WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural management practices

  1. Harvest managements and cultural practices in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gustavo Quassi de Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trash from the mechanical harvest of green cane on sugarcane plantations promotes changes in the agricultural management, for example, in the mechanical cultural practices of ratoon cane in-between the rows and nitrogen (N fertilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of sugarcane in different harvest systems, associated to the mechanical cultural practices in interrows and N rates. The study was carried out on a sugarcane plantation in Sales Oliveira, São Paulo, Brazil, with the sugarcane variety SP81-3250, on soil classified as Acrudox, in a randomized block design with split-split plots and four replications. The main treatments consisted of harvest systems (harvesting green cane or burnt cane, the secondary treatment consisted of the mechanical cultural practices in the interrows and the tertiary treatments were N rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 160 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate (33 % N as N source. The harvest systems did not differ in sugarcane yield (tons of cane per hectare - TCH, but in burnt cane, the pol percent and total sugar recovery (TSR were higher. This could be explained by the higher quantity of plant impurities in the harvested raw material in the system without burning, which reduces the processing quality. Mechanical cultural practices in the interrows after harvest had no effect on cane yield and sugar quality, indicating that this operation can be omitted in areas with mechanical harvesting. The application of N fertilizer at rates of 88 and 144 kg ha-1 N, respectively, increased stalk height and TCH quadratically to the highest values for these variables. For the sugar yield per hectare (in pol %, N fertilization induced a linear increase.

  2. Impact on quality culture of total quality management practices factors

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    Faihan Mosaad Saud Alotaibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated total quality management practices and quality culture of Saudi Arabian contractors. Improving the quality can be achieved through implementation of total quality management although studies and researches work regarding this improvement is still lacking. A quantitative approach using the survey method was employed. With assistance from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs, survey questionnaires were distributed to selected contractors in Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analysed using correlation, and multiple regression analyses. The key findings were the confirmation of significant relationships between all total quality management practices and quality culture and a positive relationship between quality management practices and quality culture. Furthermore, total quality management practices were found to be able to explain 68.1% of the variance in quality culture, while quality culture explained 12.5% of the variance in competitiveness. Quality culture was found to only partially mediate the relationship between total quality management practices and competitiveness.

  3. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  4. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  5. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  6. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, André van

    2012-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  7. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  8. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  9. Cross-Cultural Interactions and Changing Management Practices in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    African societies demand and deserve visible economic benefits taht good management and governance can provide. But available evidence suggests that neither Western management practices nor thoe inspired by African culture can adequately address the socio-economic and political challenges...... confronting Sub-Saharan African countries today. This paper argues in favour of an eclectic synthesis of ideas from multiple sources to provide African managers with novel perspectives of the realities facing them and approaches to address them. The term "hybrid" management" has been used to describe...... this approach to management development. This development of a learning culture and a network of centres of management research have been suggested as preconditions for the effective development of hybrid management in Africa...

  10. Cross-Cultural Interactions and Changing Management Practices in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    African societies demand and deserve visible economic benefits taht good management and governance can provide. But available evidence suggests that neither Western management practices nor thoe inspired by African culture can adequately address the socio-economic and political challenges...... confronting Sub-Saharan African countries today. This paper argues in favour of an eclectic synthesis of ideas from multiple sources to provide African managers with novel perspectives of the realities facing them and approaches to address them. The term "hybrid" management" has been used to describe...... this approach to management development. This development of a learning culture and a network of centres of management research have been suggested as preconditions for the effective development of hybrid management in Africa...

  11. Impact on quality culture of total quality management practices factors

    OpenAIRE

    Faihan Mosaad Saud Alotaibi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated total quality management practices and quality culture of Saudi Arabian contractors. Improving the quality can be achieved through implementation of total quality management although studies and researches work regarding this improvement is still lacking. A quantitative approach using the survey method was employed. With assistance from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs, survey questionnaires were distributed to selected contractors i...

  12. Management Documentation: Indicators & Good Practice at Cultural Heritage Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppich, R.; Garcia Grinda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation for cultural heritage places usually refers to describing the physical attributes, surrounding context, condition or environment; most of the time with images, graphics, maps or digital 3D models in their various forms with supporting textural information. Just as important as this type of information is the documentation of managerial attributes. How do managers of cultural heritage places collect information related to financial or economic well-being? How are data collected over time measured, and what are significant indicators for improvement? What quality of indicator is good enough? Good management of cultural heritage places is essential for conservation longevity, preservation of values and enjoyment by the public. But how is management documented? The paper will describe the research methodology, selection and description of attributes or indicators related to good management practice. It will describe the criteria for indicator selection and why they are important, how and when they are collected, by whom, and the difficulties in obtaining this information. As importantly it will describe how this type of documentation directly contributes to improving conservation practice. Good practice summaries will be presented that highlight this type of documentation including Pamplona and Ávila, Spain and Valletta, Malta. Conclusions are drawn with preliminary recommendations for improvement of this important aspect of documentation. Documentation of this nature is not typical and presents a unique challenge to collect, measure and communicate easily. However, it is an essential category that is often ignored yet absolutely essential in order to conserve cultural heritage places.

  13. Impacts of Organizational Culture on the Practice of Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安然

    2013-01-01

      Organizational culture has received increasing attention in recent years both from academics and practioners. Many researchers have confirmed the influence of values on management theories. Barney regards organizational culture as a significant element in creating and implementing the best strategy for competitive advantage. Every thing has pros and cons, organization culture is no exception, and problems caused by organizational culture must be recognized as well, such as barriers to mergers and acquisitions.

  14. Teaching as a cultural practice: managing diverse classrooms

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    Rosa María RODRÍGUEZ IZQUIERDO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a cultural process. Actions that take place in this process are influenced by some cultural assumptions which shape pre-defined objectives and affect content, educational treatment, assessments, and relationships among participants. It is, therefore, of utmost importance not only to make explicit the cultural reality of education, but also to think critically about it. In this paper, we focus on the issue of teaching and learning in the context of cultural diversity from a socio-cultural and socio-political theoretical framework. The keywords «classroom management» it generates over 6.5 million hits in google.com. However, when we type «managing diverse classrooms», there are only 200,000 hits. This divergence indicates that classroom management is a widely explored topic, while work about how to manage a cultural diverse classroom is still limited. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for teachers to use and improve their cultural knowledge to manage classrooms more effectively. This article argues that growth in cultural awareness of the teaching process improves the quality of teaching and, therefore, students’ learning.

  15. VET Manager Identities: Culture, Philosophy and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Using a post-structural approach this article investigates the working lives of frontline managers in VET and how they negotiate change in their day to day practices and decision making. The article is organised around accounts made by managers from different types of Vocational Education and Training (VET) organisations, namely: Technical and…

  16. VET Manager Identities: Culture, Philosophy and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Using a post-structural approach this article investigates the working lives of frontline managers in VET and how they negotiate change in their day to day practices and decision making. The article is organised around accounts made by managers from different types of Vocational Education and Training (VET) organisations, namely: Technical and…

  17. [Conflict as a reality and a cultural challenge in the practice of nurses' management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2007-12-01

    The practice of nurses' management is permeated by conflicts that can be interpreted through culture references. The objective of this study is to denote cultural specificities, analyzed according to Geertz's Cultural Interpretative Theory, that are expressed as conflicts in the scope of nurses' management at a University Hospital. The results denoted the incorporation of ideological elements and mechanisms of control and power, whose origin can be seen in the way in which the work is organized. The application of policies based on the profession's very values was observed. Practices highlight a cultural construction that elucidates some understandings regarding cognitive, social and behavioral processes, because they organize the interpretations and the answers to the events of nurses' practices in management. The results of this study point out the importance of organizational culture in the practice of Nursing management in the face of labor uncertainties in the complexity of a hospital environment.

  18. The influence of culture on human resource management processes and practices: The propositions for Serbia

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    Bogićević-Milikić Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to address the influence of national culture on HRM practices and processes in order to draw conclusions for Serbian HR practitioners, multinational corporations operating in Serbia, and any other country or organizational context that has similar cultural characteristics. To achieve this we first review the relevant literature to identify the interdependencies between Hofstede's cultural dimensions and HRM practices and processes. On the basis of recognized relationships we put forward 11 propositions about likely appropriate HRM practices (such as job analysis, recruitment and selection, human resource planning and career management for the Serbian cultural context, characterized by high Uncertainty Avoidance, high Power Distance, Collectivism and Femininity.

  19. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today.

  20. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  1. THE EFFECTS OF CULTURE ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY OF MSC STATUS COMPANIES

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    Charmaine Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is recognised as being an important asset in organisations these days. Despite this, many organisations are not doing enough to effectively manage this important asset for its competitive advantage. In response to this, knowledge management which is defined as a process that effectively creates, captures, shares and uses organisation-wide knowledge to improve the organisation’s performance was conceived and has since gained widespread acceptance the world over. Despite its widespread acceptance, little is known about the current levels of knowledge management within the Malaysian context, in particular amongst the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC status companies in Malaysia. Furthermore, the extent to which cultural factors impact upon knowledge management practice in these companies is not known. This study investigated the various cultural factors (collaboration, mutual trust, leadership and incentives/rewards using a multiple case study approach operating within a critical realism research paradigm and found that these factors have impact on the level of knowledge management practice. The study also established that cultural factors do play an important role in facilitating knowledge management practice in these MSC status companies in Malaysia. It was found that collaboration, mutual trust, leadership, kiasu-ism and incentives/rewards have significant impact on the level of knowledge management practice. In view of the findings of this study, it is suggested that the relevant authorities pay adequate attention on these cultural factors to ensure that the knowledge management initiatives undertaken by Malaysian companies are effectively deployed.

  2. Cross-cultural differences in the practices of hotel managers: A study of Dutch and Belgian hotel managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jansen-Verbeke (Myriam)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn the service sector there has been debate and research on whether it is the culture of the organization or that of the location that shapes hotel management practice - particularly given the internationalization of certain, mostly US-style practices. Here Myriam Jansen-Verbeke and Lies

  3. Cross-cultural differences in the practices of hotel managers: A study of Dutch and Belgian hotel managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jansen-Verbeke (Myriam)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn the service sector there has been debate and research on whether it is the culture of the organization or that of the location that shapes hotel management practice - particularly given the internationalization of certain, mostly US-style practices. Here Myriam Jansen-Verbeke and

  4. Cross-cultural differences in the practices of hotel managers: A study of Dutch and Belgian hotel managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jansen-Verbeke (Myriam)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn the service sector there has been debate and research on whether it is the culture of the organization or that of the location that shapes hotel management practice - particularly given the internationalization of certain, mostly US-style practices. Here Myriam Jansen-Verbeke and Lies

  5. Organisational Culture and the Adoption of New Public-Management Practices = Povzetki Abstracts novega javnega managementa

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    Heli Hookana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provides insights into the levels of adoption and success of New Public Management practices, reflected in the degree of innovative accounting practices and cultures. The analysis draws upon two in-depth empirical investigations. The results provide empirical evidence to support a two-way interaction between management orientation to adopting the new accounting methods and organisational innovative changes. The success and failure could be characterised as a fragile construction that turns on the strength of diverse ties connecting many heterogeneous elements. The meaning of the subcultures and the externally driven change process are discussed in the context of Scandinavian public management.

  6. Policies on and Practices of Cultural Inclusivity in Learning Management Systems: Perspectives of Indigenous Holistic Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreamson, Neal; Thomas, Gary; Lee Hong, Anita; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    Online learning has become a conventional term and practice in Australian higher education, yet cultural inclusivity for Indigenous (Indigenous for the purposes of this paper refers to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples) students is insufficiently reflected in learning management system (LMS) policies and design. This study…

  7. Does the Gap Matter? A Study of IT and Business Culture Toward Customer Relationship Management Practice

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    T. Limsarun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Customer Relationship M anagement (CRM has become the important part of business due to the benefit of analyze sale opportunities, campaigns management, personalization to each individual customer, cross-selling and up-selling. Unfortunately, many research evidence shows that most of the companies fail to make their CRM effort to pay off. Thus success CRM is required co-operate from the management and end user buy-in from every department in the CRM installed companies. Therefore this study aims to highlight the different between Information Technology culture and Business culture. The finding has shown the significant of the culture gap toward CRM practice, while each part of the organization has to take care for their role and responsibility in order to success in CRM practice.

  8. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND QUALITY CULTURE WITH COMPETITIVENESS OF SAUDI CONTRACTORS

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    Faihan Alotaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management practices in construction industries can be described as the processes or that aligns the business performance strategy to the business processes in the hopes of achieving customer satisfaction and product and services quality. Quality culture conditions are strongly linked with project outcomes and hence, initiatives undertaken should be incorporated to the organizational cultural changes. The aim of the study is to determine the impact of total quality management practices, quality culture and their relationship with the competitiveness of Saudi Arabia contractors. A quantitative research design was adopted to collect data and test hypotheses. A cross-sectional survey method was used to conduct this study. The findings of the study will contribute to both theory and practice. Through the present study, the researcher expects the findings to indicate that total quality management practices meaningfully contributed and related to competitiveness and developing cooperative relationship with customers; practices that are related to the achievement of continuous improvement and in turn, continuous improvement affects quality outcomes.

  9. Some empirical insights into cultural differences and management practices: the case of Denmark and Slovenia

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    Aprila Cotič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents field research on differences in managers’ practices and behaviour in two EU countries: Denmark and Slovenia. The theoretical foundation of the research is based on cultural dimensions proposed by Hofstede and Hall. We combined the quantitative part of the research, which was based on surveys between Danish and Slovenian managers with semi-structured interviews. We confirmed many significant differences between Danish and Slovenian management practices and values that were predominantly consequence of two of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions: Power Distance and Uncertainty Avoidance. The emphasis of the research was on the presumption that these differences are even more articulated in extreme situations, such as the current economic crises. We also implicitly sought the answer to the question of what can Slovenian managers learn from the Danish experience. The main scientific contribution of the research is the methodological platform for further research on the effects of cultural characteristics on management practices and business efficiency within the main clusters of the EU countries.

  10. Practice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The practicing orthopaedic traumatologist must have a sound knowledge of business fundamentals to be successful in the changing healthcare environment. Practice management encompasses multiple topics including governance, the financial aspects of billing and coding, physician extender management, ancillary service development, information technology, transcription utilization, and marketing. Some of these are universal, but several of these areas may be most applicable to the private practice of medicine. Attention to each component is vital to develop an understanding of the intricacies of practice management.

  11. Compliance Culture or Culture Change? The role of funders in improving data management and sharing practice amongst researchers

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    Cameron Neylon

    2017-06-01

    over extended periods beyond grants. However there are also important differences in implementation. There is essentially no information available on the uptake and success of different policies in terms of compliance rates, or degrees of data availability. Many policies require a Data Management Plan as part of grant submission. This requirement can be enforced but there is disagreement on the value of this. One view is that requirements such as DMPs are the only way to force researchers to pay attention to these issues. The other is that such requirements lead to a culture of compliance in which the minimal effort is made and planning is seen as a “tick-box” exercise that has no further value. In this view requirements such as DMPs may actually be damaging the effort to effect culture change towards improved community practice. One way to bring these two views together is to see DMPs as living documents that form the basis of collaboration between researchers, funders, and data managers throughout the life of a research project. This approach is reflected in guidance on policy development that emphasises the importance of clarifying responsibilities of various stakeholders and ensuring that researchers are both recognised for good practice and see tangible benefits. More broadly this points to the need for the program of improving RDM and RDS to be shared project with the incentives for funders and researchers aligned as far as is possible. In the interviews successful policy implementation was often seen to be dependent on funders providing the required support, both in the form of infrastructure and resourcing, and via the provision of internal expertise amongst program managers. Where resources are limited, leveraging other support, especially from institutional sources, was seen as important as was ensuring the scope of policy requirements were commensurate with the support available and readiness of research communities. Throughout the desk research and the

  12. Suitability of Local Resource Management Practices Based on Supernatural Enforcement Mechanisms in the Local Social-cultural Context

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    Masatoshi Sasaoka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental anthropological studies on natural resource management have widely demonstrated and thematized local resource management practices based on the interactions between local people and supernatural agencies and their role in maintaining natural resources. In Indonesia, even though the legal status of local people's right to the forest and forest resources is still weak, the recent transition toward decentralization presents a growing opportunity for local people to collaborate with outsiders such as governmental agencies and environmental nongovernmental organizations in natural resource management. In such situations, in-depth understanding of the value of local resource management practices is needed to promote self-directed and effective resource management. Here, we focus on local forest resource management and its suitability in the local social-cultural context in central Seram, east Indonesia. Local resource management appears to be embedded in the wider social-cultural context of the local communities. However, few intensive case studies in Indonesia have addressed the relationship between the Indigenous resource management practices closely related to a people's belief in supernatural agents and the social-cultural context. We illustrate how the well-structured use of forest resources is established and maintained through these interactions. We then investigate how local resource management practices relate to the social-cultural and natural resources context of an upland community in central Seram and discuss the possible future applications for achieving conservation.

  13. Assessing and changing medical practice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your medical practice has an existing culture that manifests itself daily in literally hundreds of ways. Some aspects of your culture likely support your practice's growth; others may be impeding your progress. This article describes the characteristics of medical practice culture and provides numerous examples of how culture influences behavior. It describes how culture is expressed in a medical practice through objects and artifacts, language, emotions, interactions, practice management systems, and daily work habits. It offers three techniques for assessing an existing medical practice culture and a checklist for conducting culture observations. This article also provides guidelines for identifying a desired medical practice culture and explores why changing culture is so difficult. It describes five reasons employees are likely to resist culture change and provides 12 fundamental changes that will enable a practice to improve its culture. Finally, this article explores how medical practice cultures are formed and perpetuated and provides more than a dozen questions to ask employees in a culture survey.

  14. The use of management controls in different cultural regions: An empirical study of Anglo-Saxon, Germanic and Nordic practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmi, Teemu; Ax, Christian; Bedford, David

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses cultural differences in management control practices in Anglo-Saxon (Australia, Canada), Germanic (Austria, parts of Belgium, Germany), and Nordic firms (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden). Unique data is collected by structured interviews from 688 SBUs in these countries. Anglo...... targets more in Anglo than in Germanic SBUs. Reward and compensation in Anglo SBUs is more subjective, individual based and relies also on non-financial rewards to a larger extent than in Germanic and Nordic SBUs. Regarding cultural controls, Anglo SBUs value recruitment within organization more highly...

  15. Conflicted Heritage: Values, Visions and Practices in the Management and Preservation of Cultural and Environmental Heritage

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    Geoffrey Kearsley

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage has become of great importance in a number of areas, including self-identity, community identity and as an economic sector through cultural tourism. Most definitions of heritage now accept that it is a perceptual construct with many meanings, both for those who identify and manage it and for those who consume it in various ways. Because heritage can be seen in many lights, the potential for conflict between users, managers and those who own heritage is high. This article examines the nature of heritage and heritage landscapes and discusses the many symbolic and economic benefits that can ensue; the changing nature of the markets for heritage is described. The various monetary and opportunity costs of heritage are discussed and the resultant conflicts outlined. The article goes on to examine the contradictions and conflicts inherent in the concept of authenticity and the issues involved in various modes of interpretation. Here the article asks that if heritage is accepted as that which ‘we’ wish to preserve, then who are ‘we’? This question is explored in the context of the impacts of tourism upon heritage in Southern New Zealand, including the impacts of recent development, perceptions of crowding and the nature of wilderness. Inter-cultural perceptions are explained through the differing perceptions of, and attitudes to, the natural world held by Maori and by others. The article concludes by noting that, while much heritage research is still based upon the product and its presentation, future studies will need to learn more on consumers, their attitudes , expectations and values.

  16. THE LINK BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE OF IT COMPANIES FROM ROMANIA

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    Dobre Ovidiu Iliuta

    2014-07-01

    Taking into account the relation between these variables and organizational performance, it is important to retain key employees that are aware of the organizational goals and values. Therefore, the organization should implement practices that increase job security and career development. In this manner, the organization will not only decrease turnover rates, but it would also form a stronger organizational culture by keeping the employees that are already accustomed with the values, beliefs and norms of the corporation. In order to analyze the data collected from the employees working in IT field, regression and correlation statistical analysis have been used. The results show that adaptability is highly correlated to the mission. The implications of my research for the field of organizational behavior is that the models that were developed for developed economies also applies to developing economies, such as the one from Romania.

  17. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND QUALITY CULTURE WITH COMPETITIVENESS OF SAUDI CONTRACTORS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faihan Alotaibi; Rushami Zien Yusoff; Rabiul Islam

    2013-01-01

    ... customer satisfaction and product and services quality. Quality culture conditions are strongly linked with project outcomes and hence, initiatives undertaken should be incorporated to the organizational cultural changes...

  18. Relationships between Total Quality Management Practices, Organizational Culture and Teacher’s Performance: Study from Seventh Day Adventist High Schools in West Indonesia

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    Ronny Buha Sihotang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Teacher’s performance is the main key of school organization’s success. As the key, teachers’ genuineness is highlighted to be the most demanding of the school operations. They are actors, patrons, front liner workers, and models for the future. It shows that the role of teachers is the center of school operations. In the same situations, school operations are affected by school culture and quality management practices that enhance the teachers to do their duties properly. Teachers’ performances are tied to the culture and total quality management practices of the schools. The purpose of this research is to elaborate the relationships between implementation of total quality management practices, organizational culture and teacher’s performance. The research results indicate that there is a strong relationship between total quality management practices and teacher’s performance. Also there is a moderate relationship between organizational culture and teacher’s performance. While the relationship between total quality management and oganizationa culture is moderate relationship. Both total quality management practices and organizational culture positively and significantly affect teacher’s performance.

  19. Cross-Cultural Knowledge Management

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    Giudice, Manlio Del; Peruta, Maria Rosaria Della

    2012-01-01

    Cross-cultural knowledge management, an elusive yet consequential phenomenon, is becoming an increasingly essential factor in organizational practice and policy in the era of globalization. In order to overcome culturally shaped blind spots in conducting research in different settings, this volume highlights how the structuring of roles, interests, and power among different organizational elements, such as teams, departments, and management hierarchies (each comprised of members from different intellectual and professional backgrounds), generates various paradoxes and tensions that bring into

  20. Cultural management and government role

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    Edalat Nemati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Culture plays an important role on human lives and it has been in four ancient civilizations of China, Iran, Egypt and Greece. The civilization achievements are normally categorized in two different groups of material and immaterial. Practical experience of the material, social objective is called as a civilization and the mental aspect of spiritual experiences, spiritual and personal is called culture. The purpose of this research is to find a framework for cross-cultural management. First, we define the cultural planning and we review the existing cultural examples in Iranian society and try to provide an overall analysis. The paper also investigates the role of government on creating adaptive culture within the society and explains that government must act as leadership in creating value added culture.

  1. Assessing high reliability practices in wildland fire management: an exploration and benchmarking of organizational culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black; Brooke Baldauf. McBride

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to improve organizational outcomes, including safety, in wildland fire management, researchers and practitioners have turned to a domain of research on organizational performance known as High Reliability Organizing (HRO). The HRO paradigm emerged in the late 1980s in an effort to identify commonalities among organizations that function under hazardous...

  2. Consumer perceptions of the effectiveness of food risk management practices: A cross-cultural study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houghton, J.R.; Kleef, van E.; Rowe, G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Consumer perceptions of food hazards and how the associated risks are managed are likely to be an important determinant of consumer confidence in food safety. While there is a body of research that examines public perceptions of various types of food hazards, less attention has been directed to unde

  3. The cross-culture impact on managing business: an evidence from culture, performance evaluation practices, and trust in a Western Multinational Company’s subsidiary in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Purwohedi, Unggul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to investigate the cross-cultural influence on organizational practices, performance evaluation process and trust on supervisors in a Multinational Company (MNC) in Indonesia. Amongst studies of national culture and MNCs there appears to have been no studies investigating the interaction between cross-culture, performance evaluation, and trust. Therefore, I conducted a case study research in one French MNC in Indonesia to understand this process. I int...

  4. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  5. Mentoring in Contexts of Cultural and Political Friction: Moral Dilemmas of Mentors and Their Management in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Kheir-Farraj, Roseanne; Becher, Ayelet

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of moral dilemmas mentors from three different national groups (Jewish, Druze, and Arab) encounter in their work in Israeli Arab schools, how they manage these dilemmas in practice, and how the nature of particular dilemmas might connect to their management strategies. Given the multicultural and politically…

  6. Managing culture in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The paper...... argues that dynamic aspects of culture as enacted by key individual actors and constructed in a given context are far more relevant and critical for the joint venture’s managerial process. With evidence from four Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, the paper proposes a way of managing culture in IJVs...... through individual sense-making and mutual learning and adjustment as key to the process of cultural negotiation....

  7. Organizing Construction Practices in Different Cultural Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Rasmussen, Christian K. S.

    2013-01-01

    participating in the construction management on site working for three different contractors in different cultural contexts: (1) Construir Futuro S.A. in Quito, Ecuador; (2) Anker Hansen & co. A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; and (3) E. Pihl & Soen A/S in Stockholm, Sweden. Based on these explorative case studies......This paper presents in-depth case studies of construction practices with a specific focus on understanding the emergent and dynamic nature of construction management in different cultural contexts. The cases are based on actual working-experiences by the author as an assistant project manager...... a number of characteristics and challenges related to the cultural context have been identified highlighting a central issue in existing and future construction practices due to the globalization and thereby increasing importance of cultural understanding in project-based organizing. The empirical findings...

  8. Crisis Management and Navy Organizational Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    crisis management. It also presents critical case studies to illustrate how organizational culture can serve as an impediment to constructive crisis...My research concludes that the key to effective crisis management is an organizational culture which institutionalizes the use of ethical and constructive practices.

  9. practice managers in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion Practice managers are likely to play a central role in the introduction of new consultation/ communication technologies within general practice. They hold varying views on the appropriateness of these technologies, influenced by a complex mix of contextual characteristics.Managers from areas in which the ethos of the practice prioritises personalised care in service delivery are less enthusiastic about the adoption of remote consultation/ communication technologies.

  10. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  11. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  12. Games culture and media practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Alsina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this article is to explore the relationship between videogames and other practices related to audiovisual media in everyday life; we are specifically interested in examining how far videogames, as a cultural form that combines audiovisual narrative with the fun of a game, may be useful in understanding broader cultural transformations in relation to cultural production in the new media context opened up by information and communication technologies.

  13. Introducing Urban Cultural Heritage Management into Urban Planning Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1. Concept comparison of urban cultural heritage management and urban planning management 1.1 Urban cultural heritage managementUrban cultural heritage management is an important component of cultural heritage management which is a systematic conser-vation to maintain the cultural value of cul-tural heritages so as to meet the enjoyment demand of the current or future generations. At present, the cultural heritage conserva-tion principles have been defined by many worldwide laws or charters, such as the Venice Charter of ICOMOS, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, etc., and have been brought into legislation or policies in many countries. The fi nal goal of urban cul-tural heritage management is to find a real sustainable approach to manage heritages, which could benefit the heritages them-selves, the heritage managers and the local communities as well. Cultural heritage man-agement includes the management of urban cultural heritages, that of natural heritages in non-urban areas and that of intangible cultural heritages.1.2 Urban planning managementUrban planning management is a type of urban management. From the practical viewpoint, urban management should be an overall management which includes urban planning management, urban infrastructure and public facility management, urban en-vironment and public order management, etc., takes urban infrastructures and public resources as management object, and ischaracterized by the goal of exerting the comprehensive effects of economy, society and environment. While from the techni-cal viewpoint, urban planning management refers to the planning management executed by urban governments based on the relevant laws and regulations, including the manage-ment of urban land-use and that of different types of constructions. It actually means the organizing, guiding, controlling and coordinating process focusing on different construction projects in cities. The urban cultural heritage mentioned here includes all the physical

  14. Management practice: phenomenological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Siqueira da Cunha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This work has the aim of understanding the lived experiences by managers in relation to organizational changes in an enterprise in the food area, located in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The role of managers has been constantly evaluated and their capacity of continuous learning and also the ability of transforming the learning in good organizational results is reacquired every instant. In this work, my intention is to show, using an interpretative analysis, real and practical situations, from lived experiences. The methodological way followed was the hermeneutic phenomenological approach, trying to give a global and a contextual treatment to the theme. The results achieved offer subsides for a new look over the management practice and point out the importance of the study of what is lived, as an inspiration source for the strategic decisions in the enterprises.

  15. Cultural Diversity: Implications For Workplace Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatus I. Amaram

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance and management of cultural diversity have been promoted and touted as a positive tool in social and organizational engineering aimed at solving and preventing group dynamics problems in both business organizations and society as well. Positive attributes of cultural integration in business organizations have received fair and significant attention in the past two decades. What have not been sufficiently presented are the challenges and pitfalls inherent in the management of culturally diverse work groups. For the practicing manager, there is a need to know when and where mono- and multi-cultural arrangements may be preferred. This paper reviews relevant research findings that can be used for building effective paradigms in the management of cultural diversity in the workplace.

  16. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  17. Best Practices in Project Management

    OpenAIRE

    Liviu ILIES; Emil CRISAN; Ioana Natalia MURESAN

    2010-01-01

    Project management has evolved over time, becoming the principal mean of dealing with change in modern organizations. Best practices have occurred as a result of business evolution and of practicing project management at a global level. Best practices in project management, if followed, increase the chances of success in achieving goals when dealing with projects. In this article we present the concept of best practice, the advantages of using best practices in project management, which are t...

  18. Influence of Cultural and Pest Management Practices on Performance of Runner, Spanish, and Virginia Market Types in North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget R. Lassiter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virginia market type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cultivars are grown primarily in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia in the US, although growers in these states often plant other market types if marketing opportunities are available. Information on yield potential and management strategies comparing these market types is limited in North Carolina. In separate experiments, research was conducted to determine response of runner, Spanish, and Virginia market types to calcium sulfate and inoculation with Bradyrhizobium at planting, planting and digging dates, planting patterns, and seeding rates. In other experiments, control of thrips (Frankliniella spp. using aldicarb, southern corn rootworm (Diabrotica undecimpunctata Howardi using chlorpyrifos, eclipta (Eclipta prostrata L. using threshold-based postemergence herbicides, and leaf spot disease (caused by the fungi Cercospora arachidicola and Cercosporidium personatum fungicide programs was compared in these market types. Results showed that management practice and market types interacted for peanut pod yield in only the planting date experiment. Yield of runner and Virginia market types was similar and exceeded yield of the Spanish market type in most experiments.

  19. Cultural Paradigms in Management Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Sulkowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an idea for understanding cultural processes in the organizational discourse from the perspective of four paradigms in management sciences based on the concept of G. Burrell and G. Morgan.Methodology: The author has elaborated a valuable list of structures of the scientifi c theory based on the respective paradigms and has compared cultural paradigms in management sciences. The methodology involves an analysis of classical and recent world literature. Nowadays there is no consensus on the defi nitions, types or research models of organizational culture.Originality: In the literature on the subject we can fi nd many, sometimes contradictory cultural research studies that require further analysis. Precisely because of the diversity and complexity of cultural issues in management sciences a multi-paradigmatic analysis is necessary. The paper presents a proposal for a pluralistic approach to the theory and methodology of cultural studies in management sciences.

  20. Managing culture in IJVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend a cultural sense-making perspective to the context of international joint ventures. The dominant literature on cultural issues in this inter-firm setting has been criticized for relying on a narrow view of culture mainly as a country-level construct. The paper...

  1. Nurse managers describe their practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Lake, Sharon W; Brandford, Arica

    2013-01-01

    Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. Domains of nurse managers' practice environment have recently been defined. This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. Nurse managers valued time spent with their staff; therefore, workloads must permit meaningful interaction. Directors demonstrated trust when they empowered nurse managers to make decisions. Administrative leaders should build patient safety cultures on the basis of shared accountability and mutual respect among the health care team. The expectations of nurse managers have greatly expanded in the volume and complexity of direct reports, patient care areas, and job functions. The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes.

  2. Practical colour management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan

    2006-06-01

    Spectrophotometers have been successfully used for colour measurement. This paper addresses digital imaging as a complementary and alternative method of colour measurement and appearance and an effective communication tool as part of a practical colour management programme within the supply chain of a textile retailer. The specific needs—to measure and communicate textured dyed material and printed fabric—are discussed, as well as the colour specification and quality control (QC) of currently un-measurable fabrics and accessories. A unique method of using digital imaging for the assessment of colour fastness will also be discussed.

  3. Organisational culture: A contemporary management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weeks

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the concept "organisational culture from a traditional and a more contemporary management perspective. Problem investigated: The concept organizational culture has assumed a very prominent place within the management literature and has been analysed from diverse multidisciplinary perspectives. Central to the importance attributed to the concept is the fact that it acts as a perceptual and behavioural determinant, which implies that it will have a significant impact on all human related institutional activities and thus the interest in the concept and its management. Researchers and management practitioners have come to assume that while the concept is difficult to manage in practice, it is possible to determine the prevailing culture of an institution, identify what is termed to be a desired culture for an institution and then analyse the cultural gap that exists. Based on the analysis conducted, it is further frequently assumed that the transition from the prevailing to a desired culture can be managed. A more contemporary management perspective, based on complexity theory, would appear to challenge the assumption of being able to actively manage the organisation's culture transformation process to ensure that a desired culture is manifest within the institution. The traditional and more contemporary approaches for dealing with the concept "organisational culture" are the focus of discussion and analysis in this paper. Methodology: A multidisciplinary literature review and analysis is undertaken to gain an insight of traditional and contemporary management theory and practice, as it relates to the concept "organisational culture" and its management. Findings: An important conclusion drawn from the study is that traditional paradigms of organisational culture management, that evolved within a more mechanistic manufacturing economy, is no longer effective for dealing with the unpredictable and

  4. Prácticas culturales y gestión del riesgo sísmico: la cultura de las buenas costumbres / Cultural practices and seismic risk management: culture of good habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina A. Zambrano-Hernández

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Objetivo: reconocer y comprender las prácticas culturales y sentidos referidos a la gestión del riesgo sísmico de un grupo poblacional que ha vivido diversas situaciones de este tipo, en la ciudad de Manizales, Caldas. Metodología: este estudio se ubicó en el campo de la investigación cualitativa, basado en la micro-etnografía y el análisis cualitativo, asumiendo como fundamento que la investigación de este tipo centra sus análisis en el contexto histórico cultural de las comunidades. Resultados: las prácticas culturales relacionadas con la gestión del riesgo son creaciones de significado que a partir del saber popular se configuran con su particular modelo de internalización cultural frente al fenómeno sísmico. Este proceso de aprendizaje comunitario se soporta a partir de convenciones morales y valores familiares que apremian desde una ideología de prevención y supervivencia, lo que se constituye para dicha comunidad en un hecho legítimo. Por otra parte, se encuentra, la no apropiación simbólica del conocimiento de carácter técnico-científico, situación que genera resistencias comunitarias a la apropiación de los nuevos contenidos, por no sentir un verdadero respeto e inclusión de su tradición cultural. Conclusión: la gestión del riesgo no es sólo la reducción de éste, sino la comprensión social de las prácticas culturales, de conductas y modos de vida (incluso de ideologías y de perspectivas de mundo, de vida, de religión, que en términos sociales, requiere de la participación de los diversos estratos, sectores de interés y grupos representativos, y así, reconocer cómo se construye en colectivo la gestión del riesgo como una cultura de las buenas costumbres./ Abstract Objective: to recognize and understand cultural practices and meanings related to seismic risk management of a community that has lived different situations of this kind in the city of Manizales, Caldas. Methodology: is a

  5. Miscommunication and Discourse Practices in Occupational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contrasting discourse practices and occupational cultures of engineers and marketing representatives. The article argues that strong occupational cultures have different value systems and discourse practices. The article stresses the need for an interdisciplinary approach combining linguistic and cultural analyses to reduce…

  6. Toward human resource management in inter-professional health practice: linking organizational culture, group identity and individual autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataw, David

    2012-01-01

    The literature on team and inter-professional care practice describes numerous barriers to the institutionalization of inter-professional healthcare. Responses to slow institutionalization of inter-professional healthcare practice have failed to describe change variables and to identify change agents relevant to inter-professional healthcare practice. The purpose of this paper is to (1) describe individual and organizational level barriers to collaborative practice in healthcare; (2) identify change variables relevant to the institutionalization of inter-professional practice at individual and organizational levels of analysis; and (3) identify human resource professionals as change agents and describe how the strategic use of the human resource function could transform individual and organizational level change variables and therefore facilitate the healthcare system's shift toward inter-professional practice. A proposed program of institutionalization includes the following components: a strategic plan to align human resource functions with organizational level inter-professional healthcare strategies, activities to enhance professional competencies and the organizational position of human resource personnel, activities to integrate inter-professional healthcare practices into the daily routines of institutional and individual providers, activities to stand up health provider champions as permanent leaders of inter-professional teams with human resource professionals as consultants and activities to bring all key players to the table including health providers. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Culturally-Sensitive Learning Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    In today's global world, to provide meaningful education, teacher-librarians and their students need to become culturally competent: open to learning about other cultures and sharing one's own culture, able to change personal perspectives, and able to communicate effectively across cultures. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions provides a…

  8. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  9. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  10. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Müller, Sune Dueholm; Mathiassen, Lars

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture ...... organizations can have important implications for SPI outcomes. Furthermore, it provides insights into how software managers can practically assess subcultures to inform decisions about and help prepare plans for SPI initiatives....... CMMI level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software...

  11. Managing the Organizational Culture: A Technological Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takhir U. Bazarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture presents an interest for research and practice of social psychology. This article is intended to discuss the problem of managing the organizational structure on two levels that contain most topical problems: general methodological level and technological level. Organizational culture is a system with its distinct features that consists of units and sub-systems with their specific features. An organizational-culture system comprises several levels: leader's personality level (as well as the personality level in general, level of executive team (as well as of a small group in general, level of organization in general (level of a large group.

  12. Organizational Training across Cultures: Variations in Practices and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassi, Abderrahman; Storti, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis based on a review of the existing literature with respect to the variations in training practices and attitudes across national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis technique was adopted with a comparative cross-cultural management perspective as a backdrop to…

  13. Journal of Higher Education Management%West MOOC and Ideology:Dimension Focus,Cultural Challenges and Practical Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郗厚军; 康秀云

    2016-01-01

    Ideology,as the core element of culture,has an important strategic impact on cultural secur-ity.MOOC is a new form of online education that involves such fields as politics,economy,culture, education,etc.,so it has become an important topic of the times to explore and focus on the nature of West MOOC ideology and university cultural security in China from the ideological perspective.In or-der to solve a series of problems concerning ideological security hidden inside West MOOC,such as cultural permeation and shock in universities,government agencies need to grasp the bottom line of i-deological security,news media should adhere to the ideology fronts of public opinion,and school au-thorities need to build a strong psychological line of ideological defense.Only by doing so can we en-hance the strategic thinking of ideology and maintain our ideological security.%意识形态作为文化的核心要素对文化安全具有重要的战略影响。MOOC 是一个涉及政治、经济、文化、教育等多个领域的在线教育新形态,从意识形态向度聚焦和审视西方 MOOC 的意识形态性及其对我国高校文化的冲击和挑战已然成为时代的重要课题。应对西方 MOOC 中潜在的高校文化渗透和冲击等一系列意识形态安全问题,政府部门要负责把握意识形态安全底线,新闻媒体应坚守意识形态舆论战线,学校单位需筑牢意识形态心理防线,以增强我国意识形态战略思维,维护我国意识形态安全。

  14. Impacts of Different Culture on Management Style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国君

    2015-01-01

    cultural differences affect the management behavior and management style.Participatory management style in the United States and instructional management style in China has a deep cultural roots.In terms of the type of management style,they are equal.As long as management style is consistent with its culture accordingly,the leadership will be effective.

  15. Cultural and management practices for the Chinese tallow tree as a biomass fuel source: Final report, 1978-1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, J.R.; Scheld, H.W.

    1987-12-01

    The growth and cultural conditions of the Chinese tallow tree, Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb., were studied over a 6-year period. Plots from seeds or seedlings at designated densities and plots established in natural stands were studied. The maximum growth rate of the Chinese tallow tree in a marginal soil near the Texas gulf coast was 10 to 15 dry tons/hectare/year. The young trees were able to withstand long periods of flooding as well as extended dry periods. The tree species also is resistant to diseases and pathogens. The Chinese tallow tree is particularly adaptable to close spacing, direct seeding, coppicing, and short-rotation growth cycles. These factors all favor the economic usefulness of the tree as a bioenergy species. In addition, the tallow tree is economically valuable in honey production and as a chemical feedstock. Fertilization is important during the early phases of stand establishment but has diminished usefulness in subsequent years. The Chinese tallow tree appears to be an excellent bioenergy species in the southern coastal areas of the United States and especially in marginal soils. The Chinese tallow tree has the potential of producing 15 to 20 tons/hectare annually by coppicing on a 5- to 8-year rotation at close spacings. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Managing organizational culture within a management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comeau, L.; Watts, G. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau Generating Station, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) is currently undergoing a major refurbishment of its nuclear reactor. At the same time, a small team is designing the organization that will operate the plant after refurbishment. This paper offers a high level overview of the Post-Refurbishment Organization (PRO) project and will focus primarily on the approach used to address organizational culture and human system dynamics. We will describe how various tools, used to assess organization culture, team performance, and individual self-understanding, are used collectively to place the right person in the right position. We will explain how the career system, Pathfinder, is used to integrate these tools to support a comprehensive model for organization design and development. Finally, we demonstrate how the management of organizational cultural and human system dynamics are integrated into the PLGS Integrated Management System. (author)

  17. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  18. Dental Practice Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    The realization of the paper followed a review of specialty literature, through which the mainaspects of dental office management have been analyzed, rendering the management solutionsavailable to all of those interested from an economic, deontological point of view, as well asmethods of managing human resources in order to obtain the best feedback possible from patients.

  19. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Tony

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  20. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Tony

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  4. Do TQM interventions change management culture? Findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerowitz, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of TQM/CQI interventions on the culture and performance of top management teams. The findings suggest culture is related to performance but that TQM/CQI interventions are not associated with either performance or culture change. Implications for additional research and for practice are discussed.

  5. Cross-cultural Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Mihai PARASCHIV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of international companies in providing high quality products and outstanding services is subject, on the one hand, to the increasing dynamic of the economic environment and on the other hand to the adoption of worldwide quality standards and procedures. As market place is becoming more and more global, products and services offered worldwide by international companies must face the multi-cultural environment challenges. These challenges manifest themselves not only at customer relationship level but also deep inside companies, at employee level. Important support in facing all these challenges has been provided at cognitive level by management system models and at technological level by information cutting edge technologies Business Intelligence & Knowledge Management Business Intelligence is already delivering its promised outcomes at internal business environment and, with the explosive deployment of public data bases, expand its analytical power at national, regional and international level. Quantitative measures of economic environment, wherever available, may be captured and integrated in companies’ routine analysis. As for qualitative data, some effort is still to be done in order to integrate measures of social, political, legal, natural and technological environment in companies’ strategic analysis. An increased difficulty is found in treating cultural differences, common knowledge making the most hidden part of any foreign environment. Managing cultural knowledge is crucial to success in cultivating and maintaining long-term business relationships in multicultural environments. Knowledge Management provides the long needed technological support for cross-cultural management in the tedious task of improving knowledge sharing in multi-national companies and using knowledge effectively in international joint ventures. The paper is approaching the conceptual frameworks of knowledge management and proposes an unified model

  6. Practical management of hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, M.S.; Hay, I.D. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1990-03-01

    There are several causes of hyperthyroidism, and correct diagnosis is essential for management. Graves' disease is most commonly managed with radioactive iodine therapy ({sup 131}I), antithyroid drugs or surgery. Toxic adenomas (single or multiple) may be treated with {sup 131}I or surgery. Most types of thyroiditis are managed expectantly. Pregnant women, children and the elderly deserve special consideration. Follow-up is vital to identify the later development of hypothyroidism.18 references.

  7. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Empirical Analysis of Human Capital, Learning Culture, and Knowledge Management as Antecedents to Organizational Performance: Theoretical and Practical Implications for Logistics Readiness Officer Force Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    and productivity at both the individual and firm level. Snell and Dean (1992) posited that human resource management ( HRM ) practices constituted...implications in other fields as well. Among the most important of these is human resource management (Barney and Arikan, 2001). The RBV has helped build a...theoretical bridge between the fields of strategy and human resource management (Wright, et al., 2001) and serves as a setting for this research

  9. Pediatricians' weight assessment and obesity management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Donohue, Michael; Golnari, Golnaz; Fernandez, Susan; Walker-Gallego, Edward; Galvan, Kate; Briones, Christina; Tamai, Jennifer; Becerra, Karen

    2009-03-05

    Clinician adherence to obesity screening guidelines from United States health agencies remains suboptimal. This study explored how personal and career demographics influence pediatricians' weight assessment and management practices. A web-based survey was distributed to U.S. pediatricians. Respondents were asked to identify the weight status of photographed children and about their weight assessment and management practices. Associations between career and personal demographic variables and pediatricians' weight perceptions, weight assessment and management practices were evaluated using univariate and multivariate modeling. 3,633 pediatric medical providers correctly identified the weight status of children at a median rate of 58%. The majority of pediatric clinicians were white, female, and of normal weight status with more than 10 years clinical experience. Experienced pediatric medical providers were less likely than younger colleagues to correctly identify the weight status of pictured children and were also less likely to know and use BMI criteria for assessing weight status. General pediatricians were more likely than subspecialty practitioners to provide diverse interventions for weight management. Non-white and Hispanic general practitioners were more likely than counterparts to consider cultural approaches to weight management. Pediatricians' perceptions of children's weight and their weight assessment and management practices are influenced by career and personal characteristics. Objective criteria and clinical guidelines should be uniformly applied by pediatricians to screen for and manage pediatric obesity.

  10. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  11. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  12. Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice | Nkurunziza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice. ... In 2012, Human Resources for Health (HRH) Rwanda brought together international nursing ... providers in a globalized world and requires intellectual, attitudinal and behavioral flexibility.

  13. Provenance Management in Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Scientific Workflow Managements Systems (SWfMSs), such as our own research prototype e-BioFlow, are being used by bioinformaticians to design and run data-intensive experiments, connecting local and remote (Web) services and tools. Preserving data, for later inspection or reuse, determine the quali

  14. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Müller, Sune Dueholm; Mathiassen, Lars

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture ...... organizations can have important implications for SPI outcomes. Furthermore, it provides insights into how software managers can practically assess subcultures to inform decisions about and help prepare plans for SPI initiatives....... on SPI initiatives. On this backdrop, we report from a large scale SPI project in a Danish high-tech company, Terma. Two of its business units - Integrated Systems (ISY) and Airborne Systems (ASY) - followed similar approaches over a two year period, but with quite different outcomes. While ISY reached...... CMMI level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software...

  15. Review of: Legal practice and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2010-01-01

    that arose after the speech by the Archbishop: whether or to what extent cultural difference should be recognized by legal systems. Legal practice and cultural diversity, edited by Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre´ J. Hoekema, Marcel Maussen, and Prakash Shah, Farnham, UK, Ashgate, 2009......This anthology comprises contributions from a conference on legal practice and cultural diversity held in London in July 2007, but the editors take their cue from the speech made in February 2008 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The questions central to the book are the same...

  16. Organizational Culture and ISD Practices: Comparative Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Päivi; Juvonen, Pasi

    This chapter reports results from a study that aims to analyze and compare the literature related to custom IS, packaged, and open source software organizational cultures, and their systems development practices. The comparative analysis is performed using a framework for organizational culture as lenses to the literature. Our study suggests that the beliefs and values of these three communities of practice differ remarkably and make their organizational culture and systems development practices different. The most important differences were found in business milieu, ISD team efforts, ISD approaches, and products and quality. Based on the study we can question the widely held wisdom of methods, techniques, and tools in systems development and managing its efforts. Our study has several implications for research and practice, which are discussed in this chapter.

  17. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  18. Common culture practices for cyprinids in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1997-01-01

    Cyprinids are the largest group of cultured freshwater fish and thus the most important from the aspect of fish-borne parasitic zoonoses. The common practices employed in the culture of this group are described to provide background information which may be used in the formulation of strategies for the control of these zoonoses. Only the common carp is cultured in monoculture: all the rest of the carp species are usually cultured in polyculture systems incorporating several species. Polyculture of cyprinids may be carried out in ponds, cages or in free range culture in natural or man-made water bodies, Polyculture of cyprinids is often integrated with agriculture, such as livestock, poultry or crop farming, utilizing byproducts of the agriculture activity, especially manure, as a source of nutrient for the fish pond. If precautions are not taken, this practice may provide an avenue for the transmission of fish borne parasites to man.

  19. Characterization of European Management Perspective Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CÎMPEANU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because Europe is characterized by the coexistence of several cultures whose characteristics have both similarities and differences but appreciable, the results of researchers in this regard are different from each other, this distinction is often made based on the prevailing values of that culture , which determines the orientation of the country for a certain system, management style or to a specific profile manager. A particularly important role in characterizing cultural factors play European management, each differing from the other culture as module in addressing various fundamental issues that characterize that society. These issues can be characterized by certain general cultural dimensions that Hofstede defines them as aspects of a culture that can be measured in relation to other cultures. The differences between management systems in European countries (mainly EU countries in the context of this article, the study is based on four cultural dimensions of Hofstede model (power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, femininity vs. masculinity and change scores recorded for these dimensions in each country. Dimensions considered primarily affect organizational culture which in turn significantly influence the development and performance of the organization and its members, management practices and policies.Data from Hofstede's study reinforce and support the claim that European countries can be grouped systematically cultural groups (Nordic countries, Latin, Germanic, Anglo-Saxon, Eastern Europe that allow significant interpretation in terms of management organization, and that can speak of a typical single European culture but you can see all dimensions of cultural differences taken into account.

  20. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  1. 护理团队文化建设与管理实践%Practice of nursing team cultural construction and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴欣娟

    2012-01-01

    优秀的护理团队文化对护理团队的成长与发展具有至关重要的作用,在协和护理传统文化的基础上,通过不断创新与发展,我院在新时期形成了符合时代特点、富有自身特色的护理团队文化建设模式与管理方法.%Nursing team culture plays a vital role in the growth and development of the nursing team. Based on the traditional nursing culture heritage in Peking Union Medical Hospital and through continuous innovation and development, we established a mode of nursing team cultural construction and management methods abreast of the times and full of its own characteristics.

  2. Persuasive argumentation as a cultural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Gałkowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article author traces relation between argumentation and cultural practice. The first part focuses on definition of argumentation in informal logic tradition. In particular, it discusses argument in terms of verbal and social activity involving the use of everyday language. Author claims that there is no argumentation beyond language. The second part explains persuasive argumentation as a form of cultural practice. The persuasive arguments found in “social practice” can be understood as a social activity, analysable within the context of a given cultural system. Author refers to an approach taking the argumentative expression as a certain type of communicative practice, directed towards respecting, recognising or accepting specific actions. The inclusion of persuasive argumentation in the “circuit of cultural activities” to be studied makes it possible to compare this type of argumentation with other social practices, and to posit a clear historical dimension in the study of argumentation. It also makes it possible to view persuasive argumentation as one of many cultural activities aimed at changing or perpetuating behaviours, attitudes, thinking, etc. The third part of the paper concerns the problem of humanistic interpretation of persuasive argumentation. Author attempts to develop this intuition, at the same time demonstrating the problems that arise from this approach. In conclusion, author tries to analyze argumentation in terms of culture theory and humanistic interpretation.

  3. [Geertz' Interpretive Theory and care management: visualizing nurses' social practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical reflection on hospital nursing care management and Geertz' Interpretive Theory of Culture. We discuss some significant elements of culture in management, based on the theoretical reference frameworks of nursing, administration and anthropology. In these, the importance of cultural diversity is highlighted as an innovative resource to expand the vision of human integrity, valuing divergences, respect and sharing, which are important for nurses in the construction of their social practice.

  4. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  5. Physician Asthma Management Practices in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jin

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish national baseline information on asthma management practices of physicians, to compare the reported practices with the Canadian Consensus recommendations and to identify results potentially useful for interventions that improve physician asthma management practices.

  6. Practice Management: The Game Changer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessis, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The reimbursement landscape is undergoing significant changes. Practice management, which encompasses reimbursement, is becoming increasingly more important in securing business success. Each practitioner within a facility is responsible for fortifying the practice through thoughtful business protocols. Knowing legislation that impacts health care along with understanding the foundational components of reimbursement is key for keeping a practice financially healthy. Change is good, but making the changes is what counts! Legislation such as the Medicare Access and Chip Reauthorization Act defines the new payment models. Correcting current business practices might seem difficult on the surface, but implementing change is rewarding and an obligation of the practitioners within a facility to their patients. Financial stability for a practice occurs when sound business practices are routine. Today's audiologist must not only be proficient at performing his or her scope of practice, but must also accept that performing best business practices is part of the job. In the end, the patients seeking the services of the audiologist benefit most when a practice has the financial stability to be best in its class.

  7. Environmental management as situated practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar; Krause, Franz; Hartmann, Niklas Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We propose an analysis of environmental management (EM) as work and as practical activity. This approach enables empirical studies of the diverse ways in which professionals, scientists, NGO staffers, and activists achieve the partial manageability of specific “environments”. In this introduction......, we sketch the debates in Human Geography, Management Studies, and Science and Technology Studies to which this special issue contributes. We identify the limits of understanding EM though the framework of ecological modernisation, and show how political ecology and work-place studies provide...

  8. Environmental management as situated practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar; Krause, Franz; Hartmann, Niklas Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We propose an analysis of environmental management (EM) as work and as practical activity. This approach enables empirical studies of the diverse ways in which professionals, scientists, NGO staffers, and activists achieve the partial manageability of specific “environments”. In this introduction......, we sketch the debates in Human Geography, Management Studies, and Science and Technology Studies to which this special issue contributes. We identify the limits of understanding EM though the framework of ecological modernisation, and show how political ecology and work-place studies provide...

  9. Exploring cultural tensions in cross-cultural social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miu Chung

    2008-10-01

    Discussion of cultural tension in the social work literature is piecemeal. As part of a grounded theory study, this article reports some major findings on cultural tensions experienced by 30 frontline social workers. Cultural tensions caused by cultural similarities and differences among social workers, clients, organizations, and society are multifaceted. Social workers, however, are always at the center of the tensions. Findings indicate that the social work profession may need to consider the neutrality claim of the profession, the different experience of ethnic minority social workers, and the need of critical reflexivity for reflective practitioners. Implications for social work practice, social work education for ethnic minority social workers, and social work research are discussed.

  10. Knowledge management systems in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørning, Kristian

    which has the strategy of working with knowledge in the form of "best practices" meant to boost performance. The thesis explores the situation that workers are in, since they are meant to share and develop "best practices" knowledge in a portal based Knowledge Management System (KMS). The study...... is to directly seek to change the user's behavior, i.e., persuading more knowledge sharing. The main contribution is an indication of an anomaly with regards to the strategic approach towards knowledge management, where knowledge sharing is seen as an effort by which companies can gain a competitive advantage...... by working with knowledge in a structured fashion. The issue is that the descriptions found in literature on strategic knowledge management do not address the many issues uncovered when conducting prolonged fieldwork among workers who engage in the activities that the literature seemingly takes for granted...

  11. Cultural dimensions in global human resource management: implications for Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-01-01

    As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and socie...

  12. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS IN GLOBAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and society become in harmony. This is critical because cultural relativity and reality in organizations influence operations. The study was designed to explore possible relationships between cultural dimensions and global human resource management. The survey research design was employed and data generated through primary and secondary sources. The participants comprised of 385 respondents from a cross-section of the population in Nigeria. By Chi-Square test, it was found that culture has a significant positive relationship with global human resource management.

  13. How Positive Practices Can Accelerate Transformation To a Lean Improvement Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Hansen, David; Lilja, Johan

    2016-01-01

    With increasing pressure on creating more value with fewer resources, many organizations pursue continuous improvement culture and practices in daily operations.In operations management Lean and the Toyota Way have been continuous improvement role models for describing tools and culture. However......, the cultural transformation has been reported difficult to achieve. This study investigates how practices in daily operations can be used to purposely support the cultural transformation. During an explorative case study 9 practices were identified and analysed. The study showed that positive practices based...... on appreciative inquiry andpositive psychology were particularly effective in accelerating cultural transformation....

  14. Dimensions of patient safety culture in family practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pam; Zwicker, Karen; Harding, Brianne K; Casebeer, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Safety culture has been shown to affect patient safety in healthcare. While the United States and United Kingdom have studied the dimensions that reflect patient safety culture in family practice settings, to date, this has not been done in Canada. Differences in the healthcare systems between these countries and Canada may affect the dimensions found to be relevant here. Thus, it is important to identify and compare the dimensions from the United States and the United Kingdom in a Canadian context. The objectives of this study were to explore the dimensions of patient safety culture that relate to family practice in Canada and to determine if differences and similarities exist between dimensions found in Canada and those found in previous studies undertaken in the United States and the United Kingdom. A qualitative study was undertaken applying thematic analysis using focus groups with family practice offices and supplementary key stakeholders. Analysis of the data indicated that most of the dimensions from the United States and United Kingdom are appropriate in our Canadian context. Exceptions included owner/managing partner/leadership support for patient safety, job satisfaction and overall perceptions of patient safety and quality. Two unique dimensions were identified in the Canadian context: disclosure and accepting responsibility for errors. Based on this early work, it is important to consider differences in care settings when understanding dimensions of patient safety culture. We suggest that additional research in family practice settings is critical to further understand the influence of context on patient safety culture.

  15. CULTURE ET MANAGEMENT: LE MODEL D’HOFSTEDE EN QUESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufyane BADRAOUI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research has been conducted looking at the links between culture and management. Studies have examined, among other components of the managerial activity captured by power distance, individualism, etc. However; these studies assume the existence of a national culture, something largely absent in most countries that are dominated by the cultures of their various ethnic communities. Different cultures perceive the benefits differently,found significant differences between cultures in perceptions and organizational/ Managerial practices. Our modest contribution is structured in two parts: the first part concerns the presentation of the Hofstede model and analysis through this model on some African societies, the second reserved for discussing expose in socio-cultural characters that influences the African Management and limitations of the model of cultural dimensions of Hofstede and conclusion.

  16. Managerial capacity and adoption of culturally competent practices in outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G

    2010-12-01

    The field of cultural competence is shifting its primary emphasis from enhancement of counselors' skills to management, organizational policy, and processes of care. This study examined managers' characteristics associated with adoption of culturally competent practices in the nation's outpatient substance abuse treatment field. Findings indicate that in 1995, supervisors' cultural sensitivity played the most significant role in adopting practices, such as matching counselors and clients based on race and offering bilingual services. Staff's exposure to cross-cultural training increased from 1995 to 2005. In this period, positive associations were found between managers' cultural sensitivity and connection with the community and staff receiving cross-cultural training and the number of training hours completed. However, exposure to and investment in this training were negatively correlated with managers' formal education. Health administration policy should consider the extent to which the decision makers' education, community involvement, and cultural sensitivity contribute to building culturally responsive systems of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IMPROVING SITE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE NIGERIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    technological methods adopted and huge consumption of ... challenging engineering and management problems that occur on .... Communication: Formal lines of communication ..... practices through knowledge management,. Construction.

  18. Social Management of Cultural Conflict Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hong-Mei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to integrate the cultural concepts of basic social value judgments and make the members of society to form an active participation in the consensus, the study use the multi-form subculture and multi-value conflict form in the society as study aim to analysis of that the heterogeneous culture not only will not deconstruct the society but also will bring society to obtain the compatible capacity towards the same. This study indicates that the cultural inertia safeguard their own interests can easily turn into the fuse of conflict in different cultural patterns interactive cooperation of social management. The subcultures collision of the main of pluralistic society management, collectivism and individualistic culture conflict is the main form of social cultural conflict management, the emergence and impact of different cultures is an important driving force for progress and cultural shape.

  19. Managing the multi-cultural laboratory, Part II: Tools for managing the differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, S M

    1992-01-01

    This second article provides practical advice from managers in a variety of industries who have first-hand experience as multi-cultural managers. It will help laboratory professionals make practical application of two conceptual models in managing their culturally diverse employees. The advice covers such areas as performance standards, interpersonal skills, language issues, and other management practices. The first article explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for assessing the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. In this article, abbreviated reference tables are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory supervisors can use both the models and the advice to challenge their own built-in cultural biases and to meaningfully interpret some of the attitudes and behaviors of culturally diverse coworkers and employees.

  20. Management benchmarks of cultural policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria MOLDOVEANU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As public policy, cultural policy focuses on providing conditions for free and undisturbed exercise of cultural rights: right to culture and information, right to cultural identity, right of intellectual property protection, right of participation in cultural life, etc.Cultural rights are specified as a distinct class in the catalogue of international principles regarding culture created by The Cultural Diversity Network, consisting of ministers in charge from many countries such as: cultural heritage preservation, free movement of works and creators, dialogue between cultures, diversity promotion, etc.In this respect, it defines also “the intervention areas” along with actions to be taken, so that each stage of cultural policy, understood as a process of continuous construction, should gain more value.Therefore, as public policy, cultural policy has an undisputed impact on urban/rural areas/territories, at least according to the authorities’ intention to correct some discrepances as regards the number and location of cultural services in the community area, their equipping, easy access of inhabitants to cultural institutions, the density and representativity of the cultural life itself.

  1. Soil sustainability and indigenous soil management practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil sustainability and indigenous soil management practices among food crop farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria. ... Journal of Environmental Extension ... describe and analyse the current soil management practices among food crop farmers in ...

  2. Risk Management Practices and Accounting Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rita Hartung; Yahr, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews current school district risk management practices and the related accounting requirements. Summarizes the Governmental Accounting Standards Board's proposed accounting standards and the impact of these on school districts' risk management practices and on their financial statements. (11 references) (MLF)

  3. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Gupta; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing ...

  4. Theory, Practice and Characteristics of Management in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vukotic

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses management and manager's characteristics which determine the success of organisations. For Serbian managers the only constant is change. The paper deals with this aspect in 3 segments: general characteristics in international and domestic context, the influence for national culture on the characteristics of managers and the characteristics of managers in times of change. The focus of our paper is on theory and practice of management in Serbia, a country that went through significant political, economic and social changes in the postsocialistic period, but which is already transforming in every aspect including educating managers for contemporary and future work challenges.

  5. Managing equality and cultural diversity in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Beverley

    2007-12-01

    This article offers practical strategies to managers and others for supporting overseas trained nurses and managing cultural diversity in the health workforce. Widespread nursing shortages have led managers to recruit nurses from overseas, mainly from developing countries. This paper draws on evidence from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study reported elsewhere in this issue, which indicates that overseas trained nurses encountered widespread discriminatory practices including an overuse of complaints and grievances against them. The researchers also found that the overseas trained nurses responded to their experiences by using various personal strategies to resist or re-negotiate and overcome such discriminatory practices. A research workshop was held in June 2005 at the midpoint of the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study. Twenty-five participants attended the workshop. They were the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study researchers, advisory group members, including the author of this paper and other researchers in the field of migration. The overall aim of the workshop was to share emerging research data from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals and related studies. The final session of the workshop on which this paper is based, was facilitated by the author, with the specific aim of asking the participants to discuss and determine the challenges to managers when managing a culturally diverse workforce. The discussion yielded four main themes collated by the author from which a framework of strategies to facilitate equality and cultural diversity management of the healthcare workers may be developed. The four themes are: assumptions and expectations; education and training to include

  6. GENDER GENEALOGY OF READING AS CULTURAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kryvda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the cultural aspect of texts using in European culture. The paper found out methodological basis of correctly interpreting the term "practice" in the philosophical and sociological discourses. In the first case the concept reveals human nature; appealing to the field of ethics and intersubjective interactions. In sociological approach the term practice is contrasted to institutional life. It seems to be an organic; vital relevance of actions for contrast to the mechanically regulated community life. Methodology. The paper considered the typology of human intellectual conditions according to Kant’s divided into pure and practical reason. The last one directs action-willed individual efforts so as to meet the universal relevance and ethical coherence. Gottlieb Fichte interpreted practice reason as the way to combine intellectual intentions and material conditions of human being. G. W. F. Hegel enriched the concept with terms of "objectification" and "alienation” of labour. Karl Marx formulated the main features of activity approach to the human nature exploring. In sociological discourse the term practice is opposed to mechanically done actions (according to institutional normativity. Given the philosophical and sociological methodological contexts the reading is studied as activity that aimed emotional and volitional contact with sense. Originality. The paper analysed the genealogy of reading practices. There were selected two types of text perception – rapid "masculine" and prudent "women's" reading. Women salon environment of the XVIII-th century capitalistic Europe was the main condition for the forming of literary-aware public. The authors analysed the process of reading of the text-as-satisfaction and text-as-pleasure (R. Barthes. The work presents the overview of classical studies of sociocultural field: Thorstein Veblen; Vladimir Toporov; Rolan Barthes and contemporary researchers such as T. Markova

  7. Importance of including cultural practices in ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Lord, Janice M

    2017-10-01

    Ecosystems worldwide have a long history of use and management by indigenous cultures. However, environmental degradation can reduce the availability of culturally important resources. Ecological restoration aims to repair damage to ecosystems caused by human activity, but it is unclear how often restoration projects incorporate the return of harvesting or traditional life patterns for indigenous communities. We examined the incorporation of cultural use of natural resources into ecological restoration in the context of a culturally important but protected New Zealand bird; among award-winning restoration projects in Australasia and worldwide; and in the peer-reviewed restoration ecology literature. Among New Zealand's culturally important bird species, differences in threat status and availability for hunting were large. These differences indicate the values of a colonizing culture can inhibit harvesting by indigenous people. In Australasia among award-winning ecological restoration projects, <17% involved human use of restored areas beyond aesthetic or recreational use, despite many projects encouraging community participation. Globally, restoration goals differed among regions. For example, in North America, projects were primarily conservation oriented, whereas in Asia and Africa projects frequently focused on restoring cultural harvesting. From 1995 to 2014, the restoration ecology literature contained few references to cultural values or use. We argue that restoration practitioners are missing a vital component for reassembling functional ecosystems. Inclusion of sustainably harvestable areas within restored landscapes may allow for the continuation of traditional practices that shaped ecosystems for millennia, and also aid project success by ensuring community support. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Culture and International Management: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnik, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    A literature review explored the effectiveness of cross-cultural managements of multinational companies. The effect of national culture on organizational culture was analyzed and ways in which multinational companies can adopt the national differences were suggested. (Contains 42 references.) (JOW)

  9. O conflito como realidade e desafio cultural no exercício da gerência do enfermeiro El conflicto como realidad y desafío cultural, en el ejercício de la gerencia del enfermero Conflict as a reality and a cultural challenge in the practice of nurses' management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Giacomelli Prochnow

    2007-12-01

    resultados de este estudio apuntan para la importancia de la cultura organizacional en el ejercicio de la gerencia en la enfermería delante de las inseguridades laborables, en la complejidad del ambiente hospitalario.The practice of nurses' management is permeated by conflicts that can be interpreted through culture references. The objective of this study is to denote cultural specificities, analyzed according to Geertz's Cultural Interpretative Theory, that are expressed as conflicts in the scope of nurses' management at a University Hospital. The results denoted the incorporation of ideological elements and mechanisms of control and power, whose origin can be seen in the way in which the work is organized. The application of policies based on the profession's very values was observed. Practices highlight a cultural construction that elucidates some understandings regarding cognitive, social and behavioral processes, because they organize the interpretations and the answers to the events of nurses' practices in management. The results of this study point out the importance of organizational culture in the practice of Nursing management in the face of labor uncertainties in the complexity of a hospital environment.

  10. On Function and Practice of Enterprise Culture in Human Resource Management in Coal Enterprise%试论企业文化在煤企人力资源管理中的作用及实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    续亚萍; 朱宏江

    2013-01-01

    建立在企业正式制度层面上的人力资源管理模式,具有较好的目标管理优势。然而若只是依托绩效考核这种权威式管理模式,难以持续增强职工的岗位意识。需要充分挖掘企业文化的作用,作用包括凝聚作用、激励作用、强化作用。企业管理者须将企业文化的核心元素得以切实贯彻。在实践方面应突出企业的思想文化,包括向职工指出企业内涵式发展的重要性;通过企业文化营造出学习氛围;通过思想政治工作增强职工的学习意识。%Human resource management mode, based on formal enterprise system level, has good target management advantages. But It is hard to strength the employees' work sense sustainably if just relying on the authority-oriented management mode such as performance appraisal. It is essential to fully exert the function of enterprise culture, including cohesion function, incentive function, reinforcement function. Enterprise managers should carry out the core of enterprise culture elements thoroughly. In practice, they should highlight the enterprise culture, illustrating the importance of the enterprise connotative development to the employees, creating a learning atmosphere through the enterprise culture, enhancing the learning sense of employees through the ideological and political work.

  11. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-04-25

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Managing Hypertriglyceridemia in Daily Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentius A Pramono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is a form of dyslipidemia, which usually occurs in combination with hypercholesterolemia, high-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol level. Most studies suggest that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with many metabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, and also cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. Treatment of  hypertriglyceridemia is often not comprehensively addressed by many physicians, who usually only include prescribing drugs without encouraging patients to perform physical activity, to take a true healthy diet for dyslipidemia and to stop smoking. This review article discusses evaluation, diagnosis and a comprehensive, yet simple management of hypertriglyceridemia, which can be easily pplied in daily clinical practice. Key words: hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, management, clinical guidelines.

  13. Managing Hypertriglyceridemia in Daily Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, Laurentius A; Harbuwono, Dante S

    2015-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a form of dyslipidemia, which usually occurs in combination with hypercholesterolemia, high-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol level. Most studies suggest that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with many metabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, and also cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. Treatment of hypertriglyceridemia is often not comprehensively addressed by many physicians, who usually only include prescribing drugs without encouraging patients to perform physical activity, to take a true healthy diet for dyslipidemia and to stop smoking. This review article discusses evaluation, diagnosis and a comprehensive, yet simple management of hypertriglyceridemia, which can be easily applied in daily clinical practice.

  14. Managing cultural diversity in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, J

    1993-07-01

    Cultural diversity is a strength of the American work force. Due to the increasing cultural diversity in the workplace, organizations find it in their best interest to move beyond affirmative action to effective management to achieve higher employee retention and develops an employee cultural mix that better matches the mix of the available labor force and customer base. To manage a diverse work force, managers need to have the proper tools, training and evaluation and monitoring programs. Important initiatives to successful management of cultural diversity include eliciting support and commitment from the board of directors, the CEO and other top management; organizing subcommittees to research and monitor demographic changes to determine what the organization's goals should be and to decide what changes are to be made. Employees must be trained to be aware of prejudices and how to manage their own actions.

  15. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FACTORS IN MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT SERIES, NUMBER 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Organisation, Geneva (Switzerland).

    IN THIS COLLECTION OF PAPERS PRESENTED AT A 1965 MEETING OF THE INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE (ILO), ON SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FACTORS IN MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT, THE PROBLEMS OF ADAPTING AND TRANSPLANTING MANAGEMENT THEORIES AND PRACTICES FROM HIGHLY INDUSTRIALIZED NATIONS TO DEVELOPING NATIONS ARE STRESSED. AN OUTLINE OF THE ROLE OF THE ILO AND THE…

  16. Identifying enabling management practices for employee engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Joubert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A currently emerging viewpoint is that today's management practices no longer add value to organisations. The focus of this article is to conduct a systematic review of the scholarly literature on management practices that could be related to employee engagement. Research purpose: This study searched for evidence in support of the notion of a management value chain, and enabling management practices within each value chain component that could relate to employee engagement. Motivation for the study: An alternative management value chain model could contribute towards a better understanding of which management practices may potentially impact employee engagement. Research design, approach, and method: This is a non-empirical (theoretical study, based on a systematic, in-depth literature review to identify the key management components and enabling practices within this proposed management value chain. Scholarly research databases were sourced for relevant peer reviewed research conducted since 1990, not excluding important contributions prior to 1990. The literature was systematically searched, selected, studied, and contextualized within this study. Main findings: Support was found for the notion of a management value chain, for enabling management practices within each proposed management value chain component, and it was also established these management practices indeed have an impact on employee engagement. Practical/managerial/implications: The possibility that management work can be presented as a generic management value chain allows managers to approach engaging management practices more systematically. Contribution/value-add: This study highlights the importance of some management practices that have never been seen as part of management work.

  17. Principles and practices of sustainable water management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bixia Xu

    2010-01-01

    Literature related to sustainable water management is reviewed to illustrate the relationship among water management, sustainability (sustainable development), and sustainable water management. This review begins with the explanation on the definition of sustainable water management, followed by a discussion of sustainable water management principles and practices.

  18. Creating a Culture by Governance: Issues in Managing Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Victoria T. Herrera

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of culture involves a network of agencies, institutions and entities both from the public and private sectors. This is part of a collective process by which objects acwuire cultural significance. We create images of our nations, tell stories, and construct experiences for other people through exhibitions, festivals and other cultural activities. Our role is never neutral and it is important to recognize this power and the implications of our actions.In the Philippines, government has taken an active role in the production and management of culture. In spite of the relatively small percentage of funding spent on culture and the arts, it has extended support through various institutions and agencies that, at present, comprise a complex network. Through their respective programs, government has defined paths of cultural production-- from the larger policy framework for organizations to specific commemorative programs. Given this range of involvement, how has the state empowered people and organizations shape culture? What strategies has it taken to extend to support the production and distribution of culture?This paper focuses on two case studies that represent strategies the state has taken in cultural management. At a macro level, the changes the Cultural Center of the Philippines underwent reflect shifting policies and priorities. As products of changing political administrations, this institution went through a re-orientation of its mission. This came with an abrupt expansion in scale but without the necessary resources to support the CCP's new programs. At a micro level, the second evaluates the refurbished Rizal Shrine, Fort Santiago, one of the major projects of the now defunct National Centennial Commission. This underscores the need for a more transparent decision-making process, prioritizing the interest of the museum's public and not just that of the specialists who control the production of knowledge.

  19. Fundamentals of Value Based Management in practice of Quality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szczepańska

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the practical aspects of using the theory of value management in quality management. Presents the essence of value based management (VBM as a background of reflection on its links with quality management. Coherence of the concept in practice, been reviewed in the author’s own studies. The discovery of absence of sufficient procedural structure of the metrics of an economic – financial, to measure the value of the quality management system, points to a gap between the theoretical and practical considerations in managing the value of the company quality management system.  

  20. Cultural distance in international business and management : from mean-based to variance-based measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Maseland, Robbert; Onrust, Marjolijn; van Hoorn, Andre; Slangen, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Extant practice in international management is to measure cultural distance as a nation-to-nation comparison of country means on cultural values, thereby ignoring the cultural variation that exists within countries. We argue that these traditional mean-based measures of cultural distance should take

  1. Management's role in shaping organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Urrabazo, Christine

    2006-04-01

    The present study addresses the importance of the manager's role in the development and maintenance of organizational culture. It describes the types of cultures that exist and manager characteristics that are essential to facilitating a healthy workplace. While many managers do not deny the importance of organizational culture in employee satisfaction, few fail to realize the direct impact they have in shaping it. It is oftentimes believed that cultures are predetermined; however, this is a false assumption. It is crucial that managers at all levels are aware of their roles and responsibilities in upholding positive workplace environments that can increase employee satisfaction. Dissatisfaction is the major cause of turnover and can have detrimental cost and environmental effects on the agency. Four critical components of culture (i.e. trust and trustworthiness, empowerment and delegation, consistency and mentorship) are discussed, as is the role of managers in turning these into positive cultural traits. The viewpoints of several authors, such as Stephen Covey, Mark McCormack and Charles Handy, are explored in relation to the development of organizational culture. Additional theories--Kanter's 'Theory of Organizational Empowerment', Locke's 'Goal-setting Theory' and the 'Social Exchange Theory'- supplement these viewpoints. Managers are always under the magnifying glass, with each action carefully scrutinized by subordinates. They must exercise caution when making decisions, ensuring that fairness and equitability exists among staff, and that ethical standards are upheld on a continual basis. The four cultural components, viewed as managerial traits of trust and trustworthiness, empowerment, consistency and mentorship coexist at all times regardless of the type of culture. Managers must put support systems and other mechanisms into place that allow employees the opportunity to empower themselves and to flourish, thus increasing their own effectiveness as well as

  2. The Role of Cultural Compatibility in Effective Management The Application of Cultural Four-dimensional Model in Transnational Corporations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成哲

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural management is often regarded as a discipline of international management focusing on cultural encounters between the organization and the nation-state, and providing tools to tackle cultural difl'erences seen as sources of conflict, friction or misunderstanding. Based on Greet Hofstede' s Cultural Model, this paper attempts to shed some light on effective corporation management through cultural analysis of the difl'erences between China and western countries. The paper puts more emphasis on the impact of cultural compatibility on effective corporation man- agement through the case study of China, Japan, Germany and America. The author argues that managers and employ- ees involved in companies with diverse cultural backgrounds should be integrated and developed into a specific local context through interlocking their cultural identifications and the organizational practices.

  3. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  4. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  5. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  6. Dermatoses due to Indian cultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. 'Henna' use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. 'Kumkum' application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker 'bindis' and 'alta' induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with 'Holi' colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. 'Mudichood' represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  7. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ‘Henna’ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ‘Kumkum’ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ‘bindis’ and ‘alta’ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ‘Holi’ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ‘Mudichood’ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device “kangri” is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause. PMID:25657390

  8. Dermatoses due to indian cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ′Holi′ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ′Mudichood′ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  9. Problem and Preferred Management Practices Identification Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patchen, Douglas G.

    2003-03-10

    The goals for this workshop were: to introduce key players in the Appalachian basin oil industry to DOE's new Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) program; to explain the various elements of our two-year project in detail; to transfer technology through a series of short, invited talks; to identify technical problems and best management practices; and to recruit members for our Preferred Management Practices (PMP) Council.

  10. Adaptive Delta Management: cultural aspects of dealing with uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Jos; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Hermans, Leon; Kwakkel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Deltas are generally recognized as vulnerable to climate change and therefore a salient topic in adaptation science. Deltas are also highly dynamic systems viewed from physical (erosion, sedimentation, subsidence), social (demographic), economic (trade), infrastructures (transport, energy, metropolization) and cultural (multi-ethnic) perspectives. This multi-faceted dynamic character of delta areas warrants the emergence of a branch of applied adaptation science, Adaptive Delta Management, which explicitly focuses on climate adaptation of such highly dynamic and deeply uncertain systems. The application of Adaptive Delta Management in the Dutch Delta Program and its active international dissemination by Dutch professionals results in the rapid dissemination of Adaptive Delta Management to deltas worldwide. This global dissemination raises concerns among professionals in delta management on its applicability in deltas with cultural conditions and historical developments quite different from those found in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom where the practices now labelled as Adaptive Delta Management first emerged. This research develops an approach and gives a first analysis of the interaction between the characteristics of different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management and their alignment with the cultural conditions encountered in various delta's globally. In this analysis, first different management theories underlying approaches to Adaptive Delta Management as encountered in both scientific and professional publications are identified and characterized on three dimensions: The characteristics dimensions used are: orientation on today, orientation on the future, and decision making (Timmermans, 2015). The different underlying management theories encountered are policy analysis, strategic management, transition management, and adaptive management. These four management theories underlying different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management are connected to

  11. Implications of Risk Management Practices on Financial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implications of Risk Management Practices on Financial Performance of Sugar ... is that risk management is an integral part of the decision-making process and ... can proactively help in overcoming the possibilities of the business failures.

  12. The Effectiveness of Human Resource Management Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric Ng Chee Hong; Lam Zheng Hao; Ramesh Kumar; Charles Ramendran; Vimala Kadiresan

    2012-01-01

    An effective human resource management practices namely employee empowerment, training and development, appraisal system compensation are the main factor for the success of a firm on employee retention...

  13. The Use of Management Controls in Different Cultural Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmi, Teemu; Ax, Christian; Bedford, David

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses differences in management control practices in Anglo-Saxon (Australia, Canada), Germanic (Austria, Belgium, Germany), and Nordic firms (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden). Unique data is collected through structured interviews from 688 strategic business units (SBUs) in these ......This study addresses differences in management control practices in Anglo-Saxon (Australia, Canada), Germanic (Austria, Belgium, Germany), and Nordic firms (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden). Unique data is collected through structured interviews from 688 strategic business units (SBUs......) in these countries. We find differences across cultural regions with regard to how managers delegate decision rights to their subordinates, establish multidimensional reporting lines, involve subordinates in cross-functional tasks, and involve subordinates in strategic planning activities. We also find differences...... in the comprehensiveness of plans, purposes of performance measurement and evaluation, and the importance of interactively using budgets and performance measurement systems. Furthermore, we find differences in the nature and bases of rewards and variable compensation. Regarding cultural controls, differences...

  14. Teaching Cross-Cultural Conflict Management Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, David A.

    One of the most important areas for business educators to address in preparing their students to compete effectively in world markets is cross-cultural negotiating and conflict management. To do so, teachers must prepare students to understand the markets into which they enter as managers. The objective is not to learn a great deal about one…

  15. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitz, Patricia; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply diversity management best practices and provides a reading list for leaders and human resource managers wishing to optimize their organization's approach to diversity.

  16. Organizational Identity and Culture in the Context of Managed Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken; Skov, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents top and middle managers’ experiences and understandings of how organizational identity and culture were entangled with transformational change as it unfolded over a 5-year period in Carlsberg Group. Combining ethnography and grounded theory methods with engaged scholarship...... their organization’s identity led middle managers and employees both to support and resist new organizational identity claims made by top management. Within these identity activation processes we found frequent references relating new identity claims to organizational culture. Further analysis of the data revealed......, our work sits between research and practice, speaking directly to the experience of managers at the same time that it researches both the content and processes of organizational identity and culture. The study shows that engaging in processes of reflecting, questioning, and debating about...

  17. 安全文化管理在医院感染病区护理实践中的实际意义%Safety Culture Management in Hospital Infection Ward Nursing Practice in the Practical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满晓琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use of the management of safety culture in the significance of hospital infection ward were discussed and analyzed. Methods Will pick our hospital from March 2010 to March 2015were treated 84 cases of patients with all kinds of disease, according to the random grouping method divided the patients into two groups: experimental group and control group, respectively, in each group of 42 patients. To the control group patients with routine nursing intervention and routine management method, on the basis of the reference group of the experimental group patients safety culture manage-ment, compared two groups of treatment adherence for patients and nursing satisfaction. Results Through different way of nursing intervention and management, the experimental group of treatment adherence for patients with higher compared with the control group; Experimental group patients nursing satisfaction is higher, control group patients nursing satisfaction is relatively low, compared the two groups have statistical significance (P< 0.05). Conclusion Visible, in the process of clini-cal nursing intervention using safety culture management can effectively improve the patient's treatment adherence, can make patients more actively cooperate with treatment, and can effectively improve the patients' overall satisfaction with nursing care, the hospital reputation has obvious promotion effect.%目的 对安全文化管理运用于医院感染病区的意义进行探讨和分析.方法 择取该院自2010年3月-2015年3月收治的各类疾病患者84例,按照随机分组的方法将患者分为两组,分别为实验组和参照组,每组各42例患者. 对参照组患者行常规的护理干预和常规的管理方法,在参照组的基础上对实验组患者行安全文化管理,对比两组患者的治疗依从性和护理满意度. 结果 通过不同方式的护理干预和管理,实验组患者的治疗依从性与参照组相比较高;实验组患者的护理满意度较

  18. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  19. Best practice of nurse managers in risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Tavares Costa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the actions, undertaken by nurse managers in a risk management program, considered as best practice. METHOD: a case study undertaken in a private hospital in the south of Brazil. A risk manager and nurse managers working in a risk management program participated in this study. The data was collected between May and September 2011 through analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. Based on the triangulation, the data was analyzed through practical measures. RESULTS: educational actions, the critical analysis of the context, and the multiple dimensions of the management were evidenced as best practice. CONCLUSIONS: the broadening of understanding regarding risk management best practice offers further support for nurse managers to achieve excellence in their actions and thus provide safe and quality care.

  20. Best practice of nurse managers in risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Veridiana Tavares; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2013-01-01

    To identify the actions, undertaken by nurse managers in a risk management program, considered as best practice. A case study undertaken in a private hospital in the south of Brazil. A risk manager and nurse managers working in a risk management program participated in this study. The data was collected between May and September 2011 through analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. Based on the triangulation, the data was analyzed through practical measures. Educational actions, the critical analysis of the context, and the multiple dimensions of the management were evidenced as best practice. The broadening of understanding regarding risk management best practice offers further support for nurse managers to achieve excellence in their actions and thus provide safe and quality care.

  1. Pengembangan Knowledge Management Berbasiskan Talent Management untuk Mendukung Knowledge Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Harjono Muljo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Every organization needs to realize that the inside knowledge should be used efficiently and effectively, and also should get support from knowledge culture. The purpose of the writing is the development of knowledge management based on talent management to support the existence of knowledge culture. The method used is through survey, interview, direct observation and literature study. Survey and interview had been done in Talent Management BINUS University, especially in Learning and Department (L&D unit. The direct observation is through key performance indicator of lecturers. The literature study is through exploring scientific journals, especially related to the topic of knowledge management through website. The result is that it could be concluded in strategy of policy and award rewarded used to approach knowledge management development in supporting knowledge culture

  2. Videoing and ways of seeing management practices

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Katy

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses social practice theory to explore the potential of video to generate new ‘ways of seeing’ organising and management practices. The ontological assumptions of social practice theory are invoked to suggest how organisational researchers should practice the videoing, analysing and representing of videography-based research. Examples are drawn from visual anthropology, film theory and film studies to show how inserting the camera into ordinary everyday research practices is likely...

  3. Exploring the Marketing Course Practical Teaching System of the Culture and Arts Management Major%文化艺术管理专业营销课程实践教学体系探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕

    2013-01-01

    Culture and arts management major is one with strong practicality .One of its courses ,Mar‐keting ,is an important one to strengthen the practical skills of the majors and its practical teaching system needs carefully constructing .This article ,in accordance with the learning characteristics of the majors , fully explores the problems existed in the practical teaching ,and puts forward the idea that practice should be made in multi -dimensions ,multi‐levels ,and in a full range :both in class and out of class ,throughout both school and society ,and by both the teacher and the student .%  文化艺术管理专业是在国家大力发展文化产业,推动文化体制改革的时代背景下出现的一门新兴学科,各个院校专业办学的定位就在于培养应用型人才。因此,对学生的实践性、创新性、务实性要求非常高。文化艺术营销课在整个的专业中又是一门应用型和实践性非常强的课程,应该给学生提供更多的实践机会,重视学生实践能力的培养和锻炼。本文结合学生和课程特点,从课程实践教学中存在的问题出发,探索适合文化艺术专业学生的市场营销实践道路。

  4. Dossier 'Cultural management, a new discipline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Munilla

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, neither universities nor the other training centres have considered cultural management to be a free-standing area of knowledge, seeing it instead to be dependent on other areas classically accepted by the scientific and education community.In this dossier, three researchers and professionals bring us into closer contact with the world of cultural management in terms of their different areas of professional activity and their corresponding different perspectives: cultural management in public institutions and their approach to the university world; the impact that two institutions and their management model, Barcelona's Contemporary Art Museum (MACBA and Barcelona's Contemporary Culture Centre (CCCB, can have on a city and a neighbourhood, and how this new discipline is seen in terms of the day-to-day of managing events of international scope. All three, Alba Colombo, Joaquim Rius and Laura Solanilla, are united in their passion for this discipline; likewise, all three of them, show exactly the extent to which interdisciplinary training is vital for this 'new' (or not so new cultural profession.

  5. Investigating the Knowledge Management Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Vasso; Savva, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) efforts aim at leveraging an organization into a knowledge organization thereby presenting knowledge employees with a very powerful tool; organized valuable knowledge accessible when and where needed in flexible, technologically-enhanced modes. The attainment of this aim, i.e., the transformation into a knowledge…

  6. Understanding management practices in business incubators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Vincent; Thijssen, Sander; Pascucci, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Following the call for process-oriented research on business incubation processes, this paper investigates the process of business incubation (BI) via an understanding of management practices and interactions. Based on a comprehensive literature review and empirical evidence of management practices

  7. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J

    2014-01-01

    culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture indicators...

  8. Managing cultural diversity in healthcare partnerships: the case of LIFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Brown, Sally; Beck, Matthias; Lunt, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) Local Improvement Finance Trust (LIFT) programme was launched in 2001 as an innovative public-private partnership to address the historical under-investment in local primary care facilities in England. The organisations from the public and private sector that comprise a local LIFT partnership each have their own distinctive norms of behaviour and acceptable working practices - ultimately different organisational cultures. The purpose of this article is to assess the role of organisational culture in facilitating (or impeding) LIFT partnerships and to contribute to an understanding of how cultural diversity in public-private partnerships is managed at the local level. The approach taken was qualitative case studies, with data gathering comprising interviews and a review of background documentation in three LIFT companies purposefully sampled to represent a range of background factors. Elite interviews were also conducted with senior policy makers responsible for implementing LIFT policy at the national level. Interpreting the data against a conceptual framework designed to assess approaches to managing strategic alliances, the authors identified a number of key differences in the values, working practices and cultures in public and private organisations that influenced the quality of joint working. On the whole, however, partners in the three LIFT companies appeared to be working well together, with neither side dominating the development of strategy. Differences in culture were being managed and accommodated as partnerships matured. As LIFT develops and becomes the primary source of investment for managing, developing and channelling funding into regenerating the primary care infrastructure, further longitudinal work might examine how ongoing partnerships are working, and how changes in the cultures of public and private partners impact upon wider relationships within local health economies and shape the delivery of patient care

  9. Research Report: A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Practical Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jane R.

    1987-01-01

    Questions the extent to which practical intelligence can be measured in a reliable and valid fashion cross-culturally. Differentiates between the internal validity of our measure of practical intelligence and its external validity. (LHW)

  10. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information.As a main means of cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise.Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier.They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication.Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  11. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information. As a main meansof cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise. Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier. They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication. Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  12. Best Management Practice Fact Sheet. 12, Filtering Practices

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet is one of a 15-part series on urban stormwater management practices. This fact sheet discusses filtering practices, what they are, where they are used, how they work, maintenance, limitations, performance, expected costs and includes a glossary of terms.

  13. The role of cultural ecosystem services in landscape management and planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Bieling, Claudia; Fagerholm, Nora

    2015-01-01

    empirical evidence and assess what consideration of cultural ecosystem services adds to landscape management and planning. In general, cultural ecosystem services incentivize the multifunctionality of landscapes. However, depending on context, cultural ecosystem services can either encourage the maintenance...... of valuable landscapes or act as barriers to necessary innovation and transformation. Hence, cultural ecosystems services are not uncontested, as seen through the three analytical lenses of landowner behavior, cultural practices of communities, and landscape planning....

  14. Best practice of nurse managers in risk management

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the actions, undertaken by nurse managers in a risk management program, considered as best practice. METHOD: a case study undertaken in a private hospital in the south of Brazil. A risk manager and nurse managers working in a risk management program participated in this study. The data was collected between May and September 2011 through analysis of documents, semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. Based on the triangulation, the data was analy...

  15. Data Management and Sharing from the Perspective of Graduate Students: An Examination of the Culture and Practice at the Water Quality Field Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jake; Stowell-Bracke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are actively seeking to identify and respond to the data management and curation needs of researchers. One important perspective often overlooked in acquiring an understanding is that of graduate students. This case study used the Data Curation Profile Toolkit to interview six graduate students working for agronomy researchers at the…

  16. Data Management and Sharing from the Perspective of Graduate Students: An Examination of the Culture and Practice at the Water Quality Field Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jake; Stowell-Bracke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are actively seeking to identify and respond to the data management and curation needs of researchers. One important perspective often overlooked in acquiring an understanding is that of graduate students. This case study used the Data Curation Profile Toolkit to interview six graduate students working for agronomy researchers at the…

  17. Gender in identification practices of mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Sinkevych

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the images of masculinity and femininity in popular culture depends on shared cultural paradigm. However, these images not only reflect, but also construct social and cultural reality. Gender representation in popular culture activates the process of selecting, structuring and formation of values of a stereotype, its communicative refinement, giving it new meaning. It promotes innovative images, which play the role of landmarks gender identity.

  18. Cultural Connections in Leadership Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmoyer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    "Culture Currents" presents the books, essays, poetry, performances, music, websites and other cultural media influencing educational leaders. "Culture Currents" is a snapshot, a peek behind the scenes. It reveals what people are reading or seeing that may not be normally mentioned or cited in their academic work. In this issue's contribution, two…

  19. Evaluating Water Management Practice for Sustainable Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfeng Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To move towards sustainable development, the mining industry needs to identify better mine water management practices for reducing raw water use, increasing water use efficiency, and eliminating environmental impacts in a precondition of securing mining production. However, the selection of optimal mine water management practices is technically challenging due to the lack of scientific tools to comprehensively evaluate management options against a set of conflicting criteria. This work has provided a solution to aid the identification of more sustainable mine water management practices. The solution includes a conceptual framework for forming a decision hierarchy; an evaluation method for assessing mine water management practices; and a sensitivity analysis in view of different preferences of stakeholders or managers. The solution is applied to a case study of the evaluation of sustainable water management practices in 16 mines located in the Bowen Basin in Queensland, Australia. The evaluation results illustrate the usefulness of the proposed solution. A sensitivity analysis is performed according to preference weights of stakeholders or managers. Some measures are provided for assessing sensitivity of strategy ranking outcomes if the weight of an indicator changes. Finally, some advice is given to improve the mine water management in some mines.

  20. Cultural safety and its importance for Australian midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Jasten; Dietsch, Elaine; Bonner, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Cultural safety is an important concept in health care that originated in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to address Maori consumer dissatisfaction with health care. In Australia and internationally, midwives are now expected to provide culturally safe midwifery care to all women. Historically, Australia has received large numbers of immigrants from the United Kingdom, European countries and the Middle East. There have also been refugees and immigrants from South-East Asia, and most recently, from Africa. Australia continues to become more culturally diverse and yet to date no studies have explored the application of cultural safety in Australian midwifery practice. This paper explores how cultural safety has evolved from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. It examines the importance of cultural safety in nursing and midwifery practice. Finally, it explores the literature to determine how midwives can apply the concept of cultural safety to ensure safe and woman centred care.

  1. Benchmarking management practices in Australian public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy; Agarwal, Neeru; Randhawa, Krithika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality of management practices of public hospitals in the Australian healthcare system, specifically those in the state-managed health systems of Queensland and New South Wales (NSW). Further, the authors assess the management practices of Queensland and NSW public hospitals jointly and globally benchmark against those in the health systems of seven other countries, namely, USA, UK, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy and Canada. In this study, the authors adapt the unique and globally deployed Bloom et al. (2009) survey instrument that uses a "double blind, double scored" methodology and an interview-based scoring grid to measure and internationally benchmark the management practices in Queensland and NSW public hospitals based on 21 management dimensions across four broad areas of management - operations, performance monitoring, targets and people management. The findings reveal the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in the Queensland and NSW Health hospital management practices when compared with public hospitals in seven countries, namely, USA, UK, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy and Canada. Together, Queensland and NSW Health hospitals perform best in operations management followed by performance monitoring. While target management presents scope for improvement, people management is the sphere where these Australian hospitals lag the most. This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators and health care policy-makers aiming to lift management quality at the hospital level as well as at the institutional level, as a vehicle to consistently deliver sustainable high-quality health services. This study provides the first internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in Australian public hospitals, where hospitals are run independently by the state-run healthcare systems. Additionally, this research study contributes to the empirical evidence base on the quality of

  2. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  3. Soil residual nitrogen under various crop rotations and cultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop rotation and cultural practice may influence soil residual N available for environmental loss due to crop N uptake and N immobilization. We evaluated the effects of stacked vs. alternate-year crop rotations and cultural practices on soil residual N (NH4-N and NO3-N contents) at the 0-125 cm dep...

  4. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  5. Retention practices in education human resources management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review of retention practices for teachers is premised on the principles of quality ... of business principles and public service management principles based on legal and statutory provision. An increase in customer satisfaction is necessary.

  6. Moving Design from Metaphor to Management Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanne Liedtka; Bidhan Parmar

    2012-01-01

    Despite the centrality of “design” to the field of organizational science, we argue that its use has remained at the level of metaphor rather than practice. Donald Schon’s concept of “reflection in action” addresses this gap by describing how managers can practice designing by generating problem frames as hypotheses, and then testing and refining those hypotheses in the situation. Much of management theory has focused on stable and predictable situations where problem framing is less importan...

  7. Knowledge Management. Synergy between Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Craciun Bucur Matei

    2011-01-01

    There are, however, not much time, work to provide the reader synergies between theory and practice. The objective of this paper is to bring them closer to the reader the foundation and direction of knowledge management and aspects of it, because later this knowledge to develop the example of Best Practice and to be enhanced. It consists of two models of strategies in relation to the implementation of knowledge management, with special traits, oriented consultancy. The economic areas and the ...

  8. An essay on agile project management practices

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia, Daniel Rabasquinho

    2015-01-01

    The main goals for the current dissertation is to research on how practices and concepts from Agile Project Management can be applied in a non-IT context and to discover which aspects should be considered when deciding if whether an Agile approach should be implemented or not. Previous studies reflect on the adoption for the identified context. However, the recognition of these practices and concepts by the Project Management field of studies still remains unresolved. The adoption of Agile...

  9. The Role of Top Management in Supply Chain Management Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Supply chain management (SCM) has been discussed by researchers as well as business practitioners for more than two decades now, but still surprisingly little of this philosophy can be seen in today’s business practices. One important enabler for taking the SCM philosophy from theory into practice that is often mentioned, but not investigated in-depth, is top management support. The role top management plays in a company’s SCM practices could be an important piece of research that is not yet ...

  10. Organizational Culture in Budgeting Practices: A Study in an Agroindustrial Cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Wrubel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the relationship between organizational culture and budgeting practices of an organization. Developed a qualitative, descriptive research through a case study. The company's study was selected for accessibility and intentionally, since it uses corporate budget management. For data collection was designed a semi structured interview guide with questions adapted from the study of Van der Stede (2000 applied to the agricultural industry of Paraná budget manager. Was also including questions about the cultural aspects and for this was used the dimensions of organizational culture of Hofstede (1991. The organizational culture focused on results orientation contributes to the company to carry out the budget with emphasis on goals, because in this orientation the managers tend to devote efforts on tasks and is facilitated implementation of budgets that are premised on achieving planning undertaken by senior management. The organizational culture of agribusiness presents evidence to positively influence the existence of rigid control related to the budget, in which notes that people are concerned about cost control in the workplace. Some budgeting practices carried out by agribusiness are consolidated, involving the participation of managers and are influenced by cultural aspects of organizational environment that encourage such practices.

  11. Practice management: observations, issues, and empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H M; Braithwaite, J

    2001-02-01

    The primary objective of this study is to provide objective, empirical, evidence-based practice management information. This is a hitherto under-researched area of considerable interest for both the practitioner and educator. A questionnaire eliciting a mix of structured and free text responses was administered to a random sample of 480 practitioners who are members of the American Academy of Periodontology. Potential respondents not in private practice were excluded and the next listed person substituted. The results provide demographic and descriptive information about some of the main issues and problems facing practice managers, central to which are information technology (IT), financial, people management, and marketing. Human resource and marketing management appear to represent the biggest challenges. Periodontists running practices would prefer more information, development, and support in dealing with IT, finance, marketing, and people management. The empirical evidence reported here suggests that although tailored educational programs on key management issues at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels have become ubiquitous, nevertheless some respondents seek further training opportunities. Evidence-based practice management information will be invaluable to the clinician considering strategic and marketing planning, and also for those responsible for the design and conduct of predoctoral and postdoctoral programs.

  12. 25 tips for working through language and cultural barriers in your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    The language and cultural barriers facing medical patients with limited English language proficiency pose tremendous challenges and risks. Moreover, medical practices today are more likely than ever to employ individuals whose first language is not English or who do not possess native-like knowledge of American culture. Knowing how to work through the language and cultural barriers you are likely to encounter in your medical practice has become increasingly more important. This article is written by a practice management consultant who has graduate-level linguistics training and second-language teaching credentials and experience. It offers 25 practical tips to help you communicate more effectively with individuals who are outside of your native culture and language. These include easy-to-implement tips about English language pronunciation, grammar, and word choice. This article also suggests what you can do personally to bridge the cultural divide with your patients and co-workers. Finally, this article includes a case study of one Virginia practice in which cultural differences interfered with the practice's smooth operation. It explains how the practice eventually worked through and overcame this cultural obstacle.

  13. Practice Research on the Management of University Students' Dormitory Cultural Activities by Project%高校学生公寓文化活动项目化管理的实践研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾丽青

    2011-01-01

    将项目管理模式引入高校学生公寓文化活动的管理当中,通过阐述高校学生公寓文化管理的内涵及意义,重点介绍高校学生公寓文化活动项目化管理的流程,论述高校学生公寓文化活动项目化管理过程中应把握的原则。%This paper focuses on the introduction of the mold of management by project into university students' dormitory cultural activities management. After illustrating the contents and significance of university students' dormitory culture management, this paper mainly introduces the process of students' dormitory cultural activities management by project, and clarifies principles we should follow in this process.

  14. Machinima Filmmaking as Culture in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    The topic of game and player culture is addressed herein as individual and socio-cultural processes of authorship in relation to machinima filmmaking. The terms machinima (from machine, cinema and anime) and machinimators (referring to filmmakers) were coined by gamers in the late 1990s. Machinima...

  15. Teaching French Culture. Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ross; Suozzo, Andrew

    In today's global village, the choice of languages and cultures offered to the high school and college student in constantly increasing. Several reasons are offered for choosing the more traditional option of French/Francophone culture: internationalism, political contributions, intellectual achievements, France's role in Europe and in technology,…

  16. Maintenance culture and management of change - Intermediate report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P.; Kettunen, J. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland); Rollenhagen, C.; Kahlbom, U. [Maelardalen University (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Change management has emerged as an important topic in safety-critical organisations. A lot of knowledge on change management exists, but still lot of projects fail and the safety consequences of various changes are unclear. It seems that the problems of change management are interdisciplinary, but still solutions tend to only from one perspective (e.g. technical or personnel management). There also exists empirical evidence that change has been experienced as stressful in the nuclear power plants. The cultural perspective taken in this paper strives to combine technical approaches to human resources approaches. It raises new questions that are not usually explicitly taken into account in change management. Financial pressures, change of generation and other changes in the environment have forced many organisations to reorganise their practices (e.g. downsize, outsource, and develop team-based organisations). These changes have had an impact on the culture of the organisation (and the organisational culture has mediated these changes in the first phase). (au)

  17. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitz, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply…

  18. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitz, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply…

  19. Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student…

  20. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented.

  1. Blurred Boundaries in Wildlife Management Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman-Berson, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts have been increasing at alarming rates over the last few decades. Wildlife management practices deal with preventing and disentangling these conflicts. However, which approach should be taken is widely disputed in research, policy, in-the-field-wildlife management and local

  2. Blurred Boundaries in Wildlife Management Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman-Berson, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts have been increasing at alarming rates over the last few decades. Wildlife management practices deal with preventing and disentangling these conflicts. However, which approach should be taken is widely disputed in research, policy, in-the-field-wildlife management and local

  3. Practical Life: The Keystone of Life, Culture, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Uma Ramani's characterization of practical life is philosophical and anthropological, suggesting that "human history is the story of the evolution of our practical life activities." Practical life is a collaborative activity that creates community and culture. One's adaptation to life through the daily work of ordering our environment…

  4. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  5. Contemporary management of pericardial effusion: practical aspects for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Gaido, Luca; Battaglia, Alberto; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-03-01

    A pericardial effusion (PE) is a relatively common finding in clinical practice. It may be either isolated or associated with pericarditis with or without an underlying disease. The aetiology is varied and may be either infectious (especially tuberculosis as the most common cause in developing countries) or non-infectious (cancer, systemic inflammatory diseases). The management is essentially guided by the hemodynamic effect (presence or absence of cardiac tamponade), the presence of concomitant pericarditis or underlying disease, and its size and duration. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the aetiology, classification, diagnosis, management, therapy, and prognosis of PE in clinical practice.

  6. Living the border: Social and cultural practices from the sidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Winikor Wagner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migrants, while in a position of subordination and vulnerability in the host society, can be defined as subjects of analysis of cultural studies. It is from this theoretical framework, which will investigate the social and cultural practices of Brazilian migrants settled in the northeast of the province of Misiones, Argentina. We focus our attention on analyzing whether these practices are truly ways to resist the dominant culture or simply constitute forms of reproduction and naturalization of them. Through four concrete practices (portuñol, el brique, the buying and selling of improvements and spontaneous occupation of private land will reach the conclusion that the same evidence loans, grants, amalgams, conflicts, subordination and yet interstices creativity with the dominant culture. It shows the relational character that owns the popular culture with the dominant culture and its position of subordination and domination.

  7. Knowledge management practices at selected banks in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Chigada

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective knowledge organisations (EKO create dynamic capabilities through the acquisition, creation, sharing and retention of knowledge. These EKOs are designed to enable an organisation to improve best practices in business. As knowledge is different from other organisational resources, decision-makers ought to understand the importance of knowledge to an organisation. In order to fully utilise knowledge-management (KM practices and to enhance efficiency, management should appreciate and understand the importance of KM. A proper understanding of KM will add value to organisational knowledge. Objective: This study focused on investigating the knowledge-management practices at selected banks in South Africa. The objective was to establish the extent to which selected banks had implemented knowledge-management practices such as the acquisition, sharing and retention of knowledge.Method: Quantitative and qualitative data for this study were collected through the use of a multi-methods approach. Data were collected from middle and senior managers through the use of questionnaires and an interview protocol. All usable quantitative data were analysed using Survey Monkey and Microsoft Excel 2010 whilst thematic analysis was used to extract detailed, rich and complex data accounts from interviews. Results: Though the study revealed the presence of KM practices at selected banks, KM concepts were not universally understood, thus impeding the organisation-wide implementation of KM practices. Knowledge-management practices were only discussed as a footnote because no formal policies existed to add value to KM initiatives. Conclusion: The study concludes that organisations such as banks should perform a knowledge inventory. Knowledge inventories will become handy during the process of developing KM policies and practices for integrating work processes, collaborating and sharing (including the efficient use of knowledge technology platforms and

  8. Management Accounting in Denmark; Theory and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Poul; Andersen, Michael; Rohde, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    The article describes the present state of cost and management accounting in Denmark within “mainstream accounting”, both as regards theory and practice. In the case of theory, there has been a gradual convergence of views. The essence of these views is briefly described. Concerning practice......, the main results of two new empirical studies are presented one on product costing and the other on identifying the adoption of “modern cost management techniques” in Denmark. The article places both current theory and practice in their historical context. In the former, this is done through an outline...

  9. Environment management policies and practices

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson-Thomas, Colin

    2015-01-01

    According to Pope Francis (2015) our planet is “beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth.” His critique of rubbish and our throwaway culture in a encyclical on climate change, the environment and inequality, is a challenge to political and business decision makers. His references to the impacts of pollutants such as industrial and chemical waste and greenhouse gas emissions, suggest that more than a five pence charge on plastic bags may be required. So what questions shou...

  10. Quality management in a radiological practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, Michael, E-mail: kirschm@uni-greifswald.d [Department of Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald AOR, Ferdinand-Sauerbruch-Strasse, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Vogg, Ingrid, E-mail: ivmobil2@medimpuls.d [Stapelfelder Strasse 84, 22143 Hamburg (Germany); Hosten, Norbert, E-mail: hosten@uni-greifswald.d [Department of Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald AOR, Ferdinand-Sauerbruch-Strasse, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Flessa, Steffen, E-mail: Steffen.Flessa@uni-greifswald.d [General Business Studies and Health Management, Friedrich-Loeffler-Strasse 70, 17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    This paper describes the introduction of a total quality management system in a radiological practice. Certification was based on DIN EN ISO 9001:2000. The implementation of the quality management system had to overcome a number of barriers, for instance, legal obligations of a partnership association, leadership problems, and the fear to loose all hindered implementation. The knowledge of these barriers induces a faster and cheaper implementation of a quality management system in a radiological practice as a foundation of improved quality and competitiveness.

  11. Multi-Agent Simulation and Management Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Celia, Helen; Clegg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent agents offer a new and exciting way of understanding the world of work. Agent-Based Simulation (ABS), one way of using intelligent agents, carries great potential for progressing our understanding of management practices and how they link to retail performance. We have developed simulation models based on research by a multi-disciplinary team of economists, work psychologists and computer scientists. We will discuss our experiences of implementing these concepts working with a well-known retail department store. There is no doubt that management practices are linked to the performance of an organisation (Reynolds et al., 2005; Wall & Wood, 2005). Best practices have been developed, but when it comes down to the actual application of these guidelines considerable ambiguity remains regarding their effectiveness within particular contexts (Siebers et al., forthcoming a). Most Operational Research (OR) methods can only be used as analysis tools once management practices have been implemented. Ofte...

  12. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    experiencing significant change . It also demonstrates that a unit-level mentored EBP program is sustainable despite changes in organizational structure...culture, readiness, beliefs, and implementation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Evidence-based practice, culture, mentor, organizational change 16. SECURITY...Medical Command; her areas of interest include staffing, acuity, nursing workload, change management, organizational culture and empowering junior

  13. Social media best practices in emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskey, Ashley; Islam, Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Social media platforms have become popular as means of communications in emergency management. Many people use social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter on a daily basis including during disaster events. Emergency management agencies (EMAs) need to recognize the value of not only having a presence on social media but also actively engaging stakeholders and the public on these sites. However, identifying best practices for the use of social media in emergency management is still in its infancy. The objective of this article is to begin to create or further define best practices for emergency managers to use social media sites particularly Facebook and Twitter in four key areas: 1) implementation, 2) education, 3) collaboration, and 4) communication. A list of recommendations of best practices is formulated for each key area and results from a nationwide survey on the use of social media by county EMAs are discussed in this article.

  14. Cultural Competence in Child Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. faces a changing demographic landscape that is increasingly multiracial. The application of a cultural competence model for assessing and treating the psychiatric disorders of minority youths in light of this demographic change is discussed.

  15. A clash of human resource management cultures : a micro-state case study

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    1997-01-01

    When resorting to Greek divine mythology to purchase original insights on management styles, Handy (1991) identifies Apollo and Dionysius as representative of two ideal types which can be developed and fine-tuned to highlight one relatively under explored area of inter-cultural human resource management. This concerns the cultural interface between alien, imported management styles and local, home-grown practices in the context of small and island states. This paper argues that indigenous b...

  16. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  17. Construction quality management principles and good practice

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Quality management is essential for facilitating the competitiveness of modern day commercial organizations. Excellence in quality management is a requisite for construction organizations who seek to remain competitive and successful. The challenges presented by competitive construction markets and large projects that are dynamic and complex necessitate the adoption and application of quality management approaches. This textbook is written in line with the ISO 9001:2008 standard and provides a comprehensive evaluation of quality management systems and tools. Their effectiveness in achieving project objectives is explored, as well as applications in corporate performance enhancement. Both the strategic and operational dimensions of quality assurance are addressed by focusing on providing models of best practice. The reader is supported throughout by concise and clear explanations and with self-assessment questions. Practical case study examples show how various evaluative-based quality management systems and t...

  18. Strategy and Culture: Hidden Secrets and Soft Skills in Supply Chain Best Practices from Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kibuka-Sebitosi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper identifies strategy and cultural hidden secrets and soft skills pertaining to supply chain management in African contexts that are pertinent to supply chain and operations management. Africa is increasingly becoming attractive for not only multi-nationals but supply chain businesses that either want to diversify or expand their foot print. The market is complex, turbulent and highly competitive (Porter, 1986 and requires significant knowledge and understanding of the local context but also culture (Johnson, 1987; 1992; 2000, diversity and institutional dynamics (Ogbonna et al., 2002. Due to the complex nature of the emerging markets, the paper draws from multiple-disciplines (Sociology, Business, Management and theoretical approaches namely: culture and strategy; Ubuntu, stakeholder theory and systems thinking, to elicit best practices. Utilizing qualitative methods comprising case study, interviews, focus group discussions and extensive document analysis, the study covers a variety of management practices ranging from strategy, culture to hyper market management. This paper highlights lessons from successful supermarket chains in Africa particularly the hidden secrets and soft skills that are often ignored in mainstream operations and supply chain management or strategy research. Findings underscore the lessons of understanding strategy and culture implementation through practicing cultural values, treating the customer as a queen/king, knowing political skills, being a learning organisation and implementing continuous improvement. It contributes to management theory for academics, researchers & managers through strategy and culture, proposing inclusion of the cultural diversity into strategy implementation as a critical force affecting the behaviour of people inside the organization. Managers should take into account the cultural context and use it to promote organizational business excellence. These lessons for business excellence

  19. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Initial Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety culture has been studied in many practice settings, but there is a dearth of information on the culture of safety in nephrology nurse practice settings. This research study employed the use of an online survey to assess patient safety cultures in nephrology nurse practice settings. The survey was created using items from two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey assessment tools--the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Select items from these tools were combined to address the safety of care delivered in hospital and outpatient nephrology nurse practice settings. Almost 1,000 nephrology nurses responded to the survey. Analysis of results and comparison with AHRQ comparative data found high ratings for teamwork, but indicted a continued needfor additional education and attention related to hand hygiene, medication administration safety, communication, and prioritization in nephrology practice settings. Nurses in all nephrology nurse practice settings need to routinely assess and positively contribute to the culture of patient safety in their practice settings, and lead and engage in efforts to ensure that patients are safe.

  20. Management of infection control in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A; Creanor, S; Hurrell, D; Bagg, J; McCowan, M

    2009-04-01

    This was an observational study in which the management policies and procedures associated with infection control and instrument decontamination were examined in 179 dental surgeries by a team of trained surveyors. Information relating to the management of a wide range of infection control procedures, in particular the decontamination of dental instruments, was collected by interview and by examination of practice documentation. This study found that although the majority of surgeries (70%) claimed to have a management policy on infection control, only 50% of these were documented. For infection control policies, 79% of surgeries had access to the British Dental Association Advice Sheet A12. Infection control policies were claimed to be present in 89% of surgeries, of which 62% were documented. Seventy-seven per cent of staff claimed to have received specific infection control training, but for instrument decontamination this was provided mainly by demonstration (97%) or observed practice (88%). Many dental nurses (74%) and dental practitioners (57%) did not recognise the symbol used to designate a single-use device. Audit of infection control or decontamination activities was undertaken in 11% of surgeries. The majority of surgeries have policies and procedures for the management of infection control in dental practice, but in many instances these are not documented. The training of staff in infection control and its documentation is poorly managed and consideration should be given to development of quality management systems for use in dental practice.

  1. Pharmacy students' perceptions of cultural competence encounters during practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-03-12

    To determine pharmacy students' perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations.

  2. Integrative learning for practicing adaptive resource management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. McLoughlin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive resource management is a learning-by-doing approach to natural resource management. Its effective practice involves the activation, completion, and regeneration of the "adaptive management cycle" while working toward achieving a flexible set of collaboratively identified objectives. This iterative process requires application of single-, double-, and triple-loop learning, to strategically modify inputs, outputs, assumptions, and hypotheses linked to improving policies, management strategies, and actions, along with transforming governance. Obtaining an appropriate balance between these three modes of learning has been difficult to achieve in practice and building capacity in this area can be achieved through an emphasis on reflexive learning, by employing adaptive feedback systems. A heuristic reflexive learning framework for adaptive resource management is presented in this manuscript. It is built on the conceptual pillars of the following: stakeholder driven adaptive feedback systems; strategic adaptive management (SAM; and hierarchy theory. The SAM Reflexive Learning Framework (SRLF emphasizes the types, roles, and transfer of information within a reflexive learning context. Its adaptive feedback systems enhance the facilitation of single-, double-, and triple-loop learning. Focus on the reflexive learning process is further fostered by streamlining objectives within and across all governance levels; incorporating multiple interlinked adaptive management cycles; having learning as an ongoing, nested process; recognizing when and where to employ the three-modes of learning; distinguishing initiating conditions for this learning; and contemplating practitioner mandates for this learning across governance levels. The SRLF is a key enabler for implementing the "adaptive management cycle," and thereby translating the theory of adaptive resource management into practice. It promotes the heuristics of adaptive management within a cohesive

  3. The Management of Difference in Everyday School Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The paper will present and discuss our field study of everyday life in a Danish fifth grade classroom. Our aim has been to observe, describe and analyze those everyday practices in the classroom that ultimately result in offering students different positions, identities and opportunities...... for participation. Our goal is to create knowledge about the way difference is constructed and managed in schools. How is the concept of ‘difference’ conceived of, produced and reproduced through everyday practices and how is the management of difference embedded in school culture. Further our goal is to create...... knowledge about the consequences that occur for different students as a result of specific ways of managing differences by teachers....

  4. Management strategies to harness cultural diversity in Australian construction sites - a social identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Loosemore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction sites around the world employ large numbers of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The effective management of this cultural diversity has important implications for the productivity, safety, health and welfare of construction workers and for the performance and reputation of firms which employ them. The findings of a three year, multi-staged study of cultural diversity management practices on construction sites are critiqued using social identity theory. This reveals that so called “best-practice” diversity management strategies may have an opposite effect to that intended. It is concluded that the management of diversity on construction projects would benefit from being informed by social identity research.

  5. Cultural or Ecological Sustainability? The Effect of Cultural Change on Sabal Palm Management Among the Lowland Maya of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Martínez-Ballesté

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sabal palm has been used for thatching the traditional Maya house for over 3000 yr. The great importance of this resource has promoted its management within home gardens. Although traditionally managed populations in home gardens are capable of ecological long-term persistence, the impact of cultural change on sustainable resource management is poorly understood. By means of interviews in 108 households, we obtained information about Sabal management practices, leaf demand, and sociocultural data. Density and size structure of the palm populations in the respective home gardens were also measured. By means of principal components analysis, the sociocultural data were summarized into a cultural change index, which was then statistically related to palm density, size structure, leaf demand, and management practices. Leaf demand along the cultural change gradient was estimated. Sabal populations were affected by the cultural change index. Palm density and the proportion of harvestable individuals were higher in the more traditional households. The number of management practices decreased, and the probability of felling adult palms increased with cultural change. As a result, the percentage of the total leaf demand satisfied by home garden production diminished from 118.2-69.4% as cultural change increased. Traditional practices seem oriented to increasing the palm availability. Seed sowing and the protection of seedlings and adults affect the life stages with the largest impact on the population growth rate, as measured through sensitivity analysis. This means that abandoning traditional practices and felling adults more frequently should reduce rapidly, which is consistent with the low palm density observed in less traditional households. The application of demographic models to Sabal tells us that traditional management warrants the persistence of the resource as long as the current conditions remain unchanged. In contrast, our data show that

  6. Applying Dairy Cow Behavior in Management Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Kai; LIU Zongping; WANG Zongyuan

    2009-01-01

    Applying dairy cow behavior in management practice is an effective way of improving cow health, welfare and performance. This paper first reviewed daily time budget and normal patterns of dairy cow behavior, and then discussed the influence of major management conditions and practices (such as competitive environments, stocking density, grouping strategies) on cow's feeding, lying and social behavior. Finally, new findings of using feeding behavior to predict disorders in transition period were addressed. It was suggested that dairy researchers and farmers should take advantage of related knowledge of dairy cow behavior to improve dairy cow health and welfare. More research is required to further study dairy cow behavior so as to better apply it in practical management and meet the needs of production.

  7. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  8. Teaching Culture: Questioning Perspectives on Our Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Met, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of training, teaching experience, reading professional literature, attending conferences, and learning from expert colleagues, when it comes to the teaching of culture, the author wishes she knew more answers to many critical questions. Her questions are framed by the basic questions that all curricula seek to answer: WHAT is the…

  9. Critical Thinking as Cultural-Historical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Carolyn P.

    1999-01-01

    Explores critical thinking as it has been constructed in schooling and in dominant traditions of psychological theory, presenting a dialectical view of critical thinking suggested in the social and philosophical writings of critical theorists (e.g., Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse) and supported by the sociohistorical or cultural-historical…

  10. Managing the multicultural laboratory, Part III: Putting the cross-cultural tools to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, S M

    1993-01-01

    This third article provides two case studies that enable laboratory managers to see how the cross-cultural model postulated by Dr. Geert Hofstede can be practically applied to two important issues--staff training and conflict resolution between employees. In addition, the opinions of several managers from a variety of industries are presented to add realism and perspective. This encourages laboratory managers to step outside the laboratory environment and learn from other managers who have years of experience supervising culturally diverse groups of employees. Part I of this series explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for understanding the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. Part II presented advice in the form of 13 anecdotes from experienced cross-cultural managers. Issues of performance management, interpersonal skills, and language and safety were explored in light of the four dimensions. In this third article, abbreviated reference tables adapted from Hofstede's research are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory managers will receive practical, "real world" advice that will help them to positively resolve conflicts and to take full advantage of staff training opportunities.

  11. Perspectives of Early Intervention Professionals about Culturally-Appropriate Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Bennett, Tess; Fowler, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 123 early intervention professionals found they considered recommendations for providing culturally appropriate services important. However, multiple barriers often hindered implementation. Lack of time was the most common barrier to providing culturally appropriate practices, followed by lack of training and lack of materials.…

  12. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a questionnaire.…

  13. Popular Culture in Transglossic Language Practices of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shaila; Dovchin, Sender

    2017-01-01

    Based on virtual conversations drawn from two separate intensive ethnographic studies in Bangladesh and Mongolia, we show that popular cultural texts play a significant role in young adults' heteroglossic language practices. On the one hand, they borrow voices from cultural texts and cross the boundaries of language, i.e., codes, modes, and…

  14. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  15. Transnational Cultural Leadership as a Situated Practice : Dilemmas and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In a longitudinal transnational research project, a network of European research institutions and field organisations aims to understand how cultural managers mediate global and local pressures concerning creative autonomy, economy and ideology. Among the research questions are which variables

  16. Total quality management in orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, A E

    1999-12-01

    Quality is the buzz word for the new Millennium. Patients demand it, and we must serve it. Yet one must identify it. Quality is not imaging or public relations; it is a business process. This short article presents quality as a balance of three critical notions: core clinical competence, perceived values that our patients seek and want, and the cost of quality. Customer satisfaction is a variable that must be identified for each practice. In my practice, patients perceive quality as communication and time, be it treatment or waiting time. Time is a value and cost that must be managed effectively. Total quality management is a business function; it involves diagnosis, design, implementation, and measurement of the process, the people, and the service. Kazien is a function that reduces value services, eliminates waste, and manages time and cost in the process. Total quality management is a total commitment for continuous improvement.

  17. APM Best Practices Realizing Application Performance Management

    CERN Document Server

    Sydor, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of APM Best Practices: Realizing Application Performance Management is to establish reliable application performance management (APM) practices - to demonstrate value, to do it quickly, and to adapt to the client circumstances. It's important to balance long-term goals with short-term deliverables, but without compromising usefulness or correctness. The successful strategy is to establish a few reasonable goals, achieve them quickly, and then iterate over the same topics two more times, with each successive iteration expanding the skills and capabilities of the APM team. This str

  18. Strategic Management of Cultural-Tourism Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Graèan; Zrinka Zadel; Andreja Rudanèiæ-Lugariæ

    2010-01-01

    contact with local residents. Cultural tourists are in their traveling motivated by cultural-tourism resources including culture of a particular population and destination, their tradition, meeting different lifestyles, and visiting material cultural heritage … Within cultural tourism, tourists search for authentic experiences affecting cultural-tourism resources. Cultural resources represent potential tourist resources. With transformation of cultural resources from potential into real ones,...

  19. Machinima Filmmaking as Culture in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    is a practice whereby game worlds and game play are captured and edited, thereby transformed into a film. The chapter frames the phenomenon of machinima by looking at it from a view on topics of authorship, media ecology and remix practices. Two case studies are presented herein in order to leverage...... a discussion on machinima authorship as an example of evolving, dialogic processes circulating in media ecologies. This dialogic authorship involves remix (re-assemblage) and it occurs within the shifts in our current situation of media convergence. The aim in this chapter is to shed light on the dialogic...... practices of authorship such as machinima and is inspired by the dialogic theories of Russian literary philosopher M.M. Bakhtin. A three-part structure is used herein: (1) introduction to theoretical concepts, background on machinima and this study, and a review of methodology, (2) data and analysis, and (3...

  20. Risk management practices in the airline industry

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Sharon Perpetua Anasta

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of financial derivative instruments by non-financial entities to manage risk exposure. It provides the main objectives of a non-financial corporation to enter into derivative contracts with a counterparty and the scope of usage of these instruments. It is evident that most companies use derivative instruments to preserve cash flows and firm value as opposed to taking positions in contracts for speculative purposes. The paper focuses on the risk management practices ...

  1. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  2. Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage documentation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Y.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    Taiwan is an important trading and maritime channels for many countries since ancient time. Numerous relics lie underwater due to weather, wars, and other factors. In the year of 2006, Bureau of Cultural Heritage (BOCH) entrusted the Underwater Archaeological Team of Academia Sinica to execute the underwater archaeological investigation projects. Currently, we verified 78 underwater targets, with 78 site of those had been recognized as shipwrecks sites. Up to date, there is a collection of 638 underwater objects from different underwater archaeological sites. Those artefacts are distributed to different institutions and museums. As very diverse management methods/systems are applied for every individual institution, underwater cultural heritage data such as survey, excavation report, research, etc. are poorly organized and disseminated for use. For better communication regarding to Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage in every level, a universal format of documentation should be established. By comparing the existing checklist used in Taiwan with guidelines that are followed in other countries, a more intact and appropriate underwater cultural heritage condition documentation system can be established and adapted in Taiwan.

  3. Change management in a group dental practice. A consideration of management issues that may arise in a larger dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Vernon P

    2007-10-01

    The drive for quality assurance in general dental practice has arisen as a response to changing standards and demands. Dentists need to develop skills in change management in this new culture of change. Groups of practitioners often encounter difficulties when managing change, yet it is essential that they lead the process. Such problems are common among groups of professionals. A wide range of topics is presented that may, from one point of view, represent challenging or problem areas (obstacles) for a group practice but may also, from a different point of view, provide a framework of opportunities for improvement, and facilitate the management processes within the practice and the management of change in particular (tools). The range of skills required to assist a professional group is such that individual dentists or advisers may not be able to achieve much on their own. The best way forward may be to interpret the problems as a professional training need and to organise training as a group. These issues will be considered under the following headings: partners and teams; introduction: the need for change management; the challenge for group practices; obstacles and tools; conclusion: the way forward--a case for training.

  4. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking.

  6. Solid waste management. Principles and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrappa, Ramesha [Karnataka State Pollution Control Board, Biomedical Waste, Bangalore (India); Bhusan Das, Diganta [Loughborough Univ. of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-11-01

    Solid waste was already a problem long before water and air pollution issues attracted public attention. Historically the problem associated with solid waste can be dated back to prehistoric days. Due to the invention of new products, technologies and services the quantity and quality of the waste have changed over the years. Waste characteristics not only depend on income, culture and geography but also on a society's economy and, situations like disasters that affect that economy. There was tremendous industrial activity in Europe during the industrial revolution. The twentieth century is recognized as the American Century and the twenty-first century is recognized as the Asian Century in which everyone wants to earn 'as much as possible'. After Asia the currently developing Africa could next take the center stage. With transitions in their economies many countries have also witnessed an explosion of waste quantities. Solid waste problems and approaches to tackling them vary from country to country. For example, while efforts are made to collect and dispose hospital waste through separate mechanisms in India it is burnt together with municipal solid waste in Sweden. While trans-boundary movement of waste has been addressed in numerous international agreements, it still reaches developing countries in many forms. While thousands of people depend on waste for their lively hood throughout the world, many others face problems due to poor waste management. In this context solid waste has not remained an issue to be tackled by the local urban bodies alone. It has become a subject of importance for engineers as well as doctors, psychologist, economists, and climate scientists and any others. There are huge changes in waste management in different parts of the world at different times in history. To address these issues, an effort has been made by the authors to combine their experience and bring together a new text book on the theory and practice of the

  7. A culture of safety: a business strategy for medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M; Marles, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    Physician practices can enhance their economics by taking patient safety to a new level within their practices. Patient safety has a lot to do with systems and processes that occur not only at the hospital but also within a physician's practice. Historically, patient safety measures have been hospital-focused and -driven, largely due to available resources; however, physician practices can impact patient safety, efficiently and effectively, with a methodical plan involving assessment, prioritization, and compliance. With the ever-increasing focus of reimbursement on quality and patient safety, physician practices that implement a true culture of safety now could see future economic benefits using this business strategy.

  8. Notes on the Conceptualizations of Culture in Intercultural Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural management broadly refers to the handling of cultural differences in businesses and organizations. Although culture develops in all social groups, such as in firms, schools and neighbourhoods, intercultural management often refers to cultures framed within national and ethnic settings. Language, religion, family relations, work ethics and daily living are some aspects of culture. These cultural manifestations reflect the community’s world views, norms and values, ...

  9. Workplace violence: managing a culture of acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The cultural acceptance of workplace violence is changing. Management has become more educated on regulatory issues around its tolerance of workplace violence. Events around the country in a variety of settings have aided in raising awareness of this issue. Healthcare professionals are not immune to workplace violence, including those working in the imaging profession. Healthcare workers, historically, have given care despite the demeanor of patients, often putting up with aggressive behavior including sexual harassment and physical assault. Management needs to take all possible measures to ensure employees feel safe at work. It is essential to have well thought out policies and procedures to mitigate workplace violence; keeping in mind that a goal of eliminating workplace violence is unrealistic.

  10. Cultural differences in Research project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Scientific Projects today have increased in complexity, requiring multidisciplinarity, and requiring a mix of diverse individuals from different countries who must be integrated into an effective project. Effective team building is one of the prime responsibilities of the project manager. When the project is supported by a funding, the integration and the implication of the different partners are quite easy. Particularly when partners are developing high-performing teams. However, management of research project requires further skills when the budget is not very high and/or when partners are from non-European countries and are not using the same vocabulary. The various cultures, values, beliefs and social usages, particularly with Mediterranean countries cause a special style of communication for an individual or group of individuals. This communication style participates in the success of the project and encompasses a lot of diplomatic skills which will be highlighted.

  11. Endoscopy Practice Management, Fee Structures, and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Although our knowledge and appreciation of endoscopic procedures in exotic pets is extensive, associated management practices, including equipment preferences and fee structures, have rarely been discussed. This short article highlights the results of a small survey of 35 experienced exotic animal endoscopists and details their equipment ownership/preferences and fee structures. The importance of marketing is also emphasized.

  12. Understanding Management Students' Reflective Practice through Blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Gihan; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of a study on the use of blogging to encourage students to engage in the making of theory-practice linkages and critical thinking within the context of a graduate management course. Sixty-five students participated in collaborative blogging for a period of five weeks. The transcripts of these blogs were analyzed…

  13. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept.

  14. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TEST FACILITY - SWALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NRMRL swale evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research projects that evaluates many Best Management Practices. EPA has ongoing research examining the performance of constructed wet lands, and detention and retention ponds. Other projects will evaluate ra...

  15. Best management practices for airport deicing stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzenbaum, M S; Veltman, S; Mericas, D; Wagoner, B; Schoenberg, T

    2001-06-01

    With the advent of new regulations concerning aircraft deicing and management of spent aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs), many airports now face the dual challenges of simultaneously maintaining public safety and protecting the environment. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the potential environmental impact of stormwater runoff and offers detailed current information on alternative deicing fluid application methods and materials, collection and treatment practices.

  16. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockie, Alan; Bjorkelo, Kenneth

    A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence of maintenance programs on addressing the system and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. Four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management were identified: (1) the selection of critical systems and components; (2) the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; (3) the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; and (4) the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations.

  17. Practice management education during surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kory; Lebron, Ricardo A; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2008-12-01

    Surgical education has undergone radical changes in the past decade. The introductions of laparoscopic surgery and endovascular techniques have required program directors to alter surgical training. The 6 competencies are now in place. One issue that still needs to be addressed is the business aspect of surgical practice. Often residents complete their training with minimal or no knowledge on coding of charges or basic aspects on how to set up a practice. We present our program, which has been in place over the past 2 years and is designed to teach the residents practice management. The program begins with a series of 10 lectures given monthly beginning in August. Topics include an introduction to types of practices available, negotiating a contract, managed care, and marketing the practice. Both medical and surgical residents attend these conferences. In addition, the surgical residents meet monthly with the business office to discuss billing and coding issues. These are didactic sessions combined with in-house chart reviews of surgical coding. The third phase of the practice management plan has the coding team along with the program director attend the outpatient clinic to review in real time the evaluation and management coding of clinic visits. Resident evaluations were completed for each of the practice management lectures. The responses were recorded on a Likert scale. The scores ranged from 4.1 to 4.8 (average, 4.3). Highest scores were given to lectures concerning negotiating employee agreements, recruiting contracts, malpractice insurance, and risk management. The medical education department has tracked resident coding compliance over the past 2 years. Surgical coding compliance increased from 36% to 88% over a 12-month period. The program director who participated in the educational process increased his accuracy from 50% to 90% over the same time period. When residents finish their surgical training they need to be ready to enter the world of business

  18. Data management practices for collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eSchmitt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of research in the field of maternal-infant health, or in any scientific field, relies on the adoption of best practices for data and knowledge management. Prior work by our group and others has identified evidence-based solutions to many of the data management challenges that exist, including cost-effective practices for ensuring high-quality data entry and proper construction and maintenance of data standards and ontologies. Quality assurance practices for data entry and processing are necessary to ensure that data are not denigrated during processing, but the use of these practices has not been widely adopted in the fields of psychology and biology. Furthermore, collaborative research is becoming more common. Collaborative research often involves multiple laboratories, different scientific disciplines, numerous data sources, large data sets, and data sets from public and commercial sources. These factors present new challenges for data and knowledge management. Data security and privacy concerns are increased as data may be accessed by investigators affiliated with different institutions. Collaborative groups must address the challenges associated with federating data access between the data-collecting sites and a centralized data management site. The merging of ontologies between different data sets can become formidable, especially in fields with evolving ontologies. The increased use of automated data acquisition can yield more data, but it can also increase the risk of introducing error or systematic biases into data. In addition, the integration of data collected from different assay types often requires the development of new tools to analyze the data. All of these challenges act to increase the costs and time spent on data management for a given project, and they increase the likelihood of decreasing the quality of the data. In this paper, we review these issues and discuss theoretical and practical approaches for

  19. Forming Future Teachers’ Aesthetic Culture in Foreign Educational Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotska Galyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a theoretical analysis of foreign educational experience in solving scientific problems of forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture. Given the current socio-cultural situation, it has been noted that a teacher who developed his/her aesthetic culture can make a direct contribution to the social and cultural challenges of a changing world. Based on the study of scientific and pedagogical literature, normative and legal support and the content of practical courses, the author has revealed the peculiarities of forming future specialists’ aesthetic culture in foreign countries (Japan, Germany, Canada, the United States, England. Special attention has been paid to the aesthetic potential of fine arts in forming future teachers’ aesthetic culture, which ensures the harmony of intellectual and aesthetic development of personality, enriches the emotional and sensual sphere, develops cognitive and creative activities, aesthetic needs and tastes, stipulates for future teachers’ involving in the process of artistic and aesthetic culture of the nation. The performed analysis proves that the forming of future teachers’ aesthetic culture should be based on the intercultural approach; the ideas of interrelation between aesthetic and ecological in aesthetic education; integration relations between powerful potential of fine (visual arts, environmental science and aesthetic creativity. The experience of foreign educational practice may be adopted by domestic universities to form individual aesthetic culture of future teachers.

  20. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitz, Patricia A.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    should human resource specialists play in creating and managing diverse organizations? What are the best practices they should apply? The purpose of this review is to define workplace diversity, to identify best practices, and to identify how diversity management best practices can be applied in academic libraries. Finally, this review will provide a resource list for HR managers and leaders to learn more about those best practices with the goal of optimizing their organization's approach to diversity.

  1. Muslim American adolescents' explanations of changing religious practices: Cultural tools in cultural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kathleen M; Schiro, Isabella N; Gregory, Wesley E; Westberg, Lindsay M; Lee, Samantha R; Boyle, Colleen D

    2017-03-01

    To examine the culturally embedded nature of religious practices, we conducted a mixed-methods study in which Muslim American adolescents described how and why their religious practices had changed in recent years (see Etengoff & Daiute, 2013, J. Adolesc. Res., 28, 690). Participants included 201 Muslim adolescents (ages 13-19) from predominantly immigrant families; all were contestants in a Muslim Inter-Scholastic Tournament regional competition. Participants completed surveys including an item regarding whether their religious practices had changed, and for those who answered affirmatively, open-ended questions about the change. Additional measures assessed ethnic identity and perceived discrimination. As hypothesized, the 60% of participants who reported a change in religious practices described this shift as a response to new contexts, people, and religious knowledge. Those who reported a change also reported higher levels of ethnic identity exploration and perceived discrimination. Overall, Muslim American adolescents' descriptions portrayed religious practices as developing through reciprocal interactions with culture. More generally, participants' descriptions point to the viability of a model in which religious practices change and in turn are changed by cultural contexts. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Religious development is viewed as taking place in relational systems with reciprocity between individuals and surrounding contexts. Variations in contexts predict variations in religious development, but mechanisms of development are not well understood. Muslim Americans, including adolescents, show high levels of religious involvement and experience unique cultural and religious contexts. Muslim American emerging adults describe their religious practices as responsive to sociocultural contexts. What does the study add? This study focuses on Muslim American adolescents, a group that has received little research attention

  2. Culturally Relevant Management Education: Insights from Experience in Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wihak, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author's experience with a Nunavut business management education program illustrates how to develop culturally relevant organizational behavior curriculum. The process initially involved interviews with Inuit Elders about culturally appropriate responses to scenarios of cultural conflicts in the workplace identified by Inuit managers. The…

  3. Transforming nursing home culture: evidence for practice and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Shier, Victoria; Saliba, Debra

    2014-02-01

    The nursing home culture change movement aims to improve resident quality of life and quality of care by emphasizing the deinstitutionalization of nursing home culture and focusing on person-centered care. This article briefly reviews the history of culture change, discusses some of the challenges related to culture change in nursing homes, and overviews the conceptualization and select models of culture change. Building from this background, it critiques current understanding, identifies critical research questions, and notes key issues arising during a workshop that addressed existing and emerging evidence in the field. This review and analysis provide a context for how 9 accompanying papers in this supplemental issue of The Gerontologist fill identified evidence gaps and provide evidence for future practice and policies that aim to transform nursing home culture.

  4. Human Resource Management Practice Tourism and Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Hrou S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of human resources management (HRM in promoting competitiveness in tourism and hotel industry, this review intend to enhance the understanding of practical issues of HRM more importantly since it involve organizing the management of human resources, with respect to accomplishment of organizational objective further more it shows that the issues either related to external factors, which include technological change, legislation and regulation, and national culture, globalization, or internal factors including size, industry and sector characteristic and structure of an organization, strategy and past practice of HRM. On the issue of human resources capability training, this research review recommend provision of array of opportunity for capability building and conducive working environment to promote productivity. Also worth considering, employee, employer relationship, Other variables such as attitude and productivity of employees, relationship between employees and employers, increase and decrease in financial assets should be taken into account.

  5. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-12-08

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it's potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice.

  6. MANAGEMENT OF CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN MULTINATIONAL TEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynep Gultekin; Cemil Ulukan

    2012-01-01

    Assurance of efficiency and productivity of multinational teams necessitates policies, rules, and procedures covering underlying characteristics of team members’ home country cultures, potential cross-cultural conflicts and their solutions, cultural awareness in the organization, and harmonization mechanisms for different cultures with the organizational culture, etc. In spite of ever-increasing importance, studies addressing multinational teams and cultural differences simultaneously are ins...

  7. Towards managing diversity: Cultural aspects of conflict management in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Hamdorf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated cultural aspects of conflict management in organizations in response to the growing need for an understanding of how people from diverse cultural backgrounds can work together without the often-resulting problem of intercultural conflict. Culture was evaluated through self-assessments of how independent or interdependent the subjects were (Markus & Kitayama, 1991, and conflict behavior through eight conflict management styles: dominating, integrating, compromising, avoiding, obliging, emotion, neglect and third-party help (Rahim, 1983; Ting-Toomey et al., 2000. Furthermore, drawing upon face-negotiation theory (Ting-Toomey, 1988; Ting-Toomey & Kurogi, 1998, a test was made of whether self-face, other-face and mutual-face concerns could explain cultural differences in conflict behavior. A total of 185 professionals from different countries completed an Internet questionnaire. An exploratory factor analysis of the eight styles revealed three factors which seem to describe direct, indirect and integrating plus compromising conflict behaviors. In line with this study's hypotheses, persons with a tendency to act independently mentioned direct styles, as well as integrating, and persons with a tendency to act interdependently mentioned indirect styles in addition to integrating and compromising. Furthermore, a concern for self-face maintenance was related to direct conflict behavior, a concern for other-face maintenance to indirect conflict behavior, and a concern for mutual-face maintenance to integrating and compromising. However, persons with a tendency to act independently do not seem to be particularly concerned about self-face maintenance. Persons with a tendency to act interdependently, on the other hand, show other- and mutual-face concerns in conflict situations. It was concluded that face concerns do play a crucial role, but mainly in explaining the conflict behavior of persons with a tendency to act interdependently

  8. Soil management practices under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Adel; Chami Ziad, Al; Hamdy, Atef

    2015-04-01

    Organic farming methods combine scientific knowledge of ecology and modern technology with traditional farming practices based on naturally occurring biological processes. Soil building practices such as crop rotations, intercropping, symbiotic associations, cover crops, organic fertilizers and minimum tillage are central to organic practices. Those practices encourage soil formation and structure and creating more stable systems. In farm nutrient and energy cycling is increased and the retentive abilities of the soil for nutrients and water are enhanced. Such management techniques also play an important role in soil erosion control. The length of time that the soil is exposed to erosive forces is decreased, soil biodiversity is increased, and nutrient losses are reduced, helping to maintain and enhance soil productivity. Organic farming as systematized and certifiable approach for agriculture, there is no surprise that it faces some challenges among both farmers and public sector. This can be clearly demonstrated particularly in the absence of the essential conditions needed to implement successfully the soil management practices like green manure and composting to improve soil fertility including crop rotation, cover cropping and reduced tillage. Those issues beside others will be fully discussed highlighting their beneficial impact on the environmental soil characteristics. Keywords: soil fertility, organic matter, plant nutrition

  9. Bamboozled: A Visual Culture Text for Looking at Cultural Practices of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade art educators have engaged in a dialogue about a reconceptualization of art education theory and practice. This reconceptualization has roots in cultural studies, anthropology, and critical theory. One focus has been on the notion of art as visual culture. This article is organized into four sections. The first section looks…

  10. Bamboozled: A Visual Culture Text for Looking at Cultural Practices of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade art educators have engaged in a dialogue about a reconceptualization of art education theory and practice. This reconceptualization has roots in cultural studies, anthropology, and critical theory. One focus has been on the notion of art as visual culture. This article is organized into four sections. The first section looks…

  11. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Incorporating cultural issues in education for ethical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Susan; Klotz, Linda

    2007-07-01

    The population of most non-dominant ethnic groups in the USA is growing dramatically. Faculty members are challenged to develop curricula that adequately prepare our future nurses. An increased focus on clinical ethics has resulted from the use of sophisticated technology, changes in health care financing, an increasing elderly population and the shift of care from inpatient to outpatient settings. Nurses frequently face situations demanding resolution of ethical dilemmas involving cultural differences. Nursing curricula must include content on both ethics and cultural sensitivity. Active student participation is an important element providing a foundation for ethical practice. A proposed educational format was introduced with graduating baccalaureate students. In a pilot study, curricular content on cultural sensitivity and ethical practice was taught in separate modules. Students were then asked to identify and problem solve an ethical dilemma involving patients and professional caregivers from vastly different cultures. Course faculty members provided discussion questions to guide the students' thinking.

  13. Management by objectives in medical group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozis, D E

    1986-01-01

    When the concept of management by objectives first emerged, it was heralded by many as the long-sought secret to employee motivation. The MBO technique, involving the three primary functions of objective setting, objective using, and employee involvement, is described here in terms of both theory and practice. Although it does have its pitfalls and is certainly not the "ultimate answer," MBO in medical group practice does have its merits when properly introduced. It is much more than a purely academic concept, and its major strength lies in its recognition of the importance of human resources in getting the job done.

  14. Practical Methods for Information Security Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian AMANCEI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present some directions to perform the risk man-agement for information security. The article follows to practical methods through question-naire that asses the internal control, and through evaluation based on existing controls as part of vulnerability assessment. The methods presented contains all the key elements that concurs in risk management, through the elements proposed for evaluation questionnaire, list of threats, resource classification and evaluation, correlation between risks and controls and residual risk computation.

  15. Practical Risk Management for the CIO

    CERN Document Server

    Scherling, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The growing complexity of today's interconnected systems has not only increased the need for improved information security, but also helped to move information from the IT backroom to the executive boardroom as a strategic asset. And, just like the tip of an iceberg is all you see until you run into it, the risks to your information are mostly invisible until disaster strikes. Detailing procedures that will help your team perform better risk assessments and aggregate results into more meaningful metrics, Practical Risk Management for the CIO approaches information risk management through impro

  16. IP Address Management Principles and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Rooney, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This book will be the first covering the subject of IP address management (IPAM). The practice of IPAM includes the application of network management disciplines to IP address space and associated network services, namely DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and DNS (Domain Name System). The consequence of inaccurately configuring DHCP is that end users may not be able to obtain IP addresses to access the network. Without proper DNS configuration, usability of the network will greatly suffer as the name-to-address lookup process may fail. Imagine having to navigate to a website or send a

  17. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  18. Best practice in workplace hazardous substances management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, C

    1995-09-01

    Chemical-induced injury and disease remains a significant problem in workers in industry. As a result of this problem, a number of national and international initiatives have recommended the development of conventions, regulations, and codes of practice to attempt to deal with the problems of hazardous substances at work. Within Australia, workplace hazardous substances regulations are in development which will impose legal obligations and responsibilities on the suppliers of hazardous substances and on the employers who use them. At the same time, internationally consistent ISO standards are in use, or are being developed, for quality systems, environmental management, and occupational health and safety. These standards outline a model for the management of quality, environment, or safety, and the processes involved are applicable to the management of hazardous substances. This process includes: obtaining commitment from senior management; instituting consultative mechanisms; developing a hazardous substances policy; identifying components of the hazardous substances management program; resourcing, implementing, and reviewing the program; and integrating the program into the organisation's strategic plan. Only by blending in a specific management program for hazardous substances into the overall planning of an organization will they be managed effectively and efficiently.

  19. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavian Clipa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When the multinational firms employ human resources from different countries they have to submit to the restrictions concerning cultural differences. The paper is an attempt to show how the human resource management administrates these cultural differences.

  20. Managing Culture--Making Culture Work for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of culture in organisations can offer insights into individual and group behaviour, and leadership. It can help to explain not just what happens in an organisation, but why it happens. However, many people are concerned not just with understanding culture, and hence organisational life. They see culture as something to be…

  1. Management of sepsis: from evidence to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Gerloni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitalized patients and its management involves a lot of specialist. Internist is required to demonstrate his competence since the beginning when the diagnosis is not so easy to be clarified. A rapid clinical suspicion permits a prompt management of the patient that means important mortality reduction. However, it is essential to understand the source of infection and echography represents a rapid, economic, useful and widespread tool with whom Internist should become more and more confident. The following review is a practical guide to manage septic patients according to the most recent literature, underlining aspects of antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic stabilization and supportive therapy. To limit sepsis mortality, a valid Internist should be culturally prepared and especially able to cooperate with other specialists, because a strong enemy requires a strong team.

  2. Social and cultural dimensions of rodent pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palis, Florencia G; Singleton, Grant; Sumalde, Zenaida; Hossain, Mahabub

    2007-09-01

    Rice production in Vietnam is threatened by rodent pests, with a significant increase in impact reported from 1990 through to the early 21st century. Pre-harvest rice losses are typically 5-10%, with losses of >20% occurring in some years in some regions. Farmers' rodent control practices are generally reactive and rely essentially on chemical and physical methods. Ecologically-based rodent pest management (EBRM) was developed in the late 1990s to manage rodents in rice-based farming systems in Vietnam and other parts of South-East Asia. EBRM combines both cultural and physical rodent management practices such as synchrony of cropping, short 2-week rat campaigns at key periods in key habitats, increasing general hygiene around villages, and use of a community trap-barrier system. Although EBRM has been reported to be economically profitable, the successful adoption of this set of technologies requires community participation. In this paper we address issues relating to the adoption and sustainability of EBRM in lowland irrigated rice fields in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. We particularly explore the social and cultural mechanisms involved in maintaining community participation to further understand the conditions under which EBRM works and does not work. Positive indications of sustained use of community-based EBRM include: a policy pronouncement from the prime minister directing the use of integrated rodent management; the use of existing cooperatives for developing community actions; budgetary allocation from provincial and local governments; diffusion of EBRM to provinces in the south and north that are not involved in farmer participatory field trials; and the adoption of EBRM by a non-governmental organization, World Vision Vietnam, in their area-development programs.

  3. Trading Culture: Practical Background for Azerbaijani-English Poetry Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandaville A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Where translation theory often argues the difficulties of translation—whether or not and under what conditions translation is possible—the authors take a more practical approach. Examining the translation of poetry from Azerbaijani to English, two very different languages and poetic traditions, the authors discuss key linguistic, political, cultural considerations and demonstrate some effective practical strategies. They approach translation as a fundamentally human endeavor and the work of a translator as cultural and linguistic exchange and enrichment, even commerce.

  4. Knowledge discovery based on experiential learning corporate culture management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kai-Jan

    2014-10-01

    A good corporate culture based on humanistic theory can make the enterprise's management very effective, all enterprise's members have strong cohesion and centripetal force. With experiential learning model, the enterprise can establish an enthusiastic learning spirit corporate culture, have innovation ability to gain the positive knowledge growth effect, and to meet the fierce global marketing competition. A case study on Trend's corporate culture can offer the proof of industry knowledge growth rate equation as the contribution to experiential learning corporate culture management.

  5. Cultural health beliefs in a rural family practice: a Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Kamil M; Beng, Khoo S

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the sociocultural dimension of a patient's health beliefs is critical to a successful clinical encounter. Malaysia with its multi-ethnic population of Malay, Chinese and Indian still uses many forms of traditional health care in spite of a remarkably modern rural health service. The objective of this paper is discuss traditional health care in the context of some of the cultural aspects of health beliefs, perceptions and practices in the different ethnic groups of the author's rural family practices. This helps to promote communication and cooperation between doctors and patients, improves clinical diagnosis and management, avoids cultural blind spots and unnecessary medical testing and leads to better adherence to treatment by patients. Includes traditional practices of 'hot and cold', notions of Yin-Yang and Ayurveda, cultural healing, alternative medicine, cultural perception of body structures and cultural practices in the context of women's health. Modern and traditional medical systems are potentially complementary rather than antagonistic. Ethnic and cultural considerations can be integrated further into the modern health delivery system to improve care and health outcomes.

  6. Management of psychosis in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Janice; Miller, Graeme; Ng, Anthea

    2006-03-01

    The BEACH program, a continuous national study of general practice activity in Australia, gives us an overview of consultations involving the management of psychoses. In this analysis we have included schizophrenia, affective disorders/bipolar, organic psychoses, and senile psychoses, with undefined psychosis and chronic brain syndrome grouped as 'other'. This synopsis provides a backdrop against which the theme articles in this issue of Australian Family Physician can be further considered.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management. It has been redefined as the occurrence of two or more successive convulsions without conscience recuperation between them; or the occurrence of convulsive uninterrupted activity for more than 5 minutes, including focal crisis. This document includes a review and update of conceptual, etiological and classification aspects for diagnosis and treatment, stressing the various therapy trends. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  8. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roque Nodal Arruebarrena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management. It has been defined as the patient in Glasgow coma with scale higher or equal to 8 who doesn´t present contradictions for transplant (possible donor and who has been diagnosed of encephalic death. This document reviews and updates concepts, lists indications and contraindications for different organs donation, clinical assessment of the donor and its treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  9. Organisational culture: an important concept for pharmacy practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane; Harrison, Jeff; Carswell, Peter; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2009-10-01

    Throughout the developed world, community pharmacy is under considerable pressure to play a greater part in delivering effective primary health care. The requirement to adopt new roles continues to challenge community pharmacy and drive change. The factors that determine the ability of community pharmacy to effectively deliver services for health gain are complex and include; policy, professional, financial and structural elements. There is also evidence to suggest that organisational culture may influence the effectiveness of an organisation. In order to address this there is a need to understand the dimensions of organisational culture that lead to successful implementation of the change necessary for community pharmacy to become a more effective primary health care organisation. In this commentary, we introduce the concept of organisational culture, outline two frameworks for studying culture, and argue the benefits of pursuing an organisational culture research agenda for the evolution of pharmacy practice and research.

  10. Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions of Cultural Competence Encounters During Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Methods. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Results. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Conclusion. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations. PMID:24672064

  11. Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of blueberries, especially those grown in areas with poor drainage. Reliable cultural and chemical management strategies are needed for control of this disease. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of cultural practices and fungicide treat...

  12. The Problem of Cultural Identity in the Contemporary Archaeological Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Kuzmanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The decades-long reconsideration of the concept of culture in archaeology has been aimed at overcoming the traditional culture-historical concept, assuming culture as a relatively stable and homogeneous system of values characteristic of a certain group or a community of people. The practice of cultural classification of artefacts, based upon the premise that people linked by the production and usage of stylistically homogeneous material culture form a group with the feeling of communal identity, has been criticized as a reflection of ethnocentric projection of the modern idea of cultural identity. In spite of numerous critics of this concept, developed under the influence of various theoretical strains from the beginning of the 1960s, it seems that the implicit assumption is still present of the communal cultural identity of a group linked by the communal material culture. Furthermore, an attempt to counteract the critique and offer a multicultural interpretation of the past brings in the danger to rehabilitate the very concept of culture which archaeology has been trying to abandon for decades.

  13. Practice parameter for cultural competence in child and adolescent psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariega, Andrés J; Rothe, Eugenio; Mian, Ayesha; Carlisle, Lee; Toppelberg, Claudio; Harris, Toi; Gogineni, Rama Rao; Webb, Sala; Smith, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    The United States faces a rapidly changing demographic and cultural landscape, with its population becoming increasingly multiracial and multicultural. In consequence, cultural and racial factors relating to mental illness and emotional disturbances deserve closer attention and consideration. This Practice Parameter outlines clinical applications of the principle of cultural competence that will enable child and adolescent mental health clinicians to better serve diverse children, adolescents, and their families. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

     Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general......) for two weeks. If symptoms were unchanged after to weeks => referral to endoscopy. Later recurrence of symptoms => endoscopy (> 45 year) or management strategy according to helicobacter pylori status and/or clinical reflux (measures......)   Conclusion In management of dyspepsia therapy does have a better short term effect than endoscopy concerning symptom relief, but after 3 months the endoscopy strategy had a better effect than PPI concerning symptom relief  ...

  15. Identifying and training adaptive cross-cultural management skills: The crucial role of cultural metacognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mor (Shira); M.W. Morris (Michael); J. Joh (Johann)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFor managers, intercultural effectiveness requires forging close working relationships with people from different cultural backgrounds (Black, Mendenhall, and Oddou, 1991). Recent research with executives has found that higher cultural metacognition is associated with affective closeness

  16. Identifying and training adaptive cross-cultural management skills: The crucial role of cultural metacognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mor (Shira); M.W. Morris (Michael); J. Joh (Johann)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFor managers, intercultural effectiveness requires forging close working relationships with people from different cultural backgrounds (Black, Mendenhall, and Oddou, 1991). Recent research with executives has found that higher cultural metacognition is associated with affective closeness

  17. Transforming and Managing the Organisational Culture of a University To Meet the Challenges of a Changing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses issues in bringing about change in a higher education institution, including required changes in organizational culture, processes involved in effecting them, and continued management of organizational culture. Constructs a conceptual framework for such change, and discusses actual changes and management practices at the University of…

  18. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  19. Socialization of Adolescents: Cultural Practices in Children's Summer Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demakova, Irina D.; Valeeva, Roza A.; Shipova, Alina V.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the relevant aspects of the adolescents' cultural practices in children's summer camp, taking into account their specific characteristics. The summer camp is considered as an educational formation and holistic socio-pedagogical body, designed to create conditions for the development of the person. The criteria for inclusion…

  20. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  1. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  2. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  3. Historical and Theoretical Development of Culturally Competent Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Hermeet K.; Huber, Ruth; Faul, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a detailed review of the historical and theoretical context in which culturally competent practice has evolved in the social work profession and enables educators and practitioners to see holistic connections between the past and present. Historical review of the inclusion of diversity content is followed by definitions of…

  4. Beyond Tradition: Culture, Symbolism, and Practicality in American Indian Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous people have always created what colonial language labels art. Yet there is no Native word for "art" as defined in a Euro-American sense. Art, as the dominant culture envisions, is mostly ornamental. This is in sharp juxtaposition to a Native perspective, which sees art as integrative, inclusive, practical, and constantly…

  5. Social inclusion from visual culture: practices and technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Miranda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the social inclusion in social and educational programmes since a visual culture perspective. Is considered the work with contemporary art resources and the educative possibilities including new practices in public space and the place of technologies.

  6. Practical IT service management a concise guide for busy executives

    CERN Document Server

    Thejendra, BS

    2008-01-01

    Practical IT Service Management is a clear, concise and to the point guide to implementing IT service management (ITSM). It is based on ITIL Version 3, one of the most widely accepted best-practice approaches to ITSM

  7. HOW FUTURE MANAGERS VIEW SOCIETAL CULTURE: A CROSS-COUNTRY COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATANA DOINA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study aims at enriching the existing literature about the prospective managers view of an ideal societal value system and the existing cultural practices in their society. The findings about the students' perception on cultural practices and their expectations about societal culture are helpful in imagining the societal culture in its dynamics. The research sample consists of 727 students in business and engineering on undergraduate and graduate levels from Romania and Slovenia. The reason we have chosen to compare Romanian sample with the cultural profile of the "average" future manager from Slovenia is the scientific curiosity of finding out if there are signs of cultural convergence of Romania with a previous communist country, and an older member of European Union. In doing so, our study will hopefully broaden the body of knowledge about the cultural convergence (or divergence? between the former socialist countries joining European Union. The theoretical and methodological foundation is rooted in GLOBE international research project. Our findings revealed that at practices level,Romanians perceive significant higher Power Distance and significant lower mean value for Uncertainty Avoidance. At the expectations level, the Romanians and Slovenians are very similar in the desire concerning their societies orientation toward In group/Family Collectivism, Assertiveness and Performance Orientation, and record significant differenced in all the other societal values. The fact that for all the cultural expectations the future managers assign different mean values than for the correspondent practices make us expect that they will act to change their cultural environments. Still, the cultural orientation of Romanian future middle managers will differ in many regards from the Slovenian sample averages.

  8. THE INTEGRATION OF CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT AT SPECIAL REGION PROVINCE OF YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deffi Ayu Puspito Sari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Indonesia Law number 24 year 2007 on disaster emphasizes that the protection of national assets is in line with Law No. 11 year 2010 on the cultural heritage. Yogyakarta Province has 12 disaster hazards and has five complete archaeological cultural layers in Indonesia. In the event of a disaster, potential damage to the cultural heritage is exposed. The archaeological cultural layer consists of prehistoric, classical, Islamic and colonial. The lack of research related to cultural heritage in the province resulting in increasing vulnerability of cultural heritage and society. Using qualitative method with in-depth interview, the aim of this study is to analyse the management of cultural heritage from the perspective of disaster management. Archaeological cultural layers that embedded into the realm of cultural heritage is defined as a national asset that should be protected. The result shows that the management of cultural resources in the province is not yet integrated with disaster management. However, the results of the archaeological identification of cultural heritage in each cultural layer in Yogyakarta showed the development of community adaptation to the disaster. Utilization of cultural heritage as an element of the panca gatra has been impartial that affected the regional resilience and security in facing the disaster. Both of these problems can be overcome by integrating the cultural resources management and disaster management, the establishment of an emergency response team on cultural preservation, and disaster risk analysis on cultural heritage that annexed by BPBD and Cultural Office of Yogyakarta Province.

  9. Data issues for practical asset management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Meehan, J. [PowerNex Associates Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented opportunities for improvement of an electric utility's asset management processes, with particular reference to transmission utilities. The objective was to offer support for future maintenance and reinvestment decisions for assets such as disconnect switches and protection systems. Several recommendations were presented to help utilities quantify the state of assets and the risk to transmission system performance. Issues dealing with data gathering and condition assessment were considered. The basic approach to asset management decisions for disconnect switches and protection systems included a best practice survey; an infrared survey; a review of criticality criteria; maintenance practices; and, the possibility of refurbishment. It was noted that although there is minimal information on the performance or condition of switches, much is known about switch deficiencies. Therefore, data can be gathered to identify poor designs and substantiate changes to switch specifications and maintenance practices. Performance is the key driver for protection equipment. As such, a complete analysis of each protection operation is needed in order to understand the actual protection reliability and success. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  10. Traditional cultural effect on modern management in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛本婷

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1.0 Summary The report is stated the influence of traditional cultural and ideology arouse from old-time feudality system and Confucianism in modern management in China. The features of the culture provide many implications to modern managers in evaluation, motivation and recruitment.

  11. Managing Transnational Education: Does National Culture Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Kaye; Cranston, Neil

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study that examined the effect of national culture upon the management of Australia's provision of transnational higher education in Thailand. In particular, using Hofstede's national cultural value dimensions as an analytical tool, interviews with managers responsible for Australia's provision of…

  12. The Correlation between School Managers' Communication Skills and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanci, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Sönmez, Melek Alev; Yilmaz, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation between school administrators' communication skills and school culture. This research was conducted as a survey using a descriptive method in order to ascertain the views of school managers and teachers about the correlation between school managers' communication skills and school culture in…

  13. The Correlation between School Managers' Communication Skills and School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanci, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Sönmez, Melek Alev; Yilmaz, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation between school administrators' communication skills and school culture. This research was conducted as a survey using a descriptive method in order to ascertain the views of school managers and teachers about the correlation between school managers' communication skills and school culture in…

  14. Management of upper dyspepsia in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Hans Christian; Kier, Svend; Husum, Gitte

    of dyspepsia, dyspeptic episodes, main symptom, previous contact to general practice, previous gastroscopia, use of antacids or NSAID's, Helicobacter Pylori status and mental/physical well being (SF-36 measurement scale) (Table 1). After two weeks the GPs assessed 46 % of the patients to be free of symptoms...... Aim: To compare the effect of two strategies for management of dyspepsia. Evaluation based on GP's assessment after two weeks and patients assessment after three months.   Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial in general practice   Methods: 357 patients with dyspepsia where the general...... after 3 months.   Results: Response rate GPs after two weeks were 92% (330/357). Response rate patients after three months were 71% (252/357). There were no significant difference between the groups randomised to strategy 1(PPI group) and strategy 2 (endoscopy group) concerning, age, gender, duration...

  15. The Naming Practice in Akoose: Deviation from Cultural Stereotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ekanjume-Ilongo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bakossi names are generally inherited and are a strong bond for the cultural identity of the people. However, recent developments reveal that Bakossi names are losing their cultural values and identities which can make one to conclude that they are under threat. This is due to the fact that the so-called modern Bakossi people no longer follow the norms prescribed for naming by the traditionalists of old. The impact of the change from the traditionalists to so-call modernists, as seen in Bakossi naming practice nowadays, leads to the questioning of the Bakossi identity. Under this background, this paper looks at the function of names in constructing the Bakossi identity and especially how this is achieved following the historical and cultural background of the Bakossi naming practice. The paper demonstrates that the traditional naming practice has undergone some drastic change. It shows that the Bakossi names no longer stand for the cultural identity and succession of family members as once it was the case.

  16. Practical Implementation of Sustainable Urban Management Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses how to promote the use of decision support tools for urban sustainable development. The interest in decision support tools based on indicators is increasing among practitioners and researchers. The research has so far focused on indicator types and systems of indicators...... of intermediary actors. The paper is based on the Danish part of the PETUS-project (Practical Evaluation of Urban Sustainability) and the INTERMEDIARY-project (New intermediary services and the transformation of urban water supply and waste water disposal systems in Europe). Further the paper draws on Danish...... experiences with urban sustainable management tools. The experiences rank from simple approaches of municipalities publishing indicators or green accounts, to more advanced approaches of urban sustainability integrated in environmental management systems....

  17. Practical Management of Anaesthesia in the Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Camilla; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population is rapidly growing and particularly diverse. Ageing leads to reduced organ function and a decline in physiologic reserve. Elderly patients are characterised by great inter-individual variability in physiological function with a high prevalence of chronic disease. In general......, older patients have a higher risk of postoperative adverse outcomes, and frailty is a very important risk factor. This review article aims to provide a practical guide to anaesthetic management of the elderly surgical patient. To optimise care, clinicians should be familiar with the typical physiologic...... changes related to ageing and the implications for anaesthetic management. All anaesthetic techniques, methods and agents can be applied, if tailored to the patient's physiologic and pathologic changes. The elderly are more sensitive to anaesthetics, meaning that desired sedative and analgesic effects...

  18. Management of professionals in school practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Alice Juel; Buch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates organizational reform changes as they are con-structed in the interaction between managers and teachers in a school context. The empirical basis is comprised of case studies carried out in Danish upper secondary schools. An ethnographic approach and a concept of paradox...... related to an under-standing of professionals are used to investigate the practices involved in the change processes. The article argues that the ambiguity of a primus inter pares management position among professionals leads to several paradoxes, deadlocks, and detours, all of which affect the work...... for change in the schools. Significant paradoxes are identi-fied on the basis of the empirical material, and methodological advantages of a pro-posed paradox perspective, are demonstrated....

  19. Green Human Resource Management: Policies and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoeb Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been observed an increasing awareness within business communities on the significance of going green and adopting various environment management techniques. As the corporate world is going global, the business is experiencing a shift from a conventional financial structure to a modern capacity-based economy which is ready to explore green economic facets of business. Today, Green Human Resource Management (GHRM has become a key business strategy for the significant organizations where Human Resource Departments play an active part in going green at the office. The paper largely focuses upon the various Green Human Resource Practices pursued by the organizations all over the world and, explains the simplified meaning of GHRM. The study also adds to the extant literature by discussing future direction of some GHRM functions. Finally, the paper suggests some potentially prolific HR initiatives for Green organizations.

  20. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CROSS CULTURAL MANAGEMENT IN IT VS NON IT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata KAPUR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of business which is considered a 'second industrial revolution' is a trend that makes Cross cultural Human Resource management crucial for all organizations. Multicultural workforce congregations and increasing global interactions in business, finance, culture etc. have become today's workplace realities.Cross-cultural differences are the cause of failed negotiations and interactions, resulting in losses to the firms. This study examines the best practices in managing across a culturally diverse and geographically dispersed workforce in IT and non IT organizations and makes comparative evaluation of these practices and strategies. The results of the comparative analysis study will lead to cross fertilization of ideas as the best practices for IT companies can be imbibed by and applied to the non IT companies and vice versa. This study ellucidates that cross-cultural management will give managers on international assignments the cultural understanding essential to accomplish their tasks leading to a committed workforce thereby resulting in better financial performance of the organization.

  1. Records Management Practices in the Zambian Pension Industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Records Management Practices in the Zambian Pension Industry. ... pension industry face numerous challenges in as far as records management is concerned. ... some benefits of records management such as reduced time and effort spent to ...

  2. Employability management practices in the Polish ICT sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marzec, I.; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.; Scholarios, D.; van der Schoot, E.; Jędrzejowicz, P.; Bozionelos, N.; Epitropaki, O.; Knauth, P.; Mikkelsen, A.; van der Heijde, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines current career thinking and employability management practices within the Polish Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector. The aim of this contribution is to identify career management problems and to determine obstacles for implementing employability management pr

  3. The role of management in an in vitro fertilization practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masler, Steve; Strickland, Robert R

    2013-05-01

    An in vitro fertilization (IVF) practice is an enterprise. Like any enterprise, it has management that plays a major role, forming the structure, framework, and components that make the practice viable. Management of an IVF practice consists of two key teams: the fertility team and the management team. Management activities of the teams fall into eight core areas: business operations, financial, human resources, information technology, organizational governance, risk management, patient care systems, and quality management. Shady Grove Fertility Centers and Huntington Reproductive Center are two examples of professionally managed large fertility practices, one managed mostly centrally and the other largely managed in a decentralized way. Management is what takes a physician's IVF practice and converts it to a professional enterprise.

  4. [Survey in hospitals. Nursing errors, error culture and error management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Monika; Cramer, Henning

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge on errors is important to design safe nursing practice and its framework. This article presents results of a survey on this topic, including data of a representative sample of 724 nurses from 30 German hospitals. Participants predominantly remembered medication errors. Structural and organizational factors were rated as most important causes of errors. Reporting rates were considered low; this was explained by organizational barriers. Nurses in large part expressed having suffered from mental problems after error events. Nurses' perception focussing on medication errors seems to be influenced by current discussions which are mainly medication-related. This priority should be revised. Hospitals' risk management should concentrate on organizational deficits and positive error cultures. Decision makers are requested to tackle structural problems such as staff shortage.

  5. The relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance: Empirical investigation and managerial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Calciolari, Stefano; Lega, Federico; Grilli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are pressured to improve the cost-effectiveness of service delivery. Clinical governance is an important trigger to improve care quality and safety and rank high in the reform agenda of health systems. The senior management team culture plays a major role in establishing clinical governance practices, because it strongly influences the values, attitudes, and behaviors of the members of an organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance in the public health care organizations of three Italian regions. The assessment of senior management culture was conducted using the Competing Values Framework and a corresponding instrument adapted for the Italian context. Clinical governance was assessed using an ad hoc instrument focused on the senior management team's perception and attitude toward clinical governance. The survey achieved a 54% response rate. The results of four different models demonstrate that organizations characterized by different dominant cultures are associated with significant differences in attitudes toward clinical governance. In particular, on average, dominant cultures with a prevailing external focus are associated with a more positive attitude toward clinical governance. The selection and appointments of top managers should consider the style of leadership that is most apt to facilitate the growth of rational and developmental cultures. Furthermore, the training of top managers and leading doctors should reinforce leadership aptitude and approaches that are consistent with the desired organizational cultures.

  6. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations.

  7. Cultures of simulations vs. cultures of calculations? The development of simulation practices in meteorology and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Mikaela

    While the distinction between theory and experiment is often used to discuss the place of simulation from a philosophical viewpoint, other distinctions are possible from a sociological perspective. Turkle (1995) distinguishes between cultures of calculation and cultures of simulation and relates these cultures to the distinction between modernity and postmodernity, respectively. What can we understand about contemporary simulation practices in science by looking at them from the point of view of these two computer cultures? What new questions does such an analysis raise for further studies? On the basis of two case studies, the present paper compares and discusses simulation activities in astrophysics and meteorology. It argues that simulation practices manifest aspects of both of these cultures simultaneously, but in different situations. By employing the dichotomies surface/depth, play/seriousness, and extreme/reasonable to characterize and operationalize cultures of calculation and cultures of simulation as sensitizing concepts, the analysis shows how simulation code work shifts from development to use, the importance of but also resistance towards too much visualizations, and how simulation modelers play with extreme values, yet also try to achieve reasonable results compared to observations.

  8. A best practices approach to caries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbutt, Michelle; Young, Douglas A

    2014-06-01

    Caries management by risk assessment represents best practices and is an evidence-based model that focuses on treating and preventing disease at the patient level rather than a surgical/restorative approach at the tooth level. Dental caries is a multifactorial, biofilm and pH mediated disease that affects people of all ages and disproportionally affects certain populations at epidemic proportions. Simply restoring cavitated teeth does nothing to resolve the disease. At the heart of the CAMBRA philosophy is identifying the patient's unique risk level for future caries disease. This can be done by completing a caries risk assessment (CRA). Several easy to use CRA questionnaires are available. Once the patient's unique risk level has been determined, preventive and therapeutic interventions, based on the specific risk level, can then be implemented. Landmark publications, original research, and systematic reviews are analyzed and reviewed to form the basis for this shift in patient care related to caries disease. Caries management by risk assessment has emerged as the new paradigm in patient care and represents an evidence-based, best practices approach with the potential for significant advantages over traditional methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Greek Immigrants in Australia: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Savvas Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This exploratory research examined adjustment challenges, resiliencies, attitudes, emotional health, economic stability, criminal involvement, victimization and service experiences, and some cultural propensities of Greek Immigrants (GIs) in Australia using a convenient multi-generational sample (n = 123; response rate = .5). Data were collected via surveys, telephone, and personal-interviews in four major Australian cities. Among other things, the study revealed that Greek identity and cultural customs are often significant to first generation GIs. Adjustment challenges upon entry include primarily language, housing, and transportation difficulties, nostalgia for relatives and the motherland, unfamiliarity with socio-cultural systems, unemployment, money challenges, and lack of friendships. Christian faith, the extended family, family values and traditions, cultural pride for ancient Greek achievements, and a hard 'work ethic' are notable resiliencies that support GIs in their struggles and solidify their pursuit for happiness and success. Financial concerns, aging, and nostalgia for relatives and the motherland were the primary causes of socio-emotional instability. Attitudinal differences in the respondents based on age, gender, and socio-economic status, cross-cultural comparisons, and recommendations for culturally-sensitive practice with GIs are analyzed and methodological limitations illuminated. Future research needs in the field are also highlighted.

  10. Problems of quality and equity in pain management: exploring the role of biomedical culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Saha, Somnath; Dobscha, Steven K; Burgess, Diana J

    2009-10-01

    more biopsychosocial model of health care is particularly pressing, and suggest prioritization of inter-disciplinary, multimodal approaches to pain as one key strategy in realizing this shift. Finally, in terms of research, we identify the need for empirical research to assess aspects of biomedical culture that may influence physician's attitudes and behaviors related to pain management, as well as to explore how these cultural values and their effects may vary across different settings within the practice of medicine.

  11. Understanding the cultural antecedents of quality management in tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Muskat, Birgit; Muskat, Matthias; Blackman, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the causes that have led to a rather fragmented view of quality management among tourism marketing organisations in Germany. The aim is to identify and to interpret the relevant societal cultural factors underpinning German management. The paper examines the influence of culture on the perception and performance of quality management in tourism organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a data set which previously explore...

  12. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangho; Park, Jungsun; Park, Mijin

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21(st) century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1) how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2) the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  13. Creating a Culture of Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangho Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of occupational injuries and diseases associated with industrialization has declined markedly following developments in science and technology, such as engineering controls, protective equipment, safer machinery and processes, and greater adherence to regulations and labor inspections. Although the introduction of health and safety management systems has further decreased the incidence of occupational injuries and diseases, these systems are not effective unless accompanied by a positive safety culture in the workplace. The characteristics of work in the 21st century have given rise to new issues related to workers' health, such as new types of work-related disorders, noncommunicable diseases, and inequality in the availability of occupational health services. Overcoming these new and emerging issues requires a culture of prevention at the national level. The present paper addresses: (1 how to change safety cultures in both theory and practice at the level of the workplace; and (2 the role of prevention culture at the national level.

  14. Integrating policy, disintegrating practice: water resources management in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatuk, Larry A.; Rahm, Dianne

    Botswana is generally regarded as an African ‘success story’. Nearly four decades of unabated economic growth, multi-party democracy, conservative decision-making and low-levels of corruption have made Botswana the darling of the international donor community. One consequence of rapid and sustained economic development is that water resources use and demands have risen dramatically in a primarily arid/semi-arid environment. Policy makers recognize that supply is limited and that deliberate steps must be taken to manage demand. To this end, and in line with other members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Botswana devised a National Water Master Plan (NWMP) and undertook a series of institutional and legal reforms throughout the 1990s so as to make water resources use more equitable, efficient and sustainable. In other words, the stated goal is to work toward Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in both policy and practice. However, policy measures have had limited impact on de facto practice. This paper reflects our efforts to understand the disjuncture between policy and practice. The information presented here combines a review of primary and secondary literatures with key informant interviews. It is our view that a number of constraints-cultural, power political, managerial-combine to hinder efforts toward sustainable forms of water resources use. If IWRM is to be realized in the country, these constraints must be overcome. This, however, is no small task.

  15. [Science, technique, and culture: relations between risk and health practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeresnia, Dina

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the cultural consequences of discourses and practices aimed at training subjects for a rational, informed choice in relation to risks, calculated on the basis of scientific knowledge. The epidemiological risk concept is a central element in this process, especially in the context of health practices. The article begins by briefly characterizing the epidemiological risk concept, emphasizing that as an abstract model, it reduces the complexity of the phenomena it studies. Grasping reality through this abstraction generates values and meanings. Canguilhem's reflection on the relations between science, technique, and life is further discussed from the perspective of deepening an understanding of the cultural consequences of this process, contributing to the transformation of classical concepts of individuality, autonomy, and sociability. Such vital themes as individuality, alterity, and the relationship with death are present (albeit disguised) in issues that involve the central nature of risk in the contemporary world.

  16. Culture, salience, and psychiatric diagnosis: exploring the concept of cultural congruence & its practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Mohammed Abouelleil

    2013-07-16

    Cultural congruence is the idea that to the extent a belief or experience is culturally shared it is not to feature in a diagnostic judgement, irrespective of its resemblance to psychiatric pathology. This rests on the argument that since deviation from norms is central to diagnosis, and since what counts as deviation is relative to context, assessing the degree of fit between mental states and cultural norms is crucial. Various problems beset the cultural congruence construct including impoverished definitions of culture as religious, national or ethnic group and of congruence as validation by that group. This article attempts to address these shortcomings to arrive at a cogent construct. The article distinguishes symbolic from phenomenological conceptions of culture, the latter expanded upon through two sources: Husserl's phenomenological analysis of background intentionality and neuropsychological literature on salience. It is argued that culture is not limited to symbolic presuppositions and shapes subjects' experiential dispositions. This conception is deployed to re-examine the meaning of (in)congruence. The main argument is that a significant, since foundational, deviation from culture is not from a value or belief but from culturally-instilled experiential dispositions, in what is salient to an individual in a particular context. Applying the concept of cultural congruence must not be limited to assessing violations of the symbolic order and must consider alignment with or deviations from culturally-instilled experiential dispositions. By virtue of being foundational to a shared experience of the world, such dispositions are more accurate indicators of potential vulnerability. Notwithstanding problems of access and expertise, clinical practice should aim to accommodate this richer meaning of cultural congruence.

  17. Electronics waste management: Indian practices and guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, Amitava [Department of Chemical Engineering. University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C.Road. Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2010-07-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste or waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is a popular, informal name for discarded electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) with all of their peripherals at their end-of-life. WEEE constitutes 8% of municipal waste and is one of the fastest growing waste streams. The fraction of precious and other metals in e-waste is over 60%, while pollutants comprise a meager 2.70%. Given the volume of WEEE generated containing toxic materials, it emerges as a risk to the society. Considering the high toxicity of these pollutants especially when burned or recycled in uncontrolled environments, the Basel Convention has identified e-waste as hazardous, and developed a framework for controls on transboundary movement of such waste. In contrast, WEEE can offer a tremendous business opportunity if it would treat in proper manner. The management of the WEEE has thus become a global challenge in today's world. Several nations across the globe have implemented or are about to implement WEEE regulations based on the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR). Both existing and proposed solutions are implemented with various degrees of centralization. Practical implementations however, can give rise to absurd organizational outcomes. In the light of these findings, the present paper deals with the Indian initiatives on the WEEE management keeping pace with the international scenario. Initially, this paper aims to draw an overview on the basics of WEEE. Next, the international legislative practices followed by Indian initiatives intended to help manage these growing quantities of this waste stream are discussed.

  18. Electronics waste management: Indian practices and guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Bandyopadhyay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic waste or e-waste or waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE is a popular, informal name for discarded electrical and electronic equipment (EEE with all of their peripherals at their end-of-life. WEEE constitutes 8% of municipal waste and is one of the fastest growing waste streams. The fraction of precious and other metals in e-waste is over 60%, while pollutants comprise a meager 2.70%. Given the volume of WEEE generated containing toxic materials, it emerges as a risk to the society. Considering the high toxicity of these pollutants especially when burned or recycled in uncontrolled environments, the Basel Convention has identified e-waste as hazardous, and developed a framework for controls on transboundary movement of such waste. In contrast, WEEE can offer a tremendous business opportunity if it would treat in proper manner. The management of the WEEE has thus become a global challenge in today’s world. Several nations across the globe have implemented or are about to implement WEEE regulations based on the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR. Both existing and proposed solutions are implemented with various degrees of centralization. Practical implementations however, can give rise to absurd organizational outcomes. In the light of these findings, the present paper deals with the Indian initiatives on the WEEE management keeping pace with the international scenario. Initially, this paper aims to draw an overview on the basics of WEEE. Next, the international legislative practices followed by Indian initiatives intended to help manage these growing quantities of this waste stream are discussed.

  19. The role of cultural ecosystem services in landscape management and planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Bieling, Claudia; Fagerholm, Nora;

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing concern that the ecosystem services approach puts emphasis on optimizing a small number of services, which may jeopardize environmental sustainability. One potential solution is to bring cultural ecosystem services more strongly into the foreground. We synthesize recent empiri...... of valuable landscapes or act as barriers to necessary innovation and transformation. Hence, cultural ecosystems services are not uncontested, as seen through the three analytical lenses of landowner behavior, cultural practices of communities, and landscape planning.......There is increasing concern that the ecosystem services approach puts emphasis on optimizing a small number of services, which may jeopardize environmental sustainability. One potential solution is to bring cultural ecosystem services more strongly into the foreground. We synthesize recent...... empirical evidence and assess what consideration of cultural ecosystem services adds to landscape management and planning. In general, cultural ecosystem services incentivize the multifunctionality of landscapes. However, depending on context, cultural ecosystem services can either encourage the maintenance...

  20. Cultural and Family Challenges to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Immigrant Chinese Americans

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although Asians demonstrate elevated levels of type 2 diabetes, little attention has been directed to their unique cultural beliefs and practices regarding diabetes. We describe cultural and family challenges to illness management in foreign-born Chinese American patients with type 2 diabetes and their spouses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was an interpretive comparative interview study with 20 foreign-born Chinese American couples (n = 40) living with type 2 diabetes. Multiple ...

  1. Conserving and managing animals that learn socially and share cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Hal

    2010-08-01

    Socially learned behavior can be a crucial factor in how animals interact with their environment and, thus, in conservation and management. For species in which social learning and culture are important determinants of behavior, several factors complicate conservation and management. These include the rapid spread of novel behavior through social learning, the inhibition of adaptive behavior because of cultural conformism, the evolution of maladaptive behavior, and the development of culturally isolated but sometimes sympatric groups. These factors can affect habitat suitability, movements, how animals react to anthropogenic effects, and genetic structures. Social learning and culture may be important factors in translocation success, and should sometimes be considered when delineating population units for conservation and management. We should aim to protect cultural as well as genetic diversity. Unfortunately, clear data on social learning and culture in the wild are scarce. Hence, the ideas and methods outlined in this special issue have great potential.

  2. Cross Cultural Perspectives of Gender and Management in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.; Riordan, S.; Ozkanli, O.; Neale, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This article presents preliminary results of a cross cultural study of gender and management in universities. Methodology: Qualitative interviews with senior managers in each country were analysed in relation to key concepts of career paths, support, gate keeping, management skills, disciplinary factors, gendered leadership styles and…

  3. Patient safety culture measurement in general practice. Clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwart Dorien LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safety culture questionnaire for general practice (SCOPE which was derived from a comparable questionnaire for hospitals (Dutch-HSOPS. Methods The survey was conducted among caregivers of Dutch general practice as part of an ongoing quality accreditation process using a 46 item questionnaire. We conducted factor analyses and studied validity by calculating correlations between the subscales and testing the hypothesis that respondents' patient safety grade of their practices correlated with their scores on the questionnaire. Results Of 72 practices 294 respondents completed the questionnaire. Eight factors were identified concerning handover and teamwork, support and fellowship, communication openness, feedback and learning from error, intention to report events, adequate procedures and staffing, overall perceptions of patient safety and expectations and actions of managers. Cronbach's alpha of the factors rated between 0.64 and 0.85. The subscales intercorrelated moderately, except for the factor about intention to report events. Respondents who graded patient safety highly scored significantly higher on the questionnaire than those who did not. Conclusions The SCOPE questionnaire seems an appropriate instrument to assess patient safety culture in general practice. The clinimetric properties of the SCOPE are promising, but future research should confirm the factor structure and construct of the SCOPE and delineate its responsiveness to changes in safety culture over time.

  4. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sune Dueholm; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Mathiassen, Lars

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture...... CMMI level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software...

  5. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    ížková (2013) present two methods as peeling tests, also known as the 'Scotch tape' method, and surface water uptake measurements, using a digitized micro-tube for assessing material characteristics and consolidation effects on historic stone and mortar. Both methods are reviewed by pointing out both the advantages and the drawbacks. Solimene et al (2013) present a novel data processing technique based on the inverse electromagnetic scattering for small and weak target detection and localization. They start from the idea of applying a two-stage MUSIC algorithm. In the first stage strong scatterers are detected. Then, information concerning their number and location is employed to detect and localize the weak scatterers. The role of an adequate scattering model is emphasized to drastically improve detection performance in realistic scenarios. Kadioglu et al (2013) deal with the exploitation of ground penetrating radar, enhanced by advanced data processing based on microwave tomography, for the detection and the assessment of structural damage affecting foundation healthiness, of significant relevance for safety management in cultural heritage. An interesting case of the effectiveness of the joint procedure is shown by processing measurements collected during a survey at the Great Mosque of Ilyas Bey, one of the most important cultural heritage features from ancient Miletos-Iona in Soke Aydin, Turkey. Finally, Nordebo et al (2013) provide an interesting analysis of the optimal accuracy and resolution in electrical impedance tomography (EIT), based on the Cramer-Rao lower bound. This study is very important in the set up and analysis of the regularization strategies for the linearized problem at hand. References Battaglini R, Raco B and Scozzari A 2013 Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact J. Geophys. Eng. 10 064002 Cascini L, Peduto D, Reale D, Arena L, Ferlisi S, Verde S and Fornaro G 2013

  6. A critical analysis of intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob; Klitmøller, Anders

    2009-01-01

    for understanding intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management (CCM). Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyzes the established approaches to the cultural underpinnings of intercultural communication in CCM and examines how newer developments in anthropology may contribute...... of anthropology from which it originated. This theory gap between intercultural communication research in CCM and anthropology tends to exclude from CCM an understanding of how the context of social, organizational and power relationships shapes the role of culture in communication. Practical implications...... - The paper proposes to substitute the view of culture as comprising of abstract values and codes as determinants of communication with concepts of culture as dynamically enfolded in practice and socially situated in specific contexts, in order to give new directions to theories on intercultural communication...

  7. Knowledge management practices at an institution of higher learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mavodza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article underscores the fact that society is becoming more and more knowledge-based, and that the organisations that can identify, value, create and evolve their knowledge assets are likely to be more successful than those that do not. Knowledge management (KM is about enhancing the use of organisational knowledge through sound practices of KM and organisational learning. KM practices encompass the capture and/or acquisition of knowledge, its retention and organisation, its dissemination and re-use, and lastly responsiveness to the new knowledge.Objective: The focus of this study was on KM principles and practices that may be in place in the Metropolitan College of New York (MCNY. The argument is that KM and its survival principles and tools may help the College to improve performance. However, there is uncertainty about whether the use of KM principles and tools can partly solve the College’s approach to improving the quality of education it provides.Methods: A mixed methods research methodology encompassing a questionnaire, observation, interviews, and use of institutional documents was used in the investigation.Results: The findings of the study indicate that KM concepts were not universally understood at MCNY.Conclusion: There is a need to create a knowledge inventory at MCNY. This may help the College to develop appropriate institution-wide policies and practices for proper and well organised methods of integrating work processes, collaborating and sharing (including the efficient use of social media, and developing an enabling institutional culture.

  8. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.; Halfens, R.J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Wensing, M.J.P.; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. AIMS: To determine if the type of

  9. Cultural diversity in hospitality management : how to improve cultural diversity workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Korjala, Veera

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor´s thesis investigates cultural diversity in the hospitality management. It aims at presenting effective ways to improve cultural diversity in a workplace. This study was commissioned by JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort & Spa in Texas, USA and three hotels in Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA: Atherton Hotel, Hampton Inn & Suites and Residence Inn. The bachelor´s thesis incorporates culture theories and their applications to the workplace. Additionally, it focuses on cultural d...

  10. Еnterprise’s corporate management improvement on the base of corporate culture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Biliak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author reveals extremely important role of corporate culture and uniqueness of the corporate culture system. It is established that the corporate management is characterized above all, by the economic activity and corporate culture practice. The securement of the balance in the process of interaction between organization and its environment plays one of the key roles in any management system. The author determines the influence of corporate culture on the business activity of the enterprise, when personnel predicts the situation development according to which they build models and evaluate their behavior. While realizing them in their activity employees strengthen certain trends and create in such a way appropriate situations. The search of ways of development and changing corporate culture as the base of corporate management improvement is conducted with the use of the strategic approach. The creation of a corporate culture that supports the development strategy of the enterprise, is an essential component of effective business and management, because the culture shapes a socio-psychological climate and corporate spirit which contributes to the operational execution of tasks and achievement of certain goals. Accordingly to the mentioned above, the set of measures of enterprise’s corporate culture development securement is proposed.

  11. Management of Corporate Culture through Local Managers' Training in Foreign Companies in China: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Corporate culture is a complex phenomenon in foreign companies located in the People's Republic of China. For the management team of an international enterprise, it is a challenging task to manage cultural differences. Education and training provided to local managers might be one of the important solutions. Therefore, this study explores the…

  12. Positioning Food Cultures: 'Alternative' Food as Distinctive Consumer Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    Many sociological studies to date have explored the role of food in marking distinctions between groups. Less well understood is how 'alternative' means of food consumption become figured in such relations. Drawing on accounts of food practice derived from 20 in-depth interviews and a two-year period of participant observation, this article considers the role of class culture in the practice of alternative food consumption. As participants speak their position, expressions of class arise through discussions of food practice. Having explored how food plays a part in marking boundaries of distinction between foods 'for us' and 'for them', we are reminded that in reproducing certain ideas about proper eating, we confine our imagining of alternative food futures to a limited politics of the possible. The article highlights implications for future development of equitable alternatives to conventional foodways.

  13. Best Practice of Construction Waste Management and Minimization

    OpenAIRE

    Khor Jie Cheng; Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2014-01-01

    Material management is an important issue as seen in construction waste management. Best practice of material management is accompanied by various benefits which are acknowledged by several studies. The site layout has particular effects on both materials and their waste through effective waste management practice. Ignoring the benefits of material management could result in a daily reduction in productivity of up to 40% by material wastage. Thus, the benefits of effectiv...

  14. THE EFFECT OF NATIONAL CULTURE ON TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-hard total quality management comprises of the utility of human resource management-style personnel policies to product commitment to quality and a management ideology that supports cultural change maxims, continuous improvement and customer satisfaction. The aim of the study is to determine the mediator effect of national culture on the relationship between soft-hard total quality management and organizational performance in municipalities. A quantitative research design was adopted to collect data. Multiple regression analysis method was used to conduct this study. The findings of the study will contribute to both theory and practice. The results of this study have important contributions and implications for practitioners and policy-makers in these five developing countries. Empirical evidence revealed that soft-hard total quality management has relationship with performance. The findings also implied that soft-hard total quality management has positively relation with performance and there is difference in organizational performance mean between all these countries.

  15. Developing a positive organisational culture using a management development strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Harry

    2002-01-01

    This paper evaluates a management development program, which was piloted at Albury Base Hospital during 2001 for nurse managers. The program uses quantitative assessments of participants using a lifestyle inventory tool and enables managers to identify opportunities and strategies to assist them to become more effective managers. The program also helps identify management "blind spots" and increased awareness of the effect of management's behaviour on team efficiency. The program was evaluated as being relevant to managers from any health discipline and was a means by which workplace culture and behaviour could be improved.

  16. Best practices in specialty pharmacy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Courtney J

    2013-01-01

    Specialty pharmacy is a growing area of research, utilization, and cost. Because of the unique nature of the diseases treated by specialty pharmaceuticals, such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, novel management approaches are needed. Advocate Physician Partners (APP) is an entity within the Advocate Health Care Health System in the Chicago and the central Illinois area. It coordinates the care management and managed care contracting between the Advocate Health Care System and more than 4,000 physicians on the medical staffs of Advocate hospitals. APP has experienced a per-member-per-month (PMPM) increase of less than  3% in oncology intravenous medications spend in 2012. This spend refers to the intravenous medications covered under the medical benefits for APP's health maintenance organization (HMO) population. The spend has consistently been less than national projections, and we believe this is tied to the adoption of several key best practices. Prior to instituting the best practices, the yearly percentage increases for oncology spending were 5.52% (2007 to 2008), 9.39% (2008 to 2009), and 5.29% (2009 to 2010). After instituting best practices during the first quarter of 2011, the increases in PMPM were 3.11% (2010 to 2011) and 2.11% (2011 to 2012), which were below previous years. To describe the best practices of specialty pharmacy management adopted by APP, specifically (a) establishing a content expert and governing bodies, (b) ensuring compliance with policies, and (c) providing educational resources. APP has several key result areas (KRAs). One KRA was compliance with appropriate utilization of intravenous oncology protocols for its HMO population. The protocols for each medication outline the appropriate indication and patient population. These protocols were developed and reviewed by the APP Pharmacy and Technology (PT) committee. The PT-approved indications reflect FDA indications and indications found in national guidelines. The APP KRA target

  17. STUDY REGARDING THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT PRACTICE AND THE CHANGES IN MANAGEMENT APPROACH DUE TO FINANCIAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Silaş

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern management involves a wide range of skills and knowledge, many of which assuming skills in social sciences, logics, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, statistics, information technology, international relations, languages and culture. There is no universal management style to be effective, but all factors need to be analyzed in a given situation and then to be chosen a person with a style to suit the situation and capable to train people to meet the requirements. The present study intends to analyze the management practices that determine the success in business, as well as the changes that occur in the management approach due to the financial crisis. In this respect, the research takes into consideration two reference periods, the year 2007, a year of great economic growth, which precedes the financial crisis, and the year 2012, year in which the consequences of the financial crisis exist in a great extent in all social economic fields. The criteria considered are ranked based on a sample of data obtained by interviewing the managers of 290 companies that have successfully overcome problems caused by the crisis. Are highlighted in the paper the most important methods of management that, according to the surveyed managers, can help the company to overcome the difficulties generated by influence of national and international environment.

  18. Management strategies to harness cultural diversity in Australian construction sites - a social identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Loosemore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available  Construction sites around the world employ large numbers of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The effective management of this cultural diversity has important implications for the productivity, safety, health and welfare of construction workers and for the performance and reputation of firms which employ them. The findings of a three year, multi-staged study of cultural diversity management practices on construction sites are critiqued using social identity theory. This reveals that so called “best-practice” diversity management strategies may have an opposite effect to that intended. It is concluded that the management of diversity on construction projects would benefit from being informed by social identity research. 

  19. Potential for Applying Intergenerational Practice to Protected Area Management in Mountainous Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Mitrofanenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One way of preserving the natural and cultural diversity of mountain areas and supporting their sustainable development is the establishment of protected areas. The scientific literature acknowledges the importance of participation by local stakeholders and of considering social cohesion in protected area management. Intergenerational practice has been shown to enhance participation and improve social cohesion; however, its potential role in natural resource management has not been considered by the research community. This paper explores the potential for integrating intergenerational practice into protected area management in mountainous regions, guided by 3 research questions: What challenges of protected area management could benefit from intergenerational practice? How can intergenerational practice help to address these challenges? And how could intergenerational practice be more strongly integrated into current protected area management? The paper focuses on selected management challenges, mostly related to the development function of protected areas, and suggests intergenerational practice solution pathways for each challenge, derived from qualitative content analysis of the literature, interviews with protected area and regional development experts, and participation in the project Big Foot: Crossing Generations, Crossing Mountains, which tested intergenerational learning approaches in 3 rural municipalities—one each in Bulgaria, Greece, and Italy. Recommendations are proposed for integrating intergenerational practice into protected area management policy and practice at the global, regional, and local levels.

  20. Stadium Alcohol Management: A Best Practices Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Filce

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sport managers have expressed the concern that the largest threat to fan safety emanates from alcohol overuse. A Turnkey Sports & Entertainment (2009 study asked 1,100 senior sport executives in the United States to rank various threats to fan safety. Alcohol abuse by unruly fans was listed by 62% of respondents, easily outpacing the next highest response of terrorism (18.73%. Previous studies have also identified an increase in violence and criminal activity relating to alcohol consumption at sporting events (Erickson et al., 2011; Menaker & Chaney, 2014. Intoxicated fans have been the source of numerous documented tort claims against vendors and facility owners (Bearman, 1983; Verni, 2006. Despite the known tort liability risk, administrators continue to make decisions without real evidence due to a lack of literature on alcohol policies at sporting events (Oster-Aaland & Neighbors, 2007. This paper will document the problems associated with alcohol consumption at sporting events, review current alcohol policies and barriers to the implementation of stricter policies, and conclude with research-based suggestions for best practices in stadium alcohol management relative to: policy and training, sales and marketing, tailgating, and detection and enforcement.

  1. Fault Management Practice: A Roadmap for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesq, Lorraine M.; Oberhettinger, David

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous fault management (FM) is critical for deep space and planetary missions where the limited communication opportunities may prevent timely intervention by ground control. Evidence of pervasive architecture, design, and verification/validation problems with NASA FM engineering has been revealed both during technical reviews of spaceflight missions and in flight. These problems include FM design changes required late in the life-cycle, insufficient project insight into the extent of FM testing required, unexpected test results that require resolution, spacecraft operational limitations because certain functions were not tested, and in-flight anomalies and mission failures attributable to fault management. A recent NASA initiative has characterized the FM state-of-practice throughout the spacecraft development community and identified common NASA, DoD, and commercial concerns that can be addressed in the near term through the development of a FM Practitioner's Handbook and the formation of a FM Working Group. Initial efforts will focus on standardizing FM terminology, establishing engineering processes and tools, and training.

  2. The Standard of Management and Application of Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Ya Ning

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using digital technology for cultural heritage documentation is a global trend in the 21 st century. Many important techniques are currently under development, including 3D digital imaging, reverse engineering, GIS (Geographic Information Systems etc. However, no system for overall management or data integration is yet available. Therefore, we urgently need such a system to efficiently manage and interpret data for the preservation of cultural heritages. This paper presents a digitizing process developed in Taiwan by the authors. To govern and manage cultural property, three phases of property conservation, registration, restoration and management, has been set up along a timeline. In accordance with the laws of cultural property, a structural system has been built for project management, including data classification and data interpretation with self-documenting characteristics. Through repository information and metadata, a system catalogue (also called data dictionary (Figure 1 was created. The primary objective of the study is to create an integrated technology for an efficient management of databases. Several benefits could be obtained from this structural standard: (1 cultural heritage management documentation can be centralized to minimize the possibility of data re-entry resulting inconsistency, and also to facilitate simultaneous updating of data; (2 since multiple data can be simultaneously retrieved and saved in real time, the incidence of errors can be reduced; (3 this system could be easily tailored to meet the administrative requirements for the standardization of documentation exchanged between cultural properties institutions and various county and city governments.

  3. Focusing on the software of managing health workers: what can we learn from high commitment management practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of what constitutes best practice in human resource management (HRM) in public-oriented services is limited and the operational aspects of managing health workers at provision level have been poorly studied. The magnet hospital concept offers some insights into HRM practices that are leading to high commitment. These have been shown to lead to superior performance in not only industrial business firms, but also service industries and the public service. The mechanisms that drive these practices include positive psychological links between managers and staff, organizational commitment and trust. Conditions for successful high commitment management (HiCoM) include health service managers with a strong vision and able to transmit this vision to their staff, appropriate decision spaces for healthcare managers and a pool of reasonable well-trained health workers. For this, adequate remuneration is the first condition. Equally important are the issues of cultural fit and of 'commitment'. What would staff expect from management in return for their commitment to the organization? Salary buys indeed time of employees, but other practices ensure their commitment. Only if these drivers are understood will managers be able to make their HRM practices more responsive to the needs and expectations of the health workers.

  4. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  5. Exploring Cultural Influences of Self-Management of Diabetes in Coastal Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munib Said Abdulrehman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of increasing prevalence of diabetes among Kenyans and evidence suggesting Kenyans with diabetes maintain poor glycemic control, no one has examined the role of cultural attitudes, beliefs, and practices in their self-management of diabetes. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to describe diabetes self-management among the Swahili of coastal Kenya, and explore factors that affect diabetes self-management within the context of Swahili culture. Thirty men and women with type 2 diabetes from Lamu town, Kenya, participated in this study. Diabetes self-management was insufficiently practiced, and participants had limited understanding of diabetes. Economic factors such as poverty and the high cost of biomedical care appear to have more influence in self-management behavior than socio-cultural and educational factors do. Economic and socio-cultural influences on diabetes self-management should not be underestimated, especially in a limited resource environment like coastal Kenya, where biomedical care is not accessible or affordable to all.

  6. Influence of Culture on the Process of Managing Decisions Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin-Lucian Isac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different cultural environment requires a corresponding managerial environment. The process of managing decisions adoption is influenced by the values, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of the employees.

  7. The Role of Management Practices in Closing the Productivity Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Battisti, Giuliana; Celia, Helen; Clegg, Christopher; Fu, Xu; De Hoyos, Raphael; Iona, Alfonsiana; Petrescu, Alina; Adriano, Peixoto

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that management practices are linked to the productivity and performance of a company. However, research findings are mixed. This paper provides a multi-disciplinary review of the current evidence of such a relationship and offers suggestions for further exploration. We provide an extensive review of the literature in terms of research findings from studies that have been trying to measure and understand the impact that individual management practices and clusters of management practices have on productivity at different levels of analysis. We focus our review on Operations Management (om) and Human Resource Management (hrm) practices as well as joint applications of these practices. In conclusion, we can say that taken as a whole, the research findings are equivocal. Some studies have found a positive relationship between the adoption of management practices and productivity, some negative and some no association whatsoever. We believe that the lack of universal consensus on the effect of t...

  8. Racial/ethnic diversity management and cultural competency: the case of Pennsylvania hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Dansky, Kathryn H; De Souza, Gita; Gatto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Major demographic trends are changing the face of America's labor pool, and healthcare managers increasingly face a scarcer and more diverse workforce. As a result, healthcare organizations (HCOs) must develop policies and practices aimed at recruiting, retaining, and managing a diverse workforce and must meet the demands of a more diverse patient population by providing culturally appropriate care and improving access to care for racial/ethnic minorities. Ultimately, the goal of managing diversity is to enhance workforce and customer satisfaction, to improve communication among members of the workforce, and to further improve organizational performance. Research on diversity management practices in HCOs is scarce, providing few guidelines for practitioners. This study attempted to close that gap. Results show that hospitals in Pennsylvania have been relatively inactive with employing diversity management practices, and equal employment requirements are the main driver of diversity management policy. The number and scope of diversity management practices used were not influenced by organizational or market characteristics. The results suggest that hospitals need to adopt diversity management practices for their workforces and need to pay particular attention to marketing and service planning activities that meet the needs of a diverse patient population.

  9. Managing cultural diversity in the work place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J

    1992-01-01

    Much of the cultural diversity and racial prejudice that exist in the healthcare industry today is rooted in ignorance more than outright bigotry. The time is ripe for facing the problems and seeking solutions.

  10. Conflict interaction management as a cultural phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е L Ryabova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the definition for the concept of conflict interaction culture, reveals its functions as well as the structure of its elements and components. Conflict interactions are also examined in the paper.

  11. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Results by Primary Work Unit, Organizational Work Setting, and Primary Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety culture is critical to the achievement of patient safety. In 2014, a landmark national study was conducted to investigate patient safety culture in nephrology nurse practice settings. In this secondary analysis of data from that study, we report the status of patient safety culture by primary work unit (chronic hemodialysis unit, acute hemodialysis unit, peritoneal dialysis unit) and organizational work setting (for-profit organization, not-for-profit organization), and compare the perceptions of direct care nurses and managers/administrators on components of patient safety culture.

  12. Assessing elemental mercury vapor exposure from cultural and religious practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D M; Newby, C A; Leal-Almeraz, T O; Thomas, V M

    2001-08-01

    Use of elemental mercury in certain cultural and religious practices can cause high exposures to mercury vapor. Uses include sprinkling mercury on the floor of a home or car, burning it in a candle, and mixing it with perfume. Some uses can produce indoor air mercury concentrations one or two orders of magnitude above occupational exposure limits. Exposures resulting from other uses, such as infrequent use of a small bead of mercury, could be well below currently recognized risk levels. Metallic mercury is available at almost all of the 15 botanicas visited in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, but botanica personnel often deny having mercury for sale when approached by outsiders to these religious and cultural traditions. Actions by public health authorities have driven the mercury trade underground in some locations. Interviews indicate that mercury users are aware that mercury is hazardous, but are not aware of the inhalation exposure risk. We argue against a crackdown by health authorities because it could drive the practices further underground, because high-risk practices may be rare, and because uninformed government intervention could have unfortunate political and civic side effects for some Caribbean and Latin American immigrant groups. We recommend an outreach and education program involving religious and community leaders, botanica personnel, and other mercury users.

  13. Cultural and Economic Motivation of Pig Raising Practices in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Nazmun; Uddin, Main; Gurley, Emily S; Jahangir Hossain, M; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    The interactions that pig raisers in Bangladesh have with their pigs could increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. Since raising pigs is a cultural taboo to Muslims, we aimed at understanding the motivation for raising pigs and resulting practices that could pose the risk of transmitting disease from pigs to humans in Bangladesh, a predominantly Muslim country. These understandings could help identify acceptable strategies to reduce the risk of disease transmission from pigs to people. To achieve this objective, we conducted 34 in-depth interviews among pig herders and backyard pig raisers in eight districts of Bangladesh. Informants explained that pig raising is an old tradition, embedded in cultural and religious beliefs and practices, the primary livelihood of pig herders, and a supplemental income of backyard pig raisers. To secure additional income, pig raisers sell feces, liver, bile, and other pig parts often used as traditional medicine. Pig raisers have limited economic ability to change the current practices that may put them at risk of exposure to diseases from their pigs. An intervention that improves their financial situation and reduces the risk of zoonotic disease may be of interest to pig raisers.

  14. Lithic Management in the Chassey Culture Neolithic

    OpenAIRE

    Gassin, Bernard; Léa, Vanessa; Astruc, L.; Linton, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    The integrated technological approach of the lithic industries in Southern France Chassey culture and neighbouring cultures is a way to highlight a complex organisation of space. The development of long distance diffusion networks of lithic products from western Provence creates interdependence between producing-exporting sites and receiving-consuming sites. The analysis of their functioning, from raw material sources until remote consuming sites, is undergone on various scales (from supra-re...

  15. The impact of culture and gender on leadership behavior: Higher education and management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Qureshi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of culture, gender and leadership behavior has received much interest from researchers during the last three decades. This paper attempts to propose a conceptual framework consisting three human resource management (HRM practices (culture, gender and leadership styles and to explain the relationship among these variables. Culture plays an important role to adopt different leadership styles because it influences the way in which individuals, groups and teams interact with each other and cooperate to achieve organizational goals. The seven cultural elements are measured in the current study i.e., i member identity ii rewards criteria iii team emphasis iv means-end orientation v control vi unit integration and vii risk/ conflict tolerance. Results show that the culture has a significant influence on male leaders to adopt different leadership styles, but female leaders likely participative in their leadership positions and try to adopt democratic leadership in different cultures.

  16. Managing illicit drug use. A practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodak, A

    1994-03-01

    Illicit drug use is spreading, especially in the developing world, but has begun to stabilise in most developed countries. The phenomenon of illicit drug use is still poorly understood, with responses in most countries influenced largely by cultural factors. A range of psychosocial and pharmacotherapeutic treatments is available; of these, methadone maintenance treatment for heroin dependence has the most evidence of benefit. A large body of literature--including some well designed studies--indicates that methadone reduces heroin use, mortality, criminal activity and risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Methadone is more likely to be effective if higher doses, longer durations of treatment and more realistic goals are set. However, research findings which would improve outcomes considerably are often not implemented. Methadone maintenance programmes, which attract and retain more illicit drug users than other treatment modalities, are now being made more available in many countries in recognition of their therapeutic effectiveness and utility in reducing the spread of HIV infection among people injecting heroin. HIV infection is now recognised in many countries to be the most serious complication of illicit drug use for both individual drug injectors and their communities. Levo-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has similar properties to methadone but a longer half-life. This suggests a number of clinical benefits which would also reduce the cost of treatment. However, LAAM has not been approved by regulatory authorities for routine use despite positive findings in some studies. Buprenorphine has shown some promise in the management of heroin dependence but is still undergoing evaluation. It is, however, unlikely to ever be used widely for the management of illicit drug users. Naltrexone may have some advantages for special populations. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment for cocaine and amphetamine users is still at a developmental stage.

  17. Practice management companies. Creating sound information technology strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M A

    1997-10-01

    Practice management companies are becoming more prominent players in the health care industry. To improve the performance of the group practices that they acquire, these companies are striving to use updated information technologies.

  18. The Impact of Human Resource Management Practices on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Abstract. The focus of this paper is on the impact of HRM practices on private sector organisations ... Keywords: Human Resource Management, Performance; Best Practices ...

  19. An Analysis Of National Culture And Leadership Practices In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi Wirawan Irawanto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers around the world need ideas and support to meet many of the challenges of leading. Leadership requires actions and strategies as well as convictions and ideas. Leadership occurs in relation with followers. Leading Indonesian people is not the same as leading Westerners nor is it the same as leading other Asian people. A leadership strategy effective in one culture can be counter-productive in another. In this paper, the use findings of Hofstede’s and the GLOBE’s studies are used to identify important values of Indonesians, relating them to Indonesian culture and leadership style in an organization setting. Indonesians emphasis collective well being and show a strong humane orientation within their society. The culture is assertive, and pays attention to maintaining harmony. Effective leaders are expected to show compassion while using a more paternalistic than autocratic leadership style. It is advisable that expatriate managers need to avoid actions that are not suited to these values and expectations.

  20. Energy efficiency potentials and energy management practices in Swedish firms

    OpenAIRE

    Backlund, Sandra; Broberg, Sarah; Ottosson, Mikael; Thollander, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve energy efficiency and reach the EU:s 20-20-20 primary energy saving target, focus has mainly been on diffusion of technology. Previous studies have illustrated large untapped energy saving potentials from implementing energy management practices in firms. Energy management practices have large effects on energy utilization and also a short pay-back time. According to these studies, energy management practices also effect investment decisions and the outcome of investments ...

  1. Are Corporate Carbon Management Practices Reducing Corporate Carbon Emissions?

    OpenAIRE

    Doda, B; Gennaoli, C; Gouldson, A; Grover, D.; Sullivan, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the first large scale, quantitative study of the impact of corporate carbon management practices on corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Using data for 2009 and 2010 from the Carbon Disclosure Project survey, we find little compelling evidence that commonly adopted management practices are reducing emissions. This finding is unexpected and we propose three possible explanations for it. First, it may be because corporate carbon data and management practice information have n...

  2. The Internet in the Context of Cross-Cultural Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsoomair, Jon Franklin

    1997-01-01

    The Internet offers inexpensive contact with other cultures. This article describes the development of a cross-cultural management course for university seniors in business and economics and MBA students that made extensive use of the Internet to establish relationships with counterparts and mentors in other countries. Outlines course objectives,…

  3. Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    We survey, organize, and discuss the literature on the role of organizational practices for explaining innovation outcomes. We discuss how individual practices influence innovation, and how the clustering of specific practices matters for innovation outcomes. Relatedly, we discuss various possibl...

  4. Cultural Studies and the Subaltern: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Györke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available My article discusses the theoretical and practical implications of applying the methodology of cultural studies, as it is delineated by Stuart Hall, in the East-Central European context. Despite the celebrated “internationalization” of the discipline as well as “de-Eurocentrizing” initiatives, a number of scholars, such as G. C. Spivak and Hall himself, claim that research taking a cultural studies approach has offered little innovative intervention in recent years, and the discipline remains defined by a Western, (postmodern theoretical framework. I argue that scholars in Hungary (and Slovenia have an unprecedented opportunity to contribute to the field, yet in order to avoid falling into the trap of repeating obvious claims and conclusion, we need to take an approach that Spivak associates with the toleration of uncertainty and paradox, and Jessica Benjamin calls intersubjective interaction.

  5. UNDERSTANDING THAI CULTURE AND ITS IMPACT ON REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING PROCESS MANAGEMENT DURING INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerasak Thanasankit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of Thai culture on managing the decision making process in requirements engineering and contribution a better understand of its influence on the management of requirements engineering process. The paper illustrates the interaction of technology and culture and shows that rather than technology changing culture, culture can change the way technology is used. Thai culture is naturally inherent in Thai daily life and Thais bring that into their work practices. The concepts of power and uncertainty in Thai culture contribute toward hierarchical forms of communication and decision making process in Thailand, especially during requirements engineering, where information systems requirements need to be established for further development. The research shows that the decision making process in Thailand tends to take a much longer time, as every stage during requirements engineering needs to be reported to management for final decisions. The tall structure of Thai organisations also contributes to a bureaucratic, elongated decision-making process during information systems development. Understanding the influence of Thai culture on requirements engineering and information systems development will assist multinational information systems consulting organisations to select, adapt, better manage, or change requirements engineering process and information systems developments methodologies to work best with Thai organisations.

  6. An appraisal of construction management practice in Nigeria | Ugwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An appraisal of construction management practice in Nigeria. ... A questionnaire survey was conducted and fifty-seven (57) factors were identified, ... the project team, lack of construction management knowledge and known work progress.

  7. Impact of supply chain management practices on sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Azevedo, Susana G.; Carvalho, Helena

    2014-01-01

    elimination," "supply chain risk management" and "cleaner production." The following lean, resilient and green supply chain management practices do not have a significant impact on supply chain sustainability: "flexible transportation," "flexible sourcing," "ISO 14001 certification," and "reverse logistics...

  8. Animal Waste Management Practices and Perceptions on Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Waste Management Practices and Perceptions on Public and Environmental Health Risks. ... Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania ... and public health risks associated with improper management of animal wastes in 66 ...

  9. Technology management in construction: Lessons for the practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The relevance of managing technology to architectural practices in South .... lead times, lack of continuity in the supply chain, overprocessing, rework ..... Business e-Coach. 2003. Guidelines on technology management for. SMEs.

  10. Assessment of cold chain management practices in immunisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of cold chain management practices in immunisation centres in Kacheliba division, ... Journal Home > Vol 94, No 2 (2017) > ... Cold chain management should be improved through continuous medical educational programmemes ...

  11. Promoting culturally competent chronic pain management using the clinically relevant continuum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    This article reviews the culture of biomedicine and current practices in pain management education, which often merge to create a hostile environment for effective chronic pain care. Areas of cultural tensions in chronic pain frequently involve the struggle to achieve credibility regarding one's complaints of pain (or being believed that the pain is real) and complying with pain medication protocols. The clinically relevant continuum model is presented as a framework allowing providers to approach care from an evidence-based, culturally appropriate (patient centered) perspective that takes into account the highest level of evidence available, provider expertise, and patient preferences and values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Culture and Cultural Competence in Nursing Education and Practice: The State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Linda; Kaddoura, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    The concept of cultural competency has developed a substantial presence in nursing education and practice since first attracting widespread attention in the 1990s. While several theories and corresponding measures of cultural competency have been advanced and tried, much work remains, as many nursing professionals continue to call for greater evidence-based research and attention to patient perspectives and outcomes. Using a method provided by Hawker et al. to appraise articles, this paper compares nine recent (2008-2013) studies (including two composite studies) related to cultural competency, undergraduate curricula, and teaching strategies in nursing to assess the state of the art in this important area of care. The studies applied phenomenological, study abroad, online, and service learning strategies, four of which relied on some version of Campinha-Bacote's IAPCC© model. These studies reported a general improvement in competency among students, though generally only to a level of cultural awareness, and admitted being constrained by several common limitations. Improved results and more realistic expectations in this area may require a closer understanding of the nature of the "culture" that underlies cultural competence. Harkess Kaddoura. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly...... published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference between the Best and Emerging practices. Only two central concepts where shared namely Communication...... and Planning. Of these two concepts Communication where found to be the most central to both the Emerging and Best practices. The analysis further reveals a soft side of project management that is central in the Emerging practice but absent from the Best practices. Although this soft side might be interpreted...

  14. Spatial turn and animation practices inspired by cultural anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wieszaczewska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial turn is one of the cultural turns, which have recently occurred in the humanities. It stresses the importance of issues such as space and place and can be successfully used as a theoretical perspective gaining use in thought over issues such as globalisation, transnationality, mapping but also education. In the discourses of pedagogical science space and place are considered through their multidimensional impact on education and learning. As significant concepts rooting pedagogy or pedagogy of borderland. The pedagogical reflection on space could be also used in the field of animation practices, especially in activities, which are related to place somehow colonised.

  15. Management Studies, Cultural Criticism and American Dreams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guthey, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The article reviews three books related to industrial management, including "False Prophets: The Gurus Who Created Modern Management and Why Their Ideas Are Bad for Business Today," by James Hoopes, "Organization and Innovation: Guru Schemes and American Dreams," by David Knights and Darren McCab...

  16. Cultural Practices and HIV in South Africa: A Legal Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mswela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has not escaped the rising prevalence and severe impact of HIV/AIDS in relation to women. From an economic and social vantage point, the HIV/AIDS epidemic effects women the hardest, with underprivileged black women the most susceptible to the virus. The theoretical framework of this paper focuses on the intersection between HIV/AIDS, gender inequality and gender violence, and more specifically on certain cultural practices and customs that contribute towards and exacerbate women’s subordination and inequality, which in turn increase women’s exposure to HIV infection. Relevant to this focus is inevitably an analysis of the perceived threats to specific fundamental human rights as a result of some of the entrenched practices that continue to reinforce women’s subordinate position in society, aggravated by the high incidence of gender violence.

  17. MODERN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, SPEECH CULTURAL TRADITIONS AND INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Butorina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal to simplify the Russian language for its practical use and the extension of Russian cultural influence was set in Peter the Great’s period. In his language policy Peter the Great preferred a functional criterion, insisting on the use of the Russian language variety, which would be understandable not by the elite only, so the Russian language regulation for business purposes has had a long-standing tradition. The article discusses the European practice of various languages standardization in modern business communication. To compare Russian business texts in Russia and abroad urban sites of Moscow, New York and Tallinn are analyzed. The data obtained suggest some hypotheses about peculiarities of business texts in modern Russian language space.

  18. Towards an Inclusive Pedagogical Culture: Experiences from University Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana María Fernández-Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with conceptual and methodological elements to develop the pedagogical inclusive competence of the professors of higher education in Ecuador. We analyze the current conceptions and the main drawbacks related to the inclusion process in the university environment nowadays. We support a theoretical procedural model, and from the practical standpoint, we implemented the methodological procedures structured in a map of processes to reach an inclusive formative process. The main results are given in the development of the pedagogical inclusive competence and the increase of the inclusion culture at the university, and revealed in the improvement of university curriculum from an inclusive approach, the betterment of the physical and technological infrastructure, the permanent upgrading of professors and putting into practice policies of affirmative action.

  19. A Practical Guide for Personnel Management: The Essential Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Julie B.

    The essential elements of personnel management are outlined. Personnel management may be called by various names and may be practiced by various levels of management, but in any case it is one of the most important elements of a management position. While sample forms generally relate to Texas community colleges and libraries, the guide is written…

  20. Practical management of adverse events related to apomorphine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Henriksen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The potential for adverse events is often cited as a barrier to the use of subcutaneous apomorphine therapy (intermittent injections and continuous infusion) in the management of Parkinson's disease. However, with proactive management most adverse effects are manageable if reported and tackled...... titration, initiation and long-term treatment, and discuss practical management strategies....

  1. Snow management practices in French ski resorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandre, Pierre; Francois, Hugues; George-Marcelpoil, Emmanuelle; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Winter tourism plays a fundamental role in the economy of French mountain regions but also in other countries such as Austria, USA or Canada. Ski operators originally developed grooming methods to provide comfortable and safe skiing conditions. The interannual variability of snow conditions and the competition with international destinations and alternative tourism activities encouraged ski resorts to mitigate their dependency to weather conditions through snowmaking facilities. However some regions may not be able to produce machine made snow due to inadequate conditions and low altitude resorts are still negatively impacted by low snow seasons. In the meantime, even though the operations of high altitude resorts do not show any dependency to the snow conditions they invest in snowmaking facilities. Such developments of snowmaking facilities may be related to a confused and contradictory perception of climate change resulting in individualistic evolutions of snowmaking facilities, also depending on ski resorts main features such as their altitude and size. Concurrently with the expansion of snowmaking facilities, a large range of indicators have been used to discuss the vulnerability of ski resorts such as the so-called "100 days rule" which was widely used with specific thresholds (i.e. minimum snow depth, dates) and constraints (i.e. snowmaking capacity). The present study aims to provide a detailed description of snow management practices and major priorities in French ski resorts with respect to their characteristics. We set up a survey in autumn 2014, collecting data from 56 French ski operators. We identify the priorities of ski operators and describe their snowmaking and grooming practices and facilities. The operators also provided their perception of the ski resort vulnerability to snow and economic challenges which we could compare with the actual snow conditions and ski lift tickets sales during the period from 2001 to 2012.

  2. Indoor Environmental Control Practices and Asthma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Elizabeth C; Abramson, Stuart L; Sandel, Megan T

    2016-11-01

    Indoor environmental exposures, particularly allergens and pollutants, are major contributors to asthma morbidity in children; environmental control practices aimed at reducing these exposures are an integral component of asthma management. Some individually tailored environmental control practices that have been shown to reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations are similar in efficacy and cost to controller medications. As a part of developing tailored strategies regarding environmental control measures, an environmental history can be obtained to evaluate the key indoor environmental exposures that are known to trigger asthma symptoms and exacerbations, including both indoor pollutants and allergens. An environmental history includes questions regarding the presence of pets or pests or evidence of pests in the home, as well as knowledge regarding whether the climatic characteristics in the community favor dust mites. In addition, the history focuses on sources of indoor air pollution, including the presence of smokers who live in the home or care for children and the use of gas stoves and appliances in the home. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests can be performed or the patient can be referred for allergy skin testing to identify indoor allergens that are most likely to be clinically relevant. Environmental control strategies are tailored to each potentially relevant indoor exposure and are based on knowledge of the sources and underlying characteristics of the exposure. Strategies include source removal, source control, and mitigation strategies, such as high-efficiency particulate air purifiers and allergen-proof mattress and pillow encasements, as well as education, which can be delivered by primary care pediatricians, allergists, pediatric pulmonologists, other health care workers, or community health workers trained in asthma environmental control and asthma education.

  3. Effects of Land Management Practices on Soil Water in Southwestern Mountainous Area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jing-an; WEI Chao-fu; XIE De-ti

    2008-01-01

    The effects of selected land management practices (cross-sloping tillage, ridge culture, organic manure, and straw mulch) on soil water conservation in a southwestern mountainous area, China, were studied during November 2002 to November 2004. The experimental field is divided into three parts based on soil layer depths, 0-60 cm (part Ⅰ), 0-40 cm (part Ⅱ), and 0- 20 cm (part Ⅲ), and they all had the same slope azimuth (SE), slope (10°), and slope type (linear). The experimental plots were subjected to the following treatments: cross-sloping tillage (CST); cross-sloping tillage with organic manure (CST/ OM); cross-sloping tillage with straw mulch (CST/SM); contour ridge culture (CRC); contour ridge culture with organic manure (CRC/OM); and contour ridge culture with straw mulch (CRC/SM), to identify the effects of management practices on soil water. Water contents were determined for soil samples collected, using a 2.2 cm diameter manual probe. Soil water was monitored once every five days from Nov. 20, 2002 to Nov. 20, 2004. The results indicated that, in the study stages, an integration of rainfall, evaporative losses, and crop transcription controlled the basic tendencies of profile (mean) soil water, while land management practices, to a certain extent, only modified its amount, distribution, and routing. Moreover, these modifications also mainly focused on the first 20 cm depth of topsoil layer. When each management practice was compared with control treatment, season changes of profile (mean) soil water were pronounced, while interannual changes among them were not significant. More comparisons indicated that, in the study stages, contour ridge culture had better effects than cross-sloping tillage. And under the same tillage, the combination of organic manure could achieve more than straw mulch. These management practices should be recommended considering the effectiveness of soil and water management techniques in the southwestern mountainous area

  4. Do senior management cultures affect performance? Evidence from Italian public healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Lega, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are often characterized by diffuse power, ambiguous goals, and a plurality of actors. In this complex and pluralistic context, senior healthcare managers are expected to provide strategic direction and lead their organizations toward their goals and performance targets. The present work explores the relationship between senior management team culture and performance by investigating Italian public healthcare organizations in the Tuscany region. Our assessment of senior management culture was accomplished through the use of an established framework and a corresponding tool, the competing values framework, which supports the idea that specific aspects of performance are related to a dominant management culture. Organizational performance was assessed using a wide range of measures collected by a multidimensional performance evaluation system, which was developed in Tuscany to measure the performance of its 12 local health authorities (LHAs) and four teaching hospitals (THs). Usable responses were received from 80 senior managers of 11 different healthcare organizations (two THs and nine LHAs). Our findings show that Tuscan healthcare organizations are characterized by various dominant cultures: developmental, clan, rational, and hierarchical. These variations in dominant culture were associated with performance measures. The implications for management theory, professional practice, and public policy are discussed.

  5. Retention practices in education human resources management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Department of Education Management and Policy Studies, University of Pretoria, ... teachers is premised on the principles of quality management which aim at continual ... (tenure) applied in the management of human resources in education.

  6. On the School Cultural Construction and Management Practices after "5.12" Earthquake Reconstruction%“5·12”地震灾区重建后的学校文化塑造与管理实践探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文勇

    2012-01-01

    “5·12”大地震给灾区学校造成重大损失,如何恢复重建,并以此为契机实现学校的新发展,成为灾区学校面临的共同问题。重灾区青川县清溪小学在震后三年的管理实践中,探索出一条物质重建与文化重建并举的道路,将学校文化塑造与学校管理相结合,实施科学的文化管理。同时,以学校文化理念为指导,从管理需要出发,着力打造学校的环境适应能力、资源协调能力、流程整合能力、组织学习能力、系统创新能力和危机处理能力,总结出灾区学校可持续发展的有效模式。%The "5.12" earthquake has brought heavy losses to schools of disaster area. How to reconstruct and take it as an opportunity to achieve the school's new development is a common problem faced by schools in the disaster area. After the earthquake, Qingxi primary school has tracked out a road of the integration of material reconstruction With cultural reconstruction in school management practices in the three-year-practice of management after the earthquake. Qingxi primary school has carried out scientific cultural management by integrating the establishment of school culture with school management. Meanwhile, guided by the idea of school culture, Qingxi primary school has summed up the effective model for the sustainable development of disaster schools by focusing on creating the school's ability to adapt to the environment, as well as the ability of resource coordinating, process integrating, organization learning, system innovating and crisis managing.

  7. Study on the" Four-in-One" Mode of Operation and Management in Ecotourism Attraction ---the Practice and Reflection about Nanshan Cultural Tourism Park at Sanya%生态旅游景区“四位一体”式经营管理模式——三亚南山文化旅游区的案例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海鹰; 黄崇利; 曾小红

    2012-01-01

    It is a problem with very intense theoretic and realistic meaning to probe into a mode of operation and management in accordance with the connotation and feature of ecotourism. The current research concerning ecotourism attractions is more concentrated on the environment, community, visitors and other managed objects. And the contents of the current research are mainly partial to the exploitating management ,including the design of ecotourism product, the constructions of facilities, etc. In the meantime, research on framework, methods and means of management of ecotourism attractions is very uncommon from the point of the main body of operation and management. Nanshan Cultural Tourism Park at Sanya is made of artificial ecotourism attractions with the theme of the Buddhist culture. Since the beginning of development in 1998, the managers of Nanshan Cuhural Tourism Park have persisted in exploring and building a proper system of operation and management which is in accordance with the concept of ecotourism development. And the park has obtained significant benefits in practice owing to the system they have successfully made in Nanshan. From the view of the level of operation and management, the "four-in-one" mode of operation and management has been founded in Nanshan Cultural Tourism Park in practice, based on system of enterprizational management, with the guidance of systematic , international and humanistic idea for development and management, with paramilitary management, standardization and visitor-satisfied system as the substance , and by the support of harmonized and creative means for management. But the park is also faced with discomfiture in its operation and management. By making some analysis on the park, s character of management mode and pondering some problems it has been faced, we can summarize its developmental experience and insufficiency so as to bring out some inspirations for China, s ecotourism attractions. As to the characteristics of

  8. The Impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the Management Practices of Malaysian Smart Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Muhammad Z. M.; Atan, Hanafi; Idrus, Rozhan M.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the management practices in the Malaysian Smart Schools was investigated. The analysis revealed that the impact has resulted in changes that include the enrichment of the ICT culture among students and teachers, more efficient student and teacher administration, better accessibility…

  9. American academic headache specialists in neurology: practice characteristics and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, A G

    2004-07-01

    Headache diagnosis and treatment is the most important focus or concentration area for practising neurologists in America. The American Headache Society, formerly the American Association for the Study of Headache, is made up predominantly of neurologists. Recognition of the importance of the teaching and practice of headache medicine, especially migraine, is still incomplete at many academic teaching institutions. Suggestions that this results from inadequate academic hierarchies and education at graduate and post-graduate levels have been made. We therefore undertook a survey of academic practitioners of headache medicine in departments of neurology with membership of the American Headache Society. Subjects and addresses were identified using the 1999-2000 membership directory of the American Headache Society. Practice characteristics and time distribution were assessed. Teaching in undergraduate and resident programmes was also assessed. Fifty-five surveys from 46 institutions in 25 states were judged as adequate for this report. Academic neurologists with interest in headache medicine spent most of their time in clinic, with less than 25% spent doing either research or teaching. Medical schools had an average of 1 h of preclinical and 2 h of clinical teaching in headache. Neurology residents received an average of 3 h of didactic instruction in headache. This report is the first of its kind to review the practice characteristics and culture of headache medicine in the setting of academic departments of neurology. It describes a clinical practice similar to those of other non-academic American neurologists.

  10. Social and Cultural Factors That Effect University Women Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan; Sabo, Helena Maria; Siyli, Nese Aysin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, social and cultural effects of the low rate of woman managers at universities are tried to be identified. Women have been increasingly appearing in every field of business; on the other hand, although women compared to men constitute majority in educational organisations, they appear in the positions other than management. We will…

  11. Using Popular Movies in Teaching Cross-Cultural Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to understand context and dynamics of cognitive learning of students as an outcome of the usage of popular movies as a learning tool in the management classroom and specifically in the context of a course on cross-cultural management issues. Design/methodology/approach: This is an exploratory study based on…

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton F. Marler; Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Brenda Ringe Pace

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human occupation in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The INL Cultural Resource Management Office, staffed by BEA professionals, is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office staff during Fiscal Year 2006. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  13. Sarcopenia in daily practice: assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudart, Charlotte; McCloskey, Eugène; Bruyère, Olivier; Cesari, Matteo; Rolland, Yves; Rizzoli, René; Araujo de Carvalho, Islène; Amuthavalli Thiyagarajan, Jotheeswaran; Bautmans, Ivan; Bertière, Marie-Claude; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Burlet, Nansa; Cavalier, Etienne; Cerreta, Francesca; Cherubini, Antonio; Fielding, Roger; Gielen, Evelien; Landi, Francesco; Petermans, Jean; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Visser, Marjolein; Kanis, John; Cooper, Cyrus

    2016-10-05

    Sarcopenia is increasingly recognized as a correlate of ageing and is associated with increased likelihood of adverse outcomes including falls, fractures, frailty and mortality. Several tools have been recommended to assess muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in clinical trials. Whilst these tools have proven to be accurate and reliable in investigational settings, many are not easily applied to daily practice. This paper is based on literature reviews performed by members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group on frailty and sarcopenia. Face-to-face meetings were afterwards organized for the whole group to make amendments and discuss further recommendations. This paper proposes some user-friendly and inexpensive methods that can be used to assess sarcopenia in real-life settings. Healthcare providers, particularly in primary care, should consider an assessment of sarcopenia in individuals at increased risk; suggested tools for assessing risk include the Red Flag Method, the SARC-F questionnaire, the SMI method or different prediction equations. Management of sarcopenia should primarily be patient centered and involve the combination of both resistance and endurance based activity programmes with or without dietary interventions. Development of a number of pharmacological interventions is also in progress. Assessment of sarcopenia in individuals with risk factors, symptoms and/or conditions exposing them to the risk of disability will become particularly important in the near future.

  14. A Cross Cultural Model for FlexibleMotivation in Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratiela Dana BOCA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of world business has created a demand for managers sophisticated in global management skills and working with people from other countries. Organizational behavior from different countries and cultures compares organizational behavior across countries and cultures and seeks to understand how to improve the interaction of co workers, manager’s executives, client’s suppliers and alliance partners from around the world. The economic world shows us that all the elements that we consider static have a pulsation around an equilibrium position. The present study concerning the organization’s culture the motivational factors of the employees an outlet in this field. The flexibility in a global economy is an important element on which people can communicate and the manager can exercise his leading task thus is an imperfect world that imposed the necessity of adaptation to a cross cultural model.

  15. Explaining the Effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method for Managing Interpersonal Interactions across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Hanako; Pusina, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of intercultural education comes from the limited availability of training efficacy studies. The present study focused on explaining the effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method (CCM) as an intercultural education method for managing interpersonal interactions across cultures between graduate…

  16. Organizational Culture as a Factor Leaning Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Walczak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses subject of the organizational culture and understanding the strong role it plays in organizations from the point of view in regard to the human capital management. Basically, culture is comprised of the assumptions, values, norms and tangible signs (artifacts of organization members and their behaviors. It encourages employees to identify their goals with company goals, promotes knowledge sharing lead to increased competencies and teams effectiveness. The most significant thesis of the article says that organizational culture plays an important role in the process of knowledge management. Main conceptions of corporate culture as understanding, meaning, the most important aspects indicated changes which should be stimulated by transformation of organizational culture and ways of shaping, were shown.

  17. [Patient safety culture in Family practice residents of Galicia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela Romero, Manuel; Bugarín González, Rosendo; Rodríguez Calvo, María Sol

    To determine the views held by Family practice (FP) residents on the different dimensions of patient safety, in order to identify potential areas for improvement. A cross-sectional study. Seven FP of Galicia teaching units. 182 FP residents who completed the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was chosen because it is translated, validated, and adapted to the Spanish model of Primary Care. The results were grouped into 12 composites assessed by the mentioned questionnaire. The study variables were the socio-demographic dimensions of the questionnaire, as well as occupational/professional variables: age, gender, year of residence, and teaching unit of FP of Galicia. The "Organisational learning" and "Teamwork" items were considered strong areas. However, the "Patient safety and quality issues", "Information exchange with other settings", and "Work pressure and pace" items were considered areas with significant potential for improvement. First-year residents obtained the best results and the fourth-year ones the worst. The results may indicate the need to include basic knowledge on patient safety in the teaching process of FP residents in order to increase and consolidate the fragile patient safety culture described in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society.

  19. The role of culture in the general practice consultation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nasreen; Atkin, Karl; Neal, Richard

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, we will examine the importance of culture and ethnicity in the general practice consultation process. Good communication is associated with positive health outcomes. We will, by presenting qualitative material from an empirical study, examine the way in which communication within the context of a general practitioner (GP) consultation may be affected by ethnicity and cultural factors. The aim of the study was to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which white and South Asian patients communicate with white GPs and to explore any similarities and differences in communication. This paper reports on South Asian and white patients' explanations of recent videotaped consultations with their GP. We specifically focus on the ways in which issues of ethnic identity impacted upon the GP consultation process, by exploring how our sample of predominantly white GPs interacted with their South Asian patients and the extent to which the GP listened to the patients' needs, gave patients information, engaged in social conversation and showed friendliness. We then go on to examine patients' suggestions on improvements (if any) to the consultation. We conclude, by showing how a non-essentialist understanding of culture helps to comprehend the consultation process when the patients are from Great Britain's ethnicised communities. Our findings, however, raise generic issues of relevance to all multi-racial and multi-ethnic societies.

  20. Management of formation and development of enterprise’s innovative culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.S. Shypulina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is the elaboration of theoretical and methodological bases of formation and development of enterprise’s innovative culture based on diagnostic of its condition. An innovative culture is viewed as a key element of innovative environment at the enterprise. The results of the analysis. A formalized approach to managing the process of formation and development of enterprise’s innovative culture was worked out, the content of management procedures was concretized. A modified decision matrix was proposed basing on the choice of action to manage components of enterprise’s innovation culture regarding the results of its diagnostic (including the status of the individual subsystems and their components. Methodical principles of innovation culture usage were worked out for determining the appropriateness of its individual components development. The author developed and practically tested procedures of managing the formation and development of enterprise’s innovative culture, including: a numerical and normalized (the proposed scale assessment of the innovation culture of machine-building and engineering company; strengths and weaknesses of innovation culture were defined according to the decision matrix, the main directions of its components were selected; the complex management measures for each component of innovation culture were defined – organizational, motivational, intellectual and creative. Based on the author’s economic and mathematical model of optimization of structure tools and methods of formation and development of enterprise’s innovative culture (using Microsoft Excel, the function «Solver» there was selected a set of management activities that allow to achieve the maximum level of innovation culture under conditions of limited financial resources. Conclusions and directions of further researches. The results collectively form the theoretical and methodological backgrounds of

  1. Strategic directions for developing the Australian general practice nurse role in cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Yallop, Julie; Griffiths, Rhonda; Daly, John

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral component of British and New Zealand primary care, but in Australia it remains an emerging specialty. Despite an increased focus on the Australian practice nurse role, there has been limited strategic role development, particularly relating to national health priority areas. This paper reports the third stage of a Project exploring the Australian practice nurse role in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stage involved a consensus development conference, undertaken to identify strategic, priority recommendations for practice nurse role development. 1. Practice nurses have an important role in developing systems and processes for CVD management; 2. A change in the culture of general practice is necessary to promote acceptance of nurse-led CVD management; 3. Future research needs to evaluate specific models of care, incorporating outcome measures sensitive to nursing interventions; 4. Considerable challenges exist in conducting research in general practice; and 5. Changes in funding models are necessary for widespread practice nurse role development. The shifting of funding models provides evidence to support interdisciplinary practice in Australian general practice. The time is ripe, therefore, to engage in prospective and strategic planning to inform development of the practice nurse role.

  2. Influências das políticas e práticas de gestão de pessoas na institucionalização da cultura de segurança Influences of the human management policies and practices at a safety culture institutionalization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Arpini Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se descrever e analisar as influências das políticas e práticas de gestão de pessoas no processo de institucionalização da cultura de segurança numa indústria de grande porte. Teoricamente articularam-se quatro eixos centrais: (1 processo de institucionalização (BERGER; LUCKMANN, 2008; (2 segurança e cultura de segurança (HANSEN, 1993; GELLER, 2002; (3 políticas e práticas de gestão de pessoas (FLEURY; FISCHER, 1996; e (4 liderança e processo de mudança cultural (SCHEIN, 2004; SMIRCICH; MORGAN, 1997. Realizou-se um estudo de caso qualitativo (YIN, 2005; TRIVIÑOS, 2008, sendo os dados coletados via triangulação (JICK, 1979 e submetidos a análise temática de conteúdo (BARDIN, 2009; MINAYO, 2008. Evidências empíricas indicam o reconhecimento do papel da área de gestão de pessoas no processo de institucionalização da cultura de segurança, que encontra no fator humano o seu "dificultador", pois, em grande parte das situações, é atribuído ao trabalhador a responsabilidade pela ocorrência do acidente.The article aims to describe and analyze the influence of human management policies and practices at a safety culture institutionalization process in a high size industry. Theoretically four central axles were articulated: (1 institutionalization process (BERGER; LUCKMANN, 2008; (2 safety and safety culture (HANSEN, 1993; GELLER, 2002; (3 human management policies and practices (FLEURY; FISCHER, 1996; and, (4 leadership and the cultural change process (SCHEIN, 2004; SMIRCICH; MORGAN, 1997. It was realized a qualitative case study (YIN, 2005; TRIVIÑOS, 2008. Data were collected via triangulation (JICK, 1979 and submitted to thematic content analyses (BARDIN, 2009; MINAYO, 2008. Empirical evidences signalizes the recognition of the human management role at safety culture institutionalization process, that consider the human factor the "Achilles' heel", therefore, in most of situations it is imputed to the worker

  3. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  4. Supply chain management: New organisational practices for changing procurement realities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Andersen, Poul Houman

    2003-01-01

    we use an analytical technique known as the degree-of-freedom analysis. It is suggested that new organisational practices such as key supply management, team based management and changing skill requirements of purchasing personnel may be an outcome of implementing SCM practices towards suppliers...

  5. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...

  6. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 2 - VEGETATIVE BIOFILTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is Volume 2 of a three volume document that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This second volume provides specific design guidance for a group of onsite BMP control practices that are referred t...

  7. Toolkit - South Africa's good waste management practices: lessons learned

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Afrika, M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available practices are to be found. This paper reports on the development of a Toolkit for municipal waste management service delivery, based on some of the good waste management practices currently implemented in different municipalities across all the categories...

  8. Supply chain management: New organisational practices for changing procurement realities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Andersen, Poul Houman

    2003-01-01

    we use an analytical technique known as the degree-of-freedom analysis. It is suggested that new organisational practices such as key supply management, team based management and changing skill requirements of purchasing personnel may be an outcome of implementing SCM practices towards suppliers...

  9. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  10. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 2 - VEGETATIVE BIOFILTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is Volume 2 of a three volume document that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This second volume provides specific design guidance for a group of onsite BMP control practices that are referred t...

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  12. Assessment of Quality Management Practices Within the Healthcare Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Miller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Considerable effort has been devoted over the years by many organizations to adopt quality management practices, but few studies have assessed critical factors that affect quality practices in healthcare organizations. The problem addressed in this study was to assess the critical factors influencing the quality management practices in a single important industry (i.e., healthcare. Approach: A survey instrument was adapted from business quality literature and was sent to all hospitals in a large US Southeastern state. Valid responses were received from 147 of 189 hospitals yielding a 75.6% response rate. Factor analysis using principal component analysis with an orthogonal rotation was performed to assess 58 survey items designed to measure ten dimensions of hospital quality management practices. Results: Eight factors were shown to have a statistically significant effect on quality management practices and were classified into two groups: (1 four strategic factors (role of management leadership, role of the physician, customer focus, training resources investment and (2 four operational factors (role of quality department, quality data/reporting, process management/training and employee relations. The results of this study showed that a valid and reliable instrument was developed and used to assess quality management practices in hospitals throughout a large US state. Conclusion: The implications of this study provided an understanding that management of quality required both a focus on longer-term strategic leadership, as well as day-to-day operational management. It was recommended that healthcare researchers and practitioners focus on the critical factors identified and employ this survey instrument to manage and better understand the nature of hospital quality management practices across wider geographical regions and over longer time periods. Furthermore, this study extended the scope of existing quality management

  13. Business and Practice Management Knowledge Deficiencies in Graduating Orthopedic Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D Joshua; Throckmorton, Thomas W; Azar, Frederick M; Beaty, James H; Canale, S Terry; Richardson, David R

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a study to determine the general level of knowledge that orthopedic residents have on business and practice management topics at graduation and to evaluate the level of knowledge that practicing orthopedic surgeons need in order to function effectively in a medical practice. Residency graduates from a single training program were asked to complete a survey that gathered demographic information and had surgeons rate their understanding of 9 general business and practice management skills and the importance of these skills in their current practice situation. The amount of necessary business knowledge they lacked at graduation was defined as a functional knowledge deficiency (FKD) and was calculated as the difference between the reported importance of a topic in current practice and the level of understanding of that topic at graduation (larger FKD indicates greater deficiency). Those in physician-managed practices reported significantly higher levels of understanding of economic analytical tools than those in nonphysician-managed practices. There were no other statistically significant differences among groups. Hospital-employed physicians had the lowest overall FKD (4.0), followed by those in academic practices (5.1) and private practices (5.9). Graduating orthopedic surgeons appear to be inadequately prepared to effectively manage business issues in their practices, as evidenced by the low overall knowledge levels and high FKDs.

  14. Role of knowledge management practices for escalating universities’ performance in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahmed Jamil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the role of knowledge management practices in enhancing performance of universities, specifically in the context of Pakistan. A convenient sample of 450 employees from the universities all over the Pakistan was taken for the study. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify the elements of knowledge management and linear regression analysis was performed to test the hypotheses presented in the study. This study measures the moderating role of technology in the knowledge management framework. Furthermore, it relied on R&D, employee commitment and industry linkages to construct universities’ performance. The results revealed that knowledge management process and knowledge management infrastructure (HR and culture are significant predictors of the performance of universities. It was also found that technology moderates the relationship of knowledge management dimensions and universities’ performance. The study highlighted that with proper attention towards knowledge management infrastructure, knowledge management processes and technology, universities can outperform their competitors.

  15. Nurse leaders as managers of ethically sustainable caring cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Susanne; Koskinen, Camilla; Eriksson, Katie

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the distinctive foundations of the care culture and how nurse leaders (NL) can manage and strengthen these in a quest for ethically sustainable caring cultures. Sustainability presupposes an ethical leadership, a management of the good care and a well-educated staff, but research on NLs as managers of ethically sustainable caring cultures is not available. The study has a quantitative design with elements of a qualitative research approach. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire sent to staff at eight selected units at a hospital in western Finland during September 2013; the reply rate was 32%. The data material was comprised of opinion questions, the ranking of values and two open-ended questions on lodestars in care and ethical principles in care work. NLs manage a care culture that rests on a solid foundation, where staff are co-creators of an ethically sustainable caring culture that includes good traditions for the praxis of care. NLs as managers are therefore responsible for realizing and passing on ethically sustainable caring cultures and creating prerequisites for staff's growth and development. The basis of good care, patient safety and sustainability is comprised of ethics with a respectful and dignified care that is evidence-based and economically stable. Through their management NLs have a responsibility to nurture and protect the core of caring and create contextual, professional and cultural prerequisites to maintain the core and art of caring as well as care staff's ethical and professional competence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND PRACTICES IN IT PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANDAS Claudiu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk is identified in project management literature as an important factor influencing IT projects success, and it is relevant for both academic and practitionersn#8217; communities. The paper presents the past and current approaches to risk management in IT projects. The objective of this paper is to compare the different approaches and relate them to existing practices. Project management literature and practice have brought different approaches to risk management, and as a result, many projects ended in failure. We present how risk management is considered in the literature, and we compare the main two approaches: the evaluation approach and the management approach. The contingency approach does not consider risk management to be a specific process as it is an embedded process in the other project management processes. Then, we present the main practices in risk management. The methodology applied is based on documentary study review and analysis of the concepts used by the literature. We analyzed the literature published between 1978 and 2011 from the main journals for IT project management and found out that the essence of project management is risk management. The risk management practices have a considerable influence on stakeholdersn#8217; perception of project success. But, regardless of the chosen approach, a standard method for identifying, assessing, and responding to risks should be included in any project as this influences the outcome of the project.

  17. The Cultural Foundations of Family Business Management: Evidence from Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. BRICE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically examines what makes Ukrainian family-firm culture unique by comparing the values and beliefs of Ukrainian family-business members with that of professional bank managers within Ukraine. Morck and Yeung (2003 suggest that the implications of family business are especially relevant for former planned economies such as Ukraine in that government’s social policy on the encouragement or discouragement of privately-held sectors of the economy is yet to be fully formed. Ukraine’s future course in this regard is particularly sensitive as the pre-Soviet Ukrainian economy was almost entirely held in private hands while the Soviet-era economy was almost entirely state-controlled. Family-firm literature stresses the differences between family-firm and professional management in terms of culture, goal-setting, and strategy. Family-firm culture is said to be a resource leading to competitive advantage. This study is based on a survey comparing 76 family-firm members and 99 professional managers. Statistically significant differences between the culture of members of family-owned firms and professional managers were found within Ukraine. Family-firm membership had a significant effect in five culture constructs. We can conclude that differences in Power Distance, Social Cynicism, Social Flexibility, Spirituality and Fate Control describe fundamental aspects of family-firms in Ukraine and may possibly contribute to family-firm competitive advantage as discussed in management literature.

  18. Disease management in soilless culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.

    2010-01-01

    EU legislation, laid down in the Water Framework Directive, demands to minimize emissions of nitrogen, phosphate and crop protection products to achieve an excellent chemical and ecological quality in 2015. The aim is to force growers to a better water and disease management. Supply water of excelle

  19. Disease management in soilless culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.

    2010-01-01

    EU legislation, laid down in the Water Framework Directive, demands to minimize emissions of nitrogen, phosphate and crop protection products to achieve an excellent chemical and ecological quality in 2015. The aim is to force growers to a better water and disease management. Supply water of

  20. Disease management in soilless culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.

    2010-01-01

    EU legislation, laid down in the Water Framework Directive, demands to minimize emissions of nitrogen, phosphate and crop protection products to achieve an excellent chemical and ecological quality in 2015. The aim is to force growers to a better water and disease management. Supply water of excelle

  1. Management of rhinosinusitis in Dutch general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmans, R.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Weel, C. van; Fokkens, W.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether general practitioners (GPs) distinguish between the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), especially with regard to prescription of antibiotics and nasal steroids. METHODS: A questionnaire on the management of rhinosinusitis was sent to

  2. Performance appraisal: helpful hints for the busy medical practice manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolon, Douglas S

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the performance appraisal process in terms of its three fundamental steps. defining job performance, measuring actual job performance, and providing job performance feedback. Given that most practice managers wear many hats and do not have extensive experience or staff support in human resources, the purpose of this article is to provide these busy individuals with useful, practical suggestions that should enhance the effectiveness of the performance appraisal process for nonphysician employees within the medical practice setting. Performance appraisal should be a priority for all practice managers, as the performance of individual employees represents the key to long-term success for any medical practice.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  4. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost in the vague, scientifically unrarified notions of spirituality that brace a general, undifferentiated worldwide metaphysical experience and disregard immense cultural, functional, geographic and performative distinctness, Catholic sacramental practices aimed at alleviating suffering and promoting healthy lifestyles are receiving only marginal mention in scientific literature(1, despite the fact that they make up daily reality in large parts of contemporary Europe and Latin America. Writing this editorial from the Northeast of Brazil, where traditional religious practice has sustained generations through the calamities of severe droughts, slavery, extreme poverty, high child mortality, failed political orders, and a harsh global economic reality, it is difficult to underestimate the power of sacramental experience to sustain a cultural identity. It was defined the concept of care of the sick in the context of the religious experience of the Northeast of Brazil which is historically relevant to health promotion. Until the emergence of national health care in the late nineteenth century, it was largely the order of the Franciscan friars that was charged with promoting healthy lives in the region. The Catholic concept of care that guided their efforts structures three procedural reality principles: the psychological reality of the transference to the person in one’s charge (care/caritas, the performative practice of religious sacrament such as the anointment

  5. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 10. Periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P; Needleman, I

    2010-12-11

    A sizeable proportion of patients in clinical practice will have some form of periodontal disease and most of these patients can be well managed in primary care. Unfortunately, dento-legal claims regarding inappropriate periodontal care are increasing rapidly and are now one of the most common reasons for litigation in dentistry. In this paper we will look at aspects of contemporary management of periodontal disease in clinical practice and offer guidance for examination, management and referral.

  6. MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING PRACTICES OF SOCIAL MEDIA FIRMS

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz AlShubaily

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the key variances in application and strategy between different social media management strategies and its effective marketing. Social media firms have shown a great ability to control the stages in their product life cycles. These practices lead to managers in these firms overachieving on their respective KPIs and garnering industry attention. An analysis of social media management firms practice shows those high participatory-decisions and intellectual and manual skills ...

  7. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ALFALFA INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Clement E.; Dowdy, Alan K.; Berberet, Richard C.; Stritzke, Jimmie F.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IMP) initially focused on insect pest control. More recently, IPM encompasses a broader concept of management, one which crosses several disciplinary boundaries. This article reports results of research dealing with four integrated management decisions for alfalfa (cultivar selection, inset control, weed control, and end-of-season harvest options.

  8. Practical guide to energy management for processors

    CERN Document Server

    Consortium, Energywise

    2012-01-01

    Do you know how best to manage and reduce your energy consumption? This book gives comprehensive guidance on effective energy management for organisations in the polymer processing industry. This book is one of three which support the ENERGYWISE Plastics Project eLearning platform for European plastics processors to increase their knowledge and understanding of energy management. Topics covered include: Understanding Energy,

  9. From the trenches to the master's: a new training area for culture management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Solanilla

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Setting up the new European Higher Education Area brings with it new challenges in terms of training professionals in cultural and heritage management. It is not simply a case of producing more or less complete study plans, but also being able to overcome the challenge of responding to the needs of culture professionals (cultural managers and museologists in an increasingly complex reality; a reality which is undergoing constant change, whilst remaining strongly rooted in the land and closely linked to the local population.In short, it means being able to close the divide existing between the practice of management that has lacked areas for training and reflection, and a generation of new professionals who are leaving the classroom, but with an important gap in their knowledge when it comes to the actual day-to-day of cultural management here. To achieve this, a series of dangers need to be avoided, such as the excessive fragmentation of contents, or this possible divide has to be alleviated through an applied training focused on analysing case studies and best practices.

  10. Best practices of total quality management implementation in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Faisal; Rahman, Zillur; Azam, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Due to the growing prominence of total quality management (TQM) in health care, the present study was conducted to identify the set of TQM practices for its successful implementation in healthcare institutions through a systematic review of literature. A research strategy was performed on the selected papers published between 1995 and 2009. An appropriate database was chosen and 15 peer-reviewed research papers were identified through a screening process and were finally reviewed for this study. Eight supporting TQM practices, such as top-management commitment, teamwork and participation, process management, customer focus and satisfaction, resource management, organization behavior and culture, continuous improvement, and training and education were identified as best practices for TQM implementation in any health care setting. The article concludes with a set of recommendations for the future researchers to discuss, develop, and work upon in order to achieve better precision and generalizations.

  11. Project culture using Agile project management in hand with traditional project management

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurjón Páll Kolbeins 1965

    2013-01-01

    The Agile “revolution” within software development projects is changing how we do project management. This paper looks at the project management culture in one of the big three commercial banks in Iceland and how it has evolved the past 6 years. How stakeholders perceive project management through the lenses of those who sponsor projects, supply resources to projects, manage the projects and deliver the projects. The paper takes a look at how Agile project management has changed the cultu...

  12. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Halfens, Ruud J G; van der Weijden, Trudy; Wensing, Michel; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. To determine if the type of organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), team climate (Team Climate Inventory), and preventive pressure ulcer quality management at ward level were related to the prevalence of pressure ulcers. Also, we wanted to determine if the type of organizational culture, team climate, or the institutional quality management related to preventive quality management at the ward level. In this cross-sectional observational study multivariate (logistic) regression analyses were performed, adjusting for potential confounders and institution-level clustering. Data from 1274 patients and 460 health care professionals in 37 general hospital wards and 67 nursing home wards in the Netherlands were analyzed. The main outcome measures were nosocomial pressure ulcers in patients at risk for pressure ulcers (Braden score ≤ 18) and preventive quality management at ward level. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level and the prevalence of nosocomial pressure ulcers. Institutional quality management was positively correlated with preventive quality management at ward level (adj. β 0.32; p organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level. These results would therefore not subscribe the widely suggested importance of these factors in improving health care. However, different designs and research methods (that go beyond the cross-sectional design) may be more informative in studying relations between such complex factors and outcomes in a more meaningful way. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. NASA Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeology and Cultural Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Mission Directorate recently completed the deployment of the Earth Observation System (EOS) which is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. One of the many applications derived from EOS is the advancement of archaeological research and applications. Using satellites, manned and unmanned airborne platform, NASA scientists and their partners have conducted archaeological research using both active and passive sensors. The NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) located in south Mississippi, near New Orleans, has been a leader in space archaeology since the mid-1970s. Remote sensing is useful in a wide range of archaeological research applications from landscape classification and predictive modeling to site discovery and mapping. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, including commercial instruments, offer significantly improved spatial and spectral resolutions. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology provides for the direct detection of archaeological sites. As in all archaeological research, the application of remote sensing to archaeology requires a priori development of specific research designs and objectives. Initially targeted at broad archaeological issues, NASA space archaeology has progressed toward developing practical applications for cultural resources management (CRM). These efforts culminated with the Biloxi Workshop held by NASA and the University of Mississippi in 2002. The workshop and resulting publication specifically address the requirements of cultural resource managers through

  14. NASA Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeology and Cultural Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Mission Directorate recently completed the deployment of the Earth Observation System (EOS) which is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. One of the many applications derived from EOS is the advancement of archaeological research and applications. Using satellites, manned and unmanned airborne platform, NASA scientists and their partners have conducted archaeological research using both active and passive sensors. The NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) located in south Mississippi, near New Orleans, has been a leader in space archaeology since the mid-1970s. Remote sensing is useful in a wide range of archaeological research applications from landscape classification and predictive modeling to site discovery and mapping. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, including commercial instruments, offer significantly improved spatial and spectral resolutions. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology provides for the direct detection of archaeological sites. As in all archaeological research, the application of remote sensing to archaeology requires a priori development of specific research designs and objectives. Initially targeted at broad archaeological issues, NASA space archaeology has progressed toward developing practical applications for cultural resources management (CRM). These efforts culminated with the Biloxi Workshop held by NASA and the University of Mississippi in 2002. The workshop and resulting publication specifically address the requirements of cultural resource managers through

  15. Promoting leadership and management in Australian general practice nursing: what will it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    This paper outlines the current state of Australian practice nursing, describes the context of general practice and establishes the importance of promoting leadership and management in this setting. Australian general practice nurses have emerged as key stakeholders in primary health care. However, their role in leadership and management has been largely invisible. The reasons for this are multifactorial, including the delay to establish a strong professional organization, their negative power relationships with general medical practitioners, limited nursing leadership and poorly defined roles. To date, the impetus for practice nurse growth has been largely external to the nursing profession. Growth has been driven by the increasing burden of chronic disease and workforce shortages. This has further weakened the control of nurse leaders over the development of the specialty. The Australian practice nurse role is at a crossroads. While the practice nurse role is a viable force to improve health outcomes, the growing strength of the practice nurse challenges traditional professional roles and practice patterns. There is an urgent need to develop practice nurse leaders and managers to not only embrace the challenges of Australian general practice from an operational perspective, but also undertake a clinical leadership role. As clinical leaders, these nurses will need to develop a culture that not only optimizes health outcomes but also advances the status of the nursing profession.

  16. Empowerment in Context: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture for Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Raphael, Jr.; Deepak, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Hip-hop culture can be used as a conduit to enhanced cultural competence and practice skills through the individual and community empowerment framework. This framework is introduced as a tool for direct practice that allows social workers to understand the competing messages within hip-hop culture and how they may impact youths by promoting or…

  17. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  18. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  19. Pain Management Practices by Nurses: An Application of the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Bashar I; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2015-10-26

    Pain is one of the most common reasons that drive people to go to hospitals. It has been found that several factors affect the practices of pain management. In this regard, this study aimed at investigating the underlying determinants in terms of pain management practices. Based on reviewing the previous studies and the suggestions of the KAP model, it was hypothesized that the main elements of the KAP model (attitudes and knowledge) significantly predict the variation in the practices of nurses regarding pain management. A questionnaire comprising the KAP model' s constructs, i.e. knowledge and attitude towards pain management, as well as pain management practices, was used to collect data from 266 registered nurses (n=266) who are deemed competent in the management of patients' pain in the Jordanian public hospitals. The two constructs, attitude and knowledge, which are the main determinants of the KAP model were found to independently predict nurses' practices of managing patients' pain. Knowledge of pain management was found to be the strongest predictor. Additionally, it was found that about 69% of the variance in pain management could be explained by the constructs of the KAP model. Therefore, it is recommended that the Jordanian hospitals and universities focus on nurses' knowledge and attitude towards pain management in order to enhance their practices in the field of pain management.

  20. HOFSTEDE’S CULTURAL DIMENSIONS AND MANAGEMENT IN CORPORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina Cristina VASILE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In many cases the success or failure in management is caused by the way leaders understand the cultural environment the companies develop. The leadership approach and rules applied increase or decrease performance in economies and companies. The paper describes the relation between management failure or success and the management adjustment to the cultural dimensions. People build organizations and rule them according to their values, but in the corporation field specific values might be successfully applied or implying the whole company failure. The analysis is made based on Hofstede research and having in mind his dimensions on a dynamic hypothetical case where there are taken into account cultural dimensions for Romania, Germany, Kazakhstan and United States of America.

  1. Critical reflections on managing cultural diversity in workplaces in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Brezigar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on managing cultural diversity at workplaces in Slovenia. The author critically reflects on some aspects of research and studies that have been carried out both on discrimination as well as managing diversity in Slovenia between 2007 and 2013, and finds the cause of the inability of organisations to adopt policies on managing diversity in the lack of competences and skills associated with cultural sensibility. The author maintains that whereas workplaces are bound to become more and more diverse, the predominant approach towards diversity in workplaces in Slovenia tends to either dismiss (cultural diversity as inconsequential or treat it as a nuisance that needs to be dealt with, thus failing to grasp the advantages which such diversity could bring.

  2. The specificity of the Organizational Culture in European Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîmpeanu Mariana-Aida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting with intensifying globalization and the internationalization of economic relations, increased the competitions on the world market, producing a number of restructuring, changes in theinternational management and subjecting firms to reengenering. The emergence of technology has changed the way of making transactions eliminating the human intervention. The economic organization in these terms focuses more on knowledge and communication than control and administrative hierarchy. The necessity for organizational culture research is given that this exerts a strong influence on a company performance and becomes more pronounced in dynamic conditions in the external environment. A culture must be accepted byall company employees and the managers have to identify cultural factors that hinder the development and transform these factors into values. The leaders are those who manage to create vision of the future that they wanted and they influence and, in turn, they are influenced by organizational culture. European context is characterized by a cultural variety and we can not speak of a management model as is the Japanese or the North American. Europe is characterized by the coexistence of many cultures which presents similarities and considerable differences. Makridakis, in his "Single Market Europe” remarked that the EU cannot be treated as a unicultural organization. Cultural differences existing in the EU is not an obstacle to European integration; they can become the source of many competitive advantages for the EU citizens. Europe isshowing a trend of convergence of his values: decrease of the religious values as a source of moral obligation; the development of the democratic political system; the increase of the social relations values. We are able to conclude that, at the cultural level of Europe, is characterized by great diversity based on a set of commonand similar values, which are major components of European integration.

  3. National Culture and Management: the Greek luxury hotel GMs’ case

    OpenAIRE

    Giousmpasoglou, Charalampos; Stavrakis, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the interplay between managerial work and national culture. More specifically it investigates General Managers’ (GMs) work in Greek luxury (4 and 5*) hotels from a contextual perspective, focused in national culture. \\ud The wider context of the discussion in this paper revolves around the ‘global-local’ question from an international hospitality industry perspective. During the second half of the twentieth century, the idea for the creation of a truly global management co...

  4. Relation between creative teaching and sustainable practices in cultural heritage tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašperić Ružica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is primarily concerned with alternative teaching methodologies. Creative teaching methodologies place the student at the center of the learning process. This paper is a case study of 'Orion - promotion of the Vučedol culture' project as a self-sustainable cultural product. The primary goal of the project is the promotion of heritage through cultural tourism. The 'Orion' project was launched in cooperation with third year undergraduate students at the Department of Tourism of VERN University of Applied Sciences from Zagreb, as part of the Event Management and Marketing course (March to June 2014. Inspired by the Vučedol archaeological site, historical data and lectures on the Vučedol culture and the oldest Indo-European calendar called 'Orion' the students have developed a plan for a two-day festival that would take place in Vinkovci, Croatia and world include a scientific conference, cultural and artistic program, presentation of local cuisine, creative workshops, and promotion of local crafts. This paper reinforces the need for imaginative thinking in education for tourism. The variety of ways in which creative teaching practices can be used is infinite and this case study presents only a small contribution.

  5. Standard Practice for Quality Management Systems for Nondestructive Testing Agencies

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers general requirements for the establishment and maintenance of a quality management system for agencies engaged in nondestructive testing (NDT). 1.2 This practice utilizes criteria contained in Practice E 543. 1.3 This practice utilizes criteria contained in American National Standard ANSI/ISO/ASQ Q9001–2000, Quality management systems—Requirements. 1.4 This practice recognizes the importance of establishing minimum safety criteria. 1.5 The use of SI or inch-pound units, or combinations thereof, will be the responsibility of the technical committee whose standards are referred to in this standard. 1.6 This practice does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this practice to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Praising as bodily practice: the neocharismatic culture of celebration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Hovi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic body movements and dancing, as well as singing, have been used as a means and inspiration for both individual and communal spiritual experience throughout the history of religions. This article takes a tentative look at the contemporary neocharismatic culture of celebration as a means of aiming at religious experience through collective bodily practice; namely praising, which is generally understood to take the form of singing but is, in fact, expressed also in bodily movements such as dancing. In the neocharismatic context, a celebration means a certain type of a meeting with a special focus on contemplative worship and prayer, accompanied with lively music of praise. First, the historical background of the neo­charismatic branch is outlined shortly. Secondly, the tradition of praise itself within this context is described – what are the insider definitions and what kinds of forms praise in the culture of celebration actually includes, especially in Finland. The description is basically based on internet material and the author's previous field experiences in the Word of Life congregational meetings and other charismatic Christian events. In conclusion, acts of praise as a source of religious experience are discussed.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Clayton Marler; Brenda Pace

    2008-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2007. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  8. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis.

  9. Theory and Practice of Marine Regional Management in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangjie; JI; Qunzhen; QU

    2014-01-01

    With the development of marine economy in coastal provinces and cities,there comes a series of environmental problems. Marine regional management,as a completely new marine management mode,transforms traditional management mode and can protect marine ecosystem. Thus,the marine regional management is feasible and applicable in China. This paper firstly discussed connotation and development of the marine regional management in China and pointed that the marine regional management is integrated management of a certain marine region. Next,it summarized characteristics of the marine regional management at current stage,for example,land-based pollution of trans-geographic system and marine management under regional government cooperative mechanism. Finally,it came up with recommendations including combining theory and practice of the marine regional management,and establishing marine regional management system as soon as possible,to realize benign interaction and sustainable development of marine economy and ecological environment.

  10. National Cultures, Performance Appraisal Practices, and Organizational Absenteeism and Turnover: A Study across 21 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Hilla; Fried, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Performance appraisal (PA) is a key human resource activity in organizations. However, in this global economy, we know little about how societal cultures affect PA practices. In this study, we address this gap by focusing on 2 complementary issues: (a) the influence of societal (national) cultural practices on PA practices adopted by organizations…

  11. Comparing Higher Education Practices and Cultural Competences in Kenya and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musamali, Kennedy; Martin, Barbara N.

    2016-01-01

    Examined within this paper are effective leadership practices across two cultures. Specifically, this study examined the relationship between cultural competency and effective leadership practices in higher education institutions. A quantitative design was used to investigate and compare effective practices of educational leaders in two distinct…

  12. Analysis of Management Practices in Lagos State Tertiary Institutions through Total Quality Management Structural Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdulAzeez, Abbas Tunde

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated total quality management practices and quality teacher education in public tertiary institutions in Lagos State. The study was therefore designed to analyse management practices in Lagos state tertiary institutions through total quality management structural framework. The selected public tertiary institutions in Lagos…

  13. Workplace road safety risk management: An investigation into Australian practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmerdam, Amanda; Newnam, Sharon; Sheppard, Dianne; Griffin, Mark; Stevenson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In Australia, more than 30% of the traffic volume can be attributed to work-related vehicles. Although work-related driver safety has been given increasing attention in the scientific literature, it is uncertain how well this knowledge has been translated into practice in industry. It is also unclear how current practice in industry can inform scientific knowledge. The aim of the research was to use a benchmarking tool developed by the National Road Safety Partnership Program to assess industry maturity in relation to risk management practices. A total of 83 managers from a range of small, medium and large organisations were recruited through the Victorian Work Authority. Semi-structured interviews aimed at eliciting information on current organisational practices, as well as policy and procedures around work-related driving were conducted and the data mapped onto the benchmarking tool. Overall, the results demonstrated varying levels of maturity of risk management practices across organisations, highlighting the need to build accountability within organisations, improve communication practices, improve journey management, reduce vehicle-related risk, improve driver competency through an effective workplace road safety management program and review organisational incident and infringement management. The findings of the study have important implications for industry and highlight the need to review current risk management practices.

  14. Key Practice for Green Building Management In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the management practices for green building management in Malaysia. A set of practices was ascertained from the reviewed of various established Green Building Standard in the world. Green building practices are significant role in attaining sustainability particularly in the construction industry. Green building is constructed for minimizing impacts to environment as well as decreasing building effects on occupants. To achieve the goals of green buildings, set of management practices is required. A comprehensive review on the world green building standards that include the criteria of “management” has been carried out. The results of the content analysis have identified a total of five clusters of practices that found important for effective management of green building in Malaysia. These including Sustainable Procurement, Sustainable Operation, Resource Management, Repair and Maintenance Management, and Environmental Health. Each cluster of management practice composed of few activities. The identification of the set of practices contributes to the effective and efficient operation of green building in advancing the sustainability agenda, hence decreasing building’s operating costs and realising increase in return of investment.

  15. A preliminary report of an educational intervention in practice management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Richard J

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice management education continues to evolve, and little information exists regarding its curriculum design and effectiveness for resident education. We report the results of an exploratory study of a practice management curriculum for primary care residents. Methods After performing a needs assessment with a group of primary care residents at Wright State University, we designed a monthly seminar series covering twelve practice management topics. The curriculum consisted of interactive lectures and practice-based application, whenever possible. We descriptively evaluated two cognitive components (practice management knowledge and skills and the residents' evaluation of the curriculum. Results The mean correct on the knowledge test for this group of residents was 74% (n = 12 and 91% (n = 12 before and after the curriculum, respectively. The mean scores for the practice management skill assessments were 2.62 before (n = 12, and 3.65 after (n = 12 the curriculum (modified Likert, 1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree. The residents rated the curriculum consistently high. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that this curriculum may be useful in developing knowledge and skills in practice management for primary care residents. This study suggests further research into evaluation of this curriculum may be informative for practice-based education.

  16. Multiple sclerosis: management in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Foets, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A descriptive study on 118 MS patients in general practice, to describe the family physician's role in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. METHOD: Random sample of 103 general practices (161 family physicians) throughout The Netherlands with a total list of 335

  17. Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys, organizes, and critically discusses the literature on the role of human resource practices for explaining innovation outcomes. We specifically put an emphasis on what is often called ‘new’ or ‘modern’ HRM practices—practices that imply high levels of delegation of decisions...

  18. Performance-based competencies for culturally responsive interprofessional collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Valerie; Lackie, Kelly

    2009-11-01

    This paper will highlight how a literature review and stakeholder-expert feedback guided the creation of an interprofessional facilitator-collaborator competency tool, which was then used to design an interprofessional facilitator development program for the Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education (PICE) Project. Cancer Care Nova Scotia (CCNS), one of the PICE Project partners, uses an Interprofessional Core Curriculum (ICC) to provide continuing education workshops to community-based practitioners, who as a portion of their practice, care for patients experiencing cancer. In order to deliver this curriculum, health professionals from a variety of disciplines required education that would enable them to become culturally sensitive interprofessional educators in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice. The Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre (RN-PDC), another PICE Project partner, has expertise in performance-based certification program design and utilizes a competency-based methodology in its education framework. This framework and methodology was used to develop the necessary interprofessional facilitator competencies that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for performance. Three main competency areas evolved, each with its own set of competencies, performance criteria and behavioural indicators.

  19. An Introduction to Plum Blossom Boxing: History, Culture and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Meihuaquan (“Plum Blossom Fist [Boxing]” has traditionally been practiced as vernacular (folk art practiced among the Han ethnic group residing in the Shandong, Henan and Hebei Provinces of China. Historical documentation dates Plum Blossom Boxing to the seventeenth century. The classic Chinese novel, Shuǐhǔ Zhuàn (Marsh Chronicles recounts the martial exploits of Shandong’s twelfth century outlaw heroes who may have been Mei Boxers, also. Thus, for perhaps a millennium, the region has been noted for vernacular martial arts and social banditry. The region’s rampant lawlessness promoted highly-developed martial prowess among both lawbreakers and those who were required to protect themselves against the brigands. Cultural, economic, and environmental factors in the region gave rise to heterodox political and religious beliefs that frequently served as a catalyst for martial sects, most notably the “Boxers” who at the turn of the twentieth century, came into conflict with the imperial government. These factors laid the groundwork for the “character traits” of the art while Taoism, the Five Elements theory, and a concept of predictable change shaped Plum Boxing’s strategic and mechanical principles. In the past decade, there have been efforts to globalize this vernacular martial art. Rather than driving Plum Boxing to extinction it is likely that the folk and the “larger than local” will co-exist.

  20. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  1. Cultural Resources as Sustainability Enablers: Towards a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan O. Keitumetse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available People inhabit and change environments using socio-cultural and psycho-social behaviors and processes. People use their socio-cultural understanding of phenomena to interact with the environment. People are carriers of cultural heritage. These characteristics make cultural values ubiquitous in all people-accessed and people-inhabited geographic spaces of the world, making people readily available assets through which environmental sustainability can be implemented. Yet, people’s conservation development is rarely planned using cultural resources. It is against this background that a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM model is initiated as a new approach that outlines the symbiosis between cultural heritage, environment and various stakeholders, with a view to create awareness about neglected conservation indicators inherent in cultural resources and better placed to complement already existing natural resources conservation indicators. The model constitutes a two-phased process with four (04 levels of operation, namely: level I (production; level II (reproduction; level III (consumption that distinguish specific components of cultural heritage resources to be monitored at level IV for sustainability using identified cultural conservation indicators. Monitored indicators, which are limitless, constitute work in progress of the model and will be constantly reviewed, renewed and updated through time. Examples of monitoring provided in this article are the development of cultural competency-based training curriculum that will assist communities to transform cultural information into certifiable intellectual (educational and culture-economic (tourism assets. Another monitoring example is the mainstreaming of community cultural qualities into already existing environmental conservation frameworks such as eco-certification to infuse new layers of conservation indicators that enrich resource sustainability. The technical

  2. Employee Spirituality in the Workplace: A Cross-Cultural View for the Management of Spiritual Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey S.; Geroy, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses six entry points to initiate discussion of employee spirituality in management education: cross-cultural management, workplace diversity, leadership, team management, organizational culture, and human resource development. (SK)

  3. Hospital administrative characteristics and volunteer resource management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intindola, Melissa; Rogers, Sean; Flinchbaugh, Carol; Della Pietra, Doug

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between various characteristics of hospital administration and the utilization of classes of volunteer resource management (VRM) practices. Design/methodology/approach - This paper uses original data collected via surveys of volunteer directors in 122 hospitals in five Northeastern and Southern US states. Findings - Structural equation modeling results suggest that number of paid volunteer management staff, scope of responsibility of the primary volunteer administrator, and hospital size are positively associated with increased usage of certain VRM practices. Research limitations/implications - First, the authors begin the exploration of VRM antecedents, and encourage others to continue this line of inquiry; and second, the authors assess dimensionality of practices, allowing future researchers to consider whether specific dimensions have a differential impact on key individual and organizational outcomes. Practical implications - Based on the findings of a relationship between administrative characteristics and the on-the-ground execution of VRM practice, a baseline audit comparing current practices to those VRM practices presented here might be useful in determining what next steps may be taken to focus investments in VRM that can ultimately drive practice utilization. Originality/value - The exploration of the dimensionality of volunteer management adds a novel perspective to both the academic study, and practice, of volunteer management. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first empirical categorization of VRM practices.

  4. SELECTED PRACTICES OF TALENT MANAGEMENT: INSIGHT INTO SLOVAK ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Viktória Ali Taha; Michaela Sirková; Martina Ferencová

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines selected areas of talent management. Based on the present literature, the aim was to identify individual processes and practices of talent management. Subsequently, questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain primary data - to determine the prevalence and implementation of talent management in Slovak organizations. The article is focused on presentation of partial results of the survey –how Slovak organizations define talents, declare talent management strategy and impleme...

  5. ON CORPORATE RISK MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra HOROBET; Dumitrescu, Sorin; Joldes, Cosmin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of corporate risk management practices in Romanian companies, by investigating the risk management approaches Romanian companies take. Our main findings are that Romanian managers are not aware of the magnitude of exposure their companies have to various types of risk – hazard, operational, financial and strategic risks, while they are able to manage rather well all these risks, even the ones that have the lowest impact on the busines...

  6. [Patient safety culture in directors and managers of a health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Júlvez, Teresa; Hernández-García, Ignacio; Aibar-Remón, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cía, Isabel; Febrel-Bordejé, Mercedes

    To assess patient safety culture in directors/managers. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out from February to June 2011 among the executive/managing staff of the Aragón Health Service through semi-structured interviews. A total of 12 interviews were carried out. All the respondents admitted that there were many patient safety problems and agreed that patient safety was a priority from a theoretical rather than practical perspective. The excessive changes in executive positions was considered to be an important barrier which made it difficult to establish long-term strategies and achieve medium-term continuity. This study recorded perceptions on patient safety culture in directors, an essential factor to improve patient safety culture in this group and in the organisations they run. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The promotion of mental health through cultural values, institutions, and practices: a reflection on some aspects of botswana culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabone, Motshedisi B

    2009-12-01

    Botswana has seen rapid socioeconomic development since the 1970s that has contributed to the erosion of the values, institutions, and practices that are believed to be supportive of mental health. In this paper, the author argues that the aspects of culture that are supportive of mental health have been diluted by the process of urbanization and the interactions of Batswana (the indigenous people of Botswana) with other cultural groups, particularly those from the western hemisphere. The paper further highlights some of the values, institutions, and practices native to Botswana and describes how they promote mental health. Lastly, recommendations for reviving the cultural values, institutions, and practices of Botswana are discussed.

  8. Nutrient Management in Recirculating Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing need to recirculate and reuse nutrient solutions in order to reduce environmental and economic costs. However, one of the weakest points in hydroponics is the lack of information on managing the nutrient solution. Many growers and research scientists dump out nutrient solutions and refill at weekly intervals. Other authors have recommended measuring the concentrations of individual nutrients in solution as a key to nutrient control and maintenance. Dumping and replacing solution is unnecessary. Monitoring ions in solution is not always necessary; in fact the rapid depletion of some nutrients often causes people to add toxic amounts of nutrients to the solution. Monitoring ions in solution is interesting, but it is not the key to effective maintenance.

  9. Service innovation management practices in the telecommunications industry: what does cross country analysis reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Abidur; Taghizadeh, Seyedeh Khadijeh; Ramayah, T; Ahmad, Noor Hazlina

    2015-01-01

    Service innovation management practice is currently being widely scrutinized mainly in the developed countries, where it has been initiated. The current study attempts to propose a framework and empirically validate and explain the service innovation practices for successful performance in the telecommunications industry of two developing countries, Malaysia and Bangladesh. The research framework proposes relationships among organisational culture, operating core (innovation process, cross-functional organisation, and implementation of tools/technology), competition-informed pricing, and performance. A total of 176 usable data from both countries are analysed for the purpose of the research. The findings show that organisational culture tends to be more influential on innovation process and cross-functional organisation in Malaysian telecommunication industry. In contrast, implementation of tools/technology plays a more instrumental role in competition-informed pricing practices in Bangladesh. This study revealed few differences in the innovation management practices between two developing countries. The findings have strategic implications for the service sectors in both the developing countries regarding implementation of innovative enterprises, especially in Bangladesh where innovation is the basis for survival. Testing the innovation management practices in the developing countries perhaps contains uniqueness in the field of innovation management.

  10. Using communities of practice towards the next level of knowledge-management maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lameshnee Chetty

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective communities of practice undoubtedly impact organisations’ knowledgemanagement and contribute towards building a learning-organisation culture. Communitiesof practice represent an environment conducive to learning and for exchanging ideas, andthey are a formal learning forum. However, the level of organisational learning to whichcommunities of practice contribute is difficult to measure.Objectives: The research was conducted to analyse the impact of communities of practiceon building a learning organisation. The organisational system, culture and people offerthe key towards leveraging knowledge as a strategic resource in a learning organisation.The awareness of the organisation concerning knowledge management was measured on areplicated knowledge-management maturity model.Method: The organisational knowledge base was analysed prior to the implementation of thecommunities of practice and was compared to the situation three years later. The research wasbased on experiential learning cycles that consisted of five consequential but perpetual stages,namely reflect, plan, act, observe and reflect again.Results: The results indicated that communities of practice were instrumental in leveraging theorganisation to the next level in the knowledge-management maturity model. A collaborationframework was developed for each business unit to work towards a common goal byharnessing the knowledge that was shared.Conclusion: Although a positive impact by communities of practice is visible, an instrumentfor the measurement of intellectual capital is necessary. It is recommended that the monetaryvalue of knowledge as an asset is determined so that the value of the potential intellectualcapital can be measured.

  11. Characterization Of Farm Management Practices And Improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Approaches to Extension Practice: A Journal of Agricultural Extension ... Like every well-intended innovation, the benefits of the improved systems could only be ... the use of improved farming technologies to realize their full benefits.

  12. Pathogen and biological contamination management in plant tissue culture: phytopathogens, vitro pathogens, and vitro pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassells, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    ; observation, random sampling, and culture screening for micro-organism in multiplication and stored cultures. The increasing accessibility of both broad-spectrum and specific molecular diagnostics has resulted in advances in multiple pathogen and latent contaminant detection. The hazard analysis critical control point management strategy for tissue culture laboratories is underpinned by staff training in aseptic technique and good laboratory practice.

  13. How managed care growth affects where physicians locate their practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, D; Escarce, J J

    2000-11-01

    Managed care has had a profound effect on physician practice. It has altered patterns in the use of physician services, and consequently, the practice and employment options available to physicians. But managed care growth has not been uniform across the United States, and has spawned wide geographic disparities in earning opportunities for generalists and specialists. This Issue Brief summarizes new information on how managed care has affected physicians' labor market decisions and the impact of managed care on the number and distribution of physicians across the country.

  14. A comparison of ethical perceptions of earnings-management practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Jooste

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, Bruns and Merchant (1990 surveyed earnings-management practices and asked the readership of the Harvard Business Review to rate the acceptability of those practices. Prior to the Bruns and Merchant (1990 study, the morality of short-term earnings-management was of little concern to researchers and accounting practitioners. However, in the light of increased financial frauds and failures, new and increased emphasis has been placed on the importance of the concepts of earnings quality and earnings-management practices. Despite increased research focusing on business ethics since 1990, there is little evidence that the profession is educating accountants about earnings-management practices. This study compares the results of studies on earnings-management practices. Students and business managers were surveyed at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU and these results were compared to studies prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act 2002 in the USA. The aim of the study is to determine if there have been changes in attitudes towards earnings-management practices since the acceptance of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  15. Human Resource Management Practices and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys, organizes, and critically discusses the literature on the role of human resource practices for explaining innovation outcomes. We specifically put an emphasis on what is often called ‘new’ or ‘modern’ HRM practices—practices that imply high levels of delegation of decisions...... underlying the HRM/innovation links remain poorly understood. Against this backdrop we suggest avenues for future research....

  16. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget.

  17. Best Practice of Construction Waste Management and Minimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khor Jie Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Material management is an important issue as seen in construction waste management. Best practice of material management is accompanied by various benefits which are acknowledged by several studies. The site layout has particular effects on both materials and their waste through effective waste management practice. Ignoring the benefits of material management could result in a daily reduction in productivity of up to 40% by material wastage. Thus, the benefits of effective material management must be well comprehended for the sake of waste minimization. Another convincing fact about waste is that poor site management accounts for the largest factor of waste generation. Hence the site condition is very crucial in developing effective material management. Factors contributing to the efficiency of material management process are effective logistical management and supply chain management. The logistics system must be performing as schedule so that materials are wisely managed on-site without encountering presence of excessive materials. As materials management is closely related to logistics in construction projects, there will be delay in construction projects when materials are not delivered to site as scheduled. The management must be effective in terms of delivery, off-loading, storage, handling, on-site transportation and on-site utilization of materials.

  18. Managing image collections a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Note, Margot

    2011-01-01

    This book explores issues surrounding all aspects of visual collection management, taken from real-world experience in creating management systems and digitizing core content. Readers will gain the knowledge to manage the digitization process from beginning to end, assess and define the needs of their particular project, and evaluate digitization options. Additionally, they will select strategies which best meet current and future needs, acquire the knowledge to select the best images for digitization, and understand the legal issues surrounding digitization of visual collections.<

  19. A critical analysis of intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob; Klitmøller, Anders

    2009-01-01

    of anthropology from which it originated. This theory gap between intercultural communication research in CCM and anthropology tends to exclude from CCM an understanding of how the context of social, organizational and power relationships shapes the role of culture in communication. Practical implications......Purpose - Functionalist models of intercultural interaction have serious limitations relying on static and decontextualized culture views. This paper sets out to outline newer developments in anthropological theory in order to provide inspirations to a more dynamic and contextual approach...... for understanding intercultural communication research in cross-cultural management (CCM). Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyzes the established approaches to the cultural underpinnings of intercultural communication in CCM and examines how newer developments in anthropology may contribute...

  20. THE COLOMBIAN REALITY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF BEHAIOVR ANALYSIS: PEACE AS A RESULT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANCA PATRICIA BALLESTEROS DE VALDERRAMA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantage of applying behavior analysis to cultural practices comprehension, considering cultural practices as group behaviors, selected and maintained by social reinforcement contingencies and metacontingencies. The three types of contingencies formulated by Skinner are described, and the principal existing data related to aggressive behavior. A proposal to analyze some relevant aspects to Colombian reality is formulated, and finally, an intent to analyze peace as a result of cultural practices is presented, emphasizing positive reciprocal social processes. Mattaini's (1996 suggestion to graphical representation of cultural practices analysis is applied.