WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally relevant instruction

  1. Teaching science in culturally diverse classrooms: The relevance of multicultural coursework on novice teachers' instructional choice

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    Cunha, Thais B. P. da

    Science education reform in the United States has been slow to reduce the troubling science achievement gap between students from mainstream and non-mainstream backgrounds. Recent data suggest the gap persists in spite of improved attention to the multicultural education of teachers, and in spite of recent, more culturally inclusive and responsive curricular materials and instructional recommendations. In this study, I examine the cases of two European American male novice science teachers in middle schools with highly diverse populations, exploring their perceptions of the necessity of adapting their instructional approaches and the science curricula in order to meet the needs of their predominantly Native American, Mexican American, and African American students. Two theoretical frameworks inform this study, Rodriguez's (2005) sociotransformative constructivism, and Freire's critical pedagogy. I apply a qualitative case study method, to better understand and analyze the classroom setting and power relations of the context. Data consist of semi-structured interviews with each teacher, classroom observation and other field notes, the science curricular and instructional materials, and teachers' lesson plans. Each teacher acknowledged the ethnicities of students positively and noticed distinctive ethnocultural features (e.g., quinceaneras, Mexican Americans). Yet, their teaching approaches were primarily teacher-centric and monocultural. Each followed the book, usually lecturing, and striving dutifully to "cover" the topics. They did not solicit students' knowledge or engage them in dialog to explore their thinking. Even when the curriculum guide detailed relevant science knowledge students of some cultural groups might have, both teachers declined to use it. These well-meaning teachers did not fully perceive that students whose culture was different from their own might have different and relevant knowledge, experiences, or histories which were resources for

  2. The Relevance of Accent in L2 Pronunciation Instruction: A Matter of Teaching Cultures or Language Ideologies?

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    Falkert, Anika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a critical discussion of the role of native and foreign accents in L2 pronunciation teaching. Several studies concluded that classroom practices of grammar instruction are strongly influenced by teaching cultures. We will examine whether this is also the case for pronunciation teaching. While the CEFR…

  3. Using Mixed Methods Research to Examine the Benefits of Culturally Relevant Instruction on Latino Students' Writing Skills

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    Murphy, Joel P.; Murphy, Shirley A.

    2016-01-01

    A convergent mixed methods research design addressed the extent of benefit obtained from reading culturally inclusive prompts (i.e., four brief essays written by Latino authors) to improve essay writing in a developmental (pre-college) English course. Participants were 45 Latino students who provided quantitative data. Chi square analysis showed…

  4. Cross Cultural Instruction: An Instructional Design Case

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    Monica W. Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In an authentic example of linking design and development with learning and performance, an international real estate development firm defined a problem; implementing a cleaning system in the largest mall in the world with a cross-cultural unskilled work force in Dubai, UAE. Partnering with a university instructional design team employing a rapid prototyping methodology and the constructivist ID approach, Layers of Negotiation Model, a comprehensive curriculum was designed. This article describes the project background, initial design, the ID team's work in Dubai, illustrates the product, and summarizes the design experience.

  5. The Need for Culturally Relevant Dance Education

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    McCarthy-Brown, Nyama

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant teaching in dance education. Many dance teachers have heard the buzz words "culturally relevant teaching methods." Yet these dance educators acknowledge that the "dance culture" is not always synonymous with "culturally relevant." This paper examines the issue of culturally relevant teaching methods in dance…

  6. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

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    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  7. Culturally relevant physical education in urban schools: reflecting cultural knowledge.

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    Flory, Sara B; McCaughtry, Nate

    2011-03-01

    Using a three-part theoretical framework, the cultural relevance cycle-which consists of (a) knowing community dynamics, (b) knowing how community dynamics influence educational processes, and (c) implementing strategies that reflect cultural knowledge of the community--we examined teachers' and students' perspectives on culturally relevant physical education in urban settings. We observed and interviewed 53 physical education teachers and 183 students in urban districts over 4 years. We identified themes of care, respect, language and communication, and curricular content that explained how these teachers enacted the cultural relevance cycle. Within these themes, teachers and students specified global and discipline-specific components of care, the rflattening of social hierarchies among students and between students and teachers, accommodation of English as a second language and urban communication, and relevant curricular content as necessary for achieving cultural relevance. Enacting the cycle of cultural relevance resulted in respectful learning environments in which students were highly engaged; however very few teachers enacted all three steps of the cycle.

  8. Where's the Race in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy?

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    Milner, H. Richard, IV

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: When Ladson-Billings described the pedagogical practices of successful teachers of African American children and consequently conceptualized culturally relevant pedagogy as an analytic resource to describe and make sense of pedagogical practices of teachers, her discussion was situated in a frame that examined instructional…

  9. Culturally Relevant Texts and Reading Assessment for English Language Learners

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    Ebe, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explored the relationship between reading proficiency and cultural relevance of text for third-grade English Language Learners (ELLs). The author presents the Cultural Relevance Rubric that helps define and determine cultural relevance of texts. Participants used the rubric to rate the cultural relevance of two…

  10. Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers

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    Gail Pritchard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper contends that disabled teachers are in such short supply as to be invisible even amongst minority teachers from already vastly marginalised populations. This is not simply because discriminatory practices are embedded within employment policies of educational systems, but deeply held socio-cultural attitudes also prevent disabled people accessing and attaining basic and later, higher levels of academic achievement. The central argument here is a simple one; disabled people as teachers offer a unique knowledge standpoint, challenge the animosity of dominant cultural beliefs around disability as analogous with passivity or non-achieving, and provide a source of resistance, solace and resolution for students they teach. Disabled people as educators enact exemplary pedagogic justice and socially inclusive practice. The aim of this paper is to explore the benefits to students and places of higher education alike of embracing both the person and the role of the teacher with disability as culturally relevant educators. Keywords: minority teachers, marginality, disability, cultural relevance, higher education

  11. Physics Instruction Utilizing Culture-Based Pedagogy

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    Nerrie E. Malaluan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research assessed topics in physics where culture-based pedagogy may be utilized and the applicability of Batangueño culture to these topics. It also determined the visual presentations which canbe prepared by teachers to incorporate Batangueñoculture in physics instruction. The end purpose of the study was to develop a teaching guide using culture-based pedagogy to reinforce the student’s learning, and help them achieve high academic performance. Descriptive method was adopted with questionnaire as tool in gathering data. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted. Thirty physics teachers in public secondary schools of the Division of Batangas City served as respondents. Purposive sampling was applied in determining the respondents. Frequency, percentage, ranking and weighted mean were statistical tools applied. Findings revealed that the culture-based pedagogy that could be utilized in teaching physics was on topics: Constant and Uniformly Acceleration; Work, Power and Energy; Laws of Motion; Projectile Motion; Heat and Light. Batangueño culture was found applicable in teaching physics. The visual presentations which could be used were pictures, powerpoint and video clips. Moreover, the proposed teaching guide utilizing culture-based pedagogy may be used by teachersto heighten students’ interest and motivation and to attain active participation and high achievement. It may be a reference of employing Batangueño culture in teaching the topics. It was recommended that the output be presented to the school heads and supervisors for their comments and suggestions for enrichment of content and application of culture-based pedagogy not only in science but in other learning areas.

  12. Culturally Relevant Education: Extending the Conversation to Religious Diversity

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    Aronson, Brittany; Amatullah, Tasneem; Laughter, Judson

    2016-01-01

    Culturally relevant education represents a wide collection of pedagogies of opposition to social injustice and holds a commitment to collective empowerment and social justice. By using culturally relevant education as a framework, we make the case to include religious diversity as a part of culturally relevant education intentionally. We believe…

  13. Cross-Cultural Challenges in Web-Based Instruction

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    Bolanle A. Olaniran

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Web Based Instruction (WBI possesses great potential for delivering e-learning solutions into Lower Economically Disadvantaged Countries (LEDCs and organizations with virtual networks of employees spread across the globe. However, these e-learning solutions are not without cross-cultural challenges. In order to adequately utilize these resources, it is imperative that developers and organizations understand how to address differences in norms, preferences and values of culturally diverse individuals when designing WBI. When instruction does not effectively address student needs, users can be distracted, or even discouraged, from completing instruction and quite possibly reject the technology through which the instruction is delivered. The purpose of this paper is to present an examination of cross cultural challenges in implementing WBI, through a discussion of Hofstede’s (1980 cultural dimensions, cultural technology perceptions, language barriers and user needs. The paper concludes with a discussion the implications of WBI and future trends in WBI design.

  14. Issues in Software Engineering of Relevance to Instructional Design

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    Douglas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Software engineering is popularly misconceived as being an upmarket term for programming. In a way, this is akin to characterizing instructional design as the process of creating PowerPoint slides. In both these areas, the construction of systems, whether they are learning or computer systems, is only one part of a systematic process. The most…

  15. Issues in Software Engineering of Relevance to Instructional Design

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    Douglas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Software engineering is popularly misconceived as being an upmarket term for programming. In a way, this is akin to characterizing instructional design as the process of creating PowerPoint slides. In both these areas, the construction of systems, whether they are learning or computer systems, is only one part of a systematic process. The most…

  16. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

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    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  17. Culturally Relevant Management Education: Insights from Experience in Nunavut

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    Wihak, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author's experience with a Nunavut business management education program illustrates how to develop culturally relevant organizational behavior curriculum. The process initially involved interviews with Inuit Elders about culturally appropriate responses to scenarios of cultural conflicts in the workplace identified by Inuit managers. The…

  18. Current Relevance of Zetetics to Library Research and Library Instruction.

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    Davis, Marta A.; Davis, Harry O.

    1996-01-01

    Explains zetetics which involve theories of research and epistemology and discusses its relevance to library science. Topics include library literacy, and the use of an information matrix to help library patrons understand what information they have and what they need to find. (Author/LRW)

  19. Language and Culture in Literacy Instruction: Where Have They Gone?

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    Rupley, William H.; Nichols, William Dee; Blair, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    An important, yet either often missing or under emphasized realization in both federal and state standards for literacy is that literacy is primarily a language process and culture is a reflection of language. As such, language and culture must be retained as essential components upon which reading instruction is based. Our nation and our states…

  20. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

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    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a questionnaire.…

  1. A Model of Instruction for Integrating Culture and Language.

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    Papalia, Anthony

    An integrated model of instruction in language and culture uses a sequential method of discovering sensation, perception, concept, and principle to develop self-analysis skills in students. When planning activities for learning a language and developing cultural understanding, teachers might follow a sequence such as the following: introduce…

  2. Start with Us! Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the Preschool Classroom

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    Durden, Tonia R.; Escalante, Elsita; Blitch, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Using an ethnographic case study approach, we examined how teachers and parents within an ethnically diverse early childhood program conceptualized and implemented culturally relevant pedagogy and how these primary caregivers were encouraging children's socio-cultural development and awareness. Data sources included questionnaires, interview…

  3. Redefining Classroom Culture through Instructional Design

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    Faryadi, Qais; Bakar, Zainab Abu; Maidinsah, Hamidah; Muhamad, Aminuddin

    2007-01-01

    This critical assessment attempts to define a good instructional design through the eyes and the minds of renowned scholars and the most outspoken educational psychologists such as Gagne, John Keller, Jerome Bruner, and Richard E. Mayer and so on. This examination also discusses ways in directing the mental map of students for better knowledge…

  4. CULTURAL HISTORICAL ACTIVITY THEORY: EXPLORING PRINCIPALS’ INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

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    Fulya Damla Kentli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instructional leadership activities are significant for school development. Although many researchers in this field consider leadership activities relating to the work of school principals, in effect, leadership is a network activity that includes all school staff. This study aims to show this interdependence network activity within Cultural Historical Activity Theory. The research question is “what are the activities of an instructional leader?” in order to understand instructional leadership activities in school from perspectives of Turkish graduate students and Cultural Historical Activity Theory. The answers are conceptualized within the framework of an Activity Theory. The students were asked to write about the activities of an instructional leader in the first and last course of the semester. Eighteen graduate students participated in this study.

  5. Developing Curriculum to Help Students Explore the Geosciences' Cultural Relevance

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    Miller, G.; Schoof, J. T.; Therrell, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Even though climate change and an unhealthy environment have a disproportionate affect on persons of color, there is a poor record of diversity in geoscience-related fields where researchers are investigating ways to improve the quality of the environment and human health. This low percentage of representation in the geosciences is equally troubling at the university where we are beginning the third and final year of a project funded through the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG). The purpose of this project is to explore a novel approach to using the social sciences to help students, specifically underrepresented minorities, discover the geosciences' cultural relevance and consider a career in the earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences. To date, over 800 college freshmen have participated in a design study to evaluate the curriculum efficacy of a geoscience reader. Over half of these participants are students of color. The reader we designed allows students to analyze multiple, and sometimes conflicting, sources such as peer-reviewed journal articles, political cartoons, and newspaper articles. The topic for investigation in the reader is the 1995 Chicago Heat Wave, a tragic event that killed over 700 residents. Students use this reader in a core university course required for entering freshmen with low reading comprehension scores on standardized tests. To support students' comprehension, evaluation, and corroboration of these sources, we incorporated instructional supports aligned with the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), reciprocal teaching, historical reasoning, media literacy, and quantitative reasoning. Using a digital format allows students to access multiple versions of the sources they are analyzing and definitions of challenging vocabulary and scientific concepts. Qualitative and quantitative data collected from participating students and their instructors included focus

  6. The Significance of Introducing Culture in EFL Instruction

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    Noor Malihah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available EFL students many times made mistakes in using the English expressions and led to misinterpretations or even acceptable message of their utterances. This is due to their lack of cultural awareness or their understanding towards L2 culture. Therefore, EFL teachers should think of how to give position to the L1 and L2 culture in their teaching and learning process of EFL instructions.To solve the problems, there are some approaches used to introduce the target language culture, by knowing the obstacles that the learners frequently made.

  7. The Impact of Culture on Instructional Design and Quality

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    Sharif, Afsaneh; Gisbert, Merce

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cultural differences, i.e. different contexts and backgrounds, on instructional designers' perspectives of quality in online environments. Using a questionnaire developed based on the Quality Matters rubric, we found designers in Canada focus slightly more on Learner Support strategies…

  8. Linking Gestures: Cross-Cultural Variation during Instructional Analogies

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    Richland, Lindsey Engle

    2015-01-01

    Deictic linking gestures, hand and arm motions that physically embody links being communicated between two or more objects in the shared communicative environment, are explored in a cross-cultural sample of mathematics instruction. Linking gestures are specifically examined here when they occur in the context of communicative analogies designed to…

  9. Using Instructional Pervasive Game for School Children's Cultural Learning

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    Chen, Cheng-Ping; Shih, Ju-Ling; Ma, Yi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    In the past ten years, mobile learning (m-learning) has created a new learning environment that enables learners, through active learning aids. Instructional pervasive gaming (IPG) seems to be an innovative way introduced to enhance m-learning. This study employed a theoretical IPG model to construct a cultural-based pervasive game. Individual and…

  10. Meeting the Cultural Challenges of Instructional Technology in Iran.

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    Johari, Abbas

    2002-01-01

    Discusses instructional technology in Iran. Highlights include a historical background of Iran; Islamic faith and technology; technology without western culture and influence; access to mass communication; telecommunications conferences; Internet access, usage, and connectivity; social issues; media in schools; Internet inequalities; and…

  11. Improving Middle School Student Engagement through Career-Relevant Instruction in the Core Curriculum

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    Orthner, Dennis K.; Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley; Akos, Patrick; Rose, Roderick A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors assessed the effect of career-relevant instruction on school valuing and engagement of middle school students in a southern U.S. school district. Previous research and theory indicate students learn best when new knowledge is provided within the context of information students consider to be of value. The data come from a school-based…

  12. Critical Reflectivity and the Development of New Culturally Relevant Teachers

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    Durden, Tonia R.; Truscott, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Three case studies present how preservice teachers use reflections while learning to teach. Interviews and document analysis reveal that critical reflections evidence greater understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy and offer a platform for critical consciousness. Using critical reflectivity to develop teachers' understandings of culturally…

  13. Social Skills Instruction for Urban Learners with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Culturally Responsive and Computer-Based Intervention

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    Robinson-Ervin, Porsha; Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Musti-Rao, Shobana; Gibson, Lenwood, Jr.; Keyes, Starr E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of culturally relevant/responsive, computer-based social skills instruction on the social skill acquisition and generalization of 6 urban African American sixth graders with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A multiple-probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of the social skills…

  14. Toward a Theory of Culturally Relevant Leadership for School-Community Culture

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    Fraise, Nicole Jaenee; Brooks, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore concepts related to culturally relevant pedagogy and connect them to nascent theoretical work in the field of educational leadership. The article begins with a review of literature on educational leadership and culture and then suggests shortcomings in the way these concepts are currently conceptualized.…

  15. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students’ Perspectives

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    Jia Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students’ language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of technology on teens, and scant literature is available that incorporates the perspective of urban and linguistically diverse students on the feasibility of applying new technologies in teaching and learning literacy in intact classrooms. This paper reports urban adolescents’ perspectives on the use of technology within teen culture, for learning in general and for literacy instruction in particular. Focus group interviews were conducted among linguistically diverse urban students in grades 6, 7 and 8 in a lower income neighborhood in the Northeastern region of the United States. The major findings of the study were that 1 urban teens primarily and almost exclusively used social media and technology devices for peer socializing, 2 they were interested in using technology to improve their literacy skills, but did not appear to voluntarily or independently integrate technology into learning, and 3 8th graders were considerably more sophisticated in their use of technology and their suggestions for application of technology to literacy learning than 6th and 7th graders. These findings lead to suggestions for developing effective literacy instruction using new technologies.

  16. Supporting the Reading Development of Middle School English Language Learners through Culturally Relevant Texts

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    Ebe, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explored the relationship between reading proficiency and the cultural relevance of text for adolescent English language learners. The author presents a rubric that was used to help determine cultural relevance. Participants used this rubric to rate the cultural relevance of 2 stories. Although the stories were…

  17. Integration of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Into the Science Learning Progression Framework

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    Bernardo, Cyntra

    This study integrated elements of culturally relevant pedagogy into a science learning progression framework, with the goal of enhancing teachers' cultural knowledge and thereby creating better teaching practices in an urban public high school science classroom. The study was conducted using teachers, an administrator, a science coach, and students involved in science courses in public high school. Through a qualitative intrinsic case study, data were collected and analyzed using traditional methods. Data from primary participants (educators) were analyzed through identification of big ideas, open coding, and themes. Through this process, patterns and emergent ideas were reported. Outcomes of this study demonstrated that educators lack knowledge about research-based academic frameworks and multicultural education strategies, but benefit through institutionally-based professional development. Students from diverse cultures responded positively to culturally-based instruction. Their progress was further manifested in better communication and discourse with their teacher and peers, and increased academic outcomes. This study has postulated and provided an exemplar for science teachers to expand and improve multicultural knowledge, ultimately transferring these skills to their pedagogical practice.

  18. Cultural Speak: Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Experiential Learning in a Public Speaking Classroom

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    Colvin, Janet; Tobler, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the efficacy of modifications made to a higher education Latina/o public speaking course to enhance student growth and understanding. The changes included the addition of a service-learning component and the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy. Selected research, particularly related to college students, on…

  19. Relevant principal factors affecting the reproducibility of insect primary culture.

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    Ogata, Norichika; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2017-06-01

    The primary culture of insect cells often suffers from problems with poor reproducibility in the quality of the final cell preparations. The cellular composition of the explants (cell number and cell types), surgical methods (surgical duration and surgical isolation), and physiological and genetic differences between donors may be critical factors affecting the reproducibility of culture. However, little is known about where biological variation (interindividual differences between donors) ends and technical variation (variance in replication of culture conditions) begins. In this study, we cultured larval fat bodies from the Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma, and evaluated, using linear mixed models, the effect of interindividual variation between donors on the reproducibility of the culture. We also performed transcriptome analysis of the hemocyte-like cells mainly seen in the cultures using RNA sequencing and ultrastructural analyses of hemocytes using a transmission electron microscope, revealing that the cultured cells have many characteristics of insect hemocytes.

  20. Critical Factors in Cultural Immersion: A Synthesis of Relevant Literature

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    Barden, Sejal M.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    This synthesis of the literature on cross-cultural immersion experiences gives emphasis to the need for effective pedagogy for enhancing multicultural counseling competency, with cultural immersion being a potentially valuable training tool. The authors examine the empirical literature towards identifying both helpful and hindering structural and…

  1. Culturally Responsive Differentiated Instruction: Narrowing Gaps between Best Pedagogical Practices Benefiting All Learners

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    Santamaria, Lorri J.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Because of its special education association, differentiated instruction (DI) is a topic of concern for many educators working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners, whereby bilingual, multicultural, and culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is considered more appropriate for responding to cultural and…

  2. Dual Language Teachers' Stated Barriers to Implementation of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

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    Freire, Juan A.; Valdez, Verónica E.

    2017-01-01

    Culturally relevant pedagogy receives limited attention in many U.S. dual language classrooms. This article focuses on understanding the barriers eight elementary Spanish-English dual language teachers saw as preventing the implementation of culturally relevant pedagogy in their urban classrooms. Employing critical sociocultural theory and drawing…

  3. Treatment of Cultural Default in Literary Translation from the Relevance-Theoretic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡敏燕

    2016-01-01

    The present paper intends to argue that treatment of cultural default in literary translation can be accounted for within the relevance theory. An account of relevance theory is presented. Detailed analysis of some representative examples of transla-tion within the relevance-theoretic framework is made. The notions in Relevance Theory can effectively account for the opera-tion of different translation methods and techniques when tackling the cultural default. The purpose of using various translation skills is to obtain the optimal relevance between cognitive context in target readers'minds and communication intention of the original author.

  4. Computer-Supported Instructional Communication: A Multidisciplinary Account of Relevant Factors

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    Rummel, Nikol; Kramer, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The papers in the present special issue summarize research that aims at compiling and understanding variables associated with successful communication in computer-supported instructional settings. Secondly, the papers add to the question of how adaptiveness of instructional communication may be achieved. A particular strength of the special issue…

  5. Intercultural Interpretations: Making Public Relations Education Culturally Relevant

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    Chia, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Public relations educators delivering courses to international students find that each cohort of students interprets and understands public relations theory and its application to practice according to their respective cultures. The premise of this paper is to reflect on some of the interpretations and expectations of public relations students…

  6. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Public Speaking Classroom

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    Colvin, Janet Weston; Tobler, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest roots of rhetoric, practitioners emphasized the need for analyzing one's audience before developing a speech. Textbooks for most basic public speaking courses spend at least one chapter discussing audience analysis. Authors discuss adapting messages to various demographic, cultural, and individual differences. As a result,…

  7. Constructing Cultural Relevance in Science: A Case Study of Two Elementary Teachers

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    Patchen, Terri; Cox-Petersen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Classrooms across the United States increasingly find White teachers paired with ethnic minority students, but few of these teachers are prepared for the disparities such cultural integration presents. This is particularly true vis-a-vis science education. While classrooms have diversified, science instruction has not necessarily followed suit.…

  8. Infusing Culturally Responsive Instruction to Improve Mathematics Performance of Latino Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

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    Shumate, Lorraine; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive instruction has the advantage of helping diverse students make academic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of culturally infused mathematics lessons on the academic achievement of five middle school Latino students with specific learning disabilities in a resource classroom. We used an ABACACA…

  9. The Effects of Cultural Instruction on Foreign Language Learning

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    Tsou, Wenli

    2005-01-01

    Many elementary EFL teachers in Taiwan have concerns in integrating target culture teaching into their language classrooms for reasons such as teachers' limited knowledge of the target culture, lack of time, lack of methods and materials. In order to persuade more language teachers to teach target language culture, guidelines about designing an…

  10. Teaching Social Studies for Newcomer English Language Learners: Toward Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

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    Choi, Yoonjung

    2013-01-01

    Through this case study the author explores how an exemplary teacher utilized social studies curriculum and pedagogy to engage English language learners (ELLs) in learning in a culturally relevant and meaningful way and discusses practical implications for teaching and learning.

  11. Teaching Social Studies for Newcomer English Language Learners: Toward Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

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    Choi, Yoonjung

    2013-01-01

    Through this case study the author explores how an exemplary teacher utilized social studies curriculum and pedagogy to engage English language learners (ELLs) in learning in a culturally relevant and meaningful way and discusses practical implications for teaching and learning.

  12. Translating Culture-Specific Items: From the Perspective of Relevance Theory

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    施蒙

    2012-01-01

      This paper offers an exploratory analysis of translating culture-specific items from the angle of relevance theory in terms of semantic level, syntactic level and contextual level. It was revealed that due to the translation dilemma in the translation process, seman-tic meaning and syntactic structure are usually sacrificed for optimal relevance in contextual level.

  13. Perceptions and Practices of Culturally Relevant Science Teaching in American Indian Classrooms

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    Nam, Younkyeong; Roehrig, Gillian; Kern, Anne; Reynolds, Bree

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of culturally relevant science teaching of 35 teachers of American Indian students. These teachers participated in professional development designed to help them better understand climate change science content and teaching climate change using both Western science and traditional and cultural knowledge. Teacher…

  14. Effects of Culturally Relevant Psychoeducation for Korean American Families of Persons with Chronic Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Kyung

    2004-01-01

    This study is to identify culturally relevant treatment methods and to assess the effects of family psychoeducational intervention for Korean Americans who had a family member with mental illness. 48 Korean Americans with children with mental illness were randomly assigned to either an experimental group program that provided culturally sensitive…

  15. Reading Culturally Relevant Literature Aloud to Urban Youths with Behavioral Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verden, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the viability of reading culturally relevant literature aloud to urban middle school youth. The findings from a research study are shared and guidelines for implementing a culturally sensitive read aloud program in your own middle school or high school classroom are discussed. Anecdotes from students involved in the study…

  16. Using Culturally Relevant Teaching in a Co-Educational Mathematics Class of a Patriarchal Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogari, David

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports on the use of culturally relevant teaching in a class located in a patriarchal community. The paper is conceptualised around the notion that learners' familiar context provided by the socio-cultural activities can facilitate mathematics learning and make it fun to learn. Data were derived from a lesson activity using…

  17. The Relevance and Efficacy of Metacognition for Instructional Design in the Domain of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baten, Elke; Praet, Magda; Desoete, Annemie

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of metacognition as theory-based instructional principle or technique in general, and particularly in mathematics, is explored. Starting with an overview of different definitions, conceptualizations, assessment and training models originating from cognitive information processing theory, the role of metacognition in teaching and…

  18. Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Evidence Relevant to Classroom Instruction with Manipulatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Scott C.; Carbonneau, Kira J.

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on instructional strategies with manipulatives. Often described as "hands-on learning", these strategies emphasize the use of physical and, more recently, virtual objects to represent target information and concepts. These strategies are frequently suggested as effective techniques for teaching…

  19. Cultural Differences and User Instructions: Effects of a Culturally Adapted Manual Structure on Western and Chinese Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qian; Jong, de Menno D.T.; Karreman, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Research shows that Western and Chinese technical communicators structure their documents in different ways. The research reported in this article is a first attempt to systematically explore the effects cultural adaptations of user instructions have on users. Specifically, we investigate w

  20. Kulturformidlingen i Fremmedsprogsundervisningen: 4 Artikler (The Emphasis on Culture in Foreign Language Instruction: 4 Articles). ROLIG-papir 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risager, Karen

    The four articles in this issue of a series of working papers focus on the promotion of culture in foreign language instruction. The first article, "The Promotion of Culture in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden," looks at language instruction in French, English, and German in the school systems of these countries since the 1950s, and how the…

  1. Visualizing Culturally Relevant Science Pedagogy Through Photonarratives of Black Middle School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Nichols, Sharon

    2009-04-01

    This study situated in a Southern resegregated Black middle school involved four Black teachers and two White science educators’ use of photonarratives to envision culturally relevant science pedagogy. Two questions guided the study: (1) What community referents are important for conceptualizing culturally relevant practices in Black science classrooms? and (2) How do teachers’ photonarratives serve to open conversations and notions of culturally relevant science practices? The research methodologically drew upon memory-work, Black feminism, critical theory, visual methodology, and narrative inquiry as “portraiture.” Issues of positionality and identity proved to be central to this work, as three luminaries portray Black teachers’ insights about supports and barriers to teaching and learning science. The community referents identified were associated with church and its oral traditions, inequities of the market place in meeting their basic human needs, and community spaces.

  2. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  3. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  4. Archimedes, Reading, and the Sustenance of Academic Research Culture in Library Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of academic research, library instruction, and the role of leisure, reflection, and creativity. Suggests that these cultural elements should be introduced to undergraduates and contends that deep reading, rather than information literacy competency, cultivates these elements. Examines productivity and the faculty research…

  5. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total 1051…

  6. Towards Cultural Responsiveness in Music Instruction with Black Detained Youth: An Analytic Autoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increased interest in music instruction and research with incarcerated populations. Amid this attention is a need to learn more about how music teachers develop competencies for working with juvenile offenders and navigate this unfamiliar context, how they come to learn more about culturally diverse music, and how they become aware of…

  7. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total 1051…

  8. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total…

  9. Revisiting Cognitive Strategy Instruction in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: Cautions and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsfield, Lara J.; Jimenez, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors raise concerns regarding the use of cognitive strategy instruction (CSI) in culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) classrooms. The authors recognize the potential benefits afforded by CSI. At the same time, they argue that counter to the intentions of those who have developed CSI, it may be implemented in ways that…

  10. Culturally Responsive Instructional Leadership: A Conceptual Exploration with Principals of Three New Zealand Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals of many New Zealand (NZ) mainstream schools navigate a complex intercultural educational policy environment to address the academic challenges of Maori and Pasifika students. This inquiry sought to explore the concept of "culturally responsive instructional leadership" by studying the knowledge, actions, motives, perceptions,…

  11. Emerging Culture of English-Medium Instruction in Korea: Experiences of Korean and International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Tatar, Bradley; Choi, Jinsook

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to contrastively examine Korean and international students' experiences of taking subject courses at a Korean university. Focusing on the viewpoints of the students, rather than central authorities, we attempt to reveal how language use and cultural factors are interpenetrated in the praxis of English-medium instruction (EMI). The…

  12. Teachers' instructional goals for science practice: Identifying knowledge gaps using cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Cynthia Hamen

    In AP Biology, the course goal, with respect to scientific acts and reasoning, has recently shifted toward a reform goal of science practice, where the goal is for students to have a scientific perspective that views science as a practice of a community rather than a body of knowledge. Given this recent shift, this study is interested in the gaps that may exist between an individual teacher's instructional goal and the goals of the AP Biology course. A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) methodology and perspective is used to analyze four teachers' knowledge, practice, and learning. Teachers have content knowledge for teaching, a form of knowledge that is unique for teaching called specialized content knowledge. This specialized content knowledge (SCK) defines their instructional goals, the student outcomes they ultimately aim to achieve with their students. The study employs a cultural-historical continuum of scientific acts and reasoning, which represents the development of the AP Biology goal over time, to study gaps in their instructional goal. The study also analyzes the contradictions within their teaching practice and how teachers address those contradictions to shift their instructional practice and learn. The findings suggest that teachers have different interpretations of the AP Biology goals of science practice, placing their instructional goal at different points along the continuum. Based on the location of their instructional goal, different micro-communities of teachers exist along the continuum, comprised of teachers with a shared goal, language, and culture of their AP Biology teaching. The in-depth study of one teacher's AP Biology teaching, using a CHAT perspective, provides a means for studying the mechanisms that connect SCK to classroom actions and ultimately to instructional practice. CHAT also reveals the nature and importance of contradictions or cognitive dissonance in teacher learning and the types of support teachers need to

  13. Promoting culturally competent chronic pain management using the clinically relevant continuum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    This article reviews the culture of biomedicine and current practices in pain management education, which often merge to create a hostile environment for effective chronic pain care. Areas of cultural tensions in chronic pain frequently involve the struggle to achieve credibility regarding one's complaints of pain (or being believed that the pain is real) and complying with pain medication protocols. The clinically relevant continuum model is presented as a framework allowing providers to approach care from an evidence-based, culturally appropriate (patient centered) perspective that takes into account the highest level of evidence available, provider expertise, and patient preferences and values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Culturally Relevant Teaching: Hip-Hop Pedagogy in Urban Schools. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 396

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Darius D.

    2012-01-01

    "Culturally Relevant Teaching" centers hip-hop culture as a culturally relevant form of critical pedagogy in urban pre-service teacher education programs. In this important book, Darius D. Prier explores how hip-hop artists construct a sense of democratic education and pedagogy with transformative possibilities in their schools and communities. In…

  15. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 20 Years Later: Progress or Pontificating? What Have We Learned, and Where Do We Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Tyrone C.; Rodriguez-Scheel, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the concept of culturally relevant pedagogy 20 years after its introduction to the professional literature. The authors discuss key tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy, examine empirical examples of it, and makes recommendations on how the concept may inform and influence the outcomes of culturally diverse…

  16. A Spot of Our Own: The Cultural Relevancy, Anti-Bias Resource Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Cory

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Cultural Relevancy, Anti-Bias Resource Room at conference of the Washington State Association for the Education of Young Children. Discusses how the exhibit was structured and evaluated; suggests ways to organize a similar resource. Maintains that providing hands-on materials is key to the exhibit's effectiveness and that the exhibit…

  17. One White Teacher's Struggle for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: The Problem of the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nora E.

    2009-01-01

    This is a case of one novice White teacher whose strong commitment to becoming a culturally relevant teacher was hindered by her struggle to develop meaningful connections to the home community of her mostly African American students. Using a hybrid methodology of action research, discourse analysis, and critical interpretive analysis of…

  18. Dialoging about English Learners: Preparing Teachers through Culturally Relevant Literature Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The author describes how culturally relevant children's literature allowed teachers and teacher candidates to explore the lived realities of diverse students. Through the author's qualitative investigation of 23 literature discussions of undergraduate and graduate students across five academic semesters, the author found that texts written by…

  19. Developing and Enacting Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Voices of New Teachers of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Noah E.; Flores, Esther; de la Cruz, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    A group of preservice and first year teachers share their experiences as new teachers of Color entering the profession in urban public schools. Specifically, these novice teachers discuss the transition from an urban education teacher preparation program into the classroom and their successes and challenges enacting culturally relevant pedagogy.…

  20. The Need for a Culturally Relevant Approach to Gifted Education: The Case of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieridou, Alexandra N.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the status of gifted education in Cyprus and argues for the need for a culturally relevant approach. First, the history of education in Cyprus is briefly reviewed. Then, past unsuccessful efforts to provide education for academically advanced students in the public elementary schools are critically examined.…

  1. Cultural Relevance and Working with Inner City Youth Populations to Achieve Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shakoor; Webster, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals consider the cultural relevant needs of inner city residents in hopes of achieving ongoing civic engagement and appropriate program activities in these communities. Having a deep understanding of how the various dimensions of marginalized community life among inner city populations affect participation in…

  2. Using a Conference Workshop Setting to Engage Mathematics Teachers in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons-Brown, Stephanie; Warner, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore using a conference workshop setting to engage mathematics teachers, who serve largely underserved student populations, in culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP). The conference workshop encouraged the exchange of information among teachers of similar grade levels and classroom contexts. The authors' analysis of the…

  3. A Culturally Relevant and Responsive Approach to Screening for Perinatal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah Kye; Handrick, Sandii Leland

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a culturally relevant and responsive approach to screening for perinatal depression in low-income, predominantly African American women. Method: The study details the development of the community-informed instrument and subsequent evaluation of its psychometric…

  4. Latino Parents and Students Foster Literacy through a Culturally Relevant Folk Medicine Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Mary Esther Soto; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This study was inspired by the literary elements of "cuentos tipicos" (culturally-relevant stories). The book "Prietita y la llorona" ("Prietita and the Ghost Woman") written by Anzaldua (1995) is a good example of a "cuento" that provides information about medicinal herbs and also includes…

  5. Leading for Democracy in Urban Schools: Toward a Culturally Relevant Progressivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seher, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the enactment of culturally relevant progressivism on the part of the principal of the Social Justice School, a small urban public high school explicitly committed to democratic education. Drawing upon extensive interviews and field observations conducted over the course of an academic year by a teacher-researcher within the…

  6. An Exploration of Teachers' Efforts to Understand Identity Work and its Relevance to Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. Cecil; Darfler, Anne

    2012-06-01

    US educators express concern that students are turning away from the study of science and have little interest in pursuing science careers. Nationally, science achievement scores for 8th graders are unchanged since 1996, but 12th graders' scores have significantly decreased. A shortcoming of education reform efforts is lack of attention to students' developmental needs. Science study should enable students to learn about themselves—to develop and refine their skills, define their values, explore personal interests, and understand the importance of science to themselves and others. Effective secondary science instruction requires attention to students' identity development—the key developmental task of adolescence. Secondary science teachers participated in an 8-week course focused on understanding adolescent identity development and methods for addressing identity. Transcripts of the teachers' online discussions of salient issues were analyzed to determine their perceptions regarding classroom identity work. Teachers identified several assets and obstacles to identity work that were organized into two broad categories: teacher knowledge, training opportunities, and administrative support, or lack of these; and, presence of inflexible curricula, standardized testing regimes, and increased teacher accountability. Implications for student growth and science teacher professional development are discussed.

  7. Middle School Students’ Perceptions of Culturally and Geographically Relevant Content in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Braga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Advocates for non-traditional approaches to physical education (PE emphasize the need for physical educators to design curricula that foster students’ engagement in physically active lifestyles outside of the school setting. Accordingly, current guidelines for PE curriculum design recommend the inclusion of content that is relevant to the students’ cultural background and their geographical environment (Society of Health and Physical Educators, 2009, 2015. Purpose: This study investigated how less predisposed to be active (LPA and more predisposed to be active (MPA students perceived the incorporation of culturally and geographically relevant content in a newly developed standards-based middle school PE curriculum. Methods: The study followed a sequential mixed-methods approach. In Phase One, two instruments measured attraction to physical activity and perceived athletic competence of 116 students. In Phase Two, 47 students (selected based on Phase One results participated across twelve focus groups. Results: Four overarching themes emerged from both LPA and MPA focus groups’ data: (a Enjoyment, (b Learning, (c Value, and (d Challenges. Findings from this study revealed a sense of increased perceptions of competency and value of PE among students as a result of their engagement with the new content. Conclusion: This study underlines the importance of selecting PE content that is innovative, challenging, meaningful, and relevant to the students’ culture and geographical environment. Keywords: physical education, physical activity, curriculum, culture, geographical environment

  8. Clinically applied medical ethnography: relevance to cultural competence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Medical anthropology provides an excellent resource for nursing research that is relevant to clinical nursing. By expanding the understanding of ethnographic research beyond ethnicity, nurses can conduct research that explores patient's constructions and explanatory models of health and healing and how they make meaning out of chronic conditions and negotiate daily life. These findings can have applicability to culturally competent care at both the organizational or systems level, as well as in the patient/provider encounter. Individual patient care can be improved by applying ethnographic research findings to build provider expertise and then using a cultural negotiation process for individualized patient care.

  9. "Lo Cotidiano": The Effectiveness of Critical Task-Based Instruction in Teaching the Culture of Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villada, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Teaching cultural competency in the language classroom can be a challenge. This study explores the effectiveness of task-based instruction (Lee, 2000) on the learning of culture by students in college-level Spanish language courses. Students were required to record oral presentations, write essays, and make comparisons between the culture and…

  10. "Lo Cotidiano": The Effectiveness of Critical Task-Based Instruction in Teaching the Culture of Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villada, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Teaching cultural competency in the language classroom can be a challenge. This study explores the effectiveness of task-based instruction (Lee, 2000) on the learning of culture by students in college-level Spanish language courses. Students were required to record oral presentations, write essays, and make comparisons between the culture and…

  11. Relevance of blood cultures in acute pyelonephritis in a single-center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledochowski, Stanislas; Abraham, Paul-Samuel; Jacob, Xavier; Dumitrescu, Oana; Lina, Gérard; Lepape, Alain; Piriou, Vincent; Wallet, Florent; Friggeri, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    Pyelonephritides are frequently encountered diagnosis in Emergency Departments. Urinalyses have a central place in the management of this situation but the usefulness of blood cultures is not clear. We conducted a single-center retrospective study of 24 months to study the microbiological relevance of blood cultures in pyelonephritis. We included patients with blood cultures (BC) and urine cultures (UC) drawn at the same time, if they were not exposed to antibiotics prior to these tests. Of our 264 patients, 39 (15 %) had no bacteriological documentation. There were 83 (31 %) bacteremic patients. Seven patients had contaminated or sterile UC with positive BC. Four patients had positive UC and BC with the latter allowing identification of a pathogen absent from the UC (n = 1) or identifying the main pathogen in three cases. A total of 11 patients theoretically benefited from BC representing 4.2 % of our population. Excluding one patient who was known to be infected with multi-drug resistant bacteria, all empirical antibiotics regimens were effective against the identified pathogens. We did not reveal any significant therapeutic impact of blood cultures in the management of pyelonephritis, when BC and UC are performed before any antimicrobials treatment.

  12. Multicultural Children's Literature as a Context for Teaching Mathematics for Cultural Relevance in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jacqueline; Moore, Cara M.; Brooks, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a teacher-research study that used multicultural texts as a context for teaching mathematics for cultural relevance during an elementary mathematics methods course. The results of the study reveal that 28% (5 out of 18) of the teacher candidates (TCs) chose books that were culturally contextual or culturally amenable.…

  13. The Cultural Relevance of Mindfulness Meditation as a Health Intervention for African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Giscombé, Cheryl L.; Gaylord, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans experience a disproportionate rate of stress-related health conditions compared to European Americans. Mindfulness meditation has been shown to be effective for managing stress and various stress-related health conditions. This study explored the cultural relevance of mindfulness meditation training for African Americans adults. Fifteen African American adults with past or current experience with mindfulness meditation training were interviewed. Participants felt that mindfulness meditation helped them with enhanced stress management, direct health improvement, and enhanced self-awareness and purposefulness. They felt that they would recommend it and that other African Americans would be open to the practice but suggested that its presentation may need to be adapted. They suggested emphasizing the health benefits, connecting it to familiar spiritual ideology and cultural practices, supplementing the reading material with African American writers, increasing communication (education, instructor availability, “buddy system,” etc.), and including African Americans as instructors and participants. By implementing minor adaptations that enhance cultural relevance, mindfulness meditation can be a beneficial therapeutic intervention for this population. PMID:24442592

  14. Instructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Animal Husbandry and Feed Science(ISSN 1943-9911)is an academic journal sponsored by Wu Chu(USA-China)Science and Culture Media Co.(USA).It was first published in 2009.The journal is published bimonthly to report basic theory and applied research about animal husbandry,veterinary,aquaculture,feed science and other related fields,including aspects of genetics and breeding,reproduction,physiology,biochemistry,nutrition,

  15. The Relevance of Cultural and Media Studies to Theatre and Television in Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hobart

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA critical approach to Balinese society presents a starkly different picturefrom the representations that Balinese usually tell themselves, whichare largely myths to disguise a painful reality. Bali no longer belongsto Balinese but to international capital, a process of alienation by whichBalinese energetically commoditize their culture while claiming theopposite. Even the frames of reference for discussing what is happeningare inadequate because they predate the rise of contemporary consumercapitalism and the mass media. That is why critical media and culturalstudies, disciplines designed precisely to address such phenomena, arepotentially so relevant for Indonesian intellectuals.

  16. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montellano, B.O. de

    1996-11-14

    This report describes later stages of a program to develop culturally relevant science and math programs for Hispanic students. Part of this effort was follow-up with 17 teachers who participated in early stages of the program. Response was not very good. Included with the report is a first draft effort for curriculum materials which could be used as is in such a teaching effort. Several of the participating teachers were invited to a writing workshop, where lesson plans were drafted, and critiqued and following rework are listed in this publication. Further work needs to be completed and is ongoing.

  17. Culturally Relevant Educational Games in the Ocean, Earth and Planetary Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.

    2007-05-01

    Educational games can be a fun, challenging way of engaging students. Teachers can use games to teach content (students learn as they play), or to assess previously acquired knowledge. I will present a board game that is culturally relevant to Hawaii (available by eamiling barb@hawaii.edu). Originally developed for 6-8th graders studying Mars, it can be readily exported to a variety of grade levels and content areas in the ocean, earth and planetary sciences. This project began with a NASA Education and Public Outreach grant to develop standards-based, hands-on Mars science curricula that are culturally relevant to Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders. We both developed new curricula and tailored existing curricula to make the content and teaching methodologies culturally relevant. Our main curriculum product is an eight-lesson unit entitled Life in Hawaii, Life on Mars, developed in partnership with teachers and currently being field-tested in Hawaii schools. The final lesson in the unit is an educational board game entitled Hawaii to Mars: A Voyage of Discovery. Like many board games, players advance along a set path by rolling a die. Landing on certain squares requires students to answer questions on Hawaiian culture and Mars science; landing on others requires students to do a variety of activities (drawing, acting, unscrambling words) on relevant topics. Correct answers allow players to roll again. Although incorrect answers require they skip a turn, correct answers are provided and a limited number of questions ensures a second opportunity to answer the question correctly. We are currently developing a microbial oceanography version of the game in partnership with scientists at the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), as part of C-MORE's efforts to increase diversity in the ocean sciences. We also plan to develop a generic version of the game board, so simply changing the content and difficulty of the question cards will allow

  18. Breast cancer education for Navajo women: a pilot study evaluating a culturally relevant video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Priscilla R; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Baldwin, Julie A; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55-67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient-provider communication.

  19. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for hispanics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montellano, B.O. de

    1996-11-14

    This progress report summarizes results of a teacher workshop. A letter sent to 17 teachers who had participated in the workshop requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed. Only nine responses were received, and not all of them demonstrated a satisfactory level of activity. Teachers who submitted materials showing the most promise were invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. A partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual was written which provides a rationale for culturally relevant science and presents the cultural and scientific background needed. The outline of the book is presented in Appendix 1. Appendix 2 is a sample chapter from the book.

  20. 3D Culture as a Clinically Relevant Model for Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Toh, Tan Boon; Yu, Hanry; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Advances in understanding many of the fundamental mechanisms of cancer progression have led to the development of molecular targeted therapies. While molecular targeted therapeutics continue to improve the outcome for cancer patients, tumor heterogeneity among patients, as well as intratumoral heterogeneity, limits the efficacy of these drugs to specific patient subtypes, as well as contributes to relapse. Thus, there is a need for a more personalized approach toward drug development and diagnosis that takes into account the diversity of cancer patients, as well as the complex milieu of tumor cells within a single patient. Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems paired with patient-derived xenografts or patient-derived organoids may provide a more clinically relevant system to address issues presented by personalized or precision medical approaches. In this review, we cover the current methods available for applying 3D culture systems toward personalized cancer research and drug development, as well as key challenges that must be addressed in order to fully realize the potential of 3D patient-derived culture systems for cancer drug development. Greater implementation of 3D patient-derived culture systems in the cancer research field should accelerate the development of truly personalized medical therapies for cancer patients.

  1. The Power of Digital Storytelling as a Culturally Relevant Health Promotion Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Katherine J; Halter, Amy; Marchello, Nathan; Escareño, Monica; Thompson, Beti

    2016-11-01

    Digital storytelling is an emergent method in health promotion. It addresses health inequities by combining technology with the voices of members of vulnerable, often underrepresented populations. The overall goal of this pilot project was to explore if digital storytelling could be a culturally relevant health promotion tool for Hispanics/Latinos to share their experiences with cancer, or other diseases. Promotores participated in a train-the-trainer workshop. Community members worked with trained promotores to create digital stories through community workshops. We conducted one-on-one interviews with digital story creators to elicit perspectives and assess their experience. One overarching theme among storytellers was the power of storytelling. Supporting subthemes that emerged in the interviews were (1) connection and communication, (2) lack of opportunities and barriers to telling stories, and (3) potential for disease prevention awareness and education. This study found digital storytelling to be culturally relevant for Hispanics/Latinos of Mexican origin. For these storytellers it was a uniquely valuable tool for sharing personal stories of overcoming or managing health issues. Participants found the digital story experience to be positive and beneficial. It provided a healing outlet to reflect on a difficult experience and find support within one's own community.

  2. Motivating Young Native American Students to Pursue STEM Learning Through a Culturally Relevant Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sally; Andrade, Rosi; Page, Melissa

    2016-12-01

    Data indicate that females and ethnic/race minority groups are underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce calling for innovative strategies to engage and retain them in science education and careers. This study reports on the development, delivery, and outcomes of a culturally driven science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) program, iSTEM, aimed at increasing engagement in STEM learning among Native American 3rd-8th grade students. A culturally relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge, informs the iSTEM program, a program based on the contention that the synergistic effect of a hybrid program combining two strategic approaches (1) in-school mentoring and (2) out-of-school informal science education experiences would foster engagement and interest in STEM learning. Students are paired with one of three types of mentors: Native American community members, university students, and STEM professionals. The iSTEM program is theme based with all program activities specifically relevant to Native people living in southern Arizona. Student mentees and mentors complete interactive flash STEM activities at lunch hour and attend approximately six field trips per year. Data from the iSTEM program indicate that the program has been successful in engaging Native American students in iSTEM as well as increasing their interest in STEM and their science beliefs.

  3. Motivating Young Native American Students to Pursue STEM Learning Through a Culturally Relevant Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sally; Andrade, Rosi; Page, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Data indicate that females and ethnic/race minority groups are underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce calling for innovative strategies to engage and retain them in science education and careers. This study reports on the development, delivery, and outcomes of a culturally driven science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) program, iSTEM, aimed at increasing engagement in STEM learning among Native American 3rd-8th grade students. A culturally relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge, informs the iSTEM program, a program based on the contention that the synergistic effect of a hybrid program combining two strategic approaches (1) in-school mentoring and (2) out-of-school informal science education experiences would foster engagement and interest in STEM learning. Students are paired with one of three types of mentors: Native American community members, university students, and STEM professionals. The iSTEM program is theme based with all program activities specifically relevant to Native people living in southern Arizona. Student mentees and mentors complete interactive flash STEM activities at lunch hour and attend approximately six field trips per year. Data from the iSTEM program indicate that the program has been successful in engaging Native American students in iSTEM as well as increasing their interest in STEM and their science beliefs.

  4. Understanding the interrelationship of instructional technology use and organizational culture: a case study of a veterinary medical college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Susan L; Harris, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Many predicted that in the latter part of the twentieth century modern technology would revolutionize higher education and "create a second Renaissance" (Sculley J. The relationship between business and higher education: A perspective on the 21st century. Commun ACM32:1056-1061, 1989 p1061). However, as the reality of the twenty-first century has set in, it is apparent that these revolutionary prophecies have fallen short. Using the lens of Douglas's Typology of Grid and Group, this case study examines (1) the organizational context of a veterinary medical college at a large Midwestern university; (2) individual faculty members' preferences toward instructional technology use; and (3) the interrelationship of culture and the decision process to implement instructional technology use in curricula. The study has several implications for instructional technology use in veterinary medical educational settings that help explain how cultural context can guide leadership decisions as well as influence faculty motivation and preference. The findings suggest that a key mitigating factor to instructional technology implementation is conflict or concord between the cultural biases of faculty members and actual cultural identity of the college (Stansberry S, Harris EL. Understanding why faculty use (or don't use) IT: Implementation of instructional technology from an organizational culture perspective. In Simonson M, Crawford M, eds. 25th Annual Proceedings: Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the 2002 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, vol. 1. North Miami Beach, FL: Nova Southeastern University:viii, 507).

  5. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Montellano, B.

    1996-11-14

    As planned a letter was sent out to 17 teachers who had participated in a Summer 1994 workshop on ``Culturally Relevant Science for Hispanics`` at Michigan State. These teachers were supposed to have spent the intervening time developing lesson plans and curricula. The letter requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed by February 1996 with a stipend of $400 for satisfactory reports. It was a disappointment to only get 9 responses and not all of them demonstrating a satisfactory level of activity. Diana Marinez, Dean of Science at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, who is the other developer of this curriculum and the author reviewed the submitted materials and chose those showing the most promise to be invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. Spring of 1996 and particularly in May--June, the author wrote a partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual which would provide a rationale for doing culturally relevant science, present the cultural and the scientific background that teachers would need in order to be able to teach. One of the goals of this curriculum is that it should be off-the-shelf ready to teach and that teachers would not have to do extra research to encourage its adoption. The outline of the book is appendix 1. The Writing Workshop was held at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi from July 14 to July 27, 1996. Participating teachers chose topics that they were interested in developing and wrote first drafts. These were distributed to all participants and critiqued by the workshop directors before being rewritten. Some teachers were more productive than others depending on their science background. In total an impressive number of lesson plans were written. These lesson plans are listed in Appendix 3. Appendix 4 is a sample lesson. Work still needs to be done on both the source book and the teachers` manual.

  6. Social marketing: approach to cultural and contextual relevance in a community-based physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Colleen; Vega-López, Sonia; Ainsworth, Barbara; Nagle-Williams, Allison; Records, Kathie; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean

    2014-03-01

    We report the social marketing strategies used for the design, recruitment and retention of participants in a community-based physical activity (PA) intervention, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health). The study example used to illustrate the use of social marketing is a 48-week prescribed walking program, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health), which tests a social support intervention to explore the effectiveness of a culturally specific program using 'bouts' of PA to effect the changes in body fat, fat tissue inflammation and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary Hispanic women. Using the guidelines from the National Benchmark Criteria, we developed intervention, recruitment and retention strategies that reflect efforts to draw on community values, traditions and customs in intervention design, through partnership with community members. Most of the women enrolled in Madres para la Salud were born in Mexico, largely never or unemployed and resided among the highest crime neighborhoods with poor access to resources. We developed recruitment and retention strategies that characterized social marketing strategies that employed a culturally relevant, consumer driven and problem-specific design. Cost and benefit of program participation, consumer-derived motivation and segmentation strategies considered the development transition of the young Latinas as well as cultural and neighborhood barriers that impacted retention are described.

  7. Social marketing: approach to cultural and contextual relevance in a community-based physical activity intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Colleen; Vega-López, Sonia; Ainsworth, Barbara; Nagle-Williams, Allison; Records, Kathie; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean

    2014-01-01

    We report the social marketing strategies used for the design, recruitment and retention of participants in a community-based physical activity (PA) intervention, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health). The study example used to illustrate the use of social marketing is a 48-week prescribed walking program, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health), which tests a social support intervention to explore the effectiveness of a culturally specific program using ‘bouts’ of PA to effect the changes in body fat, fat tissue inflammation and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary Hispanic women. Using the guidelines from the National Benchmark Criteria, we developed intervention, recruitment and retention strategies that reflect efforts to draw on community values, traditions and customs in intervention design, through partnership with community members. Most of the women enrolled in Madres para la Salud were born in Mexico, largely never or unemployed and resided among the highest crime neighborhoods with poor access to resources. We developed recruitment and retention strategies that characterized social marketing strategies that employed a culturally relevant, consumer driven and problem-specific design. Cost and benefit of program participation, consumer-derived motivation and segmentation strategies considered the development transition of the young Latinas as well as cultural and neighborhood barriers that impacted retention are described. PMID:23002252

  8. Impact of Culturally Relevant Contextualized Activities on Elementary and Middle School Students' Perceptions of Science: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Espada, Wilson; Llerandi-Román, Pablo; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; Ortiz-Vega, Nicole; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Colón-Ramos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers have argued that textbooks should be customized to local cultures and experiences, they rarely are. Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit group interested in promoting science literacy and education among Latino(a)s/Hispanics, identified a need to provide schools with culturally relevant materials. The result was the publication…

  9. Towards culturally relevant classroom science: a theoretical framework focusing on traditional plant healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Vongai; Otulaja, Femi S.; Mushayikwa, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical framework is an important component of a research study. It grounds the study and guides the methodological design. It also forms a reference point for the interpretation of the research findings. This paper conceptually examines the process of constructing a multi-focal theoretical lens for guiding studies that aim to accommodate local culture in science classrooms. A multi-focal approach is adopted because the integration of indigenous knowledge and modern classroom science is complex. The central argument in this paper is that a multi-focal lens accommodates the multifaceted nature of integrating indigenous knowledge and western oriented classroom science. The objective of the paper, therefore, is to construct a theoretical framework that can be used to guide and inform the integration of indigenous knowledge and western science at classroom science level. The traditional plant healing form of indigenous knowledge is used as a case study. The paper is important for raising the complexities, tensions and dilemmas inherent in the design and implementation of indigenous knowledge-science integrated curricula. An understanding of the issues raised will pave the way towards achieving culturally relevant classroom science.

  10. Theme-Based Culture Capsules and EFL Learners' Multicultural Attitude: The Efficiency of Explicit and Implicit Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Zari; Fatalaki, Javad Ahmadi; Nazari, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims at gaining insight into the effectiveness of the explicit and implicit instructions of the culture capsules through multimedia resources and tracks EFL learners|' multicultural attitudes. The study sampled 43 advanced EFL learners who took part in speaking courses at Shoukoh and Safiran institutes. The researchers applied…

  11. The Cultures of Contemporary Instructional Design Scholarship, Part Two: Developments Based on Constructivist and Critical Theory Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second in a series (see Willis, 2011) that looks at the current status of instructional design scholarship and theory. In this concluding article, the focus is on two cultures of ID work, one based on constructivist and interpretivist theory and the other based on critical theory and critical pedagogy. There are distinct…

  12. Exploring cultural differences in feedback processes and perceived instructiveness during clerkships : Replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Prihatiningsih, Titi S.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cultural differences between countries may entail differences in feedback processes. Aims: By replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia, we analysed whether differences in processes influenced the perceived instructiveness of feedback. Methods: Over a two-week period, Indonesian students (n =

  13. Cognition and Misrecognition: A Bourdieuian Analysis of Cognitive Strategy Instruction in a Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsfield, Lara J.; Jimenez, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    This study reports data from a year-long ethnographic case study of a third-grade teacher's literacy instruction for her linguistically and culturally diverse students. Specifically, we use Bourdieu's social practice theory (1991, 1998) to examine the teacher's linguistic and literate habitus and the discourses of the field converge in her use of…

  14. The Cultures of Contemporary Instructional Design Scholarship, Part One: Developments Based on Behavioral and Cognitive Science Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two articles examining the current status of instructional design (ID) scholarship and theory in four different cultures or traditions. In this article, the focus is on, first, ID models based on traditional behavioral theories of learning and, second, on models based on cognitive science and the learning sciences.…

  15. The Cultures of Contemporary Instructional Design Scholarship, Part Two: Developments Based on Constructivist and Critical Theory Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second in a series (see Willis, 2011) that looks at the current status of instructional design scholarship and theory. In this concluding article, the focus is on two cultures of ID work, one based on constructivist and interpretivist theory and the other based on critical theory and critical pedagogy. There are distinct…

  16. Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction: An Investigation of Primary Grade Teachers' Attitudes, Beliefs and Practices with African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Agren, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate primary grade teachers' attitudes, beliefs and practices concerning Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction (CRLI) with African American students. Through a mixed methods research design, quantitative and qualitative data sources were collected and analyzed sequentially. The participant school…

  17. Cultural Relevance for Rural Community Development in China: A Case Study in Bai, Jingpo and Huyaodai Communities of Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Kui; Du Juan; Dai Cong; Hu Huabin

    2007-01-01

    A three-year study over the Bai, Jingpo and Huayaodai communities in Yunnan Province reveals that the community development is significantly influenced in various ways by such cultural factors as the concepts of development; concepts and traditions of inter-community relationships, consumption, marriage and gender; patterns of decision-making and production, resource and income allocation; as well as the role of information dissemination systems, religion and ritual. Based on the analysis over the interactive relevance between each factor and community development, some strategies and methods for dealing with such a cultural relevance in development projects are recommended.

  18. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  19. "Picturing" Culturally Relevant Literacy Practices: Using Photography to See How Literacy Curricula and Pedagogies Matter to Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkov, Kristien; Pellegrino, Anthony; Harmon, James; Ewaida, Marriam; Bell, Athene; Lynch, Megan; Sell, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a photography and literacy project the authors conducted with 117 diverse city students. Relying on a critical pedagogy framework, the foundations for this study include research on cultural relevance, literacy, and visual sociology. The authors used Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) and photo…

  20. The relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Dorst, A.G. van; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex educa

  1. The Relevance of Cultural Factors in Predicting Condom-Use Intentions among Immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, P. L.; van Dorst, A. G.; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex education and machismo beliefs on gender and power…

  2. The relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Dorst, A.G. van; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex

  3. An Examination of Culturally Relevant Stressors, Coping, Ethnic Identity, and Subjective Well-Being in Urban, Ethnic Minority Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Elizabeth M.; Vacek, Kimberly; Coyle, Laura D.; Stinson, Jennifer; Mull, Megan; Doud, Katherine; Buchheit, Christine; Gorman, Catherine; Hewitt, Amber; Keene, Chesleigh; Blackmon, Sha'kema; Langrehr, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relations between culturally relevant stressors (i.e., urban hassles, perceived discrimination) and subjective well-being (SWB; i.e., positive/ negative affect, life satisfaction) to examine whether ethnic identity and/or coping strategies would serve as moderators of the relations between stress and SWB for 157 urban, ethnic…

  4. Social Studies Pedagogy for Latino/a Newcomer Youth: Toward a Theory of Culturally and Linguistically Relevant Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffee, Ashley Taylor

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how teachers in 4 urban newcomer high schools conceptualized and implemented social studies education for Latino/a newcomer youth through an emerging framework of culturally and linguistically relevant citizenship education. Through a multi-site, collective case study design, the perspectives and decision making of social…

  5. The relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Dorst, A.G. van; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex educa

  6. The Relevance of Cultural Factors in Predicting Condom-Use Intentions among Immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, P. L.; van Dorst, A. G.; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex education and machismo beliefs on gender and power…

  7. Social Studies Pedagogy for Latino/a Newcomer Youth: Toward a Theory of Culturally and Linguistically Relevant Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffee, Ashley Taylor

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how teachers in 4 urban newcomer high schools conceptualized and implemented social studies education for Latino/a newcomer youth through an emerging framework of culturally and linguistically relevant citizenship education. Through a multi-site, collective case study design, the perspectives and decision making of social…

  8. Indigenous Knowledge and Language: Decolonizing Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in a Mapuche Intercultural Bilingual Education Program in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Patricio R.

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates how Mapuche Indigenous knowledge (Kimun) and language (Mapudungun) incorporated into an Intercultural Bilingual Education (IBE) program of a school within a Mapuche context in Chile creates decolonizing counter-hegemonic narratives as forms of culturally relevant pedagogy. Based on a six-month school ethnography, this…

  9. Relevance Theory: A Guide to Culture-loaded Words in News Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李媛媛

    2015-01-01

    1.Intorduction Ernst-August Gutt studies translation with relevance theory.He finds connection between translation and relevance,"…relevance is dependent on the interplay of two factors:contextual effects and processing effort…the notion of‘relevance’itself is context-dependent…"(Gutt,2004:31).We can see that relevance theory and translation are intertwined.As context and cognition are the focus of both.We could say that for most translations,translators are trying to build the

  10. Examining English Language Arts Common Core State Standards Instruction through Cultural Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Tatum, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The English Language Arts Common Core State Standards and corresponding assessments brought about many changes for educators, their literacy instruction, and the literacy learning of their students. This study examined the day-to-day literacy instruction of two primary grade teachers during their first year of full CCSS implementation. Engestr?m's…

  11. How relevant are Hofstede's dimensions for inter-cultural studies? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stenden Hotel Management School, Stenden University of Applied Sciences, ... Hofstede tried to solve the “Western bias” in his original VSM ... is examined as a main effect (Type I studies) at the individual .... cultural dimensions in order to test their hypothesis that an ..... Consumer behavior and culture: Consequences.

  12. A Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Using Visual Culture for the Creation of a Socially Relevant Mural in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how high school and university students in Georgia and members of a small weaving pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico, collaborated in designing and creating a mural in the central market ("mercado") of the pueblo. A number of lessons emerged from this multi-cultural collaboration. First they learned that using images…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Using Visual Culture for the Creation of a Socially Relevant Mural in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how high school and university students in Georgia and members of a small weaving pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico, collaborated in designing and creating a mural in the central market ("mercado") of the pueblo. A number of lessons emerged from this multi-cultural collaboration. First they learned that using…

  14. African American History and Culture: A Grassroots Interpretation of Culturally-Relevant Teaching for Academic Achievement and College Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Beverly E.

    2008-01-01

    The Achievement, Confidence and Excellence (ACE) Academy in Memphis is a partnership involving the University of Memphis, its Benjamin Hooks Institute for Social Change, and three area school districts. ACE operates as a Saturday Institute, serving three hundred seventh to twelfth grade African American students. Grounded in culturally relevant…

  15. A Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Using Visual Culture for the Creation of a Socially Relevant Mural in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how high school and university students in Georgia and members of a small weaving pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico, collaborated in designing and creating a mural in the central market ("mercado") of the pueblo. A number of lessons emerged from this multi-cultural collaboration. First they learned that using…

  16. How relevant are Hofstede's dimensions for inter-cultural studies? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geert Hofstede is one of the leading academics on culture. (Søndergaard, 1994 .... Venezuela, Mexico, and Chile, and their results yielded useful findings of some ..... some mistakes were made during this process, which could influence the ...

  17. Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, T; Eriksson, H; Holm, E; Strömgren, M; Ekberg, J; Spreco, A; Dahlström, Ö

    2016-07-01

    Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10·6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics.

  18. The relevance of cultural activities in ethnic identity among California Native American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigman, Kurt; Soto, Claradina; Wright, Serena; Unger, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed data from a large statewide sample of Native American adolescents throughout California to determine whether participation in cultural practices was associated with stronger ethnic identity. The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) scale was used to measure the ethnic identity of 945 Native American adolescents (416 male, 529 female) aged 13 - 19 across California. Respondents who participated in cultural activities including pow-wows, sweat lodge, drum group and roundhouse dance reported significantly higher Native American ethnic identity than their counterparts who did not take part in cultural activities. The association between cultural activities and ethnic identity was only significant among urban youth and not among reservation youth. Higher grades in school were associated with ethnic identity among females but not among males. Findings from this study show a strong association between cultural activities and traditional practices with tribal enculturation among Native American youth in California. Cultural-based practices to enhance Native identity could be useful to improve mental and behavioral health among Native American youth.

  19. The extent to which Latina/o preservice teachers demonstrate culturally responsive teaching practices during science and mathematics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.

    2011-12-01

    Complex social, racial, economic, and political issues involved in the practice of teaching today require beginning teachers to be informed, skilled, and culturally responsive when entering the classroom. Teacher educators must educate future teachers in ways that will help them teach all children regardless of language, cultural background, or prior knowledge. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) novice teachers described and demonstrated culturally responsive teaching strategies using their students' cultural and academic profiles to inform practice in science and mathematics instruction. This qualitative exploratory case study considered the culturally responsive teaching practices of 12, non-traditional, Latina/o students as they progressed through a distance-based collaborative teacher education program. Qualitative techniques used throughout this exploratory case study investigated cultural responsiveness of these student teachers as they demonstrated their abilities to: a) integrate content and facilitate knowledge construction; b) illustrate social justice and prejudice reduction; and c) develop students academically. In conclusion, student teachers participating in this study demonstrated their ability to integrate content by: (1) including content from other cultures, (2) building positive teacher-student relationships, and (3) holding high expectations for all students. They also demonstrated their ability to facilitate knowledge construction by building on what students knew. Since there is not sufficient data to support the student teachers' abilities to assist students in learning to be critical, independent thinkers who are open to other ways of knowing, no conclusions regarding this subcategory could be drawn. Student teachers in this study illustrated prejudice reduction by: (1) using native language support to assist students in learning and understanding science and math content

  20. Vignette methodology and culture-relevance: lessons learned through a project on successful aging with Iranian immigrants to Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sandra

    2009-03-01

    It is a well-known fact that cultural values play an important role in the construction of aging and old-age related understandings. This is why ethnogerontologists have tried to expand the gerontological imagination by arguing that research needs to become more culturally-relevant. Tapping into the values that people uphold and the understandings of aging that are shaped by them is a challenging endeavor. This is especially the case if one does not share the cultural background of the people whose values one is studying. The same holds true when one wants to shed light on understandings that mainstream social gerontology regards as deviations from the norm. It is after all relatively easy to "impose the Western template" under such circumstances. Vignette methodology has been found to be particularly useful when studying value-laden understandings. This is why it is an appropriate method to consider when designing research that aims to avoid the imposition of the Western template. This article focuses on the pros and cons of this methodology while discussing some of the lessons learned from a project that explored how the construct of successful aging is understood by a group of Iranian immigrants to Sweden. It will be argued that vignettes are particularly useful when trying to shed culturally-relevant light on aging and old age-related understandings.

  1. "Hold up..do pigs eat bacon?!" An investigation of science instruction for urban Black youth and the need for a culturally considerate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgeway, Monica Lynn

    As a critical race ethnography, this dissertation attempts to foreground the richness of Black urban youth culture during and around science classroom instruction. Ironically, during an era of much diversity rhetoric in the United States, the culture of urban Black youth is rarely reflected in mainstream public school culture. I attempt to explicate such a worldview compassionately and authentically for both insiders and outsiders of the lived experiences of Black America. Education in the United States can be damning for Black youth who do not fit the mainstream mold, and several authors have provided detailed critique of mechanisms that shape, direct, and marginalize outliers to the successful academic cultural model. The U.S. through this lens is experiencing an opportunity gap, not an achievement gap--one which equitable educational experience can best be viewed through the richness of critical ethnographic methods. This methodical approach allowed me as a researcher to listen to marginalized voices and to incorporate lived interactions with youth, their parents, and community stakeholders all committed to provide support for the today's youth. As a Black female science educator, I explore the evidence for reform impact as I examine in school experiences and science teaching of culturally relevant pedagogies for urban, working-class and poor families of color in grades six-eight who participated in a Western New York academic enrichment program. Findings suggest that skepticism of reform efforts and new pedagogical approaches existed for all stakeholders aforementioned, but that students were the most amenable and responsive to alternative educational approaches. Specific recommendations for engaging students in inquiry processes are given for teachers, institutions, parents and students on the basis of videotaped lessons, interviews, and instructional artifacts. Implications include the recommendations that educators working with youth of color need to be

  2. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  3. Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beineke, John A.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance" is an exploration of research, ideas, trends, and practices for educators who teach American history to adolescents from the middle grades through high school. Higher education faculty in history and professional education will also find the book germane to their work. Topics within the…

  4. Relevance of Piagetian cross-cultural psychology to the humanities and social sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterdiekhoff, Georg W

    2013-01-01

    Jean Piaget held views according to which there are parallels between ontogeny and the historical development of culture, sciences, and reason. His books are full of remarks and considerations about these parallels, with reference to many logical, physical, social, and moral phenomena.This article explains that Piagetian cross-cultural psychology has delivered the decisive data needed to extend the research interests of Piaget. These data provide a basis for reconstructing not only the history of sciences but also the history of religion, politics, morals, culture, philosophy, and social change and the emergence of industrial society. Thus, it is possible to develop Piagetian theory as a historical anthropology in order to provide a basis for the humanities and social sciences.

  5. Designing a patient care model with relevance to the cultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson-Malt, Suzi; Herrin-Griffith, Donna M; Davies, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Healthcare leaders are challenged to develop new approaches to care that better serve populations and use valuable resources in more effective and efficient ways. The authors discuss a model of care under development at Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar, with emphasis on how to translate the best available evidence in a way that is applicable and meaningful for the cultural setting. Strategies that nurse leaders can call upon to engage their team members' cultural intelligence during the planning and design of new processes of care are also discussed.

  6. A Journey with a Refugee Family: Raising Culturally Relevant Teaching Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Freyca Calderon; Silva, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    In a context that is increasingly becoming more diverse, we consider it essential to promote activities to develop linguistic and cultural awareness among preservice teachers. This chapter is based on the narratives of college students who when enrolled in an English as a Second Language class participated in a project where they accompanied newly…

  7. Cognitive Contours: Recent Work on Cross-Cultural Psychology and Its Relevance for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines new work in cross-cultural psychology largely drawn from Nisbett, Choi, and Smith ("Cognition," 65, 15-32, 1997); Nisbett, Peng, Choi, & Norenzayan, "Psychological Review," 108(2), 291-310, 2001; Nisbett, "The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently...and Why." New…

  8. Motivating Young Native American Students to Pursue STEM Learning through a Culturally Relevant Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sally; Andrade, Rosi; Page, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Data indicate that females and ethnic/race minority groups are underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce calling for innovative strategies to engage and retain them in science education and careers. This study reports on the development, delivery, and outcomes of a culturally driven science, technology, engineering, mathematics…

  9. The CPAI-2 As a Culturally Relevant Personality Measure in Differentiating among Academic Major Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alexander; Fan, Weiqiao; Cheung, Fanny M.; Leong, Frederick T. L.; Cheung, Shu Fai

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory-2 (CPAI-2), developed by the combined emic-etic approach, could provide useful information for us to understand the relations between personality and the key academic major groups in the Chinese context. Participants in this study included 989 university students…

  10. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  11. Are cultural dimensions relevant for explaining cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Greta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics are widely-used medicines for which a more prudent use has been advocated to minimize development of resistance. There are considerable cross-national differences that can only partially be explained by epidemiological difference and variations in health care structure. The aim of this study was to explore whether cross-national differences in use of antibiotics (prescribed and non-prescribed are associated with differences between national cultures as described in Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions (Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-Term Orientation. Methods Country-level data of prescribed antibiotic use and self-medication with antibiotics were correlated to country-specific scores of cultural dimensions obtained from Hofstede. Data on use of antibiotics were provided by three European studies, based on different methods and/or countries: Self-medication with Antibiotics and Resistance in Europe (SAR, based on a survey in 2003 on reported use of antibiotics in 19 countries, the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption, based on distribution and reimbursement of antibiotics in ambulatory care (1997–2002, and the 2002 interview-based Eurobarometer study, asking whether respondents had taken antibiotics in the previous 12 months. These studies provided data on antibiotics use for 27 European countries in total, for which scores of cultural dimensions were also available. The SAR-study differentiated between prescribed antibiotics and self-medication with antibiotics. Results Significant positive correlations were found for Power Distance Index with use of prescribed antibiotics in the three studies (rho between 0.59 and 0.62 and with self-medication (rho = 0.54 in the SAR study. Positive significant correlations were found for the Uncertainty Avoidance Index with the use of antibiotics as reported in two studies (rho between 0.57 and 0.59; for the SAR study

  12. The relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, Pl; van Dorst, Ag; Schaalma, H

    2006-04-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex education and machismo beliefs on gender and power relationships is addressed. The study was conducted among 346 Dutch Antilleans from a random sample of an Antillean population aged 15-50 years. The response rate was 37.8%. The results showed that condom-use intentions were primarily determined by perceived subjective norms, the perceived taboo on discussing sex, machismo attitudes, gender, age and educational background. Moreover, the respondent's opinion regarding machismo was an effect modificator for the association between condom-use intentions and subjective social norm. It is concluded that, in predicting condom-use intentions, factors specific to the culture of a population contribute significantly to the determinants drawn from the general social-cognition models. It is recommended that future research should use measurement instruments that are adapted to culture-specific beliefs, and should explore the influence of cultural factors on actual condom use. Moreover, interventions promoting condom use among migrant populations should target the cultural correlates of condom use.

  13. Solutions to academic failure: The cognitive and cultural realities ofEnglish as the medium of instruction among black learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gamaroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa, black learners who are speakers of Bantu languages have to use a second language, namely English, as the medium of instruction from Std 3 onwards. The differences between English language-culture and Bantu languages-culture(s have generated a host of problems (and pseudo-problems?, where the main problem is academic failure. Three solutions to academic failure are discussed in the light of cultural and cognitive factors in multicultural education: 1. The use of the mother tongue as the exclusive medium of instruction 2. Critical Language Study (CLS and People's English 3. The separation of high ability learners from limited ability learners in the teaching situation. It is emphasised that culture is closely connected to a symbolic system, and thus an understanding of cognitive processes in academic learning requires an understanding of culture, and vice versa. Ultimately, of primary importance in academic study are the cognitive underpinnings of Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP developed in the first language. In Suid-Afrika word swart leerders wie se moedertaal een van die Afrika tale is, tans vanaf st. 3 in 'n tweede taal, naamlik Engels, onderrig. As gevolg van die verskille tussen die Engelse taalkultuur en die taalkulture van die A.frika tale het daar 'n groot aantal probleme (en pseudoprobleme? ontstaan, waarvan akademiese mislukking die belangrikste is. Drie oplossings vir hierdie akademiese mislukking word bespreek aan die hand van kulturele en kognitiewe faktore in multikulturele onderwys: 1. Die gebruik van die moedertaal as eksklusiewe medium van onderrig 2. "Critical Language Study" (CLS en "People's English" 3. Die afsonderlike hantering van hoogsbegaafde en minder begaafde leerlinge. Dit moet beklemtoon word dat kultuur nouverwant is aan 'n simbolesisteem. Gevolglik is 'n be grip van die kognitiewe prosesse betrokke by akademiese leer 'n voorvereiste vir 'n be grip van kultuur, en omgekeerd. Vera

  14. Attention to instruction directed to another by U.S. Mexican-heritage children of varying cultural backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Angélica; Correa-Chávez, Maricela; Rogoff, Barbara; Gutiérrez, Kris

    2010-05-01

    Children commonly observe and pitch in to ongoing activities in Indigenous communities of Mexico, according to ethnographic research. The present study examines the generality of this approach to learning by comparing its use among Mexican immigrants of two cultural backgrounds in the United States. Results showed more sustained attention to (and learning from) instruction directed to another person by 22 U.S. Mexican-heritage 6- to 11-year-old children whose families likely have experience with Indigenous practices (and limited involvement in Western schooling), compared with 16 U.S. Mexican-heritage children whose families have extensive involvement in Western schooling (and related practices).

  15. Exploring the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures: when does culture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkir, Nazli; Arens, Elisabeth A; Barnow, Sven

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the absence of both autonomy and social support (relatedness) are two important etiologic pathways to major depressive disorder (MDD). However, cross-cultural researchers state that the implications of autonomy and relatedness for mental health vary across cultures. To test these assumptions, the current study investigated the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures (Germans and Turkish immigrants in Germany). One hundred and eight (108) women were evaluated for their levels of autonomy/relatedness satisfaction, for overall psychopathological complaints including depression, for affectivity and for perceived loneliness through self-report measures. Among healthy groups, relatedness satisfaction predicted better mental health in Turkish women, whereas in German women, autonomy satisfaction was the better mental health predictor. Within depressed groups however, cultural differences in mental health outcomes regarding autonomy were no longer evident. Autonomy was associated with higher levels of mental health in Turkish as well as in German patients. Our findings indicate that the relationship between autonomy and mental health is culture-specific in healthy women, but disappears in depressed women. These findings are discussed with consideration of clinical implications and an outlook regarding further research.

  16. Lack of clinical relevance in routine final subcultures of radiometrically negative BACTEC blood culture vials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plorde, J.J.; Carlson, L.G.; Dau, M.E.

    1982-11-01

    During a 38-month period, 10,106 blood specimens were received in the laboratory for culture. These were inoculated into 26,424 vials and processed using the BACTEC radiometric detection system. Of these vials, 1,914 were eventually found to be microbiologically positive. Isolates from 836 vials were judged to be contaminants. In the remaining 1,078 vials, growth was first detected visually or radiometrically in 1,062 and by final subculture in 16. Growth from these sixteen bottles represented 12 clinically significant bacteremic episodes in as many patients. In nine of these episodes, other culture vials from the same patient were positive radiometrically. Therefore, 358 of 361 (99.2%) bacteremic episodes were detected without the benefit of routine final subcultures. The three patients whose bacteremia was missed were diagnosed clinically and placed on appropriate therapy prior to the detection of the bacteremias by final subculture.

  17. Cutting the gordian knot-development and biological relevance of hepatitis C virus cell culture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith Margarete; Bukh, Jens

    2008-01-01

    described. Research on the viral life cycle, efficient therapeutics, and a vaccine has been hampered by the absence of suitable cell culture systems. The first system permitting studies of the full viral life cycle was intrahepatic transfection of RNA transcripts of HCV consensus complementary DNA (c...... studies of the function of viral proteins, their interaction with each other and host proteins, new antivirals, and neutralizing antibodies in the context of the full viral life cycle. However, several challenges remain, including development of cell culture systems for all major HCV genotypes...... isolate JFH1, which for unknown reasons showed an exceptional replication capability and resulted in formation of infectious viral particles in the human hepatoma cell line Huh7, led in 2005 to the development of the first full viral life cycle in vitro systems. JFH1-based systems now enable in vitro...

  18. The Relevance of Cultural and Media Studies to Theatre and Television in Bali

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Hobart

    2015-01-01

    AbstractA critical approach to Balinese society presents a starkly different picturefrom the representations that Balinese usually tell themselves, whichare largely myths to disguise a painful reality. Bali no longer belongsto Balinese but to international capital, a process of alienation by whichBalinese energetically commoditize their culture while claiming theopposite. Even the frames of reference for discussing what is happeningare inadequate because they predate the rise of contemporary ...

  19. Relationship between Language Learners' Attitudes toward Cultural Instruction and Pragmatic Comprehension and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieyan, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Development of target language pragmatic competence in language learners requires not only provision of cultural features of target language community in language classes but also language learner's willingness to learn and use those cultural features. To investigate the relationship between language learners' attitudes toward cultural instruction…

  20. Relationship between Attitude toward Target Language Culture Instruction and Pragmatic Comprehension Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieyan, Vahid; Majid, Norazman Bin Abdul; Eng, Lin Siew

    2013-01-01

    Familiarity with the cultural features of the target language society and interest in learning those cultural features are the key factors to determine language learners' level of pragmatic comprehension. To investigate this issue, this study attempted to assess the relationship between attitude toward incorporating target language culture into…

  1. Diversifying Instruction and Shifting Authority: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Analysis of Classroom Participant Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Terri; Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls asking science teachers to increase student authority by diversifying instruction appear stalled by a lack of empirical evidence supporting the actual implementation of any such shifts. To better support the practical integration of more student-directed inquiry into the science classroom, we consider one teacher's day-to-day…

  2. Seeing Culture and Power in Mathematical Learning: Toward a Model of Equitable Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This paper is centered on creating equitable opportunities for learners in mathematics education. Through observations of teacher practice, the paper seeks to theorize how teachers enact their dispositions toward mathematics instruction. These observed propensities, in relation to teachers' aims for students to "take up their space" in and beyond…

  3. Educational Counter Culture: Motivations, Instructional Approaches, Curriculum Choices, and Challenges of Home School Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Kenneth Vance

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in depth knowledge of the day to day activities of home school families in order to better understand the instructional approaches, curriculum decisions, and challenges. Four themes were addressed: motivations, operations, resources, and challenges. Findings about motivations to home school included: (a)…

  4. Web Instruction as Cultural Transformation: A Reeducation Model for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Frank

    This paper offers a model of faculty staff development for distance education that does not require, or permit, continuous change in instructional design. The model is based on the paradigm shift ideas of Thomas Kuhn and the reeducation model of Kurt Lewin. In the model offered reeducation implies not simply education or training, but involves…

  5. A cross-cultural, multilevel study of inquiry-based instruction effects on conceptual understanding and motivation in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Meiko

    Student achievement and motivation to learn physics is highly valued in many industrialized countries including the United States and Japan. Science education curricula in these countries emphasize the importance and encourage classroom teachers to use an inquiry approach. This dissertation investigated high school students' motivational orientations and their understanding of physics concepts in a context of inquiry-based instruction. The goals were to explore the patterns of instructional effects on motivation and learning in each country and to examine cultural differences and similarities. Participants consisted of 108 students (55 females, 53 males) and 9 physics teachers in the United States and 616 students (203 females and 413 males) and 11 physics teachers in Japan. Students were administered (a) Force Concept Inventory measuring physics conceptual understanding and (b) Attitudes about Science Questionnaire measuring student motivational orientations. Teachers were given a survey regarding their use of inquiry teaching practices and background information. Additionally, three teachers in each country were interviewed and observed in their classrooms. For the data analysis, two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) methods were used to examine individual student differences (i.e., learning, motivation, and gender) within each classroom (i.e., inquiry-based teaching, teaching experience, and class size) in the U.S. and Japan, separately. Descriptive statistical analyses were also conducted. The results indicated that there was a cultural similarity in that current teaching practices had minimal influence on conceptual understanding as well as motivation of high school students between the U.S. and Japan. In contrast, cultural differences were observed in classroom structures and instructional approaches. Furthermore, this study revealed gender inequity in Japanese students' conceptual understanding and self-efficacy. Limitations of the study, as well as

  6. Keeping the intracellular vitamin C at a physiologically relevant level in endothelial cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette Rønne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the addition of vitamin C to cell culture medium improves cell growth. However, once added, the vitamin C concentration declines rapidly. This situation differs from the in vivo environment where the endothelium is constantly supplied with ascorbate from the blood....... With a focus on intracellular vitamin C, we simulated constant supply of ascorbate by the hourly addition of freshly prepared medium containing 75 lM ascorbate and subsequently compared it with more practical regimens using combinations of ascorbate and 2-phosphoascorbate. We found that a single supplement...

  7. Quantitative assessment of organizational culture within hospitals and its relevance to infection prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Waisfisz, B; Frank, U

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that organizational culture (OC) is an important driver of infection prevention and control (IPC) behaviour among healthcare workers. This study examined OC in seven European hospitals using a validated assessment tool based on Hofstede's model, and identified significant variations in OC scores. Hospitals with low prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibited high scores for change facilitation and change readiness, whereas hospitals with high prevalence of MRSA exhibited low scores for these determinants. It is possible to use tools, available outside health care, to study OC within hospitals and gain better insight into IPC behaviour change strategies.

  8. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-01-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes. PMID:27478033

  9. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-08-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

  10. Uncovering study abroad: foreignness and its relevance to nurse education and cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatrex-White, Sheila

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports some of the findings from a hermeneutic phenomenological research project designed to uncover the nature of the phenomenon 'study abroad' in the context of Nursing Higher Education in the United Kingdom. The research question asked was 'How is study abroad manifest in the experience of nursing students?' Informed by the philosophy of Martin Heidegger, the analysis of 26 study abroad students' diary accounts uncovered six general structures, or ways for study abroad to be, namely; leaving behind, escape, foreigner, self-discovery, learning and risk. The focus here is on the general structure 'foreigner' and the far-reaching implications this can have in terms of understanding how study abroad comes to be. The relationship between study abroad, positive disturbance and the development of students who are able to recognise diversity across different cultures is discussed. It is suggested that if one of the major aims of nurse higher education is the development of culturally competent practitioners, study abroad is deserving of far greater attention than is currently the case.

  11. Comparing the accuracy of different smell identification tests in Parkinson's disease: relevance of cultural aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Gonzalez-Latapi, Paulina; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of the University of Pennsylvania smell identification test (UPSIT), sniffin sticks (SS-16) and brief smell identification test (B-SIT) to assess smell identification in the Mexican population and its accuracy in discriminating subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD). We included 199 nondemented PD subjects and 199 control subjects matched by gender. Smell identification was tested using the UPSIT and SS-16. Our group obtained B-SIT data from a previous report. The mean number of UPSIT items correctly identified by controls was 27.3±6; the PD group had a mean score of 19.4±6. UPSIT had a sensitivity of 82% with a specificity of 66% for a cut-off score of ≤25 for detection of PD. The mean number of SS-16 items correctly identified by controls was 10.3±2.2, while the PD group had 7.4±2.8 correct answers. For SS-16, sensitivity was 77.8% and specificity of 71.2% when using a cut-off value of ≤9. Lemon, turpentine and rose had an identification rate below the 25th percentile for all three tests. Odors with an identification rate above the 75th percentile include banana for all three tests, and gasoline, onion and chocolate for UPSIT and B-SIT. The sensitivity and specificity of the smell tests that were evaluated were lower in comparison to other published reports. Cultural biases and smell familiarity may influence the test results. The development of a true cross-culturally adapted smell identification test is warranted may improve test accuracy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods: the case for cost over volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Wamalwa, Emmanuel S; Okumu, Thomas O; Bryant, Kendall L; Goulet, Joseph L; Maisto, Stephen A; Braithwaite, R Scott; Justice, Amy C

    2010-08-01

    Traditional homemade brew is believed to represent the highest proportion of alcohol use in sub-Saharan Africa. In Eldoret, Kenya, two types of brew are common: chang'aa, spirits, and busaa, maize beer. Local residents refer to the amount of brew consumed by the amount of money spent, suggesting a culturally relevant estimation method. The purposes of this study were to analyze ethanol content of chang'aa and busaa; and to compare two methods of alcohol estimation: use by cost, and use by volume, the latter the current international standard. Laboratory results showed mean ethanol content was 34% (SD = 14%) for chang'aa and 4% (SD = 1%) for busaa. Standard drink unit equivalents for chang'aa and busaa, respectively, were 2 and 1.3 (US) and 3.5 and 2.3 (Great Britain). Using a computational approach, both methods demonstrated comparable results. We conclude that cost estimation of alcohol content is more culturally relevant and does not differ in accuracy from the international standard.

  13. ELECTRONIC COLLABORATION ACROSS CULTURES IN A WEB-BASED PROJECT FOR ENGLISH WRITING INSTRUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    George C.K. Jor

    2000-01-01

    The paper highlights the importance of experimentation and an innovative approach to English language writing instruction with the help of information communication technology (ICT or IT). First, it describes the local situation of English language teaching at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). Then, it summarizes the development of IT proficiency and student-led collaborative learning groups at CUHK. Third, it reports on an international Web-based writing project involving six colla...

  14. Exploring the parent agency through a culturally relevant and inclusive science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Sumi

    2002-01-01

    Science education reform calls for the inclusivity of all learners, the same should also apply to immigrant Latino/a parents. The Literacy in Food and the Environment (LIFE) program, a two-year inner-city middle-school science curriculum designed to teach science, nutrition and the environment through investigations of food is analyzed based on quantitative and qualitative data gathered during 1999--2001. A sample of 19 immigrant Latino/a parents participated in 12 workshops and collaborated with teachers in the classroom to implement the curriculum. A quantitative analysis of year one using a pre/post test design measured the impact of the program on the parents' science knowledge, attitude and beliefs about science and participating in their child's science education, and food choices and behavior. Four mothers continued with the program in year two. Qualitative data was gathered to create descriptive case studies. From the data I developed an interpretive discussion based on cross case analysis using a grounded theory method, When compared to a comparison group (n = 13), quantitative results showed significantly higher outcomes for science knowledge on the topics of energy flow (65% intervention vs, 37% control, p culture and language in positioning self in science and in school, (3) the mothers' experience as socially transformative. By engaging parents inside the classroom with science taught through food, parents' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs around science improved, as they developed a sense of agency transforming their role from parent to educator.

  15. Perspectives on the German "Energiewende": Culture and Ecology in German Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Bartell M.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a dual desire for teaching units that (1) incorporate green issues into the language curriculum, (2) fulfill the need for comparative cultural studies in the language classroom, and (3) incorporate the ACTFL "Standards for Foreign Language Learning." Included are a review of recent approaches to teaching culture in…

  16. Perspectives on the German "Energiewende": Culture and Ecology in German Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Bartell M.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a dual desire for teaching units that (1) incorporate green issues into the language curriculum, (2) fulfill the need for comparative cultural studies in the language classroom, and (3) incorporate the ACTFL "Standards for Foreign Language Learning." Included are a review of recent approaches to teaching culture in…

  17. An Emerging Theory for Evidence Based Information Literacy Instruction in School Libraries, Part 2: Building a Culture of Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A. Gordon

    2009-09-01

    research was social reform, while action research in education targeted self through the improvement of practice. The dichotomy between purposes of self and society is resolved by the Lewin‐Dewey connection, where the reiterative cycle of action and reflection is the basis for a common intent for both types of action research. Dewey’s approach comprises the metatheory for emerging theory: a philosophy of purpose and methodology that determines how the research is done.Results – The emerging theory developed in this paper postulates that evidence based information literacy instruction uses action research for two purposes. Self‐oriented action research (AR(S1 targets self‐improvement on the local level of teaching and learning in school libraries; social‐oriented action research (AR(S2 targets social reform on the global level of educational improvement. Corollaries of the theory indicate a research agenda and methodologies for the research.Conclusion – Implicit in the content of the research is methodology that evolves from the distinction between the purposes of self‐ and social‐oriented action research. Clearly, evidence is generated in the field of teaching and learning that is situated in theory‐based practices, such as user‐centered information processing, constructivist learning, and a culture of inquiry that grows from social processes. Librarianship is well suited to developing practitioner‐researchers who are proficient in making the information‐to‐knowledge connection that informs their professional performance.

  18. Effect of culturally relevant pedagogy on Latino students' engagement and content mastery on states of matter unit in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jennifer

    This research, in response to the lack of empirical evidence of the impact of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) on Latino students in science education, examined the effect CRP on Latino students' engagement and content mastery. Quantitative research was conducted with a treatment group that received an intervention unit on states of matter with CRP approaches and a comparison group that did not receive the intervention. The sample comprised approximately 189 eighth-grade students from a Southern Californian middle school. The research findings reveal that CRP approaches had a statistically significant positive effect on student engagement of all ethnic groups in this study, particularly Latino students, while CRP approaches had a statistically significant negative effect on Latino students' content mastery. Three recommendations result from this study, including professional development of CRP for educators, professional development of CRP for educational leaders, and using CRP to address multiculturalism.

  19. Commonly prescribed β-lactam antibiotics induce C. trachomatis persistence/stress in culture at physiologically relevant concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eKintner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease agent worldwide, enters a viable, non-dividing and non-infectious state (historically termed persistence and more recently referred to as the chlamydial stress response when exposed to penicillin G in culture. Notably, penicillin G-exposed chlamydiae can reenter the normal developmental cycle upon drug removal and are resistant to azithromycin-mediated killing. Because penicillin G is less frequently prescribed than other β-lactams, the clinical relevance of penicillin G-induced chlamydial persistence/stress has been questioned. The goal of this study was to determine whether more commonly used penicillins also induce C. trachomatis serovar E persistence/stress. All penicillins tested, as well as clavulanic acid, induced formation of aberrant, enlarged reticulate bodies (called aberrant bodies or AB characteristic of persistent/stressed chlamydiae. Exposure to the penicillins and clavulanic acid also reduced chlamydial infectivity by >95%. None of the drugs tested significantly reduced chlamydial unprocessed 16S rRNA or genomic DNA accumulation, indicating that the organisms were viable, though non-infectious. Finally, recovery assays demonstrated that chlamydiae rendered essentially non-infectious by exposure to ampicillin, amoxicillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, penicillin V and clavulanic acid recovered infectivity after antibiotic removal. These data definitively demonstrate that several commonly used penicillins induce C. trachomatis persistence/stress at clinically relevant concentrations.

  20. Integration of Geomatics Techniques for Digitizing Highly Relevant Geological and Cultural Heritage Sites: the Case of San Leo (italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, V. A.; Borgatti, L.; Dellapasqua, M.; Mandanici, E.; Spreafico, M. C.; Tini, M. A.; Bitelli, G.

    2017-08-01

    The research activities described in this contribution were carried out at San Leo (Italy). The town is located on the top of a quadrangular rock slab affected by a complex system of fractures and has a wealth of cultural heritage, as evidenced by the UNESCO's nomination. The management of this fragile set requires a comprehensive system of geometrical information to analyse and preserve all the geological and cultural features. In this perspective, the latest Geomatics techniques were used to perform some detailed surveys and to manage the great amount of acquired geometrical knowledge of both natural (the cliff) and historical heritage. All the data were also georeferenced in a unique reference system. In particular, high accurate terrestrial laser scanner surveys were performed for the whole cliff, in order to obtain a dense point cloud useful for a large number of geological studies, among others the analyses of the last rockslide by comparing pre- and post-event data. Moreover, the geometrical representation of the historical centre was performed using different approaches, in order to generate an accurate DTM and DSM of the site. For these purposes, a large scale numerical map was used, integrating the data with GNSS and laser surveys of the area. Finally, many surveys were performed with different approaches on some of the most relevant monuments of the town. In fact, these surveys were performed by terrestrial laser scanner, light structured scanner and photogrammetry, the last mainly applied with the Structure from Motion approach.

  1. INTEGRATION OF GEOMATICS TECHNIQUES FOR DIGITIZING HIGHLY RELEVANT GEOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL HERITAGE SITES: THE CASE OF SAN LEO (ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Girelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research activities described in this contribution were carried out at San Leo (Italy. The town is located on the top of a quadrangular rock slab affected by a complex system of fractures and has a wealth of cultural heritage, as evidenced by the UNESCO’s nomination. The management of this fragile set requires a comprehensive system of geometrical information to analyse and preserve all the geological and cultural features. In this perspective, the latest Geomatics techniques were used to perform some detailed surveys and to manage the great amount of acquired geometrical knowledge of both natural (the cliff and historical heritage. All the data were also georeferenced in a unique reference system. In particular, high accurate terrestrial laser scanner surveys were performed for the whole cliff, in order to obtain a dense point cloud useful for a large number of geological studies, among others the analyses of the last rockslide by comparing pre- and post-event data. Moreover, the geometrical representation of the historical centre was performed using different approaches, in order to generate an accurate DTM and DSM of the site. For these purposes, a large scale numerical map was used, integrating the data with GNSS and laser surveys of the area. Finally, many surveys were performed with different approaches on some of the most relevant monuments of the town. In fact, these surveys were performed by terrestrial laser scanner, light structured scanner and photogrammetry, the last mainly applied with the Structure from Motion approach.

  2. Bridging Theory and Practice: Using Hip-Hop Pedagogy As A Culturally Relevant Approach In The Urban Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Edmund S.

    This dissertation explores the context of urban science education as it relates to the achievement and engagement of urban youth. This study provides a framework for Hip-Hop Pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning anchored in the creative elements of Hip-Hop culture, in STEM as an innovative approach to teaching and learning demonstrates the effect that Hip-Hop Pedagogy, as a culturally relevant approach to teaching has on teaching and learning in an urban science classroom. This study establishes practical tools and approaches, which were formed from by theory and research that transcend the traditional monolithic approaches to teaching science. Participants in this study are middle school students who attend an urban school in one of the largest school systems in the country. This research showed that as result of utilizing Hip-Hop pedagogical practices, students reported that they developed a deeper understanding of science content, students were more likely to identify as scientists, and students were provided a space and opportunities to deconstruct traditional classroom spaces and structures.

  3. The Rationalizing Logics of Public School Reform: How Cultural Institutions Matter for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    The research herein uses a mixed methods approach to examine how organizational phenomena at the macro level of analysis translate into phenomena at the micro level. Specifically, the research attempts to explain how cultural institutions may translate into individual attitudes and actions, such as public school teachers' decisions about using…

  4. Drawing upon Lessons Learned: Effective Curriculum and Instruction for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Gifted Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Julie Dingle

    2016-01-01

    Javits Gifted and Talented Education Program has provided a wealth of knowledge on culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) gifted learners and how to support teachers in their work with CLD students. This study examined five impactful Javits projects through qualitative inquiry centered on how innovative practice takes root or not. Using…

  5. Instructional Design of a Distance Education Cultural Awareness Course to Enhance Currency and Authenticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Susan L.; Martin, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a virtual learning environment using a blend of collaborative technologies and human resources to provide US preservice teachers with an authentic experience of another culture. A core design component is the use of "embedded instructors" who are natives of and living in the target country (N.…

  6. Tesoros de mi raza: Programa de lecture y ensenanza del lenguaje (Treasures of My Culture: Reading and Teaching Program for Language Instruction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Richard G.; And Others

    This teacher's guide, reader and workbook are part of a series of bilingual instructional materials designed for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. The present materials are specifically for fourth graders. The goal of the series is to teach Spanish by means of stories that present historical and cultural facts and aspects of the daily life of a…

  7. The Need for a Multimedia Center To Enhance the Implementation of Instructional Art Culturally-Oriented Programs in Arts on the Square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Janet Alvarez

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not Arts on the Square in Richmond, Virginia needed a multimedia center to enhance the implementation of its instructional art culturally-oriented programs. The study was descriptive, using the purposive non-probability sampling technique. The instrument used in the study was designed for Arts…

  8. From direct instruction to inquiry learning in the earth sciences: common challenges and opportunities across cultures in the Singapore context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Rubin, C. M.; Eriksson, S. C.; Hill, E.; Phua, A.; Yong Hon Zun, F.

    2013-12-01

    At all educational levels and across cultures, moving from direct instruction to inquiry learning is challenging for both students and instructors. Is knowledge fixed, to be dispensed by an instructor and received by the learner? Or, is knowledge provisional and dynamic, to be sought and constructed actively by a learner under the guidance of her instructor? In a class for beginning PhD students, we initially observed great cultural discomfort with criticizing others' work. We emphasize the importance of critical discourse in science and provide a small, seminar-style environment in which students can openly critique the work of their colleagues and superiors. We have seen progress toward an intellectual environment where open critique is part of mutual respect. At the secondary level, we provide training and support for teachers to make the transition from knowledge dispenser to learning guide. Inquiry learning opens up the classroom discourse, which can move beyond the teacher's own content knowledge. In our teacher workshops, we model the teacher not as all-knowing, but rather as investigator and learning guide. By taking the role of active learners, teachers deepen their own content knowledge and can anticipate the questions that students might ask; this reduces the challenges of implementing inquiry learning in their own classrooms. With sufficient guidance, institutional support, and chance to practice in a supportive environment, both secondary teachers and graduate students move toward inquiry learning.

  9. ELECTRONIC COLLABORATION ACROSS CULTURES IN A WEB-BASED PROJECT FOR ENGLISH WRITING INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C.K. Jor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the importance of experimentation and an innovative approach to English language writing instruction with the help of information communication technology (ICT or IT. First, it describes the local situation of English language teaching at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK. Then, it summarizes the development of IT proficiency and student-led collaborative learning groups at CUHK. Third, it reports on an international Web-based writing project involving six collaborating schools in different parts of the world including China, the United States, Indonesia, and Hong Kong in the year 1999-2000. In the report, the author-presenter will share with the audience a new ELT course development titled "English Online: Writing on the Web." He will explain the course objectives, the background of participating classes, the Web Course Tools (WebCT, the design of the project, the evaluation of course effectiveness and the outcome of the new curricular initiative. Finally, the paper presents a summary of a practical guide to electronic collaboration and some of the lessons the writer has learnt in five years' experience of participant-observation in English teaching practice using the Web.

  10. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  11. The positive mental health instrument: development and validation of a culturally relevant scale in a multi-ethnic asian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaingankar Janhavi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instruments to measure mental health and well-being are largely developed and often used within Western populations and this compromises their validity in other cultures. A previous qualitative study in Singapore demonstrated the relevance of spiritual and religious practices to mental health, a dimension currently not included in exiting multi-dimensional measures. The objective of this study was to develop a self-administered measure that covers all key and culturally appropriate domains of mental health, which can be applied to compare levels of mental health across different age, gender and ethnic groups. We present the item reduction and validation of the Positive Mental Health (PMH instrument in a community-based adult sample in Singapore. Methods Surveys were conducted among adult (21-65 years residents belonging to Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicities. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (EFA, CFA were conducted and items were reduced using item response theory tests (IRT. The final version of the PMH instrument was tested for internal consistency and criterion validity. Items were tested for differential item functioning (DIF to check if items functioned in the same way across all subgroups. Results: EFA and CFA identified six first-order factor structure (General coping, Personal growth and autonomy, Spirituality, Interpersonal skills, Emotional support, and Global affect under one higher-order dimension of Positive Mental Health (RMSEA = 0.05, CFI = 0.96, TLI = 0.96. A 47-item self-administered multi-dimensional instrument with a six-point Likert response scale was constructed. The slope estimates and strength of the relation to the theta for all items in each six PMH subscales were high (range:1.39 to 5.69, suggesting good discrimination properties. The threshold estimates for the instrument ranged from -3.45 to 1.61 indicating that the instrument covers entire spectrums for the six dimensions. The

  12. Cultural Distance:How is it defined, how is it measured, and what is its relevance to international marketers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳

    2015-01-01

    This essay analyses the meaning of culture and in particular aims at reviewing different tools to measure differences be⁃tween cultures—the so-called cultural distance. Two major tools are considered in detail:Hall’s High Vs Low context culture (1977) and Hofstede’s Five Cultural Dimensions (1991). The conclusion of this essay draws on the weaknesses of existing systems and suggests the introduction of a‘cultural distance segmentation’that would change global companies’tendency of uniformity in their messages to a more adaptive message amongst different cultures.

  13. "The Cow Loves To Learn": The Hao-Xue-Xin Learning Model as a Reflection of the Cultural Relevance of "Zhima Jie," China's "Sesame Street."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Li, Jimei

    2002-01-01

    Examined the cultural basis and relevance of "Zhima Jie," a Chinese adaptation of "Sesame Street." Found that most of 3- to 6-year-olds in the sample desired books and learning materials, with disadvantaged children more likely than more advantaged children to desire books and learning materials. Older children showed a greater…

  14. Creating a Model of Acceptance: Preservice Teachers Interact with Non-English-Speaking Latino Parents Using Culturally Relevant Mathematics and Science Activities at Family Learning Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Olga; McCollough, Cherie A.; Diaz, Zulmaris

    2016-01-01

    The following describes a culturally relevant mathematics and science content program implemented by preservice teachers (PSTs) at Family Math/Science Learning Events (FM/SLEs) conducted through two different university programs in south Texas. These experiences are required course activities designed to inform PSTs of the importance of…

  15. Teaching Science from Cultural Points of Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Gummer, Edith

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on a professional development program for science teachers near or on American Indian reservations in Montana. This program was framed by culturally relevant pedagogy premises and was characterized by instructional strategies and content foci resulting from the intersection between three cultures: tribal, science teaching, and…

  16. The Effect of Plain-English Vocabulary on Student Achievement and Classroom Culture in College Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoerning, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the translation of traditional scientific vocabulary into plain English on student achievement in college science instruction. The study took place in the context of an introductory microbiology course. Data were collected from course sections instructed with traditional microbiology vocabulary as well as sections…

  17. Instructional Implications of David C. Geary's Evolutionary Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweller, John

    2008-01-01

    David C. Geary's thesis has the potential to alter our understanding of those aspects of human cognition relevant to instruction. His distinction between biologically primary knowledge that we have evolved to acquire and biologically secondary knowledge that is culturally important, taught in educational institutions and which we have not evolved…

  18. Staying Relevant in the Google Age: Implementing Vertical Search at the University of Manchester — a Technological and Cultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Beard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available John Rylands University Library at the University of Manchester makes a clear commitment to improving resource discovery in its New Directions strategy. In addition an external review of the Library’s systems portfolio identified a clear need to improve the user experience in finding and accessing information. There are also drivers to ensure better utilisation of the Library’s investment in e-resources, as well as the need for the Library to respond to the question of how libraries continue to stay relevant in the Google age. Taking all these factors into account the Library took a strategic decision in 2010 to implement a vertical search solution and it established a formal project to do so in Summer 2010. The project has involved working in close partnership with a number of key stakeholders from the Library, IT Services, multiple vendors and the academic community and is a good example of the changing way in which libraries need to plan and manage their projects in order to improve and deliver services which address the needs of their users. Effective governance, communication, change and project management have been key to the success of this project and highlights the growing importance of these skills in libraries today. The paper will consider the complex technological issues around integrating data from different sources and using different metadata standards. The project has involved vendors working co-operatively together to enable data to move between systems and different metadata formats, which also presents challenges. The cultural issues involved in implementing vertical search will also be discussed, including a shift in the Library’s internal philosophy towards search, the possible impact on the traditional Library catalogue and associated workflows and the changing user perception of the Library in response to vertical search. The project is an excellent case study in new ways of working for libraries, tackling complex

  19. Detergent resistant membrane-associated IDE in brain tissue and cultured cells: Relevance to Aβ and insulin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño Eduardo M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is implicated in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ steady-state levels in the brain, and its deficient expression and/or activity may be a risk factor in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although IDE sub-cellular localization has been well studied, the compartments relevant to Aβ degradation remain to be determined. Results Our results of live immunofluorescence, immuno gold electron-microscopy and gradient fractionation concurred to the demonstration that endogenous IDE from brain tissues and cell cultures is, in addition to its other localizations, a detergent-resistant membrane (DRM-associated metallopeptidase. Our pulse chase experiments were in accordance with the existence of two pools of IDE: the cytosolic one with a longer half-life and the membrane-IDE with a faster turn-over. DRMs-associated IDE co-localized with Aβ and its distribution (DRMs vs. non-DRMs and activity was sensitive to manipulation of lipid composition in vitro and in vivo. When IDE was mis-located from DRMs by treating cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, endogenous Aβ accumulated in the extracellular space and exogenous Aβ proteolysis was impaired. We detected a reduced amount of IDE in DRMs of membranes isolated from mice brain with endogenous reduced levels of cholesterol (Chol due to targeted deletion of one seladin-1 allele. We confirmed that a moderate shift of IDE from DRMs induced a substantial decrement on IDE-mediated insulin and Aβ degradation in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the notion that optimal substrate degradation by IDE may require its association with organized-DRMs. Alternatively, DRMs but not other plasma membrane regions, may act as platforms where Aβ accumulates, due to its hydrophobic properties, reaching local concentration close to its Km for IDE facilitating its clearance. Structural integrity of DRMs may also be required to tightly retain insulin receptor and IDE for

  20. Detergent resistant membrane-associated IDE in brain tissue and cultured cells: Relevance to Aβ and insulin degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloj, Ayelén; Leal, María C; Surace, Ezequiel I; Zhang, Xue; Xu, Huaxi; Ledesma, Maria D; Castaño, Eduardo M; Morelli, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is implicated in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ) steady-state levels in the brain, and its deficient expression and/or activity may be a risk factor in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although IDE sub-cellular localization has been well studied, the compartments relevant to Aβ degradation remain to be determined. Results Our results of live immunofluorescence, immuno gold electron-microscopy and gradient fractionation concurred to the demonstration that endogenous IDE from brain tissues and cell cultures is, in addition to its other localizations, a detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)-associated metallopeptidase. Our pulse chase experiments were in accordance with the existence of two pools of IDE: the cytosolic one with a longer half-life and the membrane-IDE with a faster turn-over. DRMs-associated IDE co-localized with Aβ and its distribution (DRMs vs. non-DRMs) and activity was sensitive to manipulation of lipid composition in vitro and in vivo. When IDE was mis-located from DRMs by treating cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), endogenous Aβ accumulated in the extracellular space and exogenous Aβ proteolysis was impaired. We detected a reduced amount of IDE in DRMs of membranes isolated from mice brain with endogenous reduced levels of cholesterol (Chol) due to targeted deletion of one seladin-1 allele. We confirmed that a moderate shift of IDE from DRMs induced a substantial decrement on IDE-mediated insulin and Aβ degradation in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the notion that optimal substrate degradation by IDE may require its association with organized-DRMs. Alternatively, DRMs but not other plasma membrane regions, may act as platforms where Aβ accumulates, due to its hydrophobic properties, reaching local concentration close to its Km for IDE facilitating its clearance. Structural integrity of DRMs may also be required to tightly retain insulin receptor and IDE for insulin proteolysis. The

  1. Nanoparticle dispersion in environmentally relevant culture media: a TiO{sub 2} case study and considerations for a general approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, Allison M., E-mail: ahorst@umail.ucsb.edu [University of California at Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States); Ji, Zhaoxia [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN) (United States); Holden, Patricia A. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Nanoparticle exposure in toxicity studies requires that nanoparticles are bioavailable by remaining highly dispersed in culture media. However, reported dispersion approaches are variable, mostly study-specific, and not transferable owing to their empirical basis. Furthermore, many published approaches employ proteinaceous dispersants in rich laboratory media, both of which represent end members in environmental scenarios. Here, a systematic approach was developed to disperse initially agglomerated TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (Aeroxide Registered-Sign TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik, NJ; primary particle size range 6.4-73.8 nm) in oligotrophic culture medium for environmentally relevant bacterial toxicity studies. Based on understanding particle-particle interactions in aqueous media and maintaining environmental relevance, the approach involves (1) quantifying the relationship between pH and zeta potential to determine the point of zero charge of select nanoparticles in water; (2) nominating, then testing and selecting, environmentally relevant stabilizing agents; and (3) dispersing via 'condition and capture' whereby stock dry powder nanoparticles are sonicated in pre-conditioned (with base, or acid, plus stabilizing agent) water, then diluted into culture media. The 'condition and capture' principle is transferable to other nanoparticle and media chemistries: simultaneously, mechanically and electrostatically, nanoparticles can be dispersed with surrounding stabilizers that coat and sterically hinder reagglomeration in the culture medium.

  2. Teaching science as a cultural way of knowing: merging authentic inquiry, nature of science, and multicultural strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Xenia; Crawford, Barbara A.

    2011-09-01

    Due to the growing number of students from populations underrepresented in the sciences, there is an intensified need to consider alternatives to traditional science instruction. Inquiry-based instructional approaches provide promise and possibility for engaging underrepresented students in the activities of science. However, inquiry-based instruction without culturally relevant pedagogy and instructional congruency, may not be sufficient to support non-mainstream students in science learning, and may even serve to challenge students' cultural ways of knowing. This conceptual paper suggests that aligning reform efforts in science education to the field of multicultural education would buttress efforts to reach underrepresented student groups in science. This includes providing culturally relevant instruction and instruction toward making the assumptions of science explicit, in particular. To this end, this paper draws from literature in multicultural education to propose that deconstructing science through instruction in NOS may support Latino, African American and English language learning students in science learning.

  3. How relevant are house dust mite-fungal interactions in laboratory culture to the natural dust system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, D B; Hart, B J; Pearce, R B; Kozakiewicz, Z; Douglas, A E

    1992-11-01

    Both house dust and house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus contained a wider range of fungi than laboratory mite cultures. In total, nine species of fungi were isolated from D. pteronyssinus in house dust, and these included three xerophilic species (Eurotium amstelodami, Aspergillus penicillioides and Wallemia sebi) commonly found in laboratory cultures of D. pteronyssinus. It is concluded that mites do interact with a similar range of fungi in natural dust and in laboratory culture, but that the diversity of fungal species in the laboratory is reduced and the density of individual fungal species in culture exceeds that of house dust. In a second experiment, dust samples were incubated at room temperature with 75% relative humidity. The diversity of fungi invariably declined from up to 13 genera to the few species recorded in laboratory culture. This suggests that the dominance of xerophilic fungi in laboratory mite rearings is mediated primarily by low relative humidity, and the exclusion of air-borne spores.

  4. Perceptions of the Host Country's Food Culture among Female Immigrants from Africa and Asia: Aspects Relevant for Cultural Sensitivity in Nutrition Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnweidner, Lisa Maria; Terragni, Laura; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Mosdol, Annhild

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore how female immigrants from Africa and Asia perceive the host country's food culture, to identify aspects of their original food culture they considered important to preserve, and to describe how they go about preserving them. Design: Qualitative in-depth interviews. Setting: Oslo, Norway. Participants: Twenty one female…

  5. Perceptions of the Host Country's Food Culture among Female Immigrants from Africa and Asia: Aspects Relevant for Cultural Sensitivity in Nutrition Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnweidner, Lisa Maria; Terragni, Laura; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Mosdol, Annhild

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore how female immigrants from Africa and Asia perceive the host country's food culture, to identify aspects of their original food culture they considered important to preserve, and to describe how they go about preserving them. Design: Qualitative in-depth interviews. Setting: Oslo, Norway. Participants: Twenty one female…

  6. Development of a theory-based (PEN-3 and Health Belief Model), culturally relevant intervention on cervical cancer prevention among Latina immigrants using intervention mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Isabel C; Bandura, Lisa; Hidalgo, Bertha; Cherrington, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The development of efficacious theory-based, culturally relevant interventions to promote cervical cancer prevention among underserved populations is crucial to the elimination of cancer disparities. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a theory-based, culturally relevant intervention focusing on primary (sexual risk reduction) and secondary (Pap smear) prevention of cervical cancer among Latina immigrants using intervention mapping (IM). The PEN-3 and Health Belief Model provided theoretical guidance for the intervention development and implementation. IM provides a logical five-step framework in intervention development: delineating proximal program objectives, selecting theory-based intervention methods and strategies, developing a program plan, planning for adoption in implementation, and creating evaluation plans and instruments. We first conducted an extensive literature review and qualitatively examined the sociocultural factors associated with primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer. We then proceeded to quantitatively validate the qualitative findings, which led to development matrices linking the theoretical constructs with intervention objectives and strategies as well as evaluation. IM was a helpful tool in the development of a theory-based, culturally relevant intervention addressing primary and secondary prevention among Latina immigrants.

  7. Recommendations for a Culturally Relevant Internet-Based Tool to Promote Physical Activity Among Overweight Young African American Women, Alabama, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P.; Cherrington, Andrea; Cuffee, Yendelela; Knight, BernNadette; Lewis, Dwight; Allison, Jeroan J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Innovative approaches are needed to promote physical activity among young adult overweight and obese African American women. We sought to describe key elements that African American women desire in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight and obese young adult African American women. Methods A mixed-method approach combining nominal group technique and traditional focus groups was used to elicit recommendations for the development of an Internet-based physical activity promotion tool. Participants, ages 19 to 30 years, were enrolled in a major university. Nominal group technique sessions were conducted to identify themes viewed as key features for inclusion in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool. Confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify and elicit more in-depth information on the themes. Results Twenty-nine women participated in nominal group (n = 13) and traditional focus group sessions (n = 16). Features that emerged to be included in a culturally relevant Internet-based physical activity promotion tool were personalized website pages, diverse body images on websites and in videos, motivational stories about physical activity and women similar to themselves in size and body shape, tips on hair care maintenance during physical activity, and online social support through social media (eg, Facebook, Twitter). Conclusion Incorporating existing social media tools and motivational stories from young adult African American women in Internet-based tools may increase the feasibility, acceptability, and success of Internet-based physical activity programs in this high-risk, understudied population. PMID:24433625

  8. Recommendations for a culturally relevant Internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight young African American women, Alabama, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Nefertiti H; Joseph, Rodney P; Cherrington, Andrea; Cuffee, Yendelela; Knight, BernNadette; Lewis, Dwight; Allison, Jeroan J

    2014-01-16

    Innovative approaches are needed to promote physical activity among young adult overweight and obese African American women. We sought to describe key elements that African American women desire in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool to promote physical activity among overweight and obese young adult African American women. A mixed-method approach combining nominal group technique and traditional focus groups was used to elicit recommendations for the development of an Internet-based physical activity promotion tool. Participants, ages 19 to 30 years, were enrolled in a major university. Nominal group technique sessions were conducted to identify themes viewed as key features for inclusion in a culturally relevant Internet-based tool. Confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify and elicit more in-depth information on the themes. Twenty-nine women participated in nominal group (n = 13) and traditional focus group sessions (n = 16). Features that emerged to be included in a culturally relevant Internet-based physical activity promotion tool were personalized website pages, diverse body images on websites and in videos, motivational stories about physical activity and women similar to themselves in size and body shape, tips on hair care maintenance during physical activity, and online social support through social media (eg, Facebook, Twitter). Incorporating existing social media tools and motivational stories from young adult African American women in Internet-based tools may increase the feasibility, acceptability, and success of Internet-based physical activity programs in this high-risk, understudied population.

  9. Making Earth Science Relevant in the K-8 Classroom. The Development of an Instructional Soils Module for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Using the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. A.; Hauge, R.; Dechaine, J. M.; Varrella, G.; Egger, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The development and adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) raises a challenge in teacher preparation: few current teacher preparation programs prepare students to teach science the way it is presented in the NGSS, which emphasize systems thinking, interdisciplinary science, and deep engagement in the scientific process. In addition, the NGSS include more geoscience concepts and methods than previous standards, yet this is a topic area in which most college students are traditionally underprepared. Although nationwide, programmatic reform is needed, there are a few targets where relatively small, course-level changes can have a large effect. One of these targets is the 'science methods' course for pre-service elementary teachers, a requirement in virtually all teacher preparation programs. Since many elementary schools, both locally and across the country, have adopted a kit based science curriculum, examining kits is often a part of a science methods course. Unfortunately, solely relying on a kit based curriculum may leave gaps in science content curriculum as one prepares teachers to meet the NGSS. Moreover, kits developed at the national level often fall short in connecting geoscientific content to the locally relevant societal issues that engage students. This highlights the need to train pre-service elementary teachers to supplement kit curriculum with inquiry based geoscience investigations that consider relevant societal issues, promote systems thinking and incorporate connections between earth, life, and physical systems. We are developing a module that teaches geoscience concepts in the context of locally relevant societal issues while modeling effective pedagogy for pre-service elementary teachers. Specifically, we focus on soils, an interdisciplinary topic relevant to multiple geoscience-related societal grand challenges (e.g., water, food) that is difficult to engage students in. Module development is funded through InTeGrate, NSF

  10. Adaptation of a culturally relevant nutrition and physical activity program for low-income, Mexican-origin parents with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lucia; Martinez, Judith; Horowitz, Marcel; Lamp, Catherine; Johns, Margaret; Espinoza, Dorina; Byrnes, Michele; Gomez, Mayra Muñoz; Aguilera, Alberto; de la Torre, Adela

    2015-05-14

    Latino children experience higher rates of obesity than do non-Latino white children. Family-centered nutrition interventions can slow the rate of weight gain in this population. Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (Healthy Children, Healthy Family) is a 5-year, community-based, participatory research study that targets rural Mexican-origin farmworker families with children aged 2 to 8 years in California's Central Valley. Adaptation of a culturally relevant obesity prevention program involved qualitative research to tailor key obesity prevention messages, pilot testing and implementation of key messages and activities at family nights, and continual modification to incorporate culturally innovative elements. Of the 238 families enrolled, 53% (125) attended the recommended minimum of 5 (of 10 possible) classes during the first year. A university and community partnership can guide development of a culturally tailored obesity prevention program that is suitable for reaching a high-risk Mexican-origin audience through cooperative extension and other public health programs.

  11. Cross-Age Reading Buddies and Cultural-Sensitive Literature: Student-Centered English Language Instruction in an Ethiopian Budget School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianca, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The Ethiopian government has called for educational improvement, emphasizing the employment of active, student-centered pedagogy. One way of maximizing an interactive learning approach involves blending a cross-age reading buddies program with high-quality, culturally relevant children's literature. Employing descriptive, mixed-method research,…

  12. Cross-Age Reading Buddies and Cultural-Sensitive Literature: Student-Centered English Language Instruction in an Ethiopian Budget School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianca, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The Ethiopian government has called for educational improvement, emphasizing the employment of active, student-centered pedagogy. One way of maximizing an interactive learning approach involves blending a cross-age reading buddies program with high-quality, culturally relevant children's literature. Employing descriptive, mixed-method research,…

  13. Fostering Culturally Relevant/Responsive Pedagogy and Global Awareness through the Integration of International Service-Learning in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, Tata

    2010-01-01

    Educators are being asked to respond to the forces of globalization and human interconnectedness that characterize the 21st century. These forces are resulting in changing population demographics and increased migration which is bringing a new complexity to cultural and ethnic diversity within regions, local communities and ultimately in…

  14. Culturally Relevant Education and Skill-Based Education for Sustainability: Moving towards an Integrated Theoretical and Methodological Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study considers how educators can cultivate the skills that prepare students from all cultural backgrounds for an active role in creating a sustainable global future. These skills include systems thinking skills, collaborative skills, creative and critical thinking skills, self-directed inquiry skills, and skills for active citizenship.…

  15. Inhibitory effect of chromogenic culture media on the growth of Rhodotorula: relevance to the diagnosis of Rhodotorula spp. infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Grenouillet, Frédéric; François, Nadine; Skana, Florence; Millon, Laurence

    2013-11-01

    With the increasing incidence and diverse etiologies of fungal infections, chromogenic yeast culture media are increasingly used for routine diagnosis. Rhodotorula species, which are characterized by the production of carotenoid pigments, are considered as emerging opportunistic pathogens. We recently diagnosed two fungemia due to Rhodotorula spp. and noticed that in both cases, the yeast failed to grow in subculture on the chromogenic yeast culture medium. This study was thus undertaken to investigate more thoroughly the ability (or inability) of Rhodotorula species to grow on different commercially available chromogenic media for yeast. Eighteen Rhodotorula spp. were checked for their ability to grow on four chromogenic yeast culture media: CHROMagar Candida (BD), Candi 4 Select (Biorad), Brilliance Candida (Oxoid), and Candida ID 2 (BioMerieux). All the Rhodotorula spp. strains grew on Brilliance and Candida ID 2, while only six isolates grew on Candi 4, and seven on CHROMagar. Two chromogenic yeast culture media showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of Rhodotorula species. As all Rhodotorula species are resistant to echinocandins and fluconazole, it is essential to isolate and identify these yeast quickly to initiate appropriate amphotericin B antifungal treatment as early as possible. The choice of media for routine use should take into account the ability of different media to allow all emerging fungal pathogens to grow. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A long-term three dimensional liver co-culture system for improved prediction of clinically relevant drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostadinova, Radina; Boess, Franziska [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland); Applegate, Dawn [RegeneMed, 9855 Towne Centre Drive Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Suter, Laura; Weiser, Thomas; Singer, Thomas [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland); Naughton, Brian [RegeneMed, 9855 Towne Centre Drive Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roth, Adrian, E-mail: adrian_b.roth@roche.com [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the major cause for liver failure and post-marketing drug withdrawals. Due to species-specific differences in hepatocellular function, animal experiments to assess potential liabilities of drug candidates can predict hepatotoxicity in humans only to a certain extent. In addition to animal experimentation, primary hepatocytes from rat or human are widely used for pre-clinical safety assessment. However, as many toxic responses in vivo are mediated by a complex interplay among different cell types and often require chronic drug exposures, the predictive performance of hepatocytes is very limited. Here, we established and characterized human and rat in vitro three-dimensional (3D) liver co-culture systems containing primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal hepatic cells. Our data demonstrate that cells cultured on a 3D scaffold have a preserved composition of hepatocytes, stellate, Kupffer and endothelial cells and maintain liver function for up to 3 months, as measured by the production of albumin, fibrinogen, transferrin and urea. Additionally, 3D liver co-cultures maintain cytochrome P450 inducibility, form bile canaliculi-like structures and respond to inflammatory stimuli. Upon incubation with selected hepatotoxicants including drugs which have been shown to induce idiosyncratic toxicity, we demonstrated that this model better detected in vivo drug-induced toxicity, including species-specific drug effects, when compared to monolayer hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our results underline the importance of more complex and long lasting in vitro cell culture models that contain all liver cell types and allow repeated drug-treatments for detection of in vivo-relevant adverse drug effects. - Highlights: ► 3D liver co-cultures maintain liver specific functions for up to three months. ► Activities of Cytochrome P450s remain drug- inducible accross three months. ► 3D liver co-cultures recapitulate drug-induced liver toxicity

  17. Culturally-Relevant Online Cancer Education Modules Empower Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners to Disseminate Cancer Information and Reduce Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Katie; Revels, Laura; Cueva, Melany; Lanier, Anne P; Dignan, Mark; Viswanath, K; Fung, Teresa T; Geller, Alan C

    2017-04-12

    To address a desire for timely, medically accurate cancer education in rural Alaska, ten culturally relevant online learning modules were developed with, and for, Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps). The project was guided by the framework of Community-Based Participatory Action Research, honored Indigenous Ways of Knowing, and was informed by Empowerment Theory. A total of 428 end-of-module evaluation surveys were completed by 89 unique Alaska CHA/Ps between January and December 2016. CHA/Ps shared that as a result of completing the modules, they were empowered to share cancer information with their patients, families, friends, and communities, as well as engage in cancer risk reduction behaviors such as eating healthier, getting cancer screenings, exercising more, and quitting tobacco. CHA/Ps also reported the modules were informative and respectful of their diverse cultures. These results from end-of-module evaluation surveys suggest that the collaboratively developed, culturally relevant, online cancer education modules have empowered CHA/Ps to reduce cancer risk and disseminate cancer information. "brought me to tears couple of times, and I think it will help in destroying the silence that surrounds cancer".

  18. The Cultural Relevance of Mindfulness Meditation as a Health Intervention for African Americans: Implications for Reducing Stress-Related Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Giscombé, Cheryl L; Gaylord, Susan A

    2014-09-01

    African Americans experience a disproportionate rate of stress-related health conditions compared to European Americans. Mindfulness meditation has been shown to be effective for managing stress and various stress-related health conditions. This study explored the cultural relevance of mindfulness meditation training for African Americans adults. Fifteen African American adults with past or current experience with mindfulness meditation training were interviewed. Participants felt that mindfulness meditation helped them with enhanced stress management, direct health improvement, and enhanced self-awareness and purposefulness. They felt that they would recommend it and that other African Americans would be open to the practice but suggested that its presentation may need to be adapted. They suggested emphasizing the health benefits, connecting it to familiar spiritual ideology and cultural practices, supplementing the reading material with African American writers, increasing communication (education, instructor availability, "buddy system," etc.), and including African Americans as instructors and participants. By implementing minor adaptations that enhance cultural relevance, mindfulness meditation can be a beneficial therapeutic intervention for this population.

  19. The Multiple Influences on Nonformal Instructional Practices in Rural Mozambique: Exploring the Limits of World Culture Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubhaar, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from 12 months of ethnographic observations of nonformal adult education classes offered by an internationally funded nonprofit, referred to in this article as Comunidades de Poder (CDP). The primary objective of this article is to examine the various contextual factors that influenced CDP teachers' instruction and…

  20. Biological Effects of Clinically Relevant CoCr Nanoparticles in the Dura Mater: An Organ Culture Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis Papageorgiou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical interventions for the treatment of spinal disc degeneration include total disc replacement and fusion devices. There are, however, concerns regarding the generation of wear particles by these devices, the majority of which are in the nanometre sized range with the potential to cause adverse biological effects in the surrounding tissues. The aims of this study were to develop an organ culture model of the porcine dura mater and to investigate the biological effects of CoCr nanoparticles in this model. A range of histological techniques were used to analyse the structure of the tissue in the organ culture. The biological effects of the CoCr wear particles and the subsequent structural changes were assessed using tissue viability assays, cytokine assays, histology, immunohistochemistry, and TEM imaging. The physiological structure of the dura mater remained unchanged during the seven days of in vitro culture. There was no significant loss of cell viability. After exposure of the organ culture to CoCr nanoparticles, there was significant loosening of the epithelial layer, as well as the underlying collagen matrix. TEM imaging confirmed these structural alterations. These structural alterations were attributed to the production of MMP-1, -3, -9, -13, and TIMP-1. ELISA analysis revealed that there was significant release of cytokines including IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, ECP and also the matrix protein, tenascin-C. This study suggested that CoCr nanoparticles did not cause cytotoxicity in the dura mater but they caused significant alterations to its structural integrity that could lead to significant secondary effects due to nanoparticle penetration, such as inflammation to the local neural tissue.

  1. Main Features of a 3d GIS for a Monumental Complex with AN Historical-Cultural Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, A.; La Guardia, M.

    2017-05-01

    The last achievements of technologies in geomatics especially in survey and restitution of 3D models (UAV/drones and laser scanner technologies) generated new procedures and higher standards of quality in representation of archaeological sites. Together with Geomatics, the recent development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) strongly contribute to document and the Cultural Heritage (CH). The representation and documentation of CH using these new technologies has became necessary in order to satisfy different needs: - for restorers in order to acquire a deep knowledge of the cultural good and to define possible strategies of restoration; - for the conservation of information, allowing to preserve the 3D geometry of the monumental complex with the integration of descriptions about architectural elements; - for touristic aims, giving the opportunity of sharing CH information on web, allowing users to visit and explore, in a virtual way, monumental complexes, acquiring information details about architectural elements or the history of monumental complex. Looking through these new scenarios, the development of a 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) applied to a cultural good could be, today, an added value of fundamental importance for full description and data management of monumental complexes. In this work, the main features necessary for the correct construction of a 3D GIS of a monumental complex will be analyzed, with a particular focus on the possibilities for creating a standardized procedure to follow.

  2. MAIN FEATURES OF A 3D GIS FOR A MONUMENTAL COMPLEX WITH AN HISTORICAL-CULTURAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scianna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The last achievements of technologies in geomatics especially in survey and restitution of 3D models (UAV/drones and laser scanner technologies generated new procedures and higher standards of quality in representation of archaeological sites. Together with Geomatics, the recent development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT strongly contribute to document and the Cultural Heritage (CH. The representation and documentation of CH using these new technologies has became necessary in order to satisfy different needs: – for restorers in order to acquire a deep knowledge of the cultural good and to define possible strategies of restoration; – for the conservation of information, allowing to preserve the 3D geometry of the monumental complex with the integration of descriptions about architectural elements; – for touristic aims, giving the opportunity of sharing CH information on web, allowing users to visit and explore, in a virtual way, monumental complexes, acquiring information details about architectural elements or the history of monumental complex. Looking through these new scenarios, the development of a 3D Geographic Information System (GIS applied to a cultural good could be, today, an added value of fundamental importance for full description and data management of monumental complexes. In this work, the main features necessary for the correct construction of a 3D GIS of a monumental complex will be analyzed, with a particular focus on the possibilities for creating a standardized procedure to follow.

  3. An administrative concern: Science teachers' instructional efficacy beliefs regarding racially, culturally, economically, and linguistically diverse student populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck Bonner, Natalie Christine

    A teacher's sense of {instructional} efficacy has been considered a critical variable in student academic performance. Researchers Tschannen-Moran and Hoy Woolfolk (2001, p.783) defined teachers' {instructional} efficacy as a teacher's judgment of his or her capabilities to bring about desired outcomes of student engagement and learning, even among those students who may be difficult or unmotivated. There has been a substantial amount of research which reveals a strong correlation among teacher efficacy, teaching performance, and student achievement (Goddard & Goddard, et.al., 2000; Hackett; Hackett, 1995; Pajares, 1997 as cited in Villereal, 2005). This research study explored the content area of science and teacher's personal perception of their competency level in teaching science to all learners regardless of socio-economic, ethnicity/race or gender for grade levels Pre-K to 12. Lewthwaite states that a science teacher's personal teacher attributes or intrinsic factors such as science teaching self-efficacy, professional science knowledge, science teaching, instructional methodologies, interest in science, and motivation to teach science are critical dimensions and noted barriers in the delivery of science programs on elementary level campuses (Lewthwaite, Stableford & Fisher, 2001). This study focused on teacher instructional efficacy issues which may affect diverse learners' classroom and state-mandated assessment academic performance outcomes. A SPSS analysis of data was obtained from the following teacher survey instruments: The Bandura Teacher Efficacy Scale, the SEBEST, and the SETAKIST. Research findings revealed that a majority of science teachers surveyed believe they can effectively teach learners of diverse backgrounds, but responded with a sense of lower efficaciousness in teaching English Language Learners. There was also a statistically significant difference found between a state science organization and a national science organization

  4. Psychometric properties of WHOQOL-BREF in clinical and health Greek populations: incorporating new culture-relevant items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginieri-Coccossis, M; Triantafillou, E; Tomaras, V; Soldatos, C; Mavreas, V; Christodoulou, G

    2012-01-01

    -BREF Greek version was found to perform well with sick and healthy participants, demonstrating satisfactory psychometric properties. Use of the instrument may be recommended for clinical and general populations, for service or intervention evaluation, as well as for cross-cultural clinical trials.

  5. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    , socio-cognitive and affective relevance. It then shows, at the hand of examples, why relevance is important from a user perspective in the extra-lexicographical pre- and post-consultation phases and in the intra-lexicographical consultation phase. It defines an additional type of subjective relevance...... that is very important for lexicography as well as for information science, viz. functional relevance. Since all lexicographic work is ultimately aimed at satisfying users’ information needs, the article then discusses why the lexicographer should take note of all these types of relevance when planning a new...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  6. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diann Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content.  We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell cycle and ethics in scientific studies.  Over 90% of our students preferred this additional teaching method compared to a traditional lecture only.  Furthermore, the exercise enhanced the students' writing, research, and critical thinking skills through the ethical implications of the film.

  7. Impact of TiO₂ and ZnO nanoparticles at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultures under ammonia oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Chen, Zheng; Du Laing, Gijs; Liu, Aifen; Yan, Changzhou

    2015-02-01

    Increased application of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO) raises concerns related to their environmental impacts. The effects that such nanoparticles have on environmental processes and the bacteria that carry them out are largely unknown. In this study, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enrichment cultures, grown from surface sediments taken from an estuary wetland in Fujian Province, China, were spiked with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO (with an average size of 32 and 43 nm, respectively) at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations (≤2 mg L(-1)) to determine their impacts on ammonia oxidation and the mechanisms involved. Results showed that higher nano-TiO2 concentrations significantly inhibited ammonia oxidation in enrichment cultures. It is noteworthy that the average ammonia oxidation rate was significantly correlated to the Shannon index, the Simpson's index, and AOB abundance. This suggested that ammonia oxidation inhibition primarily resulted from a reduction of AOB biodiversity and abundance. However, AOB biodiversity and abundance as well as the average ammonia oxidation rate were not inhibited by nano-ZnO at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations. Accordingly, an insignificant correlation was established between biodiversity and abundance of the AOB amoA gene and the average ammonia oxidation rate under nano-ZnO treatments. AOB present in samples belonged to the β-Proteobacteria class with an affinity close to Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas genera. This suggested that identified impacts of nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO on ammonia oxidation processes can be extrapolated to some extent to natural aquatic environments. Complex impacts on AOB may result from different nanomaterials present in aquatic environments at various ambient conditions. Further investigation on how and to what extent different nanomaterials influence AOB diversity and abundance and their subsequent ammonia oxidation processes is therefore

  8. Effects of Explicit and Non-Explicit Versions of an Early Intervention Program Incorporating Indigenous Culture into Kindergarten Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Leslie D.; McIntosh, Kent

    2012-01-01

    Low literacy is a challenge facing Indigenous communities across North America and is an identified barrier to school success. Early literacy intervention is an important target to reduce the discrepancies in literacy outcomes. The Moe the Mouse® Speech and Language Development Program (Gardner & Chesterman, 2006) is a cultural curriculum…

  9. Japanese Culture: Tradition and Change. For Students in Grades Nine through Twelve. Instructional Materials about Japan (IMAJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ray W.; Reeves, William; Settles, Lois; Sheehan, Valerie Henderson; Spellman, Steve

    This manual provides suggestions and materials for teaching about Japan. Designed as a supplement to typical textbook treatments, the lessons provide a range of readings, visuals, and activities to enrich and deepen student learning about Japan. Organized around topics dealing with history, geography, government, economics, and culture, the…

  10. Fuzziness and Relevance Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grace Qiao Zhang

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how the phenomenon of fuzzy language, such as `many' in `Mary has many friends', can be explained by Relevance Theory. It is concluded that fuzzy language use conforms with optimal relevance in that it can achieve the greatest positive effect with the least processing effort. It is the communicators themselves who decide whether or not optimal relevance is achieved, rather than the language form (fuzzy or non-fuzzy) used. People can skillfully adjust the deployment of different language forms or choose appropriate interpretations to suit different situations and communication needs. However, there are two challenges to RT: a. to extend its theory from individual relevance to group relevance; b. to embrace cultural considerations (because when relevance principles and cultural protocols are in conflict, the latter tends to prevail).

  11. We Look More, Listen More, Notice More: Impact of Sustained Professional Development on Head Start Teachers' Inquiry-Based and Culturally-Relevant Science Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Gillian H.; Dubosarsky, Mia; Mason, Annie; Carlson, Stephan; Murphy, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    Despite many scholars' recommendations, science is often avoided during early childhood education. Among the reasons provided by early childhood teachers for the exclusion of science from their daily routines included science anxiety, low self-efficacy with respect to teaching science, lack of experience participating in science activities as students, or the notion that literacy and language are more important during the early years. In minority populations the problem is even greater due to identification of science with the `culture of. This article presents results from Ah Neen Dush, a sustained and transformative professional development program for Head Start teachers on an American Indian Reservation. The goal of the program is to support early childhood teachers in developing inquiry-based and culturally-relevant teaching practices. Through analysis of teachers' classroom practices, surveys and interviews, we explore changes in teachers' attitudes toward science and inquiry-based practices. Classroom observations were conducted using CLASS (Classroom assessment Scoring System), a tool used to evaluate the quality of classroom interactions. After 1 year of professional development teachers' attitudes were found to improve and after 2 years teachers classroom practices were more inquiry-based with statistically significant increases in CLASS observation scores.

  12. Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage in South Africa: The Development of Relevant Management Strategies in the Historical Maritime Context of the Southern Tip of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfman, Jonathan; Boshoff, Jaco; Parthesius, Robert

    2012-10-01

    South Africans have a long association with water. It has provided a source of food, a medium for trade and a catalyst for migration and development. The country's geographical position as a crossroads of maritime trade between Europe and the East means that its history is inextricably linked to the history of the rest of the world. The result is a multi-faceted representation of sites, objects and mythologies related to water and maritime heritage that reflect not only local historical and social development, but global cultural change as well. Given the importance of South Africa's underwater cultural heritage (UCH), managers have grappled with management principles, ethics and theoretical models in an effort to produce and enforce heritage legislation that is relevant and effective. This paper outlines South Africa's maritime context from 1.5 million years ago until the present, summarises legislative and mitigation developments over the past half century and provides details of current trends in maritime archaeology and UCH management at the southern tip of Africa. Training programmes and public awareness are keys to this strategy to bring UCH and maritime archaeology into the mainstream and counter treasure hunting and looting of this rich, friable resource.

  13. Pursuing through Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy Aparicio

    2013-01-01

    The demographic profile of Conard High School in West Hartford, CT, reflects the national trends in "first-ring suburbs." Neither fully urban nor fully suburban, first-ring suburbs went from being generally less diverse than the nation in 1980 to more diverse by 2000 (Puentes, 2006). Conard students speak 53 different languages at home,…

  14. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  15. Highly Relevant Mentoring (HRM as a Faculty Development Model for Web-Based Instruction / Highly Relevant Mentoring (HRM (mentorat haute efficacité, un modèle de formation du corps professoral à l’enseignement en réseau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Carter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a faculty development model called the highly relevant mentoring (HRM model; the model includes a framework as well as some practical strategies for meeting the professional development needs of faculty who teach web-based courses. The paper further emphasizes the need for faculty and administrative buy-in for HRM and examines relevant theories that may be used to guide HRM in web-based teaching environments. Of note is that HRM was conceived by the instructional design staff who contributed to this paper before the concept of high impact mentoring appeared in the recent literature (2009. While the model is appropriate in various disciplines and professions, the examples and scenarios provided are drawn from a Canadian university’s experience of using HRM, in conjunction with a pedagogical approach called ICARE, in a variety of nursing courses and programs. Cet article décrit un modèle de formation du personnel enseignant intitulé « highly relevant mentoring (HRM » (mentorat haute efficacité; ce modèle comprend une structure et des stratégies pratiques visant à combler les besoins en formation du corps professoral d’une faculté offrant des cours en réseau. L’article souligne la nécessité d’un appui facultaire et administratif au HRM et étudie les théories pertinentes pouvant servir à guider le HRM dans des milieux d’enseignement en réseau. On notera que le HRM a été conçu par l’équipe de conception de matériel pédagogique qui a contribué à cet article avant l’apparition, dans les publications récentes (2009, du concept de « high impact mentoring » (mentorat à haut rendement. Bien que ce dernier modèle convienne à diverses disciplines et professions, les exemples et les scénarios fournis ici sont tirés de l’expérience d’utilisation du HRM dans une université canadienne, conjointement à une approche pédagogique appelée ICARE, dans une variété de cours et de programmes

  16. Problematizing Assumptions, Examining Dilemmas, and Exploring Promising Possibilities in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. A Response to "'I Didn't See It as a Cultural Thing': Supervisors of Student Teachers Define and Describe Culturally Responsive Supervision"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Whitney, Maria; Ulveland, R. Dana

    2016-01-01

    In response to the study and recommendations presented in the article "I Didn't See it as a Cultural Thing," written by Linda Griffin, Dyan Watson and Tonda Liggett, we explore three interrelated topics. First, we seek to problematize some of the assumptions in the study. We review some of the authors' approaches and assertions that seem…

  17. Using Explicit C-R-A Instruction to Teach Fraction Word Problem Solving to Low-Performing Asian English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun A.; Wang, Peishi; Michaels, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of fraction word problem-solving instruction involving explicit teaching of the concrete-representational-abstract sequence with culturally relevant teaching examples for 3 low-performing Asian immigrant English learners who spoke a language other than English at home. We used a multiple probe design across…

  18. Characterization of cellular uptake and toxicity of aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with different charges in central nervous system-relevant cell culture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Z

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhizhi Sun,1 Vinith Yathindranath,2 Matthew Worden,3 James A Thliveris,4 Stephanie Chu,1 Fiona E Parkinson,1 Torsten Hegmann,1–3 Donald W Miller1 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 3Chemical Physics Interdisciplinary Program, Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA; 4Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada  Background: Aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (AmS-IONPs have been widely used in constructing complex and multifunctional drug delivery systems. However, the biocompatibility and uptake characteristics of AmS-IONPs in central nervous system (CNS-relevant cells are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of surface charge and magnetic field on toxicity and uptake of AmS-IONPs in CNS-relevant cell types. Methods: The toxicity and uptake profile of positively charged AmS-IONPs and negatively charged COOH-AmS-IONPs of similar size were examined using a mouse brain microvessel endothelial cell line (bEnd.3 and primary cultured mouse astrocytes and neurons. Cell accumulation of IONPs was examined using the ferrozine assay, and cytotoxicity was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results: No toxicity was observed in bEnd.3 cells at concentrations up to 200 µg/mL for either AmS-IONPs or COOH-AmS-IONPs. AmS-IONPs at concentrations above 200 µg/mL reduced neuron viability by 50% in the presence or absence of a magnetic field, while only 20% reductions in viability were observed with COOH-AmS-IONPs. Similar concentrations of AmS-IONPs in astrocyte cultures reduced viability to 75% but only in the presence of a magnetic field, while exposure to COOH-AmS-IONPs reduced viability to 65% and 35% in the absence and presence of a magnetic field, respectively. Cellular accumulation of AmS-IONPs was greater

  19. On the Translation of Cultural-loaded Words in the Analects from the Perspective of Relevance Theory%关联理论视角下《论语》中文化负载词的翻译研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢颖慧

    2016-01-01

    Relevance theory has a strong explanatory power in the classics translation. It is a big challenge for transla-tors since the translation of cultural-loaded expressions in classics is of vital importance for the cultural transmission and communication between China and western countries. By using the optimal relevance principle of relevance the-ory, the translator can better explain and restore the historical cultural information and customs. This paper explores the positive effects of relevance theory in the English translation of the cultural-loaded words by using different ver-sions of the Analects as examples.%关联理论对典籍翻译有着很强的解释力。典籍翻译中,文化负载词的翻译对中西文化的传递以及交流有着至关重要的作用,是对译者的极大挑战。以《论语》为例,运用关联理论中的最佳关联原则,译者可以更好地解释和还原文化负载词所承载的历史文化信息以及民情风俗。

  20. Phenotypic differentiation between wild and domesticated varieties of Crescentia cujete L. and culturally relevant uses of their fruits as bowls in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Dugua, Xitlali; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-11-14

    Selection criteria are important for analyzing domestication of perennial plant species, which experience a selection pressure throughout several human generations. We analyze the preferred morphological characteristics of Crescentia cujete fruits, which are used as bowls by the Maya of Yucatan, according to the uses they are given and the phenotypic consequences of artificial selection between one wild and three domesticated varieties. We performed 40 semi-structured interviews in seven communities. We calculated Sutrop's salience index (S) of five classes of ceremonial and daily life uses, and of each item from the two most salient classes. We sampled 238 bowls at homes of people interviewed and compared their shape, volume and thickness with 139 fruits collected in homegardens and 179 from the wild. Morphology of varieties was assessed in fruit (n = 114 trees) and vegetative characters (n = 136 trees). Differences between varieties were evaluated through linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Use of bowls as containers for the Day of the Dead offerings was the most salient class (S = 0.489) with chocolate as its most salient beverage (S = 0.491), followed by consumption of daily beverages (S = 0.423), especially maize-based pozol (S = 0.412). The sacred saka' and balche' are offered in different sized bowls during agricultural and domestic rituals. Roundness was the most relevant character for these uses, as bowls from households showed a strong selection towards round shapes compared with wild and homegarden fruits. Larger fruits from domesticated varieties were also preferred over small wild fruits, although in the household different sizes of the domesticated varieties are useful. LDA separated wild from domesticated trees (p people model the domestication process of this important tree in their culture.

  1. English Instruction and English Learners' Culture Identity Construction from the Perspective of the Adaptation Theory%顺应论视角下英语教学与学习者文化身份建构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽冰

    2013-01-01

    English learners in China often experienced several years learning English, and gradually, their identity has been characterized by multi-cultures. This paper provides a new perspective---the adaptation theory to probe into construction of English learners' culture identity through English instruction. It puts forward the strategies used in the English instruction, such as multi- culture role play, debate, writing and reading, so as to provide multi-cultural context to help English learners to make language choosing and adaptation and at last help to construct their culture identity.%英语学习者处在多元文化共生的时代,如何从语言入手在英语教学中帮助学生建构文化身份显得很重要。试图用顺应论的观点来指导英语教学,在英语教学中设计多元文化的语境,诸如多元文化角色扮演、辩论、写作和阅读,让学习者在变化的语境中“选择”语言,以达到建构文化身份与使用语言的双重效果。

  2. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  3. A science teacher's reflections and knowledge growth about STS instruction after actual implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2002-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to describe a science teacher's views of STS (Science-Technology-Society) instruction and what she acquired after implementing a two-semester STS-oriented science course in a high school of Taiwan. Upon analysis of the teacher's journals, interview data, concept maps, and relevant student questionnaire responses, this study revealed the following findings. The teacher believed that STS instruction was a potential way of practicing so-called constructivist teaching and her pedagogical knowledge about STS showed a considerable growth. As a result of STS instruction, her epistemological views of science seemed to progress toward more constructivist-oriented views of science. The heavy content load of Taiwan's national curriculum, regular cross-class standard tests, the lack of peers' or administrative support, the resource limitations in Chinese language, and the cultural impacts were identified as major factors that inhibited her implementation of STS instruction.

  4. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction...... exchanges. Through detailed multimodal analysis of participants’ actions, it is shown how instructors systematically elaborate their corrective instructions to include relevant information about the trouble and remedial action – a practice we refer to as unpacking corrections. It is proposed...... that the practice of unpacking the local particulars of corrections (i) provides for the instructional character of the interaction, and (ii) is highly sensitive to the relevant physical and mobile contingencies. These findings contribute to the existing literature on the interactional organisation of correction...

  5. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  6. Designing for culturally responsive science education through professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-02-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well identified. This study examined associations between specific Science Teachers are Responsive to Students (STARTS) program activities and United States high school life science teachers' understanding and enactment of culturally responsive science teaching. Findings suggest: (a) critically examining their practices while learning of students' needs and experiences enabled teachers to identify responsive instructional strategies and relevant science topics for culturally responsive teaching; (b) evaluating culturally responsive exemplars while identifying classroom-based needs allowed teachers to identify contextually appropriate instruction, thereby yielding a robust understanding of the purpose and feasibility of culturally responsive science teaching; and (c) by justifying the use of responsive and reform-based instructional strategies for their classrooms, teachers made purposeful connections between students' experiences and science instruction. We propose a set of empirically based design conjectures and theoretical conjectures to generate adaptable knowledge about preparing culturally responsive science teachers through professional development.

  7. Optimization of high grade glioma cell culture from surgical specimens for use in clinically relevant animal models and 3D immunochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, Laura A; Irtenkauf, Susan M; Lemke, Nancy W; Nelson, Kevin K; Berezovsky, Artem D; Carlton, Enoch T; Transou, Andrea D; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2014-01-07

    Glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive form of astrocytoma, are refractory to therapy, and molecularly heterogeneous. The ability to establish cell cultures that preserve the genomic profile of the parental tumors, for use in patient specific in vitro and in vivo models, has the potential to revolutionize the preclinical development of new treatments for glioblastoma tailored to the molecular characteristics of each tumor. Starting with fresh high grade astrocytoma tumors dissociated into single cells, we use the neurosphere assay as an enrichment method for cells presenting cancer stem cell phenotype, including expression of neural stem cell markers, long term self-renewal in vitro, and the ability to form orthotopic xenograft tumors. This method has been previously proposed, and is now in use by several investigators. Based on our experience of dissociating and culturing 125 glioblastoma specimens, we arrived at the detailed protocol we present here, suitable for routine neurosphere culturing of high grade astrocytomas and large scale expansion of tumorigenic cells for preclinical studies. We report on the efficiency of successful long term cultures using this protocol and suggest affordable alternatives for culturing dissociated glioblastoma cells that fail to grow as neurospheres. We also describe in detail a protocol for preserving the neurospheres 3D architecture for immunohistochemistry. Cell cultures enriched in CSCs, capable of generating orthotopic xenograft models that preserve the molecular signatures and heterogeneity of GBMs, are becoming increasingly popular for the study of the biology of GBMs and for the improved design of preclinical testing of potential therapies.

  8. Co-Teaching Partnerships: How Culture of Schools and Classrooms Affect Practices in Co-Planning and Co-Implementing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalo, Cecilia Gray

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how the school and classroom cultures affected practices of inclusion for students with disabilities and how the inclusionary practice of co-teaching was influenced by the school culture. This study sought to investigate school and classroom cultures and their impact on practices of inclusion. It also…

  9. L'enseignement des langues secondes standard aux minorites culturelles a Bruxelles (Standard Second Language Instruction to Cultural Minorities in Brussels).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vriendt, Sera

    Three major issues in the second language instruction of migrant primary school children in Brussels are discussed: (1) how to develop communicative competence; (2) how to ensure correct pronunciation; and (3) how to improve nonverbal communication. In the case of pronunciation, a "soft" method without explanation about articulation or…

  10. Constructing a Model of ESOL Content-Based Instruction with Native Language Support: Self-Reflective Action Research Grounded in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstein, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The study started as a critical response to a new sheltered science content course introduced by the school district where I teach ESOL students. Although the course was a bold and timely initiative, it was not supported by a well-built curriculum, realistic educational goals, and appropriate instructional materials. As I was unsatisfied with what…

  11. The Challenges of Promoting Instructional Improvement: Teaching Behaviors and Teaching Cultures at Liberal Arts Institutions in the Associated Colleges of the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kent; Lom, Barbara; Sandlin, Betsy A.

    2016-01-01

    One goal of faculty development is to improve instructional practice (McKee, Johnson, Ritchie, & Tew, 2013; Ouellett 2010; Sorcinelli, Austin, Eddy, & Beach, 2006). This goal accords with the design of the Associated Colleges of the South Teaching and Learning Workshop, a faculty development workshop begun in 1992 for 16 residential,…

  12. Mujer Sana, Familia Fuerte: The Effects of a Culturally-Relevant, Community-Based, Promotores Program to Increase Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, A Manuela; Vargas, Marcela; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena; Garcia, Melawhy; Galvez, Gino; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Although cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and follow-up, Latinas' rate of Pap tests remains low due to knowledge gaps and cultural and attitudinal factors. This study used a single-group pre-/post-test design to evaluate the effectiveness of Mujer Sana, Familia Fuerte (Healthy Woman, Strong Family), an intervention intended to improve Latinas' cervical cancer prevention knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy to obtain a Pap test, and intention to get tested. The intervention is delivered through a single session by promotores de salud, who use a culturally competent, linguistically appropriate toolkit. A total of 5,211 Latinas participated in the study. The evaluation indicated that participants had increases in knowledge, positive attitudes, self-efficacy, and intention to test. Latinas have a low rate of cervical cancer screening but a high rate of cervical cancer, and Mujer Sana, Familia Fuerte shows promise as a public health practice for use with this population.

  13. Development of a Rapid Reverse Blot Hybridization Assay for Detection of Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Blood Cultures Testing Positive for Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Yoo, Gilsung; Kim, Juwon; Uh, Young; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Jong Bae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the causative pathogens of bloodstream infections is crucial for the prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy to decrease the related morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a newly developed PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the rapid detection of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and their extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase, and carbapenemase resistance genes directly from the blood culture bottles. The REBA-EAC (ESBL, AmpC β-lactamase, carbapenemase) assay was performed on 327 isolates that were confirmed to have an ESBL producer phenotype, 200 positive blood culture (PBCs) specimens, and 200 negative blood culture specimens. The concordance rate between the results of REBA-EAC assay and ESBL phenotypic test was 94.2%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the REBA-EAC assay for GNB identification in blood culture specimens were 100% (95% CI 0.938-1.000, P < 0.001), 100% (95% CI 0.986-1.000, P < 0.001), 100% (95% CI 0.938-1.000, P < 0.001), and 100% (95% CI 0.986-1.000, P < 0.001), respectively. All 17 EAC-producing GNB isolates from the 73 PBCs were detected by the REBA-EAC assay. The REBA-EAC assay allowed easy differentiation between EAC and non-EAC genes in all isolates. Moreover, the REBA-EAC assay was a rapid and reliable method for identifying GNB and their β-lactamase resistance genes in PBCs. Thus, this assay may provide essential information for accelerating therapeutic decisions to achieve earlier appropriate antibiotic treatment during the acute phase of bloodstream infection.

  14. Development of a Rapid Reverse Blot Hybridization Assay for Detection of Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Blood Cultures Testing Positive for Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-young; Yoo, Gilsung; Kim, Juwon; Uh, Young; Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Jong Bae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the causative pathogens of bloodstream infections is crucial for the prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy to decrease the related morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a newly developed PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the rapid detection of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and their extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase, and carbapenemase resistance genes directly from the blood culture bottles. The REBA-EAC (ESBL, AmpC β-lactamase, carbapenemase) assay was performed on 327 isolates that were confirmed to have an ESBL producer phenotype, 200 positive blood culture (PBCs) specimens, and 200 negative blood culture specimens. The concordance rate between the results of REBA-EAC assay and ESBL phenotypic test was 94.2%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the REBA-EAC assay for GNB identification in blood culture specimens were 100% (95% CI 0.938–1.000, P < 0.001), 100% (95% CI 0.986–1.000, P < 0.001), 100% (95% CI 0.938–1.000, P < 0.001), and 100% (95% CI 0.986–1.000, P < 0.001), respectively. All 17 EAC-producing GNB isolates from the 73 PBCs were detected by the REBA-EAC assay. The REBA-EAC assay allowed easy differentiation between EAC and non-EAC genes in all isolates. Moreover, the REBA-EAC assay was a rapid and reliable method for identifying GNB and their β-lactamase resistance genes in PBCs. Thus, this assay may provide essential information for accelerating therapeutic decisions to achieve earlier appropriate antibiotic treatment during the acute phase of bloodstream infection. PMID:28232823

  15. Moving beyond a destructive past to a decolonised and inclusive future: The role of ubuntu-style education in providing culturally relevant pedagogy for Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biraimah, Karen L.

    2016-02-01

    Namibia has one of the most dehumanising and destructive colonial pasts of any nation in Africa, or, for that matter, the world. Before colonisation, the area now known as Namibia was home to diverse cultural groups. The successive colonial regimes of Germany and South Africa inflicted genocide, brutality and apartheid on the region. Namibia finally fought for and won its independence in 1990 - over three decades after Ghana became the first independent sub-Saharan nation in 1957. Today, Namibia strives to leave behind its troubled past and harness the power of education to provide greater equality of opportunity and quality of life for all of its citizens. The concept of ubuntu, with its emphasis on inclusiveness, equity and equality, is central to Namibia's pursuit of this goal. Significant challenges stand in its way, including extreme poverty, an emerging economy struggling with drought and a competitive world market, and a populace with multiple mother tongues and cultural traditions. After a brief summary of Namibia's colonial past, this study examines these challenges, noting that the same factors that provide Namibia with a rich and diverse cultural tapestry also pose great difficulties for educators determined to provide equitable education for all. Current inequities in Namibian education are assessed, with a particular focus on the divide between urban and rural Namibia and between the four major ethnic and cultural groupings: the White Afrikaans speakers, the Black African majority, the Coloured population, and the Basters. The study concludes by suggesting multiple ways in which education could be brought closer into line with ubuntu values. The author argues that the very same factors that currently pose challenges to the quality and equity of Namibian education (ethnicity, urban/rural location, gender and socioeconomic class) might, if seen from a new perspective, become the basis for educational transformation.

  16. Acculturative Dissonance and Risks for Proactive and Reactive Aggression Among Latino/a Adolescents: Implications for Culturally Relevant Prevention and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, Anne; Fite, Paula J; Johnson-Motoyama, Michelle; Frazer, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    There is a dearth of studies concerning the functions of aggression among Latino/a youth despite the fact they are one of the fastest growing youth populations in the United States. We examined individual, peer, cultural, and community level indicators of reactive and proactive aggression and determined whether these relationships were moderated by acculturative dissonance (e.g., culturally specific family conflicts arising from the acculturation process) among a sample of Latino/a adolescents who were predominantly of Mexican heritage. Consistent with prior evidence, results revealed that peer delinquency was uniquely associated with proactive aggression, whereas impulsivity was uniquely associated with reactive aggression. Further, acculturative dissonance was uniquely associated with proactive but not reactive aggression. No moderating effects for acculturative dissonance were found, indicating that the significant risk factors in our study were associated with proactive and reactive aggression regardless of the level of acculturative dissonance experienced. Notably, acculturative dissonance was a unique risk factor for proactive aggression and thus may be an important target for prevention and interventions among Latino/a youth. Consequently, interventions designed to prevent culturally specific family conflicts and promote family functioning may be particularly useful in mitigating the risk of aggression intended to achieve social and material awards among in this population.

  17. Safety Instructions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instructions N0 37 rev. 3 (IS 37 rev. 3) entitled ""LEVEL-3" SAFETY ALARMS AND ALARM SYSTEMS" Is available on the web at the following URL: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335802 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch TIS Secretariat

  18. Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  19. Three-dimensional epithelial and mesenchymal cell co-cultures form early tooth epithelium invagination-like structures: expression patterns of relevant molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2012-06-01

    Epithelium invagination is the key feature of early tooth development. In this study, we built a three-dimensional (3D) model to represent epithelium invagination-like structure by tissue engineering. Human normal oral epithelial cells (OECs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were co-cultivated for 2-7 weeks on matrigel or collagen gel to form epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. The histological change and gene expression were analyzed by HE staining, immunostaining, and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). After 4 weeks of cultivation, OECs-formed epithelium invaginated into DPSCs-derived mesenchyme on both matrigel and collagen gel. OEC-DPSC co-cultures on matrigel showed typical invagination of epithelial cells and condensation of the underlying mesenchymal cells. Epithelial invagination-related molecules, CD44 and E-cadherin, and mesenchymal condensation involved molecules, N-cadherin and Msx1 expressed at a high level in the tissue model, suggesting the epithelial invagination is functional. However, when OECs and DPSCs were co-cultivated on collagen gel; the invaginated epithelium was transformed to several epithelial colonies inside the mesenchyme after long culture period. When DPSCs were co-cultivated with immortalized human OECs NDUSD-1, all of the above-mentioned features were not presented. Immunohistological staining and qRT-PCR analysis showed that p75, BMP2, Shh, Wnt10b, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Msx1, and Pax9 are involved in initiating epithelium invagination and epithelial-mesenchymal interaction in the 3D OEC-DPSC co-cultures. Our results suggest that co-cultivated OECs and DPSCs on matrigel under certain conditions can build an epithelium invagination-like model. This model might be explored as a potential research tool for epithelial-mesenchymal interaction and tooth regeneration.

  20. Microbiological diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis: relevance of second percutaneous biopsy following initial negative biopsy and limited yield of post-biopsy blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, G; Buzele, R; Parienti, J J; Debiais, F; Dinh, A; Dupon, M; Roblot, F; Mulleman, D; Marcelli, C; Michon, J; Bernard, L

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiological diagnosis yield of post-biopsy blood cultures (PBBCs) and second percutaneous needle biopsy (PNB) following an initial negative biopsy in vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) without bacteremia. A retrospective multicenter study was performed. Patients with VO, pre-biopsy negative blood culture(s), ≥1 PNB, and ≥1 PBBC (0-4 h) were included. One hundred and sixty-nine PNBs (136 first and 33 following initial negative biopsy) were performed for 136 patients (median age = 58 years, sex ratio M/F = 1.9). First and second PNBs had a similar yield: 43.4 % (59/136) versus 39.4 % (13/33), respectively. Only two PBBCs (1.1 %) led to a microbiological diagnosis. The strategy with positive first PNB and second PNB following an initial negative result led to microbiological diagnosis in 79.6 % (74/93) of cases versus 44.1 % (60/136) for the strategy with only one biopsy. In the multivariate analysis, young age (odds ratio, OR [95 % confidence interval (CI)] = 0.98 [0.97; 0.99] per 1 year increase, p = 0.02) and >1 sample (OR = 2.4 ([1.3; 4.4], p = 0.007)) were independently associated with positive PNB. To optimize microbiological diagnosis in vertebral osteomyelitis, performing a second PNB (after an initial negative biopsy) could lead to a microbiological diagnosis in nearly 80 % of patients. PBBC appears to be limited in microbiological diagnosis.

  1. Reconstruction of Cultural Images in Advertisement Translation from the Perspective of the Relevance Theory%从关联理论翻译观看广告翻译中文化意象的重构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾; 朱小美

    2012-01-01

    Cultural images are usually employed in the composition of advertisements to enhance their artistry and appeal. But put into foreign markets, advertisements with cultural images will probably fail to take effect because of cultural differences. Therefore, when translating such advertisements, translators should reconstruct those cultural images so as to achieve the same effect as the original. From the perspective of Relevance Theory, translators should make the version optimally relevant to the cognitive context of the target readers so that they can obtain the same contextual effect with the least effort.%为了增强艺术性和感染力,广告语言常常会融入特定的文化意象。该类广告一般在本国市场能够达到很好的宣传效果,但在产品的跨国销售时,往往会遭遇“文化门槛”。由于文化存在地域和民族的差异,这些原本十分成功的广告在异国的销售市场上可能达不到原本的效果,这就要求在广告翻译时对其中的文化意象进行重构。广告翻译中文化意象的重构应该遵循最佳关联原则,让目的读者能用最少的努力达到与原语读者相类似的心理效果,获得广告翻译最佳的语境效果,从而实现产品销售的最终目的。

  2. Cultural competence knowledge and confidence after classroom activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Jagannath Mohan; Holiday-Goodman, Monica; Black, Curtis; Powers, Mary

    2010-10-11

    To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum. Cultural competence material was covered in the second-year PharmD curriculum through lectures, laboratories, and an experiential/out-of-class assignment. Eighty-five second-year (P2) pharmacy students completed a survey which assessed influence of classroom activities related to cultural competence. Mean values for knowledge and perceived confidence were significantly higher for posttest compared to pretest (p activities. Focus groups were used to solicit students' opinions on instructional effectiveness, relevance of activities, and areas for enhancement. The cultural competency curriculum increased pharmacy students' awareness of and confidence in addressing cultural diversity issues that affect pharmaceutical care delivery.

  3. Differentiating science instruction: Success stories of high school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Jennifer Lynn Cunningham

    This study investigated the characteristics and practices of high school science teachers who differentiate instruction. Specifically teachers' beliefs about science teaching and student learning and how they planned for and implemented differentiated instruction in their classrooms were explored. Understanding how high school science teachers differentiate instruction fills a gap in the literature. Participants included 7 high school science teachers purposefully selected from 4 different schools located in three school districts in a mid-Atlantic state. Data was collected during the spring of 2010 and fall of 2011 and occurred in two phases. For all 7 participants, data included one one-hour semi-structured interview and field notes from a minimum of four 90-minute classroom observations. Each classroom observation was scored using the validated Differentiated Instruction Implementation Matrix-Modified (DIIM-M), which evaluated participants' proficiency in differentiating instruction. The DIIM-M was analyzed using descriptive statistics and triangulated with field notes. This analysis led to the identification of a single teacher, Diane, for in-depth case study. Case study data included approximately two hours of semi-structured interview responses, 37.5 hours of classroom observations of Diane's Ecology and Biology classes, relevant instructional materials, and other artifacts. This variety of data allowed for triangulation of the evidence. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach (Lincoln & Guba, 1985). Results indicated that Diane consistently integrated complex learning profile differentiation strategies; however, she differentiated less frequently for readiness and interest. Technology-enhanced formative assessment played an integral role in planning and implementing lessons differentiated for readiness. Diane's content knowledge, self-efficacy, administrative support, and alignment between beliefs and the philosophy of differentiated

  4. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  5. Effect of Aeroponical Culture and Solution Culture on the Root Nitrogen Metabolism Relevant Enzymes of Cucumber%雾培与液培对黄瓜根系氮代谢相关酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘广晶; 孙周平; 包美丽; 赵乐; 薛东东

    2011-01-01

    采用雾培和液培(深液流)栽培系统,研究了不同无土栽培方式对津绿'21-10'和迷你黄瓜'22-405'根系氮代谢的影响.结果表明,在整个生育期,雾培和液培黄瓜根系硝态氮(NO3- -N)和铵态氮(NH4 +-N)含量、根系活力、硝酸还原酶(NR)活性、谷氨胺胺合成酶(GS)活性、谷氨酸脱氢酶(GDH)、谷草转氨酶(GOT)活性、谷丙转氨酶(GPT)活性、游离氨基酸和可溶性蛋白质含量总体上均呈现出先升高后降低的变化特点,其中在处理的前20 d液培处理的各项指标均大于雾培,且在处理的第20天达到最大,而雾培处理的各项指标最大值是在处理的第30天,且在处理的30 d之后,雾培根系各项指标均比较高.在不同基因型品种之间,津绿'21-10'根系各项指标变化幅度大于迷你黄瓜'22-405',但品种之间无显著差异.结果说明在生育前期液培黄瓜植株根系氮的吸收和代谢能力比较强,而在生长中后期雾培黄瓜根系氮的吸收和代谢能力增强.%Effects of two different soilless culture systems of aeroponical culture and solution culture (Deep fluid flow) on the root nitrogen metabolism of cucumber plant were studied with two cucumber varieties (Jin green ‘21-10’ and mini_cucumber ‘ 22-405’). The results showed that in the whole growth period, there was a tendency and characteristics increased at first and then decreased in the contents of NO3 --N , NH4+-N, the free amino acids, soluble protein, and the activity of root vigor,nitrate reductase (NR) , glutamine synthase (GS) , glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) , glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) of cucumber root for the aeroponical culture and solution culture, of which in the first of 20 days, all indexes measured in the solution culture were higher than in the aeroponical culture, and reached the maximum at the 20th day; however after treated 30 d, compared with the solution culture, these

  6. The relevance of cross-cultural adaptation and clinimetrics for physical therapy instruments A importância da adaptação transcultural e clinimétrica para instrumentos de fisioterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CG Maher

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-report outcome measures (questionnaires are widely used by physiotherapists for measuring patient's health status or treatment outcomes. Most of these measurement tools were developed in English and their usefulness is very limited in non-English speaking countries such as Brazil. The only way to solve this problem is to properly adapt the relevant questionnaires into a target language and culture (e.g. Brazilian-Portuguese and then test the instrument by checking its psychometric (clinimetric characteristics. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper was to present relevant issues in the process of cross-cultural adaptations and clinimetric testing for self-report outcome measurements. Advice on how to perform a cross-cultural adaptation, how to properly check the clinimetric properties, how to select a relevant questionnaire and how to evaluate the quality of an adapted questionnaire are provided. Additionally we present all Brazilian-Portuguese cross-cultural adaptations of low back pain measurements that we know of. CONCLUSIONS: There is a clear need for more effort in the field of cross-cultural adaptation and clinimetrics, without proper instruments, the management of patients from non-English speaking countries is compromised.INTRODUÇÃO: Questionários vem sendo amplamente utilizados por fisioterapeutas para medir a condição de saúde do paciente ou dos resultados de tratamento. A maioria desses instrumentos para avaliação foi desenvolvida em inglês, sendo seu uso bastante limitado em países que não usam o inglês como língua nativa, a exemplo do Brasil. A única forma de resolver esse problema é através de uma adaptação apropriada dos questionários relevantes para um alvo lingüístico e cultural (por exemplo, português do Brasil e então testar suas características psicométricas (clinimétricas. OBJETIVO: A finalidade deste artigo foi a apresentar os tópicos relevantes no processo das adapta

  7. East versus West: Effectiveness of Knowledge Acquisition and Impact of Cultural Dislocation Issues for Mainland Chinese Students across Ten Commonly Used Instructional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Kumaran; Bordia, Sarbari

    2013-01-01

    The research analyses the new trend of training culturally diverse students in western style business education in Singapore where a substantial number of mainland Chinese students enroll in business courses. Building on ideas by Hosfede (1984), Morey and Frangioso (1998) and Rodrigues (2004), 402 mainland Chinese students who were enrolled in…

  8. English as a Medium of Instruction in East Asia's Higher Education Sector: A Critical Realist Cultural Political Economy Analysis of Underlying Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierski, Matt

    2016-01-01

    As discourses of globalisation and the knowledge-based economy become increasingly influential in both policy-making and in public debates about education, employability and national competitiveness--the choice of language in the classroom takes on a strategic importance. The paper employs a critical realist Cultural Political Economy lens to…

  9. Environmental and complexation effects on the structures and spectroscopic signatures of organic pigments relevant to cultural heritage: the case of alizarin and alizarin-Mg(II)/Al(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Luciano; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Licari, Daniele; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-02-21

    An integrated computational approach allowed an unbiased analysis of optical and structural properties of alizarin-based pigments, which can be directly compared with experimental results. Madder lake pigments have been modeled by Mg(II)- and Al(III)-coordinated alizarin taking into account solvation and metal-linkage effects, responsible for colour modifications. Moreover, different environmental conditions have been analyzed for free alizarin, showing in all cases semi-quantitative agreement with experimental spectroscopic data (UV-VIS). Our results point out the ability of in silico approaches to unravel the subtle interplay of stereo-electronic, dynamic, and environmental effects in tuning the physico-chemical properties of pigments relevant to cultural heritage.

  10. Review Essay: Zur Relevanz des ethnografischen Blicks bei der sozial- und kulturwissenschaftlichen Erforschung von Orten und Räumen [Researching Place and Space in the Social Sciences and Cultural Studies: The Relevance of the Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Siebeck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the so-called "spatial turn" in the social sciences and cultural studies, social geographers have rightfully been cautioning against positivist notions of space and place: We cannot simply deduce the social from spatial reality—on the contrary, this reality is in every respect itself socially constituted and mediated. In her highly recommended study on the esthetical and socio-political reshaping of Alexanderplatz in Berlin after 1990, Gisa WESZKALNYS has shown how a radical constructivist concept of place and space can be transformed into practical research. This review essay argues that an ethnographic research perspective is of particular relevance both epistemologically as well as methodologically if the aim is to reconstruct places and spaces beyond their perceived "actuality" in terms of a fundamentally contingent social and essentially political practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1103203

  11. 语言的文化功能与大学英语词汇教学%On the Influence of Language Cultural Functions on CET Vocabulary Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段友国

    2012-01-01

    摘要:从语言的文化功能出发,谈论了语言的文化功能在大学英语词汇教学中的重要作用以及在大学其语词汇教学中文化因素所产生的正面和负面影响,尤其文化因素对外语学习者在词汇学习中带来的干扰所带来的问题,如语用失误等,论证了合理利用语言的文化功能有效学习英语词汇的重要性和可行性。%Based on the cultural functions of languages, the paper discuses the significance that the cultural functions have on college English vocabulary teaching and learning. In the meanwhile, the positive and negative influences (e.g. pragmatic failures) that cuhural factors have on college English vocabulary teaching and learning are also involved in it. By arguing such aspects, the paper verifies the signifieanee and practicability of efficient vocabulary learning that the cultural fimctions have in EFL teaching.

  12. Hispanic Literature: A Fiesta for Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Bess A.; Casteel, Carolyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how literature can facilitate students' appreciation of the multifaceted Hispanic culture. Offers advice on merging Hispanic literature and literacy instruction, organizing children's books by category to help structure classroom activities, exploring themes and cultural concepts, and integrating literacy/thinking strategies with…

  13. Exploring the Effectiveness of Interdisciplinary Instruction on Learning: A Case Study in a College Level Course on Culture, Aid, and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Frank

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity for higher education students to study a topic through multiple, integrated angles is rare even though life outside of the classroom is filled with problems that require blending of knowledge areas to make appropriate decisions. The authors created a course at the United States Air Force Academy called Foreign Area Studies (FAS 495 in the Spring 2012 semester that integrated African studies, economics, history, political science, literature, project management, military strategy, language, culture, and environmental engineering in the study of how foreign aid has affected Mozambique and how an engineering technology along with cultural consciousness can be effectively used for good. To determine effectiveness of the interdisciplinary approach, qualitative data from student reflection papers and in-class discussions were collected and analyzed. The intent of this paper is to highlight the challenges and lessons learned from developing a project based interdisciplinary course. Results suggest a project based course with interdisciplinary pedagogy can be effective in meeting course goals and increasing meaningful student learning.

  14. Creating Culturally Relevant Holiday Curriculum: A Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Karen; Jones, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes the holiday celebration of Dia de los Muertos at Pacific Oaks Children's School in Los Angeles. Considers the decision to celebrate the holiday, preparation for the celebration, its place in the curriculum, its relationship to Halloween, adult conflicts related to personal religious values, children's misunderstanding of the rituals, and…

  15. Creating Culturally Relevant Holiday Curriculum: A Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Karen; Jones, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes the holiday celebration of Dia de los Muertos at Pacific Oaks Children's School in Los Angeles. Considers the decision to celebrate the holiday, preparation for the celebration, its place in the curriculum, its relationship to Halloween, adult conflicts related to personal religious values, children's misunderstanding of the rituals, and…

  16. African American Teachers and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michele

    An overview is presented of research on African American teachers, addressing the large body of literature written by policy analysts, first-person narratives, and the sociological and anthropological literature. Policy research has identified the small number of African American teachers and has studied some reasons for this shortage and some of…

  17. A Sixth Sense--Cultural Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Francesina R.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents suggestions for culturally sensitive modifications to help students from all backgrounds learn better. The modifications include building trust, building a repertoire of instructional strategies, using effective questioning techniques, providing effective feedback, analyzing instructional materials, and establishing positive…

  18. Cultural Molding: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the student to cultural molding, the idea that most human behavior can be traced to enculturation and exposure rather than to a socio-biological explanation of human behavior. Following a brief description of socialization,…

  19. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  20. The Culture Based Model: Constructing a Model of Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends reveal that models of culture aid in mapping the design and analysis of information and communication technologies. Therefore, models of culture are powerful tools to guide the building of instructional products and services. This research examines the construction of the culture based model (CBM), a model of culture that evolved…

  1. Paulo Freire's Relevance to Online Instruction and Performance Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Sheri; Dessinger, Joan Conway

    2010-01-01

    Paulo Freire argued that learning should be conversational, accessible, and centered on the experience of the participants. Freirean theory remains strong in adult education and has implications for human performance technology applications in such areas as online learning in terms of design, accessibility, and content, as well as performance…

  2. 三级甲等医院护士安全文化认知及影响因素调查%Investigation of nurses' perception of patient safety culture and relevant factors in 3A-grade general hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉娥; 欧阳庆; 罗敏; 王波兰; 王晖; 谢惠兰; 戴利

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate nurses' perception of patient safety culture and relevant factors in 3A-grade general hospitals,so as to provide an empirical evidence for the developmental measures to improve patient safety culture.Methods Clinical Nurses Questionnaire about Patient Safety Culture Assessment Scale was used to survey 1 866 nurses in six 3A-grade general hospitals.Results Nurses' perception score of patient safety culture was (3.57 ± 0.42).Five factors in descending order according to the questionnaire score were teamwork climate(4.20 ± 0.61),safety climate (3.72 ± 0.50),job satisfaction (3.61 ± 0.83),perception of management(3.44 ±0.89) and stress perception(2.31 ±0.69).No significant difference was found in score of the safety climate among nurses with different education background and titles (P > 0.05).Different ages nurses had significantly different scores of safety climate,job satisfaction,perception of management,and stress perception (F =3.964,4.808,2.831,5.652,respectively ;P < 0.05).And significant difference was found in the stress perception score among nurses with different education background(F =11.341,P < 0.01).So,there were statistically significant difference in nurses' perception of patient safety culture among different age,education background,technical title,position,service years and department (P < 0.05).Multiple linear regression analysis with nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture showed that technical title and position entered into the regression equation.Conclusions Technical title and position are the influence factors of nurses' perception of patient safety culture.It is necessary to consider the perception of different technical title and position of nurses into the targeted training and management,when nursing administrators improving their patient safety culture in hospital.%目的 调查护士的患者安全文化认知水平及其影响因素,为制定改善护士的患者安全文化的

  3. Monkeys on the Screen?: Multicultural Issues in Instructional Message Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie McAnany

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available With the shift in numbers between Canadian-born students in the university classroom and the increased number of international students, it is a primary concern for instructors and instructional designers to know and understand learner characteristics in order to create effective instructional messages and materials. Recognizing how culture might shape cognition and learning, we can value and design for the diversity of students and maximize their learning while improving the learning environment for all students. To celebrate cultural diversity and meet the challenges associated with designing for diverse learning styles and educational experiences, this paper offers a review of the literature and proposes a systematic three-fold approach to the creation and evaluation of multicultural instructional messages and materials: first, “Do no harm”; second, “Know your learner”; and third, “Incorporate global concepts and images into instructional messages.” Résumé Avec le renversement des proportions d’étudiants nés au Canada et d’étudiants internationaux qui sont de plus en plus nombreux dans nos universités, connaître et comprendre les caractéristiques des apprenants constitue maintenant une préoccupation majeure pour les instructeurs et les concepteurs pédagogiques afin de créer des messages et du matériel pédagogiques efficaces. En prenant en considération la façon dont la culture peut influencer la cognition et l’apprentissage, nous pouvons tenir compte de la diversité des étudiants lors de la conception et ainsi maximiser leur apprentissage tout en améliorant l’environnement d’apprentissage pour tous les étudiants. Dans le but de célébrer la diversité culturelle tout en relevant les défis associés à la conception pour divers styles d’apprentissage et d’expériences éducatives, le présent article présente un examen de la documentation et propose une approche systématique en trois volets pour

  4. Effect of Lecture Instruction on Student Performance on Qualitative Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of lecture instruction on student conceptual understanding in physics has been the subject of research for several decades. Most studies have reported disappointingly small improvements in student performance on conceptual questions despite direct instruction on the relevant topics. These results have spurred a number of attempts to…

  5. Learning Styles in the Age of Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J.; McDuffie, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of learning styles has tremendous logical and intuitive appeal, and educators' desire to focus on learning styles is understandable. Recently, a growing emphasis on differentiated instruction may have further increased teachers' tendency to look at learning styles as an instructionally relevant variable when individualizing instruction…

  6. The Relevance of Anthropology to Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Beverly

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of anthropological theory, methodology, and literature to language teaching is discussed. It is argued that culture should be taught explicitly in the language classroom, and that the anthropological theory of cultural relativity is useful in creating a judgment-free atmosphere. (Author/RM)

  7. Speechreading Instruction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1988-01-01

    This holistic approach to speechreading instruction proposes: enhancement of the child's self-motivation, strategy-based instruction, an interactive processing approach that focuses on meaning and psycholinguistic guessing, bisensory instruction, and a hierarchical continuum beginning with easy, successful activities that gradually increase in…

  8. Inclusive Design in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel ZAMFIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Much instruction starts with abstract representations for which learners have insufficient foundation [1]. The British Standard, BS 7000-6:2005 Guide to Managing Inclusive Design, provides a comprehensive framework that can help all private enterprises, public sector and not-for-profit organizations, build a consistent approach to inclusive design into organizational culture as well as processes [2]. While courses, technology, and student services are typically designed for the narrow range of characteristics of the average student, the practice of universal design in education (UDE considers people with a broad range of characteristics in the design of all educational products and environments [3]. This paper has been designed to provide an overview about the curriculum paradigm consisting in the fusion of the technology and the classroom instruction in economic higher education.

  9. Stability of Instructional System and Process for a Sample of Ten Bilingual Teachers in the SBIF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Ana Maria

    As part of a larger study of significant bilingual instructional education features, the stability of instruction by 10 teachers was examined. Six aspects of instruction were investigated: instructional organization, time allocation, active teaching, use of the students' native or English language and culture, curriculum intent, and the teacher's…

  10. Gender, Technology, and Instructional Design: Balancing the Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupfer, Nancy Nelson

    1999-01-01

    Examines the pervasive messages of gender stereotypes and their influence on instructional design, schooling, and society. Topics discussed include: society and gender-role construction; gender stereotypes; culture, groups, and schooling; images of males and females; and increasing equity through good instructional design. Contains 41 references.…

  11. American Reading Instruction: Pre-Revolutionary Religious Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Douglas Ray

    To provide some understanding of current reading methodology, this paper traces the history of reading instruction from ancient times to pre-Revolutionary America and examines the influences exerted upon that instruction by religion. The major portion of the paper discusses the cultures, religions, and educational systems of ancient Egypt;…

  12. Differentiating Instruction for Large Classes in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Windi D.; Solis, Oscar J.; Kincade, Doris H.

    2017-01-01

    In response to the diverse needs of individual students--their unique abilities, interests, learning styles, and cultural backgrounds--K-12 teachers have been using differentiated instruction, supported by research, for decades. While positive results have been shown in K-12 education, the literature to support differentiated instruction in higher…

  13. Heritage/Culture Preservation Model Bilingual Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samayoa, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Our first generation children face a loss of heritage in today's public schools. Unfortunately, the assets that one's bilingual ability brings into the classroom are difficult for educators to fully understand. Often this may happen because professionals in the field of education lack the knowledge about the need for children to maintain their…

  14. Developing Instructional Materials for Business Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Shohei

    Business Japanese should be the study of Japanese language and culture for business communication and should include values and beliefs and institutional constraints on which the Japanese act as well as business etiquette and terminology. Topics to be covered in instruction will vary depending on the role (seller, buyer, or colleague) played by…

  15. Resistance to Reform in Legal Ethics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Elizabeth D.

    Perceptions of forces that may restrain the implementation of needed change in legal ethics instruction were investigated in 1984, using a model of resistance to planned change proposed by Goodwin Watson. Based on this model, five barriers to change were assessed: conformity to norms, systemic and cultural coherence, vested interests, the…

  16. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared......What if Information Retrieval (IR) systems did not just retrieve relevant information that is stored in their indices, but could also "understand" it and synthesise it into a single document? We present a preliminary study that makes a first step towards answering this question. Given a query, we...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  17. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    relationship and communicate effectively with the user in order to find relevant usability problems in culturally localized applications. It includes three parts, pilot study, field study and experiments, to get both qualitative data and quantitative data. From this project, we hope to find an effective way...

  18. The Influence of Instructed English Teaching on Existing Stereotypes on America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Ying; Ji; Xuejuan

    2015-01-01

    <正>The present study aims at surveying the influence of instructed English learning on learners existing stereotypes about the American people and determining the effects of these stereotypes on their language learning and cultural openness.The result shows that the instructive teaching and the instructional

  19. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  20. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  1. The Russian Culture Course: Some Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Gilbert F.

    1981-01-01

    Presents statistical data from a survey of Russian culture courses taught at institutions that offer Russian language instruction. Includes data on total number, length, and language of instruction, which, while substantiating the widespread assumption of a culture course explosion, point to the large proportion of courses that are taught in…

  2. Perceptions of document relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBruza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of how humans perceive the relevance of documents.Humans are adept at making reasonably robust and quick decisions about what information is relevant to them, despite the ever increasing complexity and volume of their surrounding information environment. The literature on document relevance has identified various dimensions of relevance (e.g., topicality, novelty, etc., however little is understood about how these dimensions may interact.We performed a crowdsourced study of how human subjects judge two relevance dimensions in relation to document snippets retrieved from an internet search engine.The order of the judgement was controlled.For those judgements exhibiting an order effect, a q-test was performed to determine whether the order effects can be explained by a quantum decision model based on incompatible decision perspectives.Some evidence of incompatibility was found which suggests incompatible decision perspectives is appropriate for explaining interacting dimensions of relevance.

  3. Relevance Theory in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Jun; Jiang Min

    2008-01-01

    In perspective of relevance theory, translation is regarded as communication. According to relevance theory, communication not only requires encoding, transfer and decoding processes, but also involves inference in addition. As communication, translation decision-making is also based on the human beings' inferential mental faculty. Concentrating on relevance theory, this paper tries to analyze and explain some translation phenomena in two English versions of Cai Gen Tan-My Crude Philosophy of Life.

  4. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  5. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  6. Making Science Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles; Deutsch, Bill; Fuller, Jennifer; Scott, Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    Science teachers are always looking for ways to demonstrate the relevance of science to students. By connecting science learning to important societal issues, teachers can motivate students to both enjoy and engage in relevant science (Bennet, Lubben, and Hogarth 2007). To develop that connection, teachers can help students take an active role in…

  7. Foreign Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmaier, Emma; Lange, Dale

    1967-01-01

    This review of research in foreign language instruction summarizes and interprets selected studies produced during the period 1963-66. Topics covered include the psychology of learning, comparisons o f methods, language skills, visual-auditory relationships, vocabulary, grammar, and FLES, as well as programed instruction, technological media,…

  8. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  9. Presentation on Instructional Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Bibi Asia

    2009-01-01

    "Learning can be defined as change in a student's capacity for performance as a result of experience" (Kenneth D. Moore). The intended changes should be specified in instructional objectives. Viewed in this context, an objective can be defined as a clear and unambiguous description of your instructional intent. An objective is not a…

  10. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  11. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  12. Instructional Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  13. Scientific Notation in Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutwell, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the adoption of a notation system that is generalizable to all instructional designers and will allow and encourage a common communication base. Ten instructional design models are discussed as systems approaches to instructional design. (JEG)

  14. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  15. Using Principles of Programmed Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Harry

    1971-01-01

    Although programmed instruction in accounting is available, it is limited in scope and in acceptance. Teachers, however, may apply principles of programming to the individualizing of instruction. (Author)

  16. Criticisms of Relevance Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚静; 孟晔; 焦丽芳

    2006-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces first the notion of Sperber and Wilson's Relevance Theory. Then, the motivation of S & W putting forward their RT is also mentioned. Secondly, the paper gives some details about the methodology of RT, in which ostensive-inferential communication, context and optimal relevance are highlighted. Thirdly, the paper focuses on the criticisms of RT from different areas of research on human language and communication. Finally, the paper draws a conclusion on the great importance of RT in pragmatics.

  17. An Analysis on the Translation of the Culturally-Loaded Expressions in Six Chapters of A Floating Life from the Perspective of Relevance Theory%关联理论视角下《浮生六记》英译本文化负载词的翻译

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓笑

    2015-01-01

    Relevance theory has a great explanatory power on translation. In relevance theory, the translator should take the original context and the cognitive environment into account. The culturally-loaded expressions play a significant role in Six Chapters ofAFloating Life, while make it more difficult for the translator when translating. In the light of relevance theory, Lin Yutang’s version achieves the optimal relevance with the original work and translate the culturally-loaded expressions in an adequate way concerning the original context and the cognitive environment, which transfers Chinese culture to Western readers successfully.%关联理论对翻译具有强大的解释力,关联理论翻译观要求译者在翻译时考虑原文语境和读者的认知环境。《浮生六记》中的文化负载词为其起到锦上添花的作用,也给翻译工作带来困难。在关联理论翻译观的指导下,林语堂的译文与原文实现了最佳关联,在考虑语境和认知环境的基础上,恰当地将《浮生六记》中的文化负载词译出,成功地把中国文化传播给了西方读者。

  18. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  19. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  20. Cultural Learning Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    2016-01-01

    M. Tomasello, A. Kruger, and H. Ratner (1993) proposed a theory of cultural learning comprising imitative learning, instructed learning, and collaborative learning. Empirical and theoretical advances in the past 20 years suggest modifications to the theory; for example, children do not just imitate but overimitate in order to identify and…

  1. Instructing for Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bob

    1978-01-01

    To illustrate the importance of clarity and precision in stating objectives for learning a particular job task, a training consultant provides answers to the previous issue's questionnaire on writing instructional objectives. (MF)

  2. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ GENERAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS These guidelines have been prepared in accordance with the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.1 Authors should familiarize themselves with these requirements before submission.

  3. Reading Instruction Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joanna

    1979-01-01

    Describes current achievement in the areas of reading theory and reading instruction. Reviews reading research in the fields of educational and cognitive psychology. Considers the overall role of formal education in the development of literacy. (GC)

  4. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  5. Writing Concepts in Chinese Writing Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang,Xia

    1994-01-01

    Since Kaplan hypothesized English writing as direct and Oriental writing as circular in 1966, much research has been done in contrastive rhetoric. However, few studies have compared English writing and Asian writing in its original text or compared rhetoric across cultures. In addition, what causes Asian students to write differently from English speakers remains an arguable issue. In response to this debate, the researcher focuses on how Chinese writing instruction can cause negative interfe...

  6. Video Methods for Speechreading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Donald G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressed are the history, methodology, and instructional benefits of self-instruction video as a component of speechreading instruction with adolescent and adult hearing-impaired individuals, focusing on: factors in video lesson design, advantages of various hardware alternatives and computer-assisted learning, instructional evaluation methods,…

  7. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  8. The Limits to Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  9. The Relevance of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    The "legacy" of the humanities is discussed in terms of relevance, involvement, and other philosophical considerations. Reasons for studying foreign literature in language classes are developed in the article. Comment is also made on attitudes and ideas culled from the writings of Clifton Fadiman, Jean Paul Sartre, and James Baldwin. (RL)

  10. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    . We prove that computation of this model is NP-hard. For RESCU, we propose an approximative solution that shows high accuracy with respect to our relevance model. Thorough experiments on synthetic and real world data show that RESCU successfully reduces the result to manageable sizes. It reliably...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  11. Is Information Still Relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  12. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan;

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace c...

  13. Teaching the content in context: Preparing "highly qualified" and "high quality" teachers for instruction in underserved secondary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Sara E.

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation research project presents the results of a longitudinal study that investigates the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of 13 preservice secondary science teachers participating in a science teacher credentialing/Masters program designed to integrate issues of equity and diversity throughout coursework and seminars. Results are presented in the form of three papers: The first paper describes changes in preservice teacher knowledge about contextualization in science instruction, where contextualization is defined as facilitating authentic connections between science learning and relevant personal, social, cultural, ecological, and political contexts of students in diverse secondary classrooms; the second paper relates changes in the self-efficacy and content-specific beliefs about science, science teaching, diversity, and diversity in science instruction; and the final paper communicates the experiences and abilities of four "social justice advocates" learning to contextualize science instruction in underserved secondary placement classrooms. Results indicate that secondary student teachers developed more sophisticated understandings of how to contextualize science instruction with a focus on promoting community engagement and social/environmental activism in underserved classrooms and how to integrate science content and diversity instruction through student-centered inquiry activities. Although most of the science teacher candidates developed more positive beliefs about teaching science in underrepresented classrooms, many teacher candidates still attributed their minority students' underperformance and a (perceived) lack of interest in school to family and cultural values. The "social justice advocates" in this study were able to successfully contextualize science instruction to varying degrees in underserved placement classrooms, though the most significant limitations on their practice were the contextual factors of their student teaching

  14. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  15. Why do students choose English as a medium of instruction? A Bourdieusian perspective on the study strategies of non-native English speakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Lueg, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    by the Bourdieusian perspective, this relationship is not directly observable but operates through hidden mechanisms, such as cultural capital (relative English proficiency) and a better sense of gaming and positioning (career orientation). Business students from the lowest stratum self-select against EMI due......Taking a Bourdieusian perspective, we analyze the relevance of social background and capital for choosing English as a medium of instruction (EMI). Our work focuses on students with a non-native English-language background in a business school setting. Although proponents argue that EMI generally...

  16. 'The Tower of Babel' or 'after Babel in contemporary psychoanalysis'? Some historical and theoretical notes on the linguistic and cultural strategies implied by the foundation of the International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, and on its relevance today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R

    1994-12-01

    The author uses private correspondence and documents referring to the foundation of the 'International Journal of Psycho-Analysis' and the 'Glossary' for translating Freud's work, to try to delineate the political and cultural strategy of Jones in founding and developing the 'International Journal of Psycho-Analysis'. Both strategies were based on the wish to have administrative and cultural control of psychoanalysis in the English-speaking countries. In the end Jones and his colleagues succeeded in making the language they created the official language of the IPA; through control of Freud's translations, through the 'Glossary' and particularly through its diffusion in the 'Journal'. The author briefly illustrates the various cultural sources of this attempt and tries to show the similarities between the project of Jones and the first generation of pioneers of psychoanalysis in Great Britain and the myth of the tower of Babel--one of its most important foundation stones being the 'International Journal'. Finally, the author stresses that those issues are still extremely alive in psychoanalysis today. But, confronted with the near-Babel of languages of contemporary psychoanalysis, can we still imply the existence of this universal common language and use it? Can the 'International Journal' still maintain its hegemony? Do we really understand each other even when we use the same technical terminology in English? Or shall we accept that today we should live without a tower of Babel in psychoanalysis? The author concludes that there is some hope, provided that we do not pursue meanings to the forbidden limit of the absolute.

  17. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Korrek, volledig, relevant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Gouws, Rufus

    2007-01-01

    as detrimental to the status of a dictionary as a container of linguistic knowledge. This paper shows that, from a lexicographic perspective, such a distinction is not relevant. What is important is that definitions should contain information that is relevant to and needed by the target users of that specific......In explanatory dictionaries, both general language dictionaries and dictionaries dealing with languages for special purposes, the lexicographic definition is an important item to present the meaning of a given lemma. Due to a strong linguistic bias, resulting from an approach prevalent in the early...... phases of the development of theoretical lexicography, a distinction is often made between encyclopaedic information and semantic information in dictionary definitions, and dictionaries had often been criticized when their definitions were dominated by an encyclopaedic approach. This used to be seen...

  19. Information Needs/Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    A user's interaction with a DL is often initiated as the result of the user experiencing an information need of some kind. Aspects of that experience and how it might affect the user's interactions with the DL are discussed in this module. In addition, users continuously make decisions about and evaluations of the materials retrieved from a DL, relative to their information needs. Relevance judgments, and their relationship to the user's information needs, are discussed in this module. Draft

  20. Navigating a sea of ideas: Teacher and students negotiate a course toward mutual relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Lawrence B.

    Theories of social cognition and verbal communication were used to analyze the science teaching of an experienced fourth-grade teacher. Her teaching skills in language arts and reading were assets in negotiating the rapid flow of relatively unstructured information typical of inquiry in elementary classrooms, to help students generate relevant information about hands-on experience. The teacher was a collaborator in this case study of her thinking and instructional planning, and her students' learning in a unit of instruction about space. Implications for elementary science instruction include recognizing the importance of embedded speech in conceptually broad discussions with students. Efforts to reform elementary science instruction should attend to these instructional skills more common to language arts instruction.Received: 13 September 1993; Revised: 28 June 1994;

  1. Tasks for Integrating Language and Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Peter; Rucynski, John, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of culture in language teaching and provides activities for introducing culture in the classroom, focusing on teaching context and methodology to integrate culture. The authors outline five activities that can be adapted to the language level and interests of students. Instructions for each activity include language…

  2. Culture Kits for the Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M. Gail

    1997-01-01

    Outlines an instructional unit where students construct culture kits illustrating a specific culture. Culture kits are constructed out of realia and other material including maps, travel brochures, photographs, newspapers, souvenirs, and other items. Discusses collecting these items and possible multicultural applications. (MJP)

  3. Impacts of Different Culture on Management Style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国君

    2015-01-01

    cultural differences affect the management behavior and management style.Participatory management style in the United States and instructional management style in China has a deep cultural roots.In terms of the type of management style,they are equal.As long as management style is consistent with its culture accordingly,the leadership will be effective.

  4. Instruct coders' manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J.

    1971-01-01

    A manual designed both as an instructional manual for beginning coders and as a reference manual for the coding language INSTRUCT, is presented. The manual includes the major programs necessary to implement the teaching system and lists the limitation of current implementation. A detailed description is given of how to code a lesson, what buttons to push, and what utility programs to use. Suggestions for debugging coded lessons and the error messages that may be received during assembly or while running the lesson are given.

  5. Instructions for authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editors Editorial Board

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS
    Author Guidelines
    Authors must submit their papers via email to brain@edusoft.ro (please! or they can create an account and submit their papers online, at www.brain.edusoft.ro. Submited papers must be written in DOC format (Microsoft Word document, in as clear and as simple as possible English. Preferred maximum paper length for the papers is 20 pages, including figures.
    The template for the paper is at this address:
    http://www.edusoft.ro/Template_for_BRAIN.docRAIN vol. 3, issue 3, Instructions for authors

  6. American Holidays: Culture and Language Learning Combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Grace Scott

    Suggestions for combining cultural exposure and language instruction through class activities geared to American holidays are outlined. General information about gathering holiday-related realia and instructional materials from local newspapers and magazines is provided, and four specific holidays are highlighted. For each holiday, sources of…

  7. An Evaluation of Factors That Influence Children's Instruction Following

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Jolene R.; Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Pizarro, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Behavior that resembles instruction following might sometimes be under stimulus control of extraneous variables. We evaluated the effects of some of these variables (i.e., presence of relevant objects, associations between instructions and object sets) with 3 children with intellectual disabilities. In Experiment 1, we assessed whether subjects…

  8. Implementation and Effects of Explicit Reading Comprehension Instruction in Fifth-Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Rune; Braten, Ivar

    2011-01-01

    In this intervention study, teachers tried to implement four instructional principles derived from the literature on research-based, explicit reading comprehension instruction in their fifth-grade classrooms. The principles focused on relevant background knowledge, reading comprehension strategies, reading-group organization, and reading…

  9. Instructional Approaches in Social Studies: A Comparison of the Impact on Student Achievement and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carolyn Gaye

    2013-01-01

    Many students feel that studying social studies is boring and not relevant to their lives. In social studies, the most common method of instruction is the transmission model in which the textbook becomes the curriculum and the teacher transmits knowledge through lecture. In the participatory model of instruction, the teacher facilitates…

  10. Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: review and projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2009-10-01

    This paper aims to provide conceptual justifications for the inclusion of culture and cultural factors in psychiatric diagnosis, and logistic suggestions as to the content and use of this approach. A discussion of the scope and limitations of current diagnostic practice, criticisms from different quarters, and the role and relevance of culture in the diagnostic encounter, precede the examination of advantages and disadvantages of the approach. The cultural content of psychiatric diagnosis should include the main, well-recognized cultural variables, adequate family data, explanatory models, and strengths and weaknesses of every individual patient. The practical aspects include the acceptance of "cultural discordances" as a component of an updated definition of mental disorder, and the use of a refurbished cultural formulation. Clinical "telescoping" strategies to obtain relevant cultural data during the diagnostic interview, and areas of future research (including field trials on the cultural formulation and on "culture bound syndromes"), are outlined.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Whole-Genome Gene Expression Changes in Cultured Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Response to Low, Clinical Diagnostic Relevant, and High Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Nguyen, Van; Neumann, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure in humans are not comprehensively understood, generating a high degree of controversy in published literature. The earliest stages of human development are known to be among the most sensitive to stress exposures, especially genotoxic stresses. However, the risks stemming from exposure to LDIR, particularly within the clinical diagnostic relevant dose range, have not been directly evaluated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we describe the dynamics of the whole genome transcriptional responses of different hESC lines to both LDIR and, as a reference, high-dose IR (HDIR). We found that even doses as low as 0.05 Gy could trigger statistically significant transient changes in a rather limited subset of genes in all hESCs lines examined. Gene expression signatures of hESCs exposed to IR appear to be highly dose-, time-, and cell line-dependent. We identified 50 genes constituting consensus gene expression signature as an early response to HDIR across all lines of hESC examined. We observed substantial differences in biological pathways affected by either LDIR or HDIR in hESCs, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underpinning the responses of hESC may fundamentally differ depending on radiation doses. PMID:26133243

  12. Secondary Dance Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    This manual provides guidelines for dance teachers in secondary schools. A brief statement is made on the purpose and philosophy of dance education, and activities and instructional suggestions are presented for various dance forms: (1) group dance--folk/ethnic, square dance, and social dance; (2) aerobic dance; (3) jazz dance; (4) modern dance;…

  13. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  14. Safety instruction no 50

    CERN Multimedia

    Secrétariat SC

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the safety instruction no 50 (IS 50) entitled 'Safety Coordination on CERN Worksites' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/479454/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit Secretariat, email: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  15. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  16. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  17. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  18. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  19. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  20. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss th

  1. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  2. Instructional Guide for Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    Intended as a tool for cosmetology teachers in Virginia public and private schools, the document is an instructional guide which offers 12 units of study, arranged in a three year course. Materials covered help prepare students for licensure in the State of Virginia and the guide is designed to cover the 1,500 hours required to be spent in the…

  3. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  4. Using Realia in Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Seven articles in this issue focus on the use of realia in instruction. Authors discuss reasons why realia effectively motivate students and enhance learning; the place of realia in supervised occupational experience programs; the importance of real-life experiences to vocational agriculture; and student teaching as a reality experience. (SK)

  5. Psychologism and Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Bekir S.; Wiley, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Little of the work in critical and hermeneutical psychology has been linked to instructional technology (IT). This article provides a discussion in order to fill the gap in this direction. The article presents a brief genealogy of American IT in relation to the influence of psychology. It also provides a critical and hermeneutical framework for…

  6. Sourcebook for Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbury, Carolyn, Ed.; And Others

    Direction and guidance are provided for establishing and maintaining bibliographic instruction (BI) programs. This document provides an overview of BI and BI programs and points readers to other sources of information. Five key topics were identified and the following papers are presented: (1) "An Introduction to Learning Theory" (Lori Arp); (2)…

  7. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  8. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  9. Instructions for Sampling Particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Frank

    This technical report presents detailed instructions for sampling particulates. The table of contents includes sections on Introduction, Volume Determinations, Apparatus - Assembly and Operation, Sampling Techniques, and Acknowledgment. Six charts, 24 graphs, and one diagram are appended to facilitate sampling, as well as sections on Isokinetic…

  10. Characteristics of Instructional Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    A thoroughly planned program for instructional technologists--one including selection, education, and on-the-job training--must take into consideration the competencies and characteristics desirable in such technologists. Such requirements fall into three categories: attitudes or values, specialized knowledge, and intellectual skills or…

  11. Safety Instruction No 43

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instruction No 43 (IS 43) entitled "ASBESTOS - DANGERS AND PRECAUTIONS" is available on the web at the following URL: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335809/LAST_RELEASED/ Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. SC Secretariat

  12. Scaffolding in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On-The-Job Training, developed as direct instruction, is one of the earliest forms of training. This method is still widely in use today because it requires only a person who knows how to do the task, and the tools the person uses to do the task. This paper is intended to be a study of the methods used in education in Knowledge Society, with more specific aspects in training the trainers; as a result of this approach, it promotes scaffolding in assisted instruction as a reflection of the digital age for the learning process. Training the trainers in old environment with default techniques and designing the learning process in assisted instruction, as an application of the Vygotskian concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD to the area of computer literacy for the younger users, generate diversity in educational communities and requires standards for technology infrastructure, standards for the content, developed as a concepts map, and applications for personalized in-struction, based on ZPD theory.

  13. Culture and Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Anne Marie; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    The literature on cross-cultural negotiation has expanded considerably over the past few decades, but the findings are often ambiguous and sometimes even contradictory. This introduction highlights the critical areas where objections are commonly raised about the relevance of national culture......, the applicability of typologies that treat cultures as static, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. It may not be surprising that studies contradict each other given the ambiguity of the national cultural construct and variations in the context of the negotiating situations that are studied. The articles...... in this issue contribute to deepening our understanding about cross-cultural negotiation processes....

  14. Instructional changes based on cogenerative physics reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Natan; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird

    2013-01-01

    We describe changes in a physics teacher's pedagogy and cultural awareness that resulted from her students' involvement in reforming their classroom. For this case study, we examined a veteran high school teacher's semester-long use of CMPLE (the Cogenerative Mediation Process for Learning Environments) in her Modeling Instruction classroom. CMPLE is a formative intervention designed to help students and instructors collaborate to change classroom dynamics, based on how closely the environment matches their learning preferences. Analysis of classroom videos, interviews, and other artifacts indicates that adapting the environment to align with the preferences of that shared culture affected the instructor in complex ways. We will trace her teaching practices and her self-described awareness of the culture of learning, to highlight notable changes. The teacher espoused deeper understanding of her students' physics learning experience, which she gained from including students in responding to their own individual and collective learning preferences.

  15. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  16. English-Chinese Translation in the Framework of Relevance Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾

    2014-01-01

    Relevance theory is widely applied in the practice of translation and elaborates communication from the perspective of human cognition. This paper, first and foremost, discusses the background of relevance theory and the essence of translation in the framework of relevance theory. Secondly, it il ustrates the differences in syntax structure, cultural connotation and pragmatic rules between English and Chinese languages. Then, it explores different strategies to transform language information on the basis of readers’ cognitive environment in Chinese-English translation.

  17. Why do students choose English as a medium of instruction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Lueg, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Taking a Bourdieusian perspective, this paper analyzes the relevance of social background and capital for choosing English as a medium of instruction (EMI). It focuses on students with a non-native English-language background in a business school setting. While proponents argue that EMI generally...

  18. Developing Self-Instructional Materials for NTIS Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howison, Beulah C.

    A package of information was developed to inform vocational, technical, and adult education teachers how to find information relevant to their occupational interests. Instructions were provided for the use of three indexes: Government Reports Announcements (GRA), Government Reports Index (GRI), and National Technical Information service (NTIS).…

  19. Epistemological Diversity and Moral Ends of Research in Instructed SLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    In this article I explore epistemological diversity in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) from the perspective that obtains if we examine the moral ends of research, and we ask: In what ways does epistemological diversity relate to enhancing the social value and educational relevance of the research generated by the instructed SLA…

  20. Ideology and Critical Self-Reflection in Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critten, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy instruction traditionally focuses on evaluating a source for bias, relevance, and timeliness, and rightfully so; this critical perspective is vital to a well-formed research process. However, this process is incomplete without a similar focus on the potential biases that the student brings to his or her interactions with…

  1. Instruction beyond the Facilitative Conditions: A Response to Biggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Elizabeth L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Biggs' article on the case presentation approach in clinical supervision by discussing implications for instruction of two relevant research programs: conceptual level (Harvey, Hunt, and Schroder, 1961) and Hunt's related matching model for education, and Strohmer and associates' cognitive models for clinical judgment. (NB)

  2. Epistemological Diversity and Moral Ends of Research in Instructed SLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    In this article I explore epistemological diversity in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) from the perspective that obtains if we examine the moral ends of research, and we ask: In what ways does epistemological diversity relate to enhancing the social value and educational relevance of the research generated by the instructed SLA…

  3. Impact of R. M. Gagne's Work on Instructional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia L.; Ragan, Tillman J.

    Although Robert M. Gagne's work is often thought of as learning theory, his contributions can most appropriately be considered as an "instructional theory." This denotes an integrated set of principles based upon learning theory, other relevant theories, and sound replicable research, that permits one to predict the effects of specific…

  4. Uncovering English-medium instruction glocal issues in higher education

    CERN Document Server

    Drljaca Margic, Branka

    2016-01-01

    This book draws on a range of theoretical and empirical insights to explore the implications of English-medium instruction in higher education and how to capitalize on its strengths and respond to its challenges. It opens up new avenues for research relevant to all educational institutions undergoing change in this field.

  5. Revisiting the Role of Explicit Genre Instruction in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Katherine K.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of the twentieth century, genre theorists and practitioners debated the possibility of explicitly teaching genres in classrooms. Though the debate is decades old, it continues to be relevant to contemporary discussions about literacy instruction because it addresses questions about how to provide all students with access to genres of…

  6. Individual Differences, Computers, and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayersman, David J.; Minden, Avril von

    1995-01-01

    Provides a conceptual foundation for the development of hypermedia as an instructional tool for addressing individual differences in learning styles. Highlights include a literature review; computers and instruction; individual differences, computers, and instruction; cognitive controls; cognitive styles and learning; personality types; and future…

  7. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  8. Interactive Instruction in Bayesian Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Azam; Breslav, Simon; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    An instructional approach is presented to improve human performance in solving Bayesian inference problems. Starting from the original text of the classic Mammography Problem, the textual expression is modified and visualizations are added according to Mayer’s principles of instruction...... that an instructional approach to improving human performance in Bayesian inference is a promising direction....

  9. Task-Based Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Alexandros

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of task-based writing instruction, a communicative language-teaching method, on second language acquisition and differentiation of instruction for English language learners during the independent work time instructional component of the Open Court Reading program. Through student-teacher…

  10. Student Models of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Shambaugh, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Mental models are one way that humans represent knowledge (Markman, 1999). Instructional design (ID) is a conceptual model for developing instruction and typically includes analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (i.e., ADDIE model). ID, however, has been viewed differently by practicing teachers and instructional designers…

  11. Effect of lecture instruction on student performance on qualitative questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula R. L. Heron

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of lecture instruction on student conceptual understanding in physics has been the subject of research for several decades. Most studies have reported disappointingly small improvements in student performance on conceptual questions despite direct instruction on the relevant topics. These results have spurred a number of attempts to improve learning in physics courses through new curricula and instructional techniques. This paper contributes to the research base through a retrospective analysis of 20 randomly selected qualitative questions on topics in kinematics, dynamics, electrostatics, waves, and physical optics that have been given in introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington over a period of 15 years. In some classes, questions were administered after relevant lecture instruction had been completed; in others, it had yet to begin. Simple statistical tests indicate that the average performance of the “after lecture” classes was significantly better than that of the “before lecture” classes for 11 questions, significantly worse for two questions, and indistinguishable for the remaining seven. However, the classes had not been randomly assigned to be tested before or after lecture instruction. Multiple linear regression was therefore conducted with variables (such as class size that could plausibly lead to systematic differences in performance and thus obscure (or artificially enhance the effect of lecture instruction. The regression models support the results of the simple tests for all but four questions. In those cases, the effect of lecture instruction was reduced to a nonsignificant level, or increased to a significant, negative level when other variables were considered. Thus the results provide robust evidence that instruction in lecture can increase student ability to give correct answers to conceptual questions but does not necessarily do so; in some cases it can even lead to a decrease.

  12. Effect of lecture instruction on student performance on qualitative questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of lecture instruction on student conceptual understanding in physics has been the subject of research for several decades. Most studies have reported disappointingly small improvements in student performance on conceptual questions despite direct instruction on the relevant topics. These results have spurred a number of attempts to improve learning in physics courses through new curricula and instructional techniques. This paper contributes to the research base through a retrospective analysis of 20 randomly selected qualitative questions on topics in kinematics, dynamics, electrostatics, waves, and physical optics that have been given in introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington over a period of 15 years. In some classes, questions were administered after relevant lecture instruction had been completed; in others, it had yet to begin. Simple statistical tests indicate that the average performance of the "after lecture" classes was significantly better than that of the "before lecture" classes for 11 questions, significantly worse for two questions, and indistinguishable for the remaining seven. However, the classes had not been randomly assigned to be tested before or after lecture instruction. Multiple linear regression was therefore conducted with variables (such as class size) that could plausibly lead to systematic differences in performance and thus obscure (or artificially enhance) the effect of lecture instruction. The regression models support the results of the simple tests for all but four questions. In those cases, the effect of lecture instruction was reduced to a nonsignificant level, or increased to a significant, negative level when other variables were considered. Thus the results provide robust evidence that instruction in lecture can increase student ability to give correct answers to conceptual questions but does not necessarily do so; in some cases it can even lead to a decrease.

  13. Personal relevance modulates the positivity bias in recall of emotional pictures in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszczyk, Jennifer C; Fernandes, Myra A; MacLeod, Colin M

    2008-02-01

    Some studies have suggested that older adults remember more positive than negative valence information, relative to younger adults, whereas other studies have reported no such difference. We tested whether differences in encoding instructions and in personal relevance could account for these inconsistencies. Younger and older adults were instructed either to passively view positive, negative, and neutral pictures or to actively categorize them by valence. On a subsequent incidental recall test, older adults recalled equal numbers of positive and negative pictures, whereas younger adults recalled negative pictures best. There was no effect of encoding instructions. Crucially, when the pictures were grouped into high and low personal relevance, a positivity bias emerged in older adults only for low-relevance pictures, suggesting that the personal relevance of pictures may be the factor underlying cross-study differences.

  14. Effects of Pre-reading Instructions on the Comprehension of Science Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Yuna H.

    This study examined how three different pre-reading (or relevance) instructions led to different learning outcomes for middle school students reading science texts on the topic of sweetness. The first was a generic instruction to read for understanding. The second prompted students to form a holistic explanation of the topic of sweetness, and the third instruction prompted students to focus on the core scientific principle of the relationship between structure and function. The latter two were specifically designed to align with science disciplinary goals. A comparison of the three treatments found that the generic instruction and the structure-function instruction led to better learning outcomes, measured by recall, short-answer performance questions, and a traditional multiple-choice/short-answer assessment. A qualitative analysis of the data also revealed some small yet notable differences in the recall pattern of students, such as an increased recall of key ideas for the structure-function instruction. This effect was seen predominantly for higher-skilled readers. The results suggest the possibility that relevance instructions targeting core ideas may help to orient students to the key ideas and explanations in scientific text, especially for higher-skilled readers, and indirectly highlights some of the challenges for students with less reading competencies. Overall, this study provides greater insight into how middle-school students read science texts, the effectiveness of instructor-provided relevance instructions in promoting (higher-level) comprehension of science texts, and implications for teachers on how to use texts in science instruction. Keywords: relevance instructions, pre-reading instructions, comprehension, science texts, middle school students, low- versus high-skilled readers.

  15. Chronobiology: relevance for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lígia Gabrielle; Pires, Gabriel Natan; Azeredo Bittencourt, Lia Rita; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2012-07-01

    Despite the knowledge concerning the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, this disease remains one of the most important causes of mortality worldwide. Several risk factors are well-known, such poverty, HIV infection, and poor nutrition, among others. However, some issues that may influence tuberculosis warrant further investigation. In particular, the chronobiological aspects related to tuberculosis have garnered limited attention. In general, the interface between tuberculosis and chronobiology is manifested in four ways: variations in vitamin D bioavailability, winter conditions, associated infections, and circannual oscillations of lymphocytes activity. Moreover, tuberculosis is related to the following chronobiological factors: seasonality, latitude, photoperiod and radiation. Despite the relevance of these topics, the relationship between them has been weakly reviewed. This review aims to synthesize the studies regarding the association between tuberculosis and chronobiology, as well as urge critical discussion and highlight its applicability to health policies for tuberculosis.

  16. Socioscientific Issues-Based Instruction: An Investigation of Agriscience Students' Content Knowledge Based on Student Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Myers, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous researchers in science education have reported student improvement in areas of scientific literacy resulting from socioscientific issues (SSI)-based instruction. The purpose of this study was to describe student agriscience content knowledge following a six-week SSI-based instructional unit focusing on the introduction of cultured meat…

  17. Television in the Schools: Instructional Television and Educational Media Resources at the National Public Broadcasting Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In 1964, in "A Guide to Instructional Television," editor Robert M. Diamond defined "educational television" as a "broad term usually applied to cultural and community broadcasting which may include some programs for in-school use" (p. 278). His definition for instructional television was "television used within the formal classroom context on any…

  18. Analyzing Archival Intelligence: A Collaboration Between Library Instruction and Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merinda Kaye Hensley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although recent archival scholarship promotes the use of primary sources for developing students’ analytical research skills, few studies focus on standards or protocols for teaching or assessing archival instruction. Librarians have designed and tested standards and learning assessment strategies for library instruction and archivists would do well to collaborate with and learn from their experience. This study examines lessons learned from one such collaboration between an instructional services librarian and archivist to evaluate and enhance archival instruction in the University Archives’ Student Life and Culture Archival Program (SLC Archives at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library. Based on evaluative data from a student survey and in-depth interviews, the authors offer strategies for meeting and exceeding learning outcomes for archival intelligence more successfully.

  19. Neural correlates of culturally familiar brands of car manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Berens, Harald; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Brands have a high impact on people's economic decisions. People may prefer products of brands even among almost identical products. Brands can be defined as cultural-based symbols, which promise certain advantages of a product. Recent studies suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be crucial for the processing of brand knowledge. The aim of this study was to examine the neural correlates of culturally based brands. We confronted subjects with logos of car manufactures during an fMRI session and instructed them to imagine and use a car of these companies. As a control condition, we used graphically comparable logos of car manufacturers that were unfamiliar to the culture of the subjects participating in this study. If they did not know the logo of the brand, they were told to imagine and use a generic car. Results showed activation of a single region in the medial prefrontal cortex related to the logos of the culturally familiar brands. We discuss the results as self-relevant processing induced by the imagined use of cars of familiar brands and suggest that the prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role for processing culturally based brands.

  20. Universal Instructional Design Principles for Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Elias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The report extends a previous analysis of universal instructional design principles in distance education by applying them to the design of mobile learning. Eight principles with particular relevance for distance education are selected, and their recommendations are discussed in relation to the design of educational materials for a range of mobile devices. The problems and opportunities of mobile learning are discussed as is the need for educators to focus on content design issues rather than on searching for the next new technology.

  1. Interactive radio instruction: developing instructional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J

    1989-01-01

    The USAID has, since 1972, funded the development of a new methodology for educational radio for young children through 3 projects: the Radio Mathematics PRoject of Nicaragua, the Radio Language Arts Project of Kenya, and the Radio Science PRoject of Papua New Guinea. These projects developed math programs for grades 1-4 and English as a second language for grades 1-3; programs to teach science in grades 4-6 are now being developed. Appropriate techniques were developed to engage young children actively in the learning process. Lessons are planned as a "conversation" between the children and the radio; scripts are written as 1/2 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that written as 12 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that students can contribute their 1/2. Teaching techniques used in all 3 projects include choral responses, simultaneous individual seatwork, and activities using simple materials such as pebbles and rulers. Certain techniques were specific to the subject being taught, or to the circumstances in which the lessons were to be used. Patterned oral drill was used frequently in the English lessons, including sound-cued drills. "Deferred" oral responses were used often in the math lessons. In this method, the children are instructed to solve a problem silently, not giving the answer aloud until requested, thus allowing time for even the slower children to participate. "One-child" questions were used in both English and science: the radio asks a question to be answered by a single child, who is selected on the spot by the classroom teacher. This allows for open-ended questions, but also requires constant supervision of the classroom teacher. Songs and games were used in all programs, and extensively for didactic purposes in the teaching of English. Instructions for science activities are often more complex than in other courses, particularly when the children are using science apparatus, especially when they work in pairs to share scarce

  2. Dynamic assessment and instructional strategies for learners who struggle to learn a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Ganschow, L

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss how the concept of dynamic (cognitive) assessment and instruction might relate to the assessment and instruction of at-risk foreign/second language learners. They describe its relevance to a diagnostic/prescriptive approach to instruction for teaching a foreign language to students with identified dyslexia and other at-risk students. They explain how to assess learners' knowledge of the native/foreign/second language through questions and guided discovery. Examples in German and English illustrate its application to foreign/second language instruction.

  3. Groundwater hydrology instructional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ronald G.

    Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, is preparing for its third cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology, beginning January 15, 1986. The first cycle finished with an impressive completion ratio for registered participants, and the second cycle has currently been underway since July. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the Soil Conservation Service (of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. Since its evolution into IRIS, an 80% participant completion rate has been recorded for the first cycle, which is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by correspondence courses. This excellent rate of success is the result of 2 years of refinement and demonstrates the progressive nature of the program. IRIS has met the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  4. Instructional immediacy in elearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkem, Kerrie

    2014-01-01

    Instructor immediacy has been positively associated with many desirable academic outcomes including increased student learning. This study extends existing understanding of instructional immediacy behaviours in elearning by describing postgraduate nursing students' reflections on their own experience. An exploratory, descriptive survey design was used to collect qualitative data. Participants were asked what behaviours or activities help to create rapport or a positive interpersonal connection (immediacy) between students and their online teacher(s). Thematic analysis of the data revealed three main themes: acknowledging and affirming student's personal and professional responsibilities; providing clear and timely information; and utilising rich media. These findings give lecturers insight into instructional strategies they may adopt to increase immediacy in elearning and hence improve student learning outcomes.

  5. Safety instruction No. 36

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that a revised version of Safety Instruction No. 36 (IS 36), entitled "Safety rules for the use of static magnetic fields at CERN" is available on the Web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335801/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat (e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch) SC Secretariat

  6. Instructional Psychology 1976 - 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    phoneme analysis and blending is reviewed by Resnick (1981) and by Williams (1980), and is discussed in terms of an interactive theory of reading...academically oriented. In a study of student ratings of instruction, Williams & Ware (1976) show that college students who received the most substantive...Rosen et al, 1977; Rosen et al, 1978; Bargh & Schul, 1980). Peer tutoring has been employed as a component of many forms of Personalized Systems of

  7. Rethinking "relevance": South African psychology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wahbie

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the phenomenon known as the "relevance debate" in South African psychology. It begins with a historical overview of the contours of the discipline in that country before describing the controversy's international dimensions, namely, the revolutionary politics of 1960s higher education and the subsequent emergence of cognate versions of the debate in American, European, and "Third World" psychology. The article then details how South Africa's "relevance" project enjoyed a special affinity with an assortment of ethnic-cultural, national, and continental myths and metaphors, all of which served the interests of the political formations of the day. It discusses how, in present-day South Africa, the intelligentsia has become an important catalyst for the so-called African Renaissance, which seeks to provide "relevant" solutions for the regeneration of African society. However, the global hegemony of what began in the 1970s as a "second academic revolution," aided by the lifting of the academic boycott of South Africa, has blunted the once critical edge of "relevance" discourse. A new mode of knowledge production now holds sway, the outcome of a dramatic reformulation of the capitalist manifesto in which the values of the "May 68" generation have been hijacked by a managerialist rationality. In light of the capitalization of the knowledge-production enterprise, it is concluded that the idiom of "relevance" has outlived its usefulness.

  8. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  9. A Framework to Reenvision Instructional Scaffolding for Linguistically Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luciana C.; Athanases, Steven Z.

    2017-01-01

    This commentary presents a coherent framework that reenvisions instructional scaffolding for linguistically and culturally diverse learners, based on our research, teaching, and collaborations with teachers. We have worked to understand how, why, and when supports work, for whom, and in what ways, as well as tensions and challenges that teachers…

  10. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  11. Effective Multicultural Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin T. Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reason why the Trayvon Martin murder trial and similar court cases create a philosophical rift in our nation is due in part to flaws in the delivery of multicultural education. Traditional multicultural instruction does not prepare citizens for the subtleties and complexities of race relations. This study investigates critical strategies and practices that address multicultural missing gaps. I also seek to fill a void in the literature created by a lack of student input regarding teaching strategies that encourage lifelong learning. Students (N = 337 enrolled at a Midwestern university were asked to rate the efficacy of selected instructional strategies. Utilizing a 9-point Likert-type scale, students gave themselves a personal growth rating of 7.15 (SD = 1.47. Variables important to predicting that growth (R2 = .56, p < .0005 were a six-factor variable known as a non-color-blind instructional approach (t = 10.509, p ≤ .0005, allowing students an opportunity to form their own opinions apart from the instructor (t = 4.797, p ≤ .0005, and a state law that mandated multicultural training (t = 3.234, p = .001. Results demonstrated that utilizing a 35% traditional and 65% critical pedagogy mixture when teaching multicultural education helped promote win/win scenarios for education candidates hoping to become difference makers.

  12. Linking didactics and research in instructional material: A new structural model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, Stefan Ting

    2009-01-01

    How can research in instructional materials become more relevant for didactics and instruction planning? And how can general didactics reflect questions developed from a media perspective. These are the guiding questions of the article, which assumes a gap between general didactics and research...... and theory of instructional material. General didactics does not sufficiently incorporate a theory of media, and research and theory in instructional material do not recognise general didactics and apply very different conceptions of instruction in their studies – if at all. Through two approaches we argue...... for a new basic structure in didactics in order to bridge the gap when relevant conclusions for pragmatic didactics are in question. The first approach accounts for the place and status of media in the most known structural theories in general didactics. The second approach argues from another angle...

  13. Culture in the Elementary School Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Carol Ann

    1991-01-01

    Explores ways in which elementary school foreign language programs can fully integrate cultural insights, skills, and understanding through an examination of instructional models and developmental factors in the teaching of culture, goal setting for teaching culture, and culture and curriculum in the foreign language classroom and in other areas.…

  14. Student performance on conceptual questions: Does instruction matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the tutorial component of introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington, students take weekly pretests that consist of conceptual questions. Pretests are so named because they precede each tutorial, but they are frequently administered after lecture instruction. Many variables associated with class composition and prior instruction (if any) could, in principle, affect student performance on these questions. Nonetheless, the results are often found to be "essentially the same" in all classes. With data available from a large number of classes, it is possible to characterize the typical variation quantitatively. In this paper three questions for which we have accumulated thousands of responses, from dozens of classes representing different conditions with respect to the textbook in use, the amount of prior instruction, etc., serve as examples. For each question, we examine the variation in student performance across all classes. We also compare subsets categorized according to the amount of relevant prior instruction each class had received. A preliminary analysis suggests that the variation in performance is essentially random. No statistically significant difference is observed between results obtained before relevant instruction begins and after it has been completed. The results provide evidence that exposure to concepts in lecture and textbook is not sufficient to ensure an improvement in performance on questions that require qualitative reasoning.

  15. STUDY OF THE RELEVANT SPACE OF INTANGIBLE CULTURE HERITAGE IN HISTORIC BLOCK OF DONGGUAN STREET IN YANGZHOU%扬州东关街历史街区中的非物质文化遗产相关空间研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星; 杨豪中

    2016-01-01

    The historic blocks involve a plenty of intangible culture heritages ( ICHs ) , and the protection and the inheritance of ICH have a close relationship with the forming characteristic for the historic blocks and their sustainable development.Using the ethnological method known as observation and interviews and the field investigation method, the close study on some problems of relevant spaces of ICH in Dongguan historical shopping street in Yangzhou was done.On the basis of objective data and subjective perception from the people investigated, this paper proposed the evaluating method and the controlling principle for the relevant spaces of ICH to contribute to the cultural ecosystem and the sustainable development of the historic blocks.%历史街区中蕴涵着丰富的非物质文化遗产,而非物质文化遗产的保护和传承则关系着历史街区的延续和特色发展。以扬州东关街历史街区为例,采用人类学的研究方法:观察法、访谈法等与实地空间调研相结合,针对历史街区中与非遗相关建筑空间存在的问题进行研究。以研究取得的访谈主体的主观认知和调研的客观数据为基础,深入挖掘其中的规律,提出历史街区中非遗相关空间的评价方法和控制原则,以促进历史街区的文化生态建设和可持续发展。

  16. AXIOLOGICAL MODEL OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushevich I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents instructional design as a new approach to the issue of developing value-oriented worldview. Scientific research and analysis led the author to summarize instructional design theory, broaden the definition of instructional design and apply it to instruction and learning in a new manner. The goal to build a pattern of instruction aimed at developing learners’ value-oriented worldview required the author to study the existing instructional design model, to analyse and generalize a number of monographs and articles devoted to the problem of building value systems and value orientations, and finally to investigate and apply the new knowledge to real life in the form of experiment. The work conducted brought the author to axiological model of instructional design, which consists of three dimensions: a linear sequence of the events from designing the instructional material to independent learning activities, interaction between a teacher and a learner, pace of learning and design. The article touches upon every dimension, level and stage of the model, describes and defines the procedures that take place on each of them, as well as suggests a possible way to visualize the model in a form of a sketch. The author also points out the advantages of using instructional design as an efficient and smart tool to organize learning and justifies the use of the new instructional design model in XXI century

  17. The Effect of Teachers’ Memory-Relevant Language on Children’s Strategy Use and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Jennie; Coffman, Jennifer L.; Ornstein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Building on longitudinal findings of linkages between aspects of teachers’ language during instruction and children’s use of mnemonic strategies, this investigation was designed to examine experimentally the impact of instruction on memory development. First and second graders (N=54, mean age=7 years) were randomly assigned to a science unit that varied only in teachers’ use of memory-relevant language. Pretest, posttest, and 1-month follow-up assessments revealed that although all participating children learned new information as a result of instruction, those exposed to memory-rich teaching exhibited greater levels of strategic knowledge and engaged in more sophisticated strategy use in a memory task involving instructional content than did students exposed to low-memory instruction. The findings provide support for a causal linkage between teachers’ language and children’s strategic efforts. PMID:23574097

  18. The effect of teachers' memory-relevant language on children's strategy use and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Jennie; Coffman, Jennifer L; Ornstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Building on longitudinal findings of linkages between aspects of teachers' language during instruction and children's use of mnemonic strategies, this investigation was designed to examine experimentally the impact of instruction on memory development. First and second graders (N = 54, M(age) = 7 years) were randomly assigned to a science unit that varied only in teachers' use of memory-relevant language. Pretest, posttest, and 1-month follow-up assessments revealed that although all participating children learned new information as a result of instruction, those exposed to memory rich teaching exhibited greater levels of strategic knowledge and engaged in more sophisticated strategy use in a memory task involving instructional content than did students exposed to low memory instruction. The findings provide support for a causal linkage between teachers' language and children's strategic efforts. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Citizenship education and its relevance to Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sibanda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Informal education systems in the traditional African systems were aimed at, among other things, passing on cultural values, norms and knowledge skills from one generation to the next.  In addition, the youth were taught to preserve their cultural identity. Owing to fundamental shifts in classical family systems and educational practices in Africa, countries such as Zimbabwe have come to recognise the need for including societal values and norms, ethics, morals and responsibilities in thewhole school curricula in order to inculcate value systems and maintain the national legacy and cultural heritage. One strategy for achieving the desired cultural ethos is implementing a deliberate Citizenship Education programme which should be incorporated into the formal education system. Citizenship Education could also be inculcated through extra curricula activities such as sport.Besides the transmission of the cultural norms and values, Citizenship Education should incorporate humanitarian issues such as inclusion of people with disabilities in social processes. In the same vein, the Citizenship Education programme should be flexible to cater for the needs of learners with special needs. This paper explores the relevance of Citizenship Education to the prevailing Zimbabwean situation. In the long term, Citizenship Education has the capacity to improve the socio-political and economic advancement of a country.  The paper concludes that Citizenship Education is relevant to the Zimbabwean situation, despite that it has been heavily politicised and has, in some cases, lost its original intention. In the long term, the programme has a propensity to improve the socio-political and economic conditions of the country. De-politicisation of Citizenship Education could be the first step towards re-aligning it to the intended national ethos and ideals. This should be policy driven.The programme should endeavour to inculcate values and norms that facilitate nation

  20. Dialysis cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, R; Märkl, H

    1998-10-01

    Dialysis techniques are discussed as a means for effective removal of low-molecular-mass components from fermentation broth to reach high cell density. Reactor systems and process strategies, the relevant properties of membranes and examples for high-density fermentation with dialysis, and problems related to scale-up are addressed. The dialysis technique has turned out to be very efficient and reliable for obtaining high cell densities. As in dialysis processes the membranes are not perfused, membrane clogging is not a problem as it is for micro- and ultrafiltration. By applying a "nutrient-split" feeding strategy, the loss of nutrients can be avoided and the medium is used very efficiently. The potential of dialysis cultures is demonstrated on the laboratory scale in a membrane dialysis reactor with an integrated membrane and in reactor systems with an external dialysis loop. In dialysis cultures with different microorganisms (Staphylococci, Escherichia coli, extremophilic microorganisms, Lactobacilli) the cell densities achieved were up to 30 times higher than those of other fermentation methods. The technique enables high cell densities to be attained without time-consuming medium optimization. For animal cell cultures the concept of a fixed bed coupled with dialysis proved to be very effective.

  1. Darwinism and cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-08-05

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different 'grains' of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles.

  2. Cross-cultural Comparison of Sino-Japanese Mathematics Classroom Instruction in Middle School%中日两国中学数学课堂教学的跨文化比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑文; 李清

    2014-01-01

    Through personal observation and video analysis on two mathematics demonstration classes in Japan and China, this paper ifnds that the main common features are:clear teaching objectives;almost same teaching process; using time effectively; putting emphasis on summarization and reflection of the learning content;stressing the intrinsic link among problems. The main differences are:more time is used for discussion and individual communication in Japanese class, while more time is used for lectures and exercises in Chinese class and the exercise problems are more complex. Therefore, Chinese mathematics classroom instruction should focus on individual differences of students and give students more time to understand mathematics so as to improve the effectiveness of inquiry learning.%本文通过对中日两节数学研究课的亲身观察和录像分析,发现中日两国数学课堂教学的主要共性有:教学目标明确;教学过程基本相同;能有效地利用课堂教学时间;重视对学习内容的总结和反思;强调问题之间的内在联系。主要差异有:日本数学课堂用于探究讨论和个别交流的时间多;中国用于讲解和练习的时间多,课堂练习的问题具有较高的复杂性。因此,我国的数学课堂教学应关注学生的个性差异,给学生更多感悟数学的时间,提高探究学习的有效性。

  3. La Culture des calembours (The Culture of Puns).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1989-01-01

    Cultivation of an understanding of puns and plays on words in French language instruction is advocated as a method of teaching phonology, exposing students to French culture, and heightening awareness of the students' native and second languages. Specific approaches are suggested. (MSE)

  4. La Culture des calembours (The Culture of Puns).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1989-01-01

    Cultivation of an understanding of puns and plays on words in French language instruction is advocated as a method of teaching phonology, exposing students to French culture, and heightening awareness of the students' native and second languages. Specific approaches are suggested. (MSE)

  5. Evaluation of two videotape instruction programmes on how to break bad news--for Cantonese-speaking medical students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, C L; Fielding, R; Wong, G; Chung, S F; Nestel, D F

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate a culture-specific videotape on how to 'break bad news' and another videotape produced by a western university, and to determine if the language of presentation influenced the students' perceived abilities to execute basic skills. Third year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong. Longitudinal study with experimental design. Two instructional tapes on breaking bad news; one using Chinese speaking role models and one using English. In both groups, self-efficacy summed scores increased from 26.8 (95% CI = 25.9-27.7) at the pre-test to 29.0 (95% CI = 28.4-29.6). The biggest changes occurred in perceived self-efficacy regarding specific skills. However, students using the Chinese tape rated skills as more useful than those using the English tape. The videotapes were useful in teaching communication skills. Culturally relevant audiovisual materials were more effective.

  6. 参与式教学理论在法学课程教学中的应用——以诉讼法学相关课程教学为例%Application of participatory instructional theory in law curriculums——Taking Litigation Law and relevant subjects for example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛玉兵

    2011-01-01

    In the teaching process of litigation courses,application of participatory instructional theory can stimulate and strengthen students' interest in participating in class learning by innovating the forms of participation,following social focus,organizing classroom discussion and court simulation.Further exploreation is need cmcemop how to overcome student's "free-riding" phenomenon to meet the teaching requirements of formal participation.%在诉讼法学相关课程教学中,运用参与式教学理论,通过创新参与形式、追踪社会热点、组织课堂讨论、组织模拟法庭等方式,实现教师教学的主导性与学生学习主体性的有机融合。而在如何克服学生"搭便车"现象,满足正规参与式教学所应具备的要求等方面,还有待于进一步的探索。

  7. Evaluation of science instructional software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Abha

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the current science education software measures up to the national science literacy standards as specified by the AAAS. The usability of software was also assessed. A sample of ten widely used middle and high school science instruction CD-ROMs was chosen from a sampling frame comprising 17 bestsellers and 30 highly recommended software packages. The study used a five-step analysis and rating procedure derived closely from the one developed by the AAAS's Project 2061 for analyzing the content and pedagogy of widely used science textbooks. Each was also rated on a checklist of 20 usability criteria that were compiled from prior research on design, usability, and interactiveness of instructional software. The results indicate that an average of about 25% of a CD-ROM's content (which includes either text, graphics, or exercises, or a combination of any or all of these) addressed the AAAS benchmarks of science literacy, but anywhere from 12--45% of this content was found to address benchmarks for lower grades than those that the CD-ROM was claimed to target. Much of remaining content addressing the benchmarks did so only partially. Thus, overall, there was poor alignment with the benchmarks. The sample failed to meet pedagogical criteria associated with attending to students' pre-existing knowledge, ideas, and skills; assessing students' progress vis-a-vis the goals of the lesson on the CD-ROM; and promoting students' thinking and reflection about what they have learned. The CD-ROMs scored satisfactory to excellent on criteria associated with providing relevant and varied experiences with scientific phenomena and effective and meaningful representation of scientific terms and ideas. The sample scored satisfactorily on all usability criteria except on some design and interface matters. Popular CD-ROMs lack of alignment with the AAAS science standards may be due to laxness on the part of developers, a

  8. Teacher change in beliefs and practices in science and literacy instruction with English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    2004-01-01

    This study examined patterns of change in beliefs and practices as elementary teachers learned to establish instructional congruence, a process of mediating academic disciplines with linguistic and cultural experiences of diverse student groups. The study focused on six bilingual Hispanic teachers working with fourth-grade, mostly Hispanic students. The results indicated that teacher learning and change occurred in different ways in the areas of science instruction, students' language and culture, English language and literacy instruction, and integration of these areas in establishing instructional congruence. The results also indicated that establishing instructional congruence was a gradual and demanding process requiring teacher reflection and insight, formal training, and extensive support and sharing. Implications for further research in promoting achievement for all students are discussed.

  9. Sleep supports selective retention of associative memories based on relevance for future utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Eelco V; Thielen, Jan-Willem; Takashima, Atsuko; Barth, Markus; Fernández, Guillén

    2012-01-01

    An outstanding question is whether memory consolidation occurs passively or involves active processes that selectively stabilize memories based on future utility. Here, we differentially modulated the expected future relevance of two sets of picture-location associations after learning. Participants first studied two sets of picture-location associations. After a baseline memory test, they were instructed that only one set of associations would be retested after a 14-hour delay. For half of the participants, this test-retest delay contained a night of sleep; for the other half the delay included a normal working day. At retest, participants were re-instructed and against their expectations tested on both sets of associations. Our results show that post-learning instruction about subsequent relevance selectively improves memory retention for specific associative memories. This effect was sleep-dependent; it was present only in the group of subjects for which the test-retest delay contained sleep. Moreover, time spent asleep for participants in this sleep group correlated with retention of relevant but not irrelevant associations; participants who slept longer forgot fewer associations from the relevant category. In contrast, participants that did not sleep forgot more relevant than irrelevant associations across the test-retest delay. In summary, our results indicate that it is possible to modulate the retention of selected memories after learning with simple verbal instructions on their future relevance. The finding that this effect depends on sleep demonstrates this state's active role in memory consolidation and may have utility for educational settings.

  10. USING GOOGLE+ FOR INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    Full Text Available Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+ quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011 blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011. Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget, the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007. Selwyn (2009 found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

  11. Instructional Use of Weblogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 can provide learners with increased interaction and online collaboration. Among its applications, weblogs have gained an increasing popularity as they allow bloggers to voice their own perspectives which can be delivered to a large audience through the Web. Weblogs can be integrated into teaching-learning process as they encourage learners to collaborate and freely voice their ideas. However, innovative technologies might not always lead to innovative distance education practices if timely adaptation lags behind. This study presents a review on instructional use of weblogs along with implications for open and distance learning.

  12. Cultural Diversity and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Van Praag, Mirjam

    One of the most salient and relevant dimensions of team heterogeneity is cultural background. We measure the impact of cultural diversity on the performance of business teams using a field experiment. Companies are set up by teams of undergraduate students in business studies in realistic though...... similar circumstances. We vary the cultural composition of otherwise randomly composed teams in a multi-cultural student population. Our data indicate that a moderate level of cultural diversity has no effect on team performance in terms of business outcomes (sales, profits and profits per share). However......, if at least the majority of team members is culturally diverse then more cultural diversity seems to affect the performance of teams positively. Our data suggest that this might be related to the more diverse pool of relevant knowledge facilitating (mutual) learning within culturally diverse teams....

  13. Cultural Diversity and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Van Praag, Mirjam

    One of the most salient and relevant dimensions of team heterogeneity is cultural background. We measure the impact of cultural diversity on the performance of business teams using a field experiment. Companies are set up by teams of undergraduate students in business studies in realistic though...... similar circumstances. We vary the cultural composition of otherwise randomly composed teams in a multi-cultural student population. Our data indicate that a moderate level of cultural diversity has no effect on team performance in terms of business outcomes (sales, profits and profits per share). However......, if at least the majority of team members is culturally diverse then more cultural diversity seems to affect the performance of teams positively. Our data suggest that this might be related to the more diverse pool of relevant knowledge facilitating (mutual) learning within culturally diverse teams....

  14. Examining Different Regions of Relevance: From Highly Relevant to Not Relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Amanda; Greisdorf, Howard; Bateman, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a useful concept of relevance as a relationship and an effect on the movement of a user through the iterative stages of their information seeking process, and that users' relevance judgments can be plotted on a Three-Dimensional Spatial Model of Relevance Level, Degree and Time. Discusses implications for the development of information…

  15. Effects of Cueing by a Pedagogical Agent in an Instructional Animation: A Cognitive Load Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a pedagogical agent that cued relevant information in a story-based instructional animation on the cardiovascular system. Based on cognitive load theory, it was expected that the experimental condition with the pedagogical agent would facilitate students to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant…

  16. Effects of Cueing by a Pedagogical Agent in an Instructional Animation: A Cognitive Load Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a pedagogical agent that cued relevant information in a story-based instructional animation on the cardiovascular system. Based on cognitive load theory, it was expected that the experimental condition with the pedagogical agent would facilitate students to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant…

  17. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    1. Requirement for ArticlesThe journal mainly publishes original research papers, research notes, letters and reports about weather and climate analysis, agri-culture and ecology meteorology, pollution meteorology,

  18. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    1. Requirement for ArticlesThe journal mainly publishes original research papers, research notes, letters and reports about weather and climate analysis, agri-culture and ecology meteorology, pollution meteorology, atmospheric physics and atmospheric chemistry, water resources and en

  19. Socially Relevant Knowledge Based Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    participants had to select and adjust insulin level for patients with type 2 diabetes . For that purpose, participants had to listen to an instructional 40...users pedal, the faster will be the exploration. Another simulated environment is Bronkie the Bronchiasaurus [25], which is designed to help kids

  20. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Vyas, Rashmi; Hamed, Omayma; Dornan, Tim; Morahan, Page

    2016-01-01

    Background We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations. PMID:27890048

  1. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Zaidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method: The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results: Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion: Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations.

  2. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover

  3. Direct Instruction Revisited: A Key Model for Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Lockee, Barbara B.; Burton, John K.

    2005-01-01

    Rooted in behavioral theory, particularly the radical or selectivist behaviorism of B.F. Skinner (1953, 1954, 1966, 1968, 1974), the direct instruction (DI) approach to teaching is now well into its third decade of influencing curriculum, instruction, and research. It is also in its third decade of controversy. Our purpose is to present the DI…

  4. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  5. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  6. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover ef

  7. Effects of Instructional Events in Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Klein, James; Sullivan, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Forty years ago, Robert Gagne published the first edition of his book The Conditions of Learning (1965) in which he proposed nine events of instruction that provide a sequence for organizing a lesson. These events remain the foundation of current instructional design practice (Reiser, 2002; Richey, 2000). They represent desirable conditions in an…

  8. An Investigation of a Culturally Responsive Approach to Science Education in a Summer Program for Marginalized Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Brittany A.

    There have been numerous calls and efforts made to provide states, school districts, and communities needed financial support to increase and enhance access to and opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) related disciplines for marginalized populations (Tyson, Lee, & Hanson, 2007; Caldwell & Siwatu, 2003). As the challenge to better educate students of color and poor students intensifies, the need to provide equitable science learning experiences for all students aimed at scientific literacy and STEM also becomes critical. Thus the need to provide summer science enrichment programs where students engage in scientific experimentation, investigation, and critical thinking are vital to helping students who have been traditionally marginalized achieve success in school science and enter the science career pipeline. This mixed methods study examined the impact of a culturally responsive approach on student attitudes, interests in science education and STEM careers, and basic science content knowledge before and after participation in an upward bound summer program. Quantitative results indicated using a culturally responsive approach to teach science in an informal learning space significantly increases student achievement. Students receiving culturally responsive science instruction exhibited statistically significant increases in their posttest science scores compared to pretest science scores, M = 0.376, 95% CI [0.266, 0.487], t (10) = 7.610, p learn science utilizing a culturally responsive approach was much more beneficial to their overall science knowledge, as it allowed students to experience, understand, and connect to and through their science learning. Likewise, culturally responsive science instruction helped students to foster a more positive interest in science and STEM careers as it provided students the opportunity to do science in a meaningful and relevant way. Moreover, results revealed students receiving culturally responsive

  9. Using Gagne’s instructional model in phlebotomy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo WH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wee Hong Woo School of Chemical & Life Sciences, Singapore Polytechnic, Singapore Abstract: As the role of a phlebotomist in a clinical setting involves patient interactions, ­correct patient identification, and blood specimen accessioning, it is essential that the phlebotomy education pay attention to these procedural tasks to inculcate a culture of patient safety. Using the Gagne’s nine events of instruction as the basis of teaching model, this paper describes the lesson plan for teaching the topic of patient approach to a group of phlebotomy students without prior clinical experience. Keywords: venipuncture, Gagne’s model, instructional design, patient handling, Peyton’s steps

  10. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  11. Children on the Move: Third Culture Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Warna D.

    1998-01-01

    Defines Third Culture Kids as the children of diplomats, missionaries, business persons, and military personnel who live outside their native countries for periods of time. Considers the problems and advantages of travel and uncertain cultural identity for these children. Suggests instructional strategies for working with internationally mobile…

  12. Culture and Language Teaching through Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Belgin; Apak, Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    The topic of teaching and learning culture has been a matter of considerable interest to language educators and much has been written about the role of culture in foreign language instruction over the past two decades. ESL students whose success in a new environment is conditioned not only by their mastery of the new language, but also, and…

  13. The Cultural Revolution and Contemporary Chinese Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guey-Meei; Suchan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Using this instructional resource, teachers can explore the impact of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) on contemporary art in mainland China with their students. The three artists Luo Zhongli (b. 1948), Xu Bing (b. 1955), and Wang Guangyi (b. 1957) came of age during the Cultural Revolution and are representative of a much larger number of…

  14. Cultural Connotation in English Vocabulary Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangJiying

    2004-01-01

    As an English language teacher with years of teaching experience, I have gradually recognized this fact that foreign language instruction and its vocabulary learn/rig should be closely combined with learning the knowledge of cultural contents of target language. Unfortunately, only a small number of teachers realize that teaching culture is very

  15. The Cultural Revolution and Contemporary Chinese Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guey-Meei; Suchan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Using this instructional resource, teachers can explore the impact of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) on contemporary art in mainland China with their students. The three artists Luo Zhongli (b. 1948), Xu Bing (b. 1955), and Wang Guangyi (b. 1957) came of age during the Cultural Revolution and are representative of a much larger number of…

  16. Culturally Relevant Teaching and the Concept of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Kelvin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses a problem that first occurred to him almost 40 years ago. Having finally arrived at a possible solution, he would like to share it with others. The issue was raised by John Dewey and taken up again by Richard Peters and Paulo Freire. It was not their main concern, however; nor has it been a major concern of…

  17. Discovering Euler Circuits and Paths through a Culturally Relevant Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaux, Rebecca R.; Rodrigue, Paulette R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a middle school discrete mathematics lesson that uses the context of catching crawfish to provide students with a hands-on experience related to Euler circuits and paths. The lesson promotes mathematical communication through the use of cooperative learning as well as connections between mathematics and the real world…

  18. Preservice Teachers: Teacher Preparation, Multicultural Curriculum and Culturally Relevant Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins-Gillispie, Delphina

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a larger study that uses mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) to investigate preservice teachers' knowledge and understanding of multiculturalism and to prepare preservice teachers to work in diverse classrooms. The results indicate two findings: 1) that preservice teachers come from homogeneous backgrounds;…

  19. African American Homeschooling and the Question of Curricular Cultural Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazama, Ama; Lundy, Garvey

    2013-01-01

    Homeschooling, and academic interest in this phenomenon, have increased tremendously over the last decade. The surge of African American involvement in the homeschool movement has also become noticeable. However, there continues to be a general paucity of research on the motivations of African American parents that choose homeschooling. In order…

  20. The Path to a Culturally Relevant National Security Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    Theory This section discusses the key theory linking self and society. Henri Tajfel , the father of social identity theory, developed this theory as...32 John C. Turner, “An Introduction,” in Social Groups and Identities – Developing the Legacy of Henri Tajfel , ed...in Social Groups and Identities – Developing the Legacy of Henri Tajfel , 17. 13 strategies for achieving or maintaining intergroup comparisons that

  1. Being Maori: Culturally Relevant Assessment in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameka, Lesley Kay

    2011-01-01

    Concern has been raised about the under-achievement of Maori children in education. The problem has tended to be located with Maori children rather than with assessments. Clearly if one takes a sociocultural perspective achievement is situated. Although studies in early childhood education have examined and developed assessment tools and…

  2. Culture and values - their relevance for marketing strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Rewerts, Astrid Lucie; Hanf, Jon Henrich

    2006-01-01

    Research on consumer behaviour has revealed that the prospect of reaching a personal value is the virtual buying motive. Bearing this in mind, the researcher, as well as the marketer, is not only able to observe whether one product is preferred to another, but also to understand why this product is preferred. Hence, identifying consumers' personal values contributes to explaining consumer preferences and buying motives, which is of great importance for marketing practice. Personal values that...

  3. Preventing Depression: Culturally Relevant Group Work with Black Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lani V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent estimates indicate that 10% to 25% of women in the United States report clinically significant depressive symptoms and that Black women are less likely to obtain care for depression and to receive appropriate treatment when they do seek care. Current mental and social health services necessitate a search for strength-based treatment models…

  4. Schooling Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: One Story about Tension and Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ann Mogush

    2013-01-01

    The need for multifaceted analyses of the relationship between how the United States acknowledges racism and how schooling can be structured to mitigate its negative impacts has never been greater, especially given the rising and often simplistic attention to the racial "achievement gap." In suburban, elite Pioneer City, a series of…

  5. Building Humans and Dances: Exploring Cultural Relevancy as Teaching Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Ellen V. P.; VanDenend Sorge, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    As dance educators in Philadelphia's schools and instructors of dance pedagogy at the university level, the authors offer a glimpse into their teaching practices as a resource for others. The co-authors have a collective twenty years of teaching experience in urban environments, from Shanghai to Chicago, and Philadelphia, where they met as…

  6. Building Humans and Dances: Exploring Cultural Relevancy as Teaching Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Ellen V. P.; VanDenend Sorge, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    As dance educators in Philadelphia's schools and instructors of dance pedagogy at the university level, the authors offer a glimpse into their teaching practices as a resource for others. The co-authors have a collective twenty years of teaching experience in urban environments, from Shanghai to Chicago, and Philadelphia, where they met as…

  7. Influencing Student Relationships With Physics Through Culturally Relevant Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dusen, Ben

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how an urban, high school physics class responded to the inclusion of a classroom set of iPads and associated applications, such as screencasting. The participatory roles of students and the expressions of their relationships to physics were examined. Findings suggest that iPad technology altered classroom norms and student relationships to include increased student agency and use of evidence. Findings also suggest that the iPad provided a connection between physics, social status, and play. Videos, observations, interviews, and survey responses were analyzed to provide insight into the nature of these changes.

  8. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...... relevant, and not-relevant judgments, and that most criteria can have either a positive or negative contribution to the relevance of a document. The criteria most frequently mentioned by study participants were content, followed by criteria characterizing the full text document. These findings may have...... implications for relevance feedback in information retrieval systems, suggesting that systems accept and utilize multiple positive and negative relevance criteria from users. Systems designers may want to focus on supporting content criteria followed by full text criteria as these may provide the greatest cost...

  9. Relevance-driven Pragmatic Inferences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞彪

    2013-01-01

    Relevance theory, an inferential approach to pragmatics, claims that the hearer is expected to pick out the input of op-timal relevance from a mass of alternative inputs produced by the speaker in order to interpret the speaker ’s intentions. The de-gree of the relevance of an input can be assessed in terms of cognitive effects and the processing effort. The input of optimal rele-vance is the one yielding the greatest positive cognitive effect and requiring the least processing effort. This paper attempts to as-sess the degrees of the relevance of a mass of alternative inputs produced by an imaginary speaker from the perspective of her cor-responding hearer in terms of cognitive effects and the processing effort with a view to justifying the feasibility of the principle of relevance in pragmatic inferences.

  10. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...... and, perhaps, unfamiliar intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, the symposium will demonstrate how local knowledge of problems enables researchers and practitioners to better understand the dynamics of cultural diversity within the topic of athlete career development and assistance....

  11. Managing culture in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The paper...... argues that dynamic aspects of culture as enacted by key individual actors and constructed in a given context are far more relevant and critical for the joint venture’s managerial process. With evidence from four Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, the paper proposes a way of managing culture in IJVs...... through individual sense-making and mutual learning and adjustment as key to the process of cultural negotiation....

  12. Goal relevance as a quantitative model of human task relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, James; Itti, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The concept of relevance is used ubiquitously in everyday life. However, a general quantitative definition of relevance has been lacking, especially as pertains to quantifying the relevance of sensory observations to one's goals. We propose a theoretical definition for the information value of data observations with respect to a goal, which we call "goal relevance." We consider the probability distribution of an agent's subjective beliefs over how a goal can be achieved. When new data are observed, its goal relevance is measured as the Kullback-Leibler divergence between belief distributions before and after the observation. Theoretical predictions about the relevance of different obstacles in simulated environments agreed with the majority response of 38 human participants in 83.5% of trials, beating multiple machine-learning models. Our new definition of goal relevance is general, quantitative, explicit, and allows one to put a number onto the previously elusive notion of relevance of observations to a goal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  14. The Knowledge-Learning-Instruction Framework: Bridging the Science-Practice Chasm to Enhance Robust Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Corbett, Albert T.; Perfetti, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Despite the accumulation of substantial cognitive science research relevant to education, there remains confusion and controversy in the application of research to educational practice. In support of a more systematic approach, we describe the Knowledge-Learning-Instruction (KLI) framework. KLI promotes the emergence of instructional principles of…

  15. Case-Based Instruction: Improving Students' Conceptual Understanding through Cases in a Mechanical Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Aman; Vinh, Megan; Shaver, Gregory M.; Meckl, Peter; Firebaugh, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a push within engineering curricula to adopt more learner-centered pedagogies, such as case-based instruction. Case-based instruction has been hypothesized to make the curriculum more relevant and motivating for students by pushing them to integrate the concepts they have learned with other experiences. The current study…

  16. Case-Based Instruction: Improving Students' Conceptual Understanding through Cases in a Mechanical Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Aman; Vinh, Megan; Shaver, Gregory M.; Meckl, Peter; Firebaugh, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a push within engineering curricula to adopt more learner-centered pedagogies, such as case-based instruction. Case-based instruction has been hypothesized to make the curriculum more relevant and motivating for students by pushing them to integrate the concepts they have learned with other experiences. The current study…

  17. Analyzing Classroom Instruction in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, William L.

    A method for analyzing instructional techniques employed during reading group instruction is reported, and the characteristics of the effective reading teacher are discussed. Teaching effectiveness is divided into two categories: (1) how the teacher acts and interacts with children on a personal level and (2) how the teacher performs his…

  18. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lene; Broth, Mathias; Cromdal, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  19. Distance Education Instructional Model Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of graduate students involved in distance education on North Dakota State University's Interactive Video Network included 80 on campus and 13 off. The instructional models rated most effective were role playing, simulation, jurisprudential (Socratic method), memorization, synectics, and inquiry. Direct instruction was rated least…

  20. Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenburg, Frederick C.; Irby, Beverly J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher behavior research has shown that teacher behaviors, as well as specific teaching strategies, make a difference with regard to student achievement. Ten durable instructional strategies are discussed: set induction, stimulus variation, reinforcement, questioning, recognizing attending behavior, lecturing or direct instruction, planned…

  1. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  2. Adaptive instruction and pupil achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtveen, A.A M; Booy, N; de Jong, Robert (Rob); van de Grift, W.J C M

    1999-01-01

    In this article the results are reported of a quasi-experiment on effects of adaptive instruction on reading results of children in the first year of reading instruction in Dutch primary schools. The research involved 456 pupils from 23 schools (12 experimental and 11 control group schools). Teacher

  3. Professional Cosmetology Practices. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcus, Sharron; Armstrong, Ivan J.

    This publication is designed to assist the instructor and students in understanding the latest concepts and techniques of the instructional phase of cosmetology programs. The instructional units are in five areas: (1) orientation, (2) professional practices: hair, (3) professional practices: skin and nails, (4) cosmetology science, and (5)…

  4. Overcoming Resistance to Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William G.; Anderson, Susan; Love, Don

    2000-01-01

    Administrators must convince and motivate faculty to adopt instructional technology if departments are to remain on the cutting edge. Describes seven actions to promote the use of instructional technology: know your faculty; be aware of faculty concerns; use technology yourself; review potential barriers; explore and obtain resources; communicate…

  5. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  6. Marketing Instructional Development Internally, Externally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, James

    This description of the marketing process as a practical way to manage the function of instruction development emphasizes the importance of the identification and evaluation of customer needs before developing objectives. To assist the instructional development agency in focusing on this aspect of planning, a check list of possible marketing…

  7. ROTI-OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Barker,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The instructional model presented here is a combination of systems used by the United States Navy and R. F. Mager's Criteria Referenced Instruction Model for Analysis Design and Implementation. The author has taken what he believes is the best components from each system and established a working model.

  8. Academic Service Quality and Instructional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Westbrook, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between academic service quality and instructional quality in higher education. Found a high correlation between academic service and instructional quality, with academic service overlapping instructional quality in three dimensions: enthusiasm, organization, and rapport. (EV)

  9. The Challenge of Individualized Instruction in Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Carl B.; McKee, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses 14 challenges to the use of individualized instruction in corrections. Emphasizes a systems approach, motivational tools, programmed instructional materials, and approaches such as Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching. (SK)

  10. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  11. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  12. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>1.Items of the paper Title,author’s name and working unit,abstract,key words,text and reference. 2.Author and working unit Entitled authors should be those involved in the research and would be able to answer relevant questions.The working units,cities and

  13. E-learning in University: a case of study on cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available How much important and fundamental instruments, formation and information methods, different from the traditional ones in the different fields of human and experimental sciences, are today and will be in the future, is highlightened in this article. According to this, some problems typical of our instructive institutions (such as universities, public administrations, factories and their relevant possible solutions are underlined. These solutions can be achieved thanks to the introduction of the "e-learning" i.e. the possibility of learning through the web. It is important to note that the usage of data processing systems and telecom technologies could improve the access to the learning resources and to meet the different requirements. A case that can be considered emblematic, with reference to our specific experience, is represented by the cultural heritage field and by the university teledidactic and telecom courses as "Cultural heritage Operator".

  14. Student perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life: A study in higher education biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is the last science course they will take for life. General biology courses are suspected of discouraging student interest in biology with large enrollment, didactic instruction, covering a huge amount of content in one semester, and are charged with promoting student disengagement with biology by the end of the course. Previous research has been aimed at increasing student motivation and interest in biology as measured by surveys and test results. Various methods of instruction have been tested and show evidence of improved learning gains. This study focused on students' perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life and the methods of instruction that increase it. A quantitative survey was administered to assess perception of relevance pre and post instruction over three topics typically taught in a general biology course. A second quantitative survey of student experiences during instruction was administered to identify methods of instruction used in the course lecture and lab. While perception of relevance dropped in the study, qualitative focus groups provided insight into the surprising results by identifying topics that are more relevant than the ones chosen for the study, conveying the affects of the instructor's personal and instructional skills on student engagement, explanation of how active engagement during instruction promotes understanding of relevance, the roll of laboratory in promoting students' understanding of relevance as well as identifying external factors that affect student engagement. The study also investigated the extent to which gender affected changes in students' perception of

  15. From the Virtual World to the Real World: A Model of Pragmatics Instruction for Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Rachel L.

    2010-01-01

    With its focus on the use of language forms in cultural context, the study of pragmatics can be a valuable component in a program that prepares students to learn both language and culture in study abroad. The goal of the present study is to propose a model for pragmatic instruction in study abroad that fosters both intercultural competence and…

  16. NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handler, B.H. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA)); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA)); Hunnum, W.H. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (USA)); Smith, D.L. (Memphis State Univ., TN (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

  17. RELIEF: Revue de linguistique et d'enseignement du francais (Review of Linguistics and French Language Instruction), 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, M., Ed.; Haillet, P., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contains five articles, all in French, reporting research on French second language instruction. "Francophonie et francais langue seconde a l'oral: quel(s) culture(s), quelles methodes?" (Francophony and Spoken French as a Second Language: What Cultures(s), What Method(s) (D. Issa-Sayegh) discusses the content and structure of a university course…

  18. Exploring the Instruction of Fluid Dynamics Concepts in an Immersive Virtual Environment: A Case Study of Pedagogical Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Cindy; Mazur, Joan

    2004-01-01

    The deployment of immersive, non-restrictive environments for instruction and learning presents a new set of challenges for instructional designers and educators. Adopting the conceptual frameworks of Sherin's (2002) learning while teaching and Vygotsky's (1978) cultural development via the mediation of tools, this paper explores one professor's…

  19. Tiered Instruction: An Effective Strategy to Differentiation of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BELER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of a tiered instructional design on classroom management, attitude and the learning level of students. The instructional program was prepared for an introductory science course for 3rd grade students. The case study research method was used. Observation form, teacher and student interview forms were used to collect data. The teaching program was planned using a tiered instruction method for nine subjects of the “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow” curriculum theme. The teacher made a short presentation and then students were classified into ability groups. Finally, each group completed learning activity via individual and group tasks based on activities appropriate to their abilities. The results indicate that tiered instruction had positive effects on the learning outcomes of students. All groups completed the classroom activities easily, which increased their motivation. Students participated in activities voluntarily and enthusiastically.

  20. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…