precisely. We establish a SIS epidemic model with multistaged progression of infectious periods on complex networks, which can be used to characterize arbitrary distributions of infectious periods of the individuals. By using mathematical analysis, the basic reproduction number R0 for the model is derived. We verify that the R0 depends on the average distributions of infection periods for different types of infective individuals, which extend the general theory obtained from the single infectious period epidemic models. It is proved that if R0<1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; otherwise the unique endemic equilibrium exists such that it is globally asymptotically attractive. Finally numerical simulations hold for the validity of our theoretical results is given.

  8. [Chronic, non-infectious diarrhea: diagnostics and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Korinna; Layer, Peter; Andresen, Viola

    2016-09-01

    Chronic, non-infectious diarrhea can be caused by a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. In anamnesis, it is important to take accompanying warning symptoms and specific triggers into account. The fecal inflammatory marker calprotectin may help differentiating between organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders, but it is not specific. Among other options, gelling fibres, Loperamide and Cholestyramine as well as probiotics are available for the symptomatic treatment of chronic diarrhea. For long-term treatment of chronic diarrhea with the enkephalinase inhibitor racecadotril, which is approved for acute diarrhea, only limited data are available. Eluxadolin presents a new therapeutic option. It can alleviate abdominal pain and diarrhea by modulation of opioid receptors in the enteric nervous system. Additional approaches in intractable irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) include 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, the antibiotic Rifaximin as well as low-dose tricyclic antidepressants. Specific diets such as the low-FODMAP diet can also relieve symptoms in IBS.

  9. Biodiversity loss and infectious diseases: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    When conservation biologists think about infectious diseases, their thoughts are mostly negative. Infectious diseases have been associated with the extinction and endangerment of some species, though this is rare, and other factors like habitat loss and poorly regulated harvest still are the overwhelming drivers of endangerment. Parasites are pervasive and play important roles as natural enemies on par with top predators, from regulating population abundances to maintaining species diversity. Sometimes, parasites themselves can be endangered. However, it seems unlikely that humans will miss extinct parasites. Parasites are often sensitive to habitat loss and degradation, making them positive indicators of ecosystem “health”. Conservation biologists need to carefully consider infectious diseases when planning conservation actions. This can include minimizing the movement of domestic and invasive species, vaccination, and culling.

  10. Spatial dynamics of airborne infectious diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, M; Drossinos, Y

    2011-01-01

    Disease outbreaks, such as those of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza, have highlighted the potential for airborne transmission in indoor environments. Respirable pathogen-carrying droplets provide a vector for the spatial spread of infection with droplet transport determined by diffusive and convective processes. An epidemiological model describing the spatial dynamics of disease transmission is presented. The effects of an ambient airflow, as an infection control, are incorporated leading to a delay equation, with droplet density dependent on the infectious density at a previous time. It is found that small droplets ($\\sim 0.4\\ \\mu$m) generate a negligible infectious force due to the small viral load and the associated duration they require to transmit infection. In contrast, larger droplets ($\\sim 4\\ \\mu$m) can lead to an infectious wave propagating through a fully susceptible population or a secondary infection outbreak for a localised susceptible population...

  11. Modeling the infectiousness of Twitter hashtags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaza, Jonathan; Blais, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This study applies dynamical and statistical modeling techniques to quantify the proliferation and popularity of trending hashtags on Twitter. Using time-series data reflecting actual tweets in New York City and San Francisco, we present estimates for the dynamics (i.e., rates of infection and recovery) of several hundred trending hashtags using an epidemic modeling framework coupled with Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. This methodological strategy is an extension of techniques traditionally used to model the spread of infectious disease. Using SIR-type models, we demonstrate that most hashtags are marginally infectious, while very few emerge as "trending". In doing so we illustrate that hashtags can be grouped by infectiousness, possibly providing a method for quantifying the trendiness of a topic.

  12. Inflammatory, vascular, and infectious myelopathies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, Leonard H; Banwell, Brenda L

    2013-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic myelopathies of childhood include inflammatory, infectious, and vascular etiologies. Inflammatory immune-mediated disorders of the spinal cord can be categorized as idiopathic isolated transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and multiple sclerosis. In recent years, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1, West Nile virus, enterovirus-71, and Lyme disease have been increasingly recognized as infectious etiologies of myelopathy, and poliomyelitis remains an important etiology in world regions where vaccination programs have not been universally available. Vascular etiologies include vasculopathies (systemic lupus erythematosus, small vessel primary angiitis of the central nervous system), arteriovenous malformations, and spinal cord infarction (fibrocartilaginous embolism, diffuse hypoxic ischemia-mediated infarction). Vascular myelopathies are less common than inflammatory and infectious myelopathies, but are more likely to lead to devastating clinical deficits. Current therapeutic strategies include acute anti-inflammatory treatment and rehabilitation. Stem cell transplantation, nerve graft implantation, and stimulation of endogenous repair mechanisms represent promising strategies for spinal cord repair.

  13. Sapronosis: a distinctive type of infectious agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Sokolow, Susanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Sapronotic disease agents have evolutionary and epidemiological properties unlike other infectious organisms. Their essential saprophagic existence prevents coevolution, and no host–parasite virulence trade-off can evolve. However, the host may evolve defenses. Models of pathogens show that sapronoses, lacking a threshold of transmission, cannot regulate host populations, although they can reduce host abundance and even extirpate their hosts. Immunocompromised hosts are relatively susceptible to sapronoses. Some particularly important sapronoses, such as cholera and anthrax, can sustain an epidemic in a host population. However, these microbes ultimately persist as saprophages. One-third of human infectious disease agents are sapronotic, including nearly all fungal diseases. Recognition that an infectious disease is sapronotic illuminates a need for effective environmental control strategies.

  14. Non-infectious inflammatory genital lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassi, Lucio; Bilenchi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The genitalia may be the site of non-infectious inflammatory lesions that are generally manifested as balanoposthitis and vulvovaginitis. In men, these forms constitute 50% of all balanoposthitis forms, and in women, vulvovaginitis frequency is even higher. They consist of genital locations of general skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, and other clinical entities with their own physiognomy, such as Zoon's balanitis-vulvitis. Diagnosis of genital non-infectious inflammatory lesions is usually made on clinical criteria. A biopsy is only necessary for the identification of clinical conditions that may simulate inflammatory form but are actually premalignant processes.

  15. [Corticosteroids in the treatment of infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronig, I; Schibler, M; Rougemont, M; Emonet, S

    2013-04-24

    The addition of a corticosteroid has become a common practice for the treatment of some infectious diseases, such as meningitis, septic shock, moderate to severe Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The belief that steroids may have a beneficial effect in the early stage of pro-inflammatory infections explains the renewed interest for these treatments. This review of recent literature helps determine the use of steroids in the treatment of infectious diseases as formal guidance, questionable or rather contraindicated. When there is a clear scientific indication for the use of corticosteroids regardless of the current infection, the latter is never a formal contraindication.

  16. Analysis on the importance of clinical competence culture for senior personnel on infectious diseases%浅析小儿传染病专业高年资住院医师临床技能培养的重要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞琳

    2012-01-01

    探讨小儿传染病专业高年资住院医师临床技能培养的重要性;总结传染病专科医院小儿传染病专业住院医师规范化培训,尤其是高年资主治医师临床技能培训的经验.高年资住院医师临床技能培训是小儿传染病学科人才培养的重要内容,但该项工作是一项长期的、需要多部门协调配合的工作.需要加强小儿传染病专业高年资住院医师临床技能培养工作经验的积累,并需进一步探索有效的工作机制.%To explore the importance of clinical competence training for senior personnel on infectious diseases professional senior and summarize pediatric infectious diseases professional resident standardized training in infectious diseases specialist hospital, especially training experience of high qualification attending clinical skills. The clinical skills training of senior residency is an important part of pediatric infectious diseases disciplines personnel training, which needs long time and multi-sectoral coordination. Experience accumulation of the professional senior clinical training on pediatric infectious diseases, and effective mechanisms need to be further explored.

  17. Infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp. after penetrating keratoplasty: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ricardo Alexandre; Bonamigo, Elcio Luiz; Cadore, Emeline; Oechsler, Rafael Allan

    2016-01-01

    Background Infectious crystalline keratopathy is a rare, progressive infection characterized by the insidious progression of branches and crystalline corneal opacities with minimal or no inflammation. This case report describes the evolution of an infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp., which developed after tectonic keratoplasty in a patient with a history of ocular trauma. Case presentation A 40-year-old Brazilian male was the victim of firework-induced trauma to the left eye, which resulted in a corneal laceration that could not be sutured as well as a severe traumatic cataract. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and phacoemulsification. During postoperative follow-up, another therapeutic keratoplasty was required because unresponsive infectious keratitis was observed. The infiltrate’s characteristics were suggestive of infectious crystalline keratopathy; in particular, the infiltrate was insidious and progressive, and grayish-white branches appeared in the anterior corneal stroma. As different therapies were administered, inflammatory reactions ranging from mild to severe were observed. The infection was unresponsive to typical antifungal drugs. This lack of response most likely occurred due to steroid treatment and the diffuse corneal spread of an atypical microorganism, which was subsequently identified in culture as Cladosporium sp. After the second therapeutic keratoplasty, the patient’s eye integrity was successfully reestablished. Conclusion This study likely provides the first report describing a case of infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp. This case emphasizes the clinical characteristics and outcome of this type of keratitis. PMID:27621671

  18. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of Haemophilus paragallinarum isolated from suspected cases of infectious coryza in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Rajurkar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Among infectious diseases of avian species Infectious coryza is one of the major problems affecting commercial poultry industry in the country. Infectious coryza is an upper respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with H. paragallinarum (HPG. The disease is characterized by swollen infra-orbital sinuses, nasal discharge, and depression. The disease is seen most commonly in adult chickens and can cause a very significant reduction in the rate of egg production. Considering the economic importance of the disease, the present research pursuit was undertaken with the aim to isolate H. paragallinarum from the suspected cases of Infectious coryza in commercial poultry farms in Gujarat state with reference to their cultural, morphological characterization and antimicrobial drug sensitivity patterns. Further these isolates were confirmed by using specific colony PCR test. The research work aims to characterize Haemophilus paragallinarum field isolates of poultry origin from Infectious coryza outbreak in and around Anand, Kheda and Mahua area of Saurashtra region of Gujarat state, India. [Vet World 2010; 3(4.000: 177-181

  19. Ozone inactivation of infectious prions in rendering plant and municipal wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Neumann, Norman F; Price, Luke M; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Disposal of tissues and organs associated with prion accumulation and infectivity in infected animals (designated as Specified Risk Materials [SRM]) is strictly regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); however, the contamination of wastewater from slaughterhouses that handle SRM still poses public concern. In this study, we examined for the first time the partitioning of infectious prions in rendering plant wastewater and found that a large proportion of infectious prions were partitioned into the scum layer formed at the top after gravity separation, while quite a few infectious prions still remained in the wastewater. Subsequently, we assessed the ozone inactivation of infectious prions in the raw, natural gravity-separated and dissolved air flotation (DAF)-treated (i.e., primary-treated) rendering plant wastewater, and in a municipal final effluent (i.e., secondary-treated municipal wastewater). At applied ozone doses of 43.4-44.6 mg/L, ozone was instantaneously depleted in the raw rendering plant wastewater, while a greater than 4-log10 inactivation was achieved at a 5 min exposure in the DAF-treated rendering plant wastewater. Prion inactivation in the municipal final effluent was conducted with two levels of applied ozone doses of 13.4 and 22.5mg/L, and a greater than 4-log10 inactivation was achieved at a 5 min exposure with the higher ozone dose. Efficiency factor Hom (EFH) models were used to model (i.e., fit) the experimental data. The CT (disinfectant concentration multiplied by contact time) values were determined for 2- and 3-log10 inactivation in the municipal final effluent treated with an ozone dose of 13.4 mg/L. Our results indicate that ozone could serve as a final barrier for prion inactivation in primary- and/or secondary-treated wastewaters.

  20. Oral antibiotic treatment of left-sided infectious endocarditis verified by 16S-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Louise E; Tønder, Niels; Hansen, Thomas Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of infectious endocarditis (IE) comprises intravenously administered antibiotic medications given at high doses for 4-6 weeks--sometimes even longer. Approximately 50% of patients referred to tertiary care centres require additional surgical intervention. At present there are few papers...... describing the effects of oral antibiotic treatment in IE, and only in patients with right-sided endocarditis. In this case report we present a patient with left-sided Streptococcus endocarditis successfully treated with oral antibiotic drugs....

  1. ADAPTATION OF INDIGENOUS INFECTIOUS BURSAL DISEASE VIRUS (IBDV) IN EMBRYONATED CHICKEN EGGS

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Ahmad, I. Hussain, M. Siddique and M. S. Mahmood

    2005-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus was isolated from bursae of broilers suffering from Gumboro disease and was designated as field virus (FV). The virus was confirmed through agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and counter current immunoelectrophoresis (CCIE). The virus was titrated by using reverse passive haemagglutination (RPHA) test and egg infective dose fifty (EID50). The FV was inoculated into 9-to 11-day-old embryonated chicken eggs through chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM). At each passage...

  2. Molecular diagnosis of infectious diarrhea: focus on enteric protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans P; Sobuz, Shihab U; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    Robust detection of enteric protozoa is a critical step toward determining the etiology of diarrhea. Widespread use of conventional microscopy, culturing and antigen detection in both industrial and developing countries is limited by relatively low sensitivity and specificity. Refinements of these conventional approaches that reduce turnaround time and instrumentation have yielded strong alternatives for clinical and research use. However, advances in molecular diagnostics for protozoal, bacterial, viral and helminth infections offer significant advantages in studies seeking to understand pathogenesis, transmission and long-term consequences of infectious diarrhea. Quantitation of enteropathogen burden and highly multiplexed platforms for molecular detection dramatically improve predictive power in emerging models of diarrheal etiology, while eliminating the expense of multiple tests.

  3. Infectious Disease Transmission during Transfusion and Transplantation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-13

    Dr. Matthew Kuehnert, Director of the Office of Blood, Organ, and Other Tissue Safety, discusses infections in transplants.  Created: 8/13/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/15/2012.

  4. Heterotypic protection to infectious bronchitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (rLS) expressing a distinct spike (S) protein gene of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). This recombinant vaccine technology confers cross-protection among different IBV strains. We also experimentally demonstrated that the recombinant construct main...

  5. Vaccination and herd immunity to infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roy M.; May, Robert M.

    1985-11-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the transmission dynamics of infectious agents and herd immunity provides a template for the design of effective control programmes based on mass immunization. Mathematical models of the spread and persistence of infection provide important insights into the problem of how best to protect the community against disease.

  6. Met uitloop meer kans op parasitaire infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijck, I.A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Parasitaire infecties vormen een belangrijk probleem in de biologische- en scharrelhouderij. In een veldinventarisatie van het Praktijkonderzoek van ASG werden meer Ascaris suum (spoelwormen), coccidiën en Toxoplasma gondii gevonden op bedrijven met uitloop dan op bedrijven zonder uitloop. Nader ond

  7. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad...

  8. Measurement and Modeling: Infectious Disease Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretzschmar, MEE

    2016-01-01

    After some historical remarks about the development of mathematical theory for infectious disease dynamics we introduce a basic mathematical model for the spread of an infection with immunity. The concepts of the model are explained and the model equations are derived from first principles. Using th

  9. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations.

  10. Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askling, Johan; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear. METHODS: We compared the incidence rates of Hodgkin's lymphoma in two population-bas...

  11. Exploring Risk Perceptions of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. de Zwart (Onno)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about risk perception of infectious diseases, with a special focus on the emerging infections SARS and avian influenza, and explores potential determinants of risk perception and the relation of risk perception with precautionary behaviours. In this first chapter I discuss

  12. STATINS AND RISK OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides hypolipidemic effect statins demonstrate some not-lipid (pleotropic ones. Special attention has been paying to statin inducing reduction in bacterial infections incidence and severity, and pneumonia particularly. Results of the large studies on statin influence on infectious disease are presented.

  13. Infectious diseases in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumate, J

    1997-01-01

    Infecto-contagious diseases in the twenty-first century with respect to precedent will see themselves deprived of smallpox, dracunculiasis and very probably of paralyzing poliomyelitis. Vaccination-preventable diseases, such as measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, rabies, some forms of meningitis, yellow fever and episodes of disseminated tuberculosis will greatly diminish in their rates of morbi-lethality; the elimination of some, and the eradication of measles, are expected. Other diseases such as diarrhea (including cholera), geo-helminthiasis, some severe respiratory tract infections and the majority of vector-transmitted infectious diseases will decrease due to improvements in potable water services, drainage, sanitary food control, living quarters, and individual and community anti-vector action. Leprosy, onchocerciasis and several parasitoses will be controlled by the available antimicrobial drugs. Infectious diseases will continue to be an important health problem due to: Reduction in the immunocompetence resulting from the aging of the population, chemotherapies necessary for neoplasms, and autoimmune pathology and the survival of persons with primary immunodeficiencies; lifestyles prone to infectious pathology, such as mega-city urbanization, children in day care centers, industrialized foods, intravenous drug addiction, sexual liberation, global commerce, and tourism; antibiotic-multiresistant microbial flora; environmental disturbances as a result of global warming, deforestation, the settling of virgin areas, dams, the large-scale use of pesticides, fertilizers and antimicrobials, and natural/social disasters generators of poverty, violence and deprivation will result in emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases already controlled in the past.

  14. [Methods for diminishing mortality from infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boev, B V; Ershov, F I

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports analysis of the "Russian Cross" demographic phenomenon characteristic of the present-day Russia, that is a marked excess of mortality over the birth rate leading to the reduction of the country's population at a rate of 750-800 thou people per year. The main causes and factors of excess mortality are considered with reference to deaths from infectious (viral and microbial) diseases. Experts of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences proposed the working concept of the research program "Avoidable population mortality from infectious diseases in 2010-2020". Its implementation envisages the use of up-to-date information and computer technologies including mathematical and computer simulation of morbidity and mortality processes in outbreaks and epidemics of infectious diseases. The use of computer-assisted technologies is illustrated by the example of smallpox epidemics. They permit to promptly analyse and prognosticate excess mortality from infectious diseases by applying new diagnostic tools and medicinal products. This approach is proposed for the evaluation of the effectiveness of different projects in the framework of the above program. Its realization requires the development of three special information (computer-aided) systems designated Projects, Infections, and Prognoses.

  15. Mathematical aspects of infectious disease dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boldin, B.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis `Mathematical aspects of infectious disease dynamics' by Barbara Boldin is about model formulation, analysis and interpretation of four questions arising from biology or medicine. Suppose that a new population is introduced into a steady community. When the basic reproduction ratio R_0 of

  16. Diagnostic challenges and opportunities in older adults with infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, David

    2012-04-01

    Infections remain a major threat to the well-being of our growing aged population. The correct and timely diagnosis of infections in older adults is increasingly important in the current age of antimicrobial resistance. Urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and bacteremia present particular challenges. In older patients with bacteremia, blood cultures have comparable yield as compared with younger patients. However, the routine triggers for ordering blood cultures may not be appropriate in older adults. In addition, resistance patterns of isolated pathogens may change with age. The main difficulties in diagnosing urinary tract infections in older adults are caused by an increased prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and frequent use of urinary catheters. However, a combined noninvasive approach that includes history, physical examination, urinary dipstick testing, urine cultures, and simple blood tests can provide direction. In addition, specific guidelines for specific populations are available. In older patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, bedside pulse oximetry and urinary antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila provide direction for the clinician. Although infected older adults pose specific and unique diagnostic challenges, a thorough history and physical examination combined with minimally invasive testing will lead to the correct diagnosis in most older adults with infectious diseases, limiting the need for empiric antibiotics in this age group.

  17. Perceptions and behaviours of infectious diseases physicians when managing urinary tract infections due to MDR organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Sergio E.; Babcock, Hilary M.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Lane, Michael A.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to attain a better understanding of infectious diseases (ID) physicians' experience with MDR organism (MDRO) urinary tract infections (UTIs) by means of a survey on disease perception, diagnostic management and treatment preferences. Methods A nine-question survey was developed and distributed to members of the North American Emerging Infections Network (EIN) in September 2013. Results Seven hundred and fourteen out of 1461 EIN members responded to the survey (49%). The responses of 603 responders were studied. Most providers perceived an increase in the incidence of MDRO UTIs over the past 3 years (75% of adult ID responders and 63% of paediatric ID responders). One hundred and thirty-four (22%) responders prefer intravenous over oral administration of antimicrobials when both are available, 171 (28%) prefer longer durations of therapy when comparing an MDRO with a susceptible isolate of the same species and 142 (24%) order a repeat urine culture as ‘proof of cure’ after treating an MDRO UTI. Nevertheless, 530 (88%) responders perceived MDRO UTIs to be of similar severity as non-MDRO UTIs. Fifty-five percent of providers prescribed fosfomycin for MDRO UTI at least once; the most common prescribing pattern (among a wide spectrum of approaches) was a single dose (16%). Conclusions Future studies on MDRO UTIs should clarify the role of resistance in patient outcomes and the comparative efficacy of different antimicrobials. Of particular interest is fosfomycin, which is unrelated to other antibiotic classes and may take a more prominent role in treating MDRO cystitis. PMID:26349519

  18. Antimycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzeid, Nadir; Kalsum, Sadaf; Koshy, Richin John; Larsson, Marie; Glader, Mikaela; Andersson, Henrik; Raffetseder, Johanna; Pienaar, Elsje; Eklund, Daniel; Alhassan, Muddathir S; AlGadir, Haidar A; Koko, Waleed S; Schön, Thomas; Ahmed Mesaik, M; Abdalla, Omer M; Khalid, Asaad; Lerm, Maria

    2014-11-18

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis underscores the need for continuous development of new and efficient methods to determine the susceptibility of isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the search for novel antimycobacterial agents. Natural products constitute an important source of new drugs, and design and implementation of antimycobacterial susceptibility testing methods are necessary to evaluate the different extracts and compounds. In this study we have explored the antimycobacterial properties of 50 ethanolic extracts from different parts of 46 selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Sudan to treat infectious diseases. Plants were harvested and ethanolic extracts were prepared. For selected extracts, fractionation with hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents was undertaken. A luminometry-based assay was used for determination of mycobacterial growth in broth cultures and inside primary human macrophages in the presence or absence of plant extracts and fractions of extracts. Cytotoxicity was also assessed for active fractions of plant extracts. Of the tested extracts, three exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on an avirulent strain of Mycobacterium tubercluosis (H37Ra) at the initial screening doses (125 and 6.25µg/ml). These were bark and leaf extracts of Khaya senegalensis and the leaf extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Further fractions of these plant extracts were prepared with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, ethanol and water, and the activity of these extracts was retained in hydrophobic fractions. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that the chloroform fraction of Khaya senegalensis bark was non-toxic to human monocyte-derived macrophages and other cell types at the concentrations used and hence, further analysis, including assessment of IC50 and intracellular activity was done with this fraction. These results encourage further investigations to identify the active compound(s) within the

  19. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerabilities to Infectious Diseases in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jan C. Semenza; Jonathan E. Suk; Virginia Estevez; Kristie L. Ebi; Elisabet Lindgren

    ...: In 2007 and 2009/2010, national infectious disease experts from 30 European Economic Area countries were surveyed about recent and projected infectious disease patterns in relation to climate change...

  20. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and thank you for your interest in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). ... This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) ...

  1. Spatiotemporal Frameworks for Infectious Disease Diffusion and Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Congdon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases, and the resurgence of previously controlled infectious disease (e.g., malaria, tuberculosis, are a major focus for public health concern, as well as providing challenges for establishing aetiology and transmission. [...

  2. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  3. Perspectives of public health laboratories in emerging infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Gubler, Duane J.

    2013-01-01

    The world has experienced an increased incidence and transboundary spread of emerging infectious diseases over the last four decades. We divided emerging infectious diseases into four categories, with subcategories in categories 1 and 4. The categorization was based on the nature and characteristics of pathogens or infectious agents causing the emerging infections, which are directly related to the mechanisms and patterns of infectious disease emergence. The factors or combinations of factors...

  4. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Clabough, D L; Gebhard, D; Flaherty, M T; Whetter, L E; Perry, S T; Coggins, L; Fuller, F J

    1991-01-01

    An adult horse infected with a virulent, cell culture-adapted strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) developed cyclical thrombocytopenia in which the nadir of platelet counts coincided with peak febrile responses. In order to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia during acute febrile episodes, four adult horses were experimentally infected with the wild-type Wyoming strain of EIAV. Platelet counts decreased from baseline as rectal temperature increased. Serum reverse transcri...

  5. Membrane Bioreactor-Based Wastewater Treatment Plant in Saudi Arabia: Reduction of Viral Diversity, Load, and Infectious Capacity

    KAUST Repository

    Jumat, Muhammad

    2017-07-18

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR)-based wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia was assessed over a nine-month period for virus removal efficiency. Viral diversity was detected using omics-based approaches. Log reduction values (LRV) of Adenoviruses (AdV) and Enteroviruses (EV) were enumerated using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) and assessed for infectivity using fluorescence-based infection assays. MBR treatment was successful in reducing viral diversity. Plant viruses remained abundant in the treated effluent. Human enteric viruses were present in lower abundance than plant viruses, and were reduced by MBR at varying LRV. AdV copy numbers were reduced by 3.7-log. Infectious AdV was not detected in the effluent. EV copy numbers were reduced by 1.7-log post MBR and infectious EV decreased by an average of 2.0-log. Infectious EV was detected in the chlorinated effluent, occasionally in concentrations that approximate to its 50% infectious dose. Overall, results indicated that a MBR-based wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effectively reduces viral diversity, viral load, and infectious capacity by up to 4-logs. These findings suggest potential concerns associated with plant and human enteric viruses for reuse events in this country. Local guidelines for assessment of treated water quality should take into consideration both infectious viral concentration and LRV.

  6. Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-12

    Polyxeni Potter, retired managing editor of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal, discusses the history of the journal and her new book, Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 2/12/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/13/2014.

  7. Infectious complications in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinosoglou, K S; Karkoulias, K; Marangos, M

    2013-01-01

    Infections remain a part of the natural course of cancer. During the course of their disease, patients with lung cancer frequently present with an infection that can ultimately be fatal. Pathogenesis of infectious syndromes is usually determined by the underlying disease, as well as, the iatrogenic manipulations that occur during its management. Hence, lung cancer infections include lower respiratory tract infections in the context of COPD, aspiration, obstruction and opportunistic infections due to immunosuppression. Moreover, treatment-related infectious syndromes including post operative pneumonia, febrile neutropenia and superimposed infection following radiation/chemotherapy toxicity is common. Importantly, diagnosis of infection in the febrile lung cancer patient is challenging and requires a high index of suspicion in order to distinguish from other causes of fever, including malignant disease and pulmonary embolism. Prompt initiation of treatment is pivotal to avoid increased mortality. Careful consideration of infection pathogenesis can predict most likely pathogens and guide antibiotic management, thus, ensuring most favourable outcome.

  8. Anti-Infectious Agents against MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Koyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinically useful antibiotics, β-lactams and vancomycin, are known to inhibit bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has a unique cell wall structure consisting of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid. In recent years, new anti-infectious agents (spirohexaline, tripropeptin C, DMPI, CDFI, cyslabdan, 1835F03, and BPH-652 targeting MRSA cell wall biosynthesis have been discovered using unique screening methods. These agents were found to inhibit important enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis such as undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UPP synthase, FemA, flippase, or UPP phosphatase. In this review, the discovery, the mechanism of action, and the future of these anti-infectious agents are described.

  9. [Medication in infectious acute diarrhea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cézard, J-P; Bellaiche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea in children remain still a frequent cause of morbidity. 50 % of them are due to rotavirus. Oral rehydration therapy and early realimentation have drastically reduced their mortality and morbidity. Beside oral or eventually IV rehydration therapy no medication has proven its efficacy based on the main HMO criteria (reduction of over 30 % of the stool output) except racecadotril and loperamide which is contre-indicated for the last one in children less than 2 years old. Other medications such as silicates or some probiotics have shown efficacy on diarrhea duration or stool consistency but not on stool output. They have so no formal indication in infectious diarrhea and should be considered as "comfort" treatment. Antibiotics, beside their indication in shigella, cholera and amibiasis could be used in invasive diarrhea in some debilating conditions or infants less than 3 months.

  10. Globalization, international law, and emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    The global nature of the threat posed by new and reemerging infectious diseases will require international cooperation in identifying, controlling, and preventing these diseases. Because of this need for international cooperation, international law will certainly play a role in the global strategy for the control of emerging diseases. Recognizing this fact, the World Health Organization has already proposed revising the International Health Regulations. This article examines some basic problems that the global campaign against emerging infectious diseases might face in applying international law to facilitate international cooperation. The international legal component of the global control strategy for these diseases needs careful attention because of problems inherent in international law, especially as it applies to emerging infections issues. PMID:8903206

  11. Infectious diseases in Greenlanders of Upernavik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1985-01-01

    of disease was similar in all age groups. Of these contacts 26% were caused by acute upper respiratory tract infections, 8% by other acute respiratory infections, 10% by chronic respiratory infections, 24% by non-traumatic skin infections, 7% by post-traumatic skin infections, 8% by sexually transmitted...... diseases, and 17% by other infections. Skin infections were most common in males, whereas all other infections were most common in females. The patterns of age specific contact rates were similar in males and females, except regarding "other infections". A peak of respiratory infections in July and of skin...... infections during winter was noted. The contact rate for all infectious diseases together was slightly higher than in Danish general practice, and infectious diseases also accounted for a larger proportion of all registered contacts. Contacts due to chronic respiratory infections, skin infections...

  12. Progress and Challenges in Infectious Disease Cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Moritz U G; Hay, Simon I; Pigott, David M; Smith, David L; Wint, G R William; Golding, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Quantitatively mapping the spatial distributions of infectious diseases is key to both investigating their epidemiology and identifying populations at risk of infection. Important advances in data quality and methodologies have allowed for better investigation of disease risk and its association with environmental factors. However, incorporating dynamic human behavioural processes in disease mapping remains challenging. For example, connectivity among human populations, a key driver of pathogen dispersal, has increased sharply over the past century, along with the availability of data derived from mobile phones and other dynamic data sources. Future work must be targeted towards the rapid updating and dissemination of appropriately designed disease maps to guide the public health community in reducing the global burden of infectious disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transgenic animals resistant to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, L

    2016-04-01

    The list of transgenic animals developed to test ways of producing livestock resistant to infectious disease continues to grow. Although the basic techniques for generating transgenic animals have not changed very much in the ten years since they were last reviewed for the World Organisation for Animal Health, one recent fundamental technological advance stands to revolutionise genome engineering. The advent of technically simple and efficient site-specific gene targeting has profound implications for genetically modifying livestock species.

  14. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF INFECTIOUS SALMON ANEMIA (ISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Østergaard, Peter

    The first outbreak of ISA on the Faroe Islands was diagnosed in March 2000. Despite intensive surveillance, control and eradication of ISA, the disease has since spread to most of the Faroe Islands affecting about half of the 23 aquaculture farms. Sampling and laboratory diagnosis of ISA is perfo...... characterisation of the virus causing infectious salmon anemia in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L): an orthomyxo-like virus in a teleost....

  15. Infectious diarrheas of infants and young children

    OpenAIRE

    Mata, Leonardo

    1985-01-01

    artículo -- Universidad de Costa Rica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud. 1985 Acute diarrhea' disease was once attributed to "indigestion." Although shigellosis, cholera, salmonellosis, giardiasis, and amebiasis have long been recognized as distinct clinical entities, it was not too long ago that many medical personnel had difficulty accepting the fact that most diarrheas are of infectious origin. The occurrence of diarrhea with the onset of weaning in many animal speci...

  16. Experimental production of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikman, J G; Allan, E M; Selman, I E

    1985-09-07

    The left eyes of 10 conventional dairy cross calves were inoculated with a pathogenic strain of Moraxella bovis and lesions of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis developed in nine of these eyes. M bovis was isolated from all inoculated eyes and lesions developed in five out of 10 eyes which had become naturally infected. The clinical and microbiological findings were similar to those described in field cases.

  17. Complete Isolation System for Laboratory Infectious Animal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean; Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Contents:Duringthe development of biological medical science,a great number of research experiments are carried out andthe various infectious animal experiments are necessary part of them.For lab animal experiments,it is necessary tochoose proper isolation equipments accordingto experiment hazardlevels.1.FunctionsAnimal isolation systemare used broadlyin laboratory research,pharmaceuticals and medical areas.The isolationsystemhas become excellent equipmentsin animal breeding,disease diagnosis,analysis,test ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  19. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Moestrup; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Understanding the underlying causes for the variation in case-fatality-ratios (CFR) is important for assessing the mechanism governing global disparity in the burden of infectious diseases. Variation in CFR is likely to be driven by factors such as population genetics...... to their biology. We suggest that the overall result reflects an interaction between the forces driving demographic change and the virulence of human-to-human transmitted diseases....

  20. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS (SANARELLI) IN PREGNANT RABBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunt, Douglas H.

    1932-01-01

    Pregnancy in rabbits alters the reactivity of the tissues to the virus of infectious myxomatosis. The livers of pregnant animals with the myxoma have a central acidophilic necrosis. Secondary lesions in the lungs are much more numerous and larger in the pregnant than in the non-gravid animals. In like manner the lesions in the spleen are more extensive in the pregnant rabbit. On the other hand the skin lesions of the pregnant animal are decreased in size. PMID:19870088

  1. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  3. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms.

  4. Infectious myocarditis (Clinic, diagnostics, principles of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Finogeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective myocarditis can be considered as a case of myocardial damage caused by different infectious agents. Traditionally discusses the questions of diagnostics and treatment infectious myocarditis. The paper has repeatedly stressed the difficulty of clinical diagnosis, and the laboriousness and economic costs of laboratory tests and additional researches. Endomyocardial biopsy findings remain the gold standard for unequivocally establishing the diagnosis. However, it is technically extremely invasive test and can be performed only in specialized cardiology centers. The paper analyzes in detail not only own materials, but also results of researches published in numerous domestic and foreign sources of literature. Publication of «Infectious myocarditis» is necessary due to the fact that patients with a diagnosis of «Myocarditis » account for 11% of all cardiovascular disease in the world. Article is timely and necessary for many professionals, senior students of medical universities.

  5. Electronic tools for infectious diseases and microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Steven D

    2007-11-01

    Electronic tools for infectious diseases and medical microbiology have the ability to change the way the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases are approached. Medical information today has the ability to be dynamic, keeping up with the latest research or clinical issues, instead of being static and years behind, as many textbooks are. The ability to rapidly disseminate information around the world opens up the possibility of communicating with people thousands of miles away to quickly and efficiently learn about emerging infections. Electronic tools have expanded beyond the desktop computer and the Internet, and now include personal digital assistants and other portable devices such as cellular phones. These pocket-sized devices have the ability to provide access to clinical information at the point of care. New electronic tools include e-mail listservs, electronic drug databases and search engines that allow focused clinical questions. The goal of the present article is to provide an overview of how electronic tools can impact infectious diseases and microbiology, while providing links and resources to allow users to maximize their efficiency in accessing this information. Links to the mentioned Web sites and programs are provided along with other useful electronic tools.

  6. Epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Marjorie

    2010-04-01

    The Homeland Security News Wire has been reporting on new ways to fight epidemics using digital tools such as iPhone, social networks, Wikipedia, and other Internet sites. Instant two-way communication now gives consumers the ability to complement official reports on emerging infectious diseases from health authorities. However, there is increasing concern that these communications networks could open the door to mass panic from unreliable or false reports. There is thus an urgent need to ensure that epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases gives health authorities the capability to identify, analyze, and report disease outbreaks in as timely and efficient a manner as possible. One of the dilemmas in the global dissemination of information on infectious diseases is the possibility that information overload will create inefficiencies as the volume of Internet-based surveillance information increases. What is needed is a filtering mechanism that will retrieve relevant information for further analysis by epidemiologists, laboratories, and other health organizations so they are not overwhelmed with irrelevant information and will be able to respond quickly. This paper introduces a self-organizing ontology that could be used as a filtering mechanism to increase relevance and allow rapid analysis of disease outbreaks as they evolve in real time.

  7. "Nanoantibiotics": a new paradigm for treating infectious diseases using nanomaterials in the antibiotics resistant era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Ae Jung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-12-10

    Despite the fact that we live in an era of advanced and innovative technologies for elucidating underlying mechanisms of diseases and molecularly designing new drugs, infectious diseases continue to be one of the greatest health challenges worldwide. The main drawbacks for conventional antimicrobial agents are the development of multiple drug resistance and adverse side effects. Drug resistance enforces high dose administration of antibiotics, often generating intolerable toxicity, development of new antibiotics, and requests for significant economic, labor, and time investments. Recently, nontraditional antibiotic agents have been of tremendous interest in overcoming resistance that is developed by several pathogenic microorganisms against most of the commonly used antibiotics. Especially, several classes of antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) and nanosized carriers for antibiotics delivery have proven their effectiveness for treating infectious diseases, including antibiotics resistant ones, in vitro as well as in animal models. This review summarizes emerging efforts in combating against infectious diseases, particularly using antimicrobial NPs and antibiotics delivery systems as new tools to tackle the current challenges in treating infectious diseases.

  8. Molecular diagnosis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James R.; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    The fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), cause extensive losses among salmon and trout in several areas of the world (Bootland and Leong, 1999; Smail, 1999; Wolf, 1988). Historically, IHNV was endemic among wild anadromous salmonids in the western portion of North America, but the virus has spread to stocks of cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the United States, Asia and Western Europe, probably as a result of the movement of infected fish or eggs (Winton, 1991). Prior to 1989, VHSV was thought to be largely restricted to freshwater fishes in Western Europe (Wolf, 1988); however, in the last decade, VHSV has been isolated from an increasing number of free-living marine fish species in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans (Dixon et al., 1997; Dixon, 1999; Kent et al., 1998; Meyers and Winton, 1995; Meyers et al., 1999; Mortensen et al., 1999; Smail; 2000, Takano et al., 2000). These findings have lead to the conclusion that both viruses are principally endemic among marine or anadromous fish species, but have established themselves in freshwater among cultured salmonids where their effects are most frequently observed.

  9. Recommended Curriculum for Training in Pediatric Transplant Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Allen, Upton; Englund, Janet; Herold, Betsy; Hoffman, Jill; Green, Michael; Gantt, Soren; Kumar, Deepali; Michaels, Marian G

    2015-03-01

    A working group representing the American Society of Transplantation, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and International Pediatric Transplant Association has developed a collaborative effort to identify and develop core knowledge in pediatric transplant infectious diseases. Guidance for patient care environments for training and core competencies is included to help facilitate training directed at improving the experience for pediatric infectious diseases trainees and practitioners in the area of pediatric transplant infectious diseases. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Efficacy of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J for the treatment of dairy calves with experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Mélanie J; Mani, Rinosh; Breshears, Melanie A; Gilmour, Margi; Taylor, Jared D; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the efficacy of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J for the treatment of calves with experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). ANIMALS 12 healthy dairy calves. PROCEDURES For each calf, a grid keratotomy was performed on both eyes immediately before inoculation with Moraxella bovis hemolytic strain Epp63-300 (n = 11 calves) or nonhemolytic strain 12040577 (1 calf). For each calf inoculated with M bovis Epp63-300, the eyes were randomly assigned to receive an artificial tear solution with (treatment group) or without (control group) lyophilized B bacteriovorus 109J. Six doses of the assigned treatment (0.2 mL/eye, topically, q 48 h) were administered to each eye. On nontreatment days, eyes were assessed and corneal swab specimens and tear samples were collected for bacterial culture. Calves were euthanized 12 days after M bovis inoculation. The eyes were harvested for gross and histologic evaluation and bacterial culture. RESULTS The calf inoculated with M bovis 12040577 did not develop corneal ulcers. Of the 22 eyes inoculated with M bovis Epp63-300, 18 developed corneal ulcers consistent with IBK within 48 hours after inoculation; 4 of those eyes developed secondary corneal ulcers that were not consistent with IBK. Corneal ulcer size and severity and the time required for ulcer healing did not differ between the treatment and control groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that B bacteriovorus 109J was not effective for the treatment of IBK; however, the experimental model used produced lesions that did not completely mimic naturally occurring IBK.

  11. Rescue of infectious birnavirus from recombinant ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy M Dalton

    Full Text Available Birnaviruses are unconventional members of the icosahedral double-stranded (dsRNA RNA virus group. The main differential birnavirus trait is the lack of the inner icosahedral transcriptional core, a ubiquitous structure conserved in all other icosahedral dsRNA viruses, that shelters the genome from cellular dsRNA sensors and provide the enzymatic machinery to produce and extrude mature messenger RNAs. In contrast, birnaviral particles enclose ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes formed by the genome segments, the dsRNA-binding VP3 polypeptide and the virus-encoded RNA polymerase (RdRp. The presence of RNPs suggests that the birnavirus replication program might exhibit significant differences with respect to those of prototypal dsRNA viruses. However, experimental evidences supporting this hypothesis are as yet scarce. Of particular relevance for the understanding of birnavirus replication is to determine whether RNPs act as intracellular capsid-independent transcriptional units. Our study was focused to answer this question using the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV, the best characterized birnavirus, as model virus. Here, we describe the intracellular assembly of functional IBDV RNPs in the absence of the virus-encoded VP2 capsid polypeptide. Recombinant RNPs are generated upon coexpression of the IBDV VP1 and RdRp polypeptides and transfection of purified virus dsRNA. Presented data show that recombinant RNPs direct the expression of the IBDV polypeptide repertoire and the production of infectious virus in culture cells. Results described in this report constitute the first direct experimental evidence showing that birnaviral RNPs are intracellularly active in the absence of the virus capsid. This finding is consistent with presented data indicating that RNP formation precedes virus assembly in IBDV-infected cells, and supports the recently proposed IBDV replication model entailing the release of RNPs during the initial stages of the

  12. Rapid detection of infectious rotavirus group A using a molecular beacon assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Jéssica Wildgrube; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari

    2016-08-01

    Rapid, sensitive and specific methods are necessary to detect and quantify infectious viruses. Cultivating and detecting enteric viruses in cell culture are difficult, thus impairing the advancement of knowledge regarding virus-induced diarrhea. Rotavirus (RV) detection has been conducted by serological or molecular biology methods, which do not provide information regarding viral infectivity. Molecular beacons (MBs) have demonstrated efficacy for viral detection in cell culture. We propose a MB assay to detect human rotavirus group A (HuRVA) in cell culture. MA104 cells were mock-infected or infected with HuRVA strains (RotaTeq(®) vaccine and K8 strains), and a specific MB for the HuRVA VP6 gene was used for virus detection. Mock-infected cells showed basal fluorescence, while infected cells exhibited increased fluorescence emission. MB hybridization to the viral mRNA target of HuRVA was confirmed. Fluorescence increased according to the increase in the number of infectious viral particles per cell (MOI 0.5-MOI 1). This technique provides quick and efficient HuRVA detection in cell culture without a need for viral culture for several days or many times until cytopathic effects are visualized. This methodology could be applied in the selection of samples for developing RV vaccines.

  13. Creating a global dialogue on infectious disease surveillance: connecting organizations for regional disease surveillance (CORDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Louise S; Smolinski, Mark S; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Kimball, Ann Marie; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    2013-01-01

    Connecting Organizations for Regional Disease Surveillance (CORDS) is an international non-governmental organization focused on information exchange between disease surveillance networks in different areas of the world. By linking regional disease surveillance networks, CORDS builds a trust-based social fabric of experts who share best practices, surveillance tools and strategies, training courses, and innovations. CORDS exemplifies the shifting patterns of international collaboration needed to prevent, detect, and counter all types of biological dangers - not just naturally occurring infectious diseases, but also terrorist threats. Representing a network-of-networks approach, the mission of CORDS is to link regional disease surveillance networks to improve global capacity to respond to infectious diseases. CORDS is an informal governance cooperative with six founding regional disease surveillance networks, with plans to expand; it works in complement and cooperatively with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and the Food and Animal Organization of the United Nations (FAO). As described in detail elsewhere in this special issue of Emerging Health Threats, each regional network is an alliance of a small number of neighboring countries working across national borders to tackle emerging infectious diseases that require unified regional efforts. Here we describe the history, culture and commitment of CORDS; and the novel and necessary role that CORDS serves in the existing international infectious disease surveillance framework.

  14. Quantification of infectious HIV-1 plasma viral load using a boosted in vitro infection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusert, Peter; Fischer, Marek; Joos, Beda; Leemann, Christine; Kuster, Herbert; Flepp, Markus; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra

    2004-08-15

    Methods currently used for HIV-1 viral load measurements are very sensitive, but cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious particles. Here we describe the development of a novel, sensitive, and highly reproducible method that allows rapid isolation and quantification of infectious particles from patient plasma. By immobilizing HIV-1 particles in human plasma to platelets using polybrene, we observed a 10- to 1000-fold increase in infectivity over infection protocols using free virus particles. Using this method, we evaluated infectivity in plasma from 52 patients at various disease stages. At plasma viral loads of 1000-10000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml 18%, at 10,000-50,000 copies/ml 73%, at 50,000-100,000 copies/ml 90%, and above 100,000 copies 96% of cultures were positive. We found that infectious titers among patients vary distinctively but are characteristic for a patient over extended time periods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that by evaluating infectious titers in conjunction with total HIV RNA loads, subtle effects of treatment intervention on viremia levels can be detected. The immobilization procedure does not interfere with viral entry and does not restore the infectivity of neutralized virus. Therefore, this assay system can be utilized to investigate the influence of substances that specifically affect virion infectivity such as neutralizing antibodies, soluble CD4, or protease inhibitors. Measuring viral infectivity may thereby function as an additional, useful marker in monitoring disease progression and evaluating efficacy of antivirals in vivo.

  15. Impact of NOD2 polymorphisms on infectious complications following chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomade, Olaposi; Spies-Weisshart, Bärbel; Glaser, Anita; Schnetzke, Ulf; Hochhaus, Andreas; Scholl, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    We sought to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the NOD2 gene and infectious complications following intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We hypothesised that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NOD2 gene are associated with a higher rate of infections during the phase of severe neutropenia. In 131 AML patients receiving induction therapy, the presence of the three most frequent polymorphisms of NOD2 (Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, Leu1007fsinsC) was analysed. SNP analyses by means of genomic PCR incorporating fluorescence-labelled probes with characteristic melting curves were performed using the LightCycler platform. Our data suggest a significantly lower probability of mucositis or enteritis in AML patients lacking any of the three evaluated NOD2 polymorphisms. Furthermore, bloodstream cultures of AML patients carrying either a missense or a frameshift mutation of NOD2 were significantly more frequently tested positive concerning Streptococcus spp. In contrast, the presence of NOD2 polymorphisms had no impact on such important infectious complications as systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis, the rate of central venous catheter infections or the incidence of pneumonia including fungal infections. Our data represent one of the first reports investigating the impact of polymorphisms of the innate immune system on infectious complications in patients with neutropenia following chemotherapy. A correlation between NOD2 polymorphisms and infectious events in AML patients is demonstrated.

  16. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  17. Creating a Global Dialogue on Infectious Disease Surveillance: Connecting Organizations for Regional Disease Surveillance (CORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise S. Gresham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting Organizations for Regional Disease Surveillance (CORDS is an international non-governmental organization focused on information exchange between disease surveillance networks in different areas of the world. By linking regional disease surveillance networks, CORDS builds a trust-based social fabric of experts who share best practices, surveillance tools and strategies, training courses, and innovations. CORDS exemplifies the shifting patterns of international collaboration needed to prevent, detect, and counter all types of biological dangers – not just naturally occurring infectious diseases, but also terrorist threats. Representing a network-of-networks approach, the mission of CORDS is to link regional disease surveillance networks to improve global capacity to respond to infectious diseases. CORDS is an informal governance cooperative with six founding regional disease surveillance networks, with plans to expand; it works in complement and cooperatively with the World Health Organization (WHO, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE, and the Food and Animal Organization of the United Nations (FAO. As described in detail elsewhere in this special issue of Emerging Health Threats, each regional network is an alliance of a small number of neighboring countries working across national borders to tackle emerging infectious diseases that require unified regional efforts. Here we describe the history, culture and commitment of CORDS; and the novel and necessary role that CORDS serves in the existing international infectious disease surveillance framework.

  18. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Harmless and Pathogenic Strains of Infectious Microalgae, Prototheca spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) spp are associated with rare algal infections of invertebrates termed protothecosis. Among the seven generally accepted species, P. zopfii genotype 2 (GT2) is associated with a severe form of bovine mastitis while P. blaschkeae causes the mild and sub-clinical form of mastitis. The reason behind the infectious nature of P. zopfii GT2, while genotype 1 (GT1) remains non-infectious, is not known. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the protein expression level difference between the genotypes of P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae. Cells were cultured to the mid-exponential phase, harvested, and processed for LC-MS analysis. Peptide data was acquired on an LTQ Orbitrap Velos, raw spectra were quantitatively analyzed with MaxQuant software and matching with the reference database of Chlorella variabilis and Auxenochlorella protothecoides resulted in the identification of 226 proteins. Comparison of an environmental strain with infectious strains resulted in the identification of 51 differentially expressed proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism, energy production and protein translation. The expression level of Hsp70 proteins and their role in the infectious process is worth further investigation. All mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005305. PMID:28036087

  19. Strengthening health security at the Hajj mass gatherings: characteristics of the infectious diseases surveillance systems operational during the 2015 Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Badriah M; Yezli, Saber; Bin Saeed, Abdul-Aziz A; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Alawam, Amnah H; Bieh, Kingsley L

    2017-05-01

    Hajj is one of the largest and the most ethnically and culturally diverse mass gatherings worldwide. The use of appropriate surveillance systems ensures timely information management for effective planning and response to infectious diseases threats during the pilgrimage. The literature describes infectious diseases prevention and control strategies for Hajj but with limited information on the operations and characteristics of the existing Hajj infectious diseases surveillance systems. We reviewed documents, including guidelines and reports from the Saudi Ministry of Health's database, to describe the characteristics of the infectious diseases surveillance systems that were operational during the 2015 Hajj, highlighting best practices and gaps and proposing strategies for strengthening and improvement. Using Pubmed and Embase online search engines and a combination of search terms including, 'mass gatherings' 'Olympics' 'surveillance' 'Hajj' 'health security', we explored the existing literature and highlighted some lessons learnt from other international mass gatherings. A regular indicator-based infectious disease surveillance system generates routine reports from health facilities within the Kingdom to the regional and central public health directorates all year round. During Hajj, enhanced indicator-based notifiable diseases surveillance systems complement the existing surveillance tool to ensure timely reporting of event information for appropriate action by public health officials. There is need to integrate the existing Hajj surveillance data management systems and to implement syndromic surveillance as an early warning system for infectious disease control during Hajj. International engagement is important to strengthen Hajj infectious diseases surveillance and to prevent disease transmission and globalization of infectious agents which could undermine global health security.

  20. Resposta de eixos embrionários de cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum. à concentração de sais, doses de sacarose e renovação do meio de cultivo Response of cupuassu embryonic axes (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum. to salts concentration, sucrose doses and culture medium renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA DAS GRAÇAS RODRIGUES FERREIRA

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os efeitos da concentração de sais, doses de sacarose e freqüência de renovação do meio de cultura para o desenvolvimento de eixos embrionários de cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum.. Testaram-se 2 concentrações de sais MS (100 e 50%, 2 níveis de sacarose (1,5 e 3% e 3 freqüências de renovação dos meios (sem renovação, renovação aos 30 e aos 60 dias, com os meios acrescidos de ANA (0,5 mg/L e BAP (0,3 mg/L., semi-solidificados com ágar 0,7% e pH 5,7. Observou-se que a utilização do meio MS na concentração de sais completa, com a adição de 3% de sacarose e renovações do meio em intervalos de 30 dias, apresentou melhor desenvolvimento dos eixos embrionários.The effects of concentration of salts and sucrose and culture medium renewal frequency on cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum Schum. embryonic axes development were studied. Two salts concentrations of MS (100 and 50%, two sucrose levels (1.5 and 3% and three explants subcultives (without medium renewal, renewal at 30 and 60 days were tested, with NAA (0.5 mg/L and BAP (0.3 mg/L in the MS medium. The use of MS at full concentration, with addition of 3% of sucrose, and renewals of the medium at 30 day intervals promoted better cupuassu embryonic axes development.

  1. Clinical and microbiological study of paediatric infectious keratitis in South India: a 3-year study (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruljyothi, Lokeshwari; Radhakrishnan, Naveen; Prajna, Venkatesh N; Lalitha, Prajna

    2016-12-01

    To study the risk factors, microbiological profile and clinical outcomes of infectious keratitis affecting paediatric patients. Retrospective case series. Review of case records of paediatric patients (0-16 years) diagnosed with infectious keratitis who presented to Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India during January 2011 to December 2013. Demographic details, predisposing factors, microbiological investigations, clinical course and visual outcome were analysed. In this time period, 240 eyes of 234 children had a diagnosis of infectious keratitis. One hundred and twenty-five (53.4%) children had a history of trauma. Smears were obtained in 220 eyes, while culture was performed in 191 eyes. The culture results were positive in 142 (74.3%) eyes. Fungi was the most common infectious agent isolated in culture (54.2%) followed by bacteria (40.8%) and acanthamoeba (2.1%). Successful healing of the keratitis with appropriate medical therapy occurred in 223 (92.9%) eyes, while 17 (7.1%) eyes required therapeutic keratoplasty. Of the 151 patients with preliminary and final visual acuity, vision improved by 2 lines in 68 eyes (45%), stayed the same in 75 eyes (49.6%) and worsened in 8 eyes (5.3%). Contrary to previous reports, fungi are the most common aetiological organism in the causation of infectious keratitis in children in our study population. Fusarium was the most common fungal species isolated. These data are similar to the data obtained from adult patients with infectious keratitis in this region. While microbiological investigations are important to initiate appropriate antimicrobial therapy, the findings from our study need to be kept in mind, especially while initiating empirical therapy in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Effectiveness of two commercial infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P C; Blankenship, T; Hoover, T R; Powe, T; Wright, J C

    1990-07-01

    Two commercially available infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) vaccines were evaluated for their effectiveness in protecting cattle from disease caused by experimental challenge exposure and natural transmission of Moraxella bovis infections. The study was conducted as 2 experiments, using a total of 81 cattle that were culture-negative for M bovis prior to vaccination. In each experiment, young adult cattle were randomly allotted to 4 groups. Each calf in groups 1 and 2 was vaccinated according to the vaccine manufacturer's directions. Groups 3 and 4 were unvaccinated controls. Three weeks after the last vaccination, each calf in groups 1 and 3 was experimentally challenge exposed by dropping a suspension of viable cells of a virulent strain of M bovis directly onto the corneal surface of each eye. Calves in all 4 groups were then commingled in open pastures so that calves in groups 2 and 4 could be naturally exposed to the calves with experimentally induced infections. Each calf was examined for signs of ocular disease on a regular basis by 2 experienced clinicians who scored each eye for severity of disease on the basis of a prearranged scale. Neither clinician was aware of the vaccination or exposure status of the calf nor to which experimental group they belonged. Lacrimal secretions were collected regularly to determine the number of eyes in which the virulent organism became established. Moraxella bovis with bacterial cultural characteristics similar to those of the virulent strain placed in the eyes of groups 1 and 3 was cultured from greater than or equal to 83% of the eyes of calves in all groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. How to make epidemiological training infectious.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve E Bellan

    Full Text Available Modern infectious disease epidemiology builds on two independently developed fields: classical epidemiology and dynamical epidemiology. Over the past decade, integration of the two fields has increased in research practice, but training options within the fields remain distinct with few opportunities for integration in the classroom. The annual Clinic on the Meaningful Modeling of Epidemiological Data (MMED at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences has begun to address this gap. MMED offers participants exposure to a broad range of concepts and techniques from both epidemiological traditions. During MMED 2010 we developed a pedagogical approach that bridges the traditional distinction between classical and dynamical epidemiology and can be used at multiple educational levels, from high school to graduate level courses. The approach is hands-on, consisting of a real-time simulation of a stochastic outbreak in course participants, including realistic data reporting, followed by a variety of mathematical and statistical analyses, stemming from both epidemiological traditions. During the exercise, dynamical epidemiologists developed empirical skills such as study design and learned concepts of bias while classical epidemiologists were trained in systems thinking and began to understand epidemics as dynamic nonlinear processes. We believe this type of integrated educational tool will prove extremely valuable in the training of future infectious disease epidemiologists. We also believe that such interdisciplinary training will be critical for local capacity building in analytical epidemiology as Africa continues to produce new cohorts of well-trained mathematicians, statisticians, and scientists. And because the lessons draw on skills and concepts from many fields in biology--from pathogen biology, evolutionary dynamics of host--pathogen interactions, and the ecology of infectious disease to bioinformatics, computational biology, and

  4. How to make epidemiological training infectious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Steve E; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Scott, James C; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Modern infectious disease epidemiology builds on two independently developed fields: classical epidemiology and dynamical epidemiology. Over the past decade, integration of the two fields has increased in research practice, but training options within the fields remain distinct with few opportunities for integration in the classroom. The annual Clinic on the Meaningful Modeling of Epidemiological Data (MMED) at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences has begun to address this gap. MMED offers participants exposure to a broad range of concepts and techniques from both epidemiological traditions. During MMED 2010 we developed a pedagogical approach that bridges the traditional distinction between classical and dynamical epidemiology and can be used at multiple educational levels, from high school to graduate level courses. The approach is hands-on, consisting of a real-time simulation of a stochastic outbreak in course participants, including realistic data reporting, followed by a variety of mathematical and statistical analyses, stemming from both epidemiological traditions. During the exercise, dynamical epidemiologists developed empirical skills such as study design and learned concepts of bias while classical epidemiologists were trained in systems thinking and began to understand epidemics as dynamic nonlinear processes. We believe this type of integrated educational tool will prove extremely valuable in the training of future infectious disease epidemiologists. We also believe that such interdisciplinary training will be critical for local capacity building in analytical epidemiology as Africa continues to produce new cohorts of well-trained mathematicians, statisticians, and scientists. And because the lessons draw on skills and concepts from many fields in biology--from pathogen biology, evolutionary dynamics of host--pathogen interactions, and the ecology of infectious disease to bioinformatics, computational biology, and statistics--this exercise

  5. Protect Patients by Using Single- and Multi-Dose Vials Correctly

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-10

    CDC’s One & Only Campaign urges healthcare providers to recognize the differences between single-dose and multi-dose vials, and to understand appropriate use of each container type.  Created: 7/10/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/10/2014.

  6. Carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, L

    1984-02-01

    Presently available data continue to support the idea that once a horse is infected with equine infectious anemia virus it remains infected indefinitely. Infection may not always be demonstrated by inoculation of plasma, serum, or whole blood transfusions into susceptible recipients, but transfusions of fresh whole blood will be infective in at least 95% of the horses testing positive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test. For detection of infectivity in a small percentage of inapparent carriers, it appears necessary to inoculate washed leukocytes collected over a period of time.

  7. Infectious diseases in Greenlanders of Upernavik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, P

    1985-01-01

    During one year, 1979-80, all the contacts between the 836 inhabitants of Upernavik town and the local medical officers were recorded. In the 737 native Greenlanders 1006 contacts (41%) were caused by infectious diseases, representing 705 episodes of disease. The number of contacts per episode...... of disease was similar in all age groups. Of these contacts 26% were caused by acute upper respiratory tract infections, 8% by other acute respiratory infections, 10% by chronic respiratory infections, 24% by non-traumatic skin infections, 7% by post-traumatic skin infections, 8% by sexually transmitted...... and sexually transmitted diseases were notably more frequent in Upernavik....

  8. Accelerated vaccine development against emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Pierre R; Yuan, Jianping; Brauns, Tim; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; Poznansky, Mark C

    2012-07-01

    Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases represent a major challenge to vaccine development since it involves two seemingly contradictory requirements. Rapid and flexible vaccine generation while using technologies and processes that can facilitate accelerated regulatory review. Development in the "-omics" in combination with advances in vaccinology offer novel opportunities to meet these requirements. Here we describe how a consortium of five different organizations from academia and industry is addressing these challenges. This novel approach has the potential to become the new standard in vaccine development allowing timely deployment to avert potential pandemics.

  9. Maintaining occupational dose ALARA through work management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A. H. [Darlington Nuclear Generating Division, Ontario Hydro (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Canadian philosophy in keeping occupational dose ALARA has been to train staff in radiation safety so that they can be fully responsible for participating in minimizing the risks associated with the hazardous work. Senior managers actively promote high standards of performance in dose reduction techniques as a means for integrating ALARA into the operation and maintenance of the station by all personnel. Minimizing radiation dose is accomplished by applying cost effective work management techniques such as Job Safety Analysis, pre-job briefings and establishing and achieving radiation dose goals. Radiation dose goals are used as a management tool for involving all work groups in reducing doses as well as providing a means of assessing the effectiveness of dose reduction actions. ALARA, along with conventional safety, is used as a lever to raise the standard of quality of work and to overall build a safety culture. (author). 4 figs.

  10. Equine infectious anemia and equine infectious anemia virus in 2013: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Issel, C J

    2013-11-29

    A detailed description of equine infectious anemia virus and host responses to it are presented. Current control and eradication of the infection are discussed with suggestions for improvements to increase their effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles.

    Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  12. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  13. The infectious etiology of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochocka, Marta; Zwolińska, Katarzyna; Leszek, Jerzy

    2017-03-13

    Inflammation is a part of the first line of defense of the body against invasive pathogens, and plays a crucial role in tissue regeneration and repair. A proper inflammatory response ensures the suitable resolution of inflammation and elimination of harmful stimuli, but when the inflammatory reactions are inappropriate it can lead to damage of the surrounding normal cells. The relationship between infections and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) etiology, especially late-onset AD (LOAD) has been continuously debated over the past three decades. It is suggested that chronic viral, bacterial and fungal infections might be causative factors for the inflammatory pathway for AD. Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis of the role of neurotropic viruses from the Herpesviridae family, especially Human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Human herpesvirus 2 (HHV-2), in AD neuropathology. Recent investigations also indicate the association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and dementia. Among bacteria special attention is focused on spirochetes family and on periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola that could cause chronic periodontitis and possibly contribute to the clinical onset of AD. This review discusses whether infections could be a causative factor that promotes the progression of AD and summarizes recent investigations associating infectious agents and chronic inflammation with AD. Preventive and therapeutic approaches to AD in the context of an infectious etiology of the disease are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Global climate change and infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Timeliness of notification in infectious disease cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, A; Coll, J J; Fuentes, M; Salleras, L

    1992-01-01

    Records of notification in cases of eight infectious diseases in the "Servei Territorial de Salut Publica" of the Province of Barcelona, Spain, between 1982 and 1986 were reviewed. Time from onset of symptoms to notification, time from notification to completion of data collection, and time from onset to completion of the case investigation were analyzed. For the period from onset to notification, the shortest mean was registered for meningococcal infection (6.31 days) and the longest was for pulmonary tuberculosis (54.79 days). For time from notification to complete investigation, the shortest value was for pulmonary tuberculosis (12.20 days) and the longest for rickettsioses (35.79 days). Time from onset to completion of data collection was 22.87 days for meningococcal infection and 72.34 days for tuberculosis of other organs (probably because of the long period of time that elapses between the onset of the first symptoms and notification). It would appear that both physicians and the general population must be educated so that lay-men can identify early signs and symptoms of disease and physicians can realize that statutory notification of infectious diseases is strongly linked to community health care.

  16. Tackling feline infectious peritonitis via reverse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Volker; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Tekes, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is caused by feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) and represents one of the most important lethal infectious diseases of cats. To date, there is no efficacious prevention and treatment, and our limited knowledge on FIP pathogenesis is mainly based on analysis of experiments with field isolates. In a recent study, we reported a promising approach to study FIP pathogenesis using reverse genetics. We generated a set of recombinant FCoVs and investigated their pathogenicity in vivo. The set included the type I FCoV strain Black, a type I FCoV strain Black with restored accessory gene 7b, two chimeric type I/type II FCoVs and the highly pathogenic type II FCoV strain 79-1146. All recombinant FCoVs and the reference strain isolates were found to establish productive infections in cats. While none of the type I FCoVs and chimeric FCoVs induced FIP, the recombinant type II FCoV strain 79-1146 was as pathogenic as the parental isolate. Interestingly, an intact ORF 3c was confirmed to be restored in all viruses (re)isolated from FIP-diseased animals.

  17. Feline infectious peritonitis: still an enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipar, A; Meli, M L

    2014-03-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats, the pathogenesis of which has not yet been fully revealed. The present review focuses on the biology of feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection and the pathogenesis and pathological features of FIP. Recent studies have revealed functions of many viral proteins, differing receptor specificity for type I and type II FCoV, and genomic differences between feline enteric coronaviruses (FECVs) and FIP viruses (FIPVs). FECV and FIP also exhibit functional differences, since FECVs replicate mainly in intestinal epithelium and are shed in feces, and FIPVs replicate efficiently in monocytes and induce systemic disease. Thus, key events in the pathogenesis of FIP are systemic infection with FIPV, effective and sustainable viral replication in monocytes, and activation of infected monocytes. The host's genetics and immune system also play important roles. It is the activation of monocytes and macrophages that directly leads to the pathologic features of FIP, including vasculitis, body cavity effusions, and fibrinous and granulomatous inflammatory lesions. Advances have been made in the clinical diagnosis of FIP, based on the clinical pathologic findings, serologic testing, and detection of virus using molecular (polymerase chain reaction) or antibody-based methods. Nevertheless, the clinical diagnosis remains challenging in particular in the dry form of FIP, which is partly due to the incomplete understanding of infection biology and pathogenesis in FIP. So, while much progress has been made, many aspects of FIP pathogenesis still remain an enigma.

  18. Feline Coronaviruses: Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, G; Thiel, H-J

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) belongs to the few animal virus diseases in which, in the course of a generally harmless persistent infection, a virus acquires a small number of mutations that fundamentally change its pathogenicity, invariably resulting in a fatal outcome. The causative agent of this deadly disease, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), arises from feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). The review summarizes our current knowledge of the genome and proteome of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs), focusing on the viral surface (spike) protein S and the five accessory proteins. We also review the current classification of FCoVs into distinct serotypes and biotypes, cellular receptors of FCoVs and their presumed role in viral virulence, and discuss other aspects of FIPV-induced pathogenesis. Our current knowledge of genetic differences between FECVs and FIPVs has been mainly based on comparative sequence analyses that revealed "discriminatory" mutations that are present in FIPVs but not in FECVs. Most of these mutations result in amino acid substitutions in the S protein and these may have a critical role in the switch from FECV to FIPV. In most cases, the precise roles of these mutations in the molecular pathogenesis of FIP have not been tested experimentally in the natural host, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools including genetically engineered virus mutants. We discuss the recent progress in the development of FCoV reverse genetics systems suitable to generate recombinant field viruses containing appropriate mutations for in vivo studies.

  19. Macrolides: A Canadian Infectious Disease Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S McKenna

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of erythromycin in 1965, no new compounds from the macrolide antimicrobial class were licensed in Canada until the 1990s. Clarithromycin and azithromycin, since their introduction, have become important agents for treating a number of common and uncommon infectious diseases. They have become prime agents in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, and have revolutionized the management of both genital chlamydial infections, by the use of single-dose therapy with azithromycin, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, by the use of clarithromycin. The improvement of clarithromycin and azithromycin over the gastrointestinal intolerability of erythromycin has led to supplanting the use of the latter for many primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the use of these agents has also increased the likelihood for misuse and has raised concerns about a resultant increase in the rates of macrolide resistance in many important pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This paper reviews the pharmacology and evidence for the current indications for use of these newer agents, and provides recommendations for appropriate use.

  20. Pathogenicity and immunogenicity local isolat infectious laryngo tracheitis virus

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    Risa Indriani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute and contagious respiratory diseases of chicken. The virus is Gallid herpes and belong to family herpesviridae. Two local strains of ILT virus those were BGR-6 and BKS-3 were isolated and their pathogenicity and immunogenicity were further observed after five time pareses on coris allantoic of specific pathogenic free embryonated eggs. The pathogenicity of both isolates to be possible for use as seed vaccine were detected based on pathogenicity indices and antibody response. Experimental specific pathogenic free chicken in isolator cages were infected by the isolates using103EID50. ILT virus per dose. Clinical syndromes, pathological anatomic lesions, and immunological response were observed in the infected chickens and another group at uninfected chickens as a control. Results showed that either BGR-6 or BKS-3 caused clinical signs with ITPI scores of 0,05 and 0,03 respectively and there were no mortality of infected chickens. The top antibody responces of BGR-6 and BKS-3 were observed at OD 0.90 and 0.44 respectively. It can be concluded that BGR-6 and BBS-3 had low ITPI scores, but BGR-6 gave higher antibody response and can be used as a candidate for seed vaccine.

  1. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  2. Neonatal Tetanus, Yet Not Gone: Infectious Disease Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amimul Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although neonatal tetanus (NT has been declared eliminated from Bangladesh in June 2008, it is not uncommon in Infectious Disease Hospital (IDH in Dhaka. There are various presentations of NT cases and treatment practices also vary. Objective: This study was conducted to describe our experiences with NT at IDH outlining the clinical characteristics, maternal immunization and treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: Thirty neonates admitted with tetanus in IDH from March 2011 to December 2012 were observed prospectively to study risk factors, clinical features and outcomes during hospital stay. Results: Among 30 neonates with tetanus 80% were male. Eighty seven percent of these cases were delivered at home and 83% of mothers did not receive any dose of tetanus toxoid (TT. Fifty percent of the neonates were admitted within 3–5 days of age. Shidur (Vermillion was applied to the cord stump in 23% neonates. Hot soak was applied to the umbilicus in 5 (17% neonates. Presenting features were convulsion and/or stiffness or rigidity (93%, inability to suck (90% and umbilical infection (70%. During hospital care multiple cardiac arrests developed in 86% neonates and apnea developed in 60% of the neonates. Treatment was given in pediatric ward. Case fatality rate was 50%. Conclusion: Risk factors observed in NT cases were maternal non-immunization, unhygienic delivery practices and application of substances in the umbilicus. Antenatal TT administration and universal immunization under school health program should be more emphasized to prevent NT.

  3. Procalcitonin for the differential diagnosis of infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Zhou, Jianxin; Haraguchi, Go; Arai, Hirokuni; Mitaka, Chieko

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the value of procalcitonin (PCT) for the differential diagnosis between infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after cardiac surgery. Patients diagnosed with SIRS after cardiac surgery between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2013 were retrospectively studied. A total of 142 patients with SIRS, infectious (n = 47) or non-infectious (n = 95), were included. The patients with infectious SIRS included 11 with sepsis, 12 with severe sepsis without shock, and 24 with septic shock. PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP), and the white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly higher in the infectious SIRS group than in the non-infectious SIRS group. PCT had the highest sensitivity and specificity for differential diagnosis, with a cut-off value for infectious SIRS of 0.47 ng/mL. PCT was more reliable than CRP in diagnosing severe sepsis without shock, but it was not useful for diagnosing septic shock. The PCT cut-off value for diagnosing severe sepsis without shock was 2.28 ng/mL. PCT was a useful marker for the diagnosis of infectious SIRS after cardiac surgery. The optimal PCT cut-off value for diagnosing infectious SIRS was 0.47 ng/mL.

  4. Electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor for point-of-care serodiagnosis of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, María E; Melli, Luciano J; Roberti, Mariano; Mass, Mijal; Longinotti, Gloria; Tropea, Salvador; Lloret, Paulina; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Salomón, Francisco; Lloret, Matías; Caillava, Ana J; Restuccia, Sabrina; Altcheh, Jaime; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Malatto, Laura; Ugalde, Juan E; Fraigi, Liliana; Moina, Carlos; Ybarra, Gabriel; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-06-15

    Access to appropriate diagnostic tools is an essential component in the evaluation and improvement of global health. Additionally, timely detection of infectious agents is critical in early diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Conventional pathogen detection methods such as culturing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) require long assay times, and complex and expensive instruments making them not adaptable to point-of-care (PoC) needs at resource-constrained places and primary care settings. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop portable, simple, rapid, and accurate methods for PoC detection of infections. Here, we present the development and validation of a portable, robust and inexpensive electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor (EMBIA) platform for PoC serodiagnosis of infectious diseases caused by different types of microorganisms (parasitic protozoa, bacteria and viruses). We demonstrate the potential use of the EMBIA platform for in situ diagnosis of human (Chagas disease and human brucellosis) and animal (bovine brucellosis and foot-and-mouth disease) infections clearly differentiating infected from non-infected individuals or animals. For Chagas disease, a more extensive validation of the test was performed showing that the EMBIA platform displayed an excellent diagnostic performance almost indistinguishable, in terms of specificity and sensitivity, from a fluorescent immunomagnetic assay and the conventional ELISA using the same combination of antigens. This platform technology could potentially be applicable to diagnose other infectious and non-infectious diseases as well as detection and/or quantification of biomarkers at the POC and primary care settings.

  5. Infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp. after penetrating keratoplasty: a case report

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    Stock RA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo Alexandre Stock,1 Elcio Luiz Bonamigo,2 Emeline Cadore,3 Rafael Allan Oechsler4 1Corneal Transplant Section, Santa Terezinha University Hospital, 2Department of Ophthalmology and Bioethics, 3University of Western Santa Catarina, Joaçaba, 4Cornea Department, Oftalmo Center Blumenau, Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Brazil Background: Infectious crystalline keratopathy is a rare, progressive infection characterized by the insidious progression of branches and crystalline corneal opacities with minimal or no inflammation. This case report describes the evolution of an infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp., which developed after tectonic keratoplasty in a patient with a history of ocular trauma.Case presentation: A 40-year-old Brazilian male was the victim of firework-induced trauma to the left eye, which resulted in a corneal laceration that could not be sutured as well as a severe traumatic cataract. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and phacoemulsification. During postoperative follow-up, another therapeutic keratoplasty was required because unresponsive infectious keratitis was observed. The infiltrate’s characteristics were suggestive of infectious crystalline keratopathy; in particular, the infiltrate was insidious and progressive, and grayish-white branches appeared in the anterior corneal stroma. As different therapies were administered, inflammatory reactions ranging from mild to severe were observed. The infection was unresponsive to typical antifungal drugs. This lack of response most likely occurred due to steroid treatment and the diffuse corneal spread of an atypical microorganism, which was subsequently identified in culture as Cladosporium sp. After the second therapeutic keratoplasty, the patient’s eye integrity was successfully reestablished.Conclusion: This study likely provides the first report describing a case of infectious crystalline keratopathy caused by Cladosporium sp. This case

  6. Modified concentration method for the detection of enteric viruses on fruits and vegetables by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction or cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Eric; Agier, Cécilia; Traoré, Ousmane; Hennechart, Catherine; Merle, Ghislaine; Crucière, Catherine; Laveran, Henri

    2002-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables may act as a vehicle of human enteric virus if they are irrigated with sewage-contaminated water or prepared by infected food handlers. An elution-concentration method was modified to efficiently detect, by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or by cell culture, contamination by poliovirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norwalk-like virus (NLV) of various fresh and frozen berries and fresh vegetables. The protocol included washing the fruit or vegetable surface with 100 mM Tris-HCl, 50 mM glycine, and 3% beef extract, pH 9.5 buffer, which favors viral elution from acid-releasing berries, supplemented with 50 mM MgCl2 to reduce the decrease in viral infectivity during the process. The viral concentration method was based on polyethylene glycol precipitation. Copurified RT-PCR inhibitors and cytotoxic compounds were removed from viral concentrates by chloroform-butanol extraction. Viruses from 100 g of vegetal products could be recovered in volumes of 3 to 5 ml. Viral RNAs were isolated by a spin column method before molecular detection or concentrates were filtered (0.22-microm porosity) and inoculated on cell culture for infectious virus detection. About 15% of infectious poliovirus and 20% of infectious HAV were recovered from frozen raspberry surfaces. The percentage of viral RNA recovery was estimated by RT-PCR to be about 13% for NLV, 17% for HAV, and 45 to 100% for poliovirus. By this method, poliovirus and HAV RNA were detected on products inoculated with a titer of about 5 x 10(1) 50% tissue culture infectious dose per 100 g. NLV RNA was detected at an initial inoculum of 1.2 x 10(3) RT-PCR amplifiable units. This method would be useful for the viral analysis of fruits or vegetables during an epidemiological investigation of foodborne diseases.

  7. ASPEK-ASPEK EKOLOGI DAN SOSIAL DALAM PENANGGULANGAN "EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Soewasti S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecological and social fators play very important roles in the control of emerging infectious diseases, beside case management, surveillance and laboratory examinations. The ecological factors include physical environmental factors such as altitude, latitude, climate, season, temperature, humidity, water, air, food and land; as well as biological environmental factors such as flora, fauna, agent, vector, host and biological agents used for vector control. The social factors include: education, economic status, behaviour, attitude, habit, religion, culture, population migration and density. Intervention to ecological and social factors could be done as preventive measures. We should learn from the failures as well as successes in the control of infectious diseases which gave considerations on ecological and social factors. For new diseases, studies should also be conducted to know what kinds of ecological and social factors have important roles in the control of these diseases.

  8. ASPEK-ASPEK EKOLOGI DAN SOSIAL DALAM PENANGGULANGAN "EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Soewasti S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecological and social fators play very important roles in the control of emerging infectious diseases, beside case management, surveillance and laboratory examinations. The ecological factors include physical environmental factors such as altitude, latitude, climate, season, temperature, humidity, water, air, food and land; as well as biological environmental factors such as flora, fauna, agent, vector, host and biological agents used for vector control. The social factors include: education, economic status, behaviour, attitude, habit, religion, culture, population migration and density. Intervention to ecological and social factors could be done as preventive measures. We should learn from the failures as well as successes in the control of infectious diseases which gave considerations on ecological and social factors. For new diseases, studies should also be conducted to know what kinds of ecological and social factors have important roles in the control of these diseases.

  9. A randomized double-blind clinical trial of the effect of non-absorbable oral polymyxin on infants with severe infectious diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tahan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of non-absorbable oral polymyxin on the duodenal microflora and clinical outcome of infants with severe infectious diarrhea. Polymyxin was chosen because classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was more sensitive to this antibiotic. Twenty-five infants were randomly assigned to a 7-day treatment with oral polymyxin (2.5 mg/kg in 4 daily doses or placebo. Duodenal and stool cultures were performed before and after the treatment. Five patients were excluded during the study because of introduction of parental antibiotic therapy due to clinical sepsis (N = 3 or rapid clinical improvement (N = 2. In the polymyxin group, small bowel bacterial overgrowth occurred in 61.5% of the cases (8/13 before treatment and in 76.9% (10/13 after treatment. In the placebo group these values were 71.4% (5/7 and 57.1% (4/7, respectively. By the 7th day, clinical cure was observed in 84.6% of the cases (11/13 in the polymyxin group and in 71.4% (5/7 in the placebo group (P = 0.587. Considering all 25 patients included in the study, clinical cure occurred on the 7th day in 12/14 cases (85.7% in the polymyxin group and 6/11 cases (54.5% in the placebo group (P = 0.102. Clinical sepsis occurred in 3/11 (27.3% of the patients in the placebo group and in none (0/14 in the polymyxin group (P = 0.071. Oral polymyxin was not effective in reducing bacterial overgrowth or in improving the clinical outcome of infants hospitalized with severe infectious diarrhea. Taking into account the small sample size, the rate of cure on the 7th day and the rate of clinical sepsis, further studies with greater number of patients are necessary to evaluate these questions.

  10. Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases Based on Antimicrobial Peptide Production▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Serrano, Carmen J.; Enciso-Moreno, J. Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, the great impact of antimicrobial peptides on infectious disease susceptibility and natural resistance has been reported. In some cases, susceptibility to diseases is related to antimicrobial peptide polymorphisms and gene copy numbers, but for the vast majority of infectious diseases, these phenomena need to be elucidated. This review is focused on the current knowledge about susceptibility and resistance conferred by genetic variations in antimicrobial peptide expression in infectious diseases. PMID:19703980

  11. Susceptibility to infectious diseases based on antimicrobial peptide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Serrano, Carmen J; Enciso-Moreno, J Antonio

    2009-11-01

    In the last few years, the great impact of antimicrobial peptides on infectious disease susceptibility and natural resistance has been reported. In some cases, susceptibility to diseases is related to antimicrobial peptide polymorphisms and gene copy numbers, but for the vast majority of infectious diseases, these phenomena need to be elucidated. This review is focused on the current knowledge about susceptibility and resistance conferred by genetic variations in antimicrobial peptide expression in infectious diseases.

  12. Review of Infectious Disease Report in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Sorokhan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an analysis of infectious disease report in Great Britain that is a member of the European Union. There are listed the infectious diseases and infectious agents of these diseases. There are described in detail how to fill the notification form and the methods and terms of sending it to Public Health England. Attention is focused on the importance of the analysis of infectious disease report in the European Union in the light of cooperation between Ukraine and the EU after the economic component of the Association Agreement has been signed.

  13. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerabilities to Infectious Diseases in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jan C. Semenza; Jonathan E. Suk; Virginia Estevez; Kristie L. Ebi; Elisabet Lindgren

    Background: The incidence, outbreak frequency, and distribution of many infectious diseases are generally expected to change as a consequence of climate change, yet there is limited regional information...

  14. Single-dose versus multiple-dose ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole prophylaxis in transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhoobin Heidari Bateni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate and compare the infectious and non-infectious complications of single-dose versus multiple-dose antibiotic therapy for trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study that was designed to investigate the effects of single-dose versus multiple-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen mainly on asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection (UTI without fever, fever and urinary septicemia. The single-dose group received one ciprofloxacin 500 mg tablet and two metronidazole 250 mg tablets at 2 hours before the biopsy, while the multiple-doses group received those every 12 hours from 3 days before the biopsy. One-hundred and sixty patients were evaluated in two groups and bacteriuria in urinalysis was encountered in 12 patients (15% in the single-dose group and four patients (5% in the multiple-dose group, with a significant difference (P=0.035. UTI without fever occurred in six patients (7.5% in the single-dose group and one patient (1.25% in the multiple-dose group, with no significant difference (borderline P=0.053. After biopsy, three patients (3.75% returned with fever due to UTI and bacteremia in the single-dose group and none in the multiple-dose group, but with no significant difference (P=0.08. Regarding non-infectious complications, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Using prophylactic antibiotics for prostate biopsy in multiple doses, and at least 3 days before the procedure significantly reduces the rate of bacteriuria compared with a single-dose regimen.

  15. Robust hepatitis C genotype 3a cell culture releasing adapted intergenotypic 3a/2a (S52/JFH1) viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Scheel, Troels; Høgh, Mette

    2007-01-01

    , which has a high prevalence worldwide. METHODS: Huh7.5 cells were transfected with RNA transcripts of an intergenotypic 3a/JFH1 recombinant with core, E1, E2, p7, and NS2 of the 3a reference strain S52, and released viruses were passaged. Cultures were examined for HCV core and/or NS5A expression...... (immunostaining), HCV RNA titers (real-time PCR), and infectivity titers (50% tissue culture infectious dose). The role of mutations identified by sequencing of recovered S52/JFH1 viruses was analyzed by reverse genetics studies. RESULTS: S52/JFH1 and J6/JFH viruses passaged in Huh7.5 cells showed comparable...

  16. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  17. Infectious scleritis: Clinical spectrum and management outcomes in India

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    Zia Sultan Pradhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective case series, we studied the predisposing factors, causative organisms, clinical spectrum, and outcomes of 12 cases of culture-proven infectious scleritis. Nine of 12 patients had a history of preceding trauma (surgical or accidental. Past surgical history included small-incision cataract surgery (4, pterygium surgery (1, and trabeculectomy (1. Six patients had multifocal scleral abscesses due to Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, or Nocardia. Only 2 patients retained useful vision (>6/18. A poor visual acuity at presentation usually resulted in a worse visual outcome (P = 0.005. Four eyes developed phthisis. The addition of surgical intervention did not result in a significantly better visual outcome than medical management alone (P = 0.209, but resulted in a higher globe preservation rate (P = 0.045. Therefore, we concluded that infection must be ruled out in cases of scleritis with preceding history of trauma, and aggressive surgical intervention improves the anatomical outcome but does not change the visual outcome.

  18. Glycyrrhetinic acid and its derivatives in infectious diseases

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    Langer Dominik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Licorice or liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra, Leguminosae is a perennial plant naturally occurring or cultivated in Europe and Asia. It was appreciated by many ancient cultures, and was employed within Arabic medicine and (beginning in the Middle Ages in Europe folk medicine as a remedy for many diseases. Currently, the sweet flavoured root of this plant – Radix Glycyrrhizae (Liquirtiae, is widely taken for the treating of various upper respiratory tract diseases, as well as for gastric ulcer disease. It is also utilized as a sweetening and flavouring agent in the food, tobacco and pharmacy industries. The main active ingredient of liquorice is the triterpenoid saponin, glycyrrhizin, which is a mixture of calcium, magnesium and potassium salts of glycyrrhizic acid (GA. Glycyrrhizic acid is composed of an aglycone, that is 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GE, and a D-glucuronic acid dimer. The aim of this review is to discuss some aspects of the activity of glycyrrhetinic acid and its derivatives in infectious diseases.

  19. STUDY OF INFECTIOUS AND NON INFECTIOUS PROBLEMS IN ADOLESCENTS OF URBAN CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In adolescents there is a unique set of health problems due to more social contact, less immunity, increase in requirement for nutrition, pubertal growth spurt, behavior problems, so the present study is undertaken to find out infectious and non-infectious problems in the adolescents. AIM & OBJECTIVES: To know the extent of infectious and non-infectious problems in adolescents and also to compare among different socioeconomic groups. METHODS: Adolescents belonging to different socioeconomic groups selected. Three schools and one slum in urban area chosen of adolescents aging between 11-19yrs, there weight, height, blood pressure, clinical examination of face, eye, ear, lips, teeth, gum, nails, tongue, glands, subcutaneous tissue, Musculoskeletal system, CVS, RS, GIT, CNS and previous health record checked. OBSERVATIONS: Study group comprised of 437 adolescents aging between 11-19yrs consisting of 299 girls and 138 boys, In the present study, good habit of personal hygiene was observed in 12.4% of slum adolescents, 46.8% in lower middle class group (OFH+VVH and 62.2% in upper middle class, 37.9% adolescents had falling hair. 34.5% adolescents had Dandruff. Pediculosis and hirsutism were present in 6.4% and 0.9% adolescents respectively, Acne was present in 33.9% of adolescents, 7.3% had white patches, Pyoderma and scabies 2% and 1% of adolescents respectively, 19.4% had Dental pain. It was also observed that Caries in 15.7%, Gum bleeding in 6.6%, Gingivitis in 4.1% and Malocclusion in 3.4% were present, 14.6% adolescents had Sinusitis, 8.6% had Tonsillitis and Rhinitis in 8% and Ear discharge in 0.9% was observed, 15% had Refractive error, 1.3% had Pterigium, 1.1% had Conjunctivitis, 0.7% had Stye and 0.6% had Squint, 6.8% adolescents had Asthma and 0.4% had Tuberculosis. Epilepsy, RHD, CHD, Hyperthyroidism and Goiter was observed in 0.2% adolescents. DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: Socio economic status plays an important role in infectious

  20. Infectious reproductive disease pathogens in dairy herd bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, A S; Younis, P J; Beggs, D S; Mansell, P D; Pyman, M F

    2015-10-01

    Investigate the presence of infectious reproductive disease pathogens in dairy herd bulls in south-west Victoria, Australia, using a cross-sectional study. Dairy herd bulls from 32 herds were sampled for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV: 256 bulls, 32 herds) prior to the natural mating period, bovine herpes virus-1 prior to (10 bulls, 5 herds) and after (118 bulls, 19 herds) the natural mating period, and for Campylobacter fetus spp. and Tritrichomonas foetus after the natural mating period (61 bulls, 7 herds). BVDV was detected from an ear-notch sample using a commercially available rapid assay ELISA, bovine herpes virus-1 and T. foetus were screened for by PCR from a penile swab and preputial sample respectively, and C. fetus spp. were screened for by culture of preputial samples. None of the bulls tested positive for BVDV antigen. Campylobacter fetus venerealis (or C. fetus fetus) was cultured in 6.6% (4/61) of bulls, representing 2 of the 7 (28.6%) farms that were not vaccinating bulls against bovine genital campylobacteriosis. Bovine herpes virus-1 was identified in 7.8% (10/128) bulls sampled; T. foetus was not identified in any samples. Bovine genital campylobacteriosis is present in south-western Victoria, despite longstanding recommendations to vaccinate bulls. Screening bulls for persistent infection with BVDV is probably justified, despite the absence of persistently infected bulls in this study. Further research is warranted to investigate the potential reproductive implications of BHV-1, and the presence of T. foetus. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  1. Networks and the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Danon, Leon; House, Thomas; Jewell, Chris P; Keeling, Matt J; Roberts, Gareth O; Ross, Joshua V; Vernon, Matthew C

    2010-01-01

    The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. It could be argued that epidemiology in particular has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. Here we review the growing body of research concerning the spread of infectious diseases on networks, focusing on the interplay between network theory and epidemiology. The review is split into four main sections, which examine: the types of network relevant to epidemiology; the multitude of ways these networks can be characterised; the statistical methods that can be applied to infer the epidemiological parameters on a realised network; and finally simulation and analytical methods to determine epidemic dynamics on a given network. Given the breadth of areas covered and the ever-expanding number of publications, a comprehensive review of all work is impossible. Instead, we provide a personalised overview into the areas of network epidemiology that have seen the greatest progress in recent ...

  2. Vaccine development for emerging virulent infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Joel N

    2017-02-16

    The recent outbreak of Zaire Ebola virus in West Africa altered the classical paradigm of vaccine development and that for emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in general. In this paper, the precepts of vaccine discovery and advancement through pre-clinical and clinical assessment are discussed in the context of the recent Ebola virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Zika virus outbreaks. Clinical trial design for diseases with high mortality rates and/or high morbidity in the face of a global perception of immediate need and the factors that drive design in the face of a changing epidemiology are presented. Vaccines for EIDs thus present a unique paradigm to standard development precepts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Simulating City-level Airborne Infectious Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Mei; Yifan, Zhu; Zhenghu, Zu; Tao, Zheng; Boukhanovsky, A V; Sloot, P M A

    2012-01-01

    With the exponential growth in the world population and the constant increase in human mobility, the danger of outbreaks of epidemics is rising. Especially in high density urban areas such as public transport and transfer points, where people come in close proximity of each other, we observe a dramatic increase in the transmission of airborne viruses and related pathogens. It is essential to have a good understanding of the `transmission highways' in such areas, in order to prevent or to predict the spreading of infectious diseases. The approach we take is to combine as much information as is possible, from all relevant sources and integrate this in a simulation environment that allows for scenario testing and decision support. In this paper we lay out a novel approach to study Urban Airborne Disease spreading by combining traffic information, with geo-spatial data, infection dynamics and spreading characteristics.

  4. Biochemical studies on equine infectious anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, E; Martone, F; Meduri, A; Vaccaro, A; Damiani, N

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of an outbreak of equine infectious anaemia (E.I.A.) in Campania [at Naples and Aversa (Caserta)]; it was diagnosed by clinical, pathological and serological examinations (Coggins test). Using the serum of 45 horses with E.I.A. and 11 healthy horses (controls), numerous investigations were carried out on: enzymes, intrinsic coagulation factors, lipids and other substances. The results obtained were very interesting and show that in this disease there are significant increases in many enzymes (LDH, LAP, gamma-GT, CPK, PK and ALD) and copper. Insignificant increases were found in other enzymes (SDH, GLDH, MDH, ICDH, AIP, lysozyme, cholinesterase, GOT and GPT) and also intrinsic coagulation factors, lipid substances (total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, triglycerides) and glucose. LDH-1-isoenzyme remains unchanged, whilst AcP decreases slightly.

  5. Endothelial cells, tissue factor and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes-Bezerra L.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor is a transmembrane procoagulant glycoprotein and a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. It activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, and induces the formation of a fibrin clot. Tissue factor is important for both normal homeostasis and the development of many thrombotic diseases. A wide variety of cells are able to synthesize and express tissue factor, including monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Tissue factor expression can be induced by cell surface components of pathogenic microorganisms, proinflammatory cytokines and membrane microparticles released from activated host cells. Tissue factor plays an important role in initiating thrombosis associated with inflammation during infection, sepsis, and organ transplant rejection. Recent findings suggest that tissue factor can also function as a receptor and thus may be important in cell signaling. The present minireview will focus on the role of tissue factor in the pathogenesis of septic shock, infectious endocarditis and invasive aspergillosis, as determined by both in vivo and in vitro models.

  6. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell P. Chandler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  7. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  8. Confidentiality. 13: The notification of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, B

    Jenny Rose was a paediatric community nurse who regularly visited a child with a chronic lung condition who was being nursed at home. On one visit she noticed that the child's mother, Jane, appeared to be very pale and thin and was told that the mother had a severe gastric disorder with diarrhoea. From the description of the illness, Jenny thought that Jane might be suffering from typhoid. Jane worked as a cook in a restaurant, was unwilling to seek medical advice and intended going to work that night. Jenny was concerned that Jane could have a serious notifiable infectious disease and therefore be a danger to customers in the restaurant. Jane insisted that Jenny should keep the information confidential. Where does Jenny stand?

  9. Infectious diseases: Surveillance, genetic modification and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, H. L.; Teh, S.Y.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases such as influenza and dengue have the potential of becoming a worldwide pandemic that may exert immense pressures on existing medical infrastructures. Careful surveillance of these diseases, supported by consistent model simulations, provides a means for tracking the disease evolution. The integrated surveillance and simulation program is essential in devising effective early warning systems and in implementing efficient emergency preparedness and control measures. This paper presents a summary of simulation analysis on influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Malaysia. This simulation analysis provides insightful lessons regarding how disease surveillance and simulation should be performed in the future. This paper briefly discusses the controversy over the experimental field release of genetically modified (GM) Aedes aegypti mosquito in Malaysia. Model simulations indicate that the proposed release of GM mosquitoes is neither a viable nor a sustainable control strategy. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  10. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  11. Ribonucleoprotein of avian infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R; Macnaughton, M R

    1981-03-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was examined by electron microscopy after shadowing with carbon/platinum. Linear RNP strands up to 6.7 microns in length, from three IVB strains, were sensitive to both pancreatic RNase and to proteases. These strands were obtained from spontaneously disrupted complete particles but not from disrupted incomplete particles that lacked RNP. They were also released from Nonidet P40-disrupted particles and could be isolated on sucrose density gradients at a density of 1.27 g/ml. In some cases, helical RNP complexes associated with virus particles were observed that were similar to RNPs of human coronavirus strain 229E and mouse hepatitis virus strain 3.

  12. Eight challenges in modelling infectious livestock diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brooks-Pollock

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of infectious diseases of livestock does not differ in principle from disease transmission in any other animals, apart from that the aim of control is ultimately economic, with the influence of social, political and welfare constraints often poorly defined. Modelling of livestock diseases suffers simultaneously from a wealth and a lack of data. On the one hand, the ability to conduct transmission experiments, detailed within-host studies and track individual animals between geocoded locations make livestock diseases a particularly rich potential source of realistic data for illuminating biological mechanisms of transmission and conducting explicit analyses of contact networks. On the other hand, scarcity of funding, as compared to human diseases, often results in incomplete and partial data for many livestock diseases and regions of the world. In this overview of challenges in livestock disease modelling, we highlight eight areas unique to livestock that, if addressed, would mark major progress in the area.

  13. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marroon Thabane; John K Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is a common disorder wherein symptoms of IBS begin after an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Published studies have reported incidence of PI-IBS to range between 5% and 32%. The mechanisms underlying the development of PI-IBS are not fully understood, but are believed to include persistent sub-clinical inflammation, changes in intestinal permeability and alteration of gut flora. Individual studies have suggested that risk factors for PI-IBS include patients' demographics, psychological disorders and the severity of enteric illness. However, PI-IBS remains a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific disease markers and, to date, no definitive therapy exists. The prognosis of PIIBS appears favorable with spontaneous and gradual resolution of symptoms in most patients.

  14. Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Charles L.

    2011-12-31

    Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

  15. Infectious disease modeling a hybrid system approach

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xinzhi

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents infectious diseases modeled mathematically, taking seasonality and changes in population behavior into account, using a switched and hybrid systems framework. The scope of coverage includes background on mathematical epidemiology, including classical formulations and results; a motivation for seasonal effects and changes in population behavior, an investigation into term-time forced epidemic models with switching parameters, and a detailed account of several different control strategies. The main goal is to study these models theoretically and to establish conditions under which eradication or persistence of the disease is guaranteed. In doing so, the long-term behavior of the models is determined through mathematical techniques from switched systems theory. Numerical simulations are also given to augment and illustrate the theoretical results and to help study the efficacy of the control schemes.

  16. Managed care and the infectious diseases specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D; Slama, T G; Berman, S; Braun, P; Burke, J P; Cherney, A; Gross, P A; Harris, P; Reid-Hatton, M; Hoffman, R; Joseph, P; Lawton, S; Massanari, R M; Miller, Z I; Osheroff, W J; Poretz, D; Shalowitz, M; Simmons, B; Turner, J P; Wade, B; Nolet, B R

    1996-08-01

    There is growing demand to contain health care costs and to reassess the value of medical services. The traditional hospital, academic, and research roles of the infectious disease (ID) specialist are threatened, yet there is an increasing need for expertise because of growing antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens. Opportunities exist to develop and expand services for the care of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and in infection control, epidemiology, outcomes research, outpatient intravenous therapy, and resource management. It is important for ID physicians to appreciate the principles involved in managed care and the areas in which ID services can be valuable. To be effective, physicians need to know about tools such as practice guidelines, physician profiling, outcomes monitoring, computerized information management, risk sharing, networking, and marketing, as well as related legal issues. With a positive attitude toward learning, application, and leadership, ID physicians can redefine their role and expand their services through managed care.

  17. Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification of Infectious Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, are a group of incurable disorders caused by the accumulation of an abnormally folded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the brain. According to the "protein-only" hypothesis, PrP(Sc) is the infectious agent able to propagate the disease by acting as a template for the conversion of the correctly folded prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathological isoform. Recently, the mechanism of PrP(C) conversion has been mimicked in vitro using an innovative technique named protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). This technology represents a great tool for studying diverse aspects of prion biology in the field of basic research and diagnosis. Moreover, PMCA can be expanded for the study of the misfolding process associated to other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Scientific Opinion on infectious salmon anaemia (ISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Atlantic salmon is the only species in which the disease infectious salmon anaemia (ISA has been observed naturally. Initial reports of findings of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV before 2002, did not distinguish between non virulent HPR0 and virulent HPRΔ viruses, thus making interpretation of older findings difficult in the light of current knowledge. Following a request from the European Commission, EFSA was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the relationship between HPR0 and HPRΔ, the risk of HPRΔ ISAV emerging from HPR0 ISAV, and possible risk factors for such an emergence. HPR0 ISAV does not cause clinical disease in Atlantic salmon; however, it causes a transient subclinical infection and replicates mainly in gills. There is no evidence for HPR0 ISAV leading to natural infection and replication in fish species other than Atlantic salmon. Virulent ISAV have deletions in the HPR region of the HE gene and they have either an insertion or the Q266L mutation in the F gene. The most plausible hypothesis is that virulent ISAV (HPRΔ is derived from HPR0 ISAV. This is further supported by the close association between the genetic relatedness and spatio-temporal distances of virus strains in solitary outbreaks. Epidemiological and historical data from solitary disease outbreaks indicates that the risk of HPRΔ ISAV emerging from HPR0 is low, but not negligible. The risk factors for HPRΔ emergence from HPR0 are unknown. Nevertheless, any factor that affects virus replication or host susceptibility could possibly influence the risk of emergence. More research is needed on the drivers for transition from HPR0 to HPRΔ and factors affecting host susceptibility and thereby emergence of clinical disease. A quantitative assessment of the different evolutionary forces for ISA would be useful, as well as the prevalence of ISAV HPR0 in farmed and wild Atlantic salmon.

  19. Non-Infectious Ischiogluteal Bursitis: MRI Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Moon; Lee, Young Hwan; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Jang, Han Won

    2004-01-01

    Objective We wished to report on the MRI findings of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis. Materials and Methods The MRI findings of 17 confirmed cases of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis were analyzed: four out of the 17 cases were confirmed with surgery, and the remaining 13 cases were confirmed with MRI plus the clinical data. Results The enlarged bursae were located deep to the gluteus muscles and postero-inferior to the ischial tuberosity. The superior ends of the bursal sacs abutted to the infero-medial aspect of the ischial tuberosity. The signal intensity within the enlarged bursa on T1-weighted image (WI) was hypo-intense in three cases (3/17, 17.6%), iso-intense in 10 cases (10/17, 58.9%), and hyper-intense in four cases (4/17, 23.5%) in comparison to that of surrounding muscles. The bursal sac appeared homogeneous in 13 patients (13/17, 76.5%) and heterogeneous in the remaining four patients (4/17, 23.5%) on T1-WI. On T2-WI, the bursa was hyper-intense in all cases (17/17, 100%); it was heterogeneous in 10 cases and homogeneous in seven cases. The heterogeneity was variable depending on the degree of the blood-fluid levels and the septae within the bursae. With contrast enhancement, the inner wall of the bursae was smooth (5/17 cases), and irregular (12/17 cases) because of the synovial proliferation and septation. Conclusion Ischiogluteal bursitis can be diagnosed with MRI by its characteristic location and cystic appearance. PMID:15637479

  20. Non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kil Ho; Jang, Han Won [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Daegu Hyosung Catholic University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Suh and Joo MR Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to report on the MRI findings of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis. The MRI findings of 17 confirmed cases of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis were analyzed: four out of the 17 cases were confirmed with surgery, and the remaining 13 cases were confirmed with MRI plus the clinical data. The enlarged bursae were located deep to the gluteus muscles and postero-inferior to the ischial tuberosity. The superior ends of the bursal sacs abutted to the infero-medial aspect of the ischial tuberosity. The signal intensity within the enlarged bursa on T1-weighted image (WI) was hypo-intense in three cases (3/17, 17.6%), iso-intense in 10 cases (10/17, 58.9%), and hyper-intense in four cases (4/17, 23.5%) in comparison to that of surrounding muscles. The bursal sac appeared homogeneous in 13 patients (13/17, 76.5%) and heterogeneous in the remaining four patients (4/17, 23.5%) on T1-WI. On T2-WI, the bursa was hyper-intense in all cases (17/17, 100%); it was heterogeneous in 10 cases and homogeneous in seven cases. The heterogeneity was variable depending on the degree of the blood-fluid levels and the septae within the bursae. With contrast enhancement, the inner wall of the bursae was smooth (5/7 cases), and irregular (12/17 cases) because of the synovial proliferation and septation. Ischiogluteal bursitis can be diagnosed with MRI by its characteristic location and cystic appearance.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Whole-Genome Gene Expression Changes in Cultured Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Response to Low, Clinical Diagnostic Relevant, and High Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Nguyen, Van; Neumann, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure in humans are not comprehensively understood, generating a high degree of controversy in published literature. The earliest stages of human development are known to be among the most sensitive to stress exposures, especially genotoxic stresses. However, the risks stemming from exposure to LDIR, particularly within the clinical diagnostic relevant dose range, have not been directly evaluated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we describe the dynamics of the whole genome transcriptional responses of different hESC lines to both LDIR and, as a reference, high-dose IR (HDIR). We found that even doses as low as 0.05 Gy could trigger statistically significant transient changes in a rather limited subset of genes in all hESCs lines examined. Gene expression signatures of hESCs exposed to IR appear to be highly dose-, time-, and cell line-dependent. We identified 50 genes constituting consensus gene expression signature as an early response to HDIR across all lines of hESC examined. We observed substantial differences in biological pathways affected by either LDIR or HDIR in hESCs, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underpinning the responses of hESC may fundamentally differ depending on radiation doses. PMID:26133243

  2. Infectious salmon anaemia virus replication and induction of alpha interferon in Atlantic salmon erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groman David B

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA virus (ISAV, which causes ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon, is an orthomyxovirus belonging to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. ISAV agglutinates erythrocytes of several fish species and it is generally accepted that the ISAV receptor destroying enzyme dissolves this haemagglutination except for Atlantic salmon erythrocytes. Recent work indicates that ISAV isolates that are able to elute from Atlantic salmon erythrocytes cause low mortality in challenge experiments using Atlantic salmon. Previous work on ISAV-induced haemagglutination using the highly pathogenic ISAV strain NBISA01 and the low pathogenic ISAV strain RPC/NB-04-0851, showed endocytosis of NBISA01 but not RPC/NB-04-0851. Real-time RT-PCR was used to assess the viral RNA levels in the ISAV-induced haemagglutination reaction samples, and we observed a slight increase in viral RNA transcripts by 36 hours in the haemagglutination reaction with NBISA01 virus when the experiment was terminated. However, a longer sampling interval was considered necessary to confirm ISAV replication in fish erythrocytes and to determine if the infected cells mounted any innate immune response. This study examined the possible ISAV replication and Type I interferon (IFN system gene induction in Atlantic salmon erythrocytes following ISAV haemagglutination. Results Haemagglutination assays were performed using Atlantic salmon erythrocytes and one haemagglutination unit of the two ISAV strains, NBISA01 and RPC/NB-04-0851, of differing genotypes and pathogenicities. Haemagglutination induced by the highly pathogenic NBISA01 but not the low pathogenic RPC/NB-04-0851 resulted in productive infection as evidenced by increased ISAV segment 8 transcripts and increase in the median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 by 5 days of incubation. Moreover, reverse transcription (RT quantitative PCR used to compare mRNA levels of key Type I IFN system

  3. Generation of Infectious Poliovirus with Altered Genetic Information from Cloned cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujaki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The effect of specific genetic alterations on virus biology and phenotype can be studied by a great number of available assays. The following method describes the basic protocol to generate infectious poliovirus with altered genetic information from cloned cDNA in cultured cells.The example explained here involves generation of a recombinant poliovirus genome by simply replacing a portion of the 5' noncoding region with a synthetic gene by restriction cloning. The vector containing the full length poliovirus genome and the insert DNA with the known mutation(s) are cleaved for directional cloning, then ligated and transformed into competent bacteria. The recombinant plasmid DNA is then propagated in bacteria and transcribed to RNA in vitro before RNA transfection of cultured cells is performed. Finally, viral particles are recovered from the cell culture.

  4. Mass Spectrometric Rapid Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    sterilization and storage procedures. 2. Developed new, simpler sample preparation techniques including one to handle tissue culture media. 3. Improved on the...for t. , _ icr "- CYLER main computer over a 1200 bund multiplexor prione link. F- -i

  5. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... Introduction. Diarrhoeal diseases are a major health problem in ... Suitable antimicrobial treatment shortens bacterial ... Movement of people is associated with spread of ... Vibrio cholerae isolation and sub-cultured in Heart.

  6. Serum procalcitonin level in infectious and non- infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a three- year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadinejad Z

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Sepsis is the leading cause of hospital admission and mortality. One marker for differentiation between infectious and non-infectious diseases is serum procalcitonin (PCT level. The goal of this study was evaluation of serum procalcitonin level for differentiation among infectious & non infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS."n"nMethods: In a cross sectional study 263 patients with probable symptoms of sepsis that admitted to emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex in Tehran, Iran, between 2006 and 2008, were evaluated for serum procalcitonin level by semi quantitative method. The clinical findings, demographic and laboratory data were identified by reviewing the medical notes."n"nResults: A total of 263 patients enrolled in the study. Mean age in study patients was 46.9 year (±20.7 and most of the patients were male (65.8%. In 104 patients (39.5% serum procalcitonin level was less than 0.5 (ng/ml, in 49 patients (18.6% was between 0.5 and 2 (ng/ml, in 74 patients (28.1% was between 2 and 10 (ng/ml and in 36 patients (13.8% was more than 10 (ng/ml. Sixty three patients (60.6% with PCT<0.5ng/ml, had non-infectious SIRS, while all patients with PCT≥10ng/ml, had infectious

  7. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet, add...

  8. Effect of infectious status and parity on somatic cell count and California mastitis test in pampinta dairy ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, V H; Busetti, M R; Miranda, A O; Calvinho, L F; Bedotti, D O; Canavesio, V R

    2002-06-01

    The relationship between somatic cell counts (SCC) and California mastitis test (CMT) results according to the infectious status of mammary halves and parity of Pampinta dairy ewes was evaluated. Tests were associated to bacteriological analysis and classified into three groups: uninfected (negative culture), infected by minor pathogens and infected by major pathogens. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (32.4%), Micrococcus spp. (32.4%), Corynebacterium spp. (5.4%), and Bacillus spp. (1.4%) were the minor pathogens isolated, while Staphylococcus aureus (27%) and Escherichia coli (1.4%) were the major pathogens isolated. A good correlation was found between the CMT and SCC, which included inflammatory and epithelial cells (r = 0.64; P CMT scores shown in parentheses were 223 576 (0); 245,248 (1); 397,778 (2); 1,159,109 (3) and 2,460,833 (4) cells/ml. The correlation between SCC and the infectious status of udder halves was 0.58 (P CMT profiles and infectious status studied by a discriminant analysis showed, with an accuracy of 65%, three infectious status groups. SCC arithmetic means were 244,470 cells/ml for negative culture, 1,044,100 cells/ml for minor pathogens and 2,045,652 cells/ ml for major pathogens. With the exception of 1-year-old ewes, no significant differences were observed in SCC as affected by age or parity.

  9. Return to work following sickness absence due to infectious mononucleosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, P.C.; Bakhtali, R.; Katan, A.A.; Groothoff, J.W.; Roelen, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis among adults is notorious because of the prolonged incapacitating fatigue it causes. AIMS: To investigate the duration of sickness absence and return to work following infectious mononucleosis. METHODS: Episodes of sickness absence due to infec

  10. Phylogeny of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in European aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cieslak, Michael; Wahli, Thomas; Diserens, Nicolas; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Schütze, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) — a highly lethal infectious salmonid disease — has caused substantial economic losses in the European production of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) since the late 1980s. The causal agent of IHN is the IHN virus (IHNV) introduced from overseas. However,

  11. STUDIES OF A MYXOVIRUS RECOVERED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhaber, Harvey; Krugman, Saul; McGregor, Dorothy; Giles, Joan P.

    1965-01-01

    A virus has been isolated from the serum and urine of patients with infectious hepatitis. This virus is a member of the parinfluenza group. It is serologically distinct from the known members of the group, but apparently is antigenically related to the simian type-2 parainfluenza viruses. A causal relationship between WB virus and infectious hepatitis has not been established. PMID:4285254

  12. Return to work following sickness absence due to infectious mononucleosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, P.C.; Bakhtali, R.; Katan, A.A.; Groothoff, J.W.; Roelen, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis among adults is notorious because of the prolonged incapacitating fatigue it causes. AIMS: To investigate the duration of sickness absence and return to work following infectious mononucleosis. METHODS: Episodes of sickness absence due to infec

  13. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Alan J; Evengard, Birgitta; Semenza, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic...

  14. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Poureslami; W.E. van Amerongen

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans streptoc

  15. Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-04

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the article, Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe.  Created: 5/4/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/4/2016.

  16. A History of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-17

    EID Editor-in-Chief, Dr. D. Peter Drotman and Dr. James Hughes discuss the history of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 3/17/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/17/2015.

  17. The effect of global warming on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro

    2010-12-01

    Global warming has various effects on human health. The main indirect effects are on infectious diseases. Although the effects on infectious diseases will be detected worldwide, the degree and types of the effect are different, depending on the location of the respective countries and socioeconomical situations. Among infectious diseases, water- and foodborne infectious diseases and vector-borne infectious diseases are two main categories that are forecasted to be most affected. The effect on vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever is mainly because of the expansion of the infested areas of vector mosquitoes and increase in the number and feeding activity of infected mosquitoes. There will be increase in the number of cases with water- and foodborne diarrhoeal diseases. Even with the strongest mitigation procedures, global warming cannot be avoided for decades. Therefore, implementation of adaptation measures to the effect of global warming is the most practical action we can take. It is generally accepted that the impacts of global warming on infectious diseases have not been apparent at this point yet in East Asia. However, these impacts will appear in one form or another if global warming continues to progress in future. Further research on the impacts of global warming on infectious diseases and on future prospects should be conducted.

  18. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans

  19. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans streptoc

  20. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, Sanja; de Ruiter, P.C.; Heesterbeek, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073321427

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  1. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, S.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  2. Infectious uveitis. New developments in etiology and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, L.

    2009-01-01

    Uveitis is an inflammation of the inner-eye and is initiated by various infectious and noninfectious causes. In a large portion of patients the etiology is unknown and might be associated with until now undiagnosed infections.The identification of infectious uveitis is of crucial importance since it

  3. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  4. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  5. Perspectives and research challenges in veterinary infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterinary Infectious Disease specialty section seeks to become an outlet for veterinary research into infectious diseases through the study of the pathogen or its host or the host's environment or by addressing combinations of these aspects of the disease system. We vision research in this are...

  6. Determining the Infectious Dose of Influenza Aerosols in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    percentage of morbidity occurred in children and young adults as well as in individuals with such underlying conditions as obesity or diabetes (Jhung...treatments. Various approaches have been proposed to increase the effectiveness of respiratory filtering media including the addition of bioactive media...Although materials such as silver nanoparticles (Lala et al. 2007), copper oxide (Borkow et al. 2010), iodinated compounds (Heimbuch and Wander 2006

  7. Vancomycin Utilization Evaluation: Are We Dosing Appropriately?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Ayazkhoo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inappropriate use of vancomycin not only increase health care costs but also contribute to the emergence of resistant organisms. Higher trough serum vancomycin concentrations (>10mg/L has been recommended for avoidance of development of resistance. We aim to compare the administered dose with recommended doses based on guideline-recommended weight-based dosing.Methods: In a cross sectional study, all patients who received vancomycin between July and October 2013, in infectious disease, internal medicine wards and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran were entered to the study. Indication of vancomycin and necessary data for dose calculation including height and serum creatinine were recorded. Prescribed doses were compared with recommended doses in guidelines and calculated Glomerular filtration rate (GFR for each patient.Results: One hundred and four patients (45 females and 59 males recruited in the study. Our results indicated that, from all administered doses of vancomycin, 64.4% and 88.8% differs significantly (more than 20% based on American Pharmacist Association (AphA vancomycin monograph and guideline-recommended, weight-based vancomycin dosing (for adults, respectively.Conclusion: Underdosing of vancomycin is a major risk factor for developing resistance of gram positive organisms to this glycopeptide. Our results showed that more than half of patients receiving vancomycin are in the risk of low drug levels based on guidelines. So, having a comprehensive plan for the proper use of this drug especially designing effective internal guidelines can prevent emergence of resistance to vancomycin in future.

  8. Assessment of the risk of White Sturgeon to become infected and potential carriers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPatra, Scott E; Mead, Sherry

    2013-12-01

    Little scientific information is available to assess whether White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus can become infected and potential carriers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). To assess this risk, monitoring results of adult and progeny White Sturgeon were examined from waters historically stocked with salmonid fish known to be IPNV carriers. From 1999 through 2004 White Sturgeon from a total of 30 separate families whose parentage came from waters historically stocked with IPNV carrier fish were tested. Duplicate groups of 25 juvenile Snake River White Sturgeon were waterborne exposed to 1.0×10(4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)/mL of water for 1 h and an additional group was injected intraperitoneally with 1.0×10(5) TCID50/fish. A negative control group was handled similarly but was not exposed to the virus. No morbidity was detected in any of the treatment groups or the negative control. At 34, 40, 47, and 54 d postexposure to IPNV, virus reisolation was attempted on five fish from each group, and an additional five fish from each group were examined for histological changes consistent with an IPNV infection. At 34 and 40 d postinjection with IPNV, 20% (one of five) of the fish tested positive for the virus per sample interval; however, fish from groups that were waterborne-exposed to IPNV were all negative. At 47 and 54 d after exposure or injection with IPNV an additional five fish from each group were tested at each sample interval and all results were negative. Histological analysis of target tissue obtained from five fish per group at 34 and 54 d postinfection also failed to detect any consistent change associated with an IPNV infection. These results suggest that the risk of White Sturgeon to become infected and develop into potential carriers of IPNV is negligible.

  9. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  10. Aerobiology and Its Role in the Transmission of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Fernstrom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobiology plays a fundamental role in the transmission of infectious diseases. As infectious disease and infection control practitioners continue employing contemporary techniques (e.g., computational fluid dynamics to study particle flow, polymerase chain reaction methodologies to quantify particle concentrations in various settings, and epidemiology to track the spread of disease, the central variables affecting the airborne transmission of pathogens are becoming better known. This paper reviews many of these aerobiological variables (e.g., particle size, particle type, the duration that particles can remain airborne, the distance that particles can travel, and meteorological and environmental factors, as well as the common origins of these infectious particles. We then review several real-world settings with known difficulties controlling the airborne transmission of infectious particles (e.g., office buildings, healthcare facilities, and commercial airplanes, while detailing the respective measures each of these industries is undertaking in its effort to ameliorate the transmission of airborne infectious diseases.

  11. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  12. Climate change-related migration and infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change will have significant impacts on both human migration and population health, including infectious disease. It will amplify and alter migration pathways, and will contribute to the changing ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious disease. However there has been limited consideration of the intersections between migration and health in the context of a changing climate. This article argues that climate-change related migration - in conjunction with other drivers of migration - will contribute to changing profiles of infectious disease. It considers infectious disease risks for different climate-related migration pathways, including: forced displacement, slow-onset migration particularly to urban-poor areas, planned resettlement, and labor migration associated with climate change adaptation initiatives. Migration can reduce vulnerability to climate change, but it is critical to better understand and respond to health impacts - including infectious diseases - for migrant populations and host communities.

  13. Fecal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 283. Haines CF, Sears CL. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ... 2017:chap 22. Read More Bacterial gastroenteritis Cryptosporidium enteritis Diarrhea - overview Review Date 5/11/2016 Updated ...

  14. Infectious Zika virus in vaginal secretions from an HIV-infected woman, France, August 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penot, Pauline; Brichler, Ségolène; Guilleminot, Jean; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Taulera, Olivier; Gordien, Emmanuel; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-19

    A woman with controlled HIV infection developed in late August 2016 a pruritic rash with fever and conjunctival hyperaemia after a trip to the French Caribbean islands. On day 3 after symptom onset, Zika virus RNA was detected in plasma, urine and vaginal samples with respective viral loads of 3.8, 6.1 and 5.3 log copies/mL. Notably, we demonstrated the presence of infectious Zika virus particles in the vaginal samples by isolation in cell culture. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  15. Infectious Zika virus in vaginal secretions from an HIV-infected woman, France, August 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penot, Pauline; Brichler, Ségolène; Guilleminot, Jean; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Taulera, Olivier; Gordien, Emmanuel; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    A woman with controlled HIV infection developed in late August 2016 a pruritic rash with fever and conjunctival hyperaemia after a trip to the French Caribbean islands. On day 3 after symptom onset, Zika virus RNA was detected in plasma, urine and vaginal samples with respective viral loads of 3.8, 6.1 and 5.3 log copies/mL. Notably, we demonstrated the presence of infectious Zika virus particles in the vaginal samples by isolation in cell culture. PMID:28128730

  16. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yingchen29@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, X.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Radiation Safety, Beijing Institute of Nuclear and Chemical Safety, 14 Guan-cun, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100077 (China); Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-09-15

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0{sup -3}D{sup 2}. Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy {gamma}-irradiation from a supra-high dose {sup 60}Co gamma-ray accident.

  17. Detection of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus from the Leeches Hemiclepsis marginata and Hirudo medicinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Behnam; Abdi, Kazem

    2016-12-01

    Leeches have been reported to harbor several important fish pathogens, including spring viremia of carp virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and also may contain blood protozoa. In the present study, leeches were collected from water bodies located in Kurdistan province, Iran. The specimens were tested for IHNV, VHSV, and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) using the PCR method. The results showed that two different species of leeches, Hemiclepsis marginata and Hirudo medicinalis, were infected by IPNV among the seven species studied. The infected leeches were found in areas that were polluted with untreated sewage coming from upstream fish farms culturing Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, the fish at fish farms in the vicinity had been infected with IPNV 9 months previously. Our results showed that the virus causing infectious pancreatic necrosis is present in the leeches H. marginata and H. medicinalis, suggesting that leeches are a potential source of IPNV in fish farms. Received October 14, 2015; accepted June 1, 2016.

  18. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA) Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA (USA)); Rubin, D.H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 (VP3); 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated {sup 51}Cr, ({sup 14}C)choline, and ({sup 3}H)inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration.

  19. A Management Dilemma: Infectious Keratitis Associated with Soft Contact Lens Use and Dubious Treatment Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos T. Tsaousis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a case of infectious keratitis caused by the microorganism Serratia marcescens in a contact lens user and further to confer on the most advantageous management of comparable situations. Case. After altering the routine that she used for contact lens disinfection, a 24-year-old patient presented with pain and conjunctival redness in both eyes. Slit-lamp examination revealed two infiltrates in the inferior part of the cornea in the right eye and five smaller infiltrates in the superior half of the left cornea. Appropriate treatment, after hospitalization, improved the symptoms while culture of the contact lens material revealed Serratia marcescens as the responsible infectious factor. Conclusion. Enhancing the availability of information with respect to contact lens users and customized analysis regarding treatment for a particular complication could be beneficial in order to reduce the frequency of admission to the eye clinic due to infectious keratitis. In addition, rapid laboratory testing of the infected materials should be a priority for selection of the optimal treatment regimen.

  20. Bacterial analysis of breast milk: a tool to differentiate Raynaud's phenomenon from infectious mastitis during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; Collado, M Carmen; Fernández, Leonides; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2009-07-01

    Lactational Raynaud's syndrome may be misdiagnosed as infectious mastitis on the basis of the breast pain. The objective of this work was to elucidate if microbiological analysis of milk may contribute to the differentiation of both conditions. Ten lactating women clinically diagnosed by Spanish lactation consultants were included in the study. Of these, five suffered from mastitis and the remaining five suffered from Raynaud's syndrome. Breast milk samples were inoculated on diverse culture media. Seventy isolates were selected and identified by 16S rDNA PCR sequencing. Parallel, PCR-DGGE and quantitative real-time PCR were used to assess the presence of bacterial DNA in the samples. Neither bacteria nor yeasts could be detected in the milk samples provided by the women suffering from Raynaud's syndrome. In contrast, large numbers of bacteria were isolated from those with infectious lactational mastitis. Globally, the levels of bacterial DNA were significantly higher in the milk of mastitis-suffering women. Bacteriological analysis of milk can be an useful tool to facilitate the differential diagnosis between the infectious mastitis and Raynaud's syndrome during lactation.

  1. Emerging infectious diseases at the beginning of the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Felissa R

    2006-01-31

    The emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases involves many interrelated factors. Global interconnectedness continues to increase with international travel and trade; economic, political, and cultural interactions; and human-to-human and animal-to-human interactions. These interactions include the accidental and deliberate sharing of microbial agents and antimicrobial resistance and allow the emergence of new and unrecognized microbial disease agents. As the 21st century begins, already new agents have been identified, and new outbreaks have occurred. Solutions to limiting the spread of emerging infectious diseases will require cooperative efforts among many disciplines and entities worldwide. This article defines emerging infectious diseases, summarizes historical background, and discusses factors that contribute to emergence. Seven agents that have made a significant appearance, particularly in the 21st century, are reviewed, including: Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers, human monkeypox, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), West Nile virus, and avian influenza. The article provides for each agent a brief historical background, case descriptions, and health care implications.

  2. The Infectious Diseases Society of America emerging infections network: bridging the gap between clinical infectious diseases and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Satish K; Beekmann, Susan E; Santibanez, Scott; Polgreen, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    In 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention granted a Cooperative Agreement Program award to the Infectious Diseases Society of America to develop a provider-based emerging infections sentinel network, the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Over the past 17 years, the EIN has evolved into a flexible, nationwide network with membership representing a broad cross-section of infectious disease physicians. The EIN has an active electronic mail conference (listserv) that facilitates communication among infectious disease providers and the public health community, and also sends members periodic queries (short surveys on infectious disease topics) that have addressed numerous topics relevant to both clinical infectious diseases and public health practice. The article reviews how the various functions of EIN contribute to clinical care and public health, identifies opportunities to further link clinical medicine and public health, and describes future directions for the EIN.

  3. Infectious disease risk in asbestos abatement workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange John H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current literature reports increased infectious disease occurrence in various construction occupations, as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality arising from employment. These observations should be expanded to asbestos abatement workers, as the abatement can create an environment favorable for bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Discussion Asbestos abatement work employs activities resulting in cuts, blisters and abrasions to the skin, work in a dirty environment and exposure to dust, mists and fumes. Furthermore, this population exhibits a high smoking rate which increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and respiratory infections. In addition, these workers also commonly employ respirators, which can accumulate dirt and debris magnifying exposure to microbes. Use of respirators and related types of personal protective equipment, especially if shared and in the close environment experienced by workers, may enhance communicability of these agents, including viruses. Summary Abatement workers need to be provided with information on hazards and targeted by appropriate health education to reduce the infection risk. Epidemiological studies to investigate this risk in asbestos removers are recommended.

  4. Emerging infectious diseases and travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, S M; Kozarsky, P

    1998-03-01

    International movement of individuals, populations, and products is one of the major factors associated with the emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases as the pace of global travel and commerce increases rapidly. Travel can be associated with disease emergence because (1) the disease arises in an area of heavy tourism, (2) tourists may be at heightened risk because of their activities, or (3) because they can act as vectors to transport the agent to new areas. Examples of recently recognized diseases with relationship to travel include HIV, Legionnaire's disease, cyclosporiasis, Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal, hantavirus, and variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Reemerging diseases include dengue fever, malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, leptospirosis, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. In addition, tuberculosis, drug-resistant shigellosis, and cholera have been major concerns in refugee and migrant populations. Because of the unique role of travel in emerging infections, efforts are underway to address this factor by agencies such as the CDC, WHO, the International Society of Travel Medicine, and the travel industry.

  5. Infectious Bronchitis Vaccination Protocols for Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sulaiman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A research was conducted to investigate the effects of vaccination protocols for Infectious Bronchitis (IB on egg production, egg quality, and IB antibody titres of laying hens. Different initial vaccination (Control, VicS eye, VicS spray, VicS water, A3 eye, A3 spray, and A3 water for IB were administered to day-old Isa Brown hens. Half the hens were revaccinated regularly during lay whereas the other hens were not vaccinated. Results showed that initial vaccination treatment had significant effects on hen day egg production and egg quality of egg weight, shell reflectivity, shell breaking strength, shell thickness, albumen height, Haugh Units, and IB antibody titre levels, but had no effect on percentage of shell and yolk colour. Egg weight and shell reflectivity were less favourable in the control hens. In contrast, shell breaking strength and shell thickness were highest for the group that initially received A3 vaccine in water. However, regular revaccination had some deleterious effects on egg production and egg quality. There were no significant effects of revaccination on IB antibody titres. It is concluded that there was little advantage in regularly revaccinating laying hens for IB virus, since they had received appropriate initial vaccination.

  6. Cannibalism and Infectious Disease: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, Benjamin G; Dillemuth, Forrest P; Flick, Andrew J; Faldyn, Matthew J; Clark, David R; Rudolf, Volker H W; Elderd, Bret D

    2017-09-01

    Cannibalism occurs in a majority of both carnivorous and noncarnivorous animal taxa from invertebrates to mammals. Similarly, infectious parasites are ubiquitous in nature. Thus, interactions between cannibalism and disease occur regularly. While some adaptive benefits of cannibalism are clear, the prevailing view is that the risk of parasite transmission due to cannibalism would increase disease spread and, thus, limit the evolutionary extent of cannibalism throughout the animal kingdom. In contrast, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the other half of the interaction between cannibalism and disease, that is, how cannibalism affects parasites. Here we examine the interaction between cannibalism and parasites and show how advances across independent lines of research suggest that cannibalism can also reduce the prevalence of parasites and, thus, infection risk for cannibals. Cannibalism does this by both directly killing parasites in infected victims and by reducing the number of susceptible hosts, often enhanced by the stage-structured nature of cannibalism and infection. While the well-established view that disease should limit cannibalism has held sway, we present theory and examples from a synthesis of the literature showing how cannibalism may also limit disease and highlight key areas where conceptual and empirical work is needed to resolve this debate.

  7. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  8. Equine infectious anemia: prospects for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issel, C J; McManus, J M; Hagius, S D; Foil, L D; Adams, W V; Montelaro, R C

    1990-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia has been managed in most countries by the imposition of testing and quarantine regulations. In the United States, about 700,000 of the more than 7,000,000 horses are tested annually. As long as the status of greater than 90% of the horse population remains unknown and horses are transported and congregate in a relatively unrestricted manner, EIA will continue to exact its toll. Therefore, it is incumbent on the scientific community to continue to develop and refine practical and sensitive diagnostic tests for EIA which will be used in an expanding market, to reduce the number of untested horses and to increase the accuracy of test results. Under ideal conditions, EIA can spread rapidly in a localized population with potentially devastating results. Although strict adherence to sanitary regulations will minimize the likelihood of epizootics, the existence of a large reservoir of untested horses with occasional contact with uninfected test-negative horses will ensure the continued transmission of EIAV. The change of this transmission occurring as a result of human intervention can be eliminated but it is not possible to eliminate the threat posed by blood feeding insects. If these "chance encounters" between an untested EIAV infected horse and a test-negative horse occur under field conditions where horse flies are abundant and the proximate distance between the horses is minimal, transmission is efficient if the quantity of EIAV in the blood of the donor horse is high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Etiology and immunology of infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LF Caron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV of chickens is currently one of the main diseases associated with respiratory syndrome in domestic poultry, as well as with losses related to egg production. The etiological agent is a coronavirus, which presents structural differences in the field, mainly in the S1 spike protein. The immune response against this virus is complicated by the few similarities among serotypes. Environmental and management factors, as well as the high mutation rate of the virus, render it difficult to control the disease and compromise the efficacy of the available vaccines. Bird immune system capacity to respond to challenges depend on the integrity of the mucosae, as an innate compartment, and on the generation of humoral and cell-mediated adaptive responses, and may affect the health status of breeding stocks in the medium run. Vaccination of day-old chicks in the hatchery on aims at eliciting immune responses, particularly cell-mediated responses that are essential when birds are first challenged. Humoral response (IgY and IgA are also important for virus clearance in subsequent challenges. The presence of antibodies against the S1 spike protein in 3- to 4-week-old birds is important both in broilers and for immunological memory in layers and breeders.

  10. SARS - infectious disease of 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is an emerging viral infectious disease. According to the World Health Organization, a suspected case of SARS is defined as documented fever (temperature >38°C, lower respiratory tract symptoms, and contact with a person believed to have had SARS or history of travel to an area of documented transmission. A probable case is a suspected case with chest radiographic findings of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, or an unexplained respiratory illness resulting in death, with autopsy findings of ARDS without identifiable cause. In this article some SARS epidemiological data in Indonesia will also presented. There are 7 SARS suspected cases and 2 probable cases were registered in Indonesia on the period of 1 March to 9 July 2003, and no more cases were reported after that time. How will be SARS progression in the future will be a subject of discussion among scientist, and we will have to wait and be prepared for any development might occur. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 59-63Keywords: SARS, Case Definition, Etiology, Indonesia

  11. DNA vaccination strategies against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A M; Kennedy, R C

    1999-08-01

    DNA immunisation represents a novel approach to vaccine and immunotherapeutic development. Injection of plasmid DNA encoding a foreign gene of interest can result in the subsequent expression of the foreign gene products and the induction of an immune response within a host. This is relevant to prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies when the foreign gene represents a protective epitope from a pathogen. The recent demonstration by a number of laboratories that these immune responses evoke protective immunity against some infectious diseases and cancers provides support for the use of this approach. In this article, we attempt to present an informative and unbiased representation of the field of DNA immunisation. The focus is on studies that impart information on the development of vaccination strategies against a number of human and animal pathogens. Investigations that describe the mechanism(s) of protective immunity induced by DNA immunisation highlight the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to developing vaccines within a given system. A variety of systems in which DNA vaccination has resulted in the induction of protective immunity, as well as the correlates associated with these protective immune responses, will be described. Particular attention will focus on systems involving parasitic diseases. Finally, the potential of DNA immunisation is discussed as it relates to veterinary medicine and its role as a possible vaccine strategy against animal coccidioses.

  12. Treatment of cats with feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin; Ritz, Susanne

    2008-05-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) infection resulting in clinical signs is invariably fatal despite clinical intervention. As FIP is an immune-mediated disease, treatment is mainly aimed at controlling the immune response triggered by the infection with the feline coronavirus (FCoV). Immune suppressive drugs such as prednisone or cyclophosphamide may slow disease progression but do not produce a cure. In nearly every published case report of attempted therapy for clinical FIP, glucocorticoids have been used; there are, however, no controlled studies that evaluate the effect of glucocorticoids as a therapy for FIP. Some veterinarians prescribe immune modulators to treat cats with FIP with no documented controlled evidence of efficacy. It has been suggested that these agents may benefit infected animals by restoring compromised immune function, thereby allowing the patient to control viral burden and recover from clinical signs. However, a non-specific stimulation of the immune system may be contraindicated as clinical signs develop and progress as a result of an immune-mediated response to the mutated FCoV.

  13. Genotyping coronaviruses associated with feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine S; Porter, Emily; Matthews, David; Kipar, Anja; Tasker, Séverine; Helps, Christopher R; Siddell, Stuart G

    2015-06-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) infections are endemic among cats worldwide. The majority of infections are asymptomatic or result in only mild enteric disease. However, approximately 5 % of cases develop feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic disease that is a frequent cause of death in young cats. In this study, we report the complete coding genome sequences of six FCoVs: three from faecal samples from healthy cats and three from tissue lesion samples from cats with confirmed FIP. The six samples were obtained over a period of 8 weeks at a single-site cat rescue and rehoming centre in the UK. We found amino acid differences located at 44 positions across an alignment of the six virus translatomes and, at 21 of these positions, the differences fully or partially discriminated between the genomes derived from the faecal samples and the genomes derived from the tissue lesion samples. In this study, two amino acid differences fully discriminated the two classes of genomes: these were both located in the S2 domain of the virus surface glycoprotein gene. We also identified deletions in the 3c protein ORF of genomes from two of the FIP samples. Our results support previous studies that implicate S protein mutations in the pathogenesis of FIP.

  14. EFFICACY OF PREBIOTIC DOSE OF LACTULOSE IN FUNCTIONAL NUTRITION OF INFANTS WITH ENTEROCOLITIS AND INTESTINAL DISBIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.R. Meskina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a data from a clinical study describing different clinical effects of lactulose. The direction of drug’s efficacy depends on different dose of lactulose. The use of prebiotic dose (milk mixture «Bifidus 1, 2» improves the state of intestinal micro flora, favors to the increase of efficacy of usually used treatment and decreases the probability of unfavorable rehabilitation period in infants with infectious enterocolitis and intestinal disbiosis.Key words: infants, infectious enterocolitis, intestinal micro flora, short-chain fatty acids, lactulose.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (4: 105–110

  15. 76 FR 6626 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact Person listed below in advance of... and Infectious Diseases Council; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Subcommittee. Date: September 19..., Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 1,...

  16. 75 FR 3472 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAID Clinical Trial Planning (R34) Grants..., Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

  17. 75 FR 7487 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis...: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Human Immune...

  18. Children's Infectious Disease in Moscow: Problems and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Mazankova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on statistical data, a comparative analysis of infectious morbidity and mortality in Moscow in 2015 and 2014 revealed a whole, the decline in these indicators. Made significant progress in reducing infectious morbidity in Moscow due to the vaccination of children, including — increased regional calendar of preventive vaccinations. However, analysis of the work of medical institutions indicates the feasibility of the development and introduction of technologies of management of patients with post-infectious syndromes, as well as improving the health care system for children with infectious diseases based on a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation infectious disease and pediatricians of different specialties. To solve these problems is proposed a plan to improve the effectiveness of children's infectious diseases services relating to the reorganization of hospital beds and outpatient care, ensure the continuity of the different health facilities, implementation of modern methods of etiological diagnosis of infections, the organization of continuous vocational training of paediatricians in Moscow on a specialty «Infectious diseases».

  19. Infectious Disinfection: "Exploring Global Water Quality"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaya, Evans; Tippins, Deborah J.; Mueller, Michael P.; Thomson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Learning about the water situation in other regions of the world and the devastating effects of floods on drinking water helps students study science while learning about global water quality. This article provides science activities focused on developing cultural awareness and understanding how local water resources are integrally linked to the…

  20. Infectious Disinfection: "Exploring Global Water Quality"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaya, Evans; Tippins, Deborah J.; Mueller, Michael P.; Thomson, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Learning about the water situation in other regions of the world and the devastating effects of floods on drinking water helps students study science while learning about global water quality. This article provides science activities focused on developing cultural awareness and understanding how local water resources are integrally linked to the…

  1. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-24

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Another Dimension, Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness.  Created: 4/24/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/24/2013.

  2. Epidemiology of infectious meningitis in the State of Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Maria das Graças Gomes; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Rocha, Lívia Laura dos Santos; Monte, Rossicléia Lins; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Santos, Marcelo Cordeiro dos; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Guerra, Marcus Vinitius de Farias; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, particularly in the capital Manaus, meningitis has affected populations of different cultures and social strata over the years. Bacterial meningitis is caused by several different species and represents a major issue of public health importance. The present study reports the meningitis case numbers with different etiologies in Amazonas from January 1976 to December 2012. Since the 1970s, the (currently named) Tropical Medicine Foundation of Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD)] has remained a reference center in Amazonas for the treatment of meningitis through the diagnosis and notification of cases and the confirmation of such cases using specific laboratory tests. The foundation has achieved coverage of over 90% of the state medical records for many years. Between 1990 and 2012, meningitis cases caused by Haemophilus influenzae decreased with the introduction of the H. influenzae vaccine. Meningococcal disease previously had a higher frequency of serogroup B disease, but starting in 2008, the detection of serogroup C increased gradually and has outpaced the detection of serogroup B. Recently, surveillance has improved the etiological definition of viral meningitis at FMT-HVD, with enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) prevailing in this group of pathogens. With the advent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), cryptococcal meningitis has become an important disease in Amazonas. Additionally, infectious meningitis is an important burden in the State of Amazonas. Changes in the epidemiological profile for the different etiology-defined cases are the result of continuous epidemiological surveillance and laboratory capacity improvements and control measures, such as Haemophilus influenzae vaccination.

  3. Epidemiology of infectious meningitis in the State of Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria das Graças Gomes Saraiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the State of Amazonas, particularly in the capital Manaus, meningitis has affected populations of different cultures and social strata over the years. Bacterial meningitis is caused by several different species and represents a major issue of public health importance. The present study reports the meningitis case numbers with different etiologies in Amazonas from January 1976 to December 2012. METHODS: Since the 1970s, the (currently named Tropical Medicine Foundation of Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado [Fundação de Medicina Tropical Doutor Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD] has remained a reference center in Amazonas for the treatment of meningitis through the diagnosis and notification of cases and the confirmation of such cases using specific laboratory tests. RESULTS: The foundation has achieved coverage of over 90% of the state medical records for many years. Between 1990 and 2012, meningitis cases caused by Haemophilus influenzae decreased with the introduction of the H. influenzae vaccine. Meningococcal disease previously had a higher frequency of serogroup B disease, but starting in 2008, the detection of serogroup C increased gradually and has outpaced the detection of serogroup B. Recently, surveillance has improved the etiological definition of viral meningitis at FMT-HVD, with enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and varicella zoster virus (VZV prevailing in this group of pathogens. With the advent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, cryptococcal meningitis has become an important disease in Amazonas. Additionally, infectious meningitis is an important burden in the State of Amazonas. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the epidemiological profile for the different etiology-defined cases are the result of continuous epidemiological surveillance and laboratory capacity improvements and control measures, such as Haemophilus influenzae vaccination.

  4. APPROUSH TO SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDIDIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsapov D.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increased level of morbidity of infective endocarditis (IE connected with new risk factors: intravenous drug use, cardiosurgical interventions, hemodialysis brought new clinical forms of the disease. As it shown in a literature main pathogenetic factors of IE are bacteraemia, trauma of endocardium and invasive medical procedures. Very typical pathogens are streptococci and staphylococci. Most typically mitral and aortal valves are affected with spreading of vegetations on surrounding media. Discussion. IE is polyetiologic disease caused by more than 128 microorganisms, and still a challenge for medical professionals. Detection a causative agent is critical for proper specific treatment. In different sources data on percentage of proven cases very according to country and different medical centres reflecting different local epidemiology of IE, diagnostic criteria and protocols. Culture negative infectious endocarditis (CNIE is considered in case of obtaining of three negative results of cultivation of samples on a standard blood agar during 7 days and subculturing. CNIE incidence very form 2% to 33% according to different researches and higher in cases of community acquired infection and reseeding antibacterial treatment. Some of cases of CNIE caused by gram - negative fastidious microorganisms - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Actinobacillus, Actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae, with united in HACEK group according to their properties to colonize oropharynx and requirement in special conditions and duration of incubation. Detection of some intracellular bacteria, such as C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. require immunological methods of detection, histological methods and of PCR. Conclusion. In case of diagnostics of patients with CNIE it is necessary to use a combination of prolonged subculturing of serum, emboli and histologic material on blood agar with microscopy by Warthin

  5. Lessons learnt from post-infectious IBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil eSarna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of IBS symptoms– altered bowel function and abdominal cramping in a subset of adult subjects exposed to severe enteric infections opened up an unprecedented opportunity to understand the etiology of this poorly understood disorder. Perhaps, for the reasons that these symptoms follow a severe enteric infection, and mucosal biopsy tissues are readily available, the focus of most studies thus far has been to show that mild/low-grade mucosal inflammation persisting after the initial infection has subsided causes the IBS symptoms. Parallel studies in non-infectious IBS patients, who did not have prior enteritis, showed similar mild mucosal inflammation. Together, these studies examined the mucosal infiltration of specific immune cells, increase of select inflammatory mediators, mast cell and enterochromafin cell hyperplasia and epithelial permeability. In spite of the fact that the data on these topics were not consistent among different studies and clinical trials with prednisone, fluoxetine and kitotifen failed to provide relief of IBS symptoms, the predominant conclusions were that mild mucosal inflammation is the cause of IBS symptoms. However, the circular smooth muscle cells, and myenteric neurons are the primary regulators of gut motility function, while primary afferent neurons and CNS play essential roles in induction of visceral hypersensitivity - no explanation was provided as to how mild mucosal inflammation causes dysfunction in cells far removed. Accumulating evidence shows that mild mucosal inflammation in IBS patients is in physiological range. It has little deleterious effects on cells within its own environment and therefore it is unlikely to affect cells in the muscularis externa. This review discusses the disconnect between the focus on mild/low-grade mucosal inflammation and the potential mechanisms and molecular dysfunctions in smooth muscle cells, myenteric neurons and primary afferent neurons that may

  6. Assembly pathway of avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, P; Scholz, E; Turek, J; Nodgreen, R; Maloney, B

    1993-12-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious upper respiratory tract infection in chickens. At present, ILTV vaccines are not satisfactory because of development of a latent carrier status in vaccinated birds. Development of recombinant virus vaccines has been hampered by the limited information available on the molecular level and organization of this virus. We isolated 3 assembly intermediates, designated A, B, and C from ILTV-infected cells. Analysis of [3H]thymidine-and [35S]methionine-labeled particles, and electron microscopic studies indicated that particle A was the empty capsid, particle B was the procapsid containing scaffolding protein, and particle C was the DNA-filled capsid. The ILTV procapsids could only be found in the nucleus, which indicated that procapsids could not translocate through the nuclear membrane until they packaged the DNA. The DNA-filled capsids migrated through the nuclear membrane and obtained an envelope from the inner membrane of the nucleus. The enveloped particles then migrated through the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum into vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Infective virions were isolated from within the infected cells, indicating that budding through the cytoplasmic membrane is not a necessary step in ILTV maturation. Abundant arrays composed of tubules about 45 to 50 nm wide were found in the cytoplasm of chicken embryonic liver cells about 30 to 38 hours after infection. Comparison of the assembly intermediates and the DNA packaging pathway of ILTV with that of bacteriophage pi 29 indicates that similarity exists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Infectious disease risk and international tourism demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló, Jaume; Santana-Gallego, Maria; Awan, Waqas

    2017-05-01

     For some countries, favourable climatic conditions for tourism are often associated with favourable conditions for infectious diseases, with the ensuing development constraints on the tourist sectors of impoverished countries where tourism's economic contribution has a high potential. This paper evaluates the economic implications of eradication of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola on the affected destination countries focusing on the tourist expenditures.  A gravity model for international tourism flows is used to provide an estimation of the impact of each travel-related disease on international tourist arrivals. Next the potential eradication of these diseases in the affected countries is simulated and the impact on tourism expenditures is estimated.  The results show that, in the case of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola, the eradication of these diseases in the affected countries would result in an increase of around 10 million of tourist worldwide and a rise in the tourism expenditure of 12 billion dollars.  By analysing the economic benefits of the eradication of Dengue, Ebola, Malaria, and Yellow Fever for the tourist sector-a strategic economic sector for many of the countries where these TRD are present-this paper explores a new aspect of the quantification of health policies which should be taken into consideration in future international health assessment programmes. It is important to note that the analysis is only made of the direct impact of the diseases' eradication and consequently the potential multiplicative effects of a growth in the GDP, in terms of tourism attractiveness, are not evaluated. Consequently, the economic results can be considered to be skeleton ones.

  8. [Imported infectious diseases in tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius Gordillo, N; Martín Nalda, A; Otero Romero, S; Soler-Palacín, P; Sulleiro Igual, E; Espiau Guarner, M; Fernández-Polo, A; Figueras Nadal, C

    2014-08-01

    An Imported Diseases Clinic was created in the hospital in 2009. The aim of this study was to asses its contribution in terms of capacity, quality of care and teaching offered. A retrospective study was conducted from 2009 to 2011, analyzing: A) development of knowledge by means of protocols and publications created, and subject taught; B) capacity and quality of care offered by the analysis of patients seen, the adequacy of the protocols and accessibility. The patients were classified into 3 groups. Group 1: immigrant patient screening, group 2: patient consultation after tropical or sub-tropical travel, group 3: screening of vertical transmission of imported disease. Six protocols have been developed and disseminated on the unit website, as well as 5 scientific publications. A total of 316 patients were evaluated: 191 included in group 1 (29 Adopted and 162 Immigrants), 57 in group 2 (94.7% Visiting Friends and Relatives and 81.5% without a pre-travel consultation). They consulted due to, gastrointestinal symptoms (52.6%) and fever (43.8%), with 68 included in group 3 at risk of imported disease by vertical transmission (62 Trypanosoma cruzi, 1 Human T Lymphotropic Virus and 5 Plasmodium spp.). The overall adherence to the protocols was about 77.1%. Infectious Diseases Units must adapt to the reality of the population and be flexible in its structure. Periodic assessment of the quality of care offered is essential, as well as an evaluation on the need for additional studies. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm complicating renal allograft: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung MMT

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marvin MT Chung, Yiu Che Chan, Yuk Law, Stephen WK Cheng Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Abstract: Infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm complicating renal transplant is rare, but probably under-reported with <30 cases worldwide. We report a 45-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and end stage renal failure, who had a renal transplant anastomosed to the right external iliac artery and vein. Postoperatively, he made a slow recovery with malaise and persistent vague right iliac fossa discomfort. Ultrasound scan 1 month postoperatively showed perinephric collection, and fluid culture grew Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. He was started on vancomycin, daptomycin and colistin. MAG-3 scan also showed suboptimal function in the renal allograft. His symptoms persisted with fever, and blood culture yielded P. aeruginosa. Repeated ultrasound scan, and subsequent computed tomography scan a few weeks later, showed perinephric collection and a large, 3.8×3.5 cm pseudoaneurysm posteromedial to the graft kidney. He underwent emergency graft excision, together with resection of the pseudoaneurysm with in situ reversed great saphenous vein interposition graft, and made a good recovery on hemodialysis. The aneurysm wall grew P. aeruginosa, and he was put on imipenem and cilastatin (tienam, colistin, ciprofloxacin and daptomycin. To our knowledge, this is one of very few cases in the world’s literature in which a P. aeruginosa infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm developed after a renal allograft. Keywords: infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm, renal allograft artery, renal transplant, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in situ interposition bypass graft

  10. Long-term, repeated dose in vitro neurotoxicity of the glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3, demonstrated in rat hippocampal slice cultures by using continuous propidium iodide incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne W; Blaabjerg, Morten; Noraberg, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Most in vitro models are only used to assess short-term effects of test compounds. However, as demonstrated here, hippocampal slice cultures can be used for long-term studies. The test compound used was the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3...

  11. Infectious discitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans, R; Simeon, P; Cuenca, R; Fonollosa, V; Bago, J; Vilardell, M

    1992-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient who developed a vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae. The organism was isolated in cultures of blood and vertebral puncture biopsy samples. The patient was satisfactorily treated with trimethroprim and sulphamethoxazole. Enterobacter cloacae, a Gram negative organism, has been confirmed as the cause of bacteremia in patients with burns, urinary infections, in adults with pneumonia, and in children with joint infections. Spondylodiscitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae has not previously been described. Images PMID:1632668

  12. Research Program in Tropical Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-14

    with sickle cell disease, meningitis, dysentery, or evidence of peritonitis, wound infection, pneumonia, tuberculosis or HIV infection were not...of the following: Glucantime, 15% paromomycin cream and traditional medicine ( herbs , leaf and root extracts, topical acid and/or burns). All BDF...and traditional medicine ( herbs , leaf and root extracts, topical acid or burns). All BDF patient Leishmania cultures were negative. An aspirate from

  13. [Blood culture update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Serieys, C; Bergogne-Bérézin, E

    2002-01-12

    Blood culture is one of the most important bacteriological examinations with important clinical and therapeutic consequences. Blood cultures should be ordered in all patients with signs suggesting septicemia, endocarditis or severe infection (pneumococcal pneumonia, bacterial meningitis with bloodstream dissemination). Blood culture methods have evolved considerably over the last twenty years. After using manual methods for many years, read by non-standardized visual methods, the development of media with defined compositions and supplemented to allow growth of bacteria difficult to culture has been associated with the development of automatic blood culture devices. These devices have undergone rapid improvement. Semi-automatic devices (Bactec NR-660) were rapidly followed by completely automatic techniques, including four devices currently available: since 1989 Bio-Argos (Rio-Rad) and Bact/Alert (Organon-Teknika) and in 1993, Bactec 9240 (Becton-Dickinson) and Vital (BioMérieux). All these devices allow automatic detection of CO2 produced during bacterial growth. Automatic reading systems provide continuous output avoiding the need for invasive methods and thus the risk of contamination in addition to saving time. Potential application to achieve quantitative blood cultures for intensive care units is in the development stage. The reliability of these devices is well recognized and their contribution to severe bacterial infection is undeniable. There are certain limitations however related to material cost and the non-identification of the pathogen involved. Molecular biology techniques open new perspectives in this field. The evolution of techniques, definitions, and pathogenic approach to septicemia must be revisited as new infectious situations have been identified at the same time as new investigation tools resulting from considerable technological progress. New methods of blood culture have largely contributed to this progress.

  14. Long terminal repeats are not the sole determinants of virulence for equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Y-B; Zhou, T; Yuan, X-F; Qiu, H-J; Xue, F; Sun, C-Q; Wang, L; Wu, D-L; Peng, J-M; Kong, X-G; Tong, G-Z

    2007-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of equine infectious anemia virus donkey leukocyte-attenuated virus (EIAV-DLA) were substituted with those of the wild-type EIAV-L (wt EIAV-L, the parent virus of EIAV-DLA). The resulting chimeric plasmid was designated pOK-LTR DLA/L. Purified pOK-LTR DLA/L was transfected into monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) cultures prepared from EIAV-negative, heparinized whole blood from a donkey. Eighth-passage cell cultures developed the typical cytopathogenic effects (CPE) of EIAV infection, and virions with typical EIAV profiles were observed with an electron microscope. Horses were inoculated with the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA and challenged with the wt EIAV-L strain six months later. All of the horses inoculated with either the chimeric virus or EIAV-DLA were protected from disease, whereas the control horses died with typical EIA symptoms.

  15. The Endemic Infectious Diseases of Somalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    ivermectin ( 100 pig/kg of’ body weight) [2 15- Ii laras is21I7[. The best preventive measures are the screening of sleeping quarters and the use of insect...lilziopwias .InoImeInani h J MCd SLi 19M8:1:433-5. 149 1 2 7 2 NIS1) 2 183. llurgdorcer W, Ornishee RA. Schmidt ML. H oogstralai 11. A search for 141 hi. ’it...tu:rs i fr’ Ethiopia (letter). Lancet 1991:338:827. dose ivermectin an~d 𔃻i -,t` ~ ity ,!,tinst b. 206. Butler T. Relapsing (ever. In; Suickldad GT

  16. Infectious prions accumulate to high levels in non proliferative C2C12 myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Herbst

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are driven by the strain-specific, template-dependent transconformation of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C into a disease specific isoform PrP(Sc. Cell culture models of prion infection generally use replicating cells resulting in lower levels of prion accumulation compared to animals. Using non-replicating cells allows the accumulation of higher levels of PrP(Sc and, thus, greater amounts of infectivity. Here, we infect non-proliferating muscle fiber myotube cultures prepared from differentiated myoblasts. We demonstrate that prion-infected myotubes generate substantial amounts of PrP(Sc and that the level of infectivity produced in these post-mitotic cells, 10(5.5 L.D.50/mg of total protein, approaches that observed in vivo. Exposure of the myotubes to different mouse-adapted agents demonstrates strain-specific replication of infectious agents. Mouse-derived myotubes could not be infected with hamster prions suggesting that the species barrier effect is intact. We suggest that non-proliferating myotubes will be a valuable model system for generating infectious prions and for screening compounds for anti-prion activity.

  17. Assortative sociality, limited dispersal, infectious disease and the genesis of the global pattern of religion diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Why are religions far more numerous in the tropics compared with the temperate areas? We propose, as an answer, that more religions have emerged and are maintained in the tropics because, through localized coevolutionary races with hosts, infectious diseases select for three anticontagion behaviours: in-group assortative sociality; out-group avoidance; and limited dispersal. These behaviours, in turn, create intergroup boundaries that effectively fractionate, isolate and diversify an original culture leading to the genesis of two or more groups from one. Religion is one aspect of a group's culture that undergoes this process. If this argument is correct then, across the globe, religion diversity should correlate positively with infectious disease diversity, reflecting an evolutionary history of antagonistic coevolution between parasites and hosts and subsequent religion genesis. We present evidence that supports this model: for a global sample of traditional societies, societal range size is reduced in areas with more pathogens compared with areas with few pathogens, and in contemporary countries religion diversity is positively related to two measures of parasite stress. PMID:18664438

  18. Analysis of the Salmonella typhimurium Proteome through Environmental Response toward Infectious Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (aka, S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes ~40,000 reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea a year in the United States. To develop a deeper understanding of the infectious state of S. typhimurium, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based “bottom-up” proteomics was used to globally analyze the proteins present under specific growth conditions. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain cells were grown in contrasting culture conditions that mimicked both natural free-living conditions and an infectious state, i.e., logarithm phase, stationary phase and Mg-depleted medium growth. Initial comparisons of the LT2 strain protein abundances among cell culture conditions indicate that the majority of proteins do not change significantly. Not unexpectedly, cells grown in Mg-depleted medium conditions had a higher abundance of Mg2+ transport proteins than found in other growth conditions. A second more virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain (14028) was also studied with these growth conditions and used to directly compare to the LT2 strain. The strain comparison offers a unique opportunity to compare and contrast observations in these closely related bacteria. One particular protein family, propanediol utilization proteins, was drastically more abundant in the 14028 strain than in the LT2 strain, and may be a contributor to increased pathogenicity in the 14028 strain.

  19. New technologies in predicting, preventing and controlling emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaki, Eirini

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of emerging infectious diseases is vital for the early identification of public health threats. Emergence of novel infections is linked to human factors such as population density, travel and trade and ecological factors like climate change and agricultural practices. A wealth of new technologies is becoming increasingly available for the rapid molecular identification of pathogens but also for the more accurate monitoring of infectious disease activity. Web-based surveillance tools and epidemic intelligence methods, used by all major public health institutions, are intended to facilitate risk assessment and timely outbreak detection. In this review, we present new methods for regional and global infectious disease surveillance and advances in epidemic modeling aimed to predict and prevent future infectious diseases threats.

  20. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, V.; Gautret, P.; Schlagenhauf, P.; Burchard, G.D.; Caumes, E.; Jensenius, M.; Castelli, F.; Gkrania-Klotsas, E.; Weld, L.; Lopez-Velez, R.; de Vries, P.; von Sonnenburg, F.; Loutan, L.; Parola, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods: To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in

  1. System for identification of microorganism and detection of infectious disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for the identification of microorganisms or infectious disorders are disclosed, comprising obtaining a suitable sample from sources such as persons, animals, plants, food, water or soil. The methods also comprise providing tailored nucleic acid substrate(s) designed to react with a type 1...... topoisomerase from one or more microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s), and incubating said substrate with said sample, or extracts or preparations from the sample, so that the substrate is processed by said topoisomerase if said microorganism(s) or infectious agent(s) is present in the sample. Finally......, processed substrates are identified and potentially quantified by one or more of a range of standard molecular biology methods and read-out systems. The identification and potential quantification of microorganisms and infectious agents, including but not limited to Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium...

  2. Ebola Virus Mutated to Become More Infectious, Scientists Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161849.html Ebola Virus Mutated to Become More Infectious, Scientists Say Virologists ... 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the Ebola virus boosted its ability to infect people during the ...

  3. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, V.; Gautret, P.; Schlagenhauf, P.; Burchard, G.D.; Caumes, E.; Jensenius, M.; Castelli, F.; Gkrania-Klotsas, E.; Weld, L.; Lopez-Velez, R.; de Vries, P.; von Sonnenburg, F.; Loutan, L.; Parola, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods: To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in Eur

  4. Newcastle disease virus as a vaccine vector for infectious laryngotracheitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective, safe, and incapable of reverting to virulence are characteristics desirable for infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccines. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing foreign antigens of avian and mammalian pathogens have been demonstrated to elicit protective immunity....

  5. Radiolabeled compounds in diagnosis of infectious and inflammatory disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Boerman, O.C.; Rennen, H.J.J.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine offers powerful noninvasive techniques for visualization of infectious and inflammatory disorders using whole body imaging enabling the determination of both localization and number of inflammatory foci. A wide variety of approaches depicting the different stages of the inflammatory

  6. Sex and Reproduction in the Transmission of Infectious Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current data permit only speculations regarding sex differences in the prevalence of infectious uveitis between women and men because uveitis case surveys do not uniformly report gender data. Differences in prevalence that are reported in the literature could relate to simple differences in the number of women and men at risk for infection or to biological differences between men and women. Compared to other types of uveitis, infectious uveitis may be directly related to occupational exposures or sexual behaviors, which differ between women and men, and may mask actual biological differences in susceptibility to ocular manifestations of the infection and its prognosis. In infectious uveitis for which there is no element of sexual transmission and data is available, prevalence of ocular disease is roughly equal between women and men. Women also have a unique relationship with infectious uveitis in their role as mothers. Vertical transmission of infections such as herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, and cytomegalovirus can produce severe chorioretinitis in neonates.

  7. The protective efficacy of cloned Moraxella bovis pili in monovalent and multivalent vaccine formulations against experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W; Atwell, J L; Lehrbach, P R; Schwartzkoff, C L; Egerton, J R; Tennent, J M

    1995-07-01

    Calves were vaccinated with cloned Moraxella bovis pili of serogroup C (experiment 1) or B (experiment 2) either as a monovalent formulation or as part of a multivalent preparation with pili of six other serogroups. Within 4 weeks of the second vaccine dose vaccinated calves and non-vaccinated controls were challenged via the ocular route with either virulent M. bovis strain Dal2d (serogroup C) or M. bovis strain 3WO7 (serogroup B) in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Calves vaccinated with multivalent vaccines had significantly lower antibody titres than those vaccinated with monovalent preparations. Nevertheless, the levels of protection against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) achieved with multivalent vaccines were 72% and 83% for the groups challenged with M. bovis strains of serogroups B and C, respectively. The serogroup C monovalent vaccine gave 100% protection against experimentally induced IBK and M. bovis isolates cultured from the eyes 6 days post-challenge were identified as belonging solely to serogroup C. Unexpectedly, only 25% protection was achieved against homologous strain challenge of calves that received the monovalent serogroup B vaccine. Furthermore, the majority of M. bovis isolates recovered from calves in this group belonged to serogroup C, as did half of those isolates cultured from the multivalent vaccinates. The remaining bacterial isolates from the latter group, together with all isolates from the non-vaccinated controls, belonged to serogroup B. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that derivatives of the serogroup B challenge inoculum had expressed serogroup C pilus antigen within 6 days of the challenge, possibly as a result of pilus gene inversion occurring in response to the presence of specific antibody in eye tissues and tears.

  8. Profiling of a network behind an infectious disease outbreak

    OpenAIRE

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity are of great interest recently in studying the spread of an infectious disease. The presented method solves an inverse problem to discover the effectively decisive topology of a heterogeneous network and reveal the transmission parameters which govern the stochastic spreads over the network from a dataset on an infectious disease outbreak in the early growth phase. Populations in a combination of epidemiological compartment models and a meta-population ...

  9. New technologies in predicting, preventing and controlling emerging infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Christaki, Eirini

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of emerging infectious diseases is vital for the early identification of public health threats. Emergence of novel infections is linked to human factors such as population density, travel and trade and ecological factors like climate change and agricultural practices. A wealth of new technologies is becoming increasingly available for the rapid molecular identification of pathogens but also for the more accurate monitoring of infectious disease activity. Web-based surveillance to...

  10. Fighting Infectious Disease: Evidence from Sweden 1870-1940

    OpenAIRE

    Lazuka, Volha; Quaranta, Luciana; Bengtsson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Fighting infectious disease in the past, much like today, focused on isolating the disease and thereby stopping its spread. New insights into the modes of transmission and the causal agents in the mid-nineteenth century, together with fear of new epidemic outbreaks, motivated public investments aimed at reducing mortality from infectious disease. Combining longitudinal individual-level data on 17,000 children in a rural/semi-urban region in southern Sweden with parish-level data on public hea...

  11. Bovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the...

  12. Epidemiology of cancers of infectious origin and prevention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Flora, S; LA MAESTRA, S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infectious and parasitic diseases represent the third cause of cancer worldwide. A number of infectious and parasitic agents have been suspected or recognized to be associated with human cancers, including DNA viruses, such as papillomaviruses (several HPV types), herpesviruses (EBV and KSHV), polyomaviruses (SV40, MCV, BK, and JCV), and hepadnaviruses (HBV); RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses (HCV), defective viruses (HDV), and retroviruses (HTLV-I, HTLV-II, HIV-1, HIV-2,HERV-K, and X...

  13. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus from Infected Horse Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Yoshino, Tomoo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1974-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was purified from infected horse serum samples. Electron microscope observation on negatively stained preparations of purified virus showed roughly spherical particles sized between 100 and 200 nm in diameter. In disrupted particles, an envelope was visible but no internal structure could be resolved. Since the purified virus fraction had a strong antigenic activity to antiserum in immunodiffusion reaction, these particles are thought to be the causative virus of equine infectious anemia. Images PMID:4372175

  14. Apoptosis and T cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Horzinek, M.C.; Haagmans, B. L.; Egberink, H F

    1996-01-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune- mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activated T cells. Since feline infectious peritonitis virus does not infect T cells, and viral proteins did not inhibit T-cell proliferation, we postulate that soluble mediators released during the infe...

  15. Managing the Navy’s Infectious Medical Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-04

    the medical staff assigned to Marine units. Although currently unaccounted for, medical waste is also generated through the home healthcare of retired...discharged to the sanitary system of the ship or must be autoclaved and stored. Infectious waste which is stored for disposal in port is either disposed...greatly fhor the infectious waste generated by the civilian sector of the healthcare industry. However, one difference is the potential for a large

  16. Peritoneal fluid culture and antibiotic treatment in patients with perforated appendicitis in a Pacific Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Boueil

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Although antibiotic use may be considered as an adjunct to surgical intervention of AP, the appropriate use of preoperative antibiotics and modifications according to culture results are essential to prevent infectious complications.

  17. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  18. Interferon Lambda: Modulating Immunity in Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Egli, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    dendritic cell polarization, and subsequent priming, activation, and proliferation of pathogen-specific T- and B-cells may also be important elements associated with infectious disease outcomes. This review summarizes the emerging details of the IFN-λ immunobiology in the context of the host immune response and viral and bacterial infections. PMID:28293236

  19. "ISA-Lation" of Single-Stranded Positive-Sense RNA Viruses from Non-Infectious Clinical/Animal Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Aubry

    Full Text Available Isolation of viral pathogens from clinical and/or animal samples has traditionally relied on either cell cultures or laboratory animal model systems. However, virus viability is notoriously susceptible to adverse conditions that may include inappropriate procedures for sample collection, storage temperature, support media and transportation. Using our recently described ISA method, we have developed a novel procedure to isolate infectious single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses from clinical or animal samples. This approach, that we have now called "ISA-lation", exploits the capacity of viral cDNA subgenomic fragments to re-assemble and produce infectious viral RNA in susceptible cells. Here, it was successfully used to rescue enterovirus, Chikungunya and Tick-borne encephalitis viruses from a variety of inactivated animal and human samples. ISA-lation represents an effective option to rescue infectious virus from clinical and/or animal samples that may have deteriorated during the collection and storage period, but also potentially overcomes logistic and administrative difficulties generated when complying with current health and safety and biosecurity guidelines associated with shipment of infectious viral material.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy for imaging infectious keratitis: demonstration of the pattern of microbial spread in an experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging and monitoring the disease progress of infectious keratitis in an experimental model, and to investigate the possible correlation of tissue architecture with spreading patterns of pathogens in an experimental model. Porcine eyes are to be obtained from slaughter house and processed and placed in organ culture system. Fungal infections by common pathogens of infectious keratitis are to be induced in porcine cornea buttons. Multiphoton fluorescence and SHG microscopy will be used for imaging and for monitoring the progression and extension of tissue destruction and possibly the pattern of pathogen spreading. We found that SHG imaging is useful in identifying alterations to collagen architecture while autofluorescence microscopy can be used to visualize the fungi and cells within the stroma. In summary, multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy can non-invasively demonstrate and monitor tissue destruction associated with infectious keratitis. The pattern of pathogen spreading and its correlation with the tissue architecture can also be shown, which can be useful for future studies of the tissue-microbial interactions for infectious keratitis.

  1. In vitro selection of high-infectious, leukemogenic virus from low-infectious, non-leukemogenic type C virus from a malignant ST/a mouse cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M

    1979-01-01

    Low-infectious, nontransforming type C virus was isolated from an in vitro spontaneously transformed ST/a mouse cell line, ST-L1. The virus released by ST-L1 cells was NB-tropic and XC(-). It gave rise to very small peroxidase antibody plaques (PAP) in cultures which initially were nonproducing....... Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels of the structural proteins of the ST-L1 virus showed an envelope glycoprotein with an apparent mass of 65 kilodaltons (kdal). The mouse cells SC-1, BALB/3T3, and NIH/3T3 could be productively infected with cell-free supernatants from the ST-L1 cell line...

  2. Infectious causes of fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alastair C; Moore, David A

    2015-06-01

    The causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO) are changing because advances in clinical practice and diagnostics have facilitated the identification of some infections. A variety of bacterial infections can cause FUO, and these can be divided into those that are easy to identify using culture and those that require serological or molecular tests for identification. A number of viral, parasitic and fungal infections can also cause prolonged fever. This article summarises the clinical features and diagnostic strategy of these infections. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  3. Irradiation of blood, blood compounds and cell culture in equipment of radiotherapy of clinical usage. Study about volume and ideal dose; Irradiacao de sangue, hemocomponentes e culturas celulares em equipamento de radioterapia de uso clinico. Estudo sobre volume e dose ideais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos [Fundacao Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital A.C. Camargo

    1996-06-01

    The irradiation of blood bags with the objective of minimizing the graft-versus-host disease in the proceedings of blood transfusion has been consolidated as an indispensable step in the advances of hematopoietic system diseases therapeutics. This practice performed in the great oncological treatment centers requires appropriate equipment (cell irradiators), that due to the high coast, is inaccessible to the majority of the services. The main objective of this work is the show the technique developed by the Radiological Physics Service of the Hospital A. C. Camargo Radiation Department, using the teletherapy equipment of clinical usage available at the Institution. The literature shows that a total dose of 2000 to 3500 c Gy must be administered to all target volume to get an ideal dose/volume relation that proportionates better therapeutic results, neutralizing the cells which are causative of post transfusion reactions of rejection, without prejudicing the other cells that are necessary to the maintenance and preservation of the transplanted person`s hematopoietic system functions. With the technic developed for optimization of the irradiation. it is possible to conclude that the utilization of radiotherapy equipment of clinical usage for blood irradiation, substituting cells irradiators, is a good option, permitting safe transfusion of products irradiated with adequate dose. (author) 12 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Epidemiology and eradication of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis (IBR/IPV) virus in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis (IBR/IPV) is a significant disease among domestic and wild cattle. The BHV-1 infection was first detected in Finland in 1970; presumably it was imported in 1968. The infection reappeared in the large-scale bulk-tank milk surveillances which started in 1990, and was eradicated in 1994. Our aim is to describe the epidemiology of this infection in Finland, and its eradication. Materials and methods The offic...

  5. A Clinical Analysis of 293 FUO Patients, A Diagnostic Model Discriminating infectious Diseases from Non-infectious Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Objective A diagnostic model was established to discriminate infectious diseases from non-infectious diseases. Methods The clinical data of patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) hospitalized in Xiangya Hospital Central South University, from January, 2006 to April, 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients enrolled were divided into two groups. The ifrst group was used to develop a diagnostic model: independent variables were recorded and considered in a logistic regression analysis to identify infectious and non-infectious diseases (αin= 0.05, αout= 0.10). The second group was used to evaluate the diagnostic model and make ROC analysis. Results The diagnostic rate of 143 patients in the ifrst group was 87.4%, the diagnosis included infectious disease (52.4%), connective tissue diseases (16.8%), neoplastic disease (16.1%) and miscellaneous (2.1%). The diagnostic rate of 168 patients in the second group was 88.4%, and the diagnosis was similar to the ifrst group. Logistic regression analysis showed that decreased white blood cell count (WBC 320 U/L) and lymphadenectasis were independent risk factors associated with non-infectious diseases. The odds ratios were 14.74, 5.84 and 5.11 (P≤ 0.01) , respectively. In ROC analysis, the sensitivity and speciifcity of the positive predictive values was 62.1% and 89.1%, respectively, while that of negative predicting values were 75% and 81.7%, respectively (AUC = 0.76,P = 0.00). Conclusions The combination of WBC 320 U/L and lymphadenectasis may be useful in discriminating infectious diseases from non-infectious diseases in patients hospitalized as FUO.

  6. Selected Pathogens of Concern to Industrial Food Processors: Infectious, Toxigenic, Toxico-Infectious, Selected Emerging Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Robert G.; Eifert, Joseph; Erickson, Marilyn C.; Gurtler, Joshua B.; Kornacki, Jeffrey L.; Line, Erick; Radcliff, Roy; Ryser, Elliot T.; Stawick, Bradley; Yan, Zhinong

    This chapter, written by several contributing authors, is devoted to discussing selected microbes of contemporary importance. Microbes from three categories are described by the following: (1) infectious invasive agents like Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter; (2) toxigenic pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Clostridium botulinum; and (3) toxico-infectious agents like enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens. In addition, emerging pathogens, like Cronobacter (Enterobacter) sakazakii, Arcobacter spp., and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis are also described.

  7. Infectious sacroiliitis: a retrospective, multicentre study of 39 adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermet Marion

    2012-11-01

    . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (n = 27, when focused on the SI (n = 25, directed towards the diagnosis to ISI in 25 cases. Pathogenic agents were isolated in 33 cases (84.6% by means of articular puncture (n = 16, blood culture (n = 14, cytobacteriological examination of urine (n = 2, or puncture of the psoas (n = 1. Gram-positive cocci were the mostly isolated common bacteria, with a predominance of staphylococci (n = 21. The most frequently isolated gram-negative bacillus was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 3. Evolution was favourable in 37 out of 39 patients under prolonged antibiotic therapy (mean duration 3.01 ± 1.21 months. Conclusion Our series confirmed that the clinical manifestations of ISI usually lead to delayed diagnosis. Based on our results, we suggest performing an MRI of the spine and SI in clinical situations characterised by lumbogluteal pain and symptoms of an infectious disease, such as fever.

  8. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  9. Efficacy and safety of metronidazole injection for the treatment of infectious peritonitis, abdominal abscess and pelvic inflammatory diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikamo, Hiroshige; Matsumizu, Miyako; Nakazuru, Yoshiomi; Nagashima, Masahito

    2015-02-01

    Although metronidazole (MNZ) has been used worldwide for more than 4 decades as a standard therapy for trichomoniasis, anaerobic and amebic infections, resistance to MNZ is still low. MNZ is available as oral, intravenous, and vaginal formulations, but the intravenous formulation of MNZ has not been approved in Japan. We conducted a phase 3 study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous MNZ combined with ceftriaxone (CTRX) in Japanese subjects with infectious peritonitis, abdominal abscess or pelvic inflammatory diseases (PIDs) to obtain regulatory approval. A combination of MNZ/CTRX at doses of 500 mg 3 or 4 times a day/1 or 2 g twice a day was administered intravenously to a total of 38 hospitalized subjects. MNZ/CTRX was well tolerated and exhibited excellent clinical and bacteriological efficacy with clinical efficacy rates of 100% (20/20) in infectious peritonitis or abdominal abscess subjects and 90.0% (9/10) in PID subjects, and the eradication rates in infectious peritonitis or abdominal abscess subjects and PID subjects were 100% (16/16) and 100% (4/4), respectively, at the test of cure. MNZ/CTRX was effective in 1 subject in whom a metallo-β-lactamase-producing Bacteroides fragilis strain (MIC of MNZ, 2 μg/ml) was identified. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (23.7%), followed by nausea (5.3%). No new safety signals were identified. MNZ/CTRX demonstrated excellent efficacy and was well tolerated in Japanese infectious peritonitis, abdominal abscess and PID subjects. This treatment regimen can be useful for anaerobic infections. Clinical registration number: NCT01473836. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  11. Development and Characterization of an In Vivo Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R. Frank; Leroux, Caroline; Cook, Sheila J.; Berger, Sandra L.; Lichtenstein, Drew L.; Ghabrial, Nadia N.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Issel, Charles J.

    1998-01-01

    An infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone (19-2-6A) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was modified by substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment amplified by PCR techniques from a pathogenic variant (EIAVPV) of the cell culture-adapted strain of EIAV (EIAVPR). This substitution consisted of coding sequences for 77 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the integrase, the S1 (encoding the second exon of tat), S2, and S3 (encoding the second exon of rev) open reading frames, the complete env gene (including the first exon of rev), and the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). Modified 19-2-6A molecular clones were designated EIAVPV3.3, and infection of a single pony (678) with viruses derived from a mixture of five of these molecular clones induced clinical signs of acute equine infectious anemia (EIA) at 23 days postinfection (dpi). As a consequence of this initial study, a single molecular clone, EIAVPV3.3#3 (redesignated EIAVUK), was selected for further study and inoculated into two ponies (613 and 614) and two horses (700 and 764). Pony 614 and the two horses developed febrile responses by 12 dpi, which was accompanied by a 48 to 64% reduction in platelet number, whereas pony 613 did not develop fever (40.6°C) until 76 dpi. EIAV could be isolated from the plasma of these animals by 5 to 7 dpi, and all became seropositive for antibodies to this virus by 21 dpi. Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence demonstrated that the 3.3-kbp 3′ fragment of EIAVUK differed from the consensus sequence of EIAVPV by just a single amino acid residue in the second exon of the rev gene. Complete homology with the EIAVPV consensus sequence was observed in the hypervariable region of the LTR. However, EIAVUK was found to contain an unusual 68-bp nucleotide insertion/duplication in a normally conserved region of the LTR sequence. These results demonstrate that substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment from the EIAVPV strain into the infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone 19-2-6A leads

  12. Intravenous piperacillin/tazobactam plus fluoroquinolone prophylaxis prior to prostate ultrasound biopsy reduces serious infectious complications and is cost effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remynse LC

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Louis C Remynse III, Patrick J Sweeney, Kevin A Brewton, Jay M LonswayUrology Associates of Battle Creek, PC, Battle Creek, MI, USAAbstract: Infectious complications related to prostate ultrasound and biopsy have increased in the past decade with the emergence of increasing fluoroquinolone bacterial resistance. We investigated the addition of intravenous (iv piperacillin/tazobactam immediately prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis to determine if it would decrease the incidence of serious infectious complications after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. Group 1 patients were a historic control of 197 patients who underwent prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. Group 2 patients, 104 patients, received standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and the addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam 30 minutes prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There were ten serious bacterial infectious complications in group 1 patients. No patients in group 2 developed serious bacterial infections after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was approximately a 5% incidence of serious bacterial infection in group 1 patients. Subgroup analysis revealed an almost 2.5 times increased risk of infection in diabetes patients undergoing prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was a 10% risk of serious bacterial infection in diabetics compared with a 3.8% risk group 1 nondiabetes patients. The addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam along with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis substantially reduces the risk of serious bacterial infection after prostate ultrasound and biopsy (P < 0.02.Keywords: piperacillin/tazobactam, fluoroquinolone, prostate biopsy, infectious complications

  13. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  14. DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICATION OF EXANTHEMA IN THE PREHOSPITAL CARE IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Plavunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease, with exanthema, pose a significant differential diagnostic difficulty for physicians multidisciplinary hospitals and require the consultation of an infectious disease physician. The article highlights the problem of early diagnostics of acute infectious diseases proceeding with exanthema. The analysis of quality of diagnostics of infectious disease on the outcomes of the consultative infectious ambulance team for 2013-2014.

  15. 77 FR 56660 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee. MID-B October 2012. Date: October 9, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to...: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

  16. Characteristics and management of infectious industrial waste in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-11-01

    Infectious industrial waste management in Taiwan is based on the specific waste production unit. In other countries, management is based simply on whether the producer may lead to infectious disease. Thus, Taiwan has a more detailed classification of infectious waste. The advantage of this classification is that it is easy to identify the sources, while the disadvantage lies in the fact that it is not flexible and hence increases cost. This study presents an overview of current management practices for handling infectious industrial waste in Taiwan, and addresses the current waste disposal methods. The number of small clinics in Taiwan increased from 18,183 to 18,877 between 2003 and 2005. Analysis of the data between 2003 and 2005 showed that the majority of medical waste was general industrial waste, which accounted for 76.9%-79.4% of total medical waste. Infectious industrial waste accounted for 19.3%-21.9% of total medical waste. After the SARS event in Taiwan, the amount of infectious waste reached 19,350 tons in 2004, an increase over the previous year of 4000 tons. Waste minimization was a common consideration for all types of waste treatment. In this study, we summarize the percentage of plastic waste in flammable infectious industrial waste generated by medical units, which, in Taiwan was about 30%. The EPA and Taiwan Department of Health have actively promoted different recycling and waste reduction measures. However, the wide adoption of disposable materials made recycling and waste reduction difficult for some hospitals. It has been suggested that enhancing the education of and promoting communication between medical units and recycling industries must be implemented to prevent recyclable waste from entering the incinerator.

  17. Pediatric malignancies presenting as a possible infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Joan L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of malignancy can overlap with those of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the findings in children who were initially thought to have an infectious disease but ultimately proved to have a malignancy. Methods The database of patients diagnosed with a malignancy in the Northern Alberta Children's Cancer Program (NACCP January 1, 1993 to December 31, 2003 was merged with the database of inpatients referred to the infectious diseases service at the Stollery Children's Hospital and charts were reviewed on all patients referred to the infectious diseases consult service prior to the diagnosis of malignancy. Results An infectious diseases consultation for diagnosis was requested in 21 of 561 patients prior to the confirmation of malignancy, and 3 of these 21 patients had both infection and malignancy (leukemia (N = 13, lymphoma (N = 3, rhabdomyosarcoma (N = 1, Langerhan's cell histiocytosis (N = 1, fibrous histicocytosis (N = 1, ependymoma (N = 1, and neuroblastoma (N = 1. The most common reason for infectious diseases consultation was suspected muskuloskeletal infection (N = 9. A palpable or radiographically enlarged spleen was noted in 11 patients (52%. All but 2 patients had abnormal hematologic parameters while an elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH occurred in 10 patients (48%. Delay of diagnosis because of investigation or therapy for an infectious disease occurred in only 2 patients. Conclusion It is not common for treatment of pediatric malignancies to be delayed because infection is thought to be the primary diagnosis. However, pediatric infectious diseases physicians should consider malignancy in the differential diagnosis when they see patients with fever and bone pain, unexplained splenomegaly or abnormal complete blood cell counts. Other clues may include hepatomegaly or elevated LDH.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  19. Papillomavirus Infectious Pathways: A Comparison of Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Biryukov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The HPV viral lifecycle is tightly linked to the host cell differentiation, causing difficulty in growing virions in culture. A system that bypasses the need for differentiating epithelium has allowed for generation of recombinant particles, such as virus-like particles (VLPs, pseudovirions (PsV, and quasivirions (QV. Much of the research looking at the HPV life cycle, infectivity, and structure has been generated utilizing recombinant particles. While recombinant particles have proven to be invaluable, allowing for a rapid progression of the HPV field, there are some significant differences between recombinant particles and native virions and very few comparative studies using native virions to confirm results are done. This review serves to address the conflicting data in the HPV field regarding native virions and recombinant particles.

  20. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF INFECTIOUS SALMON ANEMIA (ISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Østergaard, Peter

    is performed according to the EU Commission Decision draft on sampling and diagnostic procedures for ISA. Inspection, clinical and gross-pathological examination and tissue sampling is performed by the veterinarians on the islands. Laboratory examination is done in collaboration between the Veterinary...... Department at the Faroe Islands and the Danish Veterinary Institute (DVI). Fish tissue samples were investigated by several different methods, including various RT-PCR procedures on kidney material, immunoflourescence staining (IF) of kidney imprints and cell cultures inoculated with organ homogenates...... salmon. IF on imprints and IHC are reliable ways of verifying clinical ISA diagnosis. RT-PCR could be used as a way of screening fish stocks without clinical symptoms of ISA. Cell cultivation must be used in order to facilitate further studies of the viral agent. Methods for reliable surveillance...