WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally displaced students

  1. Retention of Displaced Students after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Joshua Christian

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the strategies that university leaders implemented to improve retention of displaced students in the aftermaths of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The universities that participated in this study admitted displaced students after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This study utilized a qualitative…

  2. Missed Opportunities: Examining the Literacy Experiences of African American Students Displaced by Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Tamica McClarty

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how five African American middle school students, who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina represent their literacy experiences before, during, and after their displacement. Specifically, the two research questions were: (a) What are the stories that these middle school students tell about their lives,…

  3. STUDENTS: COMMUNICATION AND PEACE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Arapé Copello

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a research about Communication and Peace Culture developed with Venezuelan students. We did a theoretical review and field-work with students. We are looking for visions and perceptions about communication to peace from students. The research is focused on three student groups who live near of Venezuela frontier. We work with three test: (COMPAZ-1, Peace Builder and Learning to Dialoguing. The students show changes in their initials perceptions after the workshop. The experience developed that short training could be useful to be better the communication behavior as support of peace project.

  4. Enhancing students' cultural competence using cross-cultural experiential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Bertolo, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate community health students' perceptions of their cultural competence. Little is known about students' cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills after their experience working with diverse cultural groups and language barriers. A cross-cultural experiential learning exercise was used as an educational approach. Reflective writing was used to elicit students' attitudes of the other culture and their coping skills. Three themes emerged as cultural awareness and knowledge, observation and learning, and cross-cultural communication. Results underscore the need for student academic preparation using cross-cultural educational approaches to enhance cultural competence.

  5. Exploring Cultural Diversity with Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Jonna; Julkunen, Saara

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Business Communication, Intercultural Communication. Objectives: Students will demonstrate understanding of some of the effects of culture on business communication. Students will explore cultural diversity in customer-seller relationships.

  6. Student Culture and Identity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, Ambreen, Ed.; Syed, Ghazal Kazim, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    The pursuit of higher education has become increasingly popular among students of many different backgrounds and cultures. As these students embark on higher learning, it is imperative for educators and universities to be culturally sensitive to their differing individualities. "Student Culture and Identity in Higher Education" is an…

  7. The Cultural Competence of Graduating Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Hanna; Vahlberg, Tero; Salminen, Leena; Papadopoulos, Irena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Cultural competence is an essential component in nursing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of cultural competence of graduating nursing students, to identify associated background factors to cultural competence, and furthermore to establish whether teaching multicultural nursing was implemented in nursing education. A structured Cultural Competence Assessment Tool was used in a correlational design with a sample of 295 nursing students in southern Finland. The level of cultural competence was moderate, and the majority of students had studied multicultural nursing. Minority background (p = .001), frequency of interacting with different cultures (p = .002), linguistic skills (p = .002), and exchange studies (p = .024) were positively associated to higher cultural competence. To improve cultural competence in students, nursing education should provide continuous opportunities for students to interact with different cultures, develop linguistic skills, and provide possibilities for internationalization both at home and abroad. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Culturally Competent Counseling Psychology Students: Developmental Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Monique L.; Bronson, M. Kristine

    Four steps are critical in developing cultural competence in students: (1) a supportive training program; (2) a significant number or "critical mass" of culturally diverse students and allies; (3) opportunities to learn about diversity; and (4) development of racial identity. An appreciation of cultural diversity lies at the heart of any…

  9. Institutional Level Student Engagement and Organisational Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the growing presence of market forces within higher education worldwide, universities are changing the way they engage with students. This article explores how a university's internal culture relates to engagement with students and their views. It builds on wider research into student engagement and organisational cultures. The…

  10. Institutional Level Student Engagement and Organisational Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the growing presence of market forces within higher education worldwide, universities are changing the way they engage with students. This article explores how a university's internal culture relates to engagement with students and their views. It builds on wider research into student engagement and organisational cultures. The…

  11. International Students' Culture Learning and Cultural Adaptation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Chiang, Shiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    This article examines international students' cultural adaptation at a major national university in China. A survey was designed to measure international students' adaptation to the Chinese sociocultural and educational environments in terms of five dimensions: (1) cultural empathy, (2) open-mindedness, (3) emotional stability, (4) social…

  12. `It's Her Body'. When Students' Argumentation Shows Displacement of Content in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander Arvola, Auli; Lundegård, Iann

    2012-12-01

    This paper approaches learning as a response instead of the acquisition of something previously expected. More specifically, it describes a process of argumentation on socioscientific issues in a classroom situation in school science amongst 15-year-old students in Sweden. The analysis of an argumentation on abortion in a science classroom highlights how science content becomes relevant to students' experiences, but also how the students' unique voices shift focus and cause displacement of the science content. The analysis demonstrates some of the tensions and possible conflicts that may lead to the exclusion of different voices. This paper argues that focusing the research or education on questions that argumentation brings to light creates interesting educational opportunities to identify and incorporate the students' experiences in the classroom. The results indicate, however, that students' spontaneous acts lead to some difficulties in finding a point of contact with the rational discourse of science education.

  13. Inter-Cultural Communication in Student Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    This article describes a project undertaken at the University of Southern Denmark designed to support active group work and inter-cultural communication between international students. The project is based on using group work and cooperative learning principles to do student research, therefore...... challenging the students to solve problems as a group. The main aim of the research is to investigate the possible effects of using integrated student research and group work using cooperative learning methods to develop international communication skills of students in multi-cultural higher education courses....

  14. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  15. We Say "Culture" and Students Say What? University Students' Definitions of Foreign Language Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Definitions of culture of 212 first-, second-, and third-year German students are presented and discussed. Results sow that--in terms of the national standards--students overall prefer practices and perspectives over products. Students views on the teachability of culture and its appropriate place in the foreign language classroom are explored.…

  16. Cultural Challenges Faced by Mexican Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugel, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This purpose of this investigation is to explore the cultural challenges faced by Mexican immigrant students through the study of current literature. Four themes emerged as a result of the investigation: dominant pedagogy, educational skills, deficit model, and student identities. The themes are discussed and suggestions are made as to how these…

  17. Conceptualizations of culture and cultural care among undergraduate nursing students: an exploration and critique of cultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Helen; Kalischuk, Ruth Grant

    2014-01-01

    Culture and cultural care have become important concepts in nursing education. However, little is known about what nursing students learn about these complex concepts. The purpose of this study was to explore and critique what nursing students learn about culture and cultural care. First and fourth year students were invited to participate in a focused ethnography to explore how nursing education might shape student knowledge of culture over time. Findings revealed that both groups of students supported the essentialist view of culture. Although students supported the ideals of cultural care, students remained unaware of critical views of culture.

  18. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  19. Student Participation in the Business Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, George J.

    1974-01-01

    A study is reported of 250 high school seniors who responded to 50 questionnaire items to determine their basic knowledge regarding business and economics, history, current events literature, and art and music. In the first three areas, students participated in the culture almost as much as high school educated adults. (SC)

  20. Relationship between school culture and students\\' performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between school culture and students\\' performance in French in ... Schools with a culture that favors teaching and learning French tend to ... and music festivals, French days, and cultural exchange programs, and by availing

  1. Developing Students' Cultural Awareness in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利

    2009-01-01

    The importance of cultural awareness in college English teaching has been noted by the author because it can help the students bridge the cultural differences between mother tongue and target language. Cultural essence of China and English-speaking countries is analyzed and some methods of developing college students' cultural awareness are introduced in this paper.

  2. Culture Portfolios Revisited: Feedback from Students and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Zsuzsanna I.; Byrd, David R.; Boovy, Bradley; Mohring, Anja

    2006-01-01

    Teaching culture in the foreign language (L2) classroom can be a real dilemma for instructors: What culture do we teach? What does it mean to learn about a culture? How can students learn culture? In order to answer these questions, we evaluated the strengths and weaknesses of two types of culture portfolios: a traditional one that used on-line…

  3. Improve Results of English Teaching Through Fostering Students' Cultural Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭秀梅

    2004-01-01

    This paper, based on recent overseas and home research findings and the author's teaching experiences,discusses the close relationship between culture background knowledge and English teaching, analyses the possible reasons for students' deficiency of culture background Knowledge, especially proposes several practical approaches of English teaching to help English teachers develop students' culture background knowledge so as to foster students' cultural competence and then improve the results of English teaching.

  4. Cultural influences for college student language brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Kim, Su Yeong; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Bersamin, Melina; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Children from immigrant families often translate communication for parents, a process known as language brokering (LB). LB begins in childhood, but may continue through emerging adulthood, even when individuals are in college. We surveyed 1,222 university students with two immigrant parents and compared non-language brokers, infrequent language brokers, and frequent language brokers on a variety of ethnic, cultural, and identity measures. Significant differences emerged for cultural heritage value orientation, ethnic identity, and dimensions of acculturation with frequent language brokers scoring highest, infrequent language brokers scoring in the middle, and non-language brokers scoring the lowest on these measures. There were no significant differences on acculturative stress among these three groups. These results suggest that LB experiences may contribute to the development of psychological assets for ethnic minority, emerging adults from immigrant families.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Two Globalization Projects on College Students' Cultural Competence and Cultural Intelligence (CQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange A.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural competence and CQ involve awareness of cultural similarities and differences, knowledge of differences in cultural values, and intercultural encounters. To assess college students' cultural competence and cultural intelligence gains, this experimental study evaluated the impact of two globalization projects on these two constructs. The…

  6. Teacher-Student Interactions under the Influence of Cultural Differences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between teachers and students are often influenced by the factor of cultural differences. The author mainly analyzes the American teacher-Chinese student interactions under the influence of cultural differences with the theory of Hofstede's four value dimensions. The author also puts forward some suggestions to promote cross-cultural communication in the classrooms.

  7. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  8. Culture-Loaded Expressions in Korean EFL Students' Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Yongjae Paul

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the inevitability of native culture-loaded expressions in Korean English-as-a-Foreign-Language students' compositions. Cultures, both native and target play a major role in forming ideas in any communicative situation. Thus, Korean EFL students' compositions all reveal without exception the traits of Korean culture. (Author/VWL)

  9. Quiet or Questioning? Students' Discussion Behaviors in Student-Centered Education across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M.; Driessen, Erik W.; Beh, Philip; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2014-01-01

    A tool used in student-centered education is discussion among students in small learning groups. The Western origin of student-centered education, coupled with cross-cultural differences in communication styles, may detract from its cross-cultural applicability. This study investigates how in student-centered education, students' cultural…

  10. The Ecological Culture of Russian and American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaeva, P. O.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative research data show that there is both a high level of ecological concern and a high level of ecological passivity among students in Russia, indicating that their ecological culture exists only on the symbolic level. The "green" culture of American college students, in contrast to that of Russia's college students, has…

  11. The Ecological Culture of Russian and American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaeva, P. O.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative research data show that there is both a high level of ecological concern and a high level of ecological passivity among students in Russia, indicating that their ecological culture exists only on the symbolic level. The "green" culture of American college students, in contrast to that of Russia's college students, has become…

  12. The Relationship between Teacher Cultural Competency and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Erin Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated teachers' cultural competency and their students' engagement within international high schools located in Hong Kong. Cultural competency is defined as a combination of knowledge about cultural groups as well as attitudes towards and skills for dealing with cultural diversity (Betancourt, 2003). The literature…

  13. Did cultural and artistic education in the Netherlands increase student participation in high cultural events?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, M.-L.; van Klaveren, C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether Cultural and Artistic Education that was implemented by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in 1999 caused students to participate more in high cultural events. A unique feature of the intervention was that students were free to choose the type of cultura

  14. Where the Two Shall Meet: Exploring the Relationship between Teacher Professional Culture and Student Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jennie M.; Higgins, Monica C.

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the understudied connection between teachers' and students' perceptions of school culture. Utilizing a longitudinal sample of approximately 130,000 students and 9000 teachers in 225 New York City traditional public schools, we investigate how professional culture among teachers intersects with students' collective emotional…

  15. Where the Two Shall Meet: Exploring the Relationship between Teacher Professional Culture and Student Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jennie M.; Higgins, Monica C.

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the understudied connection between teachers' and students' perceptions of school culture. Utilizing a longitudinal sample of approximately 130,000 students and 9000 teachers in 225 New York City traditional public schools, we investigate how professional culture among teachers intersects with students' collective emotional…

  16. Pharmacy students' perceptions of cultural competence encounters during practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-03-12

    To determine pharmacy students' perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations.

  17. Measurement of time-varying displacement fields in cell culture for traction force optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanobiology is an emerging field which seeks to link mechanical forces and properties to the behaviors of cells and tissues in cancer, stem cell growth, and other processes. Traction force microscopy (TFM) is an imaging technique that enables the study of traction forces exerted by cells on their environment to migrate as well as sense and manipulate their surroundings. To date, TFM research has been performed using incoherent imaging modalities and, until recently, has been largely confined to the study of cell-induced tractions within two-dimensions using highly artificial and controlled environments. As the field of mechanobiology advances, and demand grows for research in physiologically relevant 3D culture and in vivo models, TFM will require imaging modalities that support such settings. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging modality which enables 3D cellular resolution imaging in highly scattering environments. Moreover, optical coherence elastography (OCE) enables the measurement of tissue mechanical properties. OCE relies on the principle of measuring material deformations in response to artificially applied stress. By extension, similar techniques can enable the measurement of cell-induced deformations, imaged with OCM. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a natural extension and partner to existing OCM and OCE methods. We report the first use of OCM data and digital image correlation to track temporally varying displacement fields exhibited within a 3D culture setting. These results mark the first steps toward the realization of TF-OCM in 2D and 3D settings, bolstering OCM as a platform for advancing research in mechanobiology.

  18. Cultural minority students' experiences with intercultural competency in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyerzapf, Hannah; Abma, Tineke

    2017-05-01

    Medical schools increasingly value and focus on teaching students intercultural competency within present-day multicultural society. Little is known about the experiences of cultural minority students in intercultural competence activities. This article discusses the intercultural competence activities of medical education in a Dutch university from the perspective of cultural minority students. We will formulate recommendations for how to stimulate intercultural competency in, as well as inclusiveness of, medical education. A qualitative evaluation was performed within a medical school in the Netherlands. Data were collected through interviews (n = 23), a focus group (six participants) and participant observations (20 hours). Thematic analysis was performed. Cultural minority students experienced a lack of respect and understanding by cultural majority students and teachers. Education activities intended to transfer intercultural knowledge, address personal prejudice and stimulate intercultural sensitivity were perceived as stigmatising and as creating an unsafe climate for cultural minority students. Cultural minority and majority students on campus seemed segregated and the intercultural awareness of minority students was not integrated in intercultural competence activities. As cultural minority students were confronted with microaggressions, the medical school did not succeed in creating a safe education environment for all students. Contrary to their aims and intentions, intercultural competence activities had limited effect and seemed to support the polarisation of cultural minority and majority students and teachers. This can be seen as pointing towards a hidden curriculum privileging majority over minority students. For structural integration of intercultural competency in medical education, the focus must penetrate beyond curricular activities towards the critical addressing of the culture and structure of medical school. Collective commitment to

  19. Cultural diversity among nursing students: reanalysis of the cultural awareness scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rew, Lynn; Becker, Heather; Chontichachalalauk, Jiraporn; Lee, H Y

    2014-02-01

    Nurses are educated to provide culturally competent care. Cultural competence begins with cultural awareness, a concept previously measured with the Cultural Awareness Scale (CAS). The purpose of this study was to reanalyze the CAS to determine construct validity and differences in cultural awareness among students of varying educational levels and experiences. The sample consisted of 150 nursing students (92% female, 33.6% racial minorities). Confirmatory factor analysis yielded three factors (CFI = 0.868, TLI = 0.854, RMSEA = 0.065, and SRMR = 0.086). Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.70 to 0.89. There were significant differences among educational levels, with lower division BSN students generally scoring higher than upper division and master's of science in nursing students. Students who had taken courses on cultural diversity or global health generally outscored those who had not taken such courses. Findings support the validity of the CAS and its applicability to research studies of cultural awareness in nursing.

  20. Developing cultural intelligence: assessing the effect of the Ecotonos cultural simulation game for international business students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bücker, J.J.L.E.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we test the strength of a cross-cultural simulation game, Ecotonos, in the development of cultural intelligence (CQ) and self-efficacy amongst business students. Cross-cultural training is perceived as an important tool to help develop cross-cultural competence in international manage

  1. Culture's Consequences on Student Motivation: Capturing Cross-Cultural Universality and Variability through Personal Investment Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Culture influences basic motivational processes; however, Western theories of achievement motivation seem to have neglected the role of culture. They are inadequate when trying to explain student motivation and engagement across a wide range of cultural groups because they may not have the conceptual tools needed to handle culturally relevant…

  2. Culture's Consequences on Student Motivation: Capturing Cross-Cultural Universality and Variability through Personal Investment Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Culture influences basic motivational processes; however, Western theories of achievement motivation seem to have neglected the role of culture. They are inadequate when trying to explain student motivation and engagement across a wide range of cultural groups because they may not have the conceptual tools needed to handle culturally relevant…

  3. Developing cultural intelligence: assessing the effect of the Ecotonos cultural simulation game for international business students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bücker, J.J.L.E.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we test the strength of a cross-cultural simulation game, Ecotonos, in the development of cultural intelligence (CQ) and self-efficacy amongst business students. Cross-cultural training is perceived as an important tool to help develop cross-cultural competence in international

  4. Enriching the Student Experience Through a Collaborative Cultural Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy; Metcalfe, Sharon; Garner, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a knowledge and understanding of an international, collaborative, cultural learning model for students from the United States and Scotland. Internationalizing the student experience has been instrumental for student learning for the past eight years. Both countries have developed programs that have enriched and enhanced the overall student learning experience, mainly through the sharing of evidence-based care in both hospital and community settings. Student learning is at the heart of this international model, and through practice learning, leadership, and reflective practice, student immersion in global health care and practice is immense. Moving forward, we are seeking new opportunities to explore learning partnerships to provide this collaborative cultural learning experience.

  5. Occupational therapy students' perspectives regarding international cross-cultural experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Tamera Keiter; Burket, Allison; Deveney, Rebecca; Kennedy, Katelyn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspectives of occupational therapy students who have engaged in international, cross-cultural learning and service experiences. This study utilized a qualitative, phenomenological design. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with students who engaged in international learning opportunities. The interviews were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis approach. Three central themes emerged from the data analysis. Connectedness is the process of forming relationships with others while engaging in cross-cultural experiences. Students formed relationships with faculty, other students, and people within the community. Cultural awareness is the recognition and understanding of a different culture and responding to those differences. Students attempted to understand the new culture in comparison to their own lived experiences. Complexity portrays cross-cultural opportunities as dynamic, multi-faceted and intricate. This was demonstrated as the students raised additional questions about the conflict between their own culture and the new culture they entered. Students also identified limited orientation, support and structure with such experiences and the conflicting roles between volunteer, student, and team member. The ability to connect with others when building relationships in diverse cultural contexts held meaning for the students; however, the students also expressed conflict in trying to make sense of the new culture as it often challenged personal beliefs and constructs. The complexity and challenges of engaging in these opportunities needs to be recognized and further explored to assess how curricula and faculty best supports culturally responsive care. © 2011 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Technological Education as a Means of Developing Students' Health Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Luchinina, Anastasia O.; Ulengov, Ruslan A.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the research is due to the fact that health of school-age children in Russia is deteriorating. The development of health culture has become an integral part of students' general cultural development. The purpose of this article is to reveal the potential of "Technology" as a school subject for the development of students'…

  7. Using Cultural Assets to Enhance Assessment of Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganza, Joaquin S.; Godinez, Armando; Smith, Deidra; Gonzalez, Liliana G.; Robinson-Zañartu, Carol

    2015-01-01

    In assessment of Latino and other bilingual-bicultural students, culture and language are rarely seen as central; in contrast, they are often seen as peripheral. School psychologists infrequently consider the culture of the student to be integral to their assessment and seldom consider it as a source of learning-related assets. However, when the…

  8. How to Cultivate the Student's Cultural Awareness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    tian xiu ying

    2008-01-01

    Language and culture are inseparable and cultural awareness must be integrated with language teaching. How to cultivate the learners' cultural awareness is an important issue that we have to carry out in teaching practice in China.

  9. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  10. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience.

  11. What Relief Agencies Should Know about the Educational Rights of Children and Youth Displaced by Disaster. Connecting Schools and Displaced Students Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    After disasters, displaced families long to return to a sense of normalcy. As such, reconnecting children and youth to school is especially important during this time. By providing the structure of the educational setting, schools can help children and youth overcome the trauma of a disaster and regain their academic and social stability. Once…

  12. Teaching Strategies to Increase Cultural Awareness in Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneman, William

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence education is essential for all nurses to better prepare them to address the underlying social environment of patients, families, and communities. This article describes a study with second degree nursing students that tested 6 teaching strategies for their effectiveness in raising cultural awareness, a key aspect of cultural competence. The results demonstrated that the interventions had a positive effect.

  13. Developing Students' Cultural Intelligence through an Experiential Learning Activity: A Cross-Cultural Consumer Behavior Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpis, Lada Helen; Hunter, James

    2017-01-01

    Business schools can increase their competitiveness by offering students intercultural skills development opportunities integrated into the traditional curricula. This article makes a contribution by proposing an approach to developing students' cultural intelligence that is based on the cultural intelligence (CQ) model, experiential learning…

  14. Inequities of Intervention among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Although Response to Intervention (RTI) has been generally studied in relation to student outcomes, the system itself requires further study, particularly for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. CLD students have consistently suffered inequities in the educational system, including over representation in high incidence disability…

  15. Exploring College Students' Cultural View from a Knowledge Creation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Guo-Tsai; Hong, Huang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate college students' cultural views. To this end, an exploratory study was implemented, and data mainly came from students' essay writing (via individual reflective activities) and focused group discussion (via collective reflective activities). The participants were 176 college students taking a…

  16. Culturally Sensitive Mentoring for Asian International Students in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Saltzman, Jeeseon; Wada, Kaori; Mogami, Tamiko

    2012-01-01

    With growing attention to the internationalization of counseling psychology in the past decade, discussion on effective training of international students is much-needed. In order to provide effective mentorship to international students, the mentor needs to be aware of specific challenges faced by international students and cultural differences…

  17. Negotiating L2 Culture: Useful Strategies for Helping Younger Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Learning to speak another language requires students to adopt new ways of thinking. Some teachers believe that students can assimilate idiomatic expressions and cultural turns of phrase simply through the teacher's use and the students' practice. Others work to explicitly show the difference between the target language and native language, as if…

  18. A Study of Junior Students'Cross- Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension%A Study of Junior Students' Cross-Culture Obstacles in English Reading Comprehension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雅琴

    2015-01-01

    This paper will research Junior students' cross-cultural obstacles in English reading from the perspective of culture background,Eliminating Junior students'cross-cultural barriers can improve intercultural communication competent.

  19. "It's Her Body". When Students' Argumentation Shows Displacement of Content in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander Arvola, Auli; Lundegard, Iann

    2012-01-01

    This paper approaches learning as a response instead of the acquisition of something previously expected. More specifically, it describes a process of argumentation on socioscientific issues in a classroom situation in school science amongst 15-year-old students in Sweden. The analysis of an argumentation on abortion in a science classroom…

  20. Cross-cultural adaptation and Chinese students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This contribution goes into the experiences of Chinese students studying at universities abroad. In the host societies they find themselves having to deal with major cultural confusion, which frustrates their education. Individualism and independence are characteristics strongly embedded in modern

  1. Intangible Culture, Cooperation and Intercultural Dialogue among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Susana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on intercultural competence and dialogue across cultural borders between university students from different Portuguese-speaking countries. Various principles and strategies for intercultural education are summarised, and the project "cultures@esec", based on such principles and strategies, is described. The project was…

  2. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  3. Cultural Capital and Distinction: Aspirations of the "Other" Foreign Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, I. Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived role of UK international education as foreign cultural capital, obtained outside the UK, in facilitating middle-class social mobility. Drawing on interviews with students in Malaysia, it extends Bourdieu's concept of cultural capital to explain understandings of the rewards and limitations of undertaking UK…

  4. Creativity and Giftedness in Culturally Diverse Students. Perspectives on Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Giselle B., Ed.; Houtz, John C., Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this text address issues concerned with identification and educational intervention with gifted students who are from culturally diverse backgrounds. Chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse School Population in the United States" (Angela Reyes-Carrasquillo); (2) "Culturally…

  5. Online cultural competency education for millennial dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lorraine; Hanes, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Teaching cultural competence is now an educational requirement for U.S. dental curricula to meet 2013 accreditation standards. The question now is, given time restrictions, limited resources, and budget constraints faced by the majority of dental schools, how can they provide effective cultural competency education to prepare future dental professionals? An additional concern regarding instruction is the recent focus on techniques to engage Millennial learners since this generation is characterized as technologically savvy with a preference for multimedia and general dislike of traditional lectures. With these issues in mind, Georgia Regents University developed Healthy Perspectives, an online, interactive course in cultural competence designed to engage Millennial students. Both before and after the course, the students were asked to complete a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Of the eighty-eight students in the course (eighty-one first-year dental students and seven entering radiology students), seventy-one completed the questionnaire both before and after the course, for an 81 percent response rate. Seventy-five students also completed the course evaluation. The pre and post questionnaires showed statistically significant gains for students across the four primary areas of self-awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Student evaluations of the course were generally positive, particularly regarding content, but somewhat surprisingly their assessment of the interactive components (which were designed to meet generational expectations) was ambivalent.

  6. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  7. Exploring First-Year College Students' Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    The development of college students' cultural competence is important in an increasingly diverse world. This exploratory, qualitative, action research study examined how 158 first-year students understood and applied core concepts after participating in a standardized diversity and social justice lesson plan designed using transformative education…

  8. The Influence of Selected Elements of Schools Culture on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... This study was conducted on the elements of school culture which are teachers' .... It is now empirically believed that if you want to improve schools, .... of these problems are: increased student needs as the number of students from diverse ... behaviours evolve in the workplace, as group norms result in ...

  9. Experimenting with a Visible Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction in Agar Gel and Observing Copper Crystal Growth Patterns to Engage Student Interest and Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Meifen; Wang, Xiaogang; Yang, Yangyiwei; Shi, Xiang; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    The reaction process of copper-aluminum displacement in agar gel was observed at the microscopic level with a stereomicroscope; pine-like branches of copper crystals growing from aluminum surface into gel at a constant rate were observed. Students were asked to make hypotheses on the pattern formation and design new research approaches to prove…

  10. Overview of teaching strategies for cultural competence in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tracey B

    2012-01-01

    Multiple curricular approaches are being used to teach cultural competency to nursing students in the United States in accordance with accrediting board standards. As nurse educators are searching for evidence based teaching practices, this article reviews the most commonly current teaching methods being used. Although a variety of methods are being implemented, little empirical evidence exists to suggest any one methodology for teaching cultural competency for nursing students produces significantly better outcomes. The use of clinical experiences, standardized patients and immersion experiences have produced the most favorable results which increase student awareness, knowledge and confidence in working with ethnically diverse patients.

  11. Assessing medical student cultural competence: what really matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Mayo, Rachel M; Truong, Khoa D; Pribonic, Anne P; Schalkoff, Christine A

    2016-07-30

    The study aimed to explore medical students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients, specifically: to assess students' levels of knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos; to determine students' exposure to and previous experience with Latinos; and to evaluate whether factors such as study abroad, living abroad, previous clinical experience with Latinos, and language proficiency predict Latino knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos. This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were third and fourth year medical students at three medical schools in the Southeastern United States. Three composite measures: Latino knowledge, Cultural competence, and Comfort with Latino patients, were predicted in a multivariate regression model including individual sociodemographic characteristics and past clinical or social experience with Latinos. A total of 170 medical students completed the survey (43% response rate). Spanish language proficiency was a statistically significant predictor (t(131)=2.72, pcultural competence. Previous clinical experience with Latinos was not significantly associated with the three composite dependent variables, and comfort with Latino patients was not significantly predicted by any of the six Latino-related explanatory variables. Factors prior to medical school matriculation and during medical education may contribute to increased cultural competence and comfort with multicultural patients. Cultural patient-partner programs may be an effective way to increase cultural competence within the confines of medical school curricula.

  12. Chinese engineering students' cross-cultural adaptation in graduate school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinquan

    This study explores cross-cultural adaptation experience of Chinese engineering students in the U.S. I interact with 10 Chinese doctoral students in engineering from a public research university through in-depth interviews to describe (1) their perceptions of and responses to key challenges they encountered in graduate school, (2) their perspectives on the challenges that stem from cross-cultural differences, and (3) their conceptualization of cross-cultural adaptation in the context of graduate school. My findings reveal that the major challenges participants encounter during graduate school are academic issues related to cultural differences and difficulties of crossing cultural boundaries and integrating into the university community. These challenges include finding motivation for doctoral study, becoming an independent learner, building a close relationship with faculty, interacting and forming relationships with American people, and gaining social recognition and support. The engineering students in this study believe they are less successful in their social integration than they are in accomplishing academic goals, mainly because of their preoccupation with academics, language barriers and cultural differences. The presence of a large Chinese student community on campus has provided a sense of community and social support for these students, but it also contributes to diminishing their willingness and opportunities to interact with people of different cultural backgrounds. Depending on their needs and purposes, they have different insights into the meaning of cross-cultural adaptation and therefore, and choose different paths to establish themselves in a new environment. Overall, they agree that cross-cultural adaptation involves a process of re-establishing themselves in new academic, social, and cultural communities, and adaptation is necessary for their personal and professional advancement in the U.S. They also acknowledge that encountering and adjusting

  13. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society.

  14. Influence of Cultural Belief and Values on Secondary School Students' Understanding of Atmospheric Related Physics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Theodora Olufunke

    2015-01-01

    The study identified the different cultural concepts that secondary school students' believe in and determined the belief and idea of students about the cultural concepts. It also investigated students' source of information about the cultural concepts and determined the influence of these cultural believes on students' academic performance in…

  15. The organizational culture. A students' survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dana Adriana Lupsa-Tataru

    2016-01-01

      The paper is focused on presenting the main results of a study conducted on a sample of 300 students from a university remaining anonymous, regarding their attitudes and opinions about the values...

  16. World Language Students' Ethnographic Investigations of Culture through Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry G.; Tuttle, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    World language teachers can transform how their students learn culture through the use of mobile devices. When world language students use their mobile devices to access authentic current culture, they go from being passive receivers of culture to active cultural investigators. These students go from learning thin surface culture to exploring…

  17. Chinese Culture in ELT Classroom-The Influence of Chinese Culture on Student's Answering Questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁玲萍

    2005-01-01

    Based on personal observation and students self-reports,this article studies the characteristics presented by students in answering questions.It is found that Chinese culture plays an important part in explaining their specific behaviors. Hence, in order to lessen the negative effect of it,the author offers her own suggestions.

  18. Socio-Demographic Factors Affecting Levels of Cultural and Non-Cultural Prejudice: Comparing Korean, Chinese, and Japanese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young; Lee, Jeeyon

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how socio-demographic factors related to the levels of cultural and non-cultural prejudice among college students from Korea, China, and Japan. We used data collected from the Asian Value Survey. The main findings are as follows. First, Chinese students showed the lowest levels of cultural and non-cultural prejudice. Second,…

  19. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    Displacement ventilation is an interesting new type of air distribution principle which should be considered in connection with design of comfort ventilation in both smal1 and large spaces. Research activities on displacement ventilation are large all over the world and new knowledge of design...... methods appears continuously. This book gives an easy introduction to the basis of displacement ventilation and the chapters are written in the order which is used in a design procedure. The main text is extended by five appendices which show some of the new research activities taking place at Aalborg...

  20. The Cultural Politics of Mixed-Income Schools and Housing: A Racialized Discourse of Displacement, Exclusion, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I examine the contested and racially coded cultural politics of creating mixed-income schools in mixed-income communities. Policymakers claim deconcentrating low-income people will reduce poverty and improve education. However, based on activist research in Chicago, I argue these policies are grounded in "culture of…

  1. A Brief Study on Culture Shock over Overseas Students and the Solution to New Cultural Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维

    2014-01-01

    Culture shock is one of the common experiences by students and people abroad. They may experience the feeling of anxiety, disorientation, confusion, and even hostility because of misunderstanding to each other.“Culture shock”refers to the phenomenon in which people engage in the interaction feel depressed, discomfortable, etc. Culture shock may be caused by the conflict of various value systems when students and people enter a new culture and other value system. Culture shock is also a consequence of the influence of the negative life event. The changes in one ’s life and lack of support from family members, friends will make them more vulnerable and cause great discomfort in the new environment.

  2. Speech Therapy and the Culturally Different Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ann H.

    Educators and psychologists whose concern is to understand why a student does not succeed in school have held the view that speakers of nonstandard English are either nonverbal and, if verbal, highly ungrammatical, or so verbally destitute as to impair intellectual functioning. Linguists, on the other hand, view the language of subculture groups…

  3. Student nurses' experiences of living and studying in a different culture to their own and the development of cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi

    With the increase of culturally diverse people residing in Denmark, it has become imperative to provide student nurses with knowledge and skills that will enable them to become culturally sensitive in order interact effectively with clients from culturally diverse backgrounds. The aim of this study...... was to explore whether student nurses develop cultural sensitivity as a consequence of living and studying in a culture that is different from their own. Seven Danish student nurses who had participated in student exchanges in Jamaica, Australia, Malta and Greenland took part in this study. A qualitative...... characteristics of openness and flexibility and support networks facilitated the students transition and adjustment to the host culture. Reflection on their experiences with students from a similar background to themselves and clinical mentors from the host culture assisted the students in their understanding...

  4. How does a Culture of Learning Impact on Student Behaviour?

    OpenAIRE

    Fransa Weeks

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Despite the need for a culture of learning in South African schools, research reveal that it is not generally encountered. Research also indicates the manifestation of student behavior problems constraining effective learning. Approach: This research study was directed at determining if a link existed between behavior problems and a lack of a culture of learning. The research approach adopted constituted a literature study and a qualitative based, narrative inquiry at a sch...

  5. THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE SPECIFIC TO THE STUDENT-CENTRED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Dorel Rosca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present socio-economic realities demand the necessity of a paradigm change in the Romanian academic education, in order to promote the student centred education at strategic and operational level. This could not be accomplished without promoting a specific organizational culture. This would change the role of the universities from the diploma providers to value competence and providers for the employee and/or entrepreneur status of the students and also for their status as responsible citizens. The conclusions of the paper will help the decision factors of the upper educational system in Romania to be aware of the importance of promoting the organizational culture specific to the student-centred education as a condition of increasing the satisfaction of all the stakeholders involved (employer, teacher, student with considerable benefits for the universities and the Romanian economy's competitiveness.

  6. Enhancing cultural awareness education for undergraduate medical students: Initial findings from a unique cultural immersion activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Sargeant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cultural awareness education is mandatory for medical programs, with particular emphasis on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. However, there is limited evidence to measure the impact of such education has on medical students. Aims This paper presents the development and delivery of a cultural immersion activity for first year undergraduate medical students. Additionally we explore how this type of activity may improve attitudes, comprehension and perceived competence relating to working with and understanding people of different cultures. Methods A pre- and post-survey design was utilised in connection with a cultural immersion activity. First year medical students (N=284, responses 196, 69 per cent from three cohorts (2012–2014 inclusive voluntarily completed a cultural awareness questionnaire, which contained items that related to perceptions, personal characteristics and educational competence. The main outcome measures were changes in perceived cultural knowledge, awareness, beliefs and attitudes. Data were analysed using principal component analysis and obtained means comparison. Results Principal component analysis revealed five dimensions for pre-post comparison: Knowledge Acquisition, Perceptions of Role Modelling, Internal Beliefs and Reflections, Personality Variables and Institutional Influences. Non-parametric means comparison showed increased ratings for knowledge acquisition and institutional influences (p<0.001, whilst a decline was noted for the personality variables (p<0.05. Conclusion Cultural immersion has great potential to elicit positive shifts in attitudinal and knowledge related aspects of cultural awareness at early stages in medical curricula. Negative directions also suggest that students question their beliefs and behaviours relating to cultural knowledge.

  7. Exploring dental students' perceptions of cultural competence and social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W; Rustveld, Luis O; Weyant, Robert J; Close, John M

    2008-10-01

    The improvement of basic cultural competency skills and the creation of a greater community-minded spirit among dental students are important parts of dental education. The purpose of our study was to assess changes in dental students' attitudes and beliefs about community service and changes in cultural competencies after participation in a two-year program of non-dental community service (Student Community Outreach Program and Education, SCOPE). During 2003-07, two identical twenty-eight-item surveys were administered to SCOPE participants/completers. In the first, students reported on their attitudes after program completion. In the second, students reported retrospectively on their attitudes prior to starting the program. One hundred twenty-six post- and pre-intervention surveys were matched and assessed for changes in student attitudes after program participation. Based on factor analysis, four distinct scales were identified: 1) community service, 2) cultural competence, 3) communication, and 4) treatment perspective. Over time, statistically significant changes (pstudent attitudes and beliefs were found for scales 1 (p=.017), 2 (p=.001), and 3 (borderline significance, p=.057). Scale 4 showed no significant difference (p=.108). These scales indicate main focus areas to help guide future dentists in acquiring relevant sociocultural competencies and enabling community-minded attitudes. Overall, this study provides support for the addition of a non-dental community service-learning program into the preclinical curriculum.

  8. IS CHC student surface learner A cross-cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佩绮

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, the "CH"(Confucian Heritage Culture)learner phenomenon had aroused the interest of sociologists, educators and psychologists. Examination orientation, achievement orientation, use of repetitive learning, synthesis of memorization and understanding, and the use of recitation to bring about sharp focus for better understanding were some of the themes of these researches. This paper will explain what the general paradox of CHC learners is and how cultural difference can affect students' motivation for learning according to Chen and Stevenson's model of cultural influence, and discuss the major misconception of CHC learners' study approach.

  9. Assessment of patient safety culture: what tools for medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaneliere, M; Jacquet, F; Occelli, P; Touzet, S; Siranyan, V; Colin, C

    2016-09-29

    The assessment of patient safety culture refers mainly to surveys exploring the perceptions of health professionals in hospitals. These surveys have less relevance when considering the assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students, especially at university or medical school. They are indeed not fully integrated in care units and constitute a heterogeneous population. This work aimed to find appropriate assessment tools of the patient safety culture of medical students. Systematic review of the literature. Surveys related to a care unit were excluded. A typology of the patient safety culture of medical students was built from the included surveys. Eighteen surveys were included. In our typology of patient safety culture of medical students (15 dimensions), the number of dimensions explored by survey (n) ranged from 1 to 12, with 6 "specialized" tools (n ≤ 4) and 12 "global" tools (N ≥ 5). These surveys have explored: knowledge about patient safety, acknowledgment of the inevitability of human error, the lack of skills as the main source of errors, the errors reporting systems, disclosure of medical errors to others health professionals or patients, teamwork and patient involvement to improve safety in care. We recommend using Wetzel's survey for making an overall assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students at university. In a specific purpose-e.g. to assess an educational program on medical error disclosure-the authors recommend to determine which dimensions of patient safety will be taught, to select the best assessment tool. Learning on patient safety should however be considered beyond the university. International translations of tools are required to create databases allowing comparative studies.

  10. Culturally capable and culturally safe: Caseload care for Indigenous women by Indigenous midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R; Gamble, J; Kelly, J; Milne, T; Duffy, E; Sidebotham, M

    2016-12-01

    Evidence is emerging of the benefits to students of providing continuity of midwifery care as a learning strategy in midwifery education, however little is known about the value of this strategy for midwifery students. To explore Indigenous students' perceptions of providing continuity of midwifery care to Indigenous women whilst undertaking a Bachelor of Midwifery. Indigenous Bachelor of Midwifery students' experiences of providing continuity of midwifery care to Indigenous childbearing women were explored within an Indigenous research approach using a narrative inquiry framework. Participants were three Indigenous midwifery students who provided continuity of care to Indigenous women. Three interconnected themes; facilitating connection, being connected, and journeying with the woman. These themes contribute to the overarching finding that the experience of providing continuity of care for Indigenous women creates a sense of personal affirmation, purpose and a validation of cultural identity in Indigenous students. Midwifery philosophy aligns strongly with the Indigenous health philosophy and this provides a learning platform for Indigenous student midwives. Privileging Indigenous culture within midwifery education programs assists students develop a sense of purpose and affirms them in their emerging professional role and within their community. The findings from this study illustrate the demand for, and pertinence of, continuity of care midwifery experiences with Indigenous women as fundamental to increasing the Indigenous midwifery workforce in Australia. Australian universities should provide this experience for Indigenous student midwives. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Poor Reading Culture: A Barrier to Students' Patronage of Libraries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    causes of poor reading culture of students in secondary schools. It was also revealed ... education received then. Patronage of school ... poverty as well as providing one with the liberty for all round development. For effective and ... According to Nzeako (1982), the ability to read is a skill that a person can develop or acquire ...

  12. Promoting a Positive Cross-Cultural Identity: Reaching Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Virginia M.; Huang, Cindy W.; McIntyre, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically different youth bring strength and talents but also experience "acculturation stress" and psychosocial concerns as they attempt to adapt to their new surroundings. This article provides strategies to help educators better relate to immigrant students, more effectively address their educational needs, and assist them…

  13. What's in a Name? Honoring Students' Cultural Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavigan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    A name is one of the first things one learns about people. Many times the first word a young child learns is his or her name. Furthermore, names often serve as an indicator of a person's cultural identity. Unfortunately, for many English Language Learners (ELLs) and other students who immigrate to America, a name can be an embarrassment rather…

  14. Students Awareness towards Traditional Cultural Dances in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad R. Albattat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has many ethnic groups, and each ethnic group has own custom and tradition that most Malaysians are not aware, especially traditional dances. Among the Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, situated in the Borneo Island have the most diverse ethnic groups in Sarawak. It has more than 30 ethnic groups. Each of the ethnic groups has its own language, cultures and lifestyle. In this regards, this research focuses on the main ethnic groups of Sarawak which are Orang Ulu, Malays, Melanau, Bidayuh, Chinese and Ibans. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of awareness among the Management and Science University (MSU students regarding their level of awareness and knowledge about traditional dances of Sarawak. The data were gathered by distributing questionnaires among MSU students. The data were then analysed using SPSS system version 18.0. Results concluded that, most of MSU students have limited knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. Interests, internet, performing arts clubs and family background are the independent variable factors to learn and gain knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. The level of awareness among MSU students towards Sarawak traditional dances can be enhanced through events and special occasions to increase level of awareness towards Sarawak cultures. The government plays a major role in introducing Sarawak cultures to the whole of Malaysia. Future studies could focus on factors that influence the level of awareness towards Sarawak traditional dances, and the contribution of Sarawak’s traditional dances to Malaysia’s cultural and heritage tourism.

  15. Towards an International Culture: Gen Y Students and SNS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a small-scale investigation into the Internet user behaviour of generation Y (Gen Y) students, with particular reference to social networking sites. The study adds to the literature on cross-cultural Internet user behaviour with specific reference to Gen Y and social networking. It compares how a cohort of…

  16. Perceived Cultural Competence Levels in Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volberding, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As the patient population continues to diversify, it is essential that athletic training students (ATSs) are educated to provide culturally competent care. This high-quality health care within the context of a patient's race, ethnicity, language, religious beliefs, or behaviors is a foundation of professional practice. Objective:…

  17. The International Mobility of Chinese Students: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anyone hoping to understand China and Chinese people's behaviour in the present day must examine China's long history and culture, as these often have crystallized into current behavioural patterns. This paper discusses one important push-out factor for Chinese students' outbound mobility, and an element that is ignored in many futuristic…

  18. "Knowing Your Students" in the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Robyn; Saltmarsh, David

    2016-01-01

    The population movement of globalization brings greater cultural and linguistic diversity (CALD) to communities and education systems. To address the growing diversity in school classrooms, beginning teachers need an expanded set of skills and attitudes to support effective learning. It is an expectation today that teachers know their students and…

  19. Applying Cultural Project Based Learning to Develop Students' Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawati, Lulus

    2015-01-01

    Writing is considered to be the most demanding and difficult skill for many college students, since there are some steps to be followed such as prewriting, drafting, editing, revising and publishing. The interesting topic like culture including lifestyle, costume, and custom is necessary to be offered in Academic Writing class. Accordingly, this…

  20. Cultural Considerations in Advising Latino/a Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni-Rodriguez, Lirio K.; Dicks, Barbara A.; Morales, Julio

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model for advising Latino/a students in graduate social work programs. The model is based on ecological-systemic and empowerment theory and ascribes to the social work values and cultural competence standards proposed by the National Association of Social Workers. It has been developed within an institution that has sought…

  1. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  2. Prosocial Behaviour and Political Culture among Australian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lawrence J.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the extent to which forms of prosocial behaviour and values of social responsibility are related to various domains of political culture among Australian youth. Using data from a survey of 1311 senior secondary students from the ACT and South Australia, it was found that 14 per cent had participated in one or more volunteer…

  3. Picture this! Using photovoice to facilitate cultural competence in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    The use of digital images is a prevalent practice in today's society, especially in social media. Photovoice is a qualitative research methodology used to express the experiences of participants from a variety of populations. Photovoice can be utilized as a teaching and learning tool to facilitate cultural competence among undergraduate nursing students.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation and Chinese students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This contribution goes into the experiences of Chinese students studying at universities abroad. In the host societies they find themselves having to deal with major cultural confusion, which frustrates their education. Individualism and independence are characteristics strongly embedded in modern W

  5. Race and Cultural Flexibility among Students in Different Multiracial Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Prudence L.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: One of the most critical functions of a well-integrated school is the development of "culturally flexible" students who, over the course of their social development, effectively navigate diverse social environs such as the workplace, communities, and neighborhoods. Most studies, albeit with some exceptions, have…

  6. Towards an International Culture: Gen Y Students and SNS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a small-scale investigation into the Internet user behaviour of generation Y (Gen Y) students, with particular reference to social networking sites. The study adds to the literature on cross-cultural Internet user behaviour with specific reference to Gen Y and social networking. It compares how a cohort of…

  7. Connecting Student and Subject Matter: The Cultural Artifact Discussion Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sanders, Alane K.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a class activity where students work in dyads to select an artifact related to a course topic and, using this artifact, develop discussion questions to engage their classmates. This cultural artifact assignment is intended to, in part, answer John Dewey's call to cultivate connections between subject matter and life…

  8. Cross-Cultural Simulation to Advance Student Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Sue; Sammon, Sheila; Justice, Christopher; Cuneo, Carl; Miller, Stefania; Rice, James; Roy, Dale; Warry, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews how and why the authors have used the cross-cultural simulation BAFA BAFA in a 1st-year social sciences inquiry course on social identity. The article discusses modifications made to Shirts's original script for BAFA BAFA, how the authors conduct the postsimulation debriefing, key aspects of the student-written reflection of…

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation and Chinese students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This contribution goes into the experiences of Chinese students studying at universities abroad. In the host societies they find themselves having to deal with major cultural confusion, which frustrates their education. Individualism and independence are characteristics strongly embedded in modern W

  10. Creating Culturally-Safe Schools for Maori Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Angus; Glynn, Ted; Cavanagh, Tom; Bateman, Sonja

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the present trends in New Zealand's schooling contexts, there is a clarion call for educators to develop sensitivity and sensibility towards the cultural backgrounds and experiences of Maori students. This paper reports on the work of four scholars who share research that has been undertaken in educational settings…

  11. Attitudes of college music students towards noise in youth culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesky, Kris; Pair, Marla; Lanford, Scott; Yoshimura, Eri

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of a hearing loss prevention program within a college may be dependent on attitudes among students majoring in music. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes of music majors toward noise and to compare them to students not majoring in music. Participants ( N = 467) filled out a questionnaire designed to assess attitudes toward noise in youth culture and attitudes toward influencing their sound environment. Results showed that students majoring in music have a healthier attitude toward sound compared to students not majoring in music. Findings also showed that music majors are more aware and attentive to noise in general, likely to perceive sound that may be risky to hearing as something negative, and are more likely to carry out behaviors to decrease personal exposure to loud sounds. Due to these differences, music majors may be more likely than other students to respond to and benefit from a hearing loss prevention program.

  12. The Day Bolivian Students Came to School Motivating Students through Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Like many elementary foreign language teachers, the author traveled from room to room to teach. Each room had different materials and a different classroom culture. This article describes how the author taught her students about Bolivia and how to motivate them through culture. It discusses a service-learning project that brings life-changing…

  13. Student exchange for nursing students: does it raise cultural awareness'? A descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Doris M; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-05-01

    With free movement for citizens within the European Union and with distant parts of our globe becoming more accessible, cultural awareness and cultural competence are becoming important skills for nurses. Internationalisation and raising awareness of other cultural contexts are essential elements in Swedish higher education, thus explaining the variety of student exchange programmes that are available. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish nursing students' perceptions of student exchange and their experiences. Data were collected through group interviews and then analysed following the principles of content analysis. Our analysis resulted in three categories: Preparing to go abroad, Reasons for going abroad and From expectation to experience. Cultural aspects and cultural awareness were emphasised as strong motivational factors, both personal and professional, behind participation in student exchange programmes. Information was also highlighted as a crucial means of reaching potential students as well as the power of knowledge through personal experience. This study highlights the importance of student exchange in expanding the individual student's personal and professional horizons. It also stresses the importance of including a transcultural nursing element in nursing curricula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mobile Learning in the Institution of Higher Learning for Malaysia students : Culture Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2011-01-01

    ...; culture dimensions; and user readiness to accept the mobile learning technology. Currently, there is a lack of research about culture aspects to improve mobile learning and university students...

  15. Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Mattsson, Magnus; Sandberg, Mats

    Full-scale experiments were made in a displacement ventilated room with two breathing thermal manikins to study the effect of movements and breathing on the vertical contaminant distribution, and on the personal exposure of occupants. Concentrations were measured with tracer gas equipment...

  16. Interface of culture, insecurity and HIV and AIDS: Lessons from displaced communities in Pader District, Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwiringira Japheth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Northern Uganda unlike other rural regions has registered high HIV prevalence rates comparable to those of urbanized Kampala and the central region. This could be due to the linkages of culture, insecurity and HIV. We explored community perceptions of HIV and AIDS as a problem and its inter-linkage with culture and insecurity in Pader District. Methods A cross sectional qualitative study was conducted in four sub-counties of Pader District, Uganda between May and June 2008. Data for the study were collected through 12 focus group discussions (FGDs held separately; 2 FGDs with men, 6 FGDs with women, and 4 FGDs with the youth (2 for each sex. In addition we conducted 15 key informant interviews with; 3 health workers, 4 community leaders at village and parish levels, 3 persons living with HIV and 5 district officials. Data were analysed using the content thematic approach. This process involved identification of the study themes and sub-themes following multiple reading of interview and discussion transcripts. Relevant quotations per thematic area were identified and have been used in the presentation of study findings. Results The struggles to meet the basic and survival needs by individuals and households overshadowed HIV as a major community problem. Conflict and risky sexual related cultural practices were perceived by communities as major drivers of HIV and AIDS in the district. Insecurity had led to congestion in the camps leading to moral decadence, rape and defilement, prostitution and poverty which increased vulnerability to HIV infection. The cultural drivers of HIV and AIDS were; widow inheritance, polygamy, early marriages, family expectations, silence about sex and alcoholism. Conclusions Development partners including civil society organisations, central government, district administration, religious and cultural leaders as well as other stakeholders should mainstream HIV in all community development and

  17. [Patient safety culture - knowledge and knowledge needs of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennessen, B; Swart, E; Marx, Y

    2013-12-01

    Ten years after the publication of "To Err is Human" in November1999, the development of patient safety efforts has been summa-rised in the statement "Ten years later, a million lives lost, billions of dollars wasted." This leads to the question why, despite evidence-based mea-sures for greater patient safety, they are not implemented or only implemented on a small scale. One approach to promote patient safety is the implementation of a safety culture. Such a safety culture is based on knowledge of employees about safe behaviour and their willingness to implement it. In this context it is interesting to explore the knowledge and the needs of medical students concerning patient safety. At the University of -Magdeburg 354 medical students in their clinical semesters were asked about their knowledge of specific recommendations on patient safety and about their attitude to patient safety and risk man-agement as well as their subjective need for knowledge on this subject. Only 16.7 % of the PJ (practical year) students and 11.7 % of students in all other clinical semester indicated to know the recommenda-tions for patient safety. This correlated with the answers to questions about single recommenda-tions. The importance of risk management during medical education was considered to be important by 53.3 % of the students of all clinical semesters and in particular 80.6 % of the surveyed PJ students. The answers to most questions showed a high demand for general information on patient safety. This is seen throughout all questions, especially with increasing clinical experience, and the need for information on single recommendations, such as critical incident reporting systems (CIRS), or Team Time Out. The establishment of a safety culture is described as a useful way to fewer patient injuries. This includes knowledge on recommendations for patient safety, which may contribute to the implementation of a safety culture to reduce medical errors. Our survey shows the

  18. Cross-Cultural Homestays: An Analysis of College Students' Responses After Living in an Unfamiliar Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roger M.; Dold, Eugene

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to investigate the effects of a cross-cultural homestay program on students' attitudes and health. Available from: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Transaction Periodicals Consortium, Rutgers-The State University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903. (MH)

  19. Cultural Capital and Educational Strategies. Shaping Boundaries between Groups of Students with Homologous Cultural Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzalis, Marco; Porcu, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    Rather than assessing its causal effect on educational attainment, the authors of this article aim to use the concept of cultural capital to define a huge, complex and interconnected collection of educational and school strategies adopted by students and families and to examine the way that these strategies are related to school inequalities. Data…

  20. A Culture of Success--Examining School Culture and Student Outcomes via a Performance Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlson, Matthew; Swanson, Anne; Adams-Manning, Andrea; Byrd, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This study is a report of the relationship between a collaborative school culture, teacher quality and the influence these variables have upon student attendance and suspensions. The research is based upon data gathered from 50 public schools throughout the southeastern United States. Surveys were administered to examine teacher quality…

  1. Examining Culture's Impact on the Learning Behaviors of International Students from Confucius Culture Studying in Western Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of shared understanding of how culture impacts learning in online environment. Utilizing document analysis, the authors in this research study culture's impact on the learning behaviors of student sojourners from Confucius culture studying in Western online learning context. The shared understandings of Confucius culture and…

  2. A cultural congruence test for primary school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayanova L. F.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this article relies on the principles of the cultural-historical theory, which defines cultural impact as the main driving force behind psychological development. Based on the assumption that culture is a set of normative situations, the study identifies rules that are typical for primary school students in big Russian cities. These rules are grouped into what we refer to as factors of cultural compliance, which ultimately can be seen as indicators of pupils’ cultural congruence. In specifying the cultural congruence of primary school students, we take into account not only the rules of school life but also the whole range of stable rules for children 7- to 10-years-old. Researchers at the Psychology Institute of the Higher University of the Chinese Academy of Science (Wang, Zhu, & Shi, 2011 call such rules usual or contextually usual. We include rules that govern the behavior of children who have cultural differences, so in this article we are talking about the rules that are typical for children of this age in Russia. The goal of the study was to develop a test to diagnose the level of cultural congruence. The test was exposed to psychometric evaluation for validity, reliability, and discriminatory power. Factor analysis by means of varimax rotation provided for calibration of the rules by consolidating them into factors. These factors underpin the test and include the categories social interaction, academic competence, regulation, obedience, self-service, and self-control. In accordance with the principles employed in psychology, the factors confirm the construct validity of the test in relation to children’s development when they are between 7 and 10 years old. The study confirms that learning is the main activity at this age by introducing a factor that brings together rules inherent in normative situations in the education process. The social setting for psychological development, viewed as a specific

  3. Student interest in cultural content of a foreign country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Krželj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a study on the interest of students of non-philological faculties (of universities in Serbia in contents from foreign cultures and how high importance students attach to learning about the target culture in foreign language teaching and learning at non-philological faculties. The goal of modern foreign language teaching at non-philological faculties, in addition to the development of communicative competence in the profession, is also to develop pluricultural competence. In order to test the chances of attaining this goal, it is necessary to perform an analysis of the legislative framework in which teaching foreign languages for special purposes takes place, an analysis of learning aims and the possibility of developing cross-cultural sensitization. An analysis of the needs for and interests in the contents of the target culture must be precededed by an analysis of the specificities of intercultural learning and intercultural competence. Based on these results, it is possible to establish the correlation between the elements of the culture already present in the existing teaching material and the interests and needs of the target group which these materials are intended for.The data thus obtained will serve as a basis for defining the guidelines for selecting contents of the target culture, which, on one hand, will be based on methodological and didactical principles of interculturally oriented foreign language teaching, and on the other hand, will reflect the real needs and interests of the students from a number of non-philological faculties.

  4. Eco-cultural influences upon students' concept attainment in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsola Okebukola, Peter; Jegede, Olugbemiro J.

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the nature of the environment (ecology) influences the culture of a people. The prediction that such eco-cultural variables could exert influence on students' concept attainment in science was tested in this study using a 2 (general environment) × 2 (reasoning pattern) × 2 (nature of home) × 2 (goal structure) fixed-effect ANOVA design. The results showed that (1) students who live in a predominantly automated environment did better than those in a predominantly manual environment; (2) students whose reasoning patterns were predominantly magical and superstitious performed significantly lower than those who were empirical in reasoning; (3) rural dwellers were predominantly cooperative in outlook; (4) students who expressed preference for cooperative learning did significantly better than those who expressed preference for competitive and individual work; and (5) students from authoritarian homes achieved less well on the science concept test when compared with those from permissive homes. A number of important implications from these findings are drawn.

  5. Impact of cultural contact on intercultural competency of occupational therapy students and international graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Sandra J; Miller, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    This study examined changes in cultural perceptions and communication of 47 occupational therapy students and 39 international graduate students following 5 peer teaching activities. The peer-teaching activities were designed on the premise that positive contact between people of equal status improves intercultural competency, and included social exchanges, interviews, feedback on practice teaching, and role-playing. Changes in intercultural competency were measured with pre- and post administration of the Cross Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI), as well as questionnaires and journals. Significant positive change between pre- and post-test scores on the CCAI (p<.0002) was found for the 86 participants. When stratified into 3 subgroups (international students and occupational therapy students with and without international travel experience), changes were more pronounced. Occupational therapy students with international travel experience benefited the most from the peer-teaching activities (p<.002) and international graduate students benefited as well (p<.009). Occupational therapy students without international travel experienced no significant change. The findings indicate that peer teaching activities significantly impacted cross-cultural communication for students with prior international travel experience and confirm the importance of contextual learning.

  6. How Popular Culture Texts Inform and Shape Students' Discussions of Social Studies Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine how 6th-grade students used pop culture texts to inform their understandings about social studies texts and shape their discussions of it. Discussions showed that students used pop culture texts in three ways when talking about social studies texts. First, students applied comprehension strategies to pop culture texts to…

  7. How Popular Culture Texts Inform and Shape Students' Discussions of Social Studies Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine how 6th-grade students used pop culture texts to inform their understandings about social studies texts and shape their discussions of it. Discussions showed that students used pop culture texts in three ways when talking about social studies texts. First, students applied comprehension strategies to pop culture texts to…

  8. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  9. Simulation experiences of paramedic students: a cross-cultural examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Chloe Abel,1 Eihab Khasawneh,2 Linda Ross,1 Tracy Levett-Jones31Department of Community Emergency Health & Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: Simulation-based education is an important part of paramedic education and ­training. While accessing clinical placements that are adequate in quality and quantity continues to be challenging, simulation is being recognized by paramedic academics as a potential alternative. Examining students’ satisfaction of simulation, particularly cross-culturally is therefore important in providing feedback to academic teaching staff and the international paramedic community.Objective: This study aimed to compare simulation satisfaction among paramedic students from universities in Australia and Jordan.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based English version of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale was administered to paramedic students from all year levels.Results: A total of 511 students participated in this study; 306 students (60% from Australia (Monash University and 205 students (40% from Jordan (Jordan University of Science and Technology. There were statistically significant differences with large effect size noted in all three original factors between Australian and Jordanian students: debrief and feedback (mean =38.66 vs mean =34.15; P<0.001; d=0.86, clinical reasoning (mean =21.32 vs mean =18.28; P<0.001; d=0.90, and clinical learning (mean =17.59 vs mean =15.47; P<0.001; d=1.12.Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that simulation education is generally well received by students in Australia and Jordan although Australian students reported having higher satisfaction levels then their Jordanian counterparts. These results

  10. Displacing use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Janet; Matthews, Ben

    2014-01-01

    -centred design process. We identified alternative design-relevant relationships between people and devices that are not specifically tied to the functions/uses of the devices, e.g. relationships between the healthcare professional and the device, between doctors and patients, and between patients and their own......This paper critically discusses the concept of use in design, suggesting that relevant relationships other than use are sometimes obscured by the usercentredness of design processes. We present a design case from the medical device domain that displaced the concept of use from the centre of a human...

  11. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  12. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  13. Influence of Culture on Students' Awareness of How and Why They Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Siew Chee; Sedhu, Daljeet Singh; Liew, Yow Lin; Lee, Mun Yee; Malenee, Audrey; Anuar, Norkhadirah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The reason many Asian students find student-centred learning challenging may be due to cultural factors present in every human interaction between individuals. This study attempts to determine the influence of these cultural factors on students' awareness of how and why they learn. Method: A sample of 12 students enrolled in a two year…

  14. Do Cultural Attitudes Matter? The Role of Cultural Orientation on Academic Self-Concept among Black/African College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendi S.; Chung, Y. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between academic self-concept and noncognitive variables (i.e., Africentric cultural orientation, academic class level, gender, and involvement in culturally relevant school and community activities) among Black/African college students. Results indicated that Africentric cultural orientation and academic…

  15. Physical culture as the basis of students' healthy lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharissova, N; Kharissova, L; Smirnov, I; Kosibaeva, A; Mindubaeva, F

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed at investigation of the relationship between physiological features of cardiorespiratory system of a group of athletes with individually-typological charac-teristics of the organism (age, type of constitution, sports experience, the degree of adaptation) to physical activities on the basis of a comprehensive study of the cardiorespiratory system. The study was conducted on 450 students from 18 to 24 years of age from Kazakhstan, Russia, India, and Pakistan to evaluate the influence of physical culture and sports on the formation of a healthy lifestyle of young people in higher education institutions. The students were divided into groups - the first group - student 18-20 years of age; the second group - students 21-24 years of age; the control group included students of the same age not actively involved in sports (2 lessons of physical training per week). The relationship between physiological features of cardiorespiratory system of athletes and individually-typological characteristics of the organism (age, type of constitution, sports experience, the degree of adaptation) was determined.

  16. Cultural and Social Intelligences and Their Relationship to the Ability of Student Translators When Translating Cultural and Social Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Saffarian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the relationship between cultural, social intelligences and student translators’ ability in translating cultural and social texts. The predictive power of CQ subscales (cognitive, meta-cognitive, motivational, and behavioral and SI subscales (social information processing, social skills, and social awareness in the variance of translation scores were also examined. For the purpose of the study, a sample of 82 senior students of English Translation Studies comprised the participants of the study. Participants filled two questionnaires: the Cultural Intelligence Scale (CQS and a Persian version of Tromso Social Intelligence Scale. They also received a rendering test of translation. The results of the analysis indicated that there is a significant relationship between cultural intelligence (CQ and its subscales, social intelligence (SI and its subscales and student translators’ ability in translating cultural and social texts.Keywords: Cultural Intelligence, Social Intelligence, Translation Ability, Translation of Cultural and Social Texts

  17. LIBRARY USE IN AFGHAN TEACHER TRAINING COLLEGES : Reading Culture among Teacher Students

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Reading culture and library use in Afghan education area can be a very important issue to be studied particularly, in teacher training colleges because these institutions play a very important role in spreading and developing reading culture and library use among students. Moreover, students of TTCs as teacher students and future teachers get reading habit in order to convey it to their school students and can be very affective to establishment of this culture among them. This study is aimed ...

  18. The Analysis of Current Situation of Cultural Self-Confidence of College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛玉成; 黄秋生

    2013-01-01

    The high level of the cultural confidence is essential to instruct college students to integrate individual dream into Chinese dream, which is also the spirit source to transmit positive social energy. However,the current part of college students lack of cultural self-confidence,the loss display mainly that they are cognitive deficiencies on the national traditional culture,they blind recognition of western culture,they do not pay attention to contemporary Chinese advanced culture.

  19. Measuring vulnerability to disaster displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Susan A.; Khazai, Bijan; Power, Christopher; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Large scale disasters can cause devastating impacts in terms of population displacement. Between 2008 and 2013, on average 27 million people were displaced annually by disasters (Yonetani 2014). After large events such as hurricane Katrina or the Port-au-Prince earthquake, images of inadequate public shelter and concerns about large scale and often inequitable migration have been broadcast around the world. Population displacement can often be one of the most devastating and visible impacts of a natural disaster. Despite the importance of population displacement in disaster events, measures to understand the socio-economic vulnerability of a community often use broad metrics to estimate the total socio-economic risk of an event rather than focusing on the specific impacts that a community faces in a disaster. Population displacement is complex and multi-causal with the physical impact of a disaster interacting with vulnerability arising from the response, environmental issues (e.g., weather), cultural concerns (e.g., expectations of adequate shelter), and many individual factors (e.g., mobility, risk perception). In addition to the complexity of the causes, population displacement is difficult to measure because of the wide variety of different terms and definitions and its multi-dimensional nature. When we speak of severe population displacement, we may refer to a large number of displaced people, an extended length of displacement or associated difficulties such as poor shelter quality, risk of violence and crime in shelter communities, discrimination in aid, a lack of access to employment or other difficulties that can be associated with large scale population displacement. We have completed a thorough review of the literature on disaster population displacement. Research has been conducted on historic events to understand the types of negative impacts associated with population displacement and also the vulnerability of different groups to these impacts. We

  20. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  1. Cultural Effects on Business Students' Ethical Decisions: A Chinese versus American Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sherry F.; Persons, Obeua S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used a corporate code of ethics to create 18 scenarios for examining cultural effects on ethical decisions of Chinese versus American business students. Four cultural differences were hypothesized to contribute to overall less ethical decisions of Chinese students. The results support the hypothesis and indicate strong cultural effects…

  2. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  3. Exploring Race, Culture, and Family in the Identities of Mixed Heritage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pecero, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Family plays an integral role in racial and cultural socialization, yet how mixed heritage students understand the concepts of race and culture in relation to family is unclear. This qualitative study explored the interplay of race, culture, and family in the identity constructions of 25 mixed heritage students. Findings suggest the centrality of…

  4. The impact of cultural diversity forum on students' openness to diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Susan; Baldwin, Dee; Cannella, Kathleen A S; Charles, Jennell; Parker, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    As the population demographics for the United States (U.S.) shift towards increasing diversity, it is essential that nurses provide culturally competent care. Cultural sensitivity has been identified as a major curricular element in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN) The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. Thus it is imperative that nursing faculty use effective strategies to help nursing students develop cultural sensitivity and competence. Educational workshops focusing on cultural diversity are usually designed to increase people's cultural sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cultural diversity forum on nursing students' cultural sensitivity as measured by their openness to diversity. A convenience sample of students was recruited from a public university in the southeastern United States. The workshop was designed as a forum that combined a keynote presentation, shared meal, and a small group interactional activity. Cultural sensitivity was measured using the Openness to Diversity/Challenge Scale (ODCS), and was administered to students before and after the forum. A convenience sample of 47 students agreed to participate and completed both the pretest and posttest. Following the workshop, the students had more cultural sensitivity as measured by their scores on the ODCS (Wilcoxin Signed-Rank test z= -3.286, p = 0.001). The findings suggested that an educational format like the cultural diversity forum can promote students' cultural sensitivity. Further research needs to continue to focus on the effectiveness of strategies to increase the cultural sensitivity of baccalaureate nursing students.

  5. Cultural Effects on Business Students' Ethical Decisions: A Chinese versus American Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sherry F.; Persons, Obeua S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used a corporate code of ethics to create 18 scenarios for examining cultural effects on ethical decisions of Chinese versus American business students. Four cultural differences were hypothesized to contribute to overall less ethical decisions of Chinese students. The results support the hypothesis and indicate strong cultural effects…

  6. Exploring Race, Culture, and Family in the Identities of Mixed Heritage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pecero, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Family plays an integral role in racial and cultural socialization, yet how mixed heritage students understand the concepts of race and culture in relation to family is unclear. This qualitative study explored the interplay of race, culture, and family in the identity constructions of 25 mixed heritage students. Findings suggest the centrality of…

  7. Too Pale and Stale: Prescribed Texts Used for Teaching Culturally Diverse Students in Australia and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogie, Melissa Reshma

    2015-01-01

    How are English texts selected to teach students from culturally diverse backgrounds in Australia and England? The English curricula in both countries aim for students to read and interpret meanings through texts, while learning about their culture, and that of cultural others. However, the current list of prescribed texts in both curricula are…

  8. "That's a Hard Question": Undergraduate Students Talk about Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague-Winebarger, Caitlin N.

    2012-01-01

    In this project I examine the ability of undergraduate students to articulate a working definition of culture and cross-culture. The students were predominately elementary education majors, enrolled in one of two culture-based elective courses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks during the 2010-2011 school year. Through the use of…

  9. Developing Curriculum to Help Students Explore the Geosciences' Cultural Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.; Schoof, J. T.; Therrell, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Even though climate change and an unhealthy environment have a disproportionate affect on persons of color, there is a poor record of diversity in geoscience-related fields where researchers are investigating ways to improve the quality of the environment and human health. This low percentage of representation in the geosciences is equally troubling at the university where we are beginning the third and final year of a project funded through the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG). The purpose of this project is to explore a novel approach to using the social sciences to help students, specifically underrepresented minorities, discover the geosciences' cultural relevance and consider a career in the earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences. To date, over 800 college freshmen have participated in a design study to evaluate the curriculum efficacy of a geoscience reader. Over half of these participants are students of color. The reader we designed allows students to analyze multiple, and sometimes conflicting, sources such as peer-reviewed journal articles, political cartoons, and newspaper articles. The topic for investigation in the reader is the 1995 Chicago Heat Wave, a tragic event that killed over 700 residents. Students use this reader in a core university course required for entering freshmen with low reading comprehension scores on standardized tests. To support students' comprehension, evaluation, and corroboration of these sources, we incorporated instructional supports aligned with the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), reciprocal teaching, historical reasoning, media literacy, and quantitative reasoning. Using a digital format allows students to access multiple versions of the sources they are analyzing and definitions of challenging vocabulary and scientific concepts. Qualitative and quantitative data collected from participating students and their instructors included focus

  10. Drawing Their Way into Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Finding Voice through Mini-Novelas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephanie; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2014-01-01

    Writing can be a difficult task for many students in today's classrooms; however, for students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), writing can be especially difficult. These students often are in the process of developing their facility with the English language, and they possess cultural backgrounds that differ from those of…

  11. Drawing Their Way into Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Finding Voice through Mini-Novelas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephanie; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2014-01-01

    Writing can be a difficult task for many students in today's classrooms; however, for students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), writing can be especially difficult. These students often are in the process of developing their facility with the English language, and they possess cultural backgrounds that differ from those of…

  12. Chinese nursing students' culture-related learning styles and behaviours: A discussion paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Chunfeng Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation requires that nursing education focuses on culturally competent care. International students studying in Australia present a valuable resource for cultural learning, yet internationalisation presents opportunities and challenges for both lecturers and students. This paper explores Chinese nursing students, the single largest group of international students in Australia, their communication behaviour, patterns and learning styles at Australian universities from cultural and psychosocial perspectives. Our aim is to provide insight for educators in Western countries to better understand this particular ethnic group and help Chinese nursing students overcome learning difficulties and develop their potential learning capabilities. We further recommend coping strategies to help international Chinese nursing students' learning.

  13. Physical Culture as an integral part of general culture of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Sivas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of education of the individuality through the culture with the help of development of value potential in physical culture is discussed in the article. Improving the efficiency of education of medical students is becoming the leading aim of high school, which is connected with the development of culture of thinking, imagination, feelings and human creativity. Development of human motor capabilities is inseparable from the development of his personal qualities in physical education. One of the most important tasks of the educational process at high school is providing the motivation of a healthy lifestyle, motivation for physical culture and sports. Promotion of a healthy lifestyle should go through the activation of incentive mechanisms and a number of other phenomena of the individual's inner world. Efficiency of this approach is that it provides activity of a person in questions connected with preservation of individual and public health. The article tells us about the need to develop programs that can promote future professionals to form healthy and productive lifestyle, sustained motivation to permanent physical self-improvement. The problem can be successfully solved in the process of learning such course as «Physical education».

  14. Impact of International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence among Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sood OTD, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT educators recognize a need to ensure that OT students are culturally competent. The researchers developed the International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence (ICPCC to help students understand the impact of cultural context on client care. Entry-level MOT students from a university in the US (N = 18 collaborated with BOT students (N = 4 and advanced MOT students (N = 9 from two universities in India using an online course management system WebCT. The study explored the impact of the ICPCC on OT students’ cultural competence and discusses students’ perceptions of culture on the OT process. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Health Care Professionals Revised© measured students’ cultural competence at baseline and immediately after participation in the ICPCC. Qualitative data was collected using a Self-Reflection Form. There was an increase in the cultural competence scores among all three groups of students after participating in the ICPCC at p value < .05. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: meaning of the term culture, impact of cultural on client- centered practice, and impact of cultural on OT outcomes. OT students recognized the role that cultural differences play in OT evaluation and intervention.

  15. Exposures to war-related traumatic events and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among displaced Darfuri female university students: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Alia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the deaths of hundreds of thousands and the displacement of up to three million Darfuris, the increasingly complex and on-going war in Darfur has warranted the need to investigate war-related severity and current mental health levels amongst its civilian population. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between war-related exposures and assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms amongst a sample of Darfuri female university students at Ahfad University for Women (AUW in Omdurman city. Methods An exploratory cross-sectional study among a representative sample of Darfuri female university students at AUW (N = 123 was conducted in February 2010. Using an adapted version of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ, war-related exposures and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms were assessed. Means and standard deviations illustrated the experiential severity of war exposure dimensions and PTSD symptom sub-scales, while Pearson correlations tested for the strength of association between dimensions of war exposures and PTSD symptom sub-scales. Results Approximately 42 % of the Darfuri participants reported being displaced and 54 % have experienced war-related traumatic exposures either as victims or as witnesses (M = 28, SD = 14.24, range 0 – 40 events. Also, there was a strong association between the experiential dimension of war-related trauma exposures and the full symptom of PTSD. Moreover, the refugee-specific self-perception of functioning sub-scale within the PTSD measurement scored a mean of 3.2 (SD = .56, well above the 2.0 cut-off. Conclusions This study provides evidence for a relationship between traumatic war-related exposures and symptom rates of PTSD among AUW Darfuri female students. Findings are discussed in terms of AUW counseling service improvement.

  16. Exposures to war-related traumatic events and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among displaced Darfuri female university students: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Alia; Crutzen, Rik; Van den Borne, H W

    2012-08-03

    With the deaths of hundreds of thousands and the displacement of up to three million Darfuris, the increasingly complex and on-going war in Darfur has warranted the need to investigate war-related severity and current mental health levels amongst its civilian population. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between war-related exposures and assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms amongst a sample of Darfuri female university students at Ahfad University for Women (AUW) in Omdurman city. An exploratory cross-sectional study among a representative sample of Darfuri female university students at AUW (N = 123) was conducted in February 2010. Using an adapted version of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), war-related exposures and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed. Means and standard deviations illustrated the experiential severity of war exposure dimensions and PTSD symptom sub-scales, while Pearson correlations tested for the strength of association between dimensions of war exposures and PTSD symptom sub-scales. Approximately 42 % of the Darfuri participants reported being displaced and 54 % have experienced war-related traumatic exposures either as victims or as witnesses (M = 28, SD = 14.24, range 0 - 40 events). Also, there was a strong association between the experiential dimension of war-related trauma exposures and the full symptom of PTSD. Moreover, the refugee-specific self-perception of functioning sub-scale within the PTSD measurement scored a mean of 3.2 (SD = .56), well above the 2.0 cut-off. This study provides evidence for a relationship between traumatic war-related exposures and symptom rates of PTSD among AUW Darfuri female students. Findings are discussed in terms of AUW counseling service improvement.

  17. The Changing World Today: Cultural Change in Japan, Kenya, and India. Student Text and Student Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Elmer U.; Rice, Marion J.

    This student text and accompanying pupil study guide for intermediate grades examine cultural change in Japan, Kenya, and India. The unit objective is to help students examine processes of change occurring in the world today by systematically presenting cultural change concepts and illustrations in case study settings. The books provide students…

  18. Perceived Cultural Responsiveness and Effectiveness of a Speech and Language Program for Indigenous Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Craft, Calli B.; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing need for culturally relevant curricula, what is considered culturally responsive and how it is assessed is under-researched. The present study examined the perceived cultural responsiveness and effectiveness of an early intervention program designed to teach early language skills and expose students to Indigenous culture, the…

  19. "Lucha Libre" and Cultural Icons: Identity Formation for Student Success at HSIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natividad, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of culturally relevant imagery and representation and identity development curriculum for college students. It calls for higher education institutions to embrace cultural strengths as an asset rather than a deficit.

  20. Developing Cross-Cultural Capability in Undergraduate Business Education: Implications for the Student Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, David; Ottewill, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Identifies three aspects of cross-cultural capability: sensitivity, cross-cultural business skills, and international management competence. Suggests a strategy to shift business students' perspective from ethnocentrism to ethnodiversity and prepare them for global work. (SK)

  1. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melody Rawlings; Edna Sue

    2013-01-01

      What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English...

  2. Develop Chinese Students' English Proficiency by the Immersion of American Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠辰

    2015-01-01

    This is a lesson plan for a College English class in China, focusing on language skills development and American culture. Students' language competences are developed by immerging into culture context.

  3. "Lucha Libre" and Cultural Icons: Identity Formation for Student Success at HSIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natividad, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of culturally relevant imagery and representation and identity development curriculum for college students. It calls for higher education institutions to embrace cultural strengths as an asset rather than a deficit.

  4. Teaching methods and an outcome tool for measuring cultural sensitivity in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathleen H; Hood, Lucy J

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge facing the nursing profession is to educate and assist nurses to develop the skills to provide culturally relevant care. This article describes one school's multicultural curriculum for baccalaureate nursing students and a tool to measure changes in behaviors and attitudes. The article presents the psychometric properties of the Cross-Cultural Evaluation Tool that yields a cross-cultural interaction score. Successful teaching strategies are presented that are substantiated by increased student cross-cultural interaction score scores.

  5. Impact of reflective writing assignments on dental students' views of cultural competence and diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaac, Carol; Behar-Horenstein, Linda; Lee, Barbara; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to examine linguistic differences in dental students' reflective writing assignments before and after interviewing an individual who was culturally different from themselves...

  6. Mental Health and Military-Connected Students on Campus: Culture, Challenges, and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common challenges faced by military-connected students on university campuses. The characteristics, culture, and experiences of service members and veterans are described through vignettes based on military-connected students.

  7. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    that displaced workers' propensity to commit crime is higher than non-displaced workers before the displacement event; but it is significantly higher afterwards. Displacement impacts crime over and above what is explained by earnings losses and weeks of unemployment following displacement....

  8. Cultural factors influencing Eastern and Western engineering students' choice of university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hua-Li; Eika Sandnes, Frode; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2010-05-01

    Insight into factors that affect students' choice of university is useful when designing study programmes, especially in global competition for students. This study focuses on Taiwanese and Norwegian students' preferences for university, study programme, course qualities and future career qualities. Hofstede's model was used to predict culture-related differences. A pair-wise decision questionnaire was used to conduct measurements. Cultural differences were observed in relation to choice of university, course qualities and future careers. Discipline of study had only minor impact on students' preferences. The results suggest that a career-relevant curriculum is culture-neutral. Moreover, personal advice is the most preferred factor among Taiwanese students when choosing university.

  9. International Students from Melbourne Describing Their Cross-Cultural Transitions Experiences: Culture Shock, Social Interaction, and Friendship Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belford, Nish

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from a study that explored how international students experience cross-cultural transitions after living and studying in Melbourne for a few years, this paper, in particular, examines the participants' experiences with culture shock, social interaction, and friendship development. The findings include narratives of their personal stories…

  10. A Comparison Between Mexican-American and South American Students: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escotet, Miguel A.

    Addressing problem areas Mexican American students identify as important and differences between South American and Mexican American student problems, this research was guided by earlier work on cross-cultural methods and student problems. The study involved 1,189 high school and university students from Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Venezuela,…

  11. Promoting collaboration and cultural competence for physician assistant and physical therapist students: a cross-cultural decentralized interprofessional education model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen De Oliveira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As the United States health care model progresses towards medical teams and the country’s population continues to diversify, the need for health professional education programs to develop and implement culturally specific interprofessional education (IPE becomes increasingly imperative. A wide range of models exists for delivering and implementing IPE in health education, but none have included the cultural components that are vital in educating the health professional. Methods: A cross-cultural decentralized IPE model for physician assistant (PA and physical therapy (PT students was developed. This three-part IPE series was created using an established cultural curricular model and began with the exploration of self, continued with the examination of various dimensions of culture, and concluded with the exploration of the intersection between health and culture. We assessed student satisfaction of the IPE experiences and students’ engagement and attitudes towards IPE using a three-item open-ended questionnaire administered after each cross-cultural activity and the Interprofessional Education Series Survey (IESS upon the completion of the series. Results: IESS responses showed that PA and PT students reported benefits in interprofessional collaboration and cultural awareness and expressed overall satisfaction with the series. Qualitative analysis revealed growth in student response depth consistent with the scaffolded focus of each IPE module in the series. Conclusion: The trends in this three-part series suggest that institutions looking to develop culturally inclusive IPE educational initiatives may have success through a decentralized model mirroring the effective cultural progression focused on addressing exploration of self, examination of various dimensions of culture, and exploration of the intersection between health and culture.

  12. Deconstructing the Transfer Student Capital: Intersect between Cultural and Social Capital among Female Transfer Students in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobin, Soko S.; Smith, Dimitra Jackson; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of female transfer students majoring in STEM areas at a midwestern university by highlighting the role of Transfer Student Capital in their academic and social adjustment. The authors further deconstructed the notion of Transfer Student Capital by looking at how cultural and social capital intersect…

  13. Promoting nursing students' understanding and reflection on cultural awareness with older adults in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Diana R; Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    It is important for nursing programs to use culturally focused activities to increase student preparation in caring for diverse older adults in their homes. The purpose of this study was to examine strategies that promote students' reflection on cultural awareness using home care-focused case studies, simulations, and self-reflective writing activities. Cases and simulations were designed to depict diverse patients living at home with a variety of demographic characteristics, such as health history, age, culture, religion, dietary preferences, marital status, family involvement, and socioeconomic status. Qualitative data regarding student perceptions of cultural awareness was gathered via written surveys, and findings suggest that junior- and senior-year nursing students enhanced the depth and breadth of how they defined "cultural competence" after participating in culturally focused classroom and clinical laboratory activities. Levels of reflective writing using framework also improved by the semester's end for both groups of students.

  14. Teacher Perceptions across Cultures: The Impact of Students on Teacher Enthusiasm and Discouragement in a Cross-Cultural Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, K. Vern

    1995-01-01

    Interviews with secondary school teachers from the United States, England, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Canada, and Poland indicate that student responsiveness and enthusiasm contributed the most to teacher enthusiasm, while poorly motivated students contributed to a high level of discouragement. Responses were consistent across cultures, except for…

  15. Examining the Cultural Competence of Third- and Fourth-Year Nutrition Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Rebekah; Hekmat, Sharareh; Ahmadi, Latifeh

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary Canadian research assessing nutrition students' cultural competence and to identify areas for future education initiatives in dietetic education that could ultimately improve dietitians' cultural competence. A mixed-methods study was conducted using a 24-item questionnaire that was administered to students enrolled in third- and fourth-year undergraduate nutrition classes (n = 133). In total, 115 questionnaires were analyzed for quantitative data, and 109 were analyzed for qualitative data. The students scored an overall medium-high level of cultural competence. Out of the 5 areas examined (skills, attitudes, awareness, desires, knowledge), students' multicultural knowledge scores were the lowest. It was found that a lower number of barriers to learning about other cultures were significantly associated with a higher overall cultural competence score, and taking a course in cultural foods significantly increased the students' knowledge and overall cultural competence (P ≤ 0.05). The qualitative data found that students felt the cultural competence curriculum had gaps and identified several ideas for improvement. In conclusion, this research data provides novel insights into the cultural competence of Canadian dietetic students and additionally supports future research and curriculum development to enhance cultural competence.

  16. Self-perceptions of cultural competence among dental students and recent graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Zed, Chris; Marino, Rodrigo

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed self-perceptions of cultural competence in dental students and recent graduates of the University of British Columbia. The sample consisted of 106 predoctoral students (response rate 98 percent) and thirty-three recent graduates (response rate 43 percent). The two cohorts completed similar questionnaires. Over 80 percent of responding predoctoral students reported encountering patients from culturally different groups, 50 percent of them admitted that their communication is not effective, two-thirds were not confident in caring for patients from diverse cultural groups, and over 60 percent perceived that sociocultural differences affect the provision of care. Some significant differences between the genders and study years were observed. Exploratory Factor Analyses validated multiple indicators in five domains: 1) encountering culturally diverse patients, 2) communication challenges in sociocultural situations, 3) cultural competence-related skills, 4) cultural competence related to diagnosis and patient treatment, and 5) training in cultural competence. Through qualitative assessments, important culturally relevant topics and interactive training methods preferred by students for developing cultural competence were identified. This study concluded that cultural competence was perceived as important by both dental students and recent graduates but also as partly deficient, particularly by predoctoral students. For teaching cultural competence, participants recommended various topics and interactive teaching modalities.

  17. Investing in organisational culture: nursing students' experience of organisational learning culture in aged care settings following a program of cultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealish, Laurie; Henderson, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    Concerns around organisational learning culture limit nursing student placements in aged care settings to first year experiences. Determine the impact of an extended staff capacity building program on students' experiences of the organisational learning culture in the aged care setting. Pre and post-test design. A convenience sample of first, second and third year Bachelor of Nursing students attending placements at three residential aged care facilities completed the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey. Responses between the group that attended placement before the program (n = 17/44; RR 38%) and the group that attended following the program (n = 33/72; RR 45%) were compared. Improvements were noted in the areas of recognition, accomplishment, and influence, with decreases in dissatisfaction. Organisational investment in building staff capacity can produce a positive learning culture. The aged care sector offers a rich learning experience for students when staff capacity to support learning is developed.

  18. Attitudes of prejudice as a predictor of cultural competence among baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Pamela B; Kimble, Laura P; Gunby, Susan Sweat; Andrews, Margaret M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between attitudes of prejudice and cultural competence among nursing students. Using a mixed-methods design, a convenience sample of students (N = 129) currently enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program was recruited via Web networking. Data regarding attitudes of prejudice, cultural competence, prior cultural experience, and integration of cultural competence were obtained via a Web-based survey. Multiple linear regression was used to predict cultural knowledge, attitudes, and consciousness. Although all three regression models were statistically significant, the significant predictors varied within each model. Greater prejudice was a significant predictor of less culturally competent attitudes toward providing nursing care. Existing prejudice among nursing students needs to be addressed to help promote positive cultural attitudes and, ultimately, cultural competent nursing care.

  19. The Potential of a Mobile Group Blog to Support Cultural Learning among Overseas Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yinjuan; Crook, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of mobile social software, in the form of a mobile group blog, to assist cultural learning. The potential of using this technology for cultural adaptation among overseas students was examined as those students adapted to the everyday life of studying abroad. Two pilot studies and a successful field study of a mobile group blog…

  20. INFLUENCE OF INTERNATIONAL SERVICE LEARNING ON NURSING STUDENTS' SELF EFFICACY TOWARDS CULTURAL COMPETENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    One method of gaining knowledge, skills and experience with different cultures for nurses and nursing students is through an international immersion experience with training in language, culture and community nursing. This study is a qualitative and quantitative measurement of the influence of a two-week service learning medical experience on a student-nursing group who traveled abroad to Belize, Central America.

  1. Understanding the Role of Teachers' Culture on Student Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Hope Helene

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance educators' understanding of the role of teachers' culture on students' discipline. A key issue in education is disproportionate disciplinary representation of Black male students for cultural behaviors. National and Commonwealth of Virginia discipline data indicate that Black male students…

  2. An International Comparison Investigating the Relationship between National Culture and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng; Grant, Leslie W.; Xu, Xianxuan; Stronge, James H.; Ward, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between national culture and student achievement. Using Hofstede's six cultural dimensions and the two dimensions from the World Values survey, we conducted multiple regressions to determine the most significant predictors of student achievement as measured by the 2009 Program for…

  3. Is the Learning Approach of Students from the Confucian Heritage Culture Problematic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Tuyet

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the learning style adopted by Asian students who come from a Confucian heritage culture (CHC) such countries as China, Vietnam, Singapore, Korea and Japan are considered countries with Confucian heritage culture (Phuong-Mai et al. 2005). These students are generally viewed as typically passive, unwilling to ask…

  4. Promoting Social and Cultural Competence for Students from Diverse Backgrounds with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adera, Beatrice; Manning, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Amidst diversity in today's schools, challenges for students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds are growing. These students must acquire necessary social and cultural skills in order to navigate contrasting value systems and educational expectations despite potential cognitive and learning deficits. The combination of…

  5. Language Learning Strategies of Turkish and Arabic Students: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Dinçay; Ulum, Ömer Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the language learning strategy use of Turkish and Arabic students enrolled in middle schools and having different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Using a strategy inventory for language learning, the study examines the cross-cultural differences in strategy use of the mentioned students while learning English as a…

  6. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  7. Infusing Culturally Responsive Instruction to Improve Mathematics Performance of Latino Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, Lorraine; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive instruction has the advantage of helping diverse students make academic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of culturally infused mathematics lessons on the academic achievement of five middle school Latino students with specific learning disabilities in a resource classroom. We used an ABACACA…

  8. Pursuing Justice for Refugee Students: Addressing Issues of Cultural (Mis)Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In this paper Nancy Fraser's conceptual tools are drawn on to theorise issues of justice in a culturally diverse primary school in Australia where approximately 30% of the student population are immigrant/refugees. The paper examines justice issues of cultural recognition in relation to refugee student identity, behaviour and assessment. Drawing…

  9. Utilising the Hand Model to promote a culturally safe environment for international nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Bev; Harding, Thomas; Jurlina, Lou; Scobie, Norma; Khan, Ruelle

    2011-04-01

    The rising number of international students studying outside their own country poses challenges for nursing education. Numbers are predicted to grow and economic factors are placing increasing pressure on tertiary institutions to accept these students. In adapting to a foreign learning environment international students must not only adapt to the academic culture but also to the socio-cultural context. The most significant acculturation issues for students are English as a second language, differences in education pedagogy and social integration and connectedness. Students studying in New Zealand need to work with Maori, the indigenous people, and assimilate and practice the unique aspects of cultural safety, which has evolved in nursing as part of the response to the principles underpinning the Treaty of Waitangi. The Hand Model offers the potential to support international students in a culturally safe manner across all aspects of acculturation including those aspects of cultural safety unique to New Zealand. The model was originally developed by Lou Jurlina, a nursing teacher, to assist her to teach cultural safety and support her students in practising cultural safety in nursing. The thumb, represents 'awareness', with the other four digits signifying 'connection" 'communication', 'negotiation' and 'advocacy' respectively. Each digit is connected to the palm where the ultimate evaluation of the Hand Model in promoting cultural safety culminates in the clasping and shaking of hands: the moment of shared meaning. It promotes a sense of self worth and identity in students and a safe environment in which they can learn.

  10. Making the Tacit Explicit: Rethinking Culturally Inclusive Pedagogy in International Student Academic Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes an approach, broadly inspired by culturally inclusive pedagogy, to facilitate international student academic adaptation based on rendering tacit aspects of local learning cultures explicit to international full degree students, rather than adapting them. Preliminary findings are presented from a focus group-based exploratory…

  11. Facilitating Cultural Competence in Teacher Education Students with Digital Storytelling: Implications for Urban Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Peter A.; Afoláyan, Michael O.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the use of digital storytelling to help pre-service teachers learn to be more culturally sensitive in urban classroom settings. Each student created a digital story about his/her own culture and presented it to the class. Students responded in writing at the end of the semester regarding what they had learned by creating and…

  12. Utilising the Hand Model to promote a culturally safe environment for international nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Bev; Harding, Thomas; Jurlina, Lou; Scobie, Norma; Khan, Ruelle

    2012-03-01

    The rising number of international students studying outside their own country poses challenges for nursing education. Numbers are predicted to grow and economic factors are placing increasing pressure on tertiary institutions to accept these students. In adapting to a foreign learning environment international students must not only adapt to the academic culture but also to the social cultural context. The most significant acculturation issues for students are English as a second language, differences in education pedagogy and social integration and connectedness. Students studying in New Zealand need to work with Māori, the indigenous people, and assimilate and practice the unique aspects of cultural safety, which has evolved in nursing as part of the response to the principles underpinning the Treaty of Waitangi. The Hand Model offers the potential to support international nursing students in a culturally safe manner across all aspects of acculturation including those aspects of cultural safety unique to New Zealand. The model was originally developed by Lou Jurlina, a nursing teacher, to assist her to teach cultural safety and support her students in practising cultural safety in nursing. The thumb, represents 'awareness', with the other four digits signifying 'connection', 'communication', 'negotiation' and 'advocacy' respectively. Each digit is connected to the palm where the ultimate evaluation of The Hand Model in promoting cultural safety culminates in the clasping and shaking of hands: the moment of shared meaning. It promotes a sense of self worth and identity in students and a safe environment in which they can learn.

  13. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  14. An International Comparison Investigating the Relationship between National Culture and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng; Grant, Leslie W.; Xu, Xianxuan; Stronge, James H.; Ward, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between national culture and student achievement. Using Hofstede's six cultural dimensions and the two dimensions from the World Values survey, we conducted multiple regressions to determine the most significant predictors of student achievement as measured by the 2009 Program for…

  15. Reconstructing the Cultural Context of Urban Schools: Listening to the Voices of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Caruthers, Loyce

    2012-01-01

    Through listening to the voices of students, educators and community members can begin to reconstruct the culture of urban schools that are often full of stories about student deficits, genetic explanations about achievement, and cultural mismatch theories that may be traced to historical and sociological ideologies. The purpose of this heuristic…

  16. Using Facebook for Cross-Cultural Collaboration: The Experience of Students from Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Min

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Facebook among college students in a cross-cultural collaboration project between Taiwan and the United States, and focuses specifically on Taiwanese students' perceptions. Questions explored are: (1) Is Facebook a feasible platform for cross-cultural collaboration? (2) How does this…

  17. Effects of a Culturally Adapted Social-Emotional Learning Intervention Program on Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kristine M.; Castro-Olivo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Student self-reports of resiliency and social-emotional internalizing problems were examined to determine intervention effects of a culturally adapted social and emotional learning (SEL) program. Data were analyzed from 20 culturally and linguistically diverse high school students who participated in a school-based 12-lesson SEL intervention and…

  18. When Culture and Learning Styles Matter: A Canadian University with Middle-Eastern Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke-Westcott, Tracey; Johnson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Transnational branch campuses of universities are a growing phenomenon, particularly in the Middle-East. The cultures of home institutions and host countries are often foreign to each other. The result is a cultural and learning style gap between faculty and students impacting students' learning and teachers' effectiveness. A pilot study of the…

  19. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  20. Student Perceptions of the Hip Hop Culture's Influence on the Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Roger D.; Wallaert, Kerry A.

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine how identification and engagement with the hip hop culture influenced the educational experiences of undergraduate students at a Midwestern, predominately White university by interviewing 11 students who self-identified as being immersed in the hip hop culture. Through a qualitative, phenomenological investigation,…

  1. Using Facebook for Cross-Cultural Collaboration: The Experience of Students from Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Min

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of Facebook among college students in a cross-cultural collaboration project between Taiwan and the United States, and focuses specifically on Taiwanese students' perceptions. Questions explored are: (1) Is Facebook a feasible platform for cross-cultural collaboration? (2) How does this…

  2. The relationship between cultural individualism-collectivism and student aggression across 62 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmüller, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between countries' dominant cultural values (i.e., individualism and collectivism) and (a) school principals' perceptions of aggressive student behavior and (b) students' self-reports of being aggressively victimized in school. Data on student aggression and victimization were collected across 62 countries in nationally representative samples of fourth and eighth graders (N = 428,566) and their principals (N = 15,043) by the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007. Students were asked about three forms of aggressive victimization: physical, verbal, and relational; principals about two forms of aggressive student behavior: physical and verbal. Country-level regression analyses revealed that the level of cultural individualism, according to the individualism index (IDV) by Hofstede, Hofstede, and Minkov (2010), was not significantly related to either form of student-reported victimization. However, school principals reported aggressive student behavior more often the more individualist, and hence less collectivist, their country's culture. This relation was evident in the principals' reports on 4th and 8th grade students' aggressive behavior for both physical and verbal aggression. Multilevel analyses revealed that cultural individualism was still a powerful predictor of principal-reported aggressive student behavior after controlling for school and country characteristics. The discussion outlines reasons why principals' reports of aggressive student behavior are probably more valid indicators of student aggression than student self-reports of victimization, thereby supporting the hypothesis of culture-dependency of aggression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of a cultural competence educational intervention for first-year nursing students in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Nuszen, Evelyn; Rom, Miriam; Noble, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase general cultural competence of first-year nursing students. This was a quasi-experimental study that used a convenience sample with an experimental group and a control group and pre- and posttesting. The sample comprised 146 first-year nursing students enrolled in the Introduction to Nursing course divided into an intervention group (n = 58) of students from one school and a control group (n = 88) including students from two schools. The intervention group received a 2-hour faculty lecture on cultural competence, and students prepared and delivered a student group presentation about a cultural group in Israel, basing the presentation on Campinha-Bacote's five constructs. A demographic data instrument and Campinha-Bacote's Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professional-Revised© were used for pre- and posttesting. Students who received the educational intervention increased scores significantly (68 ± 6 to 73 ± 6, p = .000), students who did not receive the educational intervention had no significant increase (67 ± 6 to 66 ± 6). Introducing the topic of cultural competence for nursing students in the first-year Introduction to Nursing course as an integrative learning strategy revealed significant increases in cultural competence scores. Recommendations are to include evidence-based cultural competence teaching strategies into the nursing curriculum.

  4. The Impact of International Service-Learning on Nursing Students' Cultural Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlbry, Pamela Wolfe

    2016-05-01

    This article reports research findings on the effect of an international immersion service-learning project on the level and components of cultural competence of baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students. A triangulated methodology was used to determine changes in components and level of cultural competence pre- and postexperience. The theoretical model The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services was used. It identifies five central constructs in the process of becoming culturally competent: cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skill, cultural encounter, and cultural desire. The sample of 121 BSN nursing students was gathered from three southern California universities. Data were collected from 2009 to 2013. Using the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals-Student Version© and Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale, constructs of cultural competency were measured in pre- and posttest participants who participated in international service-learning immersion experiences. A demographic survey and open-ended qualitative questions were completed at the posttrip meeting. Mean, frequencies, and correlations with demographic data and survey data were calculated. Pre- and posttrip means were analyzed. Qualitative analysis from six open-ended questions completed at the posttest were coded and themes emerged. The research findings demonstrated the impact of the international service-learning project on building cultural competency in nursing students. Quantitative findings revealed statistically significant differences between pre- and posttest surveys for two of the five constructs of cultural competence. Qualitative analysis supported the quantitative findings in cultural competency constructs found in the model. The research findings support nursing education program use of international service-learning immersion experiences to foster cultural competence in nursing students. Findings from

  5. Nursing Students in a Global Learning Environment: Creative Teaching Methods on Culture, Emotion, and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dalit; Zlotnick, Cheryl

    2014-07-01

    Two tools were created to help international students to better understand culture by becoming more astute observers of nonverbal behaviors, particularly behaviors depicting emotions among Norwegian students. The two tools were a trilingual list of words illustrating emotions and an exercise with images to practice verbalizing their observations of emotional expression. Students compared the subdued behaviors of Norwegians to the Israelis' very vivid behaviors. The intense emotional expression of Israelis influenced their interpretations. By making comparisons and through the experiences with Israelis, they learned more about culture and their own emotional expression. Creative strategies can contribute to students understanding and reflection of patients in a different culture. Encouraging students to grasp the nuances of emotional expression is part of understanding a different culture. Students, like faculty, learn that self-exploration is an evolving process that requires checking out one's assumptions and interpretations. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. The Utility of Empathy for White Female Teachers' Culturally Responsive Interactions with Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers aiming to become culturally responsive must be concerned with negotiating professional interactions that produce favorable outcomes for the culturally diverse students under their charge. Very few studies offer empirical evidence of empathy's utility in the culturally responsive classroom, especially when the teacher is culturally…

  7. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Melody; Sue, Edna

    2013-01-01

    What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English. In this study, the constructs of American culture and models of English language taught in Chinese classrooms are compared with the reality of…

  8. International Immersion in Belize: Fostering Counseling Students' Cultural Self-Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Augustine, Shirlene; Dowden, Angel; Wiggins, Angel; Hall, LaCheata

    2014-01-01

    International cultural immersion provides an in vivo, authentic, cross-cultural experience that can enhance multicultural awareness, knowledge and skills. This article examines the impact of an international immersion on graduate counseling students' cultural self-awareness using a qualitative approach. Five graduate counseling students…

  9. International Immersion in Belize: Fostering Counseling Students' Cultural Self-Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Augustine, Shirlene; Dowden, Angel; Wiggins, Angel; Hall, LaCheata

    2014-01-01

    International cultural immersion provides an in vivo, authentic, cross-cultural experience that can enhance multicultural awareness, knowledge and skills. This article examines the impact of an international immersion on graduate counseling students' cultural self-awareness using a qualitative approach. Five graduate counseling students…

  10. The views of registered nursing students from different cultures on attitude and knowledge regarding elderly sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shan; Chen, Lihong; Han, Ruwang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the knowledge and the attitude of registered nursing students regarding elderly sexuality, in order to raise the awareness of sexual needs of the aging. This study also aims to identify attitude towards elderly sexuality among registered nursing students from different cultural backgrounds. The research questions of this thesis are: What is the attitude towards elderly sexuality among students from different cultural backgrounds? To what extent does reg...

  11. Cultivating College Students' National Culture Identity Based on English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Fang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Our country is a multi-ethnic country with plentiful national culture achievements, and the development of the national culture shows a trend of diversity, so cultural identity construction is particularly important. Article analyzes the concept of national identity, the relation between cultural identity and ethnic identity, the present situation…

  12. Cultural competence among nursing students in Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J P; Alquwez, N; Cruz, C P; Felicilda-Reynaldo, R F D; Vitorino, L M; Islam, S M S

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed the cultural competence of nursing students in a Saudi University. With the current situation of immigration in Saudi Arabia, the cultural diversity in healthcare facilities is anticipated to grow. This presents a great challenge to the members of the healthcare team. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 272 nursing students in a Saudi university using a self-administered questionnaire consisting of two parts, namely the respondents' demographics and cultural background information sheet and the Cultural Capacity Scale Arabic version. The respondents showed the highest competence in their ability to demonstrate communication skills with culturally diverse patients and lowest in the familiarity with health- or illness-related cultural knowledge or theory. Gender, academic level, clinical exposure, prior diversity training, the experience of taking care of culturally diverse patients and patients belonging to special population groups were significant factors that could likely to influence cultural competence. The findings suggest that the Saudi nursing students possess the ability to provide culturally appropriate nursing care to patients with a diverse cultural background. Despite the good cultural competence reflected in this study, some aspects in ensuring a culturally competent care rendered by Saudi nursing students need to be improved. With the country's Saudization policy in health care (replacing foreign nurses with Saudi nurses), the findings can be used in designing training and interventions to meet the needs of Saudi nursing students regarding cultural competence development, which is integral in their preparation to assume their future roles as nurses. Policy guidelines, such as including cultural competency training and foreign languages training as mandatory continuing education for nurses, as well as integrating cultural competency and foreign languages in the prelicensure curriculum, should be developed and implemented in

  13. Preparing TESOL Students for the ESOL Classroom: A Cross-Cultural Project in Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-López-Portillo, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural communication classes for TESOL students give them a solid foundation for their work with their own ESOL students. This article presents the cross-cultural project that TESOL students have to complete in a required intercultural communication class at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the case study that was used to…

  14. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Domestic American and International Chinese Students' Social Media Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Mocarski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This survey of American and Chinese students at a state university in the southern United States measures Social Media (SM) use and attitudes toward SM. The purpose of this study was to investigate student perception and motivation of social media communication and the relationship between student cultural values and their social media…

  15. Socio-Cultural Adaptation, Academic Adaptation and Satisfaction of International Higher Degree Research Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Baohua; Wright, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    The number of international higher degree research students has grown at a significant rate in recent years, with Australia becoming a hub for attracting such students from around the world. However, research has identified that international higher degree research students often encounter a wide range of academic and socio-cultural challenges in…

  16. Assessment of Professional Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary Lou; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2001-01-01

    The Ethnic Attitude Scale and Transcultural Questionnaire were administered to 152 bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students, registered nurses in transition to BSN, and masters's students. All three groups had low knowledge about cultural groups. The only significant difference was BSN students' understanding of such concepts as…

  17. Assessment of Professional Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes about Patients of Diverse Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary Lou; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2001-01-01

    The Ethnic Attitude Scale and Transcultural Questionnaire were administered to 152 bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students, registered nurses in transition to BSN, and masters's students. All three groups had low knowledge about cultural groups. The only significant difference was BSN students' understanding of such concepts as…

  18. How Do Students Studying Turkish in Lithuania Describe Turkish Culture and People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisoglu, M. Celal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe ideas that students learning Turkish in Lithuania have about Turkish culture and Turkish people. A descriptive method was used in the research. The data for the research was collected from 15 students who learn Turkish at Vilnius University in Vilnius, Lithuania. For the participating in the research students,…

  19. Culture Shock in the Basic Communication Course: A Case Study of Malaysian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Eunkyong

    A study examined foreign students from one cultural background, Malaysia, in the American basic speech class to discover which areas they find most difficult and to discover those norms and values that cause these difficulties. Malaysian students were chosen as the focus of the study because Asian students comprise more than half of the total…

  20. Understanding Different Behaviour and Different Culture International Students Studying in the UK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伊琳娜·伊力汗

    2015-01-01

    In the world, one popular country of destination is UK with its higher education environment. International students arrive in the UK from all around the world and for many students this is their first experience of living in new society. Because of culture difference, International students may face some difficulties.

  1. Local University Students and Intercultural Interactions: Conceptualising Culture, Seeing Diversity and Experiencing Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Cassandra; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the intercultural interaction experiences of local, first-year students (n?=?25) in their first few weeks at university. The focus on local students complements existing intercultural interaction literature, which has tended to concentrate on the experience of the "cultural other" student. Employing qualitative…

  2. Learning Style Preferences of Student Teachers: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sywelem, Mohamed; Al-Harbi, Qassem; Fathema, Nafsaniath; Witte, James E.

    2012-01-01

    All students learn, but not all learn in the same way. Educational researchers postulate that everyone has a learning style. This article examines how cultural variability is reflected in the learning style of students in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and United States. In this study, the learning styles of over 300 students in Teacher Education…

  3. THE CULTURE OF CHILDREN SOCIALIZATION CENTERS AS THE ASSUMPTION FOR SUCCESSFUL STUDENT RESOCIALIZATION: THEORETICAL INSIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Bieliūnė

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term student in this article is used meaning a member of formal education who lives and educates in a children socialization center. Purpose – discuss the culture of children socialization centers as a theoretical assumption for successful student resocialization. Methodology/approach – the concept of student resocialization process used in the article is based on the idea of social constructivism (Berger, Luckmann, 1966 which says that students construct their subjective reality by the interaction in a social system and a specific environment. The correlation between the culture of children socialization centers and student resocialization process is based on the principle of operating system (Targamadzė, 2006 where changes in the system’s one structural element affect other structural elements. Methods: analysis of documents and scientific literature, comparison. Findings: The composition of children socialization center culture is determined by historical context, non-traditional structure and features of operation. According to researchers communities of children socialization centers have authoritarianism-oriented attitude that is demonstrated by discipline, hierarchical relationship, punishments, isolation from society etc. Humanistic attitude is needed for successful student resocialization; this is proved by scientists and established by the legislation. During the process of resocialization students adopt values, norms, behavioral models, roles existing in the culture of children socialization centers. In addition to this, the culture of these institutions must be harmonized with the culture of the society. As a result, children socialization centers have to make reasonable analysis of their culture, recognize limitations and try to change it, external factors cannot make transformations. Research limitations/implications – only theoretical assumptions were made which have to be proved empirically. Practical implications

  4. Conceptualizing American Indian/Alaska Native College Student's Classroom Experiences: Negotiating Cultural Identity between Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Nanci M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. dominant culture's values and ways of knowing depicted in college curriculum assume that American Indian/Alaska Native college students will assimilate to dominant cultural beliefs and values in order to acquire a degree in higher education. Representative of this hegemonic pedagogical paradigm is the prescribed basic communication course…

  5. Effects of culture shock and cross-cultural adaptation on learning satisfaction of mainland China students studying in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Chich-Jen

    2014-01-01

    With the national impact of low fertility, the enrollment of higher education in Taiwan is facing a dilemma. To cope with such a problem, the government has actively promoted Mainland China students to study in Taiwan. In addition to enhancing the international competitiveness of domestic universities, cross-strait education, and real academic exchange, it is expected to solve the enrollment shortage of colleges. However, the situations and pressures of Culture Shock, Cross-Cultural Adaptatio...

  6. A course-based cross-cultural interaction among pharmacy students in Qatar and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; Taylor, Jeff; Khalifa, Sherief I; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-03-25

    To develop, implement, and evaluate a course-based, cross-cultural student interaction using real-time videoconferencing between universities in Canada and Qatar. A professional skills simulation practice session on smoking cessation was run for students in Qatar (n=22) and Canada (n=22). Students role played cases in small group situations and then interacted with colleagues from the other country regarding culturally challenging situations and communication strategies. Students were assessed on analytical content and communication skills through faculty member and peer evaluation. Cultural competency outcomes were assessed using a postsession survey. Overall, 92.3% of respondents agreed that learning was enhanced through the cross-cultural exchange, and 94.9% agreed that insight was gained into the health-related issues and needs of people from another culture. A course-based, cross-cultural interaction was an effective method to incorporate cultural competency principles into student learning. Future initiatives should increase direct student interaction and focus on culturally sensitive topics.

  7. Student perspectives on diversity and the cultural climate at a U.S. medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Robert; McClendon, Jennifer; Henderson, Anita; Evans, Yolanda; Colquitt, Rosa; Saha, Somnath

    2007-02-01

    To obtain the perspectives of medical students at one school on racial/ethnic campus diversity and cultural competence and to gain their perceptions of the institutional climate around diversity at their university and of reasons for minority underrepresentation at their medical school. A student-driven survey of all medical students (N = 398) at a single medical school in the spring of 2003, supplemented by four focus groups from all racial and ethnic groups on the campus. A large majority of the responding students (n = 216; 54%) endorsed the value of campus diversity and the importance of cultural competence to the process of becoming a clinician. Most students felt their university had achieved a positive cultural climate, characterized by openness to diverse perspectives and attention to equity. Most students also felt that the university's programs and policies reflected a commitment to diversity, but fewer students--those from underrepresented minorities (URMs) in particular--felt that the university truly valued having a diverse student body and faculty. Most students felt that the lack of diversity on campus was a barrier to recruiting and retaining minority candidates. Some minority students also blamed the medical school's limited social, academic, and financial support, as well as inadequate efforts to recruit minority students. Medical students generally place a high value on campus diversity and cultural competence. URM students in particular felt that their university could do more to implement its commitment to diversity, including making greater efforts to recruit and retain URM students. These views constitute a barometer for medical schools to gauge and track their efforts to enhance campus diversity, incorporate cultural competence education, and create an inclusive and welcoming climate for students of all backgrounds.

  8. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students' experiences of a study abroad programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddock, Heidi C; Turner, de Sales

    2007-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students. background: Many countries are becoming culturally diverse, but healthcare systems and nursing education often remain mono-cultural and focused on the norms and needs of the majority culture. To meet the needs of all members of multicultural societies, nurses need to develop cultural sensitivity and incorporate this into caregiving. A Gadamerian hermeneutic phenomenological approach was adopted. Data were collected in 2004 by using in-depth conversational interviews and analysed using the Turner method. Developing cultural sensitivity involves a complex interplay between becoming comfortable with the experience of making a transition from one culture to another, making adjustments to cultural differences, and growing personally. Central to this process was the students' experience of studying in an unfamiliar environment, experiencing stress and varying degrees of culture shock, and making a decision to take on the ways of the host culture. These actions led to an understanding that being sensitive to another culture required being open to its dynamics, acknowledging social and political structures, and incorporating other people's beliefs about health and illness. The findings suggest that study abroad is a useful strategy for bridging the theory-practice divide. However, further research is needed with larger and more diverse students to test the generalizability of the findings. Longitudinal research is also needed to assess the impact of study abroad programmes on the deliver of culturally sensitive care.

  9. The Relationships Among Personality, Intercultural Communication, and Cultural Self-Efficacy in Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan; Sy, Po Yi

    2016-12-01

    The demand for nurses to provide transcultural nursing care is rising. However, little is known about the relationships among the dimensions of nurse personality, intercultural communication, and cultural self-efficacy in the provision of this care. The aims of this study were to examine the associations among personality, intercultural communication, and cultural self-efficacy in nursing students and to compare intercultural communication and cultural self-efficacy between first-year and third-year nursing students. One hundred twenty-six Chinese students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three scales that were designed to measure intercultural communication, cultural self-efficacy (cultural concepts, transcultural nursing functions, and cultural knowledge related to South Asians), and personality, respectively. Intercultural communication correlated positively with the three subscales of personality, agreeableness (r = .22, p intercultural communication (r = .49, p intercultural communication (r = .36, p intercultural communication (r = .27, p intercultural communication, self-efficacy in knowledge of cultural concepts, self-efficacy in the skills needed to perform key transcultural nursing functions, or self-efficacy in the cultural knowledge related to South Asians. Personality assessments should be included in the nursing student recruitment process. Furthermore, nurse educators should focus greater attention on enhancing the cultural self-efficacy and intercultural communication skills of their students.

  10. The Effects of Political Culture of Fear on Student Perceptions of Leadership in Student-Faculty Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amin Marei Mosa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a political culture of fear and power distance on student perceptions regarding the leader-member exchange theory (LMX) relationship with faculty, and their perceptions of nature of leadership in Libyan business schools. 650 Faculty members and students from business school in seven Libyan…

  11. Teaching Business Law to Non-Law Students, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse ("CaLD") Students, and Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyawasam, Kanchana; Low, Hang Yen

    2014-01-01

    This paper is largely based on the experience of teaching law to students with non-legal background in business schools, with a focus on internationalisation and the large class lecture format. Business schools often consist of large classes which include a significant proportion of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) students. Teaching a…

  12. Students' Critical Mathematical Thinking Skills and Character: Experiments for Junior High School Students through Realistic Mathematics Education Culture-Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinussa, Anderson L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a quasi-experimental with pre-test-post-test design and control group that aims to assess students' critical mathematical thinking skills and character through realistic mathematics education (RME) culture-based. Subjects of this study were 106 junior high school students from two low and medium schools level in…

  13. Scientific and Cultural Knowledge in Intercultural Science Education: Student Perceptions of Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Mzamose; Longnecker, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    There is no consensus in the science education research community on the meanings and representations of western science and indigenous knowledge or the relationships between them. How students interpret these relationships and their perceptions of any connections has rarely been studied. This study reports student perceptions of the meaning and relationship between scientific and cultural knowledge. Personal meaning maps adapted for small groups were conducted in seven culturally diverse schools, school years 7-9 (with students aged 12-15 years) ( n = 190), with six schools in Western Australia and one school in Malawi, Africa. Of the six Australian school groups, two comprised Australian Aboriginal students in an after-school homework programme and the other four schools had a multicultural mix of students. Students in this study identified connections between scientific and cultural knowledge and constructed connections from particular thematic areas—mainly factual content knowledge as opposed to ideas related to values, attitudes, beliefs and identity. Australian Aboriginal students made fewer connections between the two knowledge domains than Malawian students whose previous science teacher had made explicit connections in her science class. Examples from Aboriginal culture were the most dominant illustrations of cultural knowledge in Australian schools, even in school groups with students from other cultures. In light of our findings, we discuss the construction of common ground between scientific knowledge and cultural knowledge and the role of teachers as cultural brokers and travel agents. We conclude with recommendations on creating learning environments that embrace different cultural knowledges and that promote explicit and enquiring discussions of values, attitudes, beliefs and identity associated with both knowledge domains.

  14. WORK-RELATED CULTURAL VALUES OF JAPANESE AND CZECH STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Cramer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Companies are very often confronted with external and internal cultural diversity to which they have to respond adequately. We need a deeper understanding of whether national cultures remain divergent in countries such as Japan and the Czech Republic following the pressures of globalization. One can argue that as cultures evolve they should constantly be assessed e.g., with respect to each of Hofstede‟s dimensions. By collecting data from one Eastern-European culture, the Czech Republic, and one Eastern culture, Japan, this study has re-examined Hofstede‟s (1984; 2001 cultural dimensions in these two cultures. Results suggest interesting changes have occurred in these cultures; a trend towards convergence may be derived. Explanations as well as implications are discussed.

  15. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    individuals, i.e. high-tenure workers with strong attachment to their firm, who lose employment during a mass-layoff event. Pre-displacement data suggests no evidence of endogenous selection of workers for displacement during mass-layoffs: displaced workers’ propensity to commit crime exhibits...... theory of crime. Marital dissolution is more likely post-displacement, and we find small intra-family externalities of adult displacement on younger family members’ crime. The impact of displacement on crime is stronger in municipalities with higher capital and labor income inequalities....

  16. A Study to Investigate the Consumer Behavior and Cultural Dimensions of Engineering Students in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARYAL SALMAN SALMAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study compares consumer behavior and Cultural Orientations between engineering and non-engineering students in Pakistan. Engineering students by virtue of their academic background are considered to have more technical know-how, more cognitive skills and can easily learn and adopt a new technology as compared to students from a non-engineering background. Furthermore the researchers were interested to find out that how the thinking skills and choice making of engineering students differ from other students and ultimately effects their consumer behavior and Cultural Dimensions. For this purpose three consumer behavior variables have been selected that are Customer Satisfaction, Customer Loyalty and Customer Switching. Cultural Dimensions are measured using the model proposed by Geert Hofstede. Two technologically sophisticated services are used in this study that is Mobile Phone and Debit Cards. The target population of the study consisted of 5000 students of which approximately 500 respondents were from various engineering universities in Pakistan. The comparison of consumer behavior and Cultural Dimensions differences was made through two group?s Discriminant Analysis. Differences in behavior and Cultural Dimensions have been reported among the engineering versus non-engineering students. Mobile Phone services satisfaction and loyalty were high among nonengineering students whereas engineering student?s registered higher satisfaction and loyalty in Debit Card services. Another interesting finding is difference in switching behavior. In case of both the servicesengineering students reported a higher mean score for switching. Score for Cultural Dimensions were also different among the two students type; whereby mean score for Masculinity

  17. Students' inclusion to the value of physical culture during the process of athletic training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychov S.O.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Means and methods of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture, during the process of athletic training on the classes of physical education are opened in this article. 52 students took part in research. It is developed the recommendation for the application of pedagogical conditions of use in the expressway strength and strength training, ability to determine dosing load for students with different level of physical background, methods of power properties development both for boys and for girls. It is shown that using of athletic training at the classes of physical education is contributing of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture.

  18. Improving Supervision of Cross-Cultural Postgraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2010-01-01

    The internet has led to an increasing number of international students enrolling for postgraduate degrees. The literature confirms that there have been problems such as attrition, motivation, supervision and others. Professors struggle to appease international student learning styles, while simultaneously international students strain to…

  19. Supporting International Students in Higher Education: Constructions, Cultures and Clashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    The article focuses on support issues relating to students on international degree programmes, and draws on the findings of a qualitative research project involving students enrolled on a joint degree course in English and education studies delivered at two higher education institutions in England and the Netherlands. Students on the programme…

  20. Statelessness and environmental displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Connell

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stateless people and migrants are at greater risk of displacement and are less likely to receive assistance; in turn, environmental displacement (especially multiple migrations heightens the risk of becoming stateless.

  1. Valuing difference in students' culture and experience in school science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-08-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer backgrounds in many countries are less likely to choose science at a post-compulsory level. This article discusses some of the potential barriers that are faced by many of these students, that prevent them from participating in school science. It suggests how people involved in school science might address these issues to allow a smoother cultural border crossing between the students' cultures and school science culture by reducing the significance of the crossing.

  2. Valuing difference in students' culture and experience in school science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-12-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer backgrounds in many countries are less likely to choose science at a post-compulsory level. This article discusses some of the potential barriers that are faced by many of these students, that prevent them from participating in school science. It suggests how people involved in school science might address these issues to allow a smoother cultural border crossing between the students' cultures and school science culture by reducing the significance of the crossing.

  3. Predictors of cultural competence among nursing students in the Philippines: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Estacio, Joel C; Bagtang, Cristeta E; Colet, Paolo C

    2016-11-01

    With the continued emigration of Filipino nurses and increasing globalization, there is a need for globally competent nurses. Thus, the development of cultural competence among nursing students is critical in their preparation to assume their future responsibilities in the profession. This study investigated the predictors of cultural competence among nursing students in the Philippines. This is a descriptive, cross-section study. This study included 332 Bachelor of Science in nursing students in three nursing schools situated in the northern Philippines. The Cultural Capacity Scale was used to gather data from the respondents. The demographic characteristics and cultural background of the students were entered in a regression analysis to predict their cultural competence. The respondents manifested appreciably good cultural competence with a mean score of 68.98±11.73. The ability to understand the beliefs of various cultural groups received the highest mean of 3.65±0.86, while the ability to identify the care needs of patients with diverse cultural backgrounds received the lowest (mean, 3.31±0.74). Living in an environment with culturally diverse people, prior diversity training, being in the latter years of the nursing program, and with experience of caring for patients from diverse cultures and special population groups, were identified as predictors, accounting for 68.1% of the variance of cultural competence. Nursing education should devise strategies to ensure future culturally competent Filipino nurses. Considering the fact that most of the Filipino nurses will potentially work overseas, they should be well prepared to provide competent care that is culturally sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of international service-learning on nursing student self-efficacy toward cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tracey

    2014-08-01

    One method of gaining knowledge, skills, and experience with different cultures for nurses and nursing students is through an international immersion program of training in language, culture, and community nursing. This article presents a qualitative and quantitative research study of the influence of a 2-week service-learning medical experience of a nursing student group who traveled abroad to Belize, Central America. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Similarities and differences in cultural values between Iranian and Malaysian nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Jaafar, Rogayah; Rahim, Ahmad F. Abul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cultural values are invisible and relatively constant in societies. The purpose of the present study is to find diversities in cultural values of Iranian and Malaysian nursing students. Materials and Methods: Convenience sampling method was used for this comparative-descriptive study to gather the data from full-time undergraduate degree nursing students in Iran and Malaysia. The data were collected using Values Survey Module 2008 and were analyzed by independent t-test. Results: ...

  6. A Cultural Immersion Experience in Indonesia for U.S. Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    Cultural immersion experiences as part of the education of health care professionals are important as our global focus expands through technology, natural disasters, pandemics, wars and the mobility of the world population. This is the story of a recent cultural immersion experience to Indonesia by U.S. nursing students. Student groups each chose an Indonesian health topic for an in-depth focus. Students critically evaluated published research and discussed evidence-based practice ideas applicable to their selected health issues. Using this knowledge, they developed PICO posters for presentation at an international nursing conference in Indonesia. The students greatly valued their opportunity to experience a different culture firsthand and to spend time with Indonesian students and faculty.

  7. Exploring research cultures through internationalization at home for doctoral students in Hong Kong and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris; Carlson, Elisabeth; Kwong, Enid E Y; Idvall, Ewa; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-09-08

    Cultural skills are fundamental to developing global academic scholars. Internationalization at home can facilitate the acquisition of these skills without students having to go abroad. However, research on the effect of internationalization of higher education is scarce, despite apparent benefits to incorporating cultural sensitivity in research. Further, little is known about the role information and communication technology plays. In this pilot study, we describe the experience of doctoral students with an internationalization-at-home program, and its impact on developing an understanding about different research cultures. Eight doctoral nursing students from Sweden and Hong Kong participated in five webinars as "critical friends". The study followed a descriptive, qualitative design. The results demonstrated that students observed cultural differences in others' research training programs. However, while cultural differences reinforced friendship among local peers, they challenged engagement with critical friends. Challenges led to the perception of one another not as critical friends but as "distant" friends. We discuss the possible reasons for these outcomes, and emphasize a need to nurture connectivity and common goals. This would prepare students to identify, translate, and recognize cultural differences to help develop knowledge of diverse research cultures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Institutional marginalisation and student resistance: barriers to learning about culture, race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jane H; Sanders, Tom; Mann, Karen; Wass, Val

    2010-10-01

    Although education about culture, race and ethnicity has increasingly been viewed as an important addition to the medical undergraduate curriculum, internationally the evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. Research to date fails to show why. We chose to explore how contrasting approaches to learning about cultural diversity impacted on medical students. The views of second year students towards teaching about cultural diversity at two UK medical schools, with differently structured curricula, were explored using a series of focus groups (7). The findings, using a methodology based on a combination of grounded theory and thematic analysis identified two potentially competing views espoused by the students at both sites. First, they claimed that although cultural diversity was important, their medical schools marginalised and failed to adequately support effective teaching. Second, in contrast, they claimed that the medical school was an 'inappropriate' setting for successful teaching about cultural diversity. Students did not consider the subject matter to be of central relevance to biomedicine. They felt it should be learnt experientially in the workplace and socially among peers. These narratives represent two potentially conflicting standpoints, which might be understood through the sociological concept of 'habitus', where students conform to the institution's dominant values in order to succeed. The tensions identified in this study cannot be ignored if effective learning about race, ethnicity and culture is to be achieved. Early introduction to understanding the delivery of health care to diverse populations is needed. This should be accompanied by more open collaborative debate between tutors and students on the issues raised.

  9. Building Cultural Competence: The Lived Experience of Semester Study Abroad Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lauren; Crump, Lauren; Struwing, Renee; Gillum, Deborah; Abraham, Sam

    College students who participate in semester abroad programs have diverse but positive experiences. Variables such as the educational institution attended by the students and the location of the study abroad can affect the experiences of the students. There is minimal research concerning students from Christian colleges who study abroad. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of college students participating in a semester abroad program in a developing country. Seven college students were interviewed regarding their experiences by three senior nursing students who also participated in the study abroad program. Results indicated that major factors influencing students' experiences were related to cultural immersion, role relationships, challenges encountered, and personal growth. Students reported that relationships with people and faith in Christ were strengthened through the experience.

  10. Assessing and Promoting Cultural Relativism in Students of Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcauliffe, Garrett John; Grothaus, Tim; Jensen, Margaret; Michel, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Multicultural counseling is often promoted as a core element in counselor development. As such, educational efforts aim to increase counselors' cultural relativism, or their ability to recognize their own enculturation and to appreciate the value of other cultural norms. This mixed qualitative-quantitative study explored the relationship between…

  11. Teaching Culture in the Classroom to Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Arabic language learning comprises of certain elements, including syntactic ability, oral capability, dialect proficiency, and a change in state of mind towards different culture or society. For teachers and laymen alike, cultural competence, i.e., the knowledge of the customs, beliefs, and systems of another country, is indisputably an integral…

  12. Developing a Culture of Assessment in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, John H.

    2013-01-01

    What is a culture of assessment? According to this author, in a culture of assessment, staff members recognize that they must collect evidence systematically to demonstrate accountability to their stakeholders, and that they must use that evidence to improve. Fundamental to the concept is the author's back-of-the-envelope definition of…

  13. Curricular Integration and Measurement of Cultural Competence Development in a Group of Physical Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombaro, Kerstin M.; Dole, Robin L.; Black, Jill D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Background: The link between cultural competence and effective physical therapy encounters is established. Physical therapist educational programs face the challenge of fostering the cultural competence of students in effective and meaningful ways within the curriculum. They also face the challenge of measuring the development of…

  14. The Relationship between Principal's Emotional Intelligence Quotient, School Culture, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between secondary school principal's emotional intelligence quotient, school culture, and student achievement. Partial correlation was conducted to examine the degree of relationships between principal's emotional intelligence quotient and school culture controlling for the effect of…

  15. International WIL Placements: Their Influence on Student Professional Development, Personal Growth and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Nigel; Dender, Alma; Lawrence, Emma; Manning, Kirrily; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    In the increasingly global world, skills in cultural competence now form part of the minimum standards of practice required for allied health professionals. During an international work-integrated learning (WIL) placement, allied health students' cultural competence is expected to be enhanced. The present study scrutinized reflective journals of…

  16. National Culture, Creativity, and Productivity: What's the Relationship with Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xianxuan; Grant, Leslie W.; Stronge, James H.; Ward, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Using Hofstede's culture dimensions and World Values Survey (WVS) dimensions, the study uses a series of multiple regressions to explore the relationship among national culture, creativity as measured by patents, economic productivity as measured by gross domestic product per capita, and student achievement as measured by Trends in International…

  17. Developing Cross-Cultural Skills of International Business Students: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizoo, Steve; Serrie, Hendrick

    2004-01-01

    Cross-cultural skills are a major criterion for success in the global business environment. For students pursuing careers in international business, this means learning to manage cultural difference on three levels: self, interpersonal, and organizational. This paper describes five related and synergistic exercises that give college students…

  18. Culturally Responsive Assessment for African American Students with Learning and Behavioral Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Cathy D.; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Bratton, Kenya

    2003-01-01

    Inappropriate assessment procedures result in the misdiagnosis, misidentification, and misplacement of many African American students in special education. This article discusses poor teacher judgment, lack of cultural awareness among teachers, cultural discontinuity between home and school, and bias inherent in current tests used in special…

  19. Korean Student's Online Learning Preferences and Issues: Cultural Sensitivity for Western Course Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Earlene

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: While online courses offer educational solutions, they are not academically suited for everyone. International students find distractions in online courses constructed with American philosophy, epistemology, values, and cultures as compared to experiences in their home country. Learner's culture, value system, learning…

  20. Examining Multiple Readings of Popular Culture by ESL Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Jasmine; Hui, Diane

    2017-01-01

    The integration of popular culture into English language learning has recently been formalised in the Hong Kong New Senior Secondary curriculum, with the development of critical reading indicated as one of the key objectives. Whether and how students respond to popular culture texts is, however, under-researched. The present paper reports findings…

  1. Themes Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Levels of Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether or not Caribbean overseas students, attending universities in the United States, perceived that they experienced culture shock and what themes emerged explaining their experiences. Thirty-eight participants indicated having experienced culture shock, and 20 did not. Five major themes (loneliness and feelings of not…

  2. Belonging, Identity and Third Culture Kids: Life Histories of Former International School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fail, Helen; Thompson, Jeff; Walker, George

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on a multiple case study which examines the lives of a group of 11 former international school students who all attended an international school between 20 and 50 years ago. The research design was based on a review of the literature on third culture kids and adult third culture kids, covering emotional and relational issues…

  3. The Relationship between an Effective Organizational Culture and Student Discipline in a Boarding School

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Oosthuizen, Izak; Wolhuter, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between effective organizational culture and student discipline in a boys' boarding house at an urban South African school. Ethnographical methods (observation and interviews) were employed. The study reports on the results pertaining to organizational culture, namely, tangible manifestations of the…

  4. Connection between Organizational Culture and Development of Achievement Motive of Students of the Faculty of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubulj, Milan; Arsenijevi, Olja; Simic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this paper are engaged in studying the organizational culture and achievement motive, by carrying out their studies among the students of the Faculty of Management in Novi Sad, AP Vojvodina, Serbia. The problem of this paper's research was set by the question: is there a connection of a dominantly present organizational culture and…

  5. Building a Culture of Academic Integrity: What Students Perceive and Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jessica A.; Glanzer, Perry L.

    2017-01-01

    McCabe, Butterfield, & Treviño (2012) recently proposed a model for helping universities cultivate a moral culture of academic integrity. This qualitative study examined how a national sample of 75 students perceived the moral culture within their university using the McCabe et al. model as a basis for analysis. The analysis revealed that…

  6. Valuing Difference in Students' Culture and Experience in School Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer…

  7. The Relationship between Principal's Emotional Intelligence Quotient, School Culture, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between secondary school principal's emotional intelligence quotient, school culture, and student achievement. Partial correlation was conducted to examine the degree of relationships between principal's emotional intelligence quotient and school culture controlling for the effect of…

  8. Themes Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Levels of Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether or not Caribbean overseas students, attending universities in the United States, perceived that they experienced culture shock and what themes emerged explaining their experiences. Thirty-eight participants indicated having experienced culture shock, and 20 did not. Five major themes (loneliness and feelings of not…

  9. The Effects of Family Cultural Capital and Reading Motivation on Reading Behaviour in Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-I; Hong, Fu-Yuan; Hu, Hsiu-yuan

    2015-01-01

    This study proposed and tested a structural model of the effects of family cultural capital and reading motivation on reading behaviour in elementary school students. Participants were 467 fifth and sixth graders from elementary schools in Changhua County, Taiwan. The instruments employed in this study included the Family Cultural Capital Scale,…

  10. The Mediating Roles of Generative Cognition and Organizational Culture between Personality Traits and Student Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Lin; Liang, Chaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Using science majors as an example, we analyzed how generative cognition, organizational culture, and personality traits affect student imagination, and examined the mediating effects of generative cognition and organizational culture. A total of 473 undergraduates enrolled in physical, chemical, mathematical, and biological science programs…

  11. The Senegal Project: A Cultural Foods Unit for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The Senegal Project is the culminating project in a unit on cultural foods in an 8th grade family and consumer sciences (FCS) course. Initially, students take a quick world tour by studying and cooking foods from Mexico, Italy, China, and India followed by a "more depth and less breadth" study of Senegal, a country with a culture vastly…

  12. Students' Evaluation of Google Hangouts through a Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies.…

  13. The Benefits of Collective Pedagogical Teacher Culture for Diverse Students' Mathematics Achievement by Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin; Stearns, Elizabeth; Bottia, Martha; Banerjee, Neena

    2011-01-01

    Most studies of educational organizations have focused on structural features of schools, such as size, resources, and infrastructure. Research on schools' organizational culture is more sparse. Yet, these studies have suggested that the organizational culture of schools can have important implications for teaching practices and student outcomes.…

  14. Effects of a Culture-Adaptive Forgiveness Intervention for Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Mingxia; Hui, Eadaoin; Fu, Hong; Watkins, David; Tao, Linjin; Lo, Sing Kai

    2016-01-01

    The understanding and application of forgiveness varies across cultures. The current study aimed to examine the effect of a culture-adaptive Forgiveness Intervention on forgiveness attitude, self-esteem, empathy and anxiety of Mainland Chinese college students. Thirty-six participants were randomly allocated to either experimental groups or a…

  15. Taiwanese Medical Students' Narratives of Intercultural Professionalism Dilemmas: Exploring Tensions between Western Medicine and Taiwanese Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V.; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2017-01-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between…

  16. The Impact of Cultural Validation on the College Experiences of Southeast Asian American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramba, Dina C.; Palmer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the critical role of culture on the success of Southeast Asian American (SEAA) college students. Specifically, we examined the saliency of cultural validation and how it shaped the educational trajectories of SEAAs. A national sample of 34 participants was analyzed across 5 public, 4-year colleges and…

  17. Ethnic and Urban Intersections in the Classroom: Latino Students, Hybrid Identities, and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing from data collected through classroom observations and in-depth interviews, this article describes and analyzes practices identified as culturally responsive by Latinos students in an urban, multiethnic/racial context. The findings suggest that culturally responsive pedagogy must be more broadly conceptualized to address the cultural…

  18. Korean Student's Online Learning Preferences and Issues: Cultural Sensitivity for Western Course Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Earlene

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: While online courses offer educational solutions, they are not academically suited for everyone. International students find distractions in online courses constructed with American philosophy, epistemology, values, and cultures as compared to experiences in their home country. Learner's culture, value system, learning…

  19. Culturally diverse health care students' experiences with teaching strategies in Finland: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkala, Kaisu

    2013-06-01

    All over the world, current health care students come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds. Their expectations and learning needs vary, yet little is known about how our current education system meets their needs. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences of teaching strategies in polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. Specifically, we aimed to compare how international students and Finnish students experience the same curriculum. A cross sectional survey. Ten polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland offering English-Language-Taught Degree Programmess (ELTDPs). 283 students studying nursing, public health nursing, or physiotherapy in English. Of these, 166 were international students and 112 were Finnish students. The data were collected using a questionnaire designed specifically for this study. The survey included items grouped into seven dimensions: 1. concreteness of theoretical instruction, 2. encouragement of student activity, 3. use of skills labs, 4. variation among teaching strategies, 5. assessment, 6. interaction in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes, and 7. approach to diversity in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes. The most positive experiences for all students were with the approach to cultural diversity and the concreteness of theoretical instruction, whereas the most negative experiences were with assessment. International students' experiences were more positive than Finnish students' in the following dimensions: encouragement of student activity (p=0.005), variation among teaching strategies (p<0.001), and assessment (p<0.001). Compared to the Finnish students, more than double the number of international students were dissatisfied with their lives (p<0.001). The implications for education include the strengthening teachers' leadership role in small group activities, providing individual and detailed feedback, and ensuring

  20. Sensitivity of Students to the Natural Environment, Animals, Social Problems and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtdede Fidan, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to determine the sensitivity levels of fourth-grade students to the natural environment, animals, social concerns and cultural heritage. Besides, it has been investigated whether some personal characteristics of the students have differentiating effect on the views related to the sensitivity to the natural environment, animals,…

  1. Can a Successful ESL Teacher Hold Deficit Beliefs of Her Students' Home Languages and Cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author explores the seeming contradictions between the successful teaching practices of an English as a Second Language teacher and the deficit beliefs she expressed toward her students' home languages and cultures. This teacher believed her students were smart and capable, and she held herself accountable for her students…

  2. Predicting Changes in Cultural Sensitivity among Students of Spanish during Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Short-term study abroad programs of less than a semester are becoming increasingly popular among undergraduate students in the United States. However, little research has examined the changes in students' cultural sensitivity through their participation in such programs or what factors may predict growth and improvement in such areas. This study…

  3. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  4. Preparing Computing Students for Culturally Diverse E-Mediated IT Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marc; French, Tim; Maple, Carsten; Zhang, Sijing

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present an account of an undergraduate team-based assignment designed to facilitate, exhibit and record team-working skills in an e-mediated environment. By linking the student feedback received to Hofstede's classic model of cultural dimensions we aim to show the assignment's suitability in revealing the student's multi-cultural…

  5. State Policy and Guidance for Identifying Learning Disabilities in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Amy N.; Boynton Hauerwas, Laura; Brown, Rachel D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how state Departments of Education address the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students as they relate to the identification of students with a specific learning disability (SLD). A qualitative research design of directed content analysis was used to examine each state's regulatory criteria for SLD, as…

  6. Delivering a Multicultural Curriculum on the Cultural Competence of Physician Assistant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Katie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect the integration of a multicultural curriculum has on the perceived level of cultural competence of physician assistant students. A convergent parallel mixed-methods approach was utilized to collect the necessary data. The physician assistant students participated in focus-group sessions and a…

  7. Teachers' Moral Values and Their Interpersonal Relationships with Students and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether and how teachers' beliefs about moral values are reflected in the student-teacher relationships (i.e. levels of control and affiliation in teachers' and students' perceptions of this relationship), and in teachers' cultural competence. A positive association was found between teachers' paternalist beliefs and their own…

  8. A Cultural and Linguistic Approach to Teaching Science and Mathematics to Native American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth W.; Davison, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Explains cultural differences and how they affect the meaning of curriculum for students. Discusses factors that affect the learning of mathematics and science for students living on the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana and strategies for the development of a relevant curriculum through the integration of mathematics and science in a…

  9. Making and Breaking Stereotypes: East Asian International Students' Experiences with Cross-Cultural/Racial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Zachary Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In response to recent budget cuts and declining revenue streams, American colleges and universities are admitting larger numbers of international students. These students add a great deal of cultural and intellectual diversity to college campuses, but they also bring racial stereotypes that can affect cross-racial interaction as well as campus…

  10. Critical Pedagogy, Internationalisation, and a Third Space: Cultural Tensions Revealed in Students' Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Margaret Jane; Brooks, Catherine F.

    2017-01-01

    Set within the context of a global pursuit towards the internationalisation of higher education, this paper critically examines student discourse in a globally connected classroom between learners in the USA and Singapore. It makes salient some of the cultural assumptions and tensions that undergird students' discourse in collaborative…

  11. Coming Back to College: Middle East Veteran Student Involvement and Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carne, Glenda Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Increased veteran enrollment in universities warrants the examination of the challenges of students transitioning on campus. In this phenomenological, mixed methods study incorporating reverse culture shock theory and student engagement, four research questions are explored. "Do current Colorado veteran residents obtain degrees at the same…

  12. Coming Back to College: Middle East Veteran Student Involvement and Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carne, Glenda Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Increased veteran enrollment in universities warrants the examination of the challenges of students transitioning on campus. In this phenomenological, mixed methods study incorporating reverse culture shock theory and student engagement, four research questions are explored. "Do current Colorado veteran residents obtain degrees at the same…

  13. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total 1051…

  14. American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Competency of Osteopathic Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video…

  15. Organizational Culture and University Responses to Parenting Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Biederman, Donna J.; Gringle, Meredith R.

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines implications of a university's culture on advocating for supportive policies and programs for parenting students. Four themes illuminated several key tensions within the institution that affected support for parenting students: the lack of formal policy, an emphasis on faculty practices around accommodations, concerns…

  16. Enculturation of unsafe attitudes and behaviors: student perceptions of safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Chelsea; Neeman, Naama; Sehgal, Niraj L

    2013-06-01

    Safety culture may exert an important influence on the adoption and learning of patient safety practices by learners at clinical training sites. This study assessed students' perceptions of safety culture and identified curricular gaps in patient safety training. A total of 170 fourth-year medical students at the University of California, San Francisco, were asked to complete a modified version of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture in 2011. Students responded on the basis of either their third-year internal medicine or surgery clerkship experience. Responses were recorded on a five-point Likert scale. Percent positive responses were compared between the groups using a chi-square test. One hundred twenty-one students (71% response rate) rated "teamwork within units" and "organizational learning" highest among the survey domains; "communication openness" and "nonpunitive response to error" were rated lowest. A majority of students reported that they would not speak up when witnessing a possible adverse event (56%) and were afraid to ask questions if things did not seem right (55%). In addition, 48% of students reported feeling that mistakes were held against them. Overall, students reported a desire for additional patient safety training to enhance their educational experience. Assessing student perceptions of safety culture highlighted important observations from their clinical experiences and helped identify areas for curricular development to enhance patient safety. This assessment may also be a useful tool for both clerkship directors and clinical service chiefs in their respective efforts to promote safe care.

  17. Investigating Organizational Culture Perception of Students Studying in School of Physical Education and Sports in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, T. Osman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine organisational culture of the students studying in School of Physical Education and Sports (SPES) in Turkey. The study group of the research is composed of 216 students studying in the third and fourth year of Physical Education and Sports Teaching, Sports Administration, Coaching Education and Recreation…

  18. Urban and Rural High School Students' Perspectives of Productive Peer Culture for Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Melva R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perspectives about productive peer culture (PPC) in general and for mathematics learning. The urban and rural high school students in this study have participated for at least one year in either an Algebra Project Cohort Model (APCM) for daily mathematics instruction and/or worked as mathematics…

  19. Strategy and Action: Assessing Student-Led Culture Workshops within the Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    King de Ramírez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In order to prepare students to successfully engage with native speakers and members of heritage language communities both at home and abroad, educators must develop course curricula that emphasize cultural practices, products, perspectives, and comparisons as well as provide students with opportunities to directly apply the skills that they have…

  20. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  1. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total 1051…

  2. Cultural Models of Education and Academic Performance for Native American and European American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A.; Covarrubias, Rebecca; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of cultural representations of self (i.e., interdependence and independence) and positive relationships (i.e., trust for teachers) in academic performance (i.e., self-reported grades) for Native American ("N"?=?41) and European American ("N"?=?49) high school students. The Native American students endorsed…

  3. The Challenges of Cultural Diversity in the Recruitment of Faculty and Students from Diverse Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josey, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of cultural diversity and the significance of ethnicity, race, and race relations in the workplace focuses on the need to recruit library school faculty and students from diverse backgrounds. Highlights include racism; minority faculty; retaining and recruiting minority students; funding; and future possibilities. (Contains 12…

  4. Evaluating the Male and Female Students' Welcome of the Cultural-Art Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghian, Masomeh; Saadatmand, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the welcome of culture-art plans in the high schools of Khomeyni Shahr City from perspectives of the educational coaches and students in the 2013. The present study is a descriptive-survey research. The statistical population of this study includes the educational coaches and students participating in the…

  5. Investigating Organizational Culture Perception of Students Studying in School of Physical Education and Sports in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, T. Osman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine organisational culture of the students studying in School of Physical Education and Sports (SPES) in Turkey. The study group of the research is composed of 216 students studying in the third and fourth year of Physical Education and Sports Teaching, Sports Administration, Coaching Education and Recreation…

  6. Digital Storytelling: A Method for Engaging Students and Increasing Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Natalie S.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2016-01-01

    Digital storytelling is explored as a method of engaging students in the development of media literacy and cultural competency. This paper describes the perceptions and experiences of 96 undergraduate students at a large Midwestern university, after completing a digital storytelling project in a semester-long diversity course. Digital storytelling…

  7. The Role of the Culture of Japanese Students in Acquisition of Academic English: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, Patricia Anne

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of Japanese students' culture and its effects on the rate of acquisition of academic English. It is based on observation of classes in Japanese schools, both in Japan and Germany, as well as in an international school, together with interviews, questionnaires, student responses and case studies over a…

  8. Knowledge from the Fields: A Migrant Farmworker Student's Community Cultural Wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Blanca E.

    2012-01-01

    Migrant farmworker students bring with them to schools a significant knowledge base that they acquire working in the fields alongside their families. These experiences can be valuable influences in their enrollment and completion of college. Using "community cultural wealth", this article examines how a Latino migrant farmworker student used his…

  9. Rape Culture and Campus Environment: An Introduction for Student Affairs Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lemeul W.; Derby, Dustin

    2000-01-01

    Provides a brief introduction for student affairs professional to the American rape culture. Offers suggestions and examples to assist student affairs professionals in their quest to develop adequate programs and services on their campus with regard to rape and sexual assault incidents. (Contains 31 references.) (GCP)

  10. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total…

  11. The Relationship between Cultural Identity and Academic Achievement of Asian American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven K.

    A study investigated the relationship between students' level of interest in maintaining their cultural identity and their academic achievement. Subjects were 105 United States-born Chinese-American and Korean-American high school students attending two public high schools in Southern California. The two groups represented the largest minority…

  12. Global Connectedness in Higher Education: Student Voices on the Value of Cross-Cultural Learning Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtomäki, Elina; Moate, Josephine; Posti-Ahokas, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The study explores how sense of global connectedness can be enhanced by creating opportunities for cross-cultural dialogue in higher education. Thematic analysis of randomly selected 15 learning journals, students' reflections on their learning during an international seminar was used to identify students' significant learning experiences. The…

  13. Test Anxiety Among Black College Students: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzaft, Arline L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    On the Alpert-Haber Achievement Anxiety Test, University of the West Indies black students had significantly higher facilitating test anxiety and significantly lower debilitating test anxiety in comparison to black students at Lehman College in the United States. Results are explained in terms of cross-cultural differences in attitudes toward…

  14. Supporting Young Adolescent Students from Minority Cultural Groups Who Are Underachieving in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jo; Parkhill, Faye; Harris, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Establishing appropriate learning environments for culturally diverse underachieving students continues to challenge educators across a range of international contexts. A synthesis of findings from our studies in New Zealand indicated that teachers and students from Pasifika and Maori backgrounds considered that learning is facilitated by the…

  15. Everyday Racism in Canadian Schools: Ideologies of Language and Culture among Korean Transnational Students in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a 2.4-year ethnography with Korean Early Study Abroad (ESA, pre-college-aged study abroad) students in Toronto high schools, I examine the intersections among race, class, language, culture and citizenship (including immigrant status) in the identity construction and language learning of these students. Conceptualising race as a…

  16. Everyday Racism in Canadian Schools: Ideologies of Language and Culture among Korean Transnational Students in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a 2.4-year ethnography with Korean Early Study Abroad (ESA, pre-college-aged study abroad) students in Toronto high schools, I examine the intersections among race, class, language, culture and citizenship (including immigrant status) in the identity construction and language learning of these students. Conceptualising race as a…

  17. Emerging Culture of English-Medium Instruction in Korea: Experiences of Korean and International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Tatar, Bradley; Choi, Jinsook

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to contrastively examine Korean and international students' experiences of taking subject courses at a Korean university. Focusing on the viewpoints of the students, rather than central authorities, we attempt to reveal how language use and cultural factors are interpenetrated in the praxis of English-medium instruction (EMI). The…

  18. Alternative Assessment Options for Students with Disabilities Who Are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, L. Elena

    2008-01-01

    This review of the literature addresses the issue of assessing students with disabilities who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD). An examination of data showing disproportionate representation of students with disabilities who are CLD establishes a case for using alternative forms of assessment. Problems with some forms of traditional…

  19. A Study of Democratic School Culture Perceptions of Sport High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikgöz, Enes

    2016-01-01

    In this study; the perceptions of the students studying at sport high schools about democratic school culture were analysed in accordance with different variables. Participants of the research consisted of 216 students studying at Sport High Schools in Sakarya and Batman Provinces of Turkey. The data were collected with the Democratic School…

  20. A Culturally Appropriate Framework for Educating Collegiate International Students about Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Laura; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    International students enrolling in American universities may receive education on alcohol use because alcohol consumption is a key concern across American colleges and universities. However, general alcohol education often overlooks the specific cultural, language, and learning needs of international students. This article reviews one current…

  1. An anthropological approach to teaching health sciences students cultural competency in a field school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Frank T; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Poulsen, Keith P

    2014-02-01

    International immersion experiences do not, in themselves, provide students with the opportunity to develop cultural competence. However, using an anthropological lens to educate students allows them to learn how to negotiate cultural differences by removing their own cultural filters and seeing events through the eyes of those who are culturally different. Faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Global Health Institute believed that an embedded experience, in which students engaged with local communities, would encourage them to adopt this Cultural Competency 2.0 position. With this goal in mind, they started the Field School for the Study of Language, Culture, and Community Health in Ecuador in 2003 to teach cultural competency to medical, veterinary, pharmacy, and nursing students. The program was rooted in medical anthropology and embraced the One Health initiative, which is a collaborative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to obtain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment. In this article, the authors identify effective practices and challenges for using a biocultural approach to educating students. In a semester-long preparatory class, students study the Spanish language, region-specific topics, and community engagement principles. While in Ecuador for five weeks, students apply their knowledge during community visits that involve homestays and service learning projects, for which they partner with local communities to meet their health needs. This combination of language and anthropological course work and community-based service learning has led to positive outcomes for the local communities as well as professional development for students and faculty.

  2. When nursing meets English: using a pathography to develop nursing students' culturally competent selves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Diann; Thomas-Connor, Iona; Tsao, Ting Man

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a collaboration between nursing and English faculty to pilot and study the use of a pathography to develop nursing students' cultural competence. The setting is a nursing program in an urban community college serving many foreign-born students. Interpreting a pathography was found to develop students' compassion for the patient and family. Exercises and assignments were used to challenge students to critically read complex transcultural interactions and apply relevant nursing concepts to analysis of these situations in health care delivery. The essay assignment presented challenges to students because of their writing skills.

  3. Helping Students Value Cultural Diversity through Research-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakins, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Although international students studying in New Zealand desire and expect contact with their domestic peers, the level of cross-national interactions remains generally low. This paper describes an initiative to promote more and better intercultural understanding within a target group of students having similar needs and interests in a higher…

  4. Helping Students Value Cultural Diversity through Research-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakins, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Although international students studying in New Zealand desire and expect contact with their domestic peers, the level of cross-national interactions remains generally low. This paper describes an initiative to promote more and better intercultural understanding within a target group of students having similar needs and interests in a higher…

  5. Culturing Reality: How Organic Chemistry Graduate Students Develop into Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bodner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one of the presumed aims of graduate training programs is to help students develop into practitioners of their chosen fields, very little is known about how this transition occurs. In the course of studying how graduate students learn to solve organic synthesis problems, we were able to identify some of the key factors in the epistemic…

  6. International Students' Views on Local Culture: Turkish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Yakup; Bahar, Mustafa; Griffiths, Carol

    2017-01-01

    The number of international students in Turkey has steadily increased in recent years. As they come from different geographical locations, their successful adaptation to a medium sized country in-between three continents is of great interest. This study was conducted to investigate international students' perceptions of their Turkish experience.…

  7. University Students' Depression: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Santos, Maria Luisa R.; Habibi, Mojtaba; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Australian, Iranian and Portuguese university students ("n"?=?967) completed the University Students Depression Inventory (USDI) in English, Persian and Portuguese languages, respectively. A series of MANOVA analyses were used to examine differences in depression symptoms as an effect of the country and demographic variables.…

  8. Stigmatised Learners: Mature-Age Students Negotiating University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Research on the socially-situated nature of learning shows how practices and identities are affected by participation in communities, but very little is known about how mature-age students experience the relational dynamics of university. Based on data from a qualitative study of first-year students, we consider written accounts by older learners…

  9. Are International Students' Preferred Pedagogy Influenced by Their Educational Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Junko

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of international students is studying at British universities. This study investigates multicultural students' preferences on teaching and learning which was conducted at a university in the South of England during 2009/2010 academic year. In the literature review, the framework used in this study is explained. The study…

  10. Culturing Reality: How Organic Chemistry Graduate Students Develop into Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bodner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one of the presumed aims of graduate training programs is to help students develop into practitioners of their chosen fields, very little is known about how this transition occurs. In the course of studying how graduate students learn to solve organic synthesis problems, we were able to identify some of the key factors in the epistemic…

  11. International Students and "The Presentation of Self" across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, Abu

    2017-01-01

    Findings from this qualitative research study suggest that some international students view social and academic interactions not simply as mediums for absorbing requisite sociocultural and academic norms, and discipline knowledge, but also as stages for expressing their varied identities. As a result, whenever students' ability to present their…

  12. Cultural Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Korean Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyojung; Puig, Ana; Lee, Jayoung; Lee, Ji Hee; Lee, Sang Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the MBI-SS in Korean students. Specifically, we investigated whether the original three-factor structure of the MBI-SS was appropriate for use with Korean students. In addition, by running multi-group structural equation model analyses with factorial invariance tests simultaneously…

  13. Students' Vıews On Culture Of Fear In Educatıon System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine students’ perceptions about concept of fear culture and to see what kind of fear culture do they have. This study which is conducted by qualitative research approach was carried out with 74 students studying in primary school in Diyarbakır, in 2014-2015 academic year. In order to determine study group, convenience sampling was used in this research. According to results of this study, perceptions of fear culture which students have, were grouped ...

  14. Changing the Engineering Student Culture with Respect to Academic Integrity and Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDeGrift, Tammy; Dillon, Heather; Camp, Loreal

    2017-08-01

    Engineers create airplanes, buildings, medical devices, and software, amongst many other things. Engineers abide by a professional code of ethics to uphold people's safety and the reputation of the profession. Likewise, students abide by a code of academic integrity while learning the knowledge and necessary skills to prepare them for the engineering and computing professions. This paper reports on studies designed to improve the engineering student culture with respect to academic integrity and ethics. To understand the existing culture at a university in the USA, a survey based on a national survey about cheating was administered to students. The incidences of self-reported cheating and incidences of not reporting others who cheat show the culture is similar to other institutions. Two interventions were designed and tested in an introduction to an engineering course: two case studies that students discussed in teams and the whole class, and a letter of recommendation assignment in which students wrote about themselves (character, strengths, examples of ethical decisions) three years into the future. Students were surveyed after the two interventions. Results show that first-year engineering students appreciate having a code of academic integrity and they want to earn their degree without cheating, yet less than half of the students would report on another cheating student. The letter of recommendation assignment had some impact on getting students to think about ethics, their character, and their actions. Future work in changing the student culture will continue in both a top-down (course interventions) and bottom-up (student-driven interventions) manner.

  15. Supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students during clinical placement: strategies from both sides of the table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Milner, Julia

    2015-10-15

    Increasing proportions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) students within health professional courses at universities creates challenges in delivering inclusive training and education. Clinical placements are a core component of most health care degrees as they allow for applied learning opportunities. A research gap has been identified in regard to understanding challenges and strategies for CALD students in health professional placements. A key stakeholder approach was used to examine barriers and enablers experienced by CALD students in clinical placement. Semi-structured focus groups with healthcare students (n = 13) and clinical placement supervisors (n = 12) were employed. The focus groups were analysed using open coding and thematic analysis. Three main barrier areas were identified: placement planning and preparation; teaching, assessment and feedback; and cultural and language issues. Potential solutions included addressing placement planning and preparation barriers, appropriate student placement preparation, pre-placement identification of higher risk CALD students, and diversity training for supervisors. For the barrier of teaching, assessment & feedback, addressing strategies were to: adapt student caseloads, encourage regular casual supervisor-student conversations, develop supportive placement delivery modes and structures, set expectations early, model the constructive feedback process, use visual aids, and tailor the learning environment to individual student needs. The enablers for cultural & language issues were to: build language and practical approaches for communication, raise awareness of the healthcare system (how it interacts with healthcare professions and how patients access it), and initiate mentoring programs. The findings suggest that teaching and learning strategies should be student-centred, aiming to promote awareness of difference and its impacts then develop appropriate responses by both student and teacher

  16. Cultural competence course for nursing students in Taiwan: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Jung; Chang, Pei-rong; Wang, Ling-Hua; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2015-12-01

    Culturally competent care is an essential ability for nursing students. However, little is known about the effects of educational intervention on attitudes or behavior changes with regard to cultural competence in Taiwan. This study evaluates the effects of a cultural competence course for nursing students. Using a longitudinal study design, 105 participants were assigned to an experiment group (51 participants) and control group (54 participants) based on the school they attended. Students in the experiment group received a two-credit course on cultural competence care. Using the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese Version (CCA-CV), data were collected between 2012 and 2013 at three points in time: before and after the course and again 6 to 8 months after the two groups (experiment and control) had completed the clinical practicum. The results of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis indicate that the cultural competence of all participants had improved at the posttest assessment, with the experiment group showing a significantly better improvement over the control group. However, the overall effectiveness of the training diminished with time. This study supports that taking a cultural competence course effectively enhances the cultural competence of nursing students for a limited period of time immediately following the course. These results support that the benefits of incorporating a cultural competence course in clinical practice should be considered in the future. Furthermore, healthcare institutions should be encouraged to provide greater support and consideration to cultural competence issues in the nursing workplace in order to reinforce and extend the benefits of cultural competence courses provided at nursing schools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Communication and cultural implications of short-term study-abroad experiences on engineering students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M. Omachinski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Study abroad is an important international learning component to add to students’ university experience. As programs of study become more rigorous and detailed, it is difficult for students to incorporate study abroad into their schedules, especially those in engineering programs. Short-term study abroad provides engineering students with an opportunity to view engineering on a global scale and to gain cultural awareness. This research study examines the cultural adjustment, communication issues, and experiential learning of a group of engineering students who studied abroad in Germany during their winter break.

  18. The Influence of Selected Elements of Schools Culture on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was recommended among others that secondary school leaders should carry out ... in school culture oriented programmes so as to take advantage of improvement in ... Keywords: Teachers' Collaboration, Self-Efficacy, Achievement Goal ...

  19. The Relationship Between Cultural Sensitivity and Assertiveness in Nursing Students from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Serap Parlar; Sevinç, Sibel

    2017-07-01

    As foreigners live in and visit Turkey for various reasons, it is essential to provide culturally appropriate health care. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between cultural sensitivity and assertiveness in university nursing students. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at two universities in the cities of Kilis and Elazığ, Turkey. The study sample consisted of 444 nursing students. Data collection tools included a questionnaire about participant sociodemographic characteristics, Chen and Starosta's Intercultural Sensitivity Scale, and the Rathus Assertiveness Scale. The mean age of participants was 21.09 years. Most students (71.6%) were female and 34.7% of the students stayed at the hostel. Of the students, 44.4%, 27.5%, and 28.2% attended were the second-, third-, and fourth-year students, respectively. Participants were asked about problems related to caring for patients who speak different languages. The mean score for the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale was 89.42 ± 13.55 and the total score for all students for the Assertiveness Scale was 112.64 ± 15.61. We identified a positive relationship between total scores for the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale and the Assertiveness Scale ( p < .001). There was relationship between cultural sensitivity and gender and want to work overseas; assertiveness and year of nursing education and want to work overseas. Nursing students at both schools had a moderate level of cultural sensitivity and assertiveness. It has been determined that as assertiveness level of the students increased, intercultural sensitivity of them also increased. Consequently, it is concluded that training as assertive and self-confident individuals during the nursing education of students has a contribution to making patient-specific and culture-sensitive care.

  20. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

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    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  1. ON HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH RELATED PHYSICAL CULTURE TRAININGS OF FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

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    V.G. Fotynyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess health protection and health related physical culture trainings of first year students. Material: in the research first year students (n=121; 86 boys and 35girls of age 16 - 19 years, participated. Results: components of students’ individual health were found. Situation with health related physical culture trainings, ensuring students’ sound health and optimal functional potentials of their organisms were determined. It was found that leading role shall be played by formation of health world vision values, knowledge about formation of practical skills in healthy life style. Motivation tendency for realization of intentions and practicing of health related physical culture trainings were found in students. Conclusions: the received results prove students’ tendency to pay insufficient attention to individual health. It was found that health related physical culture trainings require modern renewal of education’s content, forms and methods of physical education. The basis of such trainings shall be health related orientation.

  2. The "Strengthening Nursing Culture Project" - an exploratory evaluation study of nursing students' placements within Aboriginal Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bethne; Cavanagh, Miriam; Douglas, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Cultural awareness and cultural competence have been the focus of the transcultural nursing literature that has explored the roles and responsibilities of nurses in their care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Cultural immersion programs, upholding cultural safety and cultural humility, offer valuable guidance to the education of nursing students regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and cultures. This study seeks to explore nursing students' experiences of a cultural immersion program within Aboriginal Medical Services (AMSs) in New South Wales, Australia. Eight nursing students participated in a mixed methods design exploratory study of their clinical placement within AMSs. A survey gathered data regarding levels of preparation and confidence, learning barriers, placement stressors and personal reflections. Nursing students reported positive and transformative experiences of intercultural learning. Cultural immersion programs provide a valuable framework for the design and evaluation of clinical placement programs for nursing students within intercultural learning spaces.

  3. Formation of positive motivation as the basis of students will qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing

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    Dudnyk I.O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to theoretically substantiate and test experimentally pedagogic conditions of positive motivation’s formation as the basis for students will and physical qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing. Material: 244 first year students participated in experiment. At the beginning and at the end of experiment levels of manifestation of students’ will and physical qualities were assessed. Results: we have proved successfulness of will training if this process is naturally coincides with formation of positive motivation and perfection of motor fitness. It was found that motivation for physical culture practicing result from different demands: demand in motion, demand in fulfillment of student’s duties and demand in competition functioning. Conclusions: we have offered the following pedagogic conditions: application of game and competition methods: setting of appropriate for students tasks of training; usage of sufficient sport equipment and apparatuses; forcing of students for independent physical culture practicing through system of encouragement.

  4. Addressing culture shock in first year midwifery students: Maximising the initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Catling, Christine; Hogan, Rosemarie; Homer, Caroline S E

    2014-12-01

    Many Bachelor of Midwifery students have not had any exposure to the hospital setting prior to their clinical placement. Students have reported their placements are foreign to them, with a specialised confusing 'language'. It is important to provide support to students to prevent culture shock that may lead to them leaving the course. To assist first year midwifery students with the transition into clinical practice by providing a preparatory workshop. An action research project developed resources for a workshop held prior to students' first clinical placement. Four phases were held: Phase one involved holding discussion groups with students returning from clinical practice; Phase two was the creation of vodcasts; Phase three was integration of resources into the clinical subject and phase four was the evaluation and reflection on the action research project. Evaluations of the workshops were undertaken through surveying the students after they returned from their clinical placement. A descriptive analysis of the evaluations was performed. Students rated the workshop, vodcasts and the simulated handover positively. Further recommendations were that complications of labour and birth be included in their first semester as students were unexpectedly exposed to this in their first clinical placement. The students evaluated the workshop positively in reducing the amount of culture shock experienced on the first clinical placement. In addition the students provided further recommendations of strategies that would assist with clinical placement. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of culture shock and cross-cultural adaptation on learning satisfaction of mainland China students studying in Taiwan

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    Shieh, Chich-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the national impact of low fertility, the enrollment of higher education in Taiwan is facing a dilemma. To cope with such a problem, the government has actively promoted Mainland China students to study in Taiwan. In addition to enhancing the international competitiveness of domestic universities, cross-strait education, and real academic exchange, it is expected to solve the enrollment shortage of colleges. However, the situations and pressures of Culture Shock, Cross-Cultural Adaptation, and Learning Satisfaction are critical for Mainland China students. Taking Mainland China students who study in Taiwan for more than four months (about a semester as the research participants, a total of 250 questionnaires were distributed and 167 valid ones were retrieved, with a retrieval rate of 67%. The research findings show significant correlations between Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Culture Shock, Culture Shock and Learning Satisfaction, and Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Learning Satisfaction.Debido al impacto de la baja fertilidad en el país, Taiwán afronta un dilema en relación con la inscripción en la enseñanza superior. Para enfrentarse al problema el gobierno ha promovido activamente que estudiantes de la China continental estudien en Taiwán. Además de incrementar la competitividad internacional de las universidades taiwanesas, la formación a ambos lados del estrecho y un verdadero intercambio académico, se espera que ello solucione la escasez de inscripciones en las facultades. Sin embargo, las situaciones y las presiones que generan el choque cultural, la adaptación multicultural y la satisfacción con el aprendizaje resultan críticas para los estudiantes de la China continental. Tomando como muestra de investigación a estudiantes de la China continental que estudian en Taiwán durante más de cuatro meses (aproximadamente un semestre, se distribuyó un total de 250 cuestionarios, de los cuales 167 fueron válidos, con una tasa

  6. Influencing Student Relationships With Physics Through Culturally Relevant Tools

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    Van Dusen, Ben

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how an urban, high school physics class responded to the inclusion of a classroom set of iPads and associated applications, such as screencasting. The participatory roles of students and the expressions of their relationships to physics were examined. Findings suggest that iPad technology altered classroom norms and student relationships to include increased student agency and use of evidence. Findings also suggest that the iPad provided a connection between physics, social status, and play. Videos, observations, interviews, and survey responses were analyzed to provide insight into the nature of these changes.

  7. Taiwanese medical students' narratives of intercultural professionalism dilemmas: exploring tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Gosselin, Katherine; Chandratilake, Madawa; Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-05-01

    In an era of globalization, cultural competence is necessary for the provision of quality healthcare. Although this topic has been well explored in non-Western cultures within Western contexts, the authors explore how Taiwanese medical students trained in Western medicine address intercultural professionalism dilemmas related to tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture. A narrative interview method was employed with 64 Taiwanese medical students to collect narratives of professionalism dilemmas. Noting the prominence of culture in students' narratives, we explored this theme further using secondary analysis, identifying tensions between Western medicine and Taiwanese culture and categorizing students' intercultural professionalism dilemmas according to Friedman and Berthoin Antal's 'intercultural competence' framework: involving combinations of advocacy (i.e., championing one's own culture) and inquiry (i.e., exploring one's own and others' cultures). One or more intercultural dilemmas were identified in nearly half of students' professionalism dilemma narratives. Qualitative themes included: family relations, local policy, end-of-life care, traditional medicine, gender relations and Taiwanese language. Of the 62 narratives with sufficient detail for further analysis, the majority demonstrated the 'suboptimal' low advocacy/low inquiry approach (i.e., withdrawal or inaction), while very few demonstrated the 'ideal' high advocacy/high inquiry approach (i.e., generating mutual understanding, so 'intercultural competence'). Though nearly half of students' professionalism narratives concerned intercultural dilemmas, most narratives represented disengagement from intercultural dilemmas, highlighting a possible need for more attention on intercultural competence training in Taiwan. The advocacy/inquiry framework may help educators to address similar disconnects between Western medicine and non-Western cultures in other contexts.

  8. "Signs of Life" in the High School Classroom: Analyzing Popular Culture to Provide Student Choice in Analytical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author offers a user-friendly approach to semiotics that engages students in critical examination of the popular culture they are already immersed in. She defines semiotics as "the study of signs" and explains how asking students to analyze cultural objects and practices from ordinary life and popular culture can engage their…

  9. "Signs of Life" in the High School Classroom: Analyzing Popular Culture to Provide Student Choice in Analytical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author offers a user-friendly approach to semiotics that engages students in critical examination of the popular culture they are already immersed in. She defines semiotics as "the study of signs" and explains how asking students to analyze cultural objects and practices from ordinary life and popular culture can engage their…

  10. Study of the Effectiveness of Multi-Cultural Education on the Attitude towards National Integration of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The present endeavour enables the students to gain information and knowledge about different sub-cultures as well as to develop positive attitude towards national integration. A country lives and thrives in its cultural heritage. Culture is a treasure to be preserved, perpetuated and promoted. Today's students will be the future nation builders.…

  11. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

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    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area. Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on. The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  12. Trying to fit in - upper secondary school students' negotiation processes between sports culture and youth culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Thing, Lone Friis

    2017-01-01

    youth culture, because living a healthy and physically active life doesn’t fit very well with the prevailing norms of youth culture, which involve a dominant social arena characterized by parties and alcohol. By applying the figurational sociology of Norbert Elias, this article shows that being included...

  13. Minority students in the science classroom: Issues of language, class, race, culture and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin Edward

    A considerable proportion of the educationally at-risk students in the K-12 public education system is composed of minority students, either in terms of cultural background, linguistic background, and frequently, both. In particular, satisfactory levels of achievement in science are not being attained by these students. The concerns of this study center on examining and understanding the reasons underlying this situation, with a view to suggesting how these problems of underachievement in science might be addressed. Previous and ongoing educational research concerning these issues suggest that such underachievement may be due to current pedagogical practices which seem to actively discourage these students from achieving any significant measure of academic, educational or professional success. The purpose of this study is thus to explore the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, especially those minority students for whom English is not a first language and who have limited English proficiency (LEP). In the course of this study, the terminology 'minority students' will refer to and be inclusive of cultural and/or language minorities, i.e. those students who differ from the mainstream white American student in terms of cultural background and a native language other than English. Culturally derived usages of non-standard forms of English (e.g. Black English Vernacular) also will be subsumed within this definition of cultural and language minority students. Particular attention will be given to emergent issues relating to current pedagogical practices, also to the science teacher beliefs and epistemological rationales underlying such practices. In exploring these beliefs and pedagogical practices, the study also will seek to delineate and to understand the various problems which are being encountered in the teaching of science to minority students. As the result of exploring the beliefs and pedagogical practices of

  14. Homesickness among students in two cultures : antecedents and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, Margaret; van Vliet, Tony; Hewstone, Miles; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    Review of the theoretical and empirical literature on homesickness showed that despite recent advances, scientific understanding of the impact on students of leaving home for college is still limited. Further empirical investigation using standardized measures, structural equation models and includi

  15. Physical culture in the life of students with disabilities

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    Adyrkhaev S.G.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Consider the ratio of students with disabilities to physical education for learning. Justified starting conceptual tenets of the theory and methodology of physical education students with different nosology. Are proven theoretical knowledge of motor activity with students nosology: vision, hearing, musculoskeletal and cerebral palsy, diabetes mellitus and with somatic diseases. It is noted that in the formation of the modern system of physical education of young people with disabilities to the forefront should be nominated by the humanistic ideas of respect for the individual, taking care of his health and development. Accentuated the need to generate dynamic system of physical education students, which gives a person a deep knowledge of his body, his motor capabilities, effective means of exposure to psychophysical conditions and methods of their use, maintain and improve health.

  16. Homesickness among students in two cultures : antecedents and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, Margaret; van Vliet, Tony; Hewstone, Miles; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    Review of the theoretical and empirical literature on homesickness showed that despite recent advances, scientific understanding of the impact on students of leaving home for college is still limited. Further empirical investigation using standardized measures, structural equation models and includi

  17. Building Rapport between International Graduate Students and Their Faculty Advisors: Cross- Cultural Mentoring Relationships at the University of Guelph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Faiza; Mahone, James P.; Ngobia, Jane; FitzSimons, John

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring graduate students is very challenging, even when both the student and faculty have similar cultural values. Many international students have a different culture from that of Canadian. Their challenge is adapting to their new environment, and for their faculty advisors to understand and work well with them. This research explored the…

  18. Building a Connected Classroom: Teachers' Narratives about Managing the Cultural Diversity of Ethnic Minority Students in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2013-01-01

    Many Hong Kong schools are concerned about their growing numbers of ethnic minority students. When these students are enrolled in Hong Kong secondary schools, how their cultural diversity is catered for becomes critical. This article examines how teachers narrate the cultural diversity of ethnic minority students, who come from Pakistan, India,…

  19. Building a Connected Classroom: Teachers' Narratives about Managing the Cultural Diversity of Ethnic Minority Students in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2013-01-01

    Many Hong Kong schools are concerned about their growing numbers of ethnic minority students. When these students are enrolled in Hong Kong secondary schools, how their cultural diversity is catered for becomes critical. This article examines how teachers narrate the cultural diversity of ethnic minority students, who come from Pakistan, India,…

  20. The Role of Study-Abroad Students in Cultural Diplomacy: Toward an International Education as Soft Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akli, Madalina

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that study-abroad students should be at the center of cultural diplomacy. It recognizes that students can engage in soft action to establish intercultural dialogue. They develop and sustain relationships with people from host countries through cultural immersion and education. Study-abroad students are encouraged to proactively…

  1. Does high-stakes testing increase cultural capital among low-income and racial minority students?

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    Won-Pyo Hong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on research from Texas and Chicago to examine whether high-stakes testing enables low-income and racial minority students to acquire cultural capital. While students' performance on state or district tests rose after the implementation of high-stakes testing and accountability policies in Texas and Chicago in the 1990s, several studies indicate that these policies seemed to have had deleterious effects on curriculum, instruction, the percentage of students excluded from the tests, and student dropout rates. As a result, the policies seemed to have had mixed effects on students' opportunities to acquire embodied and institutionalized cultural capital. These findings are consistent with the work of Shepard (2000, Darling-Hammond (2004a, and others who have written of the likely negative repercussions of high-stakes testing and accountability policies.

  2. Interdisciplinary Service-Learning: Building Student Competencies through the Cross-Cultural Parent Groups Project

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    Michele Belliveau

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Changing demographics and an emphasis on competency-based social work education call for innovative approaches to the delivery of curricular content. In an effort to introduce BSW students to the socio-political issues facing the local Latino immigrant community, a service-learning project was developed in collaboration with the Spanish Language Department and a local middle school. An analysis of outcomes from social work student evaluations showed that students engaged with the community and issues in new and unexpected ways. Through their engagement in a cross-cultural group project, students developed greater cultural competency, honed their group practice skills in an unfamiliar context, provided a needed service to the community, and raised their awareness about the working conditions of new immigrants as part of a developing framework for social action. Details and implications of the project as a means to build student competencies are described.

  3. Approaches to learning among occupational therapy undergraduate students: A cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Fong, Kenneth N K; Bonsaksen, Tore; Lan, Tan Hwei; Murdolo, Yuki; Gonzalez, Pablo Cruz; Beng, Lim Hua

    2017-07-01

    Students may adopt various approaches to academic learning. Occupational therapy students' approaches to study and the impact of cultural context have not been formally investigated to date. To examine the approaches to study adopted by undergraduate occupational therapy students from four different cultural settings. 712 undergraduate occupational therapy students (n = 376 from Australia, n = 109 from Hong Kong, n = 160 from Norway and n = 67 from Singapore) completed the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the ASSIST subscales for the students from the four countries. Post-hoc comparisons using the Tukey HSD test indicated that the mean scores for the strategic approach were significantly different between Australia and the other three countries. The mean scores for the surface approach were significantly different between Australia and Hong Kong, and Hong Kong and Norway. There were no significant differences between the deep approach to studying between Australia, Norway, Singapore and Hong Kong. Culture and educational context do appear to impact the approaches to study adopted by undergraduate occupational therapy students. Academic and practice educators need to be cognizant of what approaches to studying the students they work with adopt.

  4. Perceived Training Needs of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments Who Work with Students from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Torres, Silvia M.; Durando, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify the needs of educators in the field of visual impairment who work with students from diverse backgrounds. The 204 participants reported areas of need, including culturally responsive teaching and practicum opportunities. Additional findings, recommendations, limitations, and suggestions for…

  5. Designing a Culturally Appropriate Format of Formative Peer Assessment for Asian Students: The Case of Vietnamese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Pham Thi Hong; Gillies, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Peer assessment has recently been widely recommended in Vietnamese classrooms. However, there are argumentative opinions about this assessment because it has many conflicts with the learning culture of Vietnamese students. To date, there has not been any study addressing this issue. The present study investigated how Vietnamese students…

  6. International Appraisal of Nursing Culture and Curricula: A Qualitative Study of Erasmus Students

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    Jose Siles Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Globalization of knowledge has emphasized the need to promote the adoption of international exchange programs in nursing. Nevertheless, the differences in cultural, educational, and structural schemes have challenged the mutual appraisal and understanding of the nursing curricula between countries. Research on nursing curricula should allow performing an analysis of different cultural idiosyncrasies in which educational and health institutions are found. These studies would contribute valuable information to the educative and organizational systems and their cultural variability. Objective. To examine the experiences of nursing students on international exchange programs. Methods. Comparative Education was taken as theoretical background. The clinical practice diaries of seven Spanish Nursing Erasmus students (a European international exchange program were used as field journals. These students undertook their placements in the United Kingdom. A content analysis was carried out to find major themes. Results. Data extracted from the students clinical practice diaries indicated cultural, educational, and structural differences between countries. Most students reflected the hidden curriculum in their diaries, writing about affective, ideological, personal, and social elements and beliefs. Conclusions. The students’ experiences on international exchange programs were found to be sources of interest to clarify the ideological and cultural connections that underlie educational and health systems.

  7. Where Cultural Competency Begins: Changes in Undergraduate Students' Intercultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Elizabeth J.; Tupy, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs and accreditation organizations have acknowledged need for educators to demonstrate intercultural knowledge, skills, and abilities. Teacher educators are responding to emphasis in higher education to assure that graduates achieve intercultural competence (NCATE, 2008). This study compared the cultural competency of…

  8. The Role of Culture, Competitiveness and Economic Performance in Explaining Academic Performance: A Global Market Analysis for International Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Hamin

    2011-01-01

    A nation's culture, competitiveness and economic performance explain academic performance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) testing of 2252 students shows culture affects competitiveness and academic performance. Culture and economic performance each explain 32%; competitiveness 36%. The model predicts academic performance when culture, competitiveness…

  9. The Role of Culture, Competitiveness and Economic Performance in Explaining Academic Performance: A Global Market Analysis for International Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Chris; Hamin

    2011-01-01

    A nation's culture, competitiveness and economic performance explain academic performance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) testing of 2252 students shows culture affects competitiveness and academic performance. Culture and economic performance each explain 32%; competitiveness 36%. The model predicts academic performance when culture, competitiveness…

  10. Rethinking Classroom Diversity: Three Student Cultures in a Mainline Seminary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must…

  11. Student Resistance Culture against School Values: An Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakul, Aygülen Kayahan

    2016-01-01

    Schools operating within capitalism reproduce class differences, and aim to graduate students who comply with the capitalist system. On the other hand, according to the principles of dialectical materialism, while schools aim to produce obedience, they also produce resistance to themselves at the same time. Working class children sometimes refuse…

  12. High School Students' Attitudes Towards Spiders: A cross-cultural comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Tolarovičová, Andrea; Camerik, Anne M.; Peterková, Viera

    2010-08-01

    Spiders are traditionally considered to be among the least popular of animals. Current evidence suggests that a negative attitude towards spiders could be influenced by both cultural and evolutionary pressures. Some researchers suggest that science education activities could positively influence students' perceptions of spiders. Their evidence is, however, ambivalent. Using a five-point score Likert-type questionnaire in which the items were developed in a similar way to four of Kellert's categories of attitude (scientistic, negativistic, naturalistic, and ecologistic) towards invertebrates, we compared the level of knowledge of and attitudes towards spiders of high school students from two countries, Slovakia (n = 354) and South Africa (n = 382). The students represented different cultures and followed dissimilar science education curricula. Only among the Slovakian students there was a statistically significant but low correlation between knowledge and attitude (r = 0.30). The South African students scored higher in the categories of scientistic, naturalistic, and ecologistic attitudes. Comparison of attitude towards spiders of indigenous Africans from coeducational Catholic schools revealed that South African students have greater fear of spiders than Slovakian students, supporting the biological preparedness hypothesis. This hypothesis predicts a greater fear of spiders in South Africa than in Europe since several South African spiders possess venoms that are dangerous to humans. The results of this study are discussed from science education, cultural, and evolutionary perspectives.

  13. Development and evaluation of an instrument to assess medical students' cultural attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, L S; Alexander, G L; Wolf, F M; Fantone, J C; Davis, W K

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an instrument designed to assess medical students' comfort with a range of sociocultural issues and intercultural experiences. Each survey item obliged students to reflect on their own sociocultural identities and academic status in relation to others', and to judge how comfortable they would be interacting across perceived boundaries based on sociocultural identity and academic status. More than 90% of University of Michigan first-year medical students (n=153) completed the survey just before classes began. Principal components analysis of the survey's 26 items identified 7 interpretable factors or subscales; the Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the 7 subscales and the total scale ranged from .73 to .92. T-tests were used to investigate differences in average ratings among student subgroups (based on gender and ethnicity). To assess the magnitude of the effect of the differences between groups, effect size was computed for each of the means comparisons. Psychometric analyses indicated that this survey was both reliable and valid for assessing students' cultural attitudes. Further, analyses by gender and ethnic subgroup identified meaningful ratings differences in men's and women's reported comfort levels. Our findings suggest that this instrument is useful for assessing students' openness to developing cultural awareness and competence. Educators at other medical schools may find this instrument useful as a needs assessment tool for planning educational programs designed to increase students' cultural competence.

  14. Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Undergraduate Student Views of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino de la Rubia, Leigh S.; Lin, Tzung-Jin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-07-01

    Past studies investigating university level students' views of nature of science (NOS) were relatively few and most of them were conducted in Western countries. This paper focuses upon comparing the quantitative patterns in Western (US Caucasian and African-American) and non-Western (Taiwanese) students' views of NOS (VNOS) by adopting a survey instrument. This analysis combined with qualitative data begin to uncover details of potential cultural differences in patterns specifically in the US educational context by comparing Caucasian and African-American student responses to a question from a commonly used assessment of VNOS. Results show different patterns of views along the four dimensions of NOS (social negotiation, invented/creative NOS, cultural impacts, and changing/tentative feature of science) according to student major, student gender, and student ethnicity. These differences and similarities have the potential to impact undergraduate education and underrepresentation of cultural minorities in science careers and call for further research into NOS views in the context of diverse student groups.

  15. Landscapes of promise: An examination of students' journals written during a cross-cultural wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Judith Ann

    1997-12-01

    This paper is an examination of nature journals written by ten American and ten Russian high school students during a cross-cultural exchange that provided experiences in selected national wilderness areas designated by the respective countries. The students participated in a backpacking excursion in the Lee Metcalf Wilderness Area of Montana in the summer of 1994, and a camping experience in the wilderness areas in the provincial region of Penza, Russia in the summer of 1995. The examination of the journals focuses on the following areas: aesthetic "peak" experiences; spiritual inspiration derived from experiences in nature; attitudes toward the preservation of wildlife; and environmental ethics. The students' attitudes toward the environment is compared using student-identified cultural values of both the Russian and the American students. Also discussed is the viability of the students' reflections as natural history journal-writing, with references to selected natural history authors, including Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold and Anne Dillard. Because the experience focused on wilderness preservation students were invited to speculate about how to develop and reinforce essential attitudes that are respectful of ecology. Conclusions they reached included the necessity to economic security at some level and the notion that direct experience in the environment is essential to developing an attitude that will engender an ethics of caring within their--as well as other--cultural groups.

  16. Enhancing student schematic knowledge of culture through literature circles in a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham-Marr Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving student understanding of a foreign language culture is anything but a peripheral issue in the teaching of a foreign language. This pilot study reports on a second year required English course in a university in Japan that took a Literature Circles approach, where students were asked to read short stories out of class and then discuss these stories in class. Although students reported that they did not gain any special insights into the target language culture presented, they did report that reading fiction as source material for classroom activity helps with the acquisition of a vocabulary set that is more closely associated with lifestyle and culture. The results suggest that further study is warranted. Procedures of this pilot study are described and interpreted in the context of the English education system in Japan.

  17. Job Displacement and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Patrick; Ouazad, Amine

    This paper matches a comprehensive Danish employer-employee data set with individual crime information (timing of offenses, charges, convictions, and prison terms by crime type) to estimate the impact of job displacement on an individual’s propensity to commit crime. We focus on displaced individ...

  18. XY displacement device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerens, W.C.; Laham, C.D.; Holman, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    An XY-displacement device (1) with a four-fold symmetry comprises a reference frame (10); an object mount (20) for holding an object (22) to be displaced; an X-manipulator (100) coupled between the reference frame (10) and the object mount (20), which provides a rigid coupling between the object mou

  19. Displacement data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, W. Steven; Venkataramani, Shankar; Mariano, Arthur J.; Restrepo, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information is important. While the displacement transformation is generic, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter framework and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  20. Interdisciplinary Area of Research Offers Tool of Cross-Cultural Understanding: Cross-Cultural Student Seminar for Communication Training on Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Misunderstanding often occurs in a multidisciplinary field of study, because each field has its own background of thinking. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop the multidisciplinary field of study. Because each nation has its own cultural background, communication in an international seminar is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student seminar has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study. Students from a variety of back grounds have joined in the seminar. Both equations and figures are effective tools for communication in the field of science. The seminar works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study of biomedical engineering. An interdisciplinary area of research offers the tool of cross-cultural understanding. The present study refers to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  1. Academic misconduct in nursing students: behaviors, attitudes, rationalizations, and cultural identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrink, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about academic misconduct in associate degree nursing students enrolled in two nursing programs in the northeastern United States. Study respondents (n = 193) identified the frequency of engagement in behaviors of misconduct in both the classroom and clinical setting and their attitudes toward the identified behaviors of misconduct, neutralization behaviors, ethical standards of the nursing profession, and the ethic of caring within the nursing profession. Findings were consistent with previous research on academic misconduct in baccalaureate nursing students. Analysis of self-reported cultural identities refuted the prevailing literature on academic misconduct across differing cultures and nations.

  2. The possible selves of international students and their cross-cultural adjustment in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruby Pi-Ju; Noels, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    We assessed 93 international students' reports of their expected and feared possible selves in terms of their thematic content and configuration, and examined the relations between possible selves and cultural adjustment in Canada. The results showed that international students mostly envisioned possible selves in career, education, intrapersonal, and interpersonal domains, and reported more balanced configurations than matched configurations of possible selves. Balanced possible selves in the educational domain were associated with better psychological well-being, but balanced selves in the intrapersonal domains were linked with more frequent sociocultural difficulties. The findings suggest that the content of international students' possible selves reflects not only their academic-focused and career-inspired sojourn, but also their intercultural experiences with various ethnic groups in the Canadian multicultural society. As well, they speak to the motivational significance of possible selves, particularly the balanced possible selves, for supporting international students' motivation to pursue an international education and for facilitating a successful cross-cultural sojourn.

  3. Building Rapport Between International Graduate Students and Their Faculty Advisors: Cross-Cultural Mentoring Relationships at the University of Guelph

    OpenAIRE

    Faiza Omar; James P. Mahone; Jane Ngobia; John FitzSimons

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring graduate students is very challenging, even when both the student and faculty have similar cultural values. Many international students have a different culture from that of Canadian. Their challenge is adapting to their new environment, and for their faculty advisors to understand and work well with them. This research explored the relationships, experience, and challenges of international graduate students and their faculty advisors at the University of Guelph, through focus group...

  4. Science knowledge and cognitive strategy use among culturally and linguistically diverse students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee; Fradd, Sandra H.; Sutman, Frank X.

    Science performance is determined, to a large extent, by what students already know about science (i.e., science knowledge) and what techniques or methods students use in performing science tasks (i.e., cognitive strategies). This study describes and compares science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use among four diverse groups of elementary students: (a) monolingual English Caucasian, (b) African-American, (c) bilingual Spanish, and (d) bilingual Haitian Creole. To facilitate science performance in culturally and linguistically congruent settings, the study included student dyads and teachers of the same language, culture, and gender. Science performance was observed using three science tasks: weather phenomena, simple machines, and buoyancy. Data analysis involved a range of qualitative methods focusing on major themes and patterns, and quantitative methods using coding systems to summarize frequencies and total scores. The findings reveal distinct patterns of science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use among the four language and culture groups. The findings also indicate relationships among science knowledge, science vocabulary, and cognitive strategy use. These findings raise important issues about science instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse groups of students.Received: 3 January 1995;

  5. Culture Clash: Interactions between Afrocultural and Mainstream Cultural Styles in Classrooms Serving African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouland, Karmen; Matthews, Jamaal S.; Byrd, Christy M.; Meyer, Rika M. L.; Rowley, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relation between classroom cultural and achievement-related characteristics and their influence on social outcomes in a sample of 74 fifth grade African American youth (41 girls; 33 boys) ages 10-13 years. Trained observers rated classrooms according to Boykin's (Boykin, Tyler, & Miller, 2005) definition of mainstream…

  6. Learning Trajectories of Primary Student Teachers; a Cross-Cultural Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Life history methodology was used to compare the life and educational trajectories of six primary student teachers in England with their counterparts at a Malawian Teacher Training College. A semi structured interview schedule was used to elicit the students’ childhood memories including experiences of school, significant people in their lives, interactions with their teachers and influential factors in deciding to enter teaching. Students were also asked to expand their philosophy and purpose of education, to consider their immediate needs as newly qualified classroom practitioners and predict their career trajectory over a 20 year period. The cross-cultural analysis reveals causal biographical and socio-cultural factors combining to influence students’ intentions to pursue teaching as a career. Teacher identity and notions of educational purpose revealed altruistic desires to teach, influenced by significant others in students’ personal lives; educational narratives and the socio- political contexts of the respective societies. Choices made by the English students reflected the individualistic nature of British society whereas their Malawian counterparts were driven by a desire to improve children’s education as a means of improving their country. In all cases the English students saw themselves remaining in primary education, in comparison all the Malawi students saw this as a stepping stone to a higher status role. This reflects the perceived low status that primary teaching has in Malawi and suggests that to improve education in Malawi a major priority should be to raise the status of primary teachers.

  7. Undergraduate students' development of social, cultural, and human capital in a networked research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Conaway, Evan; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-12-01

    Recent calls for reform in undergraduate biology education have emphasized integrating research experiences into the learning experiences of all undergraduates. Contemporary science research increasingly demands collaboration across disciplines and institutions to investigate complex research questions, providing new contexts and models for involving undergraduates in research. In this study, we examined the experiences of undergraduates participating in a multi-institution and interdisciplinary biology research network. Unlike the traditional apprenticeship model of research, in which a student participates in research under the guidance of a single faculty member, students participating in networked research have the opportunity to develop relationships with additional faculty and students working in other areas of the project, at their own and at other institutions. We examined how students in this network develop social ties and to what extent a networked research experience affords opportunities for students to develop social, cultural, and human capital. Most studies of undergraduate involvement in science research have focused on documenting student outcomes rather than elucidating how students gain access to research experiences or how elements of research participation lead to desired student outcomes. By taking a qualitative approach framed by capital theories, we have identified ways that undergraduates utilize and further develop various forms of capital important for success in science research. In our study of the first 16 months of a biology research network, we found that undergraduates drew upon a combination of human, cultural, and social capital to gain access to the network. Within their immediate research groups, students built multidimensional social ties with faculty, peers, and others, yielding social capital that can be drawn upon for information, resources, and support. They reported developing cultural capital in the form of learning to

  8. Undergraduate students' development of social, cultural, and human capital in a networked research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Conaway, Evan; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-04-01

    Recent calls for reform in undergraduate biology education have emphasized integrating research experiences into the learning experiences of all undergraduates. Contemporary science research increasingly demands collaboration across disciplines and institutions to investigate complex research questions, providing new contexts and models for involving undergraduates in research. In this study, we examined the experiences of undergraduates participating in a multi-institution and interdisciplinary biology research network. Unlike the traditional apprenticeship model of research, in which a student participates in research under the guidance of a single faculty member, students participating in networked research have the opportunity to develop relationships with additional faculty and students working in other areas of the project, at their own and at other institutions. We examined how students in this network develop social ties and to what extent a networked research experience affords opportunities for students to develop social, cultural, and human capital. Most studies of undergraduate involvement in science research have focused on documenting student outcomes rather than elucidating how students gain access to research experiences or how elements of research participation lead to desired student outcomes. By taking a qualitative approach framed by capital theories, we have identified ways that undergraduates utilize and further develop various forms of capital important for success in science research. In our study of the first 16 months of a biology research network, we found that undergraduates drew upon a combination of human, cultural, and social capital to gain access to the network. Within their immediate research groups, students built multidimensional social ties with faculty, peers, and others, yielding social capital that can be drawn upon for information, resources, and support. They reported developing cultural capital in the form of learning to

  9. Culturally Diverse Students in Higher Education: Challenges and Possibilities within Academic Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tkachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With growing diversity in the population, higher education faces a new situation with increasing student diversity. In our paper, we will explore questions concerning the consequences student diversity has for higher-education institutions. Based on our experience from three different R&D projects, the differences in culture and academic literacy practices give culturally diverse students challenges that have often been ignored in academia. Some other studies also document that this group of students has a much higher risk of dropping out and underachieving than majority students (Andersen & Skaarer- Kreutz, 2007; Støren, 2009. In our paper, we are going to discuss the students’ challenges and discourse of remediation that is often associated with their challenges and suggest how higher-education institutions can adjust their practices to be more oriented to intercultural communication. Intercultural communication as a dialogic approach may create dynamics in academic tutoring and lead to mutual change/transformation instead of a one-way adaptation of existing academic literacy norms. We argue that all teachers should be aware of cultural differences in literacy practices in the education systems and strive to adjust their teaching practices to the diversity in the classroom. This approach, we believe, can contribute to a better learning environment for all students, independently of their backgrounds. 

  10. A Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience to Improve Pharmacy Students' Empathy and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To implement and assess the effectiveness of an exercise designed to develop pharmacy students' empathy toward patients regarding diabetes and obesity and encourage cultural and “economic” competence. Design Students in the Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience attended a nutrition and weight management lecture, monitored their own nutritional intake by maintaining an online nutrition and exercise journal, and grocery shopped based on an assigned patient scenario. Scenarios varied in terms of income, ethnicity, insurance coverage, family size, grocery store, and medication lists. Students completed written reflections and group discussions and completed pre- and post-assignment survey instruments. Assessment The activities improved student confidence levels regarding nutrition and weight-related patient counseling, and knowledge about general nutrition and weight management. The majority of students agreed that the activities improved their ability to empathize with overweight patients regarding the challenges of nutrition and lifestyle changes and enhanced their awareness of the impact that cultural and financial situations have on nutrition and lifestyle. Conclusion The Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience positively impacted the way pharmacy students view the challenges surrounding nutrition and healthy eating in patients with culturally and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. PMID:19513175

  11. Religious literacy in the system of cultural competencies in the training of law students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolsky Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a clear definition of general cultural competence of the future specialist, it is shown that they represent a social expectation of the fact that a graduate student entering into the social life, shares the values that prevail in this society: high moral characteristics and values of humanism, has a common language, legal culture. In this context, religious literacy is considered, in the presentation we prove that it is an organic part of the composition of the general cultural competences, complements and reveals their content. The article specifically states that religious education is a necessary and relevant part in the socialization of young people.

  12. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale for use with Brazilian nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Domingues Hirsch

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale (NSSS for use with nursing students in the Brazilian context. Method: this was a quantitative exploratory and descriptive study using a cross-sectional design conducted with 123 undergraduate nursing students studying at a public university in the south of Brazil. The cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to international guidelines. Validation for use in a Brazilian context was performed using factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. Results: based on the expert committee assessment and pre-test, face and content validity were considered satisfactory. Factor analysis resulted in three constructs: curriculum and teaching; professional social interaction, and learning environment. The internal consistency of the instrument was satisfactory: the value of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.93 for the instrument as a whole, and between 0.88 and 0.89 for the constructs. Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the Nursing Student Satisfaction Scale was shown to be reliable and validated for the evaluation of student satisfaction with undergraduate nursing programs, considering the aspects teaching activities, curriculum, professional social interaction, and learning environment.

  13. Cultural competency and communication skills of dental students: clinical supervisors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, R; Ghanim, A; Morgan, M; Barrow, S

    2016-07-15

    This study explored clinical supervisor's (CS) views and experiences of dental students' cultural competence (CC) at the Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, Australia. Additionally, this study explored CS insights into how CC could be taught. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were organised with consenting CS. Interview topics included the following: the importance of CC, communication and rapport, the role of culture in oral health and the need for curriculum enhancement. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to identify key areas using NVivo software. A total of 12 CS participated in this study. CS acknowledged the importance of CC and felt that it was important for good patient management. CS's definition of CC focused primarily on language and communication skills. CS felt that dental students were generally able to manage culturally diverse patients. However, CS indicated that additional training in this area would be beneficial. Concerns were raised about the students' ability to establish good rapport and communication, with CS highlighting areas such as misuse of interpreters and use of jargon. CS felt that clinical experience, confidence and a positive attitude are effective tools for overcoming cultural barriers. Furthermore, some CS also felt that cultural competency was a skill that is learnt through experience. For most CS, cultural competence was an important part of the clinician-patient exchange which would benefit from enhanced curriculum. They also highlighted areas where transcultural education could be improved. The majority of CS believed dental students managed culturally diverse patients well. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. La "cultura de la vida": desplazamientos estratégicos del activismo católico conservador frente a los derechos sexuales y reproductivos The "culture of life": strategic displacement of conservative catholic activism against sexual and reproductive rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Marco Vaggione

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo considera las principales dimensiones del activismo católico conservador sobre la sexualidad a partir del análisis de la Encíclica Evangelium Vitae (1995. El análisis se focaliza en tres dimensiones: la oposición entre cultura de la vida y cultura de la muerte como el enmarque político; los desplazamientos del activismo católico conservador para intervenir en los principales debates públicos; las principales estrategias propuestas para evitar la sanción o la vigencia de los derechos sexuales y reproductivos. A través de estos ejes, se contribuye a la comprensión de las rearticulaciones en las formas de intervención de la Iglesia Católica como una parte constitutiva de la política sexual contemporánea.The article considers the main dimensions of the conservative Catholic activism on sexuality by considering the encyclical Evangelium Vitae (1995. The analysis focuses on three dimensions: the opposition between culture of life and culture of death as the political framing; the displacement of conservative catholic activism in order to intervene in public debates; the main strategies to avoid sexual and reproductive rights. Through these dimensions, the article contributes to the understanding of the Catholic Church as a crucial player in contemporary sexual politics.

  15. Culturally competent teaching strategies for Asian nursing students for whom English is a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, M; Abriam-Yago, K

    1997-01-01

    Asian nursing students for whom English is a second language have unique educational needs. These educational issues have not been addressed in the literature. The dynamic changes in the delivery of health care today and in the nursing profession have rapidly changed the academic and clinical requirements of nursing students and sometimes placed them at a disadvantage. This paper presents culturally competent teaching strategies specific to helping English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) Asian nursing students become active learners in their nursing programs.

  16. Culturally Responsive Education: Developing Lesson Plans for Vietnamese Students in the American Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of the philosophical principles of John Dewey and Culturally Responsive Education in the creation of lesson plans for Vietnamese students in the American Diaspora. Through a Fulbright-Hayes Program a group of teachers from the New York City Public School System and Long Island spent six weeks in Vietnam…

  17. School Psychologists and the Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Afifi, Amanda F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, school psychologists have increasingly recognized the importance of using valid and reliable methods to assess culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students for special education eligibility. However, little is known about their assessment practices or preparation in this area. To address these questions, a Web-based survey…

  18. Exploring the Relationship between Cultural Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Burnout in Doctorate of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, D. Michelle.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational study used standard multiple regression to determine if there was a relationship between the factors of cultural intelligence (metacognitive CQ, cognitive CQ, motivational CQ, and behavioral CQ) and transformational leadership in doctoral students. This study also sought to determine the best predictor of burnout by using a…

  19. "Those Anime Students": Foreign Language Literacy Development through Japanese Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Natsuki

    2006-01-01

    Using multiliteracies and sociocultural perspectives on language and literacy learning, this article describes three Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) students' literacy development through involvement with Japanese popular culture. As part of a larger qualitative ethnographic study, the author interviewed JFL learners who have a particular…

  20. Social Cognitive and Cultural Orientation Predictors of Well-Being in Asian American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Kayi; Lent, Robert W.; Miller, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the predictive utility of Lent and Brown's social cognitive model of educational and work well-being with a sample of Asian American college students, indexing well-being in terms of academic and social domain satisfaction. In addition, we examined the role of acculturation and enculturation as culture-specific predictors of…

  1. A Cross-Cultural Study of Taiwanese and Kuwaiti EFL Students' Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-hua; Alrabah, Sulaiman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate the findings of a survey of learning styles and multiple intelligences that was distributed among two different cultural groups of Freshman-level EFL students in Taiwan and Kuwait in order to confirm its consistency for developing teaching techniques appropriate for each group's general profiles. Data…

  2. Tolerance of Frogs among High School Students: Influences of Disgust and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Medina-Jerez, William; Coleman, Joy; Fancovicová, Jana; Özel, Murat; Fedor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians play an important role in the functioning of ecosystems and some of them inhabit human gardens where they can successfully reproduce. The decline of amphibian diversity worldwide suggests that people may play a crucial role in their survival. We conducted a cross-cultural study on high school students' tolerance of frogs in Chile,…

  3. Improving the Cultural Competency of Social Work Students with a Social Privilege Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Cynthia L.; Deck, Stacy M.; Miller, J. Jay; Borders, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development and utilization of an instructional activity created by the authors for the purposes of preparing social work students for culturally competent practice with members of historically oppressed populations. Experiential activities in the classroom provide an alternative approach to traditional pedagogical…

  4. Exploring the Relationship between Cultural Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Burnout in Doctorate of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, D. Michelle.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational study used standard multiple regression to determine if there was a relationship between the factors of cultural intelligence (metacognitive CQ, cognitive CQ, motivational CQ, and behavioral CQ) and transformational leadership in doctoral students. This study also sought to determine the best predictor of burnout by using a…

  5. Cultural Demands of the Host-Nation: International Student Experience and the Public Diplomacy Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches for hosting international students tend to focus on classroom achievement rather than on intercultural exchange and cultural immersion. Such approaches lessen the possibility of successful educational experiences which also hinders public diplomacy. Two case studies are presented that reveal how structural changes at a…

  6. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  7. Contesting "Culture": The Perspectives of Hmong American Female Students on Early Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the meaning of early marriage among Hmong American female college students. Interview and observation data attested to the complexity of the meaning of early marriage in the Hmong American community. Results refuted explanations of cultural difference as underlying early marriage and indicated that early marriage was an expression of…

  8. "Those Anime Students": Foreign Language Literacy Development through Japanese Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Natsuki

    2006-01-01

    Using multiliteracies and sociocultural perspectives on language and literacy learning, this article describes three Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) students' literacy development through involvement with Japanese popular culture. As part of a larger qualitative ethnographic study, the author interviewed JFL learners who have a particular…

  9. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Student Learning Patterns in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marambe, Kosala N.; Vermunt, Jan D.; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare student learning patterns in higher education across different cultures. A meta-analysis was performed on three large-scale studies that had used the same research instrument: the Inventory of learning Styles (ILS). The studies were conducted in the two Asian countries Sri Lanka and Indonesia and the European…

  10. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Connecting New Zealand Teachers of Science with Their Maori Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Ted; Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Macfarlane, Angus

    2010-01-01

    This paper illustrates how important changes can occur in science learning and teaching if teachers take the trouble to understand and respect the cultural worlds of Indigenous students, and incorporate something of this understanding within their teaching practice. Ten teachers participated in a specially-designed one-year university postgraduate…

  11. The Role of University Branches in the Formation of Common Cultural Competences of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina Albertovna; Rimskaya, Tatyana Grigoryevna

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the capabilities and potential of educational institutions in the formation of common cultural competences of students studying at regional municipalities of the Russian Far East. The study offers the directions and methods of interaction between government and local self-government authorities and training institutions…

  12. Undergraduate Students' Opinions with Regard to Ubiquitous MOOC for Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangsorn, Boonrat; Na-Songkhla, Jaitip; Luetkehans, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study undergraduate students' opinions with regard to the ubiquitous massive open online course (MOOC) for enhancing cross-cultural competence. This descriptive research applied a survey method. The survey data were collected by using survey questionnaires and online questionnaires from 410 undergraduate students…

  13. Problems and Recommendations: Enhancing Communication with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Shereen Abdel; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that communication between teachers and culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students need serious consideration especially in recognizing potential sources of miscommunication and misinterpretation. Considers sources of miscommunication within verbal and nonverbal communication. Discusses each element and offers examples in CLD…

  14. Social Adaptation of New Immigrant Students: Cultural Scripts, Roles, and Symbolic Interactionism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukasoanya, Grace

    2014-01-01

    It is important that counselors understand the socio-cultural dimensions of social adaptation among immigrant students. While many psychological theories could provide suitable frameworks for examining these, in this article, I argue that symbolic interactionism could provide an additional valuable framework for (a) exploring the intersections of…

  15. A Quantitative Assessment of the Cultural Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences of Junior and Senior Dietetics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H.; Greathouse, Karen R.; Smith, Erskine R.; Holbert, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the cultural competence of dietetics majors. Design: Self-administered questionnaire. Setting: Classrooms at 7 universities. Participants: Two hundred eighty-three students--98 juniors (34.6%) and 185 seniors (65.4%)--recruited during class time. Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge was measured using a multiple-choice test,…

  16. Distance Higher Education Experiences of Arab Gulf Students in the United States: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Aisha S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a phenomenological research study that was undertaken to provide cultural understanding about the nature of distance education experiences of Arab graduate students pursuing degree programs in the United States. As a theoretical framework, Hofstede's international difference dimensions and Hall's concept of low and high…

  17. The Effect of Culture on the Academic Honesty of Marketing and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Janice; Reardon, James; McCorkle, Denny E.

    2010-01-01

    Two trends in marketing higher education include (a) growing opportunities for intercultural encounters in the classroom and (b) a growing concern about student academic honesty. Research regarding the relationship between specific cultural measures and academic honesty is sparse in the context of marketing and business programs in higher…

  18. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  19. Native American Students' Experiences of Cultural Differences in College: Influence and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leslie E.

    2012-01-01

    The culture of most colleges and universities is very different for Native American students with close ties to their traditional communities. "Traditional," in a Native American sense, means multiple interconnections of emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual identity that combine to define expectations for the Native American…

  20. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  1. Nga Manu Korero: Revitalizing Communication, Customs and Cultural Competencies amongst Maori Students, Teachers, Whanau and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinirau, Rawiri; Gillies, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    The Nga Manu Speech Contest has grown to be one of the biggest and most positive events for New Zealand secondary school students where competitors articulate their thoughts and aspirations in both Maori and English. The contest is acknowledged as an avenue that enhances language and cultural development amongst Maori youth, yet no formal…

  2. ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN TEACHING CROSS CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikke Dewi Pratama

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross Cultural Understanding (CCU is one of required courses in English Language Teaching which aims at connecting language and culture so that language learners can use foreign language appropriately, i.e. appropriate forms of language for appropriate context of situation. However, some obstacles usually occur during the course, for examples: students’ lack of understanding that lead to opinions stating that this is a boring and useless course, and large number of students within a class where lecturer must teach more than 40 students in one class. Considering the importance of CCU course as well as the needs to overcome the problems during this course, this paper proposes some particular teaching strategies to help students in apprehending CCU materials through students’ active participations. Active learning strategies are preferred by means of raising students’ participation and critical thinking so that the class would run more effectively. Other consideration in composing the strategies is to prepare English Education students to be future English language teachers by training their ability in teaching performance as well as connecting language and culture in English Language Teaching (ELT.   Keywords: language, culture, strategies, media, ELT

  3. Examining College Students' Culture Learning before and after Summer Study Abroad in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Chie Matsuzawa; Anzai, Shinobu; Zimmerman, Erica

    2011-01-01

    With study abroad becoming an integral part of the American higher-education curriculum, home-institution instructors face the challenge of understanding the type and content of learning taking place abroad. We report on a study conducted at a service academy on the U.S. East Coast to examine American college students' cultural learning in the…

  4. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  5. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  6. How Organisational Culture Influences Teachers' Support of Openly Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I analyse the relationship between US high schools' organisational cultures and student perceptions of responses to anti-gay language in their school. Using data from 67 interviews with young people who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual, I compare teachers' responses to anti-gay language in schools that do and schools that do…

  7. A Comparative Study of Ethical Values of Business Students: American vs. Middle Eastern Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurden, Michael; Shurden, Susan; Cagwin, Douglass

    2008-01-01

    Business schools must prepare students to face the world and yet maintain strong ethical convictions. The question of ethics in the business environment is not exclusive to the United States. Ethical business behavior is a multinational issue, and all business schools world-wide must deal with this issue. However, cultural differences often define…

  8. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  9. The Determinants of Student Effort at Learning ERP: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; El-Masri, Mazen; Lane, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (UTAUT) and Hofstede's cultural dimensions to explore factors that influence student effort at learning Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) using LISREL was utilized to validate the proposed research…

  10. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  11. Collaborative cultures in education: sense of community of teachers and student teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Brouwer, P.; Dobber, M.; Lockhorst, D.; Vandyck, I.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher communities create excellent conditions for teacher learning implying a sustainable form of teacher collaboration and collaborative learning. Sense of community of both teachers in secondary schools and student teachers was related to the perception of a collaborative group culture. Various

  12. Anthropological Methods of Formation of University Students' Spiritual and Moral Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, Rashad A.; Nikonova, Elina I.; Gurbanov, Ramin A.; Svechnikova, Natalia V.; Tumarov, Konstantin B.; Marin, Evgeniy M.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is reasoned by the increasing complexity of life activity in modern society, which results in distortion of the moral and value criteria and norms. The purpose of the article is to reveal anthropological methods of formation of university students' spiritual and moral culture. The leading approach to the study is the…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Study of Differences in Romantic Attitudes between American and Albanian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Eneda; Hatala, Mark N.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-cultural differences in romantic attitudes are often taken for granted and accepted. However, very little research has been conducted to clearly state how much and how different Albanian and American college students are in the way they love. Results indicate that Americans are more romantic than Albanians. In addition, Americans are more…

  14. Culture Influence on the Perception of the Body Language by Arab and Malay Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Gordan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural communication is applied for communicating with each other among the different cultures and traditions. It highlighted the problems which faced by different communities and organizations, the problems which are natural to the person like when the people face to new culture or tradition even the religious issues. So intercultural communication here is seeking for an answer between the different nations that how they communicate with each other when they face some problems in their tradition and culture. This one highlights how the people encode a message and how they interpret a message to each other.  So here in this paper interaction is between students of Arabs and Malays from National University of Malaysia and it deals with their body language especially hand gestures. This paper is based on the Micheal Byram theory of language. In this quantitative research some questions will distribute among the students and the similarities and differences between their sign languages will be highlighted. Keywords: culture influence, body language, hand gestures, Arab students, Malay students

  15. Queer Student Leaders of Color: Leadership as Authentic, Collaborative, Culturally Competent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan A.; Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    A phenomenological study yielded rich data about the essence of being a queer student leader of Color. Six participants described a desire to be authentic, culturally competent, and collaborative leaders, but they faced challenges enacting these forms of leadership as they navigated oppression (e.g., disrespect, stereotyping, tokenization,…

  16. A cross-cultural comparison of student learning patterns in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marambe, Kosala; Vermunt, Jan; Boshuizen, Els

    2012-01-01

    Marambe, K. N., Vermunt, J. D., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012). A cross-cultural comparison of student learning patterns in higher education. Higher Education, 64(3), 299-316. doi:10.1007/s10734-011-9494-z

  17. The Effect of Culture on the Academic Honesty of Marketing and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, Janice; Reardon, James; McCorkle, Denny E.

    2010-01-01

    Two trends in marketing higher education include (a) growing opportunities for intercultural encounters in the classroom and (b) a growing concern about student academic honesty. Research regarding the relationship between specific cultural measures and academic honesty is sparse in the context of marketing and business programs in higher…

  18. Student Trajectories in Physics: The Need for Analysis through a Socio-Cultural Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Mara

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of student connections through time and space relative to the core discipline of physics is attempted, as viewed through the lens of actor-network-theory, by Antonia Candela. Using lenses of cultural realities, networks, and perceived power in the discourse of one specific university in the capital city of Mexico and one undergraduate…

  19. The Shaping of School Students' General Culture: Topic of the Pedagogical Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, Liudmila

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a pedagogical council meeting that was convened to discuss "The Shaping of the General Culture of School Students." The purpose of this council was to focus the teachers' attention on the question of whether they were successfully demonstrating a combination of high professionalism, intellectuality, and…

  20. Tolerance of Frogs among High School Students: Influences of Disgust and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Medina-Jerez, William; Coleman, Joy; Fancovicová, Jana; Özel, Murat; Fedor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians play an important role in the functioning of ecosystems and some of them inhabit human gardens where they can successfully reproduce. The decline of amphibian diversity worldwide suggests that people may play a crucial role in their survival. We conducted a cross-cultural study on high school students' tolerance of frogs in Chile,…

  1. The Creative Problem Solving Skills of Arts and Science Students--The Two Cultures Debate Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Research, carried out mainly in the period between the 1960s and 1980s, reported significant differences in the thinking styles of science and arts students. At this time university and school teaching was highly specialised and concern was expressed in the ongoing "two cultures" debate (Snow, 1959).Considerable changes have taken place in the…

  2. What Inclusive Dispositions Contribute to Culturally Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Students' Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Megan; Mackenzie, Jacqueline Zaleski

    2015-01-01

    Correlational research investigated relationships between PreService Teachers' dispositions and success with Culturally Linguistically Diverse Exceptional (CLDE) students, addressing disproportionality and multicultural teacher preparation. Results show a significant correlation between Inclusive Dispositional Self-Assessment scores (e.g.,…

  3. Critical Leadership Pedagogy: Engaging Power, Identity, and Culture in Leadership Education for College Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendakur, Vijay; Furr, Sara C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how the application of critical pedagogy to leadership education allows for issues of identity, power, and culture to shape the process of leadership learning. Examples from the authors' work with various populations of students of color are used to illustrate critical leadership pedagogy.

  4. The Role of Behavioral and Cognitive Cultural Orientation on Mexican American College Students' Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Edwards, Lisa M.; Hardin, Erin E.; Piña-Watson, Brandy

    2014-01-01

    We examined the role of behavioral (acculturation and enculturation) and cognitive cultural orientation (independent and interdependent self-construal) on Mexican American college students' life satisfaction. Analyses explained 28% of the variance in life satisfaction, with social class, grade point average, and independent self-construal being…

  5. Critical Leadership Pedagogy: Engaging Power, Identity, and Culture in Leadership Education for College Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendakur, Vijay; Furr, Sara C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how the application of critical pedagogy to leadership education allows for issues of identity, power, and culture to shape the process of leadership learning. Examples from the authors' work with various populations of students of color are used to illustrate critical leadership pedagogy.

  6. High School Students' Attitudes towards Spiders: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Tolarovicova, Andrea; Camerik, Anne M.; Peterkova, Viera

    2010-01-01

    Spiders are traditionally considered to be among the least popular of animals. Current evidence suggests that a negative attitude towards spiders could be influenced by both cultural and evolutionary pressures. Some researchers suggest that science education activities could positively influence students' perceptions of spiders. Their evidence is,…

  7. Spontaneous Cultural Compatibility: Mazahua Students and Their Teachers Constructing Trusting Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    Describes changes in school practices in a rural Mexican elementary school, presenting examples of social interactions that illustrate how the changes were constructed and the nature of the underlying cultural compatibility they expressed. Teacher-student relations became characterized by a tacitly recognized acceptance and respect of Mazahua…

  8. A Comparison of African & Mainstream Culture on African-American Students in Public Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Gibson, Andrea; Collett, April

    2014-01-01

    The public educational system is comprised of diverse demographics wherein each student has a distinct cultural personal history (O'Brien, 1998). In America, the traditional perception was that a melting pot society existed. But deMarrais and LeCompte (1999) maintain that a stew pot or salad bowl would be a more appropriate analogy. Melting pot…

  9. Entrepreneurial Skills and Socio-Cultural Factors: An Empirical Analysis in Secondary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosique-Blasco, Mario; Madrid-Guijarro, Antonia; García-Pérez-de-Lema, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how entrepreneurial skills (such as creativity, proactivity and risk tolerance) and socio-cultural factors (such as role model and businessman image) affect secondary education students' propensity towards entrepreneurial options in their future careers. Design/methodology/approach: A sample of…

  10. The Determinants of Student Effort at Learning ERP: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; El-Masri, Mazen; Lane, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (UTAUT) and Hofstede's cultural dimensions to explore factors that influence student effort at learning Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) using LISREL was utilized to validate the proposed research…

  11. RESEARCHING LANGUAGE ASPECTS' PREFERENCES OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT STUDENTS WHEN LEARNING CULTURE (A Case Study of Students Taking a Course called Introductory to British Studies at Jenderal Soedirman University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaifur Rochman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Communicating in English covers two aspects: 'system' referring to syntactic and semantics elements; and 'schemata' referring to appropriateness based on the social cultural contexts of native speakers. It is, therefore, very essential to teach cultural aspects when teaching English as a foreign language. This article describes a survey to investigate students' opinions on which cultural aspects that should be learned.

  12. Indigenous cultural contexts for STEM experiences: snow snakes' impact on students and the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brant G.; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-09-01

    Opportunities for American Indian youth to meaningfully engage in school-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experiences have historically been inadequate. As a consequence, American Indian students perform lower on standardized assessments of science education than their peers. In this article we describe the emergence of meaning for students—as well as their community—resulting from Indigenous culturally-based STEM curriculum that used an American Indian tradition as a focal context. Specifically, the game of snow snakes (Gooneginebig in Ojibwe) afforded an opportunity for STEM and culturally-based resources to work in unison. A case study research design was used with the bounded case represented by the community associated with the snow snake project. The research question guiding this study was: What forms of culturally relevant meaning do students and the community form as a result of the snow snake game? Results indicate evidence of increased student and community engagement through culturally-based STEM experiences in the form of active participation and the rejuvenation of a traditional game. Implications are discussed for using culturally-based contexts for STEM learning.

  13. Can medical students from two cultures learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Phillip; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Begg, Michael; Lam, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to establish whether medical students from 2 different cultures can learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment. Students from the College of Medicine, Edinburgh, UK and the Medical School, Gifu, Japan shared 2 weeks of teaching and learning in clinical genetics, using problem-based learning in a web-based application (WBA). Questions about language, time zone, agreement about the curriculum (learning outcomes, tutor activity and assessment) and specific pedagogical issues about the educational effectiveness of students' learning were considered. The evidence indicates that a shared WBA is practical where the learning outcomes and problem scenarios are common and students are fluent in the same language. Problem-based learning transfers itself best to online discussion boards when the numbers in the group are 16 or more. Students do not use the WBA as a primary source of resource material, and they augment the discussion boards with face-to-face meetings with peers and tutors.

  14. Influence of physical culture and sport on the psychophysiological state of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalenko N.V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of the psychophysiology state of students under influence of employments a physical culture and sport are considered. 50 students took part in research. From them 25 are students of sporting separation. For research of perception tests were utillized on reproducing of muscular efforts and temporal intervals. For research of memory are methods «visual memory» and «auditory memory». For research of attention is a method «proof-reading test with the rings of Landolt». For research thoughts are a method «arithmetic account». The favourable affecting of employments is exposed perception, attention and thought of students. It is set that students-sportsmen have a high level of development of attention, above average level of development of perception and memory, middle level of development of thought.

  15. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  16. Displacement Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, W Steven; Mariano, Arthur J; Restrepo, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information important. While the displacement transformation is not tied to any particular assimilation scheme, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  17. Iraqi Population Displacement Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    CENTER FOR ARMY ANALYSIS 6001 GOETHALS ROAD FORT BELVOIR, VA 22060-5230 CAA-2015098 IRAQI POPULATION DISPLACEMENT ANALYSIS NOVEMBER 2016...designated by other official documentation. Comments or suggestions should be addressed to: Director Center for Army Analysis ATTN: CSCA-OA...CONTRACT NUMBER Iraqi Population Displacement Analysis PDMC 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ms

  18. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  19. 75 FR 5637 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Secondary School Student Sponsor On-Site Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Secondary School Student Sponsor On-Site Reviews ACTION: Notice... about America through these Secondary School Student programs. Educational and cultural exchanges are the cornerstone of U.S. public diplomacy and an integral component of American foreign policy...

  20. A Case Study of Understanding the Influence of Cultural Patterns on International Students' Perception and Experience with Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralejas, Cynthia G.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation aimed to understand the influence of cultural patterns on international students' perception and experience with online learning. This case study utilized Hofstede's cultural dimension model as an interpretative framework to understand what are the international students' perceptions and experiences with online courses. Two…

  1. Ideal for Whom? A Cultural Analysis of Ideal Worker Norms in Higher Education and Student Affairs Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the consequences of ideal worker norms for graduate student-parents in higher education and student affairs programs. Using Schein's (2004) levels of culture as a conceptual lens, this chapter considers the ways that programmatic structures and interactions with faculty and peers reflect and reproduce a culture across…

  2. A Research about Attitudes and Behaviors of University Students with Having Different Cultures towards the Environment through Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the environmental attitudes and behaviors of the university students with different cultures. This research was prepared in accordance with survey model. The population of the research is composed of 300 university students with different cultures studying at Near East University in 2015-2016 academic…

  3. Language Teacher Education in Finland and the Cultural Dimension of Foreign Language Teaching--A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzen-Ostermark, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance attributed to the cultural dimension of foreign language (FL) education has entailed new demands for teachers and teacher educators. This paper explores the cultural agenda in Finnish language teacher education from a student teacher perspective. The focus is on the students' perceptions regarding how effectively cultural…

  4. The Problem of Reading and Reading Culture Improvement of Students-Bachelors of Elementary Education in Modern High Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalova, Lera A.; Koletvinova, Natal'ya D.

    2016-01-01

    This article is aimed to study the problems of reading and improve reading culture of students-bachelors of elementary education in modern high institutions and development of the most effective methods and techniques for improving of reading culture of students in the study of Humanities disciplines. The leading method to the study of this…

  5. Cultural and Social Capital and Talent Development: A Study of a High-Ability Aboriginal Student in a Remote Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, Karen; Merrotsy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During the course of a school year, a study was conducted on the cultural context, the social milieu and the personal characteristics of a high ability Aboriginal student in a remote community in Canada. Using the lenses of cultural capital, social capital and human capital, the study explores the development of the student's talent through his…

  6. Socio-cultural factors of formation of musical preferences of Ukrainian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Nesterenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of social and cultural factors on the musical preferences of students in Ukraine has been analysed in the article. The following factors have been selected: the type of society and social change in the polical fields of economy, culture, technology, students, musical paradigm. The urgency of the analysis of the genesis, development and change of musical preferences of students has been proven, the necessity to study the influence of sociocultural factors on the formation of musical preferences in modern society has been grounded. This allowed characterising the musical preferences as a socio-cultural phenomenon that present signs and society, and culture of the society. It has been found that the development of technology, such as the invention and use of the gramophone, phonograph, cinema, radio, television, and later a tape recorder, computer, Internet, mobile communications and the latest gadgets, has enhanced the formation of musical preferences.It has contributed meeting the needs and inquiries of students, which are studying musical art, the use of individual trajectories of formation of formal and informal musical preferences. Formal preferences are associated with the activities of social institutions and social organizations. In this context, the musical preferences and those recommended “from above” have been considered to be two different ways of formation of musical preferences in a totalitarian society. The variety of musical preferences has been determined. State-formed musical preferences have been identified and characterized by a second method of forming a musical preferences, which is based on the perception of diversity and is not approved by the musical culture of the individually selected samples, “from below” groups, which are defined as individual and personal, or informal, musical preferences. The musical preferences of students, related to situations of social changes that have occurred in the spheres

  7. Internal displacement in Burma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced.

  8. The cultural construction of interdisciplinarity: Doctoral student socialization in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri A.

    Using the methodologies of individual and group interviews, observation, and document analysis, this dissertation examines the experiences of doctoral students enrolled in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program. A framework drawn from theories of organizational socialization is employed to understand the influence of an interdisciplinary program on doctoral student socialization. While abundant previous literature exists in regards to the socialization of doctoral students, such literature largely concentrates the disciplinary experience. The escalating import of globalization and shifting fiscal realities place new demands on Ph.D. programs and doctoral students to work as part of collaborative research teams, produce interdisciplinary knowledge, and integrate theory and practice. The increasing influence of such factors requires a new focus on interdisciplinarity and the changing Ph.D. The goal of this dissertation is to expand the existing framework of socialization by documenting the influence of such obstacles on knowledge acquisition, identity development, and professional investment. This study focuses on how interdisciplinary identities are constructed by doctoral students through individual interaction with the social environment and cultural context. Particular attention is given to the structural and cultural obstacles that doctoral students must negotiate as they navigate an interdisciplinary program. The study expands on the previous literature regarding doctoral student socialization by focusing on identity development, specifically a student's symbolic identity as a neuroscientist, a student's disciplinary identity (related to her professional background and undergraduate experiences), and a multi-disciplinary identity that allows for connections across disciplinary boundaries. In contrast to the traditional concepts of identity which focus on boundaries and differences as an inherent part of self-definition, the structure of identity advanced

  9. Predictors of professional placement outcome: cultural background, English speaking and international student status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Stacie; McAllister, Sue; Lincoln, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Placements provide opportunities for students to develop practice skills in professional settings. Learning in placements may be challenging for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students, international students, or those without sufficient English proficiency for professional practice. This study investigated whether these factors, which are hypothesized to influence acculturation, predict poor placement outcome. Placement outcome data were collected for 854 students who completed 2747 placements. Placement outcome was categorized into 'Pass' or 'At risk' categories. Multilevel binomial regression analysis was used to determine whether being CALD, an international student, speaking 'English as an additional language', or a 'Language other than English at home' predicted placement outcome. In multiple multilevel analysis speaking English as an additional language and being an international student were significant predictors of 'at risk' placements, but other variables tested were not. Effect sizes were small indicating untested factors also influenced placement outcome. These results suggest that students' English as an additional language or international student status influences success in placements. The extent of acculturation may explain the differences in placement outcome for the groups tested. This suggests that learning needs for placement may differ for students undertaking more acculturative adjustments. Further research is needed to understand this and to identify placement support strategies.

  10. A case study of the Scaffolding Clinical Practicum Model: is it culturally competent for Hispanic nursing students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Josefina; Vasquez, Rebecca

    2010-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine, Office of Minority Health, and the Health Resources and Services Administration have called for culturally competent teaching methods to promote the success of Hispanic nursing students. The article responds to this call by analyzing an innovative clinical practicum teaching method, the Scaffolding Clinical Model, in relation to the cultural competence needs of Hispanic nursing students. The analysis is presented through a case study of a cohort of predominantly (90%) Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students at a university on the United States-Mexico border. The cultural competence of the Scaffolding Clinical Model is analyzed by identifying how well it acknowledges and fosters the application of the four metaparadigms of Hispanic culture--conquest, collectivism, familism, and personalism--for Hispanic students. The metaparadigms are described and specific examples are offered about how the Model promotes application of the metaparadigms to accomplish cultural competence for Hispanic students. Recommendations for educators are also presented.

  11. Solitude, Religious and Cultural Uniqueness in a Foreign Environment: Adjustments as an Arab Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunab, Hamzeh Y; Dator, Wireen Leila T; Salvador, Jordan T; Lacanaria, Mary Grace C

    2017-06-09

    Arab-Muslims have extremely religious-centered and restrictive cultural practices. Living in a foreign country where Islam is a minority religion and culture is categorically different entails a great deal of adjustment. This study explored how Arab-Muslim International Students live and cope in a non-Arab, non-Muslim country. The authors used phenomenological approach with Colaizzi's method of analysis to (1) explore the lived experience of the Arab students' academic and social life and (2) come up with recommendations that can be supported by universities in Philippines and other countries with Arab students. Emergent themes include Hybrid vision and empowerment from education beyond borders "Tatallo at wa kudurat," Stigma in the Arab world "Hallah," Islam as way of life "Al Islam: Manhaj Hayyat," and Future of the Arab-Muslim students "Wahaa." The major concepts that emerged from the lived experience of these students focused on the practical reasons for quality education, challenges along the way, culture shock, the stigma, and misconceptions about Arabs and Muslims. They experienced discrimination, the impact of stereotyping and misconceptions about the Arab-Muslims. Their tenacity of the Islam faith has become a coping mechanism and kept them enormously strong. They also strived to show the real meaning of being Muslim, and finally, looking forward to how they can become the oasis in the desert. The Arab-Muslim International Students experience difficult adjustments in a foreign country to acquire high quality education, while holding on to their Islam faith and keeping their culture intact.

  12. Selected personality traits and achievement motivation in university students of physical culture, education and natural sciences

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    Martin Sigmund

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding personality variables and other important psychological traits in the university population appears topical particularly with respect to personality, motivation, health as well as overall academic achievement. A significant role is played by correlations of the monitored variables in relation to selected study specialization. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge on selected personality traits and the level of achievement motivation in a specific group of university students with respect to the diversity of their study specialization. METHODS: The study included a total of 522 students from Palacký University. These were students from the Faculty of Physical Culture (n = 118, Faculty of Education (n = 218 and Faculty of Science (n = 186. In terms of age, the study focused on young adults aged 19 to 26. In the research, psychodiagnostic methods were used to perform diagnostics and to fulfil the overall research plan. All diagnostic methods used are fully standardized and contain domestic normative values. We monitored variables such as personality, achievement motivation and achievement anxiety. Statistical result processing was conducted using the Statgraphics programme v. 9.0. Result processing was made using parametric as well as non-parametric statistical methods (Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman’s correlation. RESULTS: University students specialized in physical culture showed the highest values of extraversion and psychoticism, and clearly the lowest values of neuroticism compared to the students of education and natural sciences. The highest values of openness were observed in the students specialized in sports. In terms of the overall achievement motivation related to study specialization, almost identical values were observed. However, the students of physical culture showed significantly lower values of achievement debilitating anxiety

  13. Cultural self-efficacy of graduating baccalaureate nursing students in a state funded university in the Silicon Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Mao, Chia-Ling; Barnes-Willis, Lou Ellen A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the level of cultural self-efficacy of graduating baccalaureate nursing students using Bernal and Froman's Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). A convenience sample of 48 nursing students from an ethnically diverse community completed an 8-item demographic questionnaire and a 26-item CSES. The subjects of this study were found to have an increased level of cultural confidence in comparison with previous studies. Exposure to cultural concepts and to ethnically diverse populations may play an important role in this unique finding. This study also suggests nurse educators continue to incorporate cultural concepts and skills in the nursing curriculum.

  14. ASYNCHRONICAL MEANS OF FORMING CROSS CULTURAL COMPETENCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS (IN THE CASE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

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    Valeriy G. Apalkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the key problems of forming cross cultural competence by means of asynchronic Internet-communication techniques. A concise overview of main studies in using e-mail group in forming cross cultural competence. An algorithm of forming cross cultural competence of high school students is described. 

  15. Business vs. Cultural Frames of Reference in Group Decision Making: Interactions among Austrian, Finnish, and Swedish Business Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Rizzi, Werner; Berry Michael

    2000-01-01

    Examines ways business and cultural frames of reference affect decision making in multicultural groups. Finds students' reactions to two class activities shows how "groupthink" arose in both exercises; cultural interference paralyzed group decision making in one group; and cultural interference demonstrated the importance of a cultural…

  16. Raising Students' Awareness of Cross-Cultural Contrastive Rhetoric Via an E-Learning Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential impact of e-learning on raising overseas students' cultural awareness and explored the possibility of creating an interactive learning environment for them to improve their English academic writing. The study was based on a comparison of Chinese and English rhetoric in academic writing, including a comparison of Chinese students' writings in Chinese with native English speakers' writings in English and Chinese students' writings in English with the help of an e-course and Chinese students' writings in English without the help of an e-course. Five features of contrastive rhetoric were used as criteria for the comparison. The experimental results show that the group using the e-course was successful in learning about defined aspects of English rhetoric in academic writing, reaching a level of performance that equalled that of native English speakers. Data analysis also revealed that e-learning resources helped students to compare rhetorical styles across cultures and that the interactive learning environment was effective in improving overseas students' English academic writing.

  17. Science That Matters: The Importance of a Cultural Connection in Underrepresented Students' Science Pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew C; Galvez, Gino; Landa, Isidro; Buonora, Paul; Thoman, Dustin B

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that underrepresented minority (URM) college students, and especially first-generation URMs, may lose motivation to persist if they see science careers as unable to fulfill culturally relevant career goals. In the present study, we used a mixed-methods approach to explore patterns of motivation to pursue physical and life sciences across ethnic groups of freshman college students, as moderated by generational status. Results from a longitudinal survey (N = 249) demonstrated that freshman URM students who enter with a greater belief that science can be used to help their communities identified as scientists more strongly over time, but only among first-generation college students. Analysis of the survey data were consistent with content analysis of 11 transcripts from simultaneously conducted focus groups (N = 67); together, these studies reveal important differences in motivational characteristics both across and within ethnicity across educational generation status. First-generation URM students held the strongest prosocial values for pursuing a science major (e.g., giving back to the community). URM students broadly reported additional motivation to increase the status of their family (e.g., fulfilling aspirations for a better life). These findings demonstrate the importance of culturally connected career motives and for examining intersectional identities to understand science education choices and inform efforts to broaden participation.

  18. International postgraduate nursing students: implications for studying and working within a different culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilstoff, Kathleen; Baker, Jacqueline

    2006-07-01

    The aims of this paper are twofold, firstly, to review the literature about the experiences of students studying abroad. Secondly, to discuss the results and the issues arising from a quality assurance project that explored the expectations and experiences of international students enrolled in a postgraduate nursing program in an Australian university. International postgraduate nursing students enrolled in either the Graduate Diploma or Master of Nursing programs were approached to participate in a quality assurance project. The open ended descriptive survey explored the participants' expectations and perceptions of their learning in the programs. The results indicated that the participants in this survey struggled not only with their English language skills, both academically and clinically but also with nursing practices and perspectives. Strategies to ameliorate the difficulties experienced by these students are discussed and include: assisting adaptation to the academic program and assessment tasks; orientation to the clinical practice setting; and preparation of culturally competent clinical facilitators who are able to support students' English language skill development. It is concluded that both academic and clinical staff need to develop structured support programs in order to smooth the progress of international postgraduate nursing students' learning and minimize aspects of cultural shock.

  19. Cultural acceptability and personal willingness of Iranian students toward cadaveric donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Asl, Jamal; Nikzad, Hossein; Taherian, Aliakbar; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Naderian, Homayoun; Mousavi, Gholamabbas; Kashani, Milad Motalebi; Omidi, Abdollah

    2017-03-01

    Cadaver dissection stands as a crucial component in medical curricula around the world, although computer-based multimedia programs have been introduced in order to replace the need for cadaver donations. Due to a decrease in the number of unclaimed bodies and rather few donations, there is an insufficient number of cadavers for anatomical studies in Iran. This study was carried out to evaluate medical students' awareness and willingness regarding body donation in Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. In this study, a questionnaire was designed to focus on the cultural acceptability and personal willingness to donate one's body after death. Students from the university's anatomy classes (n = 331) participated in this study. Seventy-seven percent of the students expressed their agreement toward the idea of utilizing body donation services, though only 25.4% of participants were willing to donate their own bodies. None of the demographic factors were associated with cultural acceptability or personal willingness towards body donation. These findings indicated that besides "payment", other factors were associated with students' willingness to become donors. All factors of awareness except "previous awareness of organization" were associated with cultural acceptability. In this study, students suggested that encouraging people to register for body donation using mass media (25.6%) and teaching students to respect cadavers in the dissection environment (24.8%) were the best solutions for addressing the lack of cadavers. These findings indicated that a lack of awareness about body donation might be the main factor responsible for unwillingness towards body donation; therefore, improving the public's awareness and addressing the willingness of students regarding body donation may help overcome the current lack of donated cadavers. Anat Sci Educ 10: 120-126. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. State of the level of physical preparedness of students of the Kiev National University of Culture and Art

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya Batieieva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: analysis of physical fitness of students of the Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Material and Methods: the study involved students I-st and II-nd courses of Kiev National University of Culture and Arts studying in institutions: "Film and Television", "hotel and restaurant business", "journalism and international relations." The total number of students was 136 persons aged 17–18 years, of which 107 girls and 29 boys. We used methods of theoretical analysis and synthesis ...

  1. TYPOLOGIZATION OF SOCIO-CULTURAL EXERCISES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AUDIO-VISIAL RECEPTION SKILLS OF NON-LINGUISTIC UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Наталья Владимировна Базина

    2014-01-01

    The article describes principles of building a complex of socio-cultural exercises intended for the materials of German TV to be used in training students of non-linguistic universities with under-threshold level of German language skills. Besides that the types of German language exercises for the students of non-linguistic universities are given where students study German as second language in the context of socio-cultural and competence approach for preparation of international journalist...

  2. Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nunn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning less commonly taught languages (LCTLs such as Japanese can be challenging for American students. Due to the difficulty of learning LCTLs, more effort is required of the learners to become proficient as compared to European languages. Motivation contributes to the learners’ academic success. In the socio-cultural perspective, the learners’ cultural background mediates their cognitive process. This study examines the motivational differences and similarities among two culturally diverse groups of high school learners of Japanese: Asians excluding Japanese-Americans and non-Asians. One hundred forty two students completed a survey. Factor analysis yielded six factors: integrative motivation, instrumental motivation, intrinsic motivation (doing activities for enjoyment, self-efficacy (a belief in one’s ability to succeed, goal specificity, and goal strategy. The motivational differences were confirmed in intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Implications of these findings for LCTL teachers suggest practical steps that can be taken on motivational factors that influence students from different cultural backgrounds.

  3. Students' Vıews On Culture Of Fear In Educatıon System

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    Fatih YILMAZ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to determine students’ perceptions about concept of fear culture and to see what kind of fear culture do they have. This study which is conducted by qualitative research approach was carried out with 74 students studying in primary school in Diyarbakır, in 2014-2015 academic year. In order to determine study group, convenience sampling was used in this research. According to results of this study, perceptions of fear culture which students have, were grouped under three categories. The categories are “mental (inner fears”, “external fears” and “educational fears”. Results on most of mental fears showed that children were worried by uncertain source of feelings. But two of them ( fear of death and fear of God were appeared with learning in social life. External fears of students were found t include the acquired experience and the fears which were occure with indirect acquired information. The fear are frequently encountered in the school environment, were collected under the title "educational" fears and students said they were afraid of teachers, supervisors, bullying, expulsion from school and disciplinary punishment.

  4. A Cultural Perspective on the Structure of Student Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the nature of interest in science as represented in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data. We discuss the interconnections between measures of knowledge, affect, and value as components of interest in science. Working from a perspective acknowledging that many of the models of motivation represented in the literature have been developed in Western countries, we investigated whether the ways that knowledge, affect, and value combine in the structure of students' interest in science might vary in line with historical and cultural traditions. Four countries were chosen to represent contrasting cultural values as defined in analyses of the World Values Surveys and the European Values Surveys-Colombia, Estonia, USA, and Sweden. Models are described showing variations in fit across the four countries. Efforts to increase the attractiveness of science to students should take heed of the fact that all models indicated a central role for enjoyment of science in the paths linking personal value, interest, and current science activities with intentions for future participation in science. Differences in the strength of the associations between science knowledge and interest in science support the proposition that the interconnections between knowledge, affect, and value need to be understood in relation to students' broader historical and cultural context.

  5. Building Cultural Capital in ­First-Year ­Students at ­Residential Colleges and ­Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Matthew S.; Erb, Natalee M.; Braxton, John M.

    2016-01-01

    College student persistence continues to be a vexing problem for colleges and universities. In Rethinking College Student Persistence (2014), Braxton, Doyle, Hartley, Hirshy, Jones, and McLendon explored the indirect role between cultural capital and first-year student persistence. The significance of this role becomes more important when one…

  6. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of College Students' Learning Strategies for Academic Achievement between South Korea and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jihyun; Makara, Kara A.; Fishman, Barry J.; Teasley, Stephanie D.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how the relationship between college students' learning strategies and their grade point average (GPA) differs across two culturally different institutions. Surveys of 621 students at a South Korean university and 824 students at a university in the USA were used to assess four types of learning strategies: motivation-related,…

  7. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of College Students' Learning Strategies for Academic Achievement between South Korea and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jihyun; Makara, Kara A.; Fishman, Barry J.; Teasley, Stephanie D.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how the relationship between college students' learning strategies and their grade point average (GPA) differs across two culturally different institutions. Surveys of 621 students at a South Korean university and 824 students at a university in the USA were used to assess four types of learning strategies: motivation-related,…

  8. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  9. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  10. Predicting Student Satisfaction with an Emphasis on Campus Recreational Sports and Cultural Facilities in a Turkish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ali Kemal; Akyol, Kübra

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to determine the predictors of student satisfaction focusing on campus recreational sports and cultural facilities. The present study utilized data from a written-questionnaire administered to one thousand adult undergraduate students. The dependent variable used in predicting student satisfaction was…

  11. American sign language and deaf culture competency of osteopathic medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Jessica; Colonna, Caitlin; Sexton, Patricia; Richard, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a workshop on Deaf culture and basic medical American Sign Language for increasing osteopathic student physicians' confidence and knowledge when interacting with ASL-using patients. Students completed a pretest in which they provided basic demographic information, rated their confidence levels, took a video quiz on basic medical signs, and experienced a practical standardized encounter with a Deaf patient. They then attended a 4-hour workshop and, 2 weeks later, completed a posttest. Thirty-three students completed the pretest; 29 attended the workshop; 26 completed the posttest. Video quiz scores increased significantly from pretest to posttest, as did scores for the standardized patient encounter after completion of the workshop. Students also reported increased levels of confidence in interactions with the Deaf community. The results suggest that a single workshop was effective in increasing both confidence and short-term knowledge in interactions with Deaf patients.

  12. A cross-cultural investigation of college student alcohol consumption: a classification tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsantas, Panagiota; Kitsantas, Anastasia; Anagnostopoulou, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    In this cross-cultural study, the authors attempted to identify high-risk subgroups for alcohol consumption among college students. American and Greek students (N = 132) answered questions about alcohol consumption, religious beliefs, attitudes toward drinking, advertisement influences, parental monitoring, and drinking consequences. Heavy drinkers in the American group were younger and less religious than were infrequent drinkers. In the Greek group, heavy drinkers tended to deny the negative results of drinking alcohol and use a permissive attitude to justify it, whereas infrequent drinkers were more likely to be monitored by their parents. These results suggest that parental monitoring and an emphasis on informing students about the negative effects of alcohol on their health and social and academic lives may be effective methods of reducing alcohol consumption. Classification tree analysis revealed that student attitudes toward drinking were important in the classification of American and Greek drinkers, indicating that this is a powerful predictor of alcohol consumption regardless of ethnic background.

  13. Chinese immigrant high school students' cultural interactions, acculturation, family obligations, language use, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Christine J; Okubo, Yuki; Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Shea, Munyi; Ou, Dongshu; Pituc, Stephanie T

    2008-01-01

    When immigrant youth come to the United States, they must learn to interact with dominant and cultural groups as part of the adjustment process. The current study investigated whether the association between Chinese immigrant high school students' (N = 286) English fluency, academic and career/ college help-seeking, multidimensional acculturation, family responsibilities, and social support, predicted their intercultural competence concerns (their interactions across dominant and cultural groups). Results indicate that this was the case. Implications for research and practice with immigrant youth in a high school context are discussed.

  14. Youth Culture and Globalization: The Articulation of Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in the Youth Culture of Students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry M. Lanuza

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In my study of youth culture among the students of the University of the Philippines, Diliman, I was surprised to find out that despite the steady phase of modernization in the larger Philippine society, the youth culture of the students still betrays dominant traditional values and traits. I was surprised, that, given the fact that the university is a spatial field where modernization has its very likely stronghold, the students are very much attached to family values and traditional values associated with it. This paper is an attempt to explain this phenomenon, while at the same time connecting my analysis to the wider issue of globalization. My analysis is very tentative and is based mainly on my study of youth culture of the University of the Philippines. The analysis therefore can only be considered as preliminary and may not necessarily be applied to other forms of youth culture and subculture in other localities without further qualifications.

  15. Supersymmetric Displaced Number States

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    Fredy R. Zypman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce, generate and study a family of supersymmetric displaced number states (SDNS that can be considered generalized coherent states of the supersymmetric harmonic oscillator. The family is created from the seminal supersymmetric boson-fermion entangling annihilation operator introduced by Aragone and Zypman and later expanded by Kornbluth and Zypman. Using the momentum representation, the states are obtained analytically in compact form as displaced supersymmetric number states. We study their position-momentum uncertainties, and their bunchiness by classifying them according to their Mandel Q-parameter in phase space. We were also able to find closed form analytical representations in the space and number basis.

  16. The Relationship of Complex Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in a Culturally Distinct, Conflict-Affected Population: A Study among West Papuan Refugees Displaced to Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silove, Derrick; Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Kareth, Moses; Rees, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Controversy continues about the validity of the construct of complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD). In particular, questions remain whether C-PTSD can be differentiated from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and, secondarily, other common mental disorders. The examination of these issues needs to be expanded to populations of diverse cultural backgrounds exposed to prolonged persecution. We undertake such an inquiry among a community sample of West Papuan refugees exposed to extensive persecution and trauma. We interviewed over 300 West Papuan refugees using the Refugee-Mental Health Assessment Package to record symptoms of PTSD, C-PTSD, major depressive disorder (MDD), and complex grief (CG). We used first- and second-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test aspects of the convergent and discriminant validity of C-PTSD. The CFA analysis supported both a one-factor and two-factor model of PTSD and C-PTSD. Nested model comparison tests provide support for the parsimonious one-factor model solution. A second-order CFA model of PTSD and C-PTSD produced a poor fit. The modified three-factor multi-disorder solution combining a traumatic stress (TS) factor (amalgamating PTSD and C-PTSD), MDD, and CG yielded a good fit only after removing three CG domains (estrangement, yearning, and behavioral change), a model that produced large standardized residuals (>0.20). The most parsimonious model yielded a single TS factor combining symptom domains of C-PTSD and PTSD in this culturally distinct community exposed to extensive persecution and conflict-related trauma. There may be grounds for expanding the scope of psychological treatments for refugees to encompass this wider TS response. Our findings are consistent with theoretical frameworks focusing on the wider TS reaction of refugees exposed to human rights-related traumas of mass conflict, persecution, and displacement.

  17. The Relationship of Complex Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in a Culturally Distinct, Conflict-Affected Population: A Study among West Papuan Refugees Displaced to Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick Silove

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundControversy continues about the validity of the construct of complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD. In particular, questions remain whether C-PTSD can be differentiated from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and, secondarily, other common mental disorders. The examination of these issues needs to be expanded to populations of diverse cultural backgrounds exposed to prolonged persecution. We undertake such an inquiry among a community sample of West Papuan refugees exposed to extensive persecution and trauma.MethodsWe interviewed over 300 West Papuan refugees using the Refugee-Mental Health Assessment Package to record symptoms of PTSD, C-PTSD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and complex grief (CG. We used first- and second-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA to test aspects of the convergent and discriminant validity of C-PTSD.ResultsThe CFA analysis supported both a one-factor and two-factor model of PTSD and C-PTSD. Nested model comparison tests provide support for the parsimonious one-factor model solution. A second-order CFA model of PTSD and C-PTSD produced a poor fit. The modified three-factor multi-disorder solution combining a traumatic stress (TS factor (amalgamating PTSD and C-PTSD, MDD, and CG yielded a good fit only after removing three CG domains (estrangement, yearning, and behavioral change, a model that produced large standardized residuals (>0.20.ConclusionThe most parsimonious model yielded a single TS factor combining symptom domains of C-PTSD and PTSD in this culturally distinct community exposed to extensive persecution and conflict-related trauma. There may be grounds for expanding the scope of psychological treatments for refugees to encompass this wider TS response. Our findings are consistent with theoretical frameworks focusing on the wider TS reaction of refugees exposed to human rights-related traumas of mass conflict, persecution, and displacement.

  18. Bhutanese Students' Views of Nature of Science: a Case Study of Culturally Rich Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pabi Maya; Faikhamta, Chatree; Punsuvon, Vittaya

    2017-07-01

    This study is aimed at exploring ninth-grade Bhutanese students' views of nature of science (NOS). A total of 389 students from middle secondary and higher secondary schools from the eastern, western, southern and central regions of Bhutan took part in this study. To generate a representative population, a stratified random sampling technique was used. An adopted and adapted version of the Students Understanding of Science and Scientific Inquiry (SUSSI) comprised Likert-type items, and open-ended questions were used as a research tool. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and the qualitative data were analysed and categorized into naïve, transitional and informed views. The results indicated that the majority of the Bhutanese students held naïve views on sociocultural embeddedness, scientific laws, scientific theories and science as a body of knowledge. The study has an implication for curriculum developers and teaching professionals, particularly in culturally rich countries, that explicit instruction of NOS should be reframed based on students' cultural backgrounds and their indigenous knowledge.

  19. Introducing first year students to interprofessionalism: Exploring professional identity in the "enterprise culture": a Foucauldian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, Dale J; Reeves, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of, and thoughts on, interprofessional learning and care of first year health science students at a large Canadian university within a broad socioeconomic context. We apply discourse analysis to survey data collected to evaluate an introductory interprofessional event involving first year students from a variety of health professions. Follow-up focus-group interviews were conducted to gain greater understanding of student issues and concerns emerging from the survey, providing a second source of data. A significant paper entitled, "Education, enterprise culture and the entrepreneurial self: A Foucauldian perspective" by Peters (2001) provides an historical and theoretical framework for this paper. Peters notes the changing nature of professionalism and global crises in public institutions under neoliberalism as governments divest themselves of social responsibility, shifting it onto individuals through increased privatization and focus on entrepreneurialism. In exploring the thoughts and experiences of students through the historical lens of a shifting professional discourse and changing cultural and political environment, a unique view of professionalism and this interprofessional project comes to light. Reflective of the paradigm shift that Peters documents, there was evidence of students "internalizing" responsibility for a sustainable health care system through acquisition of interprofessional knowledge and behaviours.

  20. Motivating Young Native American Students to Pursue STEM Learning Through a Culturally Relevant Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sally; Andrade, Rosi; Page, Melissa

    2016-12-01

    Data indicate that females and ethnic/race minority groups are underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce calling for innovative strategies to engage and retain them in science education and careers. This study reports on the development, delivery, and outcomes of a culturally driven science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) program, iSTEM, aimed at increasing engagement in STEM learning among Native American 3rd-8th grade students. A culturally relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge, informs the iSTEM program, a program based on the contention that the synergistic effect of a hybrid program combining two strategic approaches (1) in-school mentoring and (2) out-of-school informal science education experiences would foster engagement and interest in STEM learning. Students are paired with one of three types of mentors: Native American community members, university students, and STEM professionals. The iSTEM program is theme based with all program activities specifically relevant to Native people living in southern Arizona. Student mentees and mentors complete interactive flash STEM activities at lunch hour and attend approximately six field trips per year. Data from the iSTEM program indicate that the program has been successful in engaging Native American students in iSTEM as well as increasing their interest in STEM and their science beliefs.